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The Reflection of Fairfield

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By Danielle Anctil Contributing Writer

five senators per class. If not enough students run for senate, “responsibility falls on the class Meeting with university ad- president to fill voids within ministration, reviewing budgets, their class.� Class presidents are addressing concerns about the then elected amongst the electcore curriculum and envisioning ed senators. the future social life of students “The most difficult part of is not on the agenda of every the process for me was the deciFairfield student. sion,� said VoFUSA President Rob gel. “It’s also The next FUSA Vogel ’13 and Vice always a chalPresident Mark Ev- president will be lenge to put ans ’13 have manchallenged to con- your name out aged these responthere amongst sibilities for the past tinue to provide your peers year, and they are both innovative to represent now preparing to them in a pass on their roles programs and tracampaign setto a new staff as the ditions to our cam- ting, but I’m FUSA elections apvery happy I pus. proach. went through -Rob Vogel ‘13 with it. I’d enThe first step in the process of courage anyrunning for a FUSA one on the president or vice fence about dopresident is submitting an ap- ing it to do so in the future.� plication, along with a petition Once they have been consigned by any 20 students. Ac- firmed to be in good standing cording to FUSA’s application with the University and have packet, which was due Feb. 11, attended FUSA’s Election and 20 students from the candidate’s Posting Policy Meeting, candiclass must sign if the student is dates are allowed to post and running for a Senate position. campaign publicly. FUSA positions include CAMPAIGNS | PAGE 3 President, Vice President and

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In the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary

shootings, Fairfield students and others rally to ensure that Conn. gun laws will be tightened

By Grace Tiezzi Contributing Writer

Leigh Tauss/ The Mirror

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By Leigh Tauss Contributing Writer

No crystal ball was necessary to reveal the success of the psychic readers who came to campus this weekend to unlock the secrets of the spirit for students. The event, dubbed “AntiValentines day� was sponsored by FUSA late-night programming and drew about 100 students to the Lower Level of Barone Campus Center Friday night. Students enjoyed a wide

variety of activities, including a photo-booth, washable tattoos, friendship bracelets, desserts, piĂąata’s and two psychic readers. “There are so many things to do right now!â€? shouted excited freshman Bobby Bohny ’16. The inspiration for the event was a “party for single peopleâ€? event organizer Nicole Rende ’15, explained, to combat the over-the-top sentimentality of Valentine’s Day and provide singles with their own event. FUSA decided to play the

News

Interview with FUSA’s Candidates page 2

PSYCHICS | PAGE 3

Stockton, Calif.: 1989. Littleton, Colo.: 1999. Nickel Mines, Pa.: 2006. These three cities have one common thread, and in December 2012, Newtown, Conn. became the latest addition to this list of mass shootings aimed at children. The shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, however, has sparked a push for new gun legislation in Connecticut. On Thursday, Feb. 14, a delegation consisting of Fairfield University faculty, staff and students attended the March for Change rally at the State Capitol building in Hartford. Started by two Fairfield moms, Nancy Lefkowitz and Meg Staunton, the march was held in support of the enactment of “common sense gun laws� in Connecticut. The grassroots movement that they began is the “noise� behind the efforts of CT Against

Opinion

Losing our ability to communicate page 5

Gun Violence, a group pushing for safer gun legislation in Connecticut. According to their website, this “noise,� or the support of citizens, will force the legislators to take notice and act. Connecticut currently has some of the strictest gun laws in the nation, according to Byron Wolf of ABC. These new “common sense� laws that the march supported include a ban on high capacity ammunition magazines and a stronger ban on assault weapons, as well as universal background checks on all sales of firearms. The laws would be a new addition to the pile of pre-existing gun legislation in Connecticut with the goal of preventing another mass shooting in the state. Almost 5,500 people turned up for the march, according to Hartford police. Many were dressed in white and green in support of Sandy Hook Elementary. Others carried signs bearing slogans like “Enough is enough� and “Change now.�

According to Nicole Davidow ’15, the most striking part of the march was the children who attended the march along with their parents. While they were more interested in the piles of snow surrounding the Capitol, the children were “the face of resilience and the reason why changes for law reform are necessary,� said Davidow. With a change in the laws, children “can grow up without hate, anger and fear of what harm others can bring to them and their loved ones,� Davidow added. By simply attending the march, the children showed the participants what they were fighting for, she said. She went on to say that the March for Change was an example for the children of Connecticut. It represented citizens coming together to enact positive change. However, not everyone is in favor of stricter gun legislation in Connecticut.

UNITE | PAGE 4

The Vine

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The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

News

Page 2

Meet the FUSA Candidates By Danica Ceballos and Giovanna Giampa News Editor and Contributing Writer

Unlike last year’s unopposed race, two candidates face off for this year’s election for FUSA president.Both juniors, Alexander Long and Samuel Maxfield, sat down with The Mirror on Feb. 18 to discuss their political and personal plans should they win the election. Tonight, Feb. 20, the presidential debate is being held at 7:30 p.m. in the LLBCC. Check out the full interview with the candidates on www.fairfieldmirror.com.

What is a fun fact about you? “I’m an Eagle Scout.”

“I am the youngest of six siblings.”

Why should we vote for you? “I have the experience to really change things on campus. I have a great plan, and a great platform that I really feel will really improve quality of life here at Fairfield.” “I am a student representing students. I want to make change happen. We are changing and time is always changing and we must change with that as a University.”

What’s the first thing you would do as president? “I would interview people to make up my cabinet and build it off the right people because I want to have a team. I think that at the end of the day it’s going to be a team effort to get everything accomplished.” “I’ve heard that our contract with Sodexo is coming to a close soon. I would like to sit down with the Student Affairs division and ... and see what it’s going to be like.”

How do you plan on staying in direct contact with students and their needs? “Getting my message out there. ... In the next couple of days I plan on going door to door introducing myself and letting everyone know who I am.” “I really like using word of mouth. Just really telling my friends, tell your friends, to tell their friends.”

What is your biggest campaign strategy?

Samuel Maxfield

“Right now, we’ve implemented monthly open forums with all the class presidents. ... I hope to continue that.”

What’s your drink of choice? “Arnold Palmer”

Major: Accounting & Economics Current FUSA Position: Chair of Senate Hometown: Niantic, CT

“I want to have an open forum for student leaders.”

“Cranberry with Sprite”

Alexander Long

What’s your biggest goal for the year? “Getting all four points of my plan implemented, instill stag pride on campus, have the University united for sporting events and pep rallies and have students be proud they go here”

“Making this a better experience, utilizing all aspects we have, really bringing in administration and Board of Trustees into the conversation”

If you could choose anyone as the fall concert performer who would it be? “I think we are moving towards the direction of EDM and dance music because it seems to be a trend.”

“Mumford and Sons. I think they’re great, and everyone would love that.”

Major: Communication Current FUSA Position: Senator, President of ‘14 Hometown: Bayonne, NJ


The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

News

Page 3

4NBSUQIPOFUIJFWFTi-PPLPVUwGPSTFDVSJUZBQQ By Dylan Dembin Contributing Writer

People carry their mobile devices constantly, but they don’t always keep track of them. Considering the increasing number of thefts reported at Fairfield, students need to keep an eye on their phones to make sure they stay in their hands and not someone else’s. Recently, a security application was created to help to keep track of a stolen or lost smartphone, and it even take a picture of the thief. This security app is called “Lookout� and is available for either iPhone or Android. Lookout allows more than one phone on a free online account that can be upgraded to a paid account with additional features. The main feature, though, is the ability to control the phone over the website so the data on the phone can be tracked, updated and controlled. When lost, the camera feature on the app takes a picture from the phone’s front facing camera when there are three incorrect passcode entries. This picture of the thief is then emailed to the owner so it can be shown to the authorities. If a phone is stolen at Fair-

field, like the many other electronic thefts reported, this feature could prove very useful on such a small campus. This picture could identify the unknown thief. This app has many other features as well. There are three main ways that the app aims to assist the owner of the phone: when the device is missing, making sure the device is secure and backing up all the device data. When the device is missing, the owner can log onto the Lookout website and take steps to track it. These steps include: calling another device from the number so they call back, calling the device from the website, locating the device and playing an alarm or adding contacts to call when the phone is found. The owner can also remotely lock the phone or erase all data. The security feature on the app allows the user to check the safeness of their phone and usage. There is a system advisor that ensures the phone is up to date, checks the security of a

WiFi network and location services and detects malicious processes.

have similar features to Lookout, especially those that can track a lost phone over GPS. Find My iPhone is a popular app from Apple that keeps track of iPhones. Fairfield student James Pembroke ‘15 said, “Anyone who owns a phone with a front facing camera should think about getting Lookout, it takes a picture of the thief! That’s genius.� Tara Lenehan ’15 agreed, saying, “I think it’s a great app! Esp e -

Finally, there is a backup feature in the app that stores all of the contacts on the phone to a cloud. This ensures that even if the phone is lost and not recovered, the owner will still have their contacts saved. There are many apps that

cially for college students who are more likely to lose a phone while out and about. It could really help protect your info in a time of rampant electronics thefts. Most thieves are only interested in the data they can steal like things off of banking apps, not the phone itself.

This protects you.� To get the app and online account, simply download the app for either Android or iPhone, create an account with just an email and password, and then log onto the online Lookout website. Assistant Director of Fairfield University Public Safety John Ritchie said, “I think installing an app that does that shows that a person is taking control of their own possessions and gives the power to the person.� Ritchie went on to say how helpful it would be if people would install apps like this in advance. The lock feature, which allows a stolen or lost phone to be locked, is only available with the upgraded version, but all other features are included in the free version. Two other features included in the paid account are Privacy Advising and Safe Browsing, which monitor the content accessed on the phone. Aside from the extra money for an upgraded account, this app protects smartphones and their data. With the high risk of having a phone stolen, installing an app like this protects it before it happens. Cartoon by Lisa Tkach

1TZDIJDTTUFBMUIFTIPX CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

02.19.13 Primary Elections 02.12.13 02.20.13 Meet and Greet Pres and VP debate 02.11.13 Election meeting

START

02.26.13 Election Day

FINISH Designed by Loan Le/The Mirror

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

FUSA’s Election and Posting Policy Meeting was also held on Feb. 11. Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates campaign and are elected individually, but sometimes they combine their campaigns. This year’s Presidential candidate Alex Long ‘14 is campaigning with VP candidate Alex Cucchi ’15, against Presidential candidate Sam Maxfield ’14 with VP Joe McConville ‘14. A major opportunity for candidates is at the Meet the Candidates night, held on Feb. 12 from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Candidates mingle with students in Barone and promote their campaigns. “We encourage candidates to engage with students as much as possible wherever it is appropriate to do so,� said Vogel. “This is just a campaign event that gives candidates a publicized venue to do so.� When necessary, primary

elections are held to elect presidential and vice presidential candidates. They would have been held on Feb. 19, but as only two students are running for each position, they were not necessary this year. Tonight, Feb. 20, at 7:30 p.m. the Presidential and Vice Presidential Debate will be held in the lower level BCC. Senior Martin O’Sullivan will be moderating the debate. Vogel added, “Our Chair of Programming, Jules McGrath ’13, and our Chair of COSO, Courtney Onofrio ’13 share the election responsibilities, so they are the ones who oversee the process.� “They should be able to be pretty clear with what their objectives are through the debate, and it gives them a good platform to do so,� said Evans, “A lot of this is on the candidates to take advantage of that platform and shape the debate.� Vogel said that he thinks a major focus for the next presi-

dent will be meeting the needs of student social life, both in terms of the BCC building itself and activity programming. “We have a student center that is fundamentally flawed by design to foster any sense of natural community,� said Vogel, “The next FUSA President will be challenged to continue to provide both innovative programs and traditions to our campus.� “[The next president] will also need to continue to enhance communication between the administration and the student body, which is a two-way street, significant for successful policy changes,� added Vogel. Elections will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 26 in the lower level BCC from 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Results will be announced at the Levee at 10 p.m by The HAM channel. See The Mirror’s twitter (@ MirrorFairfield) for updates throughout the debate and on election day.

movie “Valentines Day� during the event. Freshman David Gillick remarked that this was “just to fuel the hatred.� However, the vibe that night was anything but bitter. Students were excited about the activities that FUSA offered. “I love FUSA!� exclaimed Novy Thaib ’16, while applying a temporary tattoo to her upper arm. Garnering the most attention that night was the mysterious psychic readers. While the night was advertised as an event for those against the “Hallmark Holiday� of Valentine’s Day, it quickly became apparent that the night centered around psychic powers. Students signed up and waited, some for over an hour, to hear the secrets of their soul’s unlocked. While many walked in skeptical, the overwhelming response was awe at the accuracy of the readers. Donna Lee, a tarot card reader, has been a psychic for over 25 years. Students at her table were asked to draw three cards from two different decks, one deck containing spirit animals. Each of the animal cards were combined with one of the idea cards and labeled past, present and future. Channeling spiritual energy, Donna Lee would explain the meaning behind the combinations, which were different for every participant. After being told she would be making a big impact on the global community, Miranda Muscente ’16 said, “Basically, I’m the new Hillary Clinton.�

While not taking so seriously, she said, “It was for fun, but it has a lot of truth I think.� The other reader present was Patricia Joy (PJ), a life coach who has been practicing spiritual writing for eight years. Rather than using tarot cards, her methodology involved “connecting to the heart energy.� Sophomore Kathryn Dennen explained the spirit writing process: She was given a heart shaped stone and told to hold

“Basically, I’m the new Hillary Clinton.� -Miranda Muscente ‘16 it, while PJ wrote for three minutes. “I am blown away by how insightful she was,� Dennen said after receiving her reading. Whether they believed the psychic readings were just for fun or had the potential to reveal the future, students felt it was an intense and fulfilling experience. Many walked away from the readings feeling spiritually centered. “It was scary!� said Katie Brundage ’15, a psychology major. As someone who studies the mind, she said “I believe your mentality dictates what you do - sometimes we just need someone to dig through the mess and tell us what we really need to hear.�


The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

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Tuesday, 2/12

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Thursday, Feb. 21

possibly breaking her leg while sledding on Barlow Hill.

5:38 p.m. – Students reported a suspicious male on the quad trying to sell mushrooms. Sunday, 2/17 The individual was apprehended by DPS and Fairfield Police were notified. The individual 12:54 a.m. – A student was found to be in poswas issued a Criminal Trespass Warning. session of another student’s StagCard. DPS confiscated the I.D. and contacted its owner.

Wednesday, 2/13

7:21 a.m. – A window in the Barone Campus 7:56 p.m. – A student on the quad was arrested Center was smashed, possibly by a thrown for a narcotics violation. snowball. 7:56 p.m. – A student came to DPS to report that her StagCard and iPhone were stolen from a chair in the Bannow Science Center’s north atrium. The incident is under investigation.

8:13 a.m. – A window of the checkpoint station at the campus’s main entrance was broken. The suspect was identified as a non-student and was apprehended by DPS. The individual was issued a Criminal Trespass Warning.

8:13 p.m. – The glass pane of a Regis Hall door was shattered by what was described as a 2:11 p.m. – A light pole was found ripped down snowball. DPS is investigating the situation. on Leeber Road. Electrical wires were exposed and electricians were called to make repairs.

Saturday, 2/16

2:55 a.m. – A student reported being threatened by an unknown individual. The student yelled out their residence hall window at an unruly individual to quiet down. The individual responded by going to the resident’s door and threatening the student. 11:58 a.m. – A 10-year-old girl was injured,

Monday, 2/17 1:52 a.m. – Alcohol, marijuana, drug paraphernalia and three non-students were found in a car on campus. Fairfield Police impounded the vehicle, made one arrest and all three individuals received Criminal Trespass Warnings.

*If you have information about any of these incidents, please contact the Department of Public Safety.*

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Late night at the Stag! The Stag snack bar will be open until 2 a.m., featuring a candy bar and game night.

Friday, Feb. 22 Sunday, Feb. 24

Join FUSA as they host siblings weekend! Events begin Friday evening, including magician Mat Franco in the Gonzaga Auditorium. Events will be on-going through Saturday. To close the weekend, mass will be held at Egan Chapel at 11 a.m. on Sunday.

Monday, Feb. 25

Head to the Levee to play the roommate game! Play IURPSPWRÂżQGRXW how well you know your roommate. Tuesday, Feb. 26 And the winner is? Head to the Levee where the FUSA elections results party will be held from 8-10 p.m.

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Samuel Keach ’14 has a concealed weapons permit and occasionally carries a weapon while at home. “The only gun legislation I am in favor of is promoting the familiarization of the population with firearms,� said Keach. This includes proper training in use, maintenance and storage for gun owners. He went on to say that prohibiting the sale of assault rifles and high capacity magazines will not protect the population from gun violence. Instead, the law “should make it safer and encouraged for the general population to carry guns,� Keach said. Many of Connecticut’s elected officials attended the march. Gov-

ernor Dannel Malloy and Lt. Governor Nancy Wyman were in attendance, as well as Bill Finch, mayor of Bridgeport. Malloy spoke at the event and expressed his support for the safer gun legislation proposed for the state of Connecticut. Families of the victims of the Sandy Hook shooting participated in the march, as well as the survivors of other mass shootings. Colin Goddard, a survivor of the Virginia Tech shooting and Stephen Barton, a survivor of the Aurora, Colo. theater shooting were present. Additionally, members of the clergy offered their own words of prayer and inspiration to the crowd. The march concluded with Reverend Mia Douglas of the Faith Congregational Church in Hartford

who prayed, “We are a community of hope, courage and strength ‌ heal our wounded hearts.â€? Program Coordinator for the Office of Faith and Public Life, Danielle Corea, and organizer of the Fairfield delegation that attended the march, shared several small things that can be done at home to further the cause. First, everyone can call their congressman. Using this website (http://www.demandaplan. org/TheyDeserveAVote) put your phone number into their online service and they will connect you to your representative. Second, Connecticut residents can contact their legislators through email. By putting in their names and zip codes, Connecticut residents will be provided with an automatically generated email.

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The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Opinion

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Send your thoughts to opinion@fairfieldmirror.com.

Page 5

OPINION | 5 Editor:(OL]DEHWK.RXEHNRSLQLRQ@fairfieldmirror.com

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EDITORIAL Martin O'Sullivan |Editor-in-Chief Loan Le |Executive Editor Laura O'Reilly |Managing Editor

The Drama Unfolds 5IFBCJMJUZUPEJHFTUJOGPSNBUJPOGSPNNFEJVNT MJLFUIFJOUFSOFU OFXTQBQFSTBOETNBSUQIPOFTBMMPXTUIFQVCMJDUPCFNPSFRVJDLUPKVEHF"SFXF CFJOHGFEBTPBQPQFSBTPCTUPSZ 0SBSFXFFODPVSaging the drama to be front page news from our MPWFPGHPTTJQ "U UIF NPNFOU  UIF NVTF GPS NFEJB PVUMFUT JT Oscar Pistorius. 5IF CMPOE BOE IBOETPNF i#MBEF 3VOOFS u /JLFTQPOTPSFE 0MZNQJBO BOE 1BSBMZNQJBO 3FFWB 4UFFOLBNQUIFCFBVUJGVM4PVUI"GSJDBONPEFMBOE MBXTDIPPMHSBEVBUF"TIPPUJOHPO7BMFOUJOFT%BZ "NPEFSO4IBLFTQFBSFBOUSBHFEZ He said he thought he was shooting at a robber BOEUIBU4UFFOLBNQEJFEJOIJTBSNT4UFFOLBNQhT GBNJMZ TBZT IF JT EBOHFSPVT BOE TIPVME CF MPDLFE up. 8IFO ZPV HMBODF BU BSUJDMFT BCPVU 1JTUPSJVT  ZPVMM GJOE IFBEMJOFT MJLF The Guardian’s “Oscar 1JTUPSJVTXFFQTBT4PVUI"GSJDBODPVSUIFBSTSJWFUJOHUFTUJNPOZ uBOEWashington Post’s “Contrasting images of Oscar Pistorius as weeping romantic, calDVMBUJOHLJMMFSPGGFSFEJODPVSUu*GXFTFFPOFNPSF IFBEMJOFXJUIiXFFQJOHuJOJU The Mirror staff will throw a fit. Of course he is in some way or another distraught - if he’s innocent, he’s mourning the EFBUIPGIJTHJSMGSJFOE4UFFOLBNQ*GIFTHVJMUZ IFT crying out of fear for possible jail time. 5IJTDBTFJTBSFBMMJGFi-BXBOE0SEFSuFQJTPEF splashed across multiple websites. But the way the media has portrayed the trial so far manipulates the readers when the conviction is not yet apparFOU 5IF TJUVBUJPO JUTFMG JT FOPVHI UP HFU UIF SFBEers’ attention. No need to be melodramatic. 8IBUTTBEPVUPGBMMPGUIJTJTUIBUUIFEFBUIPG 4UFFOLBNQ JT BMNPTU PWFSTIBEPXFE CZ UIF 1JTUPSJVTUSJBM4UFFOLBNQXBTMBJEUPSFTUZFTUFSEBZBOE friends and family are trying to honor the model’s memory. One writer on CNN, who was caught up in the TVNNFS i0TDBSNBOJB u QVUT JO TJNQMF UFSNT UIF lesson that everyone should learn after all of this is EPOFBOEHPOFi5PPPGUFOJOMJGF XFQVUQFPQMFPO QFEFTUBMT8FTFUUIFNVQUPGBJMu 8IFOBTIJOJOHTUBSJTPOUIFFEHFPGGBMMJOH UIF inevitability of it happening is hard to swallow. But we must remember that Pistorius, stripped of his Olympics past, is still just a man - a man who is either guilty or innocent. 'PSOPX XIBUDBOXFEP 8IBUFMTFDBOUIFNFEJBEPFYDFQUSFQPSUXIBUJTTBJEBOEEPOFEVSJOH UIFUSJBMT 8FNVTUXBJUBOETFF

Thumbs-Up / Thumbs-Down r(PPHMFhTTUPDLQSJDF passed $800 for the first time. r"MJDJB,FZThTPO&HZQU BOE#FZPODFhTEBVHIUFS #MVF*WZTIBSFEBLJTT Young love is in the air. r-PDBMNVTJDJBOTBSF hosting a benefit concert GPS4BOEZ)PPLUIJT4BUurday in Stamford. r4FUI.BD'BSMBOFJT hosting the Oscars this Sunday night.

Have an opinion about something else? Send us your thoughts to opinion@fairfieldmirror.com

Lisa Tkach/The Mirror

Are communication skills gone? By Kaitlin McEwan $ǪNJǯǭǤÇ?ǰǯǤNJǢ8ǭǤǯǠǭ

$PNNVOJDBUJPOTLJMMTBSFPOF PG UIF NPTU JNQPSUBOU TLJMMT XF DBOIBWFBTIVNBOCFJOHT8JUIPVUUIFN XFBSFOUBCMFUPTQFBL properly, hold a conversation and get a message across to someone efficiently and effectively. "CPVUBXFFLBHP*TBUEPXO to dinner with a huge group of NZ GSJFOET  MPPLFE BSPVOE  BOE everyone was staring at their phones. One was on Instagram, UIFPUIFSTPO'BDFCPPLBOE5XJUUFSPSUFYUJOHTPNFPOFFMTF It was at that moment that * MPPLFE BU BMM PG UIFN BOE TBJE i8IZ BSF XF BMM PO PVS QIPOFT  8F BSF BMM UPHFUIFS TP XF EPOU OFFEUPCFUFYUJOHBOZPOFFMTFu 5IFZ BMM MPPLFE BU NF MJLF I had five heads and that I said something totally wrong. EvFSZPOF DPOUJOVFE UP MPPL CBDL at their bright white screen and tapped away. Due to the growth of technology in the past couple of years, I strongly believe human beings’ ability to communicate has greatMZ EFDSFBTFE 0OF TNBMM FYBNQMF is shown above with my own friends.

4UVEFOUT FTQFDJBMMZ BSF NBLJOH TVDI IVHF FSSPST UIBOLT UP UFYU NFTTBHJOH BOE BMM PG UIF other things that we can do with technology. Instead of writing out full words on tests or papers, they tend to abbreviate things more ofUFOUIBOOPUCFDBVTFJUJTi0,uUP do that today. Society lets us believe that it JT 0, UP TQFMM UIJOHT XSPOH BOE forget about all of the grammar rules that were drilled into our heads at such a young age. -JLF%S"OESFX8FJM GPVOEFS BOE EJSFDUPS PG UIF "SJ[POB $FOUFS GPS *OUFHSBUJWF .FEJDJOF  states in his article Pressing the Bar, people sit on the train and tap away at their iPhones or iPads instead of communicating with TPNFPOF OFYU UP UIFN 5IFZ BSF TPJOUPUIFUFYUNFTTBHFUIFZKVTU received or the email they need to respond to and they don’t even pay attention to any of their surroundings. 8FJMSFGFSTUPUIJTQSPCMFNBT B iIJKBDLJOH PG PVS CSBJOTu BOE * completely agree with him. If we lose our ability to communicate properly with other humans what FMTFEPXFIBWF /PUIJOH It is very upsetting to me to TFF QFPQMF UFYU POF BOPUIFS CFcause they are too afraid to say

something to someone’s actual GBDFCFDBVTFJUTUPPiIBSEuUPEP JOQFSTPO'BDFUPGBDFDPNNVOJcation is something that people need to rely on. It’s what you need in the real world in your real jobs and its how we need to interact. 4FOEJOH B UFYU NFTTBHF UP someone or calling them to avoid TFFJOHUIFNJO QFSTPO JTTBE8F all do it. I have even done it before, but it needs to stop. People need to put down their phones and learn to properly communicate with one another. If they can’t communicate in person it will seriously affect them in the long run. If my dad was reading this SJHIU OPX IF XPVME TBZ  i,BUF  * UPME ZPV TPu  * OFWFS XBOUFE UP believe him when he told me that I should put down my cell phone BOE KVTU TQFBL 1BSFOUT BMXBZT LOPX CFTU BOE OPX UIBU * BN JO college and understand how important communication is, I also understand how technology has played a huge role in corrupting UIPTFTLJMMT * SFBMJ[F UIBU UFDIOPMPHZ IBT done many great things for society, but when it comes our ability UPTQFBLUPPOFBOPUIFSBOEFGGFDtively communicate, we would be better off without it.

NOTABLE AND QUOTABLE: r"OPUIFSVOFYQMBJOFE TIPPUJOHTQSFFCSPLF out leaving four dead (including the shooter) and two injured. r5IJTQBTUXFFL.BD computers suffered the MBSHFTULOPXOIBDLFS BUUBDLJOUIFJSIJTUPSZ r "NFUFPSIJU3VTTJB MBTUXFFLSFTVMUJOHJO deaths and about 1200 injuries. r-JM8BZOFJTCBOOFE GSPNBMM/#"FWFOUT

“[the children were] the face of resilience and the reason why changes for law reform are necessary� Nicole Davidow '15 "Student march for gun control," page 1

The Mirror welcomes the opinions and contributions of its readers: Letters to the editor must be timely and submitted by email to info@fairfieldmirror.com or Box AA. All letters to the editor that are appropriate will be published either in print or online. The Mirror reserves the right to edit letters and articles for content, length and grammatical error. Letters should be free of obscenities and personal attacks and should contain correct and factual information not exceeding 500 words.


The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Opinion

Letter to the Editor 'ǭǪǨ,ǴǧǠ1ÇŞÇŻÇ ÇŠÇľÇ¤ÇœÇŠÇ¤

*OUIFMBTUUXPXFFLT*IBWF been deeply disturbed by the amount of misinformation and bias being distributed by The Mirror in regard to guns and gun control through various editorials and articles. In the article UJUMFE i1FPQMF 8JUI (VOT  ,JMM 1FPQMF u UIF BVUIPS  .S 5SJGJMJP states that the reason and purQPTFPGUIF4FDPOE"NFOENFOU XBT UP BMMPX TUBUFT UP PSHBOJ[F militias in order to combat a tyrannical government. He is XSPOH UP CFMJFWF UIJT   'SPN UIF CFHJOOJOH  UIF 'PVOEJOH 'BUIFST JOUFOEFE UIJT BNFOEment to give people the right to own firearms in order to protect oneself from the government. 5IFSF BSF OVNFSPVT RVPUFT CZ 5IPNBT +FGGFSTPO BOE (FPSHF 8BTIJOHUPO UP CBDL VQ UIJT CFlief and shed light on their true intentions for this amendment which is to guarantee an individual right to own firearms. 'VSUIFSNPSF  IF JT BMTP wrong to discredit those who believe that stricter gun control will SFTVMUJOIJHIFSDSJNFSBUFT"GUFSUIF6OJUFE,JOHEPNCBOOFE handguns in their country, the following year they saw violent DSJNF SJTF CZ BMNPTU   *O fact, over the past ten years, crime rates as a whole in this country have diminished while

Page 6

This Senior year has been a rollercoaster

the number of people who own firearms has increased. 5IFSF JT OP MFHJTMBUJPO which will stop mass shootings GSPN IBQQFOJOH  5IF $PMVNCJOF)JHI4DIPPM.BTTBDSFPDcurred during the time in which UIF $MJOUPO "TTBVMU 8FBQPOT #BO XBT JO QMBDF  .PSFPWFS  studies conducted after the FYQJSBUJPO PG UIF CBO JO  showed that the ban did little if any to lower crime in this country. -BTUMZ  .S 5SJGJMJP NBLFT UIF TUBUFNFOU UIBU i8F NVTU UBLF UIF HVOT PVU PG UIF IBOET of those who are not officers of the law and those who are OPU VTJOH UIFN UP IVOUu  5IF 4FDPOE "NFOENFOU XBT OFWer about hunting and never will be. It is about being able to protect oneself from harm. 5IFSFBSFBQQSPYJNBUFMZNJMlion instances a year in the 6OJUFE 4UBUFT XIFO B QFSTPO has used a gun to defend themTFMWFT PS PUIFST  5IF GBDU UIBU people believe that one should not be able to protect oneself from someone who is trying to do them harm is absurd. 5IF FYQMPJUBUJPO PG USBHFEJFT TVDI BT UIF 4BOEZ )PPL Shooting by politicians to benefit their own agenda is despiDBCMF CFDBVTF JU UBLFT BXBZ from the real issue this country needs to address which is NFOUBM IFBMUI  (VOT BOE HVO owners are not the problem. 5IF /BUJPOBM 3JGMF "TTPDJBUJPO JTOPUUIFQSPCMFN3FTUSJDUJOH the rights of law abiding citi[FOT JT OPU B XBZ UP TUPQ UIFTF tragedies.

By Elizabeth koubek Opinion Editor

8FFLMZOBVUT(SBQFXFFLFOET )VSSJDBOF4BOEZBOEBCMJ[[BSE 8FMDPNFUPTFOJPSZFBSGPSUIF DMBTTPGǔFZFBSPGDPMMFHFXF were all waiting for. The year that was supposed to include sun, sand, parties and senioritis; however, our DMBTT IBE B GFX FYUSB FWFOUT UISPXO JOUP UIF NJY 8IBU started out as the best year for 'BJSêFMET DMBTT PG   TPPO became a rollercoaster of ups and downs as we struggled UISPVHITPNFPGUIFNPTUVOFYpected events imaginable. 3FXJOECBDLUPUIFêSTUXFFLend of school. The senior class was FOUIVTFE BOE FYDJUFE UP TUBSU UIF CFTU ZFBS PG DPMMFHF 'SPN QPJOU days to nights at The Seagrape $BGÊ  UIF ZFBS TUBSUFE PVU FYBDUMZ how we hoped. During September through October our class hosted NFNPSZNBLJOHFWFOUTJODMVEJOH 0LUPCFSGFTU  #FFS 0MZNQJDT BOE more; however, come Halloween XFFLFOE UIJT BMM DBNF UP B TUBStling halt. 8FMDPNF )VSSJDBOF 4BOEZ and what should have been the FOE PG PVS TFOJPS FYDJUFNFOU EVSJOH GBMM TFNFTUFS "GUFS UIF XJOE and waves from Sandy came crashing through, some students were out of their beloved houses GPS NPSF UIBO B NPOUI BOE MBDLing the morale they started off the ZFBSXJUI'SPNCFBDIGSPOUMJWJOH to converted dorm lounges the XFFLMZOBVUTBOE(SBQFXFFLFOET came to a close. Now, most of the senior class

was reliving their freshman year FYQFSJFODF FYDFQU XJUI B GFX BEEJtional roommates. In my personal case I went from a four bedroom beach house to a corner converted TUVEZ MPVOHF JO MFTT UIBO B XFFL -JWJOHJO XIBUNVTUIBWFCFFO B feet by 10 feet room that was home UPGPVSHJSMTUIFFYDJUFNFOU*CFHBO

the year with was about the run out. 0CWJPVTMZ UIJTXBTOPUFYBDUMZXIBU *IBEJONJOEXIFOUIJOLJOHBCPVU TFOJPSZFBSEVSJOHNZUJNFBU'BJSfield, yet, somehow, here we were. 'BTU GPSXBSE UP UIF CFHJOOJOH of December and, for most seOJPST MJGFBTXFLOFXJUIBETMPXMZ TUBSUFE UP SFHBJO OPSNBMDZ "U UIJT point my housemate and I were finally re-entering our much missed IPNF *IBWFOFWFSCFFONPSFFYcited to finally have my own room

CBDL  4MPXMZ UIF XFFLMZ OBVUT  OJHIUT BU UIF (SBQF BOE DPNQMFUF SJEJDVMPVTOFTTXFSFCBDLJOBDUJPO and our class seemed to regain the NPSBMF XF PODF LOFX IPXFWFS  VOLOPXO UP VT UIF CJ[BSSF UVSO PG events were not over. "CPVU UXP XFFLT BHP  PO 'FC   UIF DMBTT PG  XBT TVQQPTFE to celebrate the beginning of the last 100 days until graduation DPVOUEPXOIPXFWFS .PUIer Nature once again had something else in mind. On that same day our party XBTTVQQPTFEUPCF 'BJSêFME FYQFSJFODFEBCMJ[[BSEMFBWJOH the class three feet of snow. *OTUFBE PG UBLJOH UIJT XFFLFOEUPDFMFCSBUFUIJTCJHNBSLJO PVSUJNFBU'BJSêFME XFTQFOUUIF XFFLFOETIPWFMJOHTOPX USZJOHUP move our cars out of harm’s way and TUVDLXJUIPVUBOZNPEFPGUSBOTQPStation due to the condition of the SPBET /PU FYBDUMZ UIF QBSUZ XF IBE JO NJOE :FU JO DMBTTJD DMBTT PG  TQJSJU XFIBWFCPVODFECBDLBOEBSF continuing to live out the remainder of our last year as college students XJUI UIF TBNF FYDJUFNFOU BOE NPrale we started. 8JUI UIF SJEJDVMPVT FWFOUT UIJT senior class has endured, we have come out the other side with a betUFSPVUMPPLUIBOXFTUBSUFE8FIBWF MFTTUIBOEBZTUPMFBWFPVSNBSL PO 'BJSêFME BOE XF JOUFOE UP EP TP JO UIF NPTU FYDJUJOH XBZ QPTTJCMF 8JUI NBOZ FWFOUT QMBOOFE BOE UIF spring sunlight right around the corOFSUIFDMBTTPGJTSFBEZUPFOE their college careers in style, as long BT.PUIFS/BUVSFJTEPOFQMBZJOHIFS USJDLTPOVT

'Immigrant' and 'American' are synonymous By Danica Ceballos /ǠDzǎ&Ç&#x;ǤǯǪǭ

ǔF6OJUFE4UBUFTPG"NFSJDBǔF melting pot where people of different SFHJPOTBOEDVMUVSFTNJYUPHFUIFSBOE blend into a scrumptious delicacy. This melting pot has recently been renamed the salad bowl, insinuating a NJYPGQFPQMFUIBUNBJOUBJOUIFJSPXO identity and contribute a unique spice that gives the salad a satisfying flavor. Sometimes though, our desire for food is tainted by one unwanted ingreEJFOUJMMFHBMJNNJHSBOUT i8IP EFTFSWFT UP CF B 64 DJUJ[FO u RVFTUJPOT &MJ[BCFUI $PIFO JO her article titled “Should illegal immiHSBOUT CFDPNF DJUJ[FOT  -FUT BTL UIF GPVOEJOHGBUIFSTu ǔFGPVOEFSTBOTXFSXBTTJNQMF “People who immigrated and spent years building lives in this country deTFSWFEDJUJ[FOTIJQ uTUBUFT$PIFO "OTXFSJOH UIJT RVFTUJPO JT OPU as simple today. This recycled debate is constantly being fought. Since the beginning of our history, we have dealt with the issue of immigration. Every-

POFXBOUTUPMJWFUIF"NFSJDBO%SFBN #VUEP"NFSJDBOTXBOUFWFSZPOF 8IFO UIF QJMHSJNT DBNF IFSF  UIFZ UPPL UIF MBOE GSPN UIF /BUJWF "NFSJDBOT 0VS DPVOUSZT GPVOEBUJPO JTCBTFEPOJNNJHSBUJPOQFPQMFDPNing into this land and integrating their beliefs with those of the inhabitants. Interestingly, the immigration issue began in 1805 when the Supreme Court was faced with the first case over DJUJ[FOTIJQ BDDPSEJOHUP$PIFO4JODF then, there has been much discrimination toward immigrants and debate over whether or not people should be BMMPXFE UP MJWF JO UIF 6OJUFE 4UBUFT Some of the most identifiable cases JODMVEFUIF*SJTI "TJBOT "GSJDBOT BOE now Hispanics. Cohen refers to the court’s atUFNQU UP DSFBUF B iUFNQPSBM GPSNVMB time + residence + good moral charBDUFSDJUJ[FOTIJQu:FU UIFSFBSFTUJMMB significant number of people living in "NFSJDBXIPRVBMJGZUPCFDJUJ[FOTBOE IBWFOPUHBJOFEGVMMDJUJ[FOTIJQ 8JUI GPVS CPZT VOEFS UIF BHF PG seven, my grandfather (tito) came to UIF6OJUFE4UBUFTXJUIBXPSLQFSNJU 

The Mirror

got a job and a sponsor and applied for WJTBTGPSIJTGBNJMZ"UZFBSTPME NZ dad, along with his three brothers and both parents, legally crossed the borEFSUPUIF6OJUFE4UBUFTGSPN.FYJDP If there is any proper way to immigrate, that is it. Cohen refers to the idea that the “probationary period would ensure that immigrants shed the ‘prejudices’ PG UIFJS GPSNFS SFHJNFT  FYIJCJU AUIBU [FTU GPS QVSF SFQVCMJDBOJTN XIJDI JT necessary in order to taste its benefiDFODF BOE BDRVJSF DJWJD LOPXMFEHF UIBUXPVMENBLFUIFNHPPEDJUJ[FOT .ZEBEIBTOPUSFDFJWFEGVMMDJUJ[FOTIJQ)FXFOUUPDPMMFHFJOUIF6OJUed States. He began his own business JO UIF 6OJUFE 4UBUFT )F IBT XPSLFE IBSEFWFSZEBZ#VUCFDPNJOHBDJUJ[FO is a complicated and lengthy process. Now, tell me he doesn’t deserve to live here because he is an immigrant from .FYJDP*GIFEPFTOU UIFOXIPEPFT .FYJDBOT BSF TP HFPHSBQIJDBMMZ close, yet so politically far from beDPNJOHBQBSUPGUIF6OJUFE4UBUFTǔF desire for a better life can result in family separation because of the political

.BSUJO04VMMJWBO Editor-in-Chief -PBO-F Executive Editor -BVSB03FJMMZ, Managing Editor

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&NBJMBEWFSUJTJOH!GBJSĂŞFMENJSSPSDPN 4BSBI.BSDPVY CFO Brian Cleary, CFO .BSHBSFU4NJUI Assistant CFO

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obstacles. 0GUFO  UIF GBUIFS MFBWFT .FYJDP UPXPSLJOUIF6OJUFE4UBUFT)FUIFO TFOET XIBUFWFS NPOFZ IF DBO CBDL IPNFUPIJTXJGFBOEDIJMESFO.BOZ people debate that these immigrants are removing resources from the counUSZUIBUTIPVMECFTBWFEGPSDJUJ[FOT )PXNBOZ6OJUFE4UBUFTDJUJ[FOT XPVME XJMMJOHMZ XPSL JO UIF DFBTFMFTT ĂŞFMETVOEFSUIFCMB[JOH$BMJGPSOJBTVO  often getting paid less than minimum XBHFBOEQJDLJOHGSVJUTBOEWFHFUBCMFT GPS UIF SFTU PG VT UP FOKPZ  8IFO XF DBOĂŞOEFOPVHI"NFSJDBOTUPSFQMBDF UIF FĹ DJFOU BOE IBSEXPSLJOH .FYJcans, then we can discuss getting rid of these so-called foreigners who “solely UBLF GSPN PVS FDPOPNZ BOE QSPWJEF OPUIJOHJOSFUVSOu * BN B [FTUZ OFDFTTJUZ JO UIJT flavorful salad bowl that we call the 6OJUFE 4UBUFT PG "NFSJDB 5PSUJMMBT  chips and salsa are staples in my daily MJGF.PTUPGNZGBNJMZTQFBLT4QBOJTI  and Catholicism is at the center of our beliefs. Each of these family values is JOHSBJOFEJONZ.FYJDBOIFSJUBHF*UJT TPNFXIBUNPSFDPNQMFYXIFO*GBD-

Email info@fairfieldmirror.com

tor in my mom’s Irish heritage. This NJYJOH PG DVMUVSFT JT UIF FQJUPNF PG "NFSJDB “Over time, people who are living somewhere are transformed into DJUJ[FOT CZ UIBU FYQFSJFODF u TBZT $PIFO8IJMFUIBUNJHIUCFUSVF JUDBOCF BSHVFEUIBUJOUIF6OJUFE4UBUFT QBSU PG CFJOH USBOTGPSNFE NFBOT LFFQJOH PVSQBTUBMJWF NBLJOHPVSDPVOUSZEJverse. Cohen’s article also claims that iEFOZJOH w OBUVSBMJ[BUJPO PS TFMMJOH legal status only to people who can BĹ€PSE IJHI GFFT BOE MFHBM FYQFOTFT EPFTOUNBLFPVSCPSEFSDPOUSPMBOE JNNJHSBUJPO MBXT TUSPOHFS *U NBLFT UIFN VOGBJSu 8IJMF JU JT JNQPSUBOU UP LOPXXIPNBLFTVQPVSDPVOUSZ XF must decide how we will do so. That decision will impact every individual and every family trying to gain access UP UIF 6OJUFE 4UBUFT  BT XFMM BT UIPTF already here. * UBLF QSJEF JO CPUI PG NZ DVMUVSFT:FT *BNBO"NFSJDBO*BNBMTP .FYJDBO I am a descendant of immigrants, BOEUIBUJTXIBUNBLFTNF"NFSJDBO

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{The vine} A Family of

Faith PAGE

8

Photos Courtesy of Marina Shinzato of Lord's Chords (top Left), Nicholas DiFazio (Top Right) and Campus Ministry (Bottom)


The Vine

The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Three choices, one family

Page 8

This year's new Mass schedule changed attendance habits but continues to unite the community in faith By Danica Ceballos News Editor

A

Nicholas DiFazio/The Mirror

ll is quiet on a Sunday evening as Fairfield students recuperate from a long week and prepare for the one ahead. Suddenly, a clanging bell breaks the silence and its tune is heard all over campus. Students begin to emerge from the library, the campus center and their apartments and dorms. Books are closed, late-night dinners end and televisions are turned off as students come together for one special event each Sunday night. They flock towards Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola and gather to celebrate and share a common thread: their faith. Most students who attend Mass at Fairfield go to the 9 p.m. stu-

dent Mass on Sunday. Despite other urday Mass was cancelled, with a 6 Masses offered, this one remains p.m. Mass on Sunday instead. This “the most popular and predomi- change means that there are only nant choice for students,� accord- three weekend Masses available on ing to Director of Campus Ministry Sunday, the third at 11 a.m. Fr. George Collins, S.J. The lax and One very identifying part of the comfortable atmosphere, filled with 9 p.m. Mass is the student choir, the students of all ages, hobbies and Lord’s Chords. Made up of about 30 backgrounds, signifies that, for at people smiling brightly and excited least one hour a week, other obliga- to sing for the congregation, this stutions and school activities are not as dent group sets the tone for the litursignificant as the celebration taking gy. Youthful and powerful voices fill place. Sometimes, Campus Ministry the chapel with song and students even provides Super Duper Weenie clap along and sway to the beat. after Mass, supporting the fun at- The whole church participates in mosphere of this laid-back liturgy. the beautiful rhythm. To match the With over Lord’s Chords, 90 percent of a group of stuthe congregadents created I think each [Mass] in tion being stua choir known its own way has somedents, there as the Praise is relaxed thing to offer, and I’m Project for the feel to the 6 p.m. Mass. really happy that there Mass. LookThough ing around are three options for the priests rethe church, the students to choose fuse to choose any spectator one Mass as would notice from. their favorite, the backpacks Fr. Collins adpushed under “If you -Fr. George Collins, S.J. mits, chairs, girls ask the Jesuits, in yoga pants they would say and boys in oversized sweatshirts, they like that [9 p.m.] Mass just beclearly coming to Mass straight from cause it has a lot of energy, and as a their previous obligations. Although presider, you feed off the energy in it is late on Sunday night, the energy the chapel.� level in the chapel is at its maximum Similarly, student ministers compared to any other Mass held agree that the 9 p.m. liturgy is spethere. cial, set apart from most. EucharisUnfortunately, since the begin- tic minister Greg Chase ‘13 explains, ning of the school year, there has “I really like serving at the 9 p.m. been a smaller student turnout at Mass because it’s great to see all of the 9 p.m. Mass. With such an ac- your friends’ faces. Oh, and I love cessible atmosphere and the com- the Lord’s Chords,� he added. “They munity’s love of this specific liturgy, just bring a lot of positive energy to many wonder why fewer people are the Mass.� showing up. However, it is possible While Fr. Collins recognizes that this year’s new Mass schedule that the 6 p.m. Mass is cutting into has caused attendance to be rearranged. This year, the 4:30 p.m. SatMASS | PAGE 10

“

�

Photo contributed by Campus Ministry

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Liturgical music concert expresses faith through song By Margaret Liguori Contributing Writer

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n Friday, Feb. 15, students and members of local parishes entered the Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola to attend the liturgical music event “Age to Age: Generations of Faith� hosted by the Center for Catholic Studies on campus and the parish of St. Anthony of Padua in Fairfield. “Age to Age: Generations of Faith� is a liturgical music concert put together by composers and performers Dan Schutte, Steve Angrisano and Curtis Stephan. Stephan and Angrisano are contemporary liturgical composers, while Schutte is more traditional, well known for his hymn “Here I Am.� The concert started around 8 p.m. with about 350 people in attendance. The trio distributed a program containing the refrains — and even some of the verses — to the songs being performed. Schutte, Angrisa-

no, and Stephan took turns performing each other’s songs and invited the audience to sing along. This created an atmosphere similar to a mass as everyone sang a few familiar hymns together. It was also very interesting to see the difference in how these songs are performed at Fairfield Mass and how the men who wrote the songs perform them. Throughout the concert, there was some commentary between the songs. Sometimes the three performers would explain what the song meant and sometimes how the song was written. There were some funny stories as well as some heartfelt moments. One such moment was when Angrisano told the audience that he had told Schutte to play “Here I Am� at his funeral. Then Schutte said, for the first time, that he would want Angrisano’s "Psalm 65" at his funeral. The conversations between the musicians on stage helped to invite the audience in and make the con-

cert a little bit more intimate. The concert lasted for about two hours, and at the end the musicians thanked the attendees, signing autographs and taking pictures by the door. The event was a very enriching experience, especially for those who grew up with the music of these three composers. "I really enjoyed the concert!� said Grace Neubauer ‘13, who worked as an usher at the event. “It was so interesting to hear songs performed by the composers themselves. I was struck by how much faith each of the composers had when listening to them talk about their work. You could that writing liturgical music was more than a job for them — they felt it was their calling from God. " Sitting in the chapel with fellow Fairfield students, hearing it live and sharing faith was a wonderful opportunity to invite members of the community onto campus to help build community relations and to share faith.

Lisa Tkach/The Mirror


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The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

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New @ek\ie\kZiXq\j_Xb\jlg=X`i]`\c[ music:

Rust on the Carousel

By Loan Le Executive Editor

By Dylan Dembin Contributing Writer

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K_\d\d\m\ijljk_\[XeZ\ Others might not know it, but “Harlem Shake” is also the name of a hip hop dance popular in the early 1980s. Under one of the many Harlem Shake meme videos, YouTube user SharrellF commented, “Isn’t the Harlem shake an old dance? Why is everyone acting like it’s new?” The current Harlem Shake trend refers to an eccentric, unorganized dance to the song “Harlem Shake,” which does not have any connection with the hip hop dance Harlem Shake - save for the name. The Harlem Shake dance is attributed to a man from Harlem, N.Y., who used to dance at the Entertainer’s Basketball Classic at Rucker Park. In an interview with InsideHoops, he mentioned that his dance was so popular that some called it "albee,” after his name Al B. Al B said, "It's a drunken shake anyway, it's an alcoholic shake, but it's fantastic, everybody loves it and everybody appreciates it." The dance was also prominent in hip hop videos of the 80s and 90s and became more mainstream in 2001 by American rapper G. Dep who showed the Harlem shake in his music video "Let's Get It."

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utside of Regis Hall, a masked student stands on top of a snow-covered awning, basked in the glow of the lights behind him. The track “Harlem Shake” by Baauer, the stage name of New York producer Harry Rodrigues, starts playing and the student begins thrusting his pelvis to the repetitious beat. At the drop of the bass, all kinds of crazy hit the fan. One student tries to ride a miniature stuffed horse. Others flail their arms around. A group dances behind the staircase glass windows. The Harlem Shake meme, a multimedia trend that spreads throughout the internet, started with an upload from YouTube vlogger and comic Filthy Frank, and the dance responses flooded in after that. The usual video opens up with a masked individual dancing to “Harlem Shake” while other people are oblivious or paying no attention to what’s happening. Then the video jumps to the mayhem that occurs after the bass drops. One of the responses included the Fairfield University video, which was directed by freshmen Mikhyle Stein and Rozlyn Templeton. Templeton had heard about the Harlem Shake when she saw her friends Meg Coppola ‘15 and Karly Laliberte ‘15 watching the YouTube videos. They originally planned to film in a dorm room with 10 to 15 people, but not a lot of people showed up. Then Stein, a film major, had the idea of getting all of Regis Hall involved. Communicating through texts and word of mouth, they were able to gather around 60 participants in a matter of 15 minutes. Like other Harlem Shake videos, Fairfield students found whatever weird objects and cos-

tumes that were nearby — tutus, chicken masks, life-sized horse stuffed animals — and used them in funny, sometimes inappropriate, ways. Everything was filmed in about 10 minutes, and the uploaded YouTube video with the caption “Let’s go procrastination!” It received over 300 likes within the first hour and a half. As of yesterday, the video had almost 7,400 views. “It was such a spontaneous event, and the amount of people who were down to let their freak flag fly and be a part of something like this made it so much better,” said Templeton. Baauer told The Daily Beast in an interview that he used a sample from Philadelphia rapper Plastic Little’s “Miller Time.” He also disputes reports that say he was trying to pay homage to the hip hop dance popular in the early 1980s. The track hit No. 1 on iTunes’ download list on Feb. 14, beating boy band One Direction’s “One Way or Another,” Rihanna’s “Stay” and hip hop artists Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop.” As of Monday, Regis Hall joined over 12,000 Harlem Shake YouTube videos posted between the start of the month and the present. Universities have been doing it. Television shows like “The Daily Show” and “The Colbert Report” have been doing it. The University of Georgia men’s swimming team has gotten over 18 million views. Harlem Shake videos have been viewed a total of approximately 44 million times. Only time will tell if the Harlem Shake meme will reach the status of Psy’s “Gangnam Style,” the music video that became the first YouTube video to garner one billion views.

here’s a new band on the street called Rust on the Carousel with a familiar yet unique sound. Rust on the Carousel comes from the Asbury Park area of central New Jersey. Their music was born from their life experiences and heavily influenced by many well-known rock artists. Because of this influence, Rust on the Carousel has a style that many people will be familiar with. They encompass the strong-toned and emotional sound that comes from other great artists, including their fellow New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen. Some of the songs on their new EP “Born Dead” also have recognizable influences from other bands. Sophomore Allison Radde said, “The second song on their EP (The Ballad of Bubba) sounds a lot like something from Pearl Jam.” While there could be a few comparisons made between Rust on the Carousel and other groups, their sound is unmistakably of simple, strong rock and roll. Rust on the Carousel’s members include Doug Gatta (lead vocals and guitar), John Pietruszka (vocals and bass) and John Cancellieri (vocals and drums), a former Fairfield student and current sophomore at Fordham University. The band started playing together in high school jazz band a few years ago and came together officially during the past winter break. This may sound like a band of college kids that plays covers from The Clash in their parent’s garage, and it is. However, Rust on the Carousel goes beyond basic covers and is expanding greatly to include original pieces. This past winter, the band all chipped in to rent a recording studio for eight hours to create their EP, and the band has already played at La La Lush at Webster Hall in Manhattan. They are scheduled to do a two-week tour in July. This trip will go through the entire East Coast, from New Jersey to Florida and everything in between. The band is continually working on more music for the tour and is even making Rust on the Carousel merchandise. Drummer Cancellieri said, “The three of us love playing music, and the three of us love playing music together specifically.” This band is all about putting in a group effort to let people know who they are. “Music is the one thing that makes us the happiest we’ve ever been.” The band is already on Facebook and Spotify for you to check out. However, one thing they stress is being bigger than just an online

CAROUSEL | PAGE 11


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The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013 

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Recipe: Chicken Mushroom Medley Fairfield  University  Career  Planning  Center’s  weekly  update.

EMPLOYER APPLICATION DEADLINES

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put everything together. Recipe yields five servings.

Directions You have to prepare your vegetables ahead of time so that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to constantly move from counter to stove as you cook. Take your onion, slice its ends off and dice them. Wash off the dirt from your mushrooms and slice them, too, using a paring knife or a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knife (it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter what you choose because both are good all-around knives). Next, bring your chicken broth to boil in a separate pot. This yields approximately 2 cups of broth. Pour in the rice and give it a quick stir. Then lower your heat and simmer the rice with the lid on until it absorbs the broth, because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the flavor is. Some people say to always keep the lid on, but once in awhile, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d take it off and give the rice a stir. This prevents the rice from getting stuck to the bottom. As your rice is cooking, you can start on the other components of your dish. Put your sausages in a pan and, with a wooden spoon, break them down into little pieces as they cook. Once your sausages are browned and cooked through, remove and put aside in a bowl. By now the mouthwatering aroma

of your kitchen must be seducing you - but refrain from picking at your food! All of the components need to be put together. Leaving all the delicious brown bits and juices from the sausages, pour in just enough olive oil to coat the pan. Throw in your onions and, using your spoon, coat them evenly. Let those cook and soften for about three minutes. Add salt to taste. Then add your mushrooms. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll cook them until the juice from the mushrooms run out. (You might think mushrooms are dry, but they do hold a lot of water and vitamins like Vitamin B.) The juice really makes the dish more flavorful. Keep on adding salt and pepper until youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re satisfied with the flavor. You can brighten up the plate with broccoli, celery or anything with a crunch, but I wanted to keep my dish earthy and stuck with onions and mushrooms. You should be checking on your rice from time to time and stirring it up. Once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve fluffed the rice, you can add it to the pan along with the sausages. Once everything is heated, turn off the stove and go ahead and serve. The good thing about this recipe is that you can make a lot ahead of time and then store in your fridge for a few days. Enjoy!

Mass times changed, community stays strong CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 the attendance of the 9 p.m. Mass, he explains that there was much thought put into the change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The attendance at the Saturday liturgy was very small, primarily, almost exclusively, community members and very few, if any students, other than the ministers,â&#x20AC;? explains Fr. Collins. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So there were a small number of community folks that were disappointed, but I think they understand that primarily the Egan Chapel is here to serve the University students.â&#x20AC;? Fr. Collins implemented the change after researching the Mass schedules of other Jesuit schools, such as College of the Holy Cross and Loyola University Maryland. Although Fr. Collins was working for the greater good of the students, frequent attendees were upset that their weekly Mass was cancelled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mass should be Mass for anybody,â&#x20AC;? said Cath Borgman, director of Career Planning Center and previously a 4:30 p.m. regular. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were students, but I just think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great place to come being a resource for the community. To me, it shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if it was students or the community. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost like a service.â&#x20AC;? This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schedule does create more variety for students who choose to attend Mass. Though the 9 p.m. Mass is the most popular, each liturgy has a unique personality and students are welcome to attend all three. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the more traditional 11:00, or the quieter 6:00 or the more vibrant 9:00,â&#x20AC;? explains Fr. Collins. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think each [Mass] in its own way has something to offer, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really happy that there are three options for the students to choose from.â&#x20AC;? The 11 a.m. liturgy is available for students who want to attend a Mass similar to their parish at home. With an adult cantor and traditional church hymns, this service is

filled with community members and is very family-oriented. The 6 p.m. Mass allows the congregation to be more contemplative and embrace being one with God. Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the 9 p.m. Mass that encourages singing, dancing and laughing with the presider and friends. Fr. Collins recommends that students base their choice for Mass on their need for that day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It depends on what your mood is, what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping for, what you want to experience.â&#x20AC;? Regardless of the Mass students attend, they will definitely leave feeling differently than when they entered the chapel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I personally prefer to go to Mass here because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different environment. It allows me to accomplish what I need to accomplish in my own little head,â&#x20AC;? said Borgman. There is something special about Mass at Fairfield that cannot be explained. With an opened mind and an opened heart, people must experience it in order to realize its uniqueness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really enjoyed going to Mass with students because they want to be there. I just like seeing them,â&#x20AC;? explains Borgman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then, the kiss of peace, I love that part, getting to extend that to some of the students Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked with. You know, not in my office, kind of in their territory. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sharing something that we all have in common.â&#x20AC;? The change in the Mass schedule has rearranged the distribution of attendees and is affecting the overall theme that each service is traditionally known for; however, regulars keep going to Mass and newcomers continue to randomly stop by. Despite the transition period, why do Fairfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Masses continue to thrive and attract so many people? The answer is simple. Mass at Fairfield does not only solidify the tight-knit community like most parishes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than that. Mass at Fairfield creates a family.


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The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Fairfield band nominated for New England Music Award By Grace Tiezzi Contributing Writer

S

tarting a band is a common endeavor for college students. However, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rare group that stays together after graduation. Chasing Carmen, an alternative rock group, has survived graduation from Fairfield and recently has been nominated for a 2013 New England Music Award (NEMA). Senior Evan Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Abrosca, Zakk Rogg-Meltzer â&#x20AC;&#x2122;10, Joey Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alessio â&#x20AC;&#x2122;12 and Peter Sweeney â&#x20AC;&#x2122;11 have been playing together since 2010, and they have played venues like Toadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place in New Haven and have opened for famous names such as Saving Abel. Now Chasing Carmen is being recognized for their work with a nomination in the coveted Best of Connecticut category. As one of five bands in the category, â&#x20AC;&#x153;this nomination means that we are not just another band who met in college,â&#x20AC;? said Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alessio. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are actually being recognized for our hard work,â&#x20AC;? he

added. The New England Music Awards are presented each year to musicians who live and work in New England. Those honored have established themselves in the region and have contributed to the musical culture in New England. Over 100 artists and bands have been nominated for categories covering all genres of popular music, including Best Rock Band, Best Blues Band and Best New Act. With each nomination NEMA aims to â&#x20AC;&#x153;celebrate and recognize some of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best musical achievements,â&#x20AC;? according to their website. NEMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nomination committee consists of representatives from a variety of careers within the music industry including journalists, talent buyers and record label executives. The committee represents the full scope of the music industry, as well as all six New England states. The winner of each category is chosen by popular vote. Though the New England Music

Awards are only in their second year, a win would mean a lot to Chasing Carmen, said Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alessio. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This [award] would be validation to the fact that we are around to stay,â&#x20AC;? he said. The awards show will take place on April 13 at 7 p.m. at the Lowell Memorial Auditorium in Lowell, Mass. following The Artists Conference, which will feature guest speakers, discussion panels and other sessions aimed at the independent artists of New England. Tickets to the event are $10 or $15. The event will be hosted by "The Rock Babe" Suzanne Tonaire and will feature live performances by the Adam Ezra Group and Hot Day at the Zoo, as well as The Alternate Routes and Sarah Blacker. Currently, Chasing Carmen is in the studio recording their second album. Their album release show will be in June. To cast your vote for Chasing Carmen or other artists in the New England Music Awards, visit www.nemusicawards.com/vote.

Page 11

iPick, YouListen By Brian Arpie Web Manager

Photo by Nicholas

"Inca Roads"

DiFazio/The Mirror

by Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention Xylophones, groovy guitar solos, ridiculous drum parts, sporadic synths, changing time signatures, group vocal melodies, unconventional lyrics and rapping: What else did you expect from a Frank Zappa composition? This is the masterpiece that made me really start listening to the great twentieth-century composer. It is nothing like his more well-known compositions that most consider â&#x20AC;&#x153;silly;â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inca Roadsâ&#x20AC;? surpasses all categorizations and expectations. This song touches base on so many levels of musical style and presentation, yet is far from messy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a well-calculated composition that will seem like chaos to the untrained ear. Nobody can explain this song to you; you have to listen to it yourself. Listening Recommendations: find a comfy seat, absorb the atmosphere, inhale, exhale, enjoy.

"Nothing Is Something Worth Doing" by Shpongle If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t heard of Shpongle, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK. This song is exactly where I would start. Give this one a listen and see how the vibes feel as they take over. Shpongle is a mix of worldly instrumentation and psychedelic electronica. If that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t your cup of tea, you probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find much to like here, but if that is your cup of tea, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been missing out for quite some time, my friend! The hang drum melodies are where this song shines. (And if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what a hang drum is, YouTube it right now; it is the most beautiful sounding instrument I have ever heard.) Furthermore, Shpongle has by far the most beautiful electronic music Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever heard. Listening Recommendations: sit in the cross-legged position, remain quiet and calm and begin to disintegrate.

Photo contributed by Chasing Carmen

)URPOHIWWRULJKW&KDVLQJ&DUPHQEDQGPHPEHUV6ZHHQH\' $OHVVLR5RJJ0HOW]HUDQG' $EURVFD

Rust on the Carousel enters music scene CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

band. This is why they are going on an entire tour in July. Cancellieri said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You always have to be thinking about ways to set yourselves apart from other bands.â&#x20AC;? He continued by explaining that â&#x20AC;&#x153;you have to work your way upâ&#x20AC;? to make it like new bands such as Imagine Dragons, or old ones like Nirvana - they all started in the same place. The members of Rust on the Carousel know that making it as musicians is very hard and does not happen overnight. They will start on tour like all famous bands did, and they intend to keep going even when others would quit. They

believe that perseverance is the way get noticed by the right person at the right time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when you see these bands that are just popular now,â&#x20AC;? said Cancellieri. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of them will be popular for another couple of years, but the kids that are starting now are going to be the next generation of bands.â&#x20AC;? The motivation of this group comes from the membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; common love for music and similar bands. Of their music, Cancellieri said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What really drives our writing process is life, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the easiest and hardest thing to write about.â&#x20AC;? The band found inspiration from their love for the same bands,

as well as their individual appreciation for these bands and musicians. They are confident that this will carry them down the challenging and rewarding road they are traveling. Cancellieri stressed that none of the members of Rust on the Carousel are pursuing music because they want to make millions of dollars. Instead, they play music because â&#x20AC;&#x153;it is what makes us happy, and we have the skill and talent to make it happen down the road and make a career out of music.â&#x20AC;? Rust on the Carousel is a new band with a great sound and a promising future. You can listen to their EP on Spotify or catch them on tour this summer.

"ValiĂł la Pena" by Marc Anthony This is my absolute favorite salsa song. If you want to impress a nice Hispanic girl, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d recommend singing this to her. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably never be able to match Marc Anthonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing voice, but I guarantee your effort wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be wasted. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand Spanish, this song can easily be appreciated by the ears of all languages. This salsa groove is so contagious and is one that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully experience until your body starts moving with it. The instrumentation for this song is as top-notch as the singing - salsa just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get much better than this! Listening Recommendations: cook up some rice and beans, invite your Cuban girlfriend over, put on your dancing shoes, salsa!

"Varaaga Nadhi" by Shankar Mahadevan Students of Fairfield University: It is time to further diversify yourselves. It is not about the words that Shankar Mahadevan is singing in this song, which 99.5 percent of us will never be able to understand. It is about the power, the emotion and the rawness of his vocal performance. Meanwhile, there is very playful instrumentation full of drums, flute, accordion and even some tambourine. This song somehow succeeds in being playful and something very deep at the same time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Varaaga Nadhiâ&#x20AC;? spews emotion and is just waiting for you to accept it and love it wholly. Listening recommendations: find a natural landscape where nobody can see you and accept this song as it is.


The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

COFFEE BREAK | 12

Online

Send your thoughts to info@fairfieldmirror.com.

IDLUÀHOGPLUURUFRP

Ask Miss Anne Dear Dog,

Dear Miss Anne, I’m so bummed! I got sick this long weekend and am probably going to be sick for the rest of the week. What’s the best way for me to get over this sick slump? Sincerely, Sick as a Dog

Photo by: Nicholas DiFazio

I feel your pain. Getting the common cold is torturous. You think you should be able to do anything since you don’t have something as violent as a stomach bug, but if anything, it’s worse. At least with a stomach virus it only lasts 24 hours instead of a week, and you lose weight instead of gaining it from all of the Nyquil you will consume. To cope with this annoying cold, make sure you make your space clean and productive. Get your room clean and you will feel better already. Next, make sure you have three boxes of tissues, an exorbitant amount of cough drops, Chap Stick, tea, phone charger and water. You want to make sure you never have to leave your bed. Not for anything,

iQIR#IDLUÀHOGPLUURUFRP

Because we could all use a little advice now and then...

even the toilet … just kidding. Your roommate probably wouldn’t be okay with a bedpan. Maybe you do live with nice housemates who will take care of you. If so, use that to your advantage while you are all loopy on your cough syrup. You may have cravings for things while in this state. That means asking your roommates if they are going out and if they might want to pick something up for you. Whine a bit. Maybe make little whimpering sounds like a newborn pup. Crying? Only slightly, but heave as you do so to make it known to everyone around you that you are miserable. Out of these actions you can possibly get yourself a free McFlurry. Pity party for one! I hope you feel better. Just try to do as little as possible for yourself and you’re golden!

Taboo Talk:

Understanding the Sexuality Spectrum

Give Guys a Break

Disclaimer: These columns are for entertainment purposes only. The authors are students - not therapists - and the columns are not intended to take the place of professional advice. The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Mirror and its staff members. Interested in becoming a columnist? Email us at info@fairfieldmirror.com.

By Kathryn Lorraine When it comes to the touchy subject of virginity, all anyone ever cares to talk about is the pressure on young women in today’s society. While that pressure is there and valid, let’s save it for another time. The focus right now is on the guys because let’s be honest, they need a moment. Today’s youth is overwhelmed with sexuality in the media. Most of what we see is the sexualization of women, objectification of women, and pressure on women. But notice that for every instance of each of those things, there is the exact amount of pressure for men – from Calvin Klein ads and celebrity gossip to raunchy teen comedies and chatter in every dorm across the globe. In America, the majority of male high school seniors graduate having lost their virginity during high school, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a non-profit organization that researches and teach-

es about sexual and reproductive health. Of those that go off to college as virgins, almost all of them lose their virginity during the first year at school. And in too many of these instances, it’s because of the male virginity complex. You are a guy; therefore, you must be having sex. If you are not, you’re not a man What a joke. Not everyone is doing it, but in a world where guys are measured by how fit they are and how many girls they can score, it seems like it doesn’t matter that not everyone is doing it. Even on this campus, there are young men who feel the pressure. The many I have spoken with are not ready to take that very personal step, but they aren’t ready to face the ridicule of being a “prude.” Such thinking leads many guys, at Fairfield and across the country, to engage in other sexual acts simply to fit in. That said, can we step back for a second and just look at how skewed this is? Why are we telling

our boys that in order to be considered a man, they have to be having sex before they can drive a car? It’s in books. It’s in movies. It’s in everyday conversation. It’s just a social myth – manhood is not determined by sexual activity. Society has a way of bending the rules for each sex. The only equality is that women and men have it equally as difficult in the realm of sexuality. For guys, being a virgin is some sort of stigma. It’s something that is laughed at. A male virgin isn’t considered a man in this day and age. Personally, I don’t think anyone’s sex life can determine that. It’s time to give guys a break. Virginity is possibly one of the most intimate aspects of an individual’s sex life. Think about your own experiences for a moment. Pressure kills! Guys, having sex doesn’t make you a man. You already are one. Ditch what you’re being fed and do it your way – what is right for you and who you are with.

We’ve tried Sudoku. Chess puzzles. Now a picture hunt. But do you have a better idea of how to use this space? Email us at info@ fairfieldmirror.com or tweet us @MirrorFairfield with your ideas. If we like what you’ve suggested, we’ll give you credit ... perhaps even your own headshot.


Sports

The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Page 13

This Week in Sports Watch out for Fairfield Athletics

Ever wonder what it would be like to be a part of 3x5?

What To Watch For Wednesday - Women's lacrosse at Hofstra, 2 p.m. Thursday - No games. Friday - Men's tennis at Army, 5 p.m. Saturday - Baseball at Longwood, 1 p.m.

Here's your chance:

Sunday - Women's basketball at Canisius, 2 p.m.

Just answer this question:

Monday - No games.

With the Pope retiring, who would be your

Tuesday - Men's lacrosse vs. Hofstra, 4 p.m.

pick as his replacement? And if you want to take the third spot in 3x5 next year, send your answer to

Sports@fairfieldmirror.com by Feb. 28

By The Numbers 5 8 15

Men's basketball's Derek Needham '13 scored eight three-pointers against Siena on Thursday.

Women's lacrosse won their fifth straight season opener with a 14-7 victory over Monmouth on Saturday.

Men's lacrosse ranked number 15 in the nation heading into home opener against Navy on Tuesday.

Quote of the Week “Everybody talks about going from average to good is a pretty easy step, going from good to great is a very challenging step, and that’s the step right now we’re trying to take."

Be funny! Be outrageous! Be crazy!

~Men's lacrosse Coach Andy Copelan

Sports 3x5 Because they like to talk ... sports.

Jennifer Calhoun Sports Editor

Michael O'Keeffe The Mate

Thomas Shea Assistant Sports Editor

Your 2012-2013 3x5 Columnists: Jennifer Calhoun, Thomas Shea and Michael O'Keeffe.

It was Presidents Day Both lacrosse teams this Monday, who was won this weekend. Good your favorite President? indicator of the season ahead?

South African Olympian Oscar Pistorius was charged with killing his girlfriend. Thoughts?

The Oscars are this Sunday. Favorite movie you saw this year?

It was a certain member of 3x5's birthday last weekend. Happy birthday, Tom!

Will Ferrell. It was so incredibly brave of him to talk about current events and horses on his farm for the cameras. Wait. What? He wasn't ... I need to learn politics

Yes! Lacrosse is without question the most successful team on campus. They'll take this good start and let it FLOW right into the rest of the season. See what I did there?

Well ... I think I'll have to retract my 3x5 answer from the first week, that said he was my favorite Olympian. I'm going to go back to Dong Dong, the Chinese Trampoliner.

Aca-scuse me?

Oh wow, both of my fellow 3x5 members are 21 or older. I'm surrounaded by old men! We need to get some AARP up in here. Geez.

If we are going by most influential, most aweinspiring and ability to get a country to unite and follow him, it is hands down ... KID PRESIDENT!

It's LAX season! Looking forward to seeing some silverware and new chants from those crazy foreign dudes. We hate Den-ver, we hate Den-ver!

Will wait for the trial but it is sad if found guilty. All of his and the IOC's hard work to get him into the Olympics and increase awareness would be void. The evidence isn't looking promising.

Has to be "The Hobbit." The scenery and visuals were just amazing. Beautiful landscape and country. If I lived where they filmed, then I definitely wouldn't leave that country!

Yeah, Happy Birthday, Jen!

JFK hands down. He put a man on he moon and then slept with the hottest celebrity of his time. He was Charlie Sheen before Charlie Sheen. Absolute legend.

Copelan and Snow seemed incredibly focused in our interview. They're a potential Final Four Team. And all the women do is win the conference ... do they have enough to take the next step?

Gotta be a tie between "The Vow" and "The Lucky One" ... oh wait, I'm not a woman. So I'm going to say either "Lincoln" or "Django."

Why thank you. But considering I never left the couch that day, I wouldn't say it was the most exciting 21st birthday ever. Guess I'll just have to make up for it soon ...

It's really terrible, and especially eerie if you watch her goodbye clip they taped on her reality show.

It has to be "Pitch Perfect."

Aca-believe it.


Sports

The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Page 14

Gilbert brothers back together as Stags

Thomas Shea /The Mirror

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By Thomas Shea Assistant Sports Editor

By Jennifer Calhoun Sports Editor

Flashback to fall 2010. Malcolm Gilbert is entering his senior year of high school at Academy of the New Church, just outside of Philadelphia, and is being romanced and recruited by collegiate head coaches across the

Contributed Photo

Junior Malcolm Gilbert (33) in action for Pitt before transferring here.

country to come play for their respective schools. At the time, Gilbert was a very well-sought after commodity: His 6’11, 210-pound frame went blow-for-blow up against some of the top recruits in the country, holding his own against the likes of Andre Drummond, who is now a center in the NBA for the Detroit Pistons. Gilbert was hearing from big schools like Ohio State, Virginia, Wake Forest, Virginia Tech, and Pittsburgh, as well as from other smaller schools. One of those smaller schools was a Sydney Johnson-coached Princeton team. Johnson contacted Gilbert letting him know he was interested in having him play for the Ivy League school, but Gilbert decided he was looking for an opportunity with a bigger school, leading him to choose Pittsburgh. One year later, Coach Johnson was at Fairfield, looking for his first recruiting class with the Stags. Among the first players he brought to Fairfield was Marcus Gilbert, the younger brother of Malcolm. In an interview with William Paxton of the Connecticut Post, Johnson explained the recruiting process for getting Marcus, his first recruit of the 2016 class. “I knew as soon as I got the job here (at Fairfield), he was locked in,” Johnson told the Post. Six months later, Johnson achieved what he had sought a year and a half earlier, the chance

to coach Malcolm. Malcolm’s freshman season with the Big East team was less than what he had expected, a downside of playing for a big team such as Pitt. In his singular season with Panthers, Malcolm played in only 19 games for 93 minutes in total. Heading into his sophomore season, the coaches at Pitt made the decision to have Malcolm red shirt, meaning he would not have seen any time the whole season. With this in mind, Malcolm decided that it was more prudent for him to take his talents to Fairfield. While Johnson has to wait until next December to see Malcolm in action for the Stags, he has had ample time to work with the younger Gilbert brother in his freshman season. To date, Marcus has had a wildly successful first year with the Stags. He has 140 points on the year and is averaging 20 minutes of playing time per game. Within those games, Marcus was given the starting nod 19 out of 26 times. The dynamic of having the brothers together on the court will be a bonus for the Stags when it can finally come to fruition. It will also be beneficial to Malcolm and Marcus both on and off the court. It has already added an interesting dynamic to their relationship, as younger sibling Marcus has spent more time at Fairfield

and with the team than older brother Malcolm. “He’s a rookie. It’s kind of different, but I’m older now, so I can take responsibility for myself. Sometimes, you have to be the bigger brother when you are the younger one,” Marcus told the Post. Malcolm echoed the sentiment to Paxton, saying, “…We are like twins. We know each other’s inside jokes, we think alike and we are real close. We’re like twins. So for the roles to change, it’s not that significant because we both look up to each other. We both look to each other for insight and we both listen to each other.” At times, especially in their game against Iona, the team appeared to be communicating poorly or on different wavelengths for certain plays. The addition of a brotherly dynamic can help to lessen these concerns, as the Gilberts have been playing together (and against each other) for their whole lives. Fast forward to December 2013 when Malcolm will be eligible to play for the Stags alongside his brother. What this will mean for the Stags is unknown to players, coaches, and Stags fans alike. What they can hope for however is for the bond the brothers share to go beyond the two and affect the team as a whole.


Sports

The Mirror | Week of February 20, 2013

Page 15

Men's basketball: Stags win late

By Jennifer Calhoun Sports Editor

It wasn’t always pretty. It wasn’t always perfect. But it was one of the best Fairfield University Men’s Basketball games of the season. On Monday night, before the largest crowd of the season, the Stags (17-11, 9-7) defeated Iona College (15-11, 9-7) 66-64. To say they got the win in a dramatic fashion would be somewhat of an understatement. Senior Derek Needham scored a three-pointer with 5.5 seconds left to play, which ultimately gave the Stags the lead. Needham ended the game with a team-high 17 points. “It was a play that we ran a lot during the game. I didn’t want to give the ball up,” said Needham in the post-game press conference. Hitting big shots is something Needham has become accustomed to, especially from beyond the three-point line. In their last two games, Needham has scored 13 three-pointers. Eight were scored against Siena on Thursday and then the other five came against Iona on Monday. “With the points, and the

ball handling, Derek is just an All-Conference player. It’s just a lot of weight on him to score, ball handle, defend and lead,” said Head Coach Sydney Johnson. Needham has had to be particularly strong in the last several games to help make up for the loss of fellow guard Desmond Wade ‘13, who is out with a knee injury. “We miss Des. Our guys have really made a nice adjustment in terms of being without him,” said Johnson. However, while Wade was out for the game, Justin Jenkins ’16 returned to the lineup after sitting out seven games with a wrist injury. Jenkins not only returned to the team; he came back in style. Jenkins ended the game against Iona with 12 points and 5 assists, showing his prowess on the court. While Jenkins spent close to half of the game with four personal fouls, Johnson recognized how important Jenkins would be to this game, and kept him on the court. “We don’t win without [Jenkins] being out there tonight. There’s no doubt about that,” said Johnson. Jenkins himself felt that he had a better grasp on the game the second time playing Iona.

“Last time we played them, I when Needham sank the winthought I didn’t play to the best ning three, Webster Bank Arena of my abilities … So coming in erupted louder than it has all tonight, I was just focused and season. ready to play,” said Jenkins. One could never be sure exDefensively, the Stags had actly how the game would end some shaky moments, being up, with lead changes aplenty down by as many as 11 points even within the last minute. With in the run of one play it would play. seem like Jones ... it's just a mark of had won it for H o w ever, holding our senior leadership, Iona, and the next an Iona team second Needham the practice habits, with the had won it for likes of Lam- their commitment, Fairfield. ont “Momo” their trust in me and The emoJones ‘13 tions were evident and Sean their trust in each on both sides, as Armand ’14 other. Jones was visibly to only 64 distraught by the points was result, while the -Head Coach Stags were ecstata successful defensive efSydney Johnson ic with the win. fort. “I’ve been Jones saying it all year ended the long, it’s just a game with a game high 29 points, display of the leadership. Derand at times seemed to be virtu- ek’s been a joy to coach and he’s ally unstoppable on the court. In just been something else … Cofact, with ten minutes to play in lin and Des have been fantastic. the first half, Jones had as many So it’s just a mark of our senior points to his name as Fairfield leadership, the practice habits, had as a team, with 11. their commitment, their trust The game was an emotional in me, their trust in each other,” rollercoaster for Stags as well said Johnson. as Gaels fans alike. At times the Statistically, the Stags played uproarious Iona bench silenced a solid game from the free-throw the Fairfield crowd. However, line. Until about 12 minutes left

in the game, both teams were shooting 100 percent from the line. The Stags would eventually finish 11-12 and the Gaels would finish 14-15. Some statistics did not go the Stags’ way, particularly turnovers. They turned the ball over 15 times, as compared to Iona’s eight. Watching the game, it was evident that the turnovers were hurting the Stags, as Iona scored on almost every turnover. However, when the Stags held onto the ball and made their shots they were very successful against Iona. It was something they were able to do against Siena on Thursday, which helped them to their 74-52 win. The Stags play again on Saturday against the University of Albany at Webster Bank Arena at 1:00 p.m. It will be Senior Day for Wade, Needham and Colin Nickerson, although the return of Wade for tip-off is questionable. Following their game against Albany, the Stags will finish out the MAAC regular season on the road. They play Manhattan College on March 1, who they lost to 62-40 earlier in the season, followed by Marist on the third, a team who they beat 71-37.


SPORTS | 16

Online New and improved sports blog. Online only coverage. Week of February 20, 2013

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Thomas Shea /The Mirror

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Snow scores four goals in fourth quarter including game-winner with four seconds to play By Thomas Shea

Assistant Sports Editor

The 2012 Fairfield men’s lacrosse season was one for the record books. Their 12 wins on the season was a program record since moving to Division I in 1993. They finished the season ranked 17th in the national poll, the highest the team has ever finished in the polls. Before the season started, there were two players selected in the Major League Lacrosse draft midfielder Brent Adams and goalkeeper Charlie Cipriano - marking the first time in history that two Fairfield players were drafted in the same year. However, there is one accolade that they did not want to earn last season: biggest snub from the 2012 NCAA Tournament. After finishing third in the ECAC and reaching the conference championship game for the second consecutive year, Fairfield fell just short of making the NCAA Tournament when they lost to eventual national champion Loyola. Head Coach Andy Copelan said in an interview that he hopes the team will use that experience and that feeling of rejection this season. “You’d like to think that it is a

chip on the shoulder for the guys who were there and experienced getting that close but falling short,” said Copelan, “But on the other side of it is every team is a little bit different. You want to take the positives from last year and build off of those things, then you want to make sure, with your current team, you do everything in your power to reach their potential.” Thus far this season, the Stags have played up to their potential, defeating Bryant 8-4 last Saturday and winning a thriller against Navy on Tuesday, with the score of 10-9. Senior Sam Snow’s fourth goal of the game proved to be the game winner in the back-and-forth affair, as his shot found the back of the net with four seconds remaining in the fourth quarter. Copelan said there will be a few changes with how this year’s team plays, some of which will be a result of the recent rule changes in collegiate lacrosse. Some of the rule changes include the way the stick is strung, pre-whistle violations on faceoffs, a more fast-paced method of substituting players similar to hockey, and perhaps the most dramatic change, an implementation of a shot clock. “I think we need to find some easier ways to score goals, and I think we’re committing to the

transition game a little bit,” said Copelan. “ … I think it’s a good time for us to have the rules go into effect just because we feel like we’re deeper than we have been.” Snow, who along with fellow senior captain Marshall Johnson was drafted in this year’s MLL draft, sees this year as the year that the team could finally make the jump into the NCAA Tournament, despite their recent struggles in the conference tournament. “I think if you think back on my freshman, sophomore and junior year, if you break it down … we were three or four or five goals away from making the tournament every single year,” said Snow, “That’s gotten me hungry this season.” Along with relying on the senior captains Snow and Johnson for leadership on the field, Copelan pointed out a few players in particular who the Stags will be relying on this season. “Two guys in our attack right now, Jordan Greenfield and Nick Guida, a junior and a sophomore respectively, I’d put them up with Sam in just being a field general,” said Copelan. “So those three guys, offensively, I think we’re going to ask an awful lot out of.” On defense, Copelan noted that they will be counting on Toby

Armour ‘14, a Connecticut native who transferred from Johns Hopkins, as well as returning players Greg Parraut ’14 and Tom Lukacovic ’15 to be the defensive stalwarts. Both Snow and Copelan agreed that all conference games were important, as evidenced by last year’s regular season loss to Ohio State arguably being the reason they were left out of the Tournament, however there were a few key games that they wanted to win in particular. “Between Loyola, Denver, and North Carolina, we’re going to have three opportunities at getting a top-five win, and those topfive wins go really, really, really far when it comes to the NCAA Selection Committee’s criteria,” said Copelan. “Right now, we start the season with five non-conference games in the first two weeks, so that’s a daunting murderer’s row right there in itself.” Copelan says that the preseason ranking means “absolutely nothing” to him, but does admit that this year does have a different feel to it. “I’m taking this year awfully personally just because of the whole building process … Now you’re at the point where you feel like you’ve built something, on the

cusp, on the verge of being sustained,” said Copelan. “Everybody talks about going from average to good is a pretty easy step, going from good to great is a very challenging step, and that’s the step right now we’re trying to take. It’s a challenging one, but I feel like we’re doing things the right way.” For Copelan, the mission for this season is very simple: “I want us to compete in every single game. I want us to win the close game. I want us to be a lot better at the end of the season than we are now,” said Copelan. Snow, on the other hand, is putting a lot of pressure on himself and his fellow seniors to lead this team to the promised land of the NCAA Tournament. “I think that this year is going to be defined by leadership. I think that where the seniors and upperclassmen go, the rest of the team is going to follow,” said Snow. “If we just go through the season and not look at wins or loses, and make sure that I do a good job, and make sure that Marshall and the rest of the seniors do a good job of leading this team in the right direction, then I think I’ll be very happy.” The Stags have started out the season 2-0, and look to pick up an important win over North Carolina this Saturday in Chapel Hill.


Fairfield Mirror 2-20-13