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REGION’S

PREMIER

MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2004

$3.95 US/$4.95 CAN 4 2>

0

74470 56218 4 www.LifeintheFingerLakes.com DISPLAY THROUGH AUG ’04


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“An Upscale Dining Experience in a Warm and Welcoming Atmosphere.”

O

W

ur popular Sunday Brunch buffet features a selection of all your favorites as well as several of our signature dishes, combining over 150 years of success in the art of food preparation. In our fully equipped, state-of-the-art kitchen, we make our own pasta and sausage and smoke our own meats and seafoods.

arfield’s is fully stocked with a wide selection of wines, liquors and beers. The restaurant, lounge and piano bar enhances your dining experience with fireplace ambience and an extensive list of wines from our local New York wineries as well as selected wines from around the world.

T

he second floor banquet room can accommodate up to 130 people for a sit down dinner, and up to 150 for cocktail parties. The rich decor is highlighted by a beautiful dance floor with a working fire place to warm the spirits of your guests, and is accentuated with controlled lighting and hanging tapestries.

O

ur award winning bakery offers everything from specialty breads, cookies and pies to decorated cakes. Choose from a wide array of European and traditional styles and flavors. Warfield’s also serves the best Crème Brulée in Upstate New York.

Located in Historic Downtown Clifton Springs and Close to the Finger Lakes Wineries. Reservations Recommended 315-462-7184 Buy one lunch entree at regular price and receive half off of 2nd lunch entree of equal or lesser value.

Request this offer when placing your reservation. Please reference LIFL. No Expiration

7 West Main St. Clifton Springs, NY 14432 www.warfields.com We are easily reached via the NYS Thruway, between Exits 42 and 43, off Route 96. Just 25 minutes from Rochester, 45 minutes from Syracuse. Circle Reader Service Number 164

Buy one dinner entree at regular price and receive half off of 2nd dinner entree of equal or lesser value.

Request this offer when placing your reservation. Please reference LIFL. No Expiration


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D E P A R T M E N T S Volume 4, Number 2 • Summer 2004

F E A T U R E S

28

PIPED-IN MUSIC (THE REAL KIND) IN BRISTOL VALLEY The story of a world-class pipe organ builder By Bruce Beardsley

36

REMEMBERING ROSELAND Memories of a park and its carousel By Joy Underhill

46 52

NATURAL INSPIRATION The photography of Fred Bertram

LOOKING AT GLASS FROM EVERY ANGLE The Corning Museum of Glass By David L. Pierce

Below: Sarah, Mike, Ryan, Nicole and Kirsty Haner at their

2 3 6 14

MY OWN WORDS

18

GARDENING An Oasis in Your Own Backyard

22

FRUIT OF THE VINE Savoring the Seneca Lake Wine Trail

26

HUMAN INTEREST Across Time and Space

60

LIFESTYLE We ride to eat and eat to ride

64

FINGER LAKES SCRAPBOOK Photography contributions from our readers

65

DAY TRIP Discover Dinosaurs and More: Museum of the Earth

70 72

CALENDAR: FESTIVALS & EVENTS

81 88

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS & FINGER LAKES MAP

uncle’s pond on Dewey Road in Candor, Tioga County. Photo by Deena Haner

Cover Photograph: Sailing on Keuka Lake Photo by Bill Banaszewski

LETTERS NEWSBITS SPORT The Ultimate Challenge for Horse and Rider

HOW-TO Finger Lakes Golf: Rolling Terrain

OFF THE EASEL Robert Oddy, Stained Glass Artist

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O W N

W O R D S

Parks From the Past A

s some of you may already know, I didn’t grow up in the Finger Lakes region. Originally, I am from a small town named Lehman in the northeastern part of Pennsylvania. There are favorite places of mine that I

from many vantage points across the lake. It was quite a landmark. Since then, the rides have all been dismantled. No longer can you see the wonderful structure of the roller coaster. I’m sure many people have similar sentiments about Roseland. It was a fixture at the northern end of Canandaigua Lake and was the highlight of summer for fans of the park. Young adults had summer jobs there, and in turn, their children followed in their footsteps, probably operating the same rides and scooping ice cream at the same stand. Cottage The Roseland Carousel today, in the Carousel Center dwellers on the lake fell mall in Syracuse. Photo by Tricia Burnett asleep to the familiar sounds of Roseland, and grew up with that I like to reminisce the sight of the roller coaster and other about, like amusement parks. Many rides loomed familiar on the horizon. people living in the Finger Lakes In this issue, Joy Underhill presremember one special place in particuents her thoughts about Roseland Park, lar – Roseland Park in Canandaigua. especially the famous carousel. The One of the parks I lived near was park was a special place for Joy. I hope called Hansons Amusement Park. It her memories spark pleasant ones that was located on Harveys Lake, which is you have. Maybe you’ll even get out actually the largest natural lake in your photo albums and reminisce a litPennsylvania. It wasn’t shaped like any tle bit on your own. of our Finger Lakes, but had several arms like an octopus. You could view mark@lifeinthefingerlakes.com the wooden roller coaster of Hansons

Areas of interest in this magazine issue

Sodus Point Victor

Auburn Geneva Canandaigua Bristol Center

NEW YORK S TAT E

Penn Yan Hector Watkins Glen

Owego

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The Finger Lakes Region of New York State

EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR/EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Stash mark@lifeinthefingerlakes.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANCE . . . . . . . . Kari Anderson

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J. Kevin Fahy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tina Manzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carol C. Stash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heather Merrell

PRODUCTION ASSISTANCE . . . . . . . Kristin Grove

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobbie Jo Trumbull

CONTRIBUTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce Beardsley

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paul M. Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Del Cronise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rich Gardner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Judy Hirtler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moe Koch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David L. Pierce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linda Pratt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joy Underhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Russ Young

EDITORIAL OFFICE . . . . . . . . . . . . 315-789-0458 EDITORIAL FAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315-781-6820 DIRECTOR

OF

ADVERTISING . . . . . . . Tim Braden tim@lifeinthefingerlakes.com

ADVERTISING EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . Tricia Burnett tricia@lifeinthefingerlakes.com

FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES (800) 344-0559 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jason Hagerman jason@lifeinthefingerlakes.com

FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS (315) 789-0458 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tricia King

subscribe@lifeinthefingerlakes.com

BUSINESS OFFICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315-789-0458

800-344-0559

BUSINESS FAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315-789-4263 Life in the Finger Lakes is published by Fahy-Williams Publishing, Inc. and owned by Eleven Lakes Publishing, Inc. Co-owners: Mark S. Stash; Timothy J. Braden. Copyright 2004 by Eleven Lakes Publishing, Inc. No part of this publication may be reprinted or otherwise reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Uncredited photographs and illustrations are by Mark Stash. TO SUBSCRIBE, RENEW OR CHANGE ADDRESS: write to Life in the Finger Lakes, P.O. Box 1080, Geneva, New York 14456, or call 315789-0458. Subscription rates: $12.95 for one year. Outside U.S., add $15.00 per year. For renewal or change of address, include the address label from your most recent issue of Life in the Finger Lakes. For gift subscriptions, include your own name and address as well as those of gift recipients.

Life in the Finger Lakes 171 Reed St. • P.O. Box 1080 Geneva, NY 14456 www.LifeintheFingerLakes.com Serving the 14 counties of the Finger Lakes region PRINTED BY WILCOX PRESS, ITHACA, NEW YORK


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L E T T E R S Dear Mr. Stash: I am a Sergeant First Class stationed at FOB O’Ryan about 50 miles northeast of Baghdad, Iraq. I arrived here last month for a one year tour of duty as an infantryman. My National Guard unit is out of Oswego, New York, with our headquarters in Albany. I want to thank you for your magazine. We have one copy of the Spring 2004 edition and it is being circulated amongst several hundred troops from the Finger Lakes region. I have seen soldiers showing pictures in your magazine to Iraqi interpreters with much excitement saying, “See, this is where I am from.” The expression in the soldiers’ eyes and the anxiety in their voices are a great tribute to your magazine. Homesickness is temporarily placed on hold as they flip through the pages, momentarily taking themselves away from this barren country to the rich and bountiful countryside pictured throughout Life in the Finger Lakes. Morale of soldiers is a concern and responsibility of leaders at all levels. Your magazine helps contribute to a positive mindset for soldiers in Iraq and I thought you might like to know the effect you are having on soldiers away from their homes in New York.

Outletevolved. shopping

Sincerely, SFC Bobby Nolan, 2/108 Infantry A quick note to let you know how much I enjoyed the four issues I’d received last year culminating with the Winter issue which featured the pond at the end of Benson Road in Fishers. I grew up on that road and recognized that picture immediately. It brought back summer walks where the snapping turtles sunned on the logs, how beautiful the trees were, and how much I envied the family who lived at the end of that long driveway. Jan, Hopewell (Continued on page 4)

100 STORES FEATURING April Cornell, Bose, Brooks Brothers Factory Store, Carter’s, Eddie Bauer, Gap Outlet, L’eggs Hanes Bali Playtex, Liz Claiborne, Maidenform, Motherhood Maternity, Nine West, OshKosh, PacSun, Pfaltzgraff, Polo Ralph Lauren Factory Store, Reebok, Samsonite, Timberland, Tommy Hilfiger Company Store, Wilsons Leather Outlet, Zales Outlet and more AT SAVINGS OF 25% TO 65% EVERY DAY…SHOP BETTER.

WATERLOO, NY • RTE. 318 BETWEEN EXITS 41 & 42 OFF THE NY STATE THRUWAY • (315) 539-1100 MON-SAT 10-9, SUN 10-6 • PREMIUMOUTLETS.COM • CHELSEA PROPERTY GROUP • NYSE: CPG Circle Reader Service Number 165

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Indulge yourself! Good Wine Good Food & Good Fun at these 2 Celebrated Cayuga Lake Wineries

L E T T E R S I got to see your magazine for the first time in my doctor’s waiting room. Wanted to take it home with me, but felt too guilty. Jim, Homer

Tapas As You Like It July 18 A beautiful combination of seasonally and locally prepared dishes made for sharing, along with a flight of wines. A Slow Food event.

East Side Wine & Dine August 1 A progressive gourmet dinner featuring Cayuga Lake’s east shore wineries. Reservations required.

Mention this ad for a

FREE wine tasting, two FREE glasses and $5 off a $30 purchase.

“Healthy hearts and Sophisticated living”

East Side Wine & Dine

August 15 A wine tasting featuring locally produced gourmet items, and an opportunity to learn more about Slow Food. Afterwards, join us for an elegant four course dinner.

August 1 Indulge in a leisurely day of fine food & wine! Enjoy a progressive gourmet dinner at the 3 “Cayuga East” Wineries. Reservations required.

Six Mile Creek Vineyard 1551 Slaterville Rd (Rte 79E) • Ithaca, NY 607-272-WINE • 1-800-260-0612 www.sixmilecreek.com

King Ferry Winery Inc. 658 Lake Rd. • King Ferry, NY 315-364-5100 • 1-800-439-5271 www.treleavenwines.com

Our pride is inside every bottle! Pride of New York Program New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets 10B Airline Drive, Albany, NY 12235 1-800-554-4501

www.prideofny.com

Of course, we don’t recommend taking the issue from the doctor’s office, but there are three easy ways to contact us to get a valued subscription. You can take a card from the issue and send it in; you can visit our website at www.Lifein theFingerLakes.com and sign up for a subscription; or you can simply call us at (800) 344-0559. You will be pleased with the results of your effort. – Editor

Thank you for including the moving story of Safe Haven, Oswego, in your fine publication (“Safe Haven,” vol. 3, no. 4, Winter 2003, pages 3943). Safe Haven is a part of U.S. history which should be publicized, and is an important site of historic interest in the Oswego area. To add to the data given on page 43, in the paragraph beginning “thirty-five years”: The funds raised for the monument, and the arrangements for the dedication and the 40th anniversary of the refugees’ stay in Oswego, were the result of the work done by the Syracuse Chapter of Na’amat, with the help of Ruth Gruber. Na’amat is a Jewish women’s organization whose primary mission is to help support the varied social services needed by Israeli women and children. We in Syracuse felt that the need to mark the Safe Haven event was imperative. People came from Syracuse and Rochester, as well as Oswego, to participate with the former refugees in the dedication ceremony. A. Pearlman, Syracuse

Circle Reader Service Number 134

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Bought it as a star ter home. And never stopped.

© 2 0 0 4 M a r v i n Wi n d o w s a n d D o o r s . A l l r i g h t s r e s e r v e d . ® Re g i s t e r e d t r a d e m a r k o f M a r v i n Wi n d o w s a n d D o o r s .

Found windows that could keep up.

What does your home want to be when it grows up? This one dreamed big and made it with Marvin Windows and Doors. Built to your exact specifications, there’s no better choice to capture historical details or the wildest of imaginations. So add on, build up or show off with Marvin. To see how Marvin can fulfill your remodeling dreams, visit one of our showrooms. www.marvin.com 88 BC Building Supplies, Inc. Nineveh, NY 607-693-3200 Belknap Lumber, Inc. Binghamton, NY 607-729-1583 Builder's Best Do-It Center Cortland, NY 607-756-7871 www.buildersbest.doitbest.com

Builder's Best Design Center Ithaca, NY 607-266-0949 www.buildersbest.doitbest.com

Endicott Lumber & Box Endwell, NY 607-748-8227 www.endicottlumber.com

Builders Choice Lumber Co. Auburn, NY 315-252-5814

Morse Sash & Door Co. Rochester, NY 585-475-1010 www.morselumber.com

Marvin Design Gallery by Chittenango Lumber Co., Inc. Chittenango, NY 315-687-6221

Ryan's Windows & Doors Syracuse, NY 315-425-7915 WindowSmith Fairport, NY 585-388-5110 www.windowsmithinc.com

Circle Reader Service Number 139

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N E W S B I T S Area Hosts Historic Cars The Rochester Region of The Horseless Carriage Club of America will host “Brass, Brakes & Finger Susan P. DeNagel

Lakes,” a national tour of historic Brass Era cars. The tour runs from Monday, June 21 through Saturday, June 26. Each day, the tour follows a preplanned route of approximately 90 miles from the Canandaigua Inn on the Lake to a specific destination. The schedule is: June 21, to Fairport; June

22, to Hammondsport; June 23, Mumford; June 24, Seneca Falls; June 25, Honeoye Lake. On Thursday June 24th, some of the cars will be on view at an open-to-the-public cruise night at Wegmans in Canandaigua. Brass Era cars were manufactured before January 1, 1916, and are equipped with brass lights, radiators and other trim. They are rare, but 80 of these special cars are included in the Brass, Brakes & Finger Lakes tour. Members of The Horseless Carriage Club of America share a common interest in early automobiles, and strive to preserve or to restore these treasures in their original condition. Many members of the tour dress in clothing matching the era of their cars. On Saturday, June 26, for those interested in newer vehicles, there will be an informal car show and swap

meet featuring pre-1942 cars and automotive-related items. It will be held at the Finger Lakes Community College Canandaigua Campus parking lot, from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Geneva’s New Triathlon Slated for July Jeff Henderson

On July 11, hundreds of athletes will compete in an epic journey over land and water when the first annual

Finger Lakes Tourism Alliance celebrates 85 years promoting the region!

Founded in 1919, Finger Lakes Tourism Alliance is the oldest regional tourism promotion association in the United States. Our tradition of hospitality and decades of service to our visitors, as well as our partners, has not only helped make the Finger Lakes region a popular destination for all ages. . . it has made us one of the most re-visited vacationlands in the Northeast. Contact Mary Lou at 800-530-7488, ext.19 for information on advertising packages. Finger Lakes Tourism Alliance actively promotes partner businesses on a world-wide scale, encouraging regional growth and economic success! For information on how to join us, please call

800-530-7488 or 315-536-7488 visit us at www.fingerlakes.org or 309 Lake Street, Penn Yan, NY 14527

President Alexa F. Gifford Signature Pieces (from left): Regional Travel Guide, Group Tour Planner, www.fingerlakes.org and Mini-Guide & Map

Finance Jessica Heeman Circle Reader Service Number 119

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Marketing/Sales Sally Berry Ann Brink Mary Lou Culver Beulah Decker

Support Staff Christine Lickert Melinda Skinner


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BRINGS NEW MEANING TO “LIVING ON THE LAKE” Looking to spend more time on the water? Our new hydraulic hoist raises and lowers your boat with the push of a button. A durable hydraulic drive system does the heavy work quickly, smoothly and without manual cranking. Plus, an exclusive Drop Side Arm design makes getting in and out easier than ever before. Heavy-duty frame constructed of extruded aluminum alloy and galvanized steel. When you step out of your boat,step onto a new Powder-Coated Aluminum Genuine ShoreStation Dock. Beautifies your shoreline, easy to install with versatile designs to fit the way you live. Also available in Nostalgic Cedar and Superstruct Polyethylene. And, we continue to offer a full line of accessories. Cedar benches,flag poles, bumpers and lights—all designed to enhance your lakeside living. ShoreStation hoists,docks and accessories—a complete“lakefront system”that brings new meaning to living on the lake.See your dealer or call 1-800-859-3028 for a FREE video and brochure. ShoreStation— The original since 1959. Midwest Industries, Inc. • (800) 859-3028 • www.shorestation.com

Circle Reader Service Number 153


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N E W S B I T S

Circle Reader Service Number 103

Custom Built Lake Homes

New homes, renovations and raze/rebuild Exceptional one-of-a-kind designs Unmatched craftsmanship Specialists in developing lakefront sites 2 Epping Wood Trail, Pittsford, NY 14534 585-381-7758 • www.ketmar.com

The firmest foundation is built on Trust. Circle Reader Service Number 133

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Musselman Triathlon (named after the notorious zebra mussels in Seneca Lake) takes place in Geneva. Three different triathlons (swimbike-run in nonstop succession) will be held. The first one begins at 7 a.m., when the gun will fire for the title event, The Musselman. It includes 1.2 miles of swimming followed by 56 miles of cycling and 13 miles of running. An hour after it starts, a shorter race called the Mini-Mussel will commence. Participants will swim 500 yards, then travel 15 miles through Seneca County by bike, and 3 miles by foot around Seneca Lake State Park. In the afternoon, the MusselKids Race will be held for kids ages 7 to 14. Three months after registration opened in January, athletes from 18 states and three countries had signed up to compete. A dedicated team of volunteers plans to entertain, fortify, encourage, and guide as many as 900 participants on race day. Their hope is that the Musselman Triathlon will Jeff Henderson

become one of the premier events on the nationwide triathlon calendar. Race director Jeff Henderson said, “Our efforts are a source of pride for Geneva and the surrounding towns. We hope it leaves a positive impression on Geneva’s visitors, as well as on its children, since proceeds will be donated to the Boys & Girls Club of Geneva.” For more information, contact www.musselmantri.com.


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N E W S B I T S Seneca Falls Center Showcases Art of All Kinds The Frank J. Ludovico Sculpture Trail, Visitor and Art Center in Seneca Falls has announced events for its 2004 season. They include a celebration of Seneca County’s bicentennial in art form, featuring 11 portrait artists, from June 4 to July 10; a

The Ludovico sculpture trail and art center features exhibition space for large sculptures and paintings. Local artists created, then donated 4´ by 8´ murals, which will remain on permanent display. Here, Mark Stash works on his representation of the Seneca-Cayuga Canal.

“Friendly Art Show” of three local style artists, from July 11 to August 14; “Latvian Culture” from August 15 to September 24, and “Handprinted Pictographic Woodcut Prints” by artist Michael Goscinsky, from September 26 to October 31. Now in its second year, the center serves as a showcase for Finger Lakes, American and internationally known artists. It’s open Thursday through Sunday, May through October; from 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free.

New York Beer From New York Hops For the first time in more than half a century, a brewer has made beer

from hops grown in New York State. The new venture was achieved with help from Cornell University agricultural researchers working with the Northeast Hops Alliance, a group of farmers and brewers involved in a hop resurgence effort. Last fall, Rick Pederson of Pederson Farms in Seneca Castle sold his first crop of hops to the Ithaca Beer Company, which used it to produce its new Double India Pale Ale. It was brewed last November, then was fermented for two weeks and conditioned and stored for two months at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. Hops were once a leading specialty crop in New York State. Plant disease and insect pests, coupled with the impact of Prohibition, led to the crop’s demise. Fifty years ago, commercial hops production in New York ceased. “New vigorous hop varieties, pest control strategies and production technologies, along with the growth of specialty beers, may permit a small return of commercial hop production in New York and elsewhere in the region,” said Duncan Hilchey, senior extension associate in Cornell’s Community, Food and Agriculture Program, Department of Developmental Sociology.

Geneva On The Lake Wine Country Villa & Resort A Luxurious Getaway & Executive Retreat

“The food is extraordinarily good.” –Bon Appetit

1-800-3-GENEVA RT. 14, GENEVA, N.Y. WWW.GENEVAONTHELAKE.COM Circle Reader Service Number 123

Cayuga County

Famous Schooner Restored in Ithaca Ithaca boat builder Vlado Novosel has restored a 36-foot schooner, the Outward Bound, to its original racing condition. After the hull restoration was completed in March, the schooner was transported from Ithaca to Portland, Maine for the final stages of interior gallows restoration. The Outward Bound was built in 1948, and was for years a favorite contender in the New England coastal water races. In 1971, it won the Great Schooner Race in Gloucester Harbor. Novosel bought Outward Bound in 1999 and has spent the last four years

Experience Cayuga County’s award-winning wineries, top-rated museums charming villages, and scenic drives, plus its famous Finger Lakes and the Great Lake Ontario! FREE Travel Guide. Call (800) 499-9615 or visit our web site at

Circle Reader Service Number 107

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N E W S B I T S Nanci Ludwig

Back home in New England waters again. painstakingly restoring it. Novosel grew up in Zagreb, Croatia and has crewed for ships in his native Mediterranean region, Germany and France, and along the eastern seaboard from the Caribbean to Nova Scotia. He builds and restores wooden canoes, guide boats and sailboats.

Ithaca Emerges Ithaca was named the best “emerging” area in the country, according to the book, Cities Ranked & Rated by Bert Sperling and Peter Sander. The book’s main list is based on 331 metropolitan statistical areas designated by the federal government. When the government added 45 more areas in 2003, Sperling and Sander used them in a separate list, with rankings based on the new areas’ limited data. USA Today noted that the list features places that are experiencing rapid growth. The book says, “[Ithaca] is attractive, activities are plentiful and education attainment is high,” but “lots of snow and precipitation.”

Seneca County Celebrates Bicentennial Seneca County’s bicentennial celebrations will continue throughout the year with special events in Interlaken, Ovid, Tyre, Lodi, Waterloo, Seneca Falls, Fayette, Junius and Romulus. Events range from various festivals to tractor pulls and fireworks. For a com(Continued on page 12) Circle Reader Service Number 170

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P

ulling into SkyLand Farm,

we were drawn to the unusual garden art set amidst a striking abundance of flower gardens with little paths, one leading over a small waterfall and pond, complete with croaking frogs. Vying for my attention, to the left, a labyrinth and a view of Seneca Lake. To the right, stained glass, a big open doorway out of which came music and two cats. First stop the cats. Once inside, I was greeted by the work of over 300 local, regional, and U.S. artists – handmade and one of a kind! Where to look first? Wool from the sheep next door. Mirrors crafted from Seneca Lake stones. Jewelry. Glass. Wrought iron. Over 50 kinds of essential oil and herb infused soaps. Colorful brooms (I was tempted to sweep). Walls of copper sculptures. Fountains. Beeswax and bayberry candles. Wood art…And pottery…an entire pottery studio filled with pottery! Then I found the much talked about Bathroom. All I will tell you is that you will emerge inspired and refreshed. Don’t miss it. Beyond the pottery studio, one is drawn by delightful aromas into the Garden Room Café where a two-story oak tree towers over the bakery. A spiral staircase winds amazingly up through the branches for an adventurous trip up to the second floor. It is like walking up through a gigantic natural sculpture. Look for the photos on how it was built. (The other side of the shop offers a conventional, beautifully wrought iron trimmed staircase.) Back in the Café was an irresistible display of “comfort food for the heart”: European tarts, mousses, cakes, pies, smoothies, salads and sandwiches…and gelato (Italian ice cream). Since it was warm, I decided on gelato for dessert. The 15-plus flavors, are pre-dipped daily and beautifully displayed in colorful rows in an inviting self-serve fashion. A quick lesson: gelato is denser (less air, less sugar, less butterfat). It has a creamier, more intense flavor which is derived from fresh fruits and spices, not flavorings. I was instructed to let it thaw for just a minute so that one can experience and savor the full and surprisingly powerful flavors. Sitting in the one of the handcrafted booths overlooking Seneca Lake through the big open windows, I found myself wishing I had room to try some of the other amazing desserts such as the Hazelnut Torte or Cinnamon Bread Pudding. My gaze was drawn to the other side of the café where out in the little farm yard there were goats and sheep enjoying themselves just as much. I watched as the agile goats raced up inside a little barn only to appear through a second story window to await food being pullied up to them from below. Seeing this brought out the child in me – I had to go feed them too. Once outside I found there were also many chickens racing busily about the pasture and stealing bits of feed that the sheep missed. So these were the gals that the laid the beautiful green, brown and white eggs for sale. I read that these chickens eat mostly grass, carrots, squash, little bugs, and whatever fruit falls from the trees. I am sure that these extraordinary eggs made the tuna sandwich that I had for lunch one of the best I’ve ever eaten. I finally left laden with treats for home, the perfect wedding gift, pottery for myself, a wish list for my husband, and their open hours. This was the perfect (something for everyone) place to bring the parade of relatives scheduled to visit us this summer.

Craft Gallery & Café

Summer Fall Holiday

May 28 - Sept. 12 Sept. 17 - Dec. 12 Dec. 17 - Dec. 24

Wed. - Sun 11-5 Fri. - Sun. 11-5 Every day 11-5

7 miles north of Watkins Glen directly on 414 in Hector. 607-546-5050 • www.skylandfarm.net Circle Advertiser’s Reader Service Number 155

SkyLand Farm is a 3000 sq. foot Art Barn set amidst stone-walled gardens (including a cut-your-own bouquet garden), labyrinth; and feedable goats, sheep and chickens, overlooking Seneca Lake. Featuring an in-house pottery studio and the work of over 300 local, New York, and U.S. artists, exquisitely displayed amongst stained glass, wrought iron and handhewn beams. The Garden Room Café tempts with a large dessert and gelato (Italian ice cream) selection as well as light lunches. The Café is built around a two-story white oak tree with a spiral staircase winding through its branches, taking you up to the second floor for an overwhelming view of Seneca Lake. This is a true Finger Lakes Experience.


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N E W S B I T S plete schedule, visit www.visitsenecany.net, or call 800-732-1848.

Auburn’s Team Triathlon Event Scheduled for August The Great Race, now in its 27th year, will begin at 9:30 a.m. on August

Free, no obligation measurements and estimates.

230 Lake St. • Penn Yan, NY • (315) 531-8178 www.churchcreativeflooring.com Circle Reader Service Number 109

Circle Reader Service Number 161

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8 at Auburn’s Emerson Park, located at the north tip of Owasco Lake. Also known as the Captain Myles Keogh Paddle, Wheel, & Run, The Great Race is perhaps the largest team triathlon event in the United States. It includes five distinct run, bike, and paddle (either canoe or kayak) team triathlon relay races. The feature event, called the Traditional Race, is a relay of four-person teams. It begins with a 10k run on county roads and the streets of Auburn. Runners hand off to their cycling teammates who complete a course of about 17 challenging miles on paved country roads. Cyclists hand off to their canoe teammates, who run about 400 yards to their canoes/canoe partners on the beach. Canoers complete an out-and-back 4-mile sprint course on Owasco Lake. The Traditional Race also includes a Tandem Race for two-person teams. There is no solo division. The popular new Short Course features four-person teams that compete in a 5-k run/10-mile bike/2-mile canoe race. New kayak divisions, consisting of three-person teams (one runner, one


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N E W S B I T S cyclist, one kayaker) are included in both the Short and Traditional Races. Although all teams race together, the kayak and canoe teams are scored separately in their own divisions. The post-race bash features a free lunch for contestants, refreshments and a live band. For more information, visit www.great-race.com.

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$1 Million for Owego River Walk

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The federal government will fund construction of a 1200-foot walkway along the Susquehanna River in the historic downtown commercial district of Owego, said U.S. Representative Maurice Hinchey (NY-22). The $1 million requested by Hinchey was

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Lois Barden Circle Reader Service Number 144

included in a federal transportation bill that passed in April. Funds will be distributed over a six-year period. The River Walk will create riverside access for development purposes to the unused cellar levels of 20 business properties, and connect the village to the river as a recreational resource. Economic benefits include increased sales revenues, storefront occupancy rates, downtown property values, county sales tax revenues and jobs, noted Hinchey.

Bed & Breakfast

This turn of the century farmhouse is now a luxurious country inn and working equestrian farm. We offer a complimentary full homemade breakfast and rooms overlooking vineyards and the lake.

Correction The pictorial from the Spring 2004 issue titled “First Light in the Finger Lakes” featured both photographs and text by Michael Venturino.

www.hobbithollow.com phone: 315.685.2791 • toll free: 877.7HOBBIT 3061 West Lake Road • Skaneateles New York Circle Reader Service Number 128

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S P O R T

The Ultimate Challenge for Horse and Rider By Heather Merrell

T

hose looking for a perfect Finger Lakes experience this summer should check out the Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials, to be held July 23 through 25 in Victor. “We look at this as a wonderful way to spend a lovely day in the country watching magnificent animals and their riders conquer demanding courses,” said Kyra King Stuart, organizer of the event. “People become captivated by it. It’s glorious land and it’s lovely that the landowners share it with everyone.” The Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials are an equestrian “eventing” competition. Eventing is the triathlon of equestrian sports, the ultimate challenge for a horse and rider. Eventing began as a military competition in the early 1900s. A horse had to first Circle Reader Service Number 100

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demonstrate his obedience to the soldier on his back, then prove he was capable of running many miles and jumping obstacles in his path, and finally, after the tests were completed, show that he was strong enough to carry on. The first Stuart Horse Trials were held 15 years ago, on one day with 76 horses, ridden by mostly local participants. This year, organizers expect at least 300 horses to participate in the three-day trials. They will be chosen from close to 500 entries and will represent 27 states and seven or eight countries. Each of the last three years the competition has attracted 10,000 spectators over the three-day event.

Above: Anne Kaufman and Jamacian Blue attempt a jump in the cross-country phase of last year’s Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials. This jump is one of many that horse and rider face on the Intermediate Course. Photo by Brant Gamma


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Intimate - Casual - Fine Dining by the fireplace or on our porches. Serving seafood direct from Boston, wood-grilled steaks and our specialty chocolate souffles.

Fine Mediterranean cuisine and gracious accommodations in a southern mansion...Perfect for that special occasion! Gift certificates available.

3610 Pre-Emption Road • Geneva 315-789-8498 www.pastaonlyscobblestone.com

206 West Cortland Street • Groton 607-898-5817 • www.benncongerinn.com

Creative Fusion Cuisine Famous for our Italian cuisine, served in a Friendly Family atmosphere since 1954. Family owned and operated for three generations.

An intimate Bistro setting, offering a unique variety of Asian-style dishes. Select from wines and beer of the world.

156 W. Utica Street • Oswego 315-343-3540 • www.canalesrestaurant.com

486 Exchange Street • Geneva 315-719-0333

Use American Express ® Cards and

Enjoy great food and Finger Lakes Wines in an inviting atmosphere with a friendly staff.

Unmistakably excellent food. Charming - Casual - Friendly - Intimate Gardens to roam. Covered decks & porches.

Travelers Cheques at these and other

1978 Rts 5&20 • Waterloo 315-539-9300

3365 East Lake Road • Canandaigua 585-394-8254 • www.lincolnhill.com

A tradition of fine dining since 1833, this historical landmark is located in the scenic Genesee valley village of Geneseo.

Experience fine dining in a country setting at this culinary landmark. “You haven’t been to your favorite restaurant unless you've dined at the Inn Between.” Reservations recommended.

46 Main Street • Geneseo 585-243-5220 • www.bigtreeinn.com

2290 W. Genesee Tnpk (Rt 5) • Camillus 315-672-3166 • inn-between.com

THE FLAVOR OF

THE FINGER LAKES fine establishments. Take a dash of atmosphere. Toss in a pinch of great service. Flavor with great food. Then add the American Express Card and mix well for a great dining experience anytime in the Finger Lakes.

Steaks Seafood NYS Wines Good Times

Views unlike any other restaurant on Canandaigua Lake. Delicious Food! Restaurant - Banquet Facility - Tour Boat 205 Lakeshore Drive • Canandaigua 585-396-7350 www.steamboatlandingonline.com

Banquets, Parties, Live Music on Fridays Dinner or Lunch on the Deck Sports Lounge

Movie themed art deco design casual family style restaurant. A great selection of Italian specialties, sandwiches, burgers, antipasto, pizza and a full bar.

Rt. 281 • Cortland 607-753-7238 • www.therustynail.com

27 Groton Ave. • Cortland 607-753-3242

The Place for Casual Fine Dining – Martini Bar, Bistro Menu, Ultra-extensive Wine Selection. Reservations Recommended. 228 Oakwood Ave. • Elmira Hts 607-734-2022 • www.pierces1894.com

M oretti’s Comfortable, casual bistro serving French and Italian country food. 24 Winthrop Street • Rochester 585-454-6020 • www.2vine.com

Discriminating people in increasing numbers year after year have chosen Moretti's as their favorite place to enjoy the finest Italian & American foods, steaks & chops. 800 Hatch Street • Elmira 607-734-1535 www.morettis-restaurant.com

The Krebs 103rd season. Family owner. English, formal garden. Casual or fine dining. Enjoy our traditional meal. Reservations appreciated. 51 W. Genesee St. • Skaneateles 315-685-5714 • www.thekrebs.com

To enjoy offers in the Finger Lakes region, log on to: americanexpress.com/upstateny Circle Reader Service Number 101


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Michael Feldmeyer C. Todd Herbik, Jr. Portia McGuire Eileen Minster Michael Morey Judy O’Donnell Stacey Preston Louise Szczepkowski

Enza Benham Virginia Butler Anne Caprini Bernice Caprini Leo & Elizabeth Caprini Betty Clawson Molly Coe

23 Coach Street • Suite 1B Canandaigua NY 14424 585.398.2211 800.527.0074

Mitch Pierson, Jr.

PIERSONREALTORS.COM Circle Reader Service Number 141

Trip Pierson

Marvelous Finger Lakes Land “The land here is a treasure and is unique to the Finger Lakes,” Kyra said. “It’s quite wonderful for the horses. We are in the drumlins leftover from the glaciers between the two lakes. These deposits, I call them ‘horse moguls,’ are marvelous for the horses to run up and down. They come off them feeling like they are King Kong. It’s fantastic to see them excel.” This year, the competition’s 15th anniversary, there are many reasons for organizers to celebrate. First, Cosequin of Nutramax Laboratories has increased their sponsorship and the competition will now be known as the Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials. Cosequin is a supplement to improve joint function in horses. A new sponsor, Lexus, will set up a cross-country course for spectators and competitors to drive one of their vehicles. Also this year, the Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials have the honor of being part of the United States Eventing Association’s Gold Cup Series. Out of the 285 eventing competitions in the United States, the Stuart Horse Trials were chosen as one of seven events to host the series. Participants will earn cumulative points and at the end of the series, the participant with the most points will earn the title of USEA Gold Cup Series Champion. “This is the most prestigious honor for us,” Kyra said. “We are proud and excited to have been chosen. Being part of the Gold Cup is a gift to all the volunteers who have made it happen. It’s everybody’s pat on the back.” What is Eventing? The first phase of eventing, on Friday, July 23, is dressage, where the objective is to move the horse through the required patterns without any appearance of effort on the part of the rider. This phase displays the grace and harmony of the horse and rider. The second phase of eventing,

Circle Reader Service Number 116

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Giving Back

Heather Merrell recently relocated to Geneva. She enjoys knitting, writing, spending time at the wineries and hiking in the Finger Lakes region.

music, theatre, dance, visual arts, poetry, at the lake

n Chambe r Orchestr a

many times as they feel necessary, usually at least three times,” Kyra said. “The horses go out cold, so there must be total trust of horse to rider.” The courses cover a lot of land, so where is the best place to watch? Kyra’s advice is simple – find a big knoll and settle in. “The courses are not as spread out as they seem,” she continued. “The knolls are good viewing areas. Everything is clearly marked and areas are roped off for spectators. Usually people stop for a while and watch, then they move to a different spot. Just remember that horses always have the right of way.” The Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials will be held in Victor on Murray Road, which is off Boughton Hill Road. For more information, call Secretary Melissa Crystal at (585) 657-6980 or visit www.stuarthorsetrials.org.

SIX SOLID WEEKS OF THE ARTS!

Manhatta

held on Saturday, is cross-country jumping. Horses run cross-country, jumping permanent fences such as logs, water, ditches and anything else found in the natural terrain. This, Kyra explained, is the “rigors and thrills of competition.” The final phase, on Sunday, is the most familiar to many people – show jumping. Horse and rider jump brightly colored fences on a timed course. This phase proves that the horse, after riding crosscountry, has the power to perform in a show of pageantry. “Riders walk the courses as

Tickets Available ONLINE!

J U LY 1 3 – AUGUST 22 2004

tch Lake Whale Wa Photo: Seneca

The board of directors for the Cosequin Stuart Horse Trials works hard to ensure that the event is enjoyable for competitors, spectators and volunteers. They recognize and appreciate the community support that helps make the event successful. To show their thanks, in the past 14 years the competition has donated over $54,000 to local non-profit groups. “We wish to give back to those organizations that have been so good to us, or those that are near and dear to our heart,” said organizer Kyra King Stuart. “It’s very hard for events like this to break even. They are very costly to put on, but we have had wonderful success. The Rochester area and the community in the Finger Lakes have been marvelous in supporting what we are doing.” Past beneficiaries include the National Fragile X Foundation for Fragile X Syndrome; Monroe County Special Olympics Equestrian Program; Western New York Region, United States Pony Clubs, Inc.; Newark’s Everybody Rides Program; Victor-Farmington Volunteer Ambulance Corps; Mercy Flight Central; East Bloomfield Ambulance; The Humane Society at Lollypop Farm; the Ontario County Sheriff’s Office; Upstate Guide Dogs Foundation and the Heart of Gold Foundation. “Many of the organizations are for educational purposes, which is one of our primary goals,” Kyra said.

eneva Photo: G

amber Area Ch

erce of Comm

Geneva, New York... Where Art Meets the Lake Tickets Available at

www.genevarts.com

(866) 355-5483 For Tickets and Information Circle Reader Service Number 121

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G A R D E N I N G

An Oasis in Your Own Backyard By Del Cronise

O

ne of the hazards of being a landscape contractor is, after completing a really interesting project for a customer, standing back to admire your handiwork and thinking, “I’ve gotta get me one of these!” Such a thing happened to us a few summers ago when we installed a water garden for a client, creating a wonderful focal point for an already interesting garden. The combination of water coursing down a stream and over a series of waterfalls, the sound of that water splashing into the pond below, lush aquatic plants flourishing in the pool during an otherwise hot and arid summer and the calm effect of fish gliding about just under the pond surface was a revelation to me of the type of physical impact a water garden can have. We therefore had high expectations when installing our own, attempting to turn a barren patch of driveway into a vibrant and vital feature near the main entrance to our home. The result of our efforts, a 2,200-gallon aquatic oasis, happily exceeded our visions. Although water gardens can vary greatly in size and complexity, they all consist of the same basic elements: water, plants and fish. We chose a method that was fairly simple and straightforward mechanically but allowed us to create as natural a look as possible by using boulders, rocks and gravel to disguise the heavy rubber liner, plastic skimmer box and biological filter. This is a simple recirculating system where the pond water flows into the skimmer

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and is pumped to a filter box that purposefully overflows and returns the water to the pond. The skimmer acts to catch leaves and other solid debris, the filter traps still more waste while beneficial bacteria in the filter media work to decompose and render that waste harm-

Make Your Own Jungle If you enjoy gardening and growing plants as much as I do, you will discover a whole new world of plants that grow in and around a water garden. Differing textures and colors, a lushness and rate of growth that is not possible here in

Photo by Lynn Cronise

It’s feeding time at the Cronise water garden, and Del’s daughter Katie does the honors. less. As the water flows from our filter back to the pond, it drops 16 inches or so, creating a waterfall that helps to aerate the water. While this is a closed system, the inclusion of water plants, fish and bacteria together help to create a relatively self-sustaining ecosystem and with this we have been able to maintain nearly crystal clear water.

this area with land plants, movement of foliage not just by wind but by fish and water currents; these are elements of aquatic plantings that make the water garden such an interesting endeavor. The water lily, probably the most popular and recognizable of aquatic plants, is available in a vast array of cultivars. We have only grown hardy varieties, ones


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that will survive the winter in our pond, and have had great success with them although they do tend to bloom only during the day when most of us are at work. Another deep-water plant, one that will lend a more tropical quality to the garden is the lotus. Large round leaves and showy flowers held high above the water are a prelude to the lotus seed pod, familiar to many for its use in dried flower arrangements. We decided not to utilize any lotus in our pond, as they are known to be aggressive growers. Both of these plants, though, can play an important role in the ecology and functioning of the pond as the large leaves shade the water, preventing the water from receiving too much sunlight while providing protective cover for the pond fish. Just as interesting to me as the lotus and lily are the shallow water and marginal plants. This is where the real artistry of planting a watergarden is involved, as these plants grow around the borders of the pond, helping to blend the waterscape into the surrounding gardens, softening the boundaries of the pool, providing many additional textures and colors. Favorites of ours include pickerelweed, with its deep purple flower spikes, arrowhead and arrow arum with their (what else?) arrowshaped foliage, sedges with grass-like foliage, needle-thin rushes, the exotic looking pennywort and true forget-menot with its clouds of dainty blue flowers and gracefully trailing, bright green foliage. We also include tropical floating plants, such as water hyacinth and water lettuce, that float about the water surface propelled either by gentle breezes, water currents or playful fish. A personal, sentimental, favorite of mine is spearmint, the fragrance of which stirs childhood memories of playing around my grandfather’s fishpond, one that he built back in the 1930s. In fact, the spearmint plants we have by our watergarden all originate

E STABLISHED 1874

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JANSEN MARINA, Inc. SALES • SERVICE • MOORING • STORAGE 5750 East Lake Rd., Conesus, NY 14435 • (585) 346-2060 7099 Rt. 21, Canandaigua Lake • (585) 374-2384 www.jansenmarina.com Circle Reader Service Number 132

Circle Reader Service Number 151

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LANDSCAPE & DESIGN “Catering to the needs of the most meticulous clients throughout the Finger Lakes region.”

• Landscape • •

Consultation Services Plantings – Design and Installation Brick and Stone – Walks, Walls and Patios

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Call (585) 229-4776 www.croniselandscape.com Circle Reader Service Number 115

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Ph: (585)335-2710 ext 22 www.nycampgrounds.com Circle Reader Service Number 106

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as transplants from a boggy overflow area by that very pond. Pond Pets Join the Family Fish are an essential component in our water garden, providing not only a vivid kinetic presence but also as a major component of the ecosystem, by consuming insects and algae while their wastes benefit the bacteria and plantlife. We originally planned on stocking the water garden with koi, a large and multicolored Japanese relative of goldfish, considered by many people to be the most desirable of pond fish. However, when a neighbor offered a bucketload of eight inch-long goldfish rescued from a leaky farm pond, we gladly accepted the free bounty. They have actually turned out to be a complete joy, being graceful and playful swimmers, sociable (coming to eat out of your hand when called) and interactive, allowing themselves to be picked up and petted. We did purchase some inexpensive koi locally on Mother’s Day 2003, and though they were only 2 to 3 inches long then, most are now over 10 inches, and we expect that they may reach 18 inches in length by the end of this summer. It is truly difficult to describe the sense of majesty that one of these large and colorful fish exhibits as it glides about the pond. I vowed at the outset that we would not be naming any of our fish as we had heard many people do. Well, we now have “Elvis” and “Roscoe” and “Calico.” In our defense, it is easier to point and exclaim, “Look at Twinkie!” than to say, “Look at the golden yellow one with the creamy white markings!” And yes, we have developed an emotional attachment to them – so much so that when that most dreaded predator of pond fish showed up, the Great (curse word) Blue (curse word) Heron, we all go on full alert as these stealthy and crafty birds can easily wipe out an entire fish population within a visit or two. If you happened to be driving through Bristol at daybreak last September and saw some guy sitting on

a rooftop in a red metal folding chair (in the rain), that would have been me. Likewise, that was also me running down the driveway yelling and waving my arms trying to drive the (curse word) bird off. Before I left for work that day we completely covered the surface of the water with a fine black plastic netting, protecting the fish from the heron and our neighbors from my alarming behavior. One of the goals this year is to develop a physical barrier that is artistic and decorative by itself that Photo by Lynn Cronise

Blooming water lilies adorn the pond’s surface. will allow us to freely enjoy all areas of the water garden while providing a level of safety for our fish and peace of mind for us. Just How “Maintenance Free” Is It? Aside from the visual impact on our landscape that we were hoping to achieve with the water garden, I personally was interested in learning the realities of water garden care, as this type of feature is often marketed as “care-free” or “low-maintenance.” In my mind, the truth is that the level of care required is best described as a “stewardship,” a higher degree of vigi-


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lance and responsibility than for any other common landscape feature, due in large part to the inclusion of the pond fish. While goldfish and koi may be able to self-subsist by eating algae and the like, at least a cursory glance is needed every day to check on water quality. Spent blossoms and leaves from lilies may need to be removed, algae may need to be harvested by hand, beneficial bacteria often needs to be added, additional water may be needed, filters and skimmers require periodic cleaning. Not all of these need to be done every day, but as I said, attention is needed as there is a rapid, daily change of the garden throughout the growing season. Actually, it is that dynamic and ever-changing quality that makes water gardening so enjoyable for us. Most of these daily changes are positive and welcome: the discovery of the first frog or salamander, “interesting” fish behavior resulting in the appearance of swarms of offspring, the ephemeral nature of the lily blooms. Care-free? Probably not. Boring? Never. I certainly don’t mean to dissuade anyone from water gardening by virtue of the last paragraph. I think that if you truly enjoy gardening or are pet- or nature-oriented, you would probably find a water garden as fulfilling as we do. All of the maintenance issues become a labor of love. It is difficult to convey the mixture of emotions that we associate with our water garden. We’re proud of a job well done, delighted by the wonderment on a child’s face when he or she sees the pond for the first time, and satisfied when adult visitors relax by the water as we do. We enjoy the almost hypnotic melding of sights and sounds, and conclude that any time spent by a water garden is time well spent.

Del Cronise, of Cronise Landscape & Design, works throughout the Finger Lakes region. Call him at (585)229-4776 or visit his website at www.croniselandscape.com. Circle Reader Service Number 152

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F R U I T

O F

T H E

V I N E

Savoring the Seneca Lake Wine Trail By Linda D. Pratt

Wagner Vineyards in Lodi

S

ummer beckons to slow down one’s pace and enjoy the fruits of one’s labors. On the Seneca Lake Wine Trail, the success of each winery’s harvest is waiting for visitors to select and savor their favorite flavor of the season. The Seneca Lake Wine Trail starts at Amberg Wine Cellars, between Canandaigua and Geneva, in the town of Flint on Routes 5 and 20. The tasting bar, modeled in the German tradition of a cool mountainside winery, features traditional favorites such as Gerwurtztraminer and Riesling, as well as a plush burgundy and claret for those tempting chocolate desserts. Continuing on Route 5 and 20 through Geneva, the west end of the wine trail turns onto Route 14 south along Seneca Lake. Fox Run Vineyards offers awardwinning Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Noir and sparkling wines. Recent plant-

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Photo by Kristian S. Reynolds

ings of Gamay, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Gewurztraminer position Fox Run’s future on the cutting edge of the Finger Lakes’ wine industry. Not only is there a majestic view of Seneca Lake from a perch looking out over luxuriant vineyards, but a friendly tasting room and café to blend together wines and meals. Nearby is Seneca Shore Wine Cellars, whose unassuming exterior belies a medieval ambience on the interior. Winemaker and entrepreneur Dave DeMarco maintains that the premise of his winery is “to have a wine for everybody who walks in the door,” and his selection of dry and sweet reds and whites is direct proof. Of particular note are the “Red” captioned varieties and his exclusive and full-bodied Kylix wines. Neighboring Anthony Road Wine Company specializes in “fine wines for the everyday celebration of life” that complement full dinners or lighter

meals. Also prepared are the Martini Reinhardt Selection series of wines produced through extra special attention to detail and quality in both the vineyard and the cellar. The wines in this series are premium hand-crafted wines, produced in limited quantities by vineyard manager Peter Martini and Winemaker Johannas Reinhardt. Only exceptional, carefully selected fruit and wines will qualify to make the cut, and are only available through the retail store. Just south of the town of Dresden are wineries that reflect their own unique character in their wines and surroundings. Prejean Winery confirms that the Finger Lakes can cultivate a great red wine, especially savored is its Marechal Foch. Torrey Ridge provides crisp wines that complement its views of Seneca Lake from the second floor tasting room balcony, where visitors are invited to sit and leisurely enjoy their picnic lunch with their favorite wine. A left turn from Route 14 onto Randall Crossing Road will lead to Miles Wine Cellars, where visitors can sample their robust reds and lingering whites in a renovated 1802 Greek Revival home that possesses a “haunted” history of its 19th century owner and his wife restlessly making their presence known to wary guests. It is also the only winery where visitors can arrive and depart by boat along Seneca Lake. Returning to Route 14 will bring visitors to Earle Estates Meadery. Here, delightful wines are created from honey (mead) and other fruits of the harvest, such as apple, black raspberry, cherry, pear, strawberry, and blueberry, all stored in beautifully shaded bottles. Several blends of mead and fruit wines are also developed, creating yet another exciting taste for visitors to choose from.


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With a glistening view of the lake as you drive farther on Route 14, Hickory Hollow Wine Cellars presents a spacious wood-hewn tasting room to feature its fruity yet classic white wines. Owners Bruce and Suzanne Kendall aspire to build cabins in the woods of their 28 acres and hope that Hickory Hollow will become a home base for visitors vacationing in the Finger Lakes. Just next door is Glenora Wine Cellars, with its stately tasting room and restaurant, not to mention its well-apportioned accommodations. Its Chardonnay, Syrah, Cayuga and Seyval, among its other premium wines, easily complete a visit to Glenora’s beautiful surroundings. Just north of Watkins Glen are a number of wineries that offer a variety of wines to accommodate any sophisticated or casual cuisine. The “Red Zeppelin” at Fulkerson Winery is an easy-going yet hearty companion for a summer barbeque, while the Vignoles and Glaciovinum at Lakewood Vineyards provide an excellent finish to a satisfying meal. In between lies Arcadian Estate Vineyards, which features full-bodied white wines in addition to their very popular fruit and dandelion wines. Owner Mike Hastrich and winemaker Dave Shope describe Arcadian as a place “with a rustic ambience for people to socialize with each other.” Light snacks are available in their informal café or to take on the way. Within the town of Watkins Glen are two wineries that provide their visitors with the feeling of European gardens and chalets. Cascata Winery at the Professor’s Inn includes wines that range from a dry vinifera to those made from native grape varieties, featuring art and art labels created by the owner, K. Coralee Burch. Its neighbor, Castel Grisch Estate Winery, encompasses a Bavarian deli, winery, tasting room/gift boutique, manor and vineyards to let visitors enjoy their rich characteristic reds and soft-bodied whites. Both wineries have sizeable and romantic accommodations on the premises. A left turn from Route 14 onto Fourth Street in the center of Watkins

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Circle Reader Service Number 104

Circle Reader Service Number 169

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Glen will lead visitors onto the second half of the Seneca Lake Wine trail along the east shores of Seneca Lake. North of the town of Burdett lies Atwater Estate Vineyards, which produce quality viniferas, unique blends, and luscious dessert wines. Their tasting room welcomes guests with a warm and knowledgeable staff, casual atmosphere and one of the most breathtaking views of Seneca Lake. Less than a tenth of a mile away is Chateau LaFayette Reneau, which specializes in luxurious varieties to complement their panoramic view of the lake and vineyards. A collection of wineries, each with its own unique atmosphere and character for visitors, awaits further north on Route 414. A splendid menu in Red Newt Cellar’s restaurant and catering services harmonizes well with its welldefined whites and complex, spicy reds. Leidenfrost Vineyards invites visitors to relax and enjoy their fine wines and especially great reds in their beautiful half-timber tasting room with a spectacular view of Seneca Lake. Hazlitt 1852 Vineyards provides its guests with a unique wine experience at a different pace. Their horseshoe bar easily turns visitors into friends with unusual wines such as White Stag, Schooner Red and White, Cabin Fever and Red Cat. The Hazlitt family first settled in the area in 1852, beginning a long tradition of growing high quality grapes and tree fruit. This knowledge and tradition has been passed down for over 150 years to its current management, consisting of fifth and sixth generation Hazlitts. A right turn from Route 414 onto Ball Diamond Road will lead to Logan Ridge Wine Cellars, featuring quality varietal wines including Chardonnay, Riesling, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Pinot Blanc to match its restaurant menu. On Route 414, the Finger Lakes Champagne House carries a range of tastes and styles of champagnes made by Swedish Hill and Goose Watch wineries on Cayuga Lake. Champagnes such as Brut, Riesling Cuvee, and Golden Spumante can be sampled in their spacious tasting room. Further north on Route 414,

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Amberg Wine Cellars Billsboro Winery Fox Run Vineyards Seneca Shore Wine Cellars Anthony Road Wine Co. Prejean Winery Torrey Ridge Winery Miles Wine Cellars Earle Estates Winery & Meadery Four Chimneys Organic Winery Herman J. Wiemer Vineyard, Inc. Woodbury Hickory Hollow Wine Cellars Glenora Wine Cellars Fulkerson Winery Arcadian Estate Vineyards Lakewood Vineyards, Inc. Cascata Winery at the Professors' Inn Castel Grisch Estate Winery Chateau D’ Esperance Atwater Estate Vineyards Bloomer Creek Chateau Lafayette Reneau Red Newt Cellars Leidenfrost Vineyards Hazlitt 1852 Vineyards Tickle Hill Logan Ridge Wine Cellars Rasta Ranch Vineyard Finger Lakes Champagne House

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

Standing Stone Shalestone Vineyards Poplar Ridge Vineyards Caywood Vineyards Silver Thread Vineyards Wagner Vineyards Lamoreaux Landing Wine Cellars Nagy's New Land Vineyards


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Caywood Vineyards invites visitors to enjoy tastings in an exquisitely restored 1800s barn and grape-packing house overlooking the East’s largest vinifera vineyard with a magnificent view of Seneca Lake. Just a mile away is the extensive estate of Wagner Vineyards, specializing in entertaining guests with the most comprehensive tour of any Finger Lakes winery. A tasting of a wide selection of wines and non-alcoholic grape juice follows the tour. Visitors can also take a self-guided tour and taste any of their craft-brewed beers, and browse in the retail wine shop where all of Wagner’s wines and beers are available for sale. Designed with the vista overlooking the vineyards and Seneca Lake, Wagner’s Ginny Lee restaurant is the ideal place to enjoy a delightful and relaxing meal, whether on a casual outing or for a special occasion. The contemporary design of the large open dining area with its cathedral ceiling and vast expanse of windows provides a warm, inviting atmosphere at any time of the year. Continuing on Route 414 for onehalf mile travelers will find Lamoreaux Landing Wine Cellars, featuring an exceptional champagne made from its Chardonnay, in addition to a wide selection of vinifera wines. Visitors can experience a wonderful view along the lake toward the last winery on the trail, Nagy’s NewLand Vineyard and Winery, on Lerch Road off Route 414. Owner Dale Nagy is dedicated to producing elegant and full-bodied red and crisp aromatic whites for any dinner or social occasion. The Seneca Lake Wine trail is endowed with an abundance of beautiful scenery, distinctive and historic communities, as well as especially fine wines to suit any preference. A visit to the area will provide guests with many rewarding memories of a wonderful and restful summer escape. Linda D. Pratt is a freelance writer and informal promotional advocate for Finger Lakes wines. Many thanks to Bob and Linda Rubscha and Steve and Flavia Huber for their assistance in composing this article.

Summer Exhibits

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4 miles south of the City of Geneva on Route 14 South, set within 64 acres of grounds which include a wooded area with a woodland nature trail and spectacular views overlooking the eastern shore of Seneca Lake and beyond, “Cobtree” offers Deluxe Self-Catering Family Accommodations for visitors to the Finger Lakes region of New York state. This recently remodeled Colonial Style farmhouse offers accommodations for up to 10 people. Please visit our website at www.cobtree.com for further information. Circle Reader Service Number 112

Quality Transportation & Tours SERVING ROCHESTER AND THE FINGER LAKES REGION Finger Lakes Winery Tours

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H U M A N

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Across Time an By Rich Gardner

Our unique accommodations offer both value and flexibility. Call our friendly staff to discuss your group or individual needs, whether you’re planning to stay a day, a week or a month.

Points of interest minutes from FingerLakes Inn: • • • • •

Canandaigua Lake Roseland Waterpark Canandaigua Lady Steamboat Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion Finger Lakes Gaming & Race Track

• Granger Homestead & Carriage House

• • • •

New York’s finest wineries Fishing, swimming, boating Hiking and biking Golf

4343 ROUTES 5 & 20 CANANDAIGUA, NY Across from the Wal-Mart Plaza

585-394-2800 800-727-2775

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I N T E R E S T

I’M

STANDING on the terrace of a tiny stone chapel that has miraculously clung to this steep, wooded slope overlooking Keuka Lake, far below. The gingerbread structure sits alone among mature oaks and beeches that reach to the sky at an angle, like arms waving – “Look, Ma, no hands!” – attesting to the stability of this steep overlook. I’m at the end of a journey, the seed of which was planted a generation ago. My elbows rest on the railing, my binoculars aimed through an opening in the smooth, grey beech trunks, trained on a tiny white cottage – one of many – on the opposite shore, a mile across the soft blue-green water of the lake, where I spent the first eight summers of my life. Twenty-two-mile-long Keuka is the exact middle New York Finger Lake, flanked by five sister lakes to the east and five to the west, and I believe I could recognize these waters if I were deaf and blind. I could recognize Keuka by its smell, its taste, and the feel of the stones that wash up on its shore. I could further recognize how, in vapor form, Keuka’s waters penetrate and odorize bed linens, solidify old mattresses, and cling to the inner walls of smoke stacks, condensing in the cooling afternoon to push kindling smoke back out through the wood stove into the room. I recognize the way a Chris-Craft, with its V-8 engine idling in the water two cottages down, can gently vibrate the ground and magically rattle the flatware on the wooden kitchen table. And how Keuka can attract aunts, uncles and cousins from afar, often at

Photo by Steve Knapp

unexpected times. I recognize how the peacefulness of this lake can lull you into complacency, until one day it is gone, the cottage sold to settle a grandmother’s estate. Keuka deviates from the finger theme; she’s Y-shaped. As a child, I preferred “slingshot-shaped.” This could also have been used to describe my personality. I was a bit of a human rubber band, but, although overactive, I was a generous, sharing child and, throughout eight summers allowed my


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e and Space

parents, aunts, uncles and grandparents free use of the cottage, even allowing the latter to paint their name on the mailbox. I was just happy to be able to do my “work,” collecting stones, shells and driftwood from the water, and lining them all up like trophies on the breakwall. Then, before my little brother had a chance to come out and mess with it, I’d throw most of it back in. There was an art to this. I added new items: caterpillars imprisoned in a jelly

jar, a license plate from the shed and, on one memorable occasion, I threw my little brother in. I recall my mother waiting impatiently one Friday for my father to arrive for the weekend, with the car, so she could dispatch him immediately back up the shoreline to search for an oar I’d set free earlier that day. I took breaks from my work, lying on the dock in the sun, chin in hands, I stared across the lake, wondering what they were doing over there, and just who they were. Like, that big green barn-like cottage...was there a girl there, sitting on a dock, looking back at me, who would like me even if I did talk too much? Did they even speak our language? Were they rich over there? Did they have a boat with a motor? To where did they return in the fall? To me the twinkling evening lights coming from over there were as far away as the Big Dipper, reachable only by rocket ship. It turned out not to be in the cards for us to board our Plymouth four-door sedan and find out about the other side of the lake. My family lived under a terrible curse called procrastination, especially when it came to life and death matters like this. Besides, when my father finally arrived at the lake from the city, the last thing he wanted to do was get back in the car and drive around the lake. My grandmother, mother, brother and I lived in our tiny clapboard paradise all summer. My father worked in the city and came out on weekends. Grandpa was a minister and was with (Continued on page 68)

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2004

Summer Musical Season

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PIPED-IN

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MUSIC T H E REA L K I N D IN

BRISTOL VALLEY Story and photographs by Bruce Beardsley

he Bristol Valley: beautiful hills, good skiing, summer theatre, antiques, a pipe organ builder… Wait – a pipe organ builder? Sure enough, just south of Bristol Center on Route 64, you encounter a long, flat, functional shop with a sign identifying Parsons Pipe Organ Builders. The company is owned by brothers Richard and Calvin Parsons, who are the fourth generation of organ builders in the Parsons family.

NEW LIFE

FOR AN OLD TRADITION

What goes on inside that shop? And what role is there for this centuries-old “king of instruments” in the 21st century? Tom Olsen, a 2004 recipient of Eastman’s Doctor of Musical Arts degree and the current acting university organ-

ist at Cornell, sees churches heading in two clearly different directions: congregations with full bandstands up front with praise choruses in the repertoire, and those with a renewed interest in the more traditional visual and artistic environment. Today, the smaller, “tailor-made” pipe organ builders are busy. Richard Parsons explains, “At one time, every church had to have an organ. Sometimes they came quite standardized, a sort of necessary appliance. Today, a pipe organ is much more of a custom choice. The less costly, more standardized choice will more likely be electronic.” In fact, the year 2004 marks a major expansion at the Parsons shop, with an addition featuring 24-foot ceilings with a 34-foot total height in “the pit” where organs can be fully set up. The shop may also be providentially located

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when one considers Rochester’s new focus on organs. Eastman School of Music, which arguably boasts the premier conservatory organ department in the United States, has begun the Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative. The project was described in The American Organist as a 10-year plan to assemble in Rochester a diverse collection of new and historic instruments that will be unique in North America. The initiative is a collaboration with Sweden’s Goteborg Organ Art Center, founded by Hans Davidsson, a new Eastman faculty member. One organ that is in the planning stages is a three-manual instrument in late Baroque style and will reside at Christ Episcopal Church adjacent to the Eastman School. Meanwhile, Rochester’s Memorial Art Gallery is set to host a restored 1770s Italian Baroque instrument, originally from the Naples region. Another dream is a new concert organ for Rochester’s Eastman Theatre, whose old pipe organ – a mammoth instrument by Austin of Hartford, Connecticut – is history. Hopes are that a new one, unlike the old, could be handsomely apparent and speak directly into the hall. Such an instrument, together with an orchestra of the quality of the Rochester Philharmonic, would put Rochester in rare company for performing the repertoire of works for organ with orchestra. Parsons’ role in all this includes joint responsibility for a 255-year-old Italian instrument currently on loan to the Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word in Rochester, and next year, a partnership with Cornell University in replicating a 17th-century organ by German builder Arp Schnitger. The project will use metal pipe casting techniques that are true to the period. Also slated for restoration is the 1921 Skinner organ in Eastman’s Kilbourn Hall, originally installed under the supervision of Bryant Gideon Parsons, the grandfather of Parsons’ current owners.

HOW DO THEY DO IT? A pipe organ is truly an individual creation. Budget, stylistic preferences, and space limitations all affect its design, and every room is different acoustically. Certain builders will exert major pressure to remove organ chamber curtains, carpeting, seat cushions, etc., to aid resonance. Parsons takes a more moderate course. This is where pipe voicing is critical. Voicing, or coaxing pipes into uniformity by mechanical means, starts in the shop, one pipe at a time, and then

Left: A lunchtime crowd awaits a recital at the Central Presbyterian Church in Geneseo.

ORGANSTO SEE AND HEAR Christ Episcopal Church, adjacent to the Eastman School of Music – A new instrument built to a 17th century model by Paul Fritts of Washington state, is already playing. Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word in Rochester – A 255-year-old Italian instrument is currently on loan to this church.

Lutheran Church of the Atonement in Brighton – Parsons’ Opus 3 (1989) is in the balcony at the rear of the nave. One unusual division (or group of pipes) is hung in an attractive case right over the front wall of the balcony. Organist Dr. John Hanson can tune reed pipes right from the organ bench. The wooden back wall of the organ chamber doubles as part of the front wall of the upstairs choir rehearsal room – a clever, space-efficient arrangement. Western Presbyterian Church in Palmyra – Parsons’ largest and most versatile organ has “a wonderful dynamic range,” according to Ric Parsons.

Central Presbyterian Church in Geneseo – A Parsons three-manual, 38-rank pipe organ replaced the church’s old 11-rank instrument in 2002.

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The console is the organist’s “office” where he can control the sound through an innumerable combination of stops. Pictured here is the console at Central Presbyterian Church in Geneseo.

resumes in the building where the instrument ends up. Duane Prill, an Eastman graduate and noted organist in his own right, is Parsons’ tonal director. Often, he and another crew member will remain on hand for as long as two weeks after a new Parsons organ is installed, listening back and forth and making minute adjustments, bending and tweaking until the speech of every rank (or row) of pipes is blended, uniform, and right for the room.

While metal pipes come from outside sources (currently German in origin), wooden pipes and wind chests are made in-house. A wind chest is a plain wooden box that sits at the base of the pipes; air within this box is used to make the pipes speak. The style and finish of the organ console (which holds the pedals, stops, and manuals or keyboards) and the casework surrounding the pipes are all the work of real craftsmen. The American Institute of Organbuilders has two levels of certification for this work: journeyman and master. This is not work for the uninitiated. To make an organ play, air is driven by a blower into reservoirs (storage containers for wind) at a specific pressure, regulated by weights or similar means, then released

Circle Reader Service Number 108

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When the Parsons Organ Company completes a project, they hold an open house and invite the community to their factory for a recital. Duane Prill, the company’s tonal director, performs for the crowd.

on demand – when keys are depressed – by valves at the base of metal or wooden pipes. A tone is produced based on the length and character of the pipe. In those pipe chambers that are “under expression,” volume is controlled by wooden shades (slats that look like Venetian blinds) that are opened and closed by a pulley that is connected to the swell (a large foot pedal at the console). Organ pipes are made of metal or wood. Most of the pipes are flue pipes that produce sound when wind comes through the foot of the pipe and flows out the mouth. The wind causes the column of air inside the pipe to vibrate at a pitch dependent upon the length of the column. Flue pipes

generate several families of sound, including principals (a bright, clear sound) for strength, flutes for color, and strings for warmth. Reed pipes work differently from flue pipes. Sound is produced in a similar way to other single-reed instruments, such as clarinets or saxophones. The wind flowing through the pipe vibrates a flat, metal tongue, the length of which determines the pitch.

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Visit MacKenzie-Childs, renowned maker of unique handmade, hand-painted tableware, home furnishings and decorative accessories. Tour the studio to see talented artisans at work or tour the beguiling Victorian farmhouse to witness the quintessential MacKenzie-Childs design statement. High tea served seasonally from 3-5pm.

The Aurora Inn, built in 1833, has been impeccably renovated and offers ten exquisite guest rooms with private marble bathrooms. The Inn’s stunning restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Its lakeside porch, veranda and candlelit dining room afford breathtaking views of Cayuga Lake.

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Reed stops have strong, penetrating tones reminiscent of oboes or trumpets. The console, also known as the organist’s “office,” can have two, three, or even four 61-note keyboards called “manuals.” The 32-note row of foot pedals allows for the organist’s foot – or feet – to play a bass supporting line or, at a higher pitch, a solo. What’s a more sophisticated word for “ambidextrous”?

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Except for the aid of electricity, this whole basic mechanism has been around since the 1600s, and its ancestors since three centuries before. With electricity came wholesale changes. Pumping air manually into the reservoirs became a thing of the past. And an organ’s “combination action” became a sort of musical computer, decades before “computer” entered the lexicon. At the console, select the combination of stops (or knobs that turn the sound on and off) you want, then depress the numbered piston button you will use to order up that combination. Then release. The next time you push Piston Number Whatever, that combination will pop right out. With dozens of stops, and sounds, available, using these numbered pistons enables the organist to switch quickly from one combination of stops to another. With electricity, players no longer need to sit at a console directly beneath the pipes. Electrically assisted action, in its various forms, allows for flexibility in console and instrument placement, and these days can come this close to tracker (or mechanical) action, which is still the purist’s choice in response. It gets better. With solid-state electronics, many organs now sport electronic multi-level memories. Multiply an instrument’s complement of traditional combination pistons by 32 or more available levels of memory, and

individual pieces, programs, and performers can all stay out of one another’s way in the organ’s memory. Just toggle a button up or down. This comes in handy when several organists are using the same instrument to play a number of different songs, and each piece requires a unique combination of stops.

PIPE SHOPPING Organs cost money, big-time. Need must be proven, support garnered, research done, and expert

Ric Parsons’ office hosts a miniature “bits & pieces” organ console and innards. advice obtained. Grants are available under certain conditions, and memorial gifts are a traditional funding source for churches and schools. In addition to the overall cost, there are also a number of other factors that contribute to the final decision. If there is an old organ on the premises, its stops could possibly be reused and re-voiced. Acoustics, space and visual considerations also have to be made.


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One crucial piece of expert advice is: listen to any builder’s organs in unforgiving rooms as well as good ones. Anyone purchasing a custommade product wants to know what the finished piece will look like, so at Parsons, the design team of Ric and Ellen Parsons, Duane Prill and Matthew Bellachio produces fully detailed architectural drawings for their clients. Computer images can also show prospective buyers how the whole setup, from console to pipe divisions, will look.

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GIVING

BIRTH TO MUSIC On the program for a recital on Parsons’ Opus 17 organ at the Central Presbyterian Church in Geneseo, there appeared this quote: “To a church, the pipe organ is the result of long and careful planning, input and contributions from dedicated families of faith. To the organ builder, the process of designing and crafting a musical instrument is, in some ways, comparable to that of seeing a child grow and mature. As each instrument is being built, it develops and displays its own unique personality.” This is what goes on in that shop just south of Bristol Center, and further during installation. “Future expectations are very positive, despite a depressed market,” says Ric Parsons, as his company reaches out from western New York to the likes of Virginia, Wisconsin, Washington, and California. Computer-aided design and old-world craftsmanship are alive and well and coexisting in commendable fashion, as fine music is born in the Bristol Valley. Bruce Beardsley wrote previously for Life in the Finger Lakes about the Tioga Scenic Railroad. A career advertising writer/editor, he is the organist at Irondequoit United Church of Christ in Rochester. He may be contacted at kabamx@aol.com.

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Circle Reader Service Number 143

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Remembering

•••••••••••

By Joy Underhill

in my freshly painted living room, puzzling where to begin. On the floor at my feet are a half-dozen framed pictures and a few artwork reproductions. I selected these pieces for their beauty and for the way they will complement the colors I’ve chosen. Except for one picture. Canandaigua, Hold Your Horses. This colorful poster of three carousel horses represents an 11thhour effort to keep the Roseland carousel in town, even as the rest of Roseland Park was being auc-

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tioned off. Canandaigua lost the horses, lost the park, and ultimately lost nearly a third of the north end of the lake to private developers. People flocked to Roseland in the dwindling summer of 1985 for a final visit to the city’s beloved amusement park. Cottage dwellers stood on docks, listening to the colorful carnival tunes on Labor Day, knowing it would be the last time the music poured out over the reflected lights of Roseland Park. You might say that closing Roseland broke the city’s heart. I know it broke mine. Background photo courtesy of the Ontario County Historical Society


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••••••••••••••

Carousel horse photo by Tricia Burnett

••••••

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•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Photo courtesy the Ontario County Historical Society

THE ROSELAND CAROUSEL

The carousel… where you could earn a free ride if you leaned out and caught the brass ring...one of my brass rings is in the Ontario County Historical Society collection. —Barbara Swartout

For anyone growing up in the western Finger Lakes through the late ’70s, Roseland was the place to be for a fun-packed summer day. Seabreeze was too far away, and Darien Lake was still a barren field. With Kershaw Park right next door for a refreshing swim and the pier available for drive-up boat traffic, Roseland gave birth to cherished family memories for decades before its demise. Many would argue that the soul of Roseland was its merry-go-round. Maybe it was the intricacies and sheer volume of sound generated by the band organ. Or the squeals of children as they waved at parents and grandparents. Perhaps it was the mesmerizing lights of the park at night, spilling over the water in shimmering ripples.

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For me, it was the horses: the dapple grey, the steed dressed in full military armor, ponies flaunting rose garlands, the zebras, and horses saddled in leopard and mountain lion skins. Forty-two horses were brought to life by master carver Leo Zoeller in 1909 for a modest $1000. The Roseland carousel was known as PTC #18, the 18th carousel fabricated by the Philadelphia Toboggan Company of Germantown, Pennsylvania. The horses, arranged in three rows, were accompanied by two chariots. PTC #18 found its first home in Louisville, Kentucky, before being moved to Worcester, Massachusetts and Erie, Pennsylvania. After its travels, it was refurbished in the 1920s and repainted in the brilliant colors of the time. In


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••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1926, it opened at the Long Branch Amusement Park in Syracuse. The carousel continued to run for several years even after the park closed. When Roseland’s owners spotted PTC #18 in 1941, it was in need of a complete overhaul. The roundhouse leaked and none of the horses were mounted and running. The carousel was purchased for $1,500 and was renovated at Seabreeze before its debut at Roseland two years later. It was at Roseland that the horses captured the imaginations of generations of park-goers. Rides on the carousel mingled with memories of peanut butter sandwiches by the lake, heart-stopping rides on the roller coaster, and years later, stolen kisses on the cable ride that moved slowly into the dark over the lake.

HISTORY

OF

Did You

Know?

• The lead horse on any carousel is the largest and most ornate horse on the outside ring and is often depicted as a war horse. If the carousel includes a chariot, the lead horse follows directly behind it. • Roller coaster cars were originally called toboggans (hence the unique name of the Philadelphia Toboggan Company, manufacturer of the Roseland carousel and Skyliner). • “Jumpers” are horses standing on two legs. • The paper rolls used with band organs required durable paper. Rumor has it that the Roseland organ occasionally used butcher paper and that if you looked carefully, you might see “Fresh Meat” scroll by. • Roseland’s wooden roller coaster, the Skyliner, was purchased at the auction and brought to Lakemont Park in Altoona, Pennsylvania, where it started running in 1987. • The outside horses of the Roseland carousel, weighing in at 225 pounds, are considerably larger than the inner horses, which range from 100 to 150 pounds. The entire carousel, with a diameter of 54 feet, weighs in at nearly 30 tons. • One of the horses was never recovered after it was mysteriously stolen by a bandit who came in by boat.

ROSELAND PARK

Roseland’s beginnings were humble. It was built in 1925 on the site of a former farm and slaughterhouse. Up until that time, most amusement parks were built near seashores and were accessible primarily by train. Roseland was strategically located to draw automobile traffic from nearby Route 20. The first attractions were a gas station, hot-dog stand, and a dance pavilion housed in a barn. Early on, Roseland offered a baseball diamond and a beach before Kershaw Park was built. Shortly after its opening, the first of three carousels was brought to Roseland. At that time, the Ferris wheel was added, plus a Loop-the-Loop and miniature golf course. A second carousel was installed in 1937 with a run of about three years. Then one of the owners saw PTC #18 at Long Branch Park in Syracuse, and a four-decade love affair with the Roseland carousel began. In the 1940s, another 25 acres were added to the park and more rides were introduced, including a minia-

Photo by Tricia Burnett

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•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Roseland

Recall

1. What were Kiwanis Sunshine Days? 2. How many jumpers were there on the carousel? 3. Which Sousa march announced the beginning of free weekly shows on a platform that extended over the water? 4. What was the secret ingredient that made Pop’s hot dogs so delicious? 5. Who was Galloping Gertie? 6. How were the outlet ponds used across from the park? 7. How far did the carousel horses run each day? 8. Who planted the rose garden that surrounded the train ride? (Answers on page 42)

Circle Reader Service Number 158

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Photo by Bill Banaszewski


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•••••••••••••••••••• ture train. In the 1960s, the park changed ownership and the Skyliner was added—the first roller coaster built in New York State in more than 25 years. The ensuing years saw more rides: the Flying Bobs, the Yo-Yo, and the Crazy Splash water slide. At its height, Roseland offered 13 major attractions and seven kiddie rides. The community embraced Roseland Park for years, never thinking that the economics of promoting a small amusement park might one day lose ground to massive theme parks. When Roseland closed, an era ended. Bone-jarring thrill rides overshadowed the low-key beauty of the park on the lake, and for many, childhood memories were bulldozed into new development.

WHAT HAPPENED

TO

ROSELAND?

Roseland Park was privately owned and went to auction on September 16, 1985. Most of the items were sold off piecemeal. Only the carousel and the Skyliner remained intact. The Roseland carousel had a remarkable 43-year run at Roseland Park. As is typical of carousel auctions, every attempt was made to sell the carousel as a single unit. Each horse and component of the carousel was sold separately to a single bidder: James Tuozzolo of Syracuse-based Pyramid Companies. Then the individual bids were tallied, 20 percent added, and the entire carousel re-bid. The carousel sold for a record-breaking $397,500. It took more than two years and a million dollars to bring the carousel back to its original 1909 appearance. Each horse was repaired, repainted, and varnished by specialized craftsmen. All of the pictures were cleaned and restored, and new oak flooring was installed. Metal gears, jumping poles, electrical components, and vital mechanical items were completely overhauled. To finalize the restoration, the band organ, which had been marginally

The Place to Explore

The Place to Dine

The Place to Taste

The Place to Rest

G e n eva A r e a C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e a n d Vi s i t o r s C e n t e r

G A T E W AY

TO THE

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35 Lakefront Drive • 877-5-GENEVA • 315-789-1776 • www.genevany.com info@genevany.com • Open 7 days a week Memorial Day—Columbus Day Circle Reader Service Number 122

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••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Photo courtesy of the Carousel Center

Take a tour. Learn about wine. Enjoy a wine tasting. Shop in our gift boutique.

Enjoy a gourmet sandwich, a bowl of soup and a unique salad with your favorite glass of Fox Run wine. Open all year Mon-Sat 10-6, Sun 11-6. Café Daily 11-5

Route 14 on Seneca Lake 800-636-9786 www.foxrunvineyards.com Circle Reader Service Number 120

A Great Stop Along the Canandaigua Wine Trail

THE CHESHIRE UNION Gift Shop & Antique Center

What Keeps The Cheshire Cat Smiling? • Truly Unusual Gift Selections • • Group Antique Shop • • Tasty Treats at The Schoolhouse Deli • Visit our Lang Center. An Extensive Selection of Lang Products Boyds Bears • TY Products • Yankee Candles Books • Folk Art • Jewelry Seasonal and Decorative Accessories Music CD’s • Gourmet Foods • Hughes Sterling Bracelets and Charms Handmade Grape-Patterned Crystal Wine Glasses & Accessories! A Wonderful Wedding Gift Idea!

20th Annual Cheshire Union Antique Show August 14, 2004

585-394-5530 4244 Route 21 South, (Cheshire) Canandaigua, NY e-mail: cugifts@aol.com Open Daily 10-5 Circle Reader Service Number 159

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Riding the carousel Today You can ride the restored Roseland carousel on the second floor of the Carousel Center mall in Syracuse. Mall hours are Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m to 9:30 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m to 6 p.m.

DIRECTIONS:

• From the north – Take I-81 south, exit 23B (Carousel Center Drive). • From the south –Take I-81 north, exit 23 (Hiawatha Blvd.). Turn left onto Park Street. • From the east – Take 690 west to I-81 north, exit 23 (Hiawatha Blvd). Turn left onto Park Street. • From the west – Take 690 east, exit 8 (Hiawatha Blvd.). Turn left onto Hiawatha Blvd. • From the NYS Thruway - Take exit 36 (I-81) and follow directions from the north.

Answers to questions on page 40 1. During Kiwanis Sunshine Days, known later as Report Card Days, Roseland awarded free rides for bringing in report cards. 2. All 42 horses were jumpers. 3. Sousa’s “El Capitan” march announced the beginning of the free weekly shows. 4. Pop’s secret to making delicious hot dogs was dipping them in olive oil before serving. 5. Galloping Gertie was a gypsy lady with an evil laugh that welcomed you to the spook house. 6. Canoes and paddleboats were rented at the outlet ponds across from the park. 7. The carousel horses traveled about 12 miles each day. 8. Jackson & Perkins, famed rose growers who were located in Newark at the time, planted the rose garden that surrounded the train ride.


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•••••••••••••••••••• functional, was completely re-fabricated and re-cast with decorative mirrors, flowers and gold leaf adornment. The restored carousel made its debut in the Carousel Center mall in October of 1990, where it still runs today.

NEW HOME, OLD MEMORIES You can still visit the carousel, but you can’t revisit Roseland. It’s a blessing that the horses weren’t sold off one by one to collectors. They belong together, chasing one another in a perpetual race. We’re indebted to the investors who saw the value of saving a bit of Canandaigua history. But seeing the Roseland carousel in a mall is a little like trying to capture the excitement of an amusement park in a music box. The bright colors of the horses are now muted, and the zebras are gone. Carnival music competes with the din of laughing teenagers and cranky toddlers. People come to the mall to shop, and may, on their way to catch a bite, stop a moment to look at an old merry-go-round spinning gaily on the second floor. Standing on the Canandaigua City Pier today, you can almost picture where the Skyliner rose above the treetops. With a little imagination, you can still hear the siren call of calliope music that signaled the beginning of summer. Close your eyes and that breeze you feel becomes a wild ride on a black pony rearing into the night. Canandaigua, you may have lost your horses, but you’ll never lose your memories.

Joy Underhill is a freelance writer who lives in Farmington and rode the Roseland carousel during its last month in Canandaigua. She’s grateful for the cooperation of the Ontario County Historical Society and Preston Pierce in researching this article, and to Ben Hall for his contributions.

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Post and Beam Homes

Locally crafted in our South Bristol New York shop 5557 Rt. 64, Canandaigua, NY 14424 Phone: 585-374-6405 • Fax: 585-374-8090 www.timberframesinc.com • timberframes@msn.com

Building the Finger Lakes since 1977 Circle Reader Service Number 162

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© Jon Reis/ www.jonreis.com

Over 70 Specialty Shops, 35 Delicious Dining Spots, Cinema, 11 Art Galleries, 2 Theatres, Outdoor Summer Concert Series, and Special Events.

Downtown Ithaca – Discover the Experience! www.downtownithaca.com • 607-277-8679 Circle Reader Service Number 130

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Visit our website at www.downtown ithaca.com and register for drawings for FREE gift certificates!


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he Ithaca Commons, an outdoor T pedestrian center of locally owned one-of-a-kind specialty shops in the heart of downtown, is Ithaca’s alternative to “cookie-cutter” malls. Offering everything from local handcrafts to European porcelain, evening wear to camping gear, and educational toys to electric guitars, no two stores are alike. More than 30 downtown dining spots are varied enough for every taste – sophisticated cafes and quaint taverns, all manner of ethnic cuisine, international snacks, gourmet and vegetarian specialties – not to mention the opportunities to dine al fresco on summer evenings, or just grab a quick bagel, you are guaranteed to leave with a full tummy and a smile on your face. Discover the culture, arts and entertainment that remain an Ithaca tradition through the eleven fine art galleries, 2 theatres, and art film cinema. The special attractions and events that fill the year round calendar here with festivals and concert series are only enhanced by the area’s many historic sites and architectural treasures. Come explore and experience why “Ithaca is Gorges!”

Clothing, Souvenirs and other Merchandise

THE CAT’S PAJAMAS The Children’s General Store

210 The Commons, Ithaca 607-273-6667 www.t-shirtexpressions.com

Come and see the jungle of toys at The Cat’s Pajamas!!!

The Cat’s Pajamas DeWitt Mall • Ithaca, NY (607) 272-5582

A family owned and operated authentic Thai and vegetarian cuisine. Located on Ithaca’s famous pedesterian mall “The Commons.” “Discover Real Tastes of the Thai Culinary Art”

216 The Commons • Ithaca, New York (607) 256-5487 www.tasteofthaiithaca.com

• Race Day Aug 11

Titus Gallery Watercolors and Etchings also Antiques, Jewelry, Amber Susan Booth Titus • Matthew J. Peterson

222 The Commons, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-2649 • www.titusgallery.com

• Outdoor Dining May 15-Oct 3 • Summer Concert Series June 1-Aug 31 • Ithaca Festival June 3-6 • Art in the Heart of the City June 14-Dec 10 • Sidewalk Sales Days July 29-31 Circle Reader Service Number 131

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Natural I


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l Inspiration The Photography of Fred Bertram

Fred Bertram has always had a strong connection with nature and a love for art and photography. Born in Geneva, he has spent many years hiking the trails and driving the back roads of the Finger Lakes searching for subjects. He is an artist for MacKenzieChilds in Aurora and has recently moved to Moravia. “Nature photography is challenging, frustrating and, at times, very rewarding,” Fred said. “Returning at the end of a session with good photographs is a result of good planning, knowledge of subject and a whole lot of luck.”

The Finger Lakes Land Trust’s Dorothy McIlroy Bird Sanctuary in Summerhill (in southern Cayuga County) is Fred’s favorite new place to photograph. His favorite subject? “Storms and the incredible light that they can produce,” he said. Here, he describes some special shots. Above: Painted Turtles, taken in the old canal within Seneca Lake State Park, Geneva. Left: Willow in Fog, taken at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge in the early morning with the sun just rising above the horizon. SUMMER 2004 ~

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Left: Long Hill, in the town of Venice Center. After a summer rain, the afternoon sun came out and displayed the road as a silver ribbon leading up the hill. Below: Monarch Butterfly, taken in the gardens at MacKenzie-Childs, Aurora. Right: Seneca Sunset, taken from the road that leads to the Seneca Lake Yacht Club.

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Left: Eggleston’s Glen. This beautiful waterfall is on the east side of Keuka Lake, halfway between Penn Yan and Hammondsport. Above: Great Blue Heron. This shot was taken early in the morning on what was to be a hot, humid day with a lot of haze. Right: Sunflower, shot in my front yard. It probably grew from a seed that fell from the birdfeeder and was undetected by bird or mouse.

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Fred Bertram 5077 Old State Rd. Moravia, NY 13118 (315) 497 9335 bertram@novocon.net

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LOOKING AT G

Glassmakers in the museum's Hot Glass Show provide live demonstrations - shaping glass as hot as molten lava into stunning works of art. Photo courtesy the Corning Museum of Glass


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Photo courtesy the Corning Museum of Glass

By David L. Pierce

E

T GLASS

ntering the lobby at the Corning Museum of Glass is like walking into a great, glistening cave – created by enormous sheets of glass cleverly held in place by nearly invisible wires. There’s no doubt the subject is glass. That’s what the founders had in mind when the original museum opened to the public in 1951. Even then, the 2,000-piece glass art and history collection and the extensive library of glass-related books and documents comprised one of the world’s foremost collections – all to be used in a unique museum that would educate the public about glass.

FROM EVERY ANGLE Many years and a few redesigns later, the Corning Museum of Glass is still widely recognized as the world’s premiere glass museum. However, the Above: The “new” Corning Museum of Glass after its $65 million renovation in 2000. The current facade makes innovative use of glass architecture and encompasses and enhances the original museum building. SUMMER 2004 ~

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Photo courtesy the Corning Museum of Glass

new museum, which underwent a six-year, $65 million renovation in the mid-1990s, is bigger and better than before. The 200-inch Palomar telescope blank disk that many remember from childhood visits is still a dramatic centerpiece of the museum and you can still see glassmakers working the Steuben factory floor. But, now housed within a substantially larger and dramatic building, the Corning Museum of Glass has grown almost exponentially – both in the scope of its collection and in the way it approaches the subject of glass. The glass art and history collection now numbers more than 35,000 rare and spectacular objects and also includes a considerable grouping of dynamic contemporary studio pieces. “Perhaps the biggest shift in the museum’s collection has been the increase in the acquisition of contemporary studio glass and sculpture,” says Dr. David Whitehouse, the museum’s executive director. “The museum’s original founders could not have predicted the explosion in size and vision of contemporary glass art.” The Contemporary Gallery fills the original space that once housed the museum’s entire collection. It’s a quiet gallery where the modern ferment in glass art is reflected in a dazzling array of glass sculpture art. Here are striking examples of work by masters from around the world, pieces that will hold you in awe at the glass artist’s skill. The Above: Visitors of all ages are fascinated by the live, narrated demonstrations of glassblowing, presented throughout the day on a stage that overlooks the world famous Steuben factory. Left: The GlassMarket, with seven separate boutiques, is designed to be an extension of the total museum experience. Each of the shops offers merchandise that reflects some aspect of the museum experience. Photo courtesy Scott Frances/Esto


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MUSEUM OF THE EARTH Where the Earth Comes to Life! objects range widely in size, color and concept. Some address deeply personal topics; others are more lighthearted in nature. None are boring. When you leave the gallery, you’ll step back in time to see where these inspirations in modern glass began. The Art and History Galleries provide a tour of 35 centuries of glassmaking around the world. Precious, often beautiful objects surround you, ranging from the tiny head of an ancient Egyptian pharaoh to a lovely Roman cup. Here, see a cut glass masterpiece from France; there, impressive Tiffany stained glass windows. The collection of the Corning Museum is so extensive that the majority of rare pieces in the show will come from it; however, many key objects are on loan from such major institutions as the Louvre, the British Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. However, as Whitehouse points out, “The Corning Museum of Glass is not just about a big collection. This is the place you come to for information about nearly everything related to glass – the history, the art, the technology, the craft, and the latest trends.” The technology story is told in an Innovation Center that weaves a compelling, high-tech spell with stories and interactive demonstrations. You meet the inventors who discovered important truths about glass or found ingenious ways to shape it into windows, bottles, optical instruments and even optical fiber. Clever interactive exhibits make all this fascinating and fun for young people as well as adults. It is the craft of glassmaking that perhaps mesmerizes visitors most. One of the most memorable experiences at the museum is to sit a few feet from skilled craftsmen as they shape molten glass into beautiful objects in the Hot Glass Show. You feel the heat from the furnace and watch red hot glass being cleverly coaxed into shape by the glassblower’s tools and puffs of breath.

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Ithaca, NY 14850 1-877-9WILCOX www.wilcoxpress.com

When great color is the point, print with Wilcox Press.

Circle Reader Service Number 167

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“Visitors love this part of the tour,” says Steve Gibbs, manager of the Hot Glass Show. “Some of them will sit through two or three shows before they move on. “It’s not just the drama of the hot glass. It also gives them a new appreciation for the objects they see in the galleries.” Each step of the age-old process is explained by an on-stage narrator while video screens show you the 2,300 degrees Fahrenheit interior of the reheating oven through glass used as windows on the Space Shuttle. One of the most popular features of the Hot Glass Show is “You Design It; We Make It.” Children are invited to make a drawing of an object for glassblowers to produce from molten glass. During the summer, glassmakers choose a design or two each day and the lucky young artists can see their design made from start to finish – right before their eyes. The stage overlooks the working floor of the Steuben glass factory. As they leave the Hot Glass Show, visitors are invited to watch Steuben experts form and engrave fine crystal. This empties out to the GlassMarket where seven distinct shops reflect every aspect of the Museum, from art glass to telescopes. Hot glass is also shaped here on a smaller scale by a flameworker. Using a hot torch, the worker uses fire-softened rods of glass to create perfect little animals while carrying on a conversation with onlookers. Also offered in the GlassMarket are jewelry, collectibles, cooking utensils, tableware and those perfect little animals created by the flameworker. One visitor described the GlassMarket as

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Left: The museum's glassmakers are highly experienced craftsmen. Each has served at least six years as a glassmaking apprentice and most have worked in such high-end glassmaking studios as Steuben. Circle Reader Service Number 110

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Photo courtesy the Corning Museum of Glass

providing “Some of the state’s best shopping outside of New York City.” Once inspired by the museum’s collection and live glassmaking demonstrations, visitors are encouraged to go across the museum’s campus and (for a small fee) make their own glass souvenir at a walk-in workshop at the museum’s studio, where both ordinary citizens and internationally known artists work with glass beside glowing hot ovens. The Studio is recognized as a major center for serious glassmaking studies. However, it also invites beginners to try their own hand at glassmaking. They choose from projects such as making glass flowers, flameworking a bead or sandblasting a design into a piece of glass. “Our motto is ‘see glass, see glass made, then make it yourself,’” says Whitehouse. “We try to approach the world of glass from every angle.” Visitors come to Corning from across the country and other nations to do just that. The Museum is a key attraction of the Finger Lakes region and a top destination for all those traveling between Niagara Falls and New York City. Attendance has been boosted lately by free admission for children 17 and under. The Corning Museum of Glass is more than a tourist destination. It is also a core resource for people of the region, a frequent destination of class tours from area schools and the site of year-round events for both adults and Above: The Innovations Center offers visitors a look at the science behind glass, as well as the scientific uses of glass. Hands-on Do It! stations can be found throughout the exhibit area. Photo courtesy Scott Frances/Esto

Left: The Art and History Galleries show the most comprehensive and celebrated glass collection in the world, including this stained glass window by Louis Comfort Tiffany.


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Photo courtesy the Corning Museum of Glass

During the summer of 2004, the museum is presenting a major exhibition, “Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Style, 1500-1750.” More than 130 rare and precious glass objects illustrate the spread of Venetianstyle glassmaking across Europe during the Renaissance. The show runs until October 17.

families with children. An example is the regular, free “2300o” events that bring big regional crowds to enjoy glass art happenings, music and refreshments. The museum’s mission is to tell the story of glass as it’s never been told before. “Glass has long been used to create beautiful and useful objects,” says Dr. Whitehouse, “but the story hasn’t ended. Both the art and the technology keep evolving to new levels of excellence and the museum will continue to reflect that historic evolution and present glass in all its fascinating facets.” David L. Pierce is a freelance writer who began visiting Canandaigua Lake more than 25 years ago and was captured by its beauty. He has been living there since 1986. Circle Reader Service Number 172

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L I F E S T Y L E

“We ride to eat and eat to ride.” By Moe Koch and Russ Young

W

e’ve enjoyed living in the Finger Lakes for the past 20 years, but didn’t fully appreciate its spectacular beauty until we purchased our first Harley-Davidson Low-Rider in 2001. The region is made for cycling: the roads are good, the views are sensational and there’s very little traffic. Traveling on two wheels, exposed to the elements, brings us close to nature and the wonders of the lake views. We can’t seem to get enough of it. So far, we’ve ridden some 33,000 miles. After the first year, we traded our Low-Rider for a 2002 H-D Road King Classic, a touring bike better suited for long trips and overnight travel. Each year, we start in April and ride through November. Most are day trips on the weekends, often with our local HOG

(Harley Owners Group) Chapter. We often have a destination, usually a place to eat. We joke that our motto is, “We ride to eat and eat to ride.” But the destination isn’t as important as the journey. We seem to have the most fun when we take a new route, although we generally find ourselves traveling some of our favorite roads. Our third season began in 2003, and we started to keep a journal so that we could share our experiences. Here are a few entries. Sunday, May 3rd We left our home in Seneca Falls at 7:45 a.m. for our first Chapter ride, which was leaving from Canandaigua. It was 41 degrees. There’s nothing better than ice-cold fresh air to make you appreciate a clear morning.

Photo by Moe Koch

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Purveyors of Comfort & Joy We rode west on Routes 5 & 20, stopping at Patti’s Lakeview Diner in Geneva at the north end of Seneca Lake. It’s a friendly place with great food, good service and a wonderful hometown atmosphere. Although we’d traveled only 11 miles, we were starving. The body consumes lots of calories to keep itself warm at 50 miles an hour. With our hunger satisfied, we headed north on Route 14, then west on County Road 4 for our club meeting in Canandaigua. Afterwards, about 20 bikes headed to Lyons for a “Blessing of the Bikes” by the Rev. Mary Webster. It’s become an annual tradition. Then, half of the bikes headed to Papa Joe’s in Sodus Point for lunch, while the rest of us headed to Geneva – to Osmen’s for lunch – then on to Naples. Naples is a great place to stop for a grape pie (or a grape tart), some ice cream or some shopping. We left Naples and headed north on County Road 33, east on Route 20A, north on Route 64, and east along Routes 5 & 20 to the Canandaigua Lake waterfront, where we spent an hour soaking in the splendor of a fine spring afternoon. We left at about 5 p.m., heading east along Routes 5 & 20, and made one final stop at Ciccino’s in Waterloo for a slice of pizza. We arrived home at 7, after a wonderful 200 miles. Sunday, May 18 Our next adventure began at our cottage in Lodi, along the eastern shore of Seneca Lake. We headed south on Route 414 with our friends Dave and Louise on our way to the Grist Mill Café on Route 79 in Burdett. We discovered the Grist Mill about two years ago, and it’s one of our preferred stops, regardless of where we’re headed. Route 414 is a marvelous road, one of our favorites. We had a breakfast feast of blueberry pancakes, French toast made of raisin cinnamon bread, sausage patties and New York State Maple Syrup. Since it was a gorgeous morning we ate outside and lingered over coffee while we planned our ride. We decided to

A unique gift shop in the atmosphere of a 1920’s drug store where old fashioned customer service abounds. Crystal World • Nao by Lladro

Anheuser-Busch Steins Department 56 Snowbabies and Snowbunnies • Rinconada Seagull Pewter • Bulova Clocks M-Pressions framed calligraphy English mats & coasters cotton throws • oil lamps Hallmark

60 Seneca St. Downtown Geneva (315) 789-6919 Open Mon.-Sat. 9:00-5:30 • Fri. ‘til 6:00 • Sun. noon-4:00 Circle Reader Service Number 124

Circle Reader Service Number 173

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PLEASE REFERENCE THIS AD Circle Reader Service Number 157

Third Annual Life in the Finger Lakes

Photo Contest! Categories:

1st, 2nd, and 3rd place prizes for:

• Best Color • Best Black-and-White Grand prize to best overall photograph. Send submissions postmarked no later than September 30, 2004 to: Life in the Finger Lakes Photo Contest P.O. Box 1080 • Geneva, NY 14456 The awarded images will appear in the Winter 2004 issue. For more information, visit our website at: www.LifeintheFingerLakes.com Photo by 2003 Grand Prize Winner Bill Penn

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local Rieslings and frustrated that it’s so head south on Route 79 then left onto difficult to find Finger Lakes wines in Skyline Road where we enjoyed a beautiful view of Watkins Glen. From the city. Montour Falls we headed south on We headed north on Route 21, Route 224, through Odessa and then rode east on Routes 5 & 20 where Alpine, on our way to we enjoyed watching a beautiful Ithaca Harley-Davidson sunset in our mirrors. in Cayuta. Ithaca Harley was having a Sunday, sale on biker June 22 clothes, and we We’re leavfound an aweing Seneca some black Falls headed cape. The north on Route chrome was 89, with no sparkling particular on the many destination in bikes we saw mind. We turn east on the road, another sign onto Route 31 and when Russ Young and his 2002 of spring in the Finger we reach Route 31C, we H-D Road King Classic Lakes. head to the village of Photo by Moe Koch We headed south on Elbridge, then south to Route 13 and stopped at the covered Skaneateles. We think about stopping, bridge in Newfield. It’s a glorious old but the ride is too much fun. We constructure and a great place to take a tinue east on Route 20, enjoying the few pictures. We promised ourselves to gorgeous views, the rolling hills and remember to bring a picnic lunch with the apple orchards until we reach us the next time around. Cazenovia, another great destination. We headed north again on Route Photo by Moe Koch 13, then west on Route 327, a road full of hills and turns. We were on the way to Route 79, where we headed west to Watkins Glen. Along the way, we stopped at the Go Cart Track in Montour Falls, where we raced a few laps on four wheels. Then we were back on Route 79 and Route 227 to Trumansburg. We found our way to Route 89 on our way to The Lighthouse at Kidder’s Landing in Sheldrake, where we enjoyed a light supper overlooking Cayuga Lake. The five Lord brothers on Labor Day When we headed back to our cottage weekend, pictured left to right: Darryl, in Lodi, we knew we would ride again Scott, Dean, Rich and Keith. the next day. Monday, May 19 After work, we left Seneca Falls on the River Road west to Geneva. We took Route 245 south from Geneva to Naples. We decided to stop at Bob’s & Ruth’s for a quick meal, where we met a sales rep from Manhattan who told us how much he enjoys visiting the local wineries when he travels to Rochester on business. He is enamored with the

We discovered a place called Common Grounds (Project Café). While we ate a veggie humus wrap and hot tuna with green apples on pita bread, we learned that the Project Café is a student-directed nonprofit organization promoting drug-free/alcohol-free activities, art, music, community service, and scholarship. It’s also committed to


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improving the quality of life in the Cazenovia area. The Project is in collaboration with Common Grounds, a unique relationship between a for-profit local business and a not-for-profit community organization. In addition to a wide variety of soups and sandwiches, the Café offers fantastic homemade deserts and ice cream.

• FULL SERVICE FLY FISHING SHOP • FREE SHIPPING ON ORVIS CATALOG ORDERS • CLOTHING FOR MEN & WOMEN • FLY FISHING CLASSES • GUIDE SERVICES 129. S. Main St. Canandaigua • 585-396-3010 900 Panorama Trail Rochester • 585-248-8390 www.panoramaoutfitters.com Circle Reader Service Number 145

LANE’S YAMAHA INC 607-535-7574

LANE’S YAMAHA INC • 607-535-7574

Moe Koch and Russ Young belong to the Ontario County HOG Chapter sponsored by Geneva Harley Davidson. They travel about 13,400 miles a year. For information about joining this group, call 315-568-9839.

Circle Reader Service Number 127

RTE. 14 NORTH OF WATKINS GLEN, NY

Labor Day Weekend We were invited to ride with Scott and Kathy Lord, and Scott’s four brothers. It was the first time all five brothers had the opportunity to ride together, and we were delighted to be with them that day. We toured seven counties: Ontario, Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Cortland, Tompkins and Schuyler. Our first stop was Foot Prints on the northwest shore of Otisco Lake, where they had an extravagant brunch complete with live music. The brothers, Skip, Scott, Rich, Merle and Keith, reminisced about childhood stories and agreed their father would have been proud to have seen all of his sons riding together. We finished up with a fudge chocolate cake that was so rich that the chef told us he couldn’t figure out how to get more chocolate into it. We wouldn’t need to eat for the rest of the weekend (or at least until the next stop). We headed south to Ithaca, where we stopped at Maxies Supper Club and Oyster Bar, then west to Watkins Glen and north on Route 414. We stopped at Skyland Farm and tasted their Passion Fruit Gelato (Italian ice cream). Skyland is a compelling destination, one that we visit often. Afterwards, we all headed back to Scott and Kathy’s to reflect upon a very special day and another 200 miles in God’s country.

Circle Reader Service Number 135

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F I N G E R L A K E S S C R A P B O O K Readers show us their favorite Finger Lakes photographs.

“A shot that I took in February 2004 of Seneca Lake. This is my dock and boathouse with that beautiful sky.” – Robert Berry, Himrod “An old orange tractor at home in the Finger Lakes.” – Kristin Grove, Geneva “Trying to get them to smile is one thing, trying to get them to look at the camera is another.” – Nick Nebelsky, Ithaca

“Who can resist taking a shot of the kids with the sunset in the background?” – Tim Braden, Seneca Castle “A favorite creek that I like to shoot year round.” – James Cherry, Homer Please send photos to:

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Finger Lakes Scrapbook P.O. Box 1080 • Geneva, NY 14456 e-mail: Mark@LifeintheFingerLakes.com


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D A Y

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T R I P

Story and photographs by Judy Hirtler

I

the massive skeleton of a thaca is a city with 44-foot-long North treasures to discover Atlantic right whale. If at every turn. The you think you feel small newest is the Museum looking at this amazing of the Earth on Ithaca’s mammal, just wait. West Hill. There is much more Driving up Highway inside. The uniqueness of 96, the museum is just the museum is their “visithree miles from the city tor friendly” approach. I center. When I arrived, The museum is located just saw many signs throughI was fascinated by the 2 miles north of downtown out the building saying architectural wonder of Ithaca on Route 96 (1259 Trumansburg Road), “PLEASE TOUCH.” the building. Built withimmediately south of the There are a variety of in the earth itself, the Cayuga Medical Center. things within the musemuseum facility was um to capture the imagidesigned by nation of both young and old. With disWeiss/Manfredi, an award-winning covery stations such as the Fossil Lab, architectural firm in New York City. Dino Lab and the Ice Lab, there is The building has already received critmuch to be explored using more than ical acclaim and was featured in an just your sense of sight. Be sure to take exhibit at the Smithsonian Institute. a look at their preparation laboratory Upon entering, you are greeted by

Visit our Lakeside Showroom for a HUGE Selection of • Wakeboard • Runabout • Fishing • Party Boats! Catch the Excitement on Beautiful Silver Lake (Just 5 Minutes from Letchworth State Park) in the Western Finger Lakes Region.

Museum of the Earth

Moomba Headquarters for the Finger Lakes

Discover Dinosaurs and More

585-237-5185 www.silverlakemarine.com Circle Reader Service Number 154

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SPACE

Marshall Scott (315) 866-7518 tpegcny@aol.com Counties Served: Jefferson • Lewis Herkimer • Oswego Oneida • Onondaga Madison • Otsego Fu l t o n • M o n t g o m e r y

Pe t e r O s b o r n e (585) 374-2830 posborne@frontiernet.net Counties Served: M o n r o e • Wa y n e Livingston • Ontario S e n e c a • Ya t e s Steuben

Kevin McMahon (607) 749-2550 kjm@clarityconnect.com Counties Served: Cayuga • Cortland Chenango • Broome T i o g a • To m p k i n s Schuyler • Chemung

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE SOARING SPACE THAT CREATES SUCH WARMTH IN OUR UNIQUE TIMBER FRAME HOMES

www.timberpeg.com

where you can watch fossil specimens being cleaned and prepared for study and display. The Paleontological Research Institution (PRI) is the parent organization of the Museum of the Earth and was founded in 1932 by a Cornell geology professor. With an extensive collection of over 3 million artifacts, they wanted to share this with the public at large. In 1994, the PRI set out to build the museum of their dreams. They began with a $3 million budget, but by journey’s end, the budget grew to $10.6 million. The museum relies primarily on grants, donations, memberships and volunteers.

1.800.636.2424

DEPT.LFL11

Circle Reader Service Number 163

Rose McAdoo and Veronica Tuazon enjoy exploring the Museum of the Earth. The day I visited the museum, they were working on a seismograph. I stopped to watch the progress and enjoyed learning about the inner workings of the machine. One of the museum employees asked me if I had ever seen or even heard of a seismograph before. When I explained that I had been born and raised in northern California and lived not too far from Circle Reader Service Number 148

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ake it a day in the country. From fine furniture, gifts and fresh flowers to casually elegant luncheon dining, our shops offer a unique shopping experience. Relax and enjoy the country. The Loomis Barn - Fine home furnishings and accessories Corn House Cafe - Open for lunch specialty sandwiches, homemade soups Colonial Bouquets - Fresh flowers, dried arrangements, wreaths The Back Room - Unique accessories, gifts and accent items Store Hours Tues. - Sat. 10 - 5:30 • Sun. 12 - 4 Closed Mon. Cafe open for lunch Just a 10-15 minute drive from Canandaigua, Penn Yan or Geneva. Call for directions. 800-716-2276 • (585) 554-3154 www.loomisbarn.com 4942 Loomis Road • Rushville, NY 14544 Circle Reader Service Number 137

Elliot Tuazon, age 4, stands in awe of the Hyde Park mastodon. the San Andreas Fault, I felt like a celebrity. They couldn’t wait to ask what big earthquakes I had experienced. It was enjoyable to talk to people who appreciated and understood the amazing force of a quake. One of the most impressive displays is the Hyde Park mastodon. In 1999, Larry and Sheryl Lozier of Hyde Park, New York, were digging to deepen their backyard pond when they dug up a mastodon leg bone. They contacted the PRI, and staff and volunteers from the institute worked for six weeks to excavate and document the site. The skeleton was brought back to Ithaca to be assembled into the stunning exhibit you see today. The display tells us that this is one of the best-preserved and most complete mastodon skeletons ever found. More than 97 percent complete, it is only missing a few tail and foot bones. They believe it was an older male who likely suffered from bone disease. Since he sank to

the bottom of the pond, his bones were well-preserved. The Museum of the Earth offers residential discounts on various days. Be sure to check out their website at www.museumoftheearth.org for discount days, hours and special programs. People who live in the Finger Lakes and who come to visit don’t often realize how much it is the geology that makes this area so incredibly beautiful and unlike anywhere else in the world. A museum devoted to understanding how these geologic features were formed and the early plants and animals that inhabited this area is the perfect addition to the Finger Lakes. Don’t miss this opportunity to explore the newest upstate treasure.

Judy Hirtler is a designer, writer and photographer. She can be reached through e-mail at yosemitejudy@hotmail.com.

Joyce and Art Hunt invite You to tour and taste at Our 6th generation Family farm winery Enjoy the view and a Glass of wine with lunch From our ‘Picnic Station!’ Open Year-round 1 mi. up Italy Hill from Rt. 54A in Branchport on Keuka Lake 1-800-946-3289 www.huntcountryvineyards.com Circle Reader Service Number 129

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(“Across Time and Space” continued from page 27)

Offered by the Spa Apartments The Spa Apartments has put together a package of services and amenities most seniors are looking for. Prices start at $461 a month with all utilities included. • • • • • • • •

Meal Program Transportation Cable TV Nursing Service Activities Elevators Individual Heat Control Large Gracious Lobbies

• • • • • • • •

Front Door Intercom Laundry Room Laundry Service Arts & Crafts Emergency Call System Housekeeping Room Service Emergency Maintenance

• • • • • • • •

Fire Systems Library Trips Entertainment Large Porches Walk Areas Picnic Areas Full Kitchen and Bath

Nestled in the quaint little village of Clifton Springs, NY. Clifton Springs Hospital & Clinic is connected to our building. Downtown shopping is only steps away. Call today for a tour and receive a gift certificate for downtown shopping.

315-462-3080 Circle Reader Service Number 156

Can We Help You? We designed www.PhelpsNY.com The official web site for the Town, Village and Phelps Chamber of Commerce

Let us help you increase business by using the web. Call today to find out how easy and affordable it is!

www.cobblesoft.com

Toll-Free 1.866.380.6716 Circle Reader Service Number 111

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us during the week, leaving on weekends to preach in Pennsylvania. Our family, including visiting aunts, uncles and cousins, spent fair weather evenings on our front porch at the “everything” table, under a bare lightbulb with hosts of insects flying around it, assembling jigsaw puzzles. The adults talked...about how many glass gallon jugs of drinking water were used up during the last wave of guests, about preparing tomorrow’s meals, about the possibility of rain. Occasionally someone would start to sing a church hymn and we’d all join in, improvising on harmony and words. When we’d exhausted our mental hymnals, we’d slide over into secular songs – to the chagrin of some of the oldsters, like “I’ve been working on the Railroad.” It was at the everything table one evening, kneeling on a chair, moths casting aircraft-sized shadows on a map unfolded atop a puzzle-in-progress, that I was first confronted with the reality that Keuka was not my lake. There lay the undeniable evidence; it was on everyone else’s map, surrounded by towns and roads I had neither named, nor heard of. My eighth summer there was our last and the cottage was too easily forgotten as I spent three decades finishing school, working and raising a family. Twenty-eight years later, spurred by a family reunion at my cousin Lucy’s cottage, a short oar float north of my grandparents’ old cottage, I decided it was time to see the other side of the lake...on foot. I left my car at Lucy’s one summer day and headed south. In about 30 minutes I came to the old cottage. I walked around the outside. It was small and unspectacular. Possibly even smaller and less spectacular than the other tiny bungalows that line the shores along this part of the lake. The back screen door was not the same one I slammed from sunrise to sunset. The front steps were not the ones Grandpa repaired on an annual basis. In fact, the front of the cottage porch was


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enclosed, with standard windows. It did not even suggest the evening puzzle marathons, hymn singing, sudden rainstorms that scattered puzzle pieces, or the people who retrieved them. I tried to appease my disappointment by staring at the mailbox and telling myself I could still make out my grandparents’ name peeking through more recent coats of paint. I continued around the south end of the lake and pitched my tent in the woods. The next day I rose at sunup and walked 16 miles to the north end of the lake, then seven miles back out to the tip of the bluff, where a man let me camp in his apple orchard. The third day – today – I set out at dawn and in a few hundred yards I arrived here at this spot on the chapel terrace. Standing here on the bluff on the other side of the lake, the place to which my parents would never drive, that had eluded me for decades, I now find myself still intrigued with the other side. Only it’s not the side I set out to find. Even though that big green barn-like cottage I wondered over as a child is right below me on the shore, instead, I’m squinting to see if I can make out our old cottage. From the tiny white dot almost completely hidden by huge poplar trees, I am trying to make out an old screened-in porch where my mother and grandmother are husking corn...my grandfather tinkering with the front steps that are beyond repair...my father and little brother running around the cottage having a water pistol war. I can see the combination of glee and sheer terror in my little brother’s eyes as my father surprises him at the corner of the front porch, aims a loaded water pistol at him point blank, and blasts him right in the chest. I lay the binoculars down on the railing and realize, I have finally found the other side of Keuka Lake. Lake walking is addictive. Since walking around Keuka Lake, Rich Gardner has walked around 41 lakes, including three of the Great Lakes. You can read his 24-day journal from his Lake Ontario walkaround at www.lakecompasser.com.

Circle Reader Service Number 113

One day this will all be frozen... ...so why go home? Advanced Freeze Protection for Water Pipes & Roof De-Icing

www.heatline.com 705 754 4545 • 1 800 584 4944 Circle Reader Service Number 125

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New York’s Most Award Winning Winery Since 1962! C A L E N D A R Life in the Finger Lakes recommends that you call ahead for complete details on the listings.

Hammondsport, NY West Side of Keuka Lake Route 76, Middle Road 800-320-0735 www.DrFrankWines.com

~ Continuing a Tradition of Excellence ~

Every Friday Evening thru August...Friday Night Old Time Rock & Roll On the Micro Brewery Deck at Wagner Vineyards. (607) 582-6450 Every Wednesday...The Little Gather Storytelling Hour at the Corning Museum of Glass Performers and storytellers delight you and your child with music, magic, and more! At the Rakow Library, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. (800) 732-6845

Circle Reader Service Number 171

Finger Lakes Dermatology

June June 1-30...Showcase at West End Gallery The featured artists for June are Susan Waterhouse and Treacy Ziegler. (607) 936-2011

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS Pamela L. Foresman, M.D. Jeffrey R. LaDuca, PhD., M.D.

Offering BOTOX® Injections, Chemical Peels, Laser Surgery and Skin Care Products (BOTOX ® and BOTOX ® Cosmetic are trademarks owned by Allergan, Inc.)

General Dermatology, Dermatologic Surgery, Cosmetic Dermatology 100 Genesee St., Suite 108, Auburn • (315)252-7539 Circle Reader Service Number 117

June 3-6...Ithaca Festival The Festival starts on the Ithaca Commons, throughout downtown and in DeWitt Park. On Sunday, the Festival moves to Stewart Park on Cayuga Lake. Showcasing the work of over 1,000 local artists. (607) 273-3646 June 4...Luau by the Lake Emerson Park Pavilion, Auburn - Pig roast, live entertainment, celebrity sumo wrestling, youth film festival, door prizes, magician, libations available. (315) 253-4316 June 4-5...Taste of Syracuse Clinton Square, Syracuse - Food and music festival showcasing dozens of area restaurants, wineries and businesses. Fine arts and crafts, non-stop entertainment. (315) 484-1123 June 4-12...Rochester International Jazz Festival It’s not who you know before, it’s who you are fans of after! (585) 234-2002 June 5...Blue Grass on the Green, Homer Village Green (607) 749-9942 June 5...Dairy and Old Ways Days plus the Cayuga County Dairy Princess Ceremony At Ward W. O’Hara Agricultural Museum in Auburn’s Emerson Park. There will be farm animals, horse drawn wagon rides, rides in our Model T. Ford, early home crafts, butter making and a lot more! FREE. (315) 252-7644

FOUR GREAT ISSU A YEAR ES !

A Subscription for YOURSELF

GIFT Subscriptions 1st Gift ..........................$12.95 2nd Gift ..........................$10.95 Each Add’l ......................$8.95

3 Years (12 issues) ......$32.85 2 Years (8 issues) ........$23.90 1 Year (4 issues) ..........$12.95

All Foreign: Add $15.00 postage per year. U.S. funds only.

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Also available on newsstands (800)344-0559 www.lifeinthefingerlakes.com

CALL TODAY!

June 5-6...Annual Catfish Derby All night catch and release Catfish Derby at Hickories Park. Chicken BBQ, kids’ cast off contest, bicycle safety course, raffles and door prizes. Grand prize is boat/motor/trailer package. (607) 687-1792 June 5-6...Spring Festival at Bement-Billings Farmstead Juried craft fair with 1800s craft skill demonstrations, sheep dog trials, live period music, wagon rides, tour of historic home, variety of spring foods. (607) 642-9516 June 9-10...“A Journey ‘INN’ Skaneateles” The Skaneateles Garden Club is hosting a tour of 13 wonderfully unique area B&B’s and inns, each individually enhanced with floral designs by club members. Tour will benefit the village tree planting project. (315) 685-7344, (315) 685-8268


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Block The Sun...Not Your View With Durasol Retractable Solar Shades

June 11...3rd Annual Friday Night Concert Series Cayuga Ridge Estate Winery - Join us for the sensual vocal atmosphere of Kevin Kinsella and Five 2. (800) 598-9463 June 11...Wine and Cheese Concert on the Veranda with the Joe Caruso Band Sonnenberg Mansion & Gardens. (585) 394-4922 June 11...The Sweet Sounds of Jazz Hochstein in Concert: Spotlight on Faculty. (585) 454-4596 June 11-13...Coors Light Balloon Festival Jamesville Beach Park, southeast of Syracuse Balloon rides, family activities, entertainment, food and more. (315) 451-PARK (7275) June 11-July 10...Recent work by MARTIN A. POOLE at West End Gallery Opening reception is on Friday, June 11 from 5 - 7:30 p.m. (607) 936-2011 June 12...Kat Knapp Karnival at Knapp Vineyards Outside karnival with games, music and wine. (800) 869-9271 June 12-13...Cottage Garden Party at Brokenstone Cottage Celebrate the young days of summer. House and garden tour, food, music, plant sale, wild walk, vendors, herbs, workshops, and garden talk. (607) 659-3356

A Shade More Beautiful. www.durasol.com

Leo A. Kline will design and professionally install a custom-made shading system to suit your individual needs and fit your lifestyle. Come See A Wide Variety Of Displays In Our Showroom

10% OFF ALL SOLAR SCREENS “We Work For You”®

Good towards the purchase of a Durasol retractable solar screen.

2121 Teall Avenue Syracuse, NY 13206

Applies to DuraShade Series purchases only. May not be combined with any other offer or prior sales.Offer expires 8/15/04.

437-2728 www.leoakline.com

Over 50 Years Your Home Improvement Specialist! Circle Reader Service Number 136

June 13...Owasco Flyer Race Emerson Park, Auburn - 36-mile bike road race around Owasco lake. (315) 252-7611 June 13...Ontario-Yates Hospice presents “A Salute to Our Servicemen and Women” Smith Opera House. A musical competition and patriotic tribute featuring a variety of choruses and judges from Mansfield University. (315) 789-9879 x4027 June 13-19...Rose Week at Sonnenberg Mansion & Gardens (585) 394-4922 June 15...Ithaca’s Taste of the Nation Now in its 17th year, join 50 local wineries and restaurants for this charitable event held at Ithaca College, Campus Center, 6:30 - 9 p.m. (607) 277-6962 June 17 - Taste of Cazenovia Benefit for Cazenovia Childrens House - held at Hubbard Hall, Cazenovia College, Cazenovia, 6:30 9:30 p.m. (315) 655-5437 June 17...Draft Horse and Hay Day plus Town Historian Day At the Ward W. O’Hara Agricultural Museum located in Emerson Park, Auburn. Working demonstrations of how hay was “put up” in the old days. Town historians will be presenting historic material and information of interest about their individual towns. FREE. (315) 252-7644 June 18-20...Bike Tioga 2004 Experience Tioga while traveling scenic bike routes. Activities for kids, picnics, a parade, and music plus all the fun of the Annual Strawberry Festival. (800) 671-7772

(Calendar continued on page 74)

Located on the east side of Canandaigua Lake, 2 miles east of the Village of Rushville

“Simply the Best” Amish Handcrafted Furniture New This Fall Timber Ridge Bedroom Collection Thurs.-Fri. 12-4 • Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 1-4 (585) 554-5409 • 4169 Ferguson Corners Rd. • Rushville, NY 14544

Circle Reader Service Number 150

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Golf H O W - T O

Finger Lakes Golf:

L O C AT I O N S

Rolling Terrain By Paul M. Carter, Club Professional, Sodus Bay Heights Golf Club

1

Dutch Hollow Golf Club 18 Holes - Open to the Public 1839 Benson Rd., Owasco, NY 13021 “Just South of Auburn”

2

315-784-5052 www.dutchhollow.com

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

MAP

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SODUS BAY HEIGHTS GOLF CLUB, INC. 7030 Bayview Drive Sodus Point, NY

18-Hole Championship Course with views of Sodus Bay Clubhouse • Pro-Shop • Practice Facility • PGA Pro Lessons Tournament Conditions • Tennis • Full-Service Restaurant & Bar Choice Dates Available for Outings and Charity Events Limited number of memberships available

Save $20 per foursome or $5/player Everyday except Wednesday. One foursome With ad. Call for tee times.

4

Call (315) 483-6777 Visit us at www.SodusBayHeightsGC.com

swing the club down the he Finger Lakes hill rather than up into region offers many the air in your follow scenic and challenging through. Be sure not to golf courses. It has every try to lift or scoop the ball style golf course, from into the air. links style to the traditionUPHILL LIE: Doing al North American. One just the opposite, use a thing that makes all of less-lofted club as the ball these courses similar is the will shoot up into the air rolling to hilly terrain quickly. Flex the front common to the area. knee more to level out Most amateurs, and your stance and allow the especially the mid-to Downhill Lie clubhead to follow the high-handicap golfers, slope of the hill in your find the uphill, downhill, follow through. You want and side hill lies, which to be sure that you don’t they frequently encounter, bang the club into the hill very difficult at best to with this particular lie. negotiate. You will find Taking the right handling these once approach and a little pracdreaded lies will become tice will enable you to much simpler if you folhandle these lies. Sodus low some basic principles. Bay Heights Golf Club is DOWNHILL LIE: known for these challengSince your leading foot ing lies, and when I was will be lower than your hired as the golf profesback foot, the first key is to sional in 1980, I didn’t flex the knee of your back have a great deal of expeleg so it is level or near rience with these lies. I level to the front knee. Uphill Lie practiced the same basics Next, since the effective as above, and soon loft of the club required is became very proficient. less, use a more lofted club, at least two Visit us on our website for speless clubs. Allow your shoulders to tilt cials and other golf tips at www.sodus at the same angle as the slope of the bayheightsgc.com. hill in your address position and then

Trumansburg Public Golf Club Best kept secret in the Finger Lakes Lounge open to the public 23 Halsey St. • Trumansburg, NY 14886 Ph: (607) 387-8844 • (607) 387-6380 www.trumansburggolf.com

5

Willowcreek Golf Club Offering 27 challenging holes Call for a tee time

6

3069 State Rt. 352, Big Flats, NY 14814 (607)562-8898 • www.willowcreekgolfclub.com


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Real Estate Lake Country Real Estate, Inc. 326 W. Genesee Street Auburn, New York 13021

CAYUGA LAKE

L O C AT I O N S FOR

CO-OWNERS

SARA KILLIAN DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

585.394.6130 RESORT PROPERTY RENTALS 336 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424

ON

Completely furnished 2-3 BR, year-round cottage on 80´ lakefront. Beautifully landscaped lawn, decks, dock & public utilities. $133,000. Midge Fricano, Broker, Ext. 201. Cell: 315-729-0985

MAP

OWASCO LAKEFRONT

MARTY MCMILLAN & RENNA KILLIAN

81

Summer weekly rental in year-round lake home. Aurora, NY. Sleeps 10. $1500/week. Midge Fricano, Broker. Office Ext. 204 Cell: 315-729-0985

WWW.RESORTPROPERTYRENTAL.COM

Tel: 315.258.9147 • Fax: 315.258.3194 E-mail: info@Lakecountryrealestateny.com www.Lakecountryrealestateny.com

Your home search begins with Nothnagle.com

Enjoy the best that the Finger Lakes Region living has to offer in one of the area’s premier properties. Spacious custom built home in the Martin Point Lakefront Community near Auburn. 4 bdrms, 2 1/2 baths. Large lot with 145 feet of frontage. Built in 2000 with all the extras. Priced in the $700’s.

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For more information contact Shawn Murphy, Broker Creating New Standards of Service and Integrity

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Lakefront Homes Specializing in

ROBERTA L. SMITH, Associate Broker 502 S. Main St. Canandaigua, NY 14424 www.BristolHills-Realty.com 585-394-2170 ext. 13 or 585-394-6311

TURNING YOUR HOME DREAM INTO YOUR DREAM HOME

& Residential Real Estate Services

• Covering the Finger Lakes Region • Over 270 Professional Sales Associates working together for YOU!

Manlius 682-7197 100 E. Seneca Street

North Regional 622-1700 8302 Provo Drive

West Regional 488-2926

5854 Belle Isle Road

Chittenango 687-6109

601 Lakeport Road

DeWitt 446-4681

6875 E. Genesee Street

Oneida 363-5533 340 Main Street

Cicero 699-3200 7913 Route 11

Cazenovia 655-8300 57 Albany Street

www.1stproperties.com

Canandaigua Lake. Rare 156 ft prime level lakefront & private neighborhood! Yr-round lake home with formal din, f/p, gar, rear yard, game rm, all public utils. Great view, easy commutes, walk to golf! $950,000.

Nick Mendola & Marty Mendola 585-398-2320 Edelweiss Properties www.CanandaiguaLake.com

PAGE

CAYUGA LAKE

• VACATION LAKE RENTAL • PROPERTY MANAGEMENT • EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY INFORMATION

Don Kasper’s creativity and craftsmanship enhance every home he builds. On-time completion, no construction loan needed. Our plans or yours. Lots available or on your lot. For details contact Associate Broker, Tom Donovan at 315-246-6640 or call

315-255-1766 www.shawnmurphyrealestate.com

SUMMER 2004 ~

73

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

OWASCO LAKE Private 137´ lakefront on east side. Historic 6BR Victorian w/2 fireplaces to enjoy cooler summer evenings. Wrap-around porch has enclosed hot tub. Apps, dock. Spectacular views over sprawling lawn to lake. $619,000. Jeff Trescot, Assoc. Broker, Office Ext. 204, Cell: 315-730-1446


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

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11:56 AM

Page 74

Dining C A L E N D A R (Continued from page 71)

L O C AT I O N S

Do something different.

FOR

New American cuisine with Old World roots

81

1

1 mile north of Watkins Glen on Rt. 14 Watkins Glen, NY Phone: 607-535-2706 www.glenmotorinn.com

Montage Restaurant

ON

PAGE

at the Glen Motor Inn

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

MAP

Life in the Finger Lakes Photo Contest! Submissions due by September, 2004 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place prizes for: • Best Color • Best Black-and-White

Grand prize to best overall photograph Life in the Finger Lakes Photo Contest P.O. Box 1080 • Geneva, NY 14456

2

74 ~ L I F E

IN THE

FINGER LAKES

June 19...Strawberries and Wine Festival Goose Watch Winery - Sample our world famous “Strawmantes.” Enjoy fresh strawberries, strawberry desserts and strawberry wine. (315) 549-2599, (888) 549-WINE June 19...Lucas Vineyards, Major Cajun Blues Enjoy Lucas Blues coupled with Cajun foods and jammin’ tunes. Rain or shine (under the tent!). (800) 682-WINE (9463) June 19...Gardens in Bloom Garden tour to benefit Literacy Volunteers of Ontario County. Our annual garden tour includes special entertainment and refreshments during the tour to make it a day filled with ambiance and whimsy. (585) 396-1686 June 19...FCM Productions presents The John Conlee Show with special guest Anita Cochran Smith Opera House. One of country music's most consistent hit makers, John Conlee’s baritone voice was a smashing success on Rose Colored Glasses. (315) 781-LIVE June 20...Opening Reception, “An Artistic Thing Happened on the Way to Summer” Gallery artists and artisans summer exhibit, South Bristol Cultural Center. Free. (585) 396-5950 June 20...Antique & Collectible Show at Elks Emporium Owego’s unique bi-monthly antiques, collectibles, and desirables market, open the first and third Sundays of each month. 30-50 dealers. Toys, books, paper ephemera, jewelry, glasssware, pottery, tools, furniture, coins, stamps, lamps, plants, baked goods and more! (607) 687-6892 June 20...18th ANNUAL SCANDINAVIAN FESTIVAL Swedish Hill Winery - Enjoy our Scandinavian fare, plus unique arts & craft exhibitors and dance around our maypole! (315) 549-2599, (888) 549-WINE June 20...Explore Venice at the Corning Museum of Glass Activities center on Venice and its influence on glassmaking. (800) 732-6845 June 21 - Medley of Tastes To benefit the Smith Opera House - held at Houghton House on the Hobart and William Smith College campus, Geneva. About 40 local wineries and restaurants offering samples of their goods. (315) 781-LIVE

June 26...Ice Cream Concert Sonnenberg Mansion & Gardens. (585) 394-4922 June 26- 27...Barbecuing at the Wineries Keuka Lake Wine Trail - Each winery will be offering their best BBQ foods and recipes paired with a selection of great wines. All BBQ sauces served at each winery are produced by local New York State businesses. (800) 440-4898

July July 1-31...Showcase at West End Gallery The featured artists for July are Marilyn Fiegl, Marjorie Lucarelli, and Gloria Riegel. (607) 936-2011 July 3-5...Red, White & Blues and 2nd Artist Series Thirsty Owl Wine Company - live music. (866) 869-5805 July 3...thru Aug 15, Sat., Sun. only. Sterling Renaissance Festival The only historical re-enactment of 16th century England in the Finger Lakes Region. (800) 879-4446 July 3-Aug. 22...“Made in New York” Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center, Auburn, juried exhibition of NYS resident artists. (315) 255-1553 July 6-10...Tioga County Fair at Owego Fairgrounds Displays and demonstrations showing off Tioga County's agriculture and animals, homemaking and businesses, and community life. Exciting events and amusement rides and games. (607) 642-5511 July 8, 22...Syracuse Symphony Emerson Park, Auburn, 8 p.m., bring a picnic basket and chairs. (315) 253-5611 July 9... Creole River Aurora, 7 p.m., zydeco, Creole and Cajun music performed on the shores of Cayuga Lake. (315) 364-5437 July 9...Cayuga Ridge Estate Winery Enjoy new and old zydeco stylings with old time and roots-rock originals by the MacGillicuddies unplugged. 7:30 p.m. (800) 598-9463

(Calendar continued on page 76)


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

5/14/04

1:08 PM

Page 75

Museums 7

120 High St. • Newark, NY (across from Hoffman Clock Museum)

1

OPEN SATURDAYS, 1-3PM Special Medical Exhibit 2004 315-331-6409 • arcadiahistory@novocon.net

8 Historic Maritime District

315-342-0480

2

Since 1982

81 PAGE

We invite you to visit Seward House, the historic home of statesman William H. Seward and his family.

14

www.hleewhitemarinemuseum.com The Rose Hill Mansion is a National Historic Landmark and considered one of the finest examples of Greek Architecture in the United States.

ON

West 1st Street Pier, Oswego

Seward House A Registered National Historic Landmark

Patterson Inn Museum 607-937-5281

9 Seward House features an extensive collection of Civil War memorabilia, early Alaskan artifacts and mementoes collected during Seward’s travels.

543 South Main St., Geneva, NY 14456

33 South Street Auburn (315)252-1283 www.sewardhouse.org

(315)789-5151 www.genevahistoricalsociety.com

3

~ Lighthouse Gift Shop ~ Lake View From Tower ~ Docent Guided Tours ~ Sunday Concert Series ~ Festive Old-time Family 4th of July Celebration

“THE FOSTER COTTAGE”

10:30AM - 4PM on Sundays 10AM -4PM Tues thru Saturday Open until 5PM July & August

4

Glenn H. Museum 5

8419 State Rte 54 Hammondsport, NY 14840 Ph: (607)569-2160 www.linkny.com/curtissmuseum

“Agricultural Memories” Museum 1110 Townline Road, Penn Yan, NY Antique Tractors • Gasoline Engines Carriages • Toys • Misc Open June-October by Appointment Mon-Sat • Sun 1-4

6

New 8´ x 20´ Model Train Exhibit

315-536-1206

10

15

A museum complex featuring a 1796 restored Inn, early 1800 log house, a working 1878 schoolhouse, agricultural barn and blacksmith shop.

Open M-F 10:00am-4:00pm

Guided tours available

Historic Palmyra’s Mysteries in History

Old Lighthouse at Sodus Point

Home of the Clifton Springs Historical Society 9 E. Main St., Clifton Springs, NY 14432 315-462-7394 • www.fostercottage.org

MAP

59 W. Pulteney, Corning, NY Housed in the 1829 Prouty-Chew House, the Geneva Historical Society Museum explores the history of Geneva and its diverse people and enterprises. The Museum features period rooms, a library and archive, and local history programs and exhibitions.

(315) 483-4936 www.peachey.com/soduslight 7606 North Ontario Street Sodus Point,Wayne County

• The Palmyra Historical Museum 23 rooms filled with history and historic themes • The William Phelps General Store and Home Three floors of 19th century history, furniture store goods and memorabilia • Alling Coverlet Museum Fabric Art, Coverlets, Quilts and Rugs • Canaltown Days, September 18th & 19th Wayne County Fairgrounds, Antique show a must see Tours of all sizes welcome

Call Bonnie at (315) 597-6981

16

bjfhpinc@rochester.rr.com 132 Market St. Palmyra, NY 14522

Chemung Valley History Museum www.chemungvalleymuseum.org

WARD W. O’HARA AGRICULTURAL MUSEUM Open 7 days a week, 11 to 4, mid May to mid September Admission is FREE Emerson Park, Auburn NY • 315-252-7644 www.cayuganet.org/agmuseum 11

Terwilliger Museum Waterloo, NY Open Tue-Fri 1-4pm and by appointment

Experience the stories behind Mark Twain’s Elmira, local immigrant life, Chemung County’s role in the Civil War and so much more! Explore your history in the Booth Research Library and shop for special books in the Museum Store. Open seven days a week. 607-734-4167

17

415 East Water Street, Elmira, NY 14901

(315) 539-0533 The Terwilliger Museum tells the story of the development of Waterloo through 5 period rooms and exhibits which provide a window on how the early settlers lived and worked.

12

SUMMER 2004 ~

75

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

Open Daily May 15 thru Dec. 23 1-5 pm July & August 10-5 pm (Jan.-Apr., open Mon.-Sat., Sundays by Appointment)

55 Cayuga St., Seneca Falls, NY 13148 Ph: (315)568-8412 www.sfhistoricalsociety.org 13

FOR

ARCADIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Founded in 1896, our mission is to acquire, preserve and present documents and objects that relate to the history of Seneca Falls and Seneca County. We maintain a 23-room Queen Anne Style Victorian Mansion and present the first floor and a portion of the second, as they might have been circa 1890, as a home of a wealthy Victorian family. We have rooms dedicated to local industries, changing and seasonal exhibits and a gift shop.

L O C AT I O N S

Seneca Falls Historical Society


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

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1:05 PM

Page 76

Attractions C A L E N D A R

1

One look and you’ll agree... this is no ordinary hospital

July 9...Phelps Baptist Church presents 3rd Annual Puffer Homecoming Concert Smith Opera House. Featuring gospel music by Bob & Darlene Puffer with Dick Everson and John Ouellette, The Jacobs Brothers, and Dan Decker. With master of ceremonies Mark Hard of WMHR 102.9 Christian radio in Syracuse, 7 p.m. (315) 781-LIVE July 10 & 11...Bastille Day Celebration Bellwether Hard Cider - crepes, hard cider, and music. Learn to play petanque. (888) 862-4337

5

For more about what we have to offer, please visit us at www.CliftonSpringsHospital.org

ON

81

Since 1850, Clifton Springs Hospital’s goal has been to provide you and your family with the best medical care available. With an experienced and respected medical staff, skilled and dedicated employees, and state-of-the-art equipment, we’ve been accomplishing that goal for the past 153 years.

July 10...AuroraFest 5K run, parade (2 p.m.), live music, fire works (10 p.m.), vendor booths and food. (315) 364-7293 July 10...Celebrate Herbs! Cornell Plantations botanical garden celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Robison York State Herb Garden. Free. (607) 533-4852

While cruising the clear waters of Cayuga Lake aboard our research vessel, learn about the lake once known as Tiohero.

MAP

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

(Continued from page 74)

(888)231-3268 215 Tuttle Hill Rd. • Candor NY 13743 www.Buckridge Park.com

PAGE

FOR

L O C AT I O N S

Shed Your Clothes and Shed Your Stress

Tours Tues-Sun May-October

2

435 Old Taughannock Blvd. Ithaca, NY 14850 Toll Free Tel: 866-846-4376 Local: 607-697-0166 (“Tiohero”)

6

GARDEN TOUR West Lake Road • Canandaigua Lake To benefit Literacy Volunteers of Ontario County

Saturday, June 19, 10 am - 3 pm Geneva Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center

G AT E WAY 3

TO THE

FINGER LAKES

35 Lakefront Drive Geneva 877-5-GENEVA • 315-789-1776 www.genevany.com

Ride Into History... and Beautiful Scenery...

Rain or Shine • Tickets Required 585-396-1686 www.literacyvoc.org

7

The Granger Homestead & Carriage Museum 295 N. Main St. • Canandaigua, NY 14424 (585) 394-1472 www.grangerhomestead.org Horse-drawn Carriage tours of Canandaigua’s historic district June – August by reservation

CACV

The Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley Railroad Experience what was Once the Primary form of Transportation - Riding the Rails.

4

Daily Summer Operations Saturdays - Thursdays • June 14 - August 26 Upcoming Railway Events: RAILFAN WEEKEND ~ Aug 7 & 8 MURDER MYSTERY TRAIN ~ Aug 14, 7:30

• • • • •

1816 Federal style mansion Antique Carriage Museum 19th century law office Gift Shop Guided tours on the hour 1 – 4 p.m.

Reservations Required • Call (607) 432-2429 • www.lrhs.com

76 ~ L I F E

IN THE

FINGER LAKES

Tues. - Fri. 1-5 pm • May, Sept., Oct. Tues. - Sun. 1-5 pm • June-August

July 10...Buckridge Festival Second Annual Clothing-Optional Native American Gathering. Spaghetti dinner will be served with freewill offering. Proceeds to benefit A New Hope Center. (607) 659-3868 July 10...DOOBIE DAYS Swedish Hill Winery - Enjoy wine tasting, blues/jazz music and more. A great time to come and visit Doobie, our pet minature donkey. (315) 549-8326, (315) 549-8326 July 10,11...36th Annual Corn Hill Arts Festival 450 juried artists from around the country will be lining the streets of historic Corn Hill for this two-day event. Join us for art, food, music and children’s entertainment. Free. (585) 262-3142 July 12-24...NY Dance Festival Kaleidoscope Dance Theatre, Auburn, Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., world-class performers offer classes, lectures and concerts. (315) 252-4420 July 13-17...Cayuga County Fair Cayuga Co. Fairgrounds, Weedsport - Midway, vendors, farm animals, Monster Truck Nationals and live entertainment. (315) 834-9152 July 14-August 7...”Showboat” at Merry-Go-Round Playhouse This epic musical spans 40 years in the lives of three generations of show folk along the Mississippi River and in Chicago. (315) 255-1785, (800) 457-8897 July 15...Wine, Women and Chocolate at Heron Hill Join us for a benefit dinner for Camp Goodays and Special Times from 6 to 11:30 p.m. Courses feature chocolate, prepared by Chef Lerman of the Village Tavern. Plus dance music of Isis and a fabulous silent auction. Men may crash the party at 9 p.m. with a $5 donation. (800) 441-4241 ex.15 July 16-18...Geneva Theatre Guild presents “Man of La Mancha” Smith Opera House. One of the longest-running hits in Broadway stage history, Man of La Mancha takes place in the late 16th century in a prison deep beneath the streets of Seville. (315) 548-5750, (315) 789-8985

(Calendar continued on page 83)


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

5/19/04

12:28 PM

Page 77

Marinas

Pontoon Party Boat Double Decks Skiing – Fishing Run-A-Bouts

(As of April 1st)

3

Marina Road, Montour Falls, NY 14865

Fingerlakes fishing tackle and live bait Specialized marine supplies

LEISURE TIME MARINA

Hunting Gear Custom Ithaca guns Everything to talk turkey!

5364 E. Lake Rd. Conesus Lake 585-346-2260 Discounts online – www.leisuretimemarine.com

lake service - licenses - charters - boat rentals Open 7 days a week

81

Roy’s Marina, Inc. on Seneca Lake

501E. 4th St., Watkins Glen

1

FOR

5

Boat Rental, Repairs Fuel Dockage, Storage

607-535-6690

www.senecamarine.com

PAGE

Mercury Marine Misty Harbor • Crestliner

607-535-9397

“Over 50yrs. experience”

Boats • Hoists • Docks

315-712-0210

2

4

2540 Route 89, Seneca Falls, NY 13148 Just North of Cayuga Lake State Park

315-789-3094

6

Campgrounds

4 Authentic Log Cabins www.nycampgrounds.com Pool • Laundry • 3 Pavilions • Camp Grocery Store • 30-50 Amp Service • Planned Activities • Water and Sewer Hookups

1

CAYUGA LAKE CAMPGROUND

Montour Falls Municipal Campground

Family Fun for Everyone! 1475 W. Townline Rd., Phelps

315-781-5120

Clean and Fun • Seasonal Campers Welcome Just Minutes from the NYS Thruway, Exit 41

607-535-9397

2546 Route 89 • Seneca Falls

(As of April 1st)

4

Marina Road, Montour Falls, NY 14865

3 mi. west of Waterloo Premium Outlets, 1/2 mi. east on 318, from Geneva Exit 42, Left on Townline Rd., 1/4 mile

8

Frogs, Fishing and lots of Fun!

9

• New Heated Pool • Playground • Fishing Ponds • Cabin & Trailer Rentals

7150 Garner Road • Wolcott, NY

1-800-719-2267

1-888-588-4517 www.lakebluffcampground.com

7818 Marvin Hill Rd, Springwater, NY 14560

5

• Unique glen setting with 5 on-site waterfalls - 1 lighted • Adventurous hiking trails • Fun-filled family activities • Away from it all, but only 5 minutes to I-390 (Exit 4) & civilization

www.HolidayHillCampground.com

CHERRY GROVE CAMPGROUND

Located near Lake Ontario. Family oriented park with seasonal and overnight accommodations.

Call or write for a FREE color brochure

6

P.O. Box 143, LIFL, Dansville, NY 14437

2

(315) 568-0919 • (315) 712-0210 www.cayugalakecampground.com

Holiday Hill Campground

“One Of New York’s Most Beautiful Campgrounds”

www.sugarcreekglencampground.com

MAP

The One Stop Marine Shop Your Complete Lakefront Needs

ON

4398 Clarks Pt. 3 miles South of Geneva off Rt. 14

CAYUGA OUTDOOR WORLD

(585) 335-6294

Heated pool • Cabins available Group discounts for 6+ Near Renaissance Festival

www.cherrygrovecampground.com

7

10

(315)594-8320

3 SUMMER 2004 ~

L O C AT I O N S

Boats, motors, trailers sales and service. Boat lifts and portable dock systems.

CONESUS LAKE RENTALS

77

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

Montour Falls Municipal Marina

Seneca Marine


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

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1:46 PM

Page 78

Shop Here! How to make your own wine!

JOSEPH’S WAYSIDE MARKET

www.fallbright.com

201 S. Main St. Naples, NY 14512

FLOWERS, FLOWERS, FLOWERS! ABUNDANCE

Of Fresh Fruits & Veggies of the Season Fall Foliage Time Brings An ARRAY Of Grapes & Grape Products

81

Grapes, Juices, Brewing & Winemaking Supplies Store Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm

Fall Bright, The Winemakers Shoppe 10110 Hyatt Hill, Dundee 607-292-3995

4

(Visit our Sampling Area)

~ N.Y.S. Honey & Maple Syrup ~ N.Y.S. Cheddar Cheese ~ Home Baked Goods ~

Browse Our Gift Shop...Handcrafted Gifts From Across the U.S. Visit Our Other Location Indian Pines Fruit Stand Rte 54A - Penn Yan, NY

OPEN MAY-NOV 9A.M. TO 8P.M. 585-374-2380 1 www.josephs-wayside.com

Rustic, Adirondack and Cottage Styles: Plus Accessories, Lighting and more

THE CHRISTMAS HOUSE The Charm of an Old Fashioned Christmas Awaits You… 5 361 Maple Avenue • Elmira, NY 14904

585-657-6941 8

www.christmas-house.com • (607) 734-9547

The Finger Lakes Most Complete Model Train Shop

MAP

Model Trains in Scales N, HO, O • Rockets Thomas the Tank • Accessories Finger Lakes Headquarters for:

Spring Valley Garden Center and Gift Shop A quiet relaxed atmosphere in an old brick house dating back to the 1800’s. Complemented by a full service garden center. That special gift for any occasion Home decor for any room Custom painted houses and pet portraits

9

3100 Cty Rd. 10, Canandaigua, NY 14424 (1/8th mile North of Route 5 & 20 on Cty. Rd. 10)

2

6

501 Exchange St. • Geneva 315-781-6397 (next to Cinema Theater)

Mon-Sat 10-5 • Thurs ’til 9pm

(585) 396-1460

www.springvalleygreenhouse.com Shop at www.naplescreeksoaps.com Susan Bristol • Vera Bradley • Frank Lyman • Fat Hat

LUKACS POTTERY Mark and Cathy Lukacs Shop for unique handmade gifts 7060 Route Route 14 14 •• Sodus Sodus Point, Point, NY NY 14555 14555 •• (315) (315) 483-4357 483-4357 7060 Hours -- 10 10 am am to to 66 pm pm Tuesday Tuesday through through Sunday Sunday Hours

3

78 ~ L I F E

IN THE

FINGER LAKES

Wholesale Inquiries Welcome

• David Brooks • Lisbeth •

On the way to the bay... Visit a working pottery studio!

• Carol Anderson • Sigrid Olsen •

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

7007 Routes 5 & 20 • P.O. Box 519 Bloomfield, NY 14469

(Rt. 17/I86, Exit 56, Left on Madison, Left on Maple)

ON

PAGE

Home, Garden and Patio Furnishings, Sold at Carolina Prices

100’s Of Kinds of Jam’s ‘N’ Jellies...

FOR

L O C AT I O N S

For Spring Planting

The Furniture Doctor, Inc.

Secure Online Shopping — 24 Hours —

The Treasure Basket A Country Store

7 Brighton Shoes & Accessories • Barry Bricken • Jewelry

10

•••• Fine Country Furnishings & Accents Unique Specialties and Gifts •••• 61 Fall Street Seneca Falls, NY 13148 (315) 568-5636


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

5/20/04

10:18 AM

Page 79

Shop Here!

exclusively at Elizabeth Margaret, All Things Lovely www.elizabethmargaret.com

100% Virgin Wool Blankets Each blanket has a serial-number on the Cornell Sheep Program logo label and comes with a certificate of authenticity.

L O C AT I O N S

“FACES OF THE WORLD”

Lap robe (60 x 48 inches, 1 stripe) $65 Single (60 x 90 inches, 3 stripes) $89 Double (72 x 90 inches, 3 stripes) $99 Queen (78 x 104 inches, 3 stripes) $119 8.25% tax & $7 per blanket shipping.

877-493-3091

81

FOR

Cornell Orchards, Cornell Dairy Store, or the Department of Animal Science, 127 Morrison Hall, Cornell University. Ithaca.

Cornell Sheep Program Phone 607-255-7712

PAGE

...a gift to be cherished for a lifetime.

Keepsake memory boxes individually designed with photographic reproductions. ~ featuring the Finger Lakes Region Custom orders from your personal photographs.

ON

11

www.sheep.cornell.edu cspblankets@cornell.edu

MAP

THE FIRE SHOP Gifts and supplies for Firefighters, EMS, Police Statues • Mugs Patches • Lights Decals • Clocks T-shirts • Pins

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

www.rebeccasboxes.com

See us in Lown’s House of Shoppes

12

Friends of the Finger Lakes presents the newest book by Emerson Klees:

‘Rochester Lives’

131 Main St. Penn Yan At the Windmill, Rte. 14A Penn Yan every Saturday Shop online at www.pennyanfireshop.com

Keukaviews 2004 13

…..profiles forty five people who made great contributions to the third largest city in NYS. Just $16.95 in fine book stores ——————————————————————————————————————-

‘Wineries of the Finger Lakes’ The newly revised, compact, easy-to-use guide of our wineries, grapes and wines Just $14.95.

‘The Iroquois Confederacy: History and Legends’ A must-have for the Native American collector and only $16.95

www.fingerlakes.com 315-536-6504

12” x 18” poster featuring 15 beautiful images of Keuka Lake. Only $15.95 Email requests to: info@keukaview.com or check our website: www.keukaview.com.

14

SUMMER 2004 ~

79


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

5/19/04

12:59 PM

Page 80

Shop Here! Heart to Hand

Finger Lakes from Space

L O C AT I O N S

POSTER Quality ª Affordable HANDMADE

FOR

Jewelry ª Pottery Ornaments ª Figurines Wind Chimes ª Sun Catchers Magnets ª Candles ...and much much more...

§ § § § § § § § § from the silly...to the sublime

Take the Finger Lakes home with you with this stunning poster of the Finger Lakes Region from Space! The photograph, taken by satellite, consists of high-detail satellite imagery with overlaid map information. The map detail consists of cities, towns, main and secondary highways as well as airports, the Erie Canal, state parks and many other features of interest. There is no other poster of the Finger Lakes as beautiful and informative as this one. Poster size - 25˝ x 39˝. Paper Poster: $22.95 • Laminated Poster: $29.95

18 15

607-535-7846

20

Dealer inquires invited.

www.atwatervineyards.com

Antiques Unlimited CANANDAIGUA

Monica’s Pies

MAP

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

Call 1-800-331-7323 to order.

(across from Burger King)

Summer Hours ª Wed. - Sat. ª 11:00-5:30

ON

PAGE

81

218 S. Franklin St. ª Watkins Glen, NY

A Finger Lakes landmark for classic gifts, extraordinary accessories for home and garden, handcrafted jewelry, apparel, fine stationery and whims w h i m ses! ie s!

56 South Main St. • Downtown Canandaigua Open Daily 16

A Variety of Pies and Cookies Available Daily Holiday Specials Pies, Cookies and Sweetbreads Winter Specials Chicken Pot Pies, Soups and Breads Summer - Local Fresh Fruit Glace’ Pies Special Orders Welcomed We Ship Anywhere in the US Grape Pies Available Year Round Jams, Jellies and Conserves Grape Pie Kits Hand Made Pie Baskets

19

The Olde Canning Factory Gift and Gourmet Shoppe Take a drive... come for a visit! Located in an 1800’s Country House. Nine Artfully Displayed Rooms! Featuring: • Wearable Art Apparel • Hand Painted Leather Handbags • Stunning Jewelry • Chic American • Country • Dreamy Victorian • Whimsical Folk Art

Daily Sampling - 8 Delicious Gourmet Products Manager’s Weekly Specials 4789 Rte 31 • Vernon • NYS Thruway Exit 33 www.theoldecanningfactory.com Tuesday-Saturday 10-5pm • Sunday 12-5pm

17

23

7599 Route 21 Naples, New York (585) 374-2139 www.monicaspies.com

“One of the Largest Displays In Upstate New York” 50 QUALITY DEALERS MON-SAT 10-5 SUN NOON-5 168 Niagara Street

21

585-394-7255 Headquarters for

American Girl Doll Clothes And unique sewn items 22 Sewing Joys 102 Main St. Phelps, NY (315)548-8736

Hours: T-Th-F 10-1, 2-6 Sat 10-1


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

5/20/04

2:02 PM

Page 81

INDEX OF ADVER TISERS Pg. 70 Pg. 26 Pg. 6 Pg. 59 Pg. 23 Pg. 42 Pg. 17 Pg. 41 Pg. 9 Pg. 61 Pg. 69 Pg. 43 Pg. 63 Pg. 13 Pg. 67 Pg. 44 Pg. 45 Pg. 19 Pg. 8 Pg. 10 Pg. 4 Pg. 63 Pg. 71 Pg. 67 Cover 3 Pg. 5 Pg. 27 Pg. 16 Pg. 55

FREE information by mail. Life in the Finger Lakes offers you the opportunity to request free brochures and information from our advertisers. Simply circle the numbers on the adjacent postage-paid card and mail. The advertisers will send information directly to you.

Pg. 14 Pg. 15 Pg. 33 Pg. 8

Adirondack Guide Boat ......................Info #100 American Express ..............................Info #101 Aurora Inn..........................................Info #102 Beaver Mountain Log & Cedar Homes.............. ..........................................................Info #103 Pg. 23 Bright Ideas Design Center ................Info #104 Cover 4 Bristol Valley Theater ........................Info #105 Pg. 20 Campground Owners of NY ..............Info #106 Pg. 9 Cayuga County Office of Tourism ......Info #107 Pg. 32 Cayuga Wine Trail ..............................Info #108 Pg. 42 The Cheshire Union Gift Shop ..........Info #159 Pg. 12 Church Creative Flooring ..................Info #109 Pg. 57 Cicero Hoist & Dock, Inc ..................Info #110 Pg. 35 the cinnamon stick ............................Info #160 Pg. 68 CobbleSoft International ....................Info #111 Pg. 25 Cobtree Corporation ..........................Info #112 Pg. 69 Community Bank ..............................Info #113 Pg. 57 Corning Museum of Glass ................Info #114 Pg. 20 Cronise Landscape & Design ............Info #115 Pg. 83 Downstairs Cabaret............................Info #174 Pg. 70 Dr. Konstantin Frank Wines ..............Info #171 Pg. 16 Eaves Dental/Cosmetic Dentistry ......Info #116

Pg. 35

Northern Design & Building Assoc. .................. ..........................................................Info #143 Pg. 13 Packwood House ..............................Info #144 Pg. 63 Panorama Outfitters ..........................Info #145 Pg. 27 Peacock Oriental Antique Museum .................. ..........................................................Info #146 Pg. 61 Quail Summit ....................................Info #173 Pg. 25 Quality Transportation Tours..............Info #147 Pg. 66 Red Jacket Orchards..........................Info #148 Pg. 34 Rochester Folk Art Guild....................Info #149 Pg. 71 Roses and Oak Ranch........................Info #150 Pg. 19 Seneca County Tourism ....................Info #151 Pg. 21 Seneca Lake Winery Association ......Info #152 Pg. 7 Shoreland’r/Midwest Industries, Inc ................ ..........................................................Info #153 Pg. 65 Silver Lake Marine ............................Info #154 Pg. 11 SkyLand Farm....................................Info #155 Pg. 68 Spa Apartments ................................Info #156 Pg. 62 Standing Stone Vineyards..................Info #157 Pg. 40 Syracuse China Factory Outlet ..........Info #158 Pg. 12 Thendara Inn & Restaurant................Info #161 Pg. 43 Timber Frames Inc ............................Info #162 Pg. 66 Timberpeg East, Inc ..........................Info #163 Cover 2 Warfield’s Restaurant ........................Info #164 Pg. 3 Waterloo Premium Outlets ................Info #165 Pg. 25 West End Gallery ..............................Info #166 Pg. 55 Wilcox Press......................................Info #167 Pg. 34 The Windmill Farm & Craft Market .................. ..........................................................Info #168

Finger Lakes Dermatology ................Info #117 Finger Lakes Inn / Activity Center ......Info #118 Finger Lakes Tourism ........................Info #119 Finger Lakes Wine Festival ................Info #172 Finger Lakes Winery Tours ................Info #169 Fox Run Vineyards ............................Info #120 Geneva Arts Development Council ....Info #121 Geneva Chamber of Commerce ........Info #122 Geneva on the Lake ..........................Info #123 Guards Cards ....................................Info #124 Heat-Line Corp...................................Info #125 Henry B’s Authentic Italian Restaurant Heron Hill Winery ..............................Info #127 Hobbit Hollow ....................................Info #128 Hunt Country Vineyards ....................Info #129 Ithaca Downtown Partnership............Info #130 Ithaca Downtown Partnership............Info #131 Jansen Marina, Inc. ..........................Info #132 Ketmar Development Corp.................Info #133 Keuka Moon Gallery ..........................Info #170 King Ferry Winery, Inc. ......................Info #134 Lane’s Yamaha ..................................Info #135 Leo A Kline ........................................Info #136 The Loomis Barn ..............................Info #137 Lyons National Bank ..........................Info #138 Marvin Windows and Doors ..............Info #139 Merry-Go-Round Playhouse ..............Info #140 Mitchell Pierson Jr. Inc. ....................Info #141 Museum of the Earth ........................Info #142

Your Guide to the Finger Lakes 2

Icons on the map show approximate

10

5

4 3

locations of advertisers in

10 17

the Special Marketplace

1

Advertising

13 16

Sections in

4 2

this issue.

13

8 13 2 10

12 2

22 1

6

4

Please call the advertiser for

7

9 11 2 22

14

6 16 21 23 4 14 7

8

specific directions. 1

1 16 6 12 17

9 19 6

2

1 4 13 16 3

2

8 9

7 12

11 15 14 6 21

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11

10 5

Attractions ......................pg. 76 Campgrounds ..................pg. 77

3 1 2 18 1 3 18

10 5

4

Dining............................pg. 74 Museums ........................pg. 75

8 15

5

Special Marketplace Advertising Sections Golf ..............................pg. 72

3 3 9 19 8 9 6

4

1

5 2 20

3 5 6 11 5

4

Marinas..........................pg. 77 1

Shop Here!............pgs. 78-80, 82

14 15

Wineries ..................pgs. 84-85 Accommodations ........pgs. 86-87

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12 20 17 5

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Shop Here! Glass Magnolia “YOUR FINGER LAKES CHOICE FOR QUALITY CONSTRUCTION AT A FAIR PRICE”

Historic 1800’s Mansion full of shops plus Tea Room “Red Hat” Room, Christian Books & Music

• • • • • • •

Coming Soon - Bed & Breakfast Ladies-visit our Red Hat Society room!

Remodeling & Renovations New Home Construction Additions & Garages Bathrooms & Kitchens Foundations/Masonry Work Sunrooms & Decks Windows

(315) 531-9074

8339 N. Main St. • Interlaken, NY 14847 Phone: 607-532-8356 • Toll Free: (866) 532-8356 www.glassmagnolia.com 24

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Folks from the beautiful Finger Lakes Region have enjoyed millions of cups of coffee from Finger Lakes Coffee Roasters for over seven years. Our travels and roasting experience allow us to locate the highest quality beans from all over the globe. Freshness is guaranteed. Please visit us or purchase a bag of beans online!

Paradox Design Architects ARCHITECTURE

INTERIOR DESIGN

 Charles Johnson 585-624-5930

www.fingerlakescoffee.com Pittsford Plaza Monroe Ave. (Next to Michael’s) 585-385-0750 Farmington Bushnell’s Basin Corner of Routes Route 96 96 & 332 (CVS Plaza) (Next to Abbots) 585-742-6210 585-249-9310

•••

Sensitive Design of Custom Homes, Renovations and Additions

Country LCMS Lake Moving & Storage 2915 Rt. 96S • Waterloo, NY 13165 Local, Interstate and International Movers

Providing support services to individual artists, non-profits and art organizations in the Finger Lakes.

Packing Service • Packing Materials • Storage

Traditional Cupola

DOT#32239

1-800-479-3188

MC#435411

433 Exchange St., Geneva, NY 14456 315-781-7725 • www.artservicesflags.org

The look of distinction The area’s largest selection of

Weathervanes

CUSTOM MASONRY BY

Cupolas

MI-KAR CONSTRUCTION, INC. (585) 248-2594

Call for store hours and information 3096 Main Street (Rt. 5) Caledonia, NY 14423

(585) 538-2639 Michael Neyhart

All Interior & Exterior Painting

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Power Washing of Vinyl & Aluminum Siding

We’re building your future.

(315)789-9812

INSURED • NYS CERTIFIED

3 Malin Lane Penfield, NY 14526

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

MAP

ON

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Restaurant & Victorian Shops


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C A L E N D A R (Continued from page 76) July 16-August 4...Recent work by G.C. MYERS at West End Gallery Opening reception on Friday, July 16, 5 - 7:30 p.m. (607) 936-2011 July 18...Ice Cream Concert Sonnenberg Mansion & Gardens. (585) 394-4922 July 18...Tapas As You Like It Six Mile Creek Vineyard - Seasonally and locally prepared dishes made for sharing. Alongside a flight of wines, experience the power of pairing wine and food with this slow food event. (800) 260-0612 July 22-25 Finger Lakes GrassRoots Festival of Music and Dance Four stages which run ridiculously long hours to accommodate the 60-plus bands that play roots related and world music. (607) 387-5098 July 23...Swines and Wine at Heron Hill Join us from 6 to 10 p.m. as Chef Lerman from the Village Tavern prepares the pig and teams it up with all the fixin’s! Jony James (Buffalo’s #1 Blues Band) takes things to another level with their smokin' tunes. (800) 441-4241 ex.15 July 23-25...Cayuga Museum Plans Bus Trip to Washington D.C. Military Memorials Includes visits to the newly dedicated World War II Memorial, the Iwo Jima Memorial, the Korean War Memorial, the Vietnam Wall, and the Women in the Military Memorial. (315) 253-8051/(315) 253-5196 July 24...Beach Party at Knapp Vineyards Bring your chairs or blankets and enjoy live music, wine and chicken BBQ. (800) 869-9271 July 24-25...ARTSFest Please join us for this years ARTSFest in Corning's Historic Market Street. (607) 936-2011 June 26-27...Wine Cards Wild Weekend Cayuga Wine Trail Collect wine cards at each winery along the Cayuga Wine Trail. Receive prizes for our card-winning combinations, along with a commemorative glass and food samplings. (800) 684-5217 July 30, 31,August 1...26th Annual Antique and Classic Boat Show 40 boats in the water, 30 on land display, plus 10 model boats. Free. (315) 685-0552 July 30...Blue Moon/Full Moon Eclipse Dinner at Heron Hill Join us from 6 to 10 p.m. as Chef Lerman sets up several high-end grazing stations featuring grilled steak, salmon and live food preparation. Enjoy the beautiful full moon as you dance to the sounds of "Live Wire". (800) 441-4241 ex.15 July 31...Blue Moon Stroll Sonnenberg Mansion & Gardens. Stroll through moonlit gardens to the sound of music. (585) 394-4922

July 31...2004 Canoe/Kayak Races at Empire State Games at Hickories Park Boat Ramp Empire State Games Masters Division Marathon Canoe and Kayak Races feature male and female events and a one-loop course. Competition will be held on a loop course on the Susquehanna River. (585) 292-6107

August August 1...Eastside Wine & Dine King Ferry Winery/Treleaven, Long Point Winery and Six Mile Creek Vineyard - A progressive gourmet dinner featuring Cayuga Lake’s east shore wineries. Enjoy delicious food and wine with every course. (800) 439-5271

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change The Hilarious Hit Musical Now in it’s 4th Smash Year

August 1-31...Showcase at West End Gallery The featured artists for August are Parnilla Carpenter, Joanne Sonsire, and Jean K. Stephens. (607) 936-2011 August 3-7...The 2004 Children’s Show: “BOOTZ!” at Bristol Valley Theater Poor Tulip! Left all alone in a Ogre-infested kingdom with nothing but a cat to keep her company. But this cat has a few tricks up his sleeve...and under his hat...and tucked in his Bootz! (585) 374-9032 August 6...Friday Night Concert Cayuga Ridge Estate Winery - A favorite evening of music returns with the sounds of the Scott B. Adams Acoustic Ensemble. 7:30 p.m. (800) 598-9463. August 7...“It’s All About Me Day” Americana Vineyards - Come pamper yourself with good-for-you food and wine pairings. Ideas to revitalize and improve your mind, body, and spirit. (607) 387-6801

Run For Your Wife! Downstairs Cabaret’s next hilarious hit!

August 7...FCM Productions presents Mark Wills with special guest Ciara Lynn Smith Opera House. 7:15 p.m. - Doors open at 6 p.m. Reserved seat tickets available June 21. (315) 781-LIVE August 7-8...Matt’s Italian Weekend and 3rd Artist Series Thirsty Owl Wine Company - live music. (866) 869-5805 August 14...Limited Release Wine Tasting and Art Festival Swedish Hill Winery - Enjoy great food, arts and crafts vendors and many wine specials. (315) 549-8326, (888) 549-WINE

No Two Shows Are Alike

August 14...Molly Shea Band Knapp Vineyards - Outside lawn concert. 1 - 4:00 p.m. (800) 869-9271 August 15...Ice Cream Concert Sonnenberg Mansion & Gardens. (585) 394-4922 August 15...Healthy Hearts and Sophisticated Living Six Mile Creek Vineyard - A wine tasting prepared with locally produced foods, and an opportunity to learn more about slow food! Afterwards, join us for an elegant four-course meal in the winery. (800) 260-0612 August 25...The Smith presents The 199th Army Band The 199th Army Band, also known as “The Governor’s Band,” is the premier musical organization of the New York Army National Guard. 7 p.m. - Doors open 6 p.m. (315) 781-LIVE

Celebrating 20 Years as YOUR not-for-profit professional theatre with PASSION !

325-4370

www.downstairscabaret.com Circle Reader Service Number 174

SUMMER 2004 ~

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Wineries

Overlooking Seneca Lake’s west side 10 miles south of Geneva, just off of Route 14 You are invited to our visitors’ center tasting room and gift shop: Mondays-Saturdays: 10am until 5pm Sundays: Noon until 5pm Open all year.

1020 Anthony Road Penn Yan 315-536-2182 800-559-2182

1

www.anthonyroadwine.com

4 7

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81

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fine wines for the everyday celebration of life

ON

Goose Watch Winery

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

MAP

5480 Rt. 89, Romulus, NY 14541 Phone: 315-549-2599 www.goosewatch.com Wine Tasting * Gift Shop * Chestnut Groves * Boat Docking * Beautiful view of Cayuga Lake * Smoked Trout & Cheeses * Great Winery Events (visit website for more information)

8

Open Daily 10am-6pm Located on the Cayuga Lake Wine Trail

5055 Rt. 414 • Hector, NY 800.331.7323 www.atwatervineyards.com We invite you to taste our truly memorable wines in a vineyard setting 150 years mature. Located on the south-eastern shore of Seneca Lake.

2

5

Open Mon-Sat 10-5, Sun 11-5

Finger Lakes Champagne House

6075 Rt. 414, Hector NY 14841 Ph: 607-546-5115 * 888-549-WINE Located on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail

May - December - Open Daily Jan - April - Open Weekends

Visit the only 'exclusively champagne' tasting room in the Finger Lakes. Featuring award winning champagnes from Swedish Hill and Goose Watch wineries.

Gift Shop * Champagne Clubs * Great views of 6 Seneca Lake * Peach Festival in August

3

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FINGER LAKES

9 Along the Cayuga Wine Trail Route 89 • Ovid • 888-467-9463 www.hosmerwinery.com


70-88.LIFL.Summer.04

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Page 85

Wineries PREMIUM ESTATE GROWN WINES Chardonnay • Riesling • Gewurztraminer Merlot • Cabernet Sauvignon

Swedish Hill Winery 4565 Rt. 414, Romulus Phone: 315-549-8326 * 888-549-WINE

Finger Lakes Winery Tours Wine tasting & scenic tours of the beautiful Finger Lake country side. Pick up from Rochester Fast Ferry, Home, B & B or Hotel 7 days a week You can customize your tour. We have many packages for 1 person or up to 30 people. Many vehicles to choose: Sedan, Limousine Mini Bus & Coach

Special: Wine Tour and Tasting Package 6 hr. $199.00 Luxury Sedan 1-4 passengers

Quality Transportation & Tours Serving Rochester and Finger Lakes Region

11

1 (877) 424-7004 or (585) 455-8291

Live Music Starting July 4th weekend Saturdays 1:30-4pm

2770 State Route 14 Penn Yan NY 14527

Torrey Ridge Winery

81

www.prejeanwinery.com

One of Seneca Lake’s newest and most modern wineries, Torrey Ridge is a destination you won’t want to miss. Taste a variety of premium wines while enjoying one of the lake’s most panoramic views. Browse through our unique gift shop.

PAGE

13

15

www.torreyridgewinery.com torreyr@eznet.net May-Dec Mon.-Sat. 10-5pm, Sun. 11:30-5pm Jan-April Call for Hours

16

ON

Hours: 10-5:30; Sunday 11-5:30 2634 Route 14 • Penn Yan 315-536-7524

Call for Event Dates or visit our website www.swedishhill.com

315-536-1210

MAP

On the Seneca Lake Wine Trail Open year ‘round for tastings

Third Annual Life in the Finger Lakes

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

10

Photo Contest! Categories:

1st, 2nd, and 3rd place prizes for:

• Best Color • Best Black-and-White Grand prize to best overall photograph. Send submissions postmarked no later than September 30, 2004 to: Life in the Finger Lakes Photo Contest P.O. Box 1080 • Geneva, NY 14456 The awarded images will appear in the Winter 2004 issue.

12

14

FOR

Wine Tasting and Gift Shop * Personalized Labels * Gift Baskets * Scenic View & Picnic Area * Business Gift Ideas * Wedding Favors and More!

L O C AT I O N S

Open Daily 9am - 6pm

For more information, visit our website at: www.LifeintheFingerLakes.com Photo by 2003 Grand Prize Winner Bill Penn

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Accommodations THE VAGABOND INN

Waterloo/Seneca Falls

2

In the Heart of the Finger Lakes 2468 NYS Rte 414 • Waterloo, NY 13165

(315)539-5011

www.hiwaterloo.com

6

81

FOR

L O C AT I O N S

1

PAGE

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

Serenity, total renewal and rejuvenation are yours at the Vagabond Inn. Alone on a mountain, this 7,000 square foot inn offers total seclusion. Grand fireplace and hot tub/jacuzzi suites are available. Naples, NY • (585) 554-6271 • www.thevagabondinn.com

LaFayette Bed & Breakfast

ON

www.LifeintheFingerLakes.com or call (315) 789-0458

107 LaFayette Avenue, Geneva, NY Toll-Free (866) 781-0068

MAP

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

8

Your Hosts: Shirley & Jack Camp lafay107@rochester.rr.com • lafayettegenevany.com New for 2004: Wi-Fi

9

MorganSamuelsInn.com

7

...the difference between ordinary and legendary

www.oldtownsendplace.com Built in 1850, our American Gothic residence is conveniently located halfway between Ithaca and Aurora on the east side of Cayuga Lake, less than 10 minutes from King Ferry and Long Point wineries. We are within a 20 minute drive to Cornell University, Ithaca College, Wells College and MacKenzie-Childs.

4

The Hound & Hare

OPEN WEEKENDS April 15 - Nov. 15 1616 Ridge Rd., Route 34B, Lansing, NY 14882

Bed and Breakfast Recapture the Romance Jacuzzi • AC Fireplace Antiques Romantic Breakfast by Candlelight

(607) 257-2821 • 800-652-2821 1031 Hanshaw Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 AAA Approved

5 www.HoundandHare.com

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For reservations, e-mail

kristin@oldtownsendplace.com

10 11

(607) 533-8955

www.ridersrest.com A self-contained luxury country suite with SPA, Fireplace, Stereo, Swimming, Privacy Located in the Heart of the Finger Lakes Wine Country near Canandaigua & Keuka Lakes

1-888-629-0581 “A Heartfelt Place To Connect”


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Accommodations king Reservations Now Ta

Lindenwald Haus

Take control of your personal health and well being.

The Francis Hall

Bed & Breakfast & Catering 18 Rooms Available Private Parties for All Occasions

House c. 1869

Natural Health Practice & Health Retreats

1526 Grand Central Ave • Elmira, New York 14901 (607) 733-8753 • (800) 440-4287

20

www.BNBFinder.com

5 bedroom cottage on Seneca Lake - offering comprehensive week-long programs.

MAXSOM’S

www.ChristianNaturalHealth.com Robin@ChristianNaturalHealth.com 315-781-5114 - Please call to inquire.

BED and BREAKFAST 17 years of hosting domestic & foreign visitors to the Fingerlakes

Robin Helstrom is a certified natural health practitioner and trained herb specialist.

9404 State Rt. 414 • Lodi, NY 14860

(607) 582-6248

81

21

FOR

The Traveling Connoisseur’s Distinctive & Memorable B&B Experience. For reservations contact Caroline Hopkins: 526 W. Church Street, Elmira, New York 14905 Telephone (607) 734-9780 www.francishallhouse.com

Auburn / Skaneateles

MAP

(315) 776-8632 • www.lavenderpatchretreat.com

22

ON

Featuring the finest meeting and banquet facilities for 6-600 people.

Specializing in get-away retreats • quilters family, class or friendship reunions. 8613 Denman Rd • Port Byron, NY 13140 13

2003 Quality Excellence Award

75 North Street • Route 34 • Auburn (315)253-4531 • www.hiauburn.com

17

FINGERLAKES INN Travelers’ Choice®

The ambience of an inn, the convenience of a motel

Comfortable Affordable

436 S. Franklin St. (Rt 14) • Watkins Glen, NY 14891 888-736-3224 • 607-535-2441 www.senecaclipperinn.com 18 Book Online!

Centrally Located

Visit our website at: www.LifeintheFingerLakes.com and Find more information about our advertisers

4343 Routes 5 & 20 Canandaigua, NY

14

800-727-2775

Our Belhurst expansion opens in July Featuring: • BELHURST WINERY and GIFT SHOP Premium wines - unique gifts • VINIFERA INN New luxury rooms with fireplace, Jacuzzi, and breath-taking lake views • STONECUTTERS LOUNGE Sunken bar - outside patio with fire pit • EDGAR’S Featuring Steaks Chops - Seafood and other fine cuisine

15

Tudor Hall Bed & Breakfast

on Keuka Lake

16

762 East Bluff Drive Penn Yan, NY 14527 315-536-9962 tudorhal@flare.net www.bbhost.com/tudorhall

19

You can also subscribe online Its Easy! SUMMER 2004 ~

87

MARKETPLACE SECTION - SEE

Exit Rt. 17 (now Rt. 86) at Church Street ~we are just 3 miles west on the right.

PAGE

A FINGER LAKES DESTINATION

12

L O C AT I O N S

NATIONAL REGISTRY OF HISTORIC PLACES SIGNATURE HOME


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O F F

T H E

E A S E L

“Joan’s Garden” – stained glass around the front door entrance of a private residence in Skaneateles.

Robert Oddy, Stained Glass Artist – A modern artist who does fascinating windows, demonstrating that the art of stained glass is alive and well today. – From a BBC web page item on the history of stained glass (Jan. 2002)

“T

he living world provides an endless variety of good subjects for stained glass windows, as it has for art in all media from the earliest times. My work brings vivid, yet subtle and intricate, images of living forms into people’s living and working spaces. “A distinctive quality of my work is a feeling of depth in the representation of natural subjects, whilst retaining recognizable traits of traditional stained glass art. In my stained glass windows and panels, this impression of depth is largely an illusion created by multiple layers of glass and careful use of color and texture. In some work, however, there is a real sculptural element. I have combined glass with other materials, such as carved wood and cast bronze. “The richness and beauty in the light, texture, and color of stained glass make it a wonderfully satisfying medium in which to work. I think of my methods as a little like painting. We never perceive the leaves of even a single plant as uniformly green. So, while I work, I have a large variety of glass spread out around me like a palette. By choosing each piece carefully and using multiple layers, I can get artful variations of shade and hue.” Robert enjoys meeting with people to discuss ideas for commissions, without obligation. Call him at (315) 446-0279 or send an e-mail to artist@robertoddy.com for more information. There are many pictures on his website: www.robertoddy.com

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Covers.LIFL.Summer.04

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A familiar face is coming to Penn Yan

Locations: Main Office 35 William Street Lyons, NY 14489 (315) 946-4871 Lyons Corner Routes 14 & 31 Lyons, NY 14489 (315) 946-4505 Clyde 4 Williams Street Clyde, NY 14433 (315) 923-2100 Geneva 41 Seneca Street Geneva, NY 14456 (315) 789-5011 Jordan 2 North Main Street Jordan, NY 13080 (315) 689-9530

The Lyons National Bank’s new full-service Penn Yan office at 129 East Elm Street.

LNB opens a full-service office in Penn Yan The Lyons National Bank has been part of the Finger Lakes region for more than 150 years. We’re proud to provide friendly, reliable community banking to our neighbors – and now we’re pleased to extend that tradition into the Penn Yan area. We’ve opened our tenth full-service LNB office at 129 East Elm Street in Penn Yan... bringing a wealth of financial services and friendly, personalized attention to yet another Finger Lakes community. We look forward to serving the Penn Yan community and to continuing to provide hometown banking to all our neighbors in the Finger Lakes. For more information, call the Penn Yan Office at (315) 536-2300 or visit our Web site at www.lyonsbank.com. Circle Reader Service Number 138

Macedon P & C Supermarket Macedon Commons Macedon, NY 14502 (315) 986-9681 Newark 750 W. Miller Street Newark, NY 14513 (315) 331-0296 Ontario Tops Plaza 6256 Furnace Road Ontario, NY 14519 (315) 524-9661 Penn Yan 129 East Elm Street Penn Yan, NY 14527 (315) 536-2300 Wolcott 5996 New Hartford Street Wolcott, NY 14590 (315) 594-6002

It’s all about people!

www.lyonsbank.com


Covers.LIFL.Summer.04

5/13/04

4:55 PM

Page CV4

Circle Reader Service Number 105

Profile for Fahy-Williams Publishing

Life in the Finger Lakes Summer 2004  

Life in the Finger Lakes Summer 2004