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International Earth Month Edition

Issue 18

April 2018

fAce the current TRAVEL

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CULTURE

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MUSIC

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SPORTS & FITNESS

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HEALTH

Ocean Pollution Solution?

Dutch Inventor, Boyan Slat Unleashes “The Ocean Cleanup” on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Jordan Taylor Wright: Own The Power To Be The Change Goes 100% Organic on Cotton Why It’s A BIG Deal Get ‘Purified’ By Music & Nature With Nora en Pure Patagonia Launches ‘Action Works’ Innovative Tech For Renewable Clean Energy

...inspiring positive change in the world


EDITORIAL

F tC fAce the current

editorial

Issue 18 · April 2018

Connect With Us... @facethecurrent @facethecurrent @facethecurrent @facethecurrent

In the Beginning Face the Current was created with the intention to inspire positive change in the world and enhance lives by encouraging one another to relentlessly discover, explore, question and learn from current and emerging information and perspectives. Driven by a deep-rooted love of learning, creative minds and a great appreciation for connection with other individuals who are passionate about what they do, Face the Current has quickly developed into a growing team and global community of incredible people who believe in living life to the fullest and discovering their true potential. “I find it inspiring to connect with others who are following their flow, pursuing and exploring their passions. Their energy is vibrant & contagious and there is often a lot of incredible things to learn from their life experience and the perspectives they have gained.”

Sasha Frate Founder

sashafrate sasha@facethecurrent.com

Cover Image Credits: • •

Front cover by Jordan Taylor Wright Back cover by Amir Zakeri

Available at

(click logo to go)

www.facethecurrent.com For advertisement and sponsor inquiries: Annette Krey, Sales Manager annette@facethecurrent.com David Aiello, Director of Marketing david@facethecurrent.com For writer and contributor inquiries: Sasha Frate, Founder & Editor in Chief sasha@facethecurrent.com All Rights Reserved DISCLAIMER The information provided on this magazine is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Opinions and other statements expressed by the kind souls sharing their viewpoint, users and third parties are theirs alone, not opinions of Face the Current. Content created by third parties is the sole responsibility of the third parties and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. Face the Current Website and third parties may provide links to web pages, web sites, and various resources or locations on the web. Face the Current has no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Face the Current may receive compensation for some links to products and services in this magazine.

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International Earth Month Edition Every April 22nd, millions of people from around the world gather to celebrate Earth Day. It’s an important reminder to acknowledge our natural environment and various ways to preserve and protect it. In communities across the globe, people attend festivals, talks, and engage in municipal conservation efforts. But what does it all really mean? It’s striking that we only remind each other one day a year about perhaps the most pressing human concern-- maintaining our natural resources. What about the rest of the year? Living an environmentally conscious lifestyle is not as daunting a task as it may seem. There are simple actions you can take every day to become more Earth-friendly and eco-conscious. We are taking Earth Month as an opportunity to discuss ways to create a more sustainable world, and this month’s edition is packed with examples, ideas, and insights into solving our environmental issues. Dutch inventor Boyan Slat, who founded The Ocean Cleanup at the age of 18 will renew your faith in mankind as his organization seeks to remedy the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

“It’s not a question of ‘either cleanup OR prevention,’ it’s cleanup AND prevent.” –The Ocean Cleanup Adventurer, filmmaker and proponent of climate change awareness, Jordan Taylor Wright describes his oneness and connection with nature, and how and why he is a huge advocate for environmental conservation. In our interview, he reveals many ways we all own the power to the ‘be the change.’ William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation, introduces groundbreaking ideas regarding technologies that could provide means of producing abundant clean energy, halt and even reverse the ecological damage we’ve incurred. You will also learn more about eco-conscious companies who embrace the values of conservation and sustainability and are raising the bar on corporate activism. Patagonia, of Ventura, California, has developed the Action Works website for individuals to find and connect with organizations working on environmental issues in the same community. prAna, of Carlsbad, California, a manufacturer of sustainable apparel and gear, has switched to 100% organic on all cotton across its entire product line. Their new organic cotton supply chain program, designed to reduce waste and pollution, can serve as a model for the others. So as we welcome the 48th Earth Day celebration, we hope you regard it as more than one day on your calendar. It’s a time renew our commitment to protecting our environment the generations to come. We welcome your sharing of what Earth Day means to you? How will you celebrate? Have you made the commitment to take action every day? We hope you join us in doing just that.

Image Credit: Adam Krowitz

www.facethecurrent.com

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fAce the current Issue 18 · April 2018

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Sasha Frate

Founder and Editor in Chief is a perspective seeker, adventurer, and explorer. She received her Master’s Degree in Liberal Arts and continues to study a variety of subjects within and outside of the academic setting. Frate brings her personal moonshot approach to life to FtC, aiming to provide an experience for our global community where we inspire one another to stay curious, never stop exploring, and to live on-purpose and to potential.

Annette Krey

Executive Assistant to Editor-in-Chief & Sales Manager

Coming from the hospitality industry, Annette has successfully and passionately worked in Sales & Marketing both in the United States and in Germany in different industries. A German native, she has lived in the Portland, Oregon area for almost 8 years. There she learned to love the outdoors and the green lifestyle that plays an important role in the lives of many Oregonians. As a mom of two young children a healthy and sustainable lifestyle is now a big priority for her and she teaches her children to live passionately, be open-minded and to be respectful to our planet and all living things.

David Aiello

Chief Operating Officer is an author, musician and photographer based in Portland, Oregon. He has worked with Fortune 50 companies to build their global brands but now applies his natural curiosity to exploring and documenting the world around him.

Sema Garay

Executive Designer Sema is the graphic designer behind the development of the image and magazine of Face the Current. He has developed a multitude of projects, including his previous job leading the Creative Department of BG Life Magazine, in Marbella, Spain. Sema is passionate about all kinds of artistic expressions, especially music and architecture.

Danny McGee

Brand Engagement & Partnerships Danny is our lead photographer and filmmaker based out of Colorado. For the past 3 years he has traveled all around the world taking photos and making films, creating cutting edge photo and drone video content. Danny has been chasing and living his dream, unafraid to travel solo, travel deeper, or adventure to new heights to capture some of this planet’s most stunning landscapes and life’s precious moments in connection with people, place, and culture. His goal is to not only share his vision of the world, but to inspire people to get out and explore it for themselves.

Michole Jensen

Project & Content Consultant is a journalist, marketer and blogger, Michole is a Northwest native who spent many years directing communications and marketing for a world-class organization in his home state. Michole’s array of skills, curiosity, and a passion for the environment and community, drive his exploration and immersion in both his professional and personal life.


APRIL

CREW David Ryan

is a celebrity trainer in Los Angeles, California and creator of LIFTSTRONG Max Intensity Interval Training. You can get your own personalized HIIT program at www.DavidRyanFitness.com Instagram: @DavidRyanFitness

Woody Woodrow

is a touring musician and yoga instructor. On and off the road he enjoys guiding others through their practice. He believes through relaxation we have no limits to what we can accomplish. Woody is a 200hr RYT and a Strala guide having trained with his friend and mentor Tara Stiles. Music is naturally an important part of his practice and his classroom setting reflects just that. www.woodywoodrow.com Instagram: @woodywoodrow

Matthew Belair

Belair is the author of the best selling book Zen Athlete and the host of the top-rated Matt Belair podcast. He is an explorer of the mind and world and has trained with 34th generation Shaolin Masters in China, studied meditation with monks in Nepal and survived a near-death experience trekking Mount Everest just to name a few of his accomplishments. He is dedicated to teaching others how to expand their consciousness, connect with spirit and bring more awareness, love and kindness to the planet. www.ZenAthlete.com www.MattBelair.com

We are a growing team of Up-standers whose intention is to create positive change in the world, through networking, connecting, supporting and developing at an individual and global community level. We are passionate about building our network of experts and industry leaders to deliver cutting edge information to our global community. This month’s Team and Crew are based in the US, Spain, Germany and Canada.

Kevin Eassa

is a photographer and videographer who is passionate about the outdoors, nature, and shooting landscapes across the world’s craziest locations. He has traveled most his life, even long before buying his first camera. Once his first professional camera was in his hands, Kevin was filled with a newfound passion for photography. Before he knew it, he had dropped out of college to pursue his profound interest. Kevin worked four jobs for six months, putting in 100-120 hours a week until he was able to quit everything, and take his first one-way trip to Europe. From there the rest was history and he has been living his dream, turning his travels into a full time career and lifestyle.

Ronald A. Alexander, PhD is a licensed psychotherapist, leadership consultant, clinical trainer, and the author of the widely acclaimed book, Wise Mind, Open Mind. He is the Executive Director of the OpenMind Training® Institute in Santa Monica, a leading edge organization that offers personal and professional training programs in mindfulness based mind-body therapies, transformational leadership, and meditation. His unique method combines ancient wisdom teachings with positive psychology and creative thinking into a comprehensive integrated, behaviorally effective mind-body program. This system combines techniques that support strategies of personal, clinical, and corporate excellence and growth. www.ronaldalexander.com

Benjamin Decker

is a writer, meditation teacher and holistic business consultant. He is a founding meditation teacher at Unplug Meditation, The DEN Meditation, Wanderlust Hollywood, Mystic Journey, and is the founding Spiritual Director at Full Circle Venice. He is the author of the upcoming book, Practical Meditation (Althea Press), released May 1, 2018 in stores worldwide. www.bendeckermeditation.com

Amanda Hubik

Ainsley Schoppel

is a classical pianist, former figure skater, and loves summers at the lake in northern Ontario. She holds an honours BA in Psychology and Arts & Business, and also earned a graduate degree in Hospitality and Business Management while working at the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida. After working in Toronto on published women-focused research, she moved outside the city to raise her family. While home with her son, she indulges her love of the written word with freelance editing.

William Brown

is a biophysicist and research scientist at The Resonance Science Foundation where he performs theoretical and experimental research to better understand the physics of complex, self-organizing systems, particularly the biological system. Within the theoretical purview, this has revealed important new insights into the processes of biogenesis, evolution, biological intelligence and consciousness. In experimental and applied domains, this has potential applications in new health and wellness technologies, manufacturing, and agriculture. William is passionate about learning and considers that as a fundamental aspect of his work and life. His primary objective is to help bring forth new ideas and technologies to assist humanity and advance civilization. https://resonance.is https://academy.resonance.is

lives in the Pacific Northwest, enjoying the gentle pace of island life. She volunteers her time across various non-profits in the area that focus on women’s equality and leadership, and nurtures her soul by spending time in her various gardening spaces.

www.facethecurrent.com

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CONTENT Issue 18 · April 2018

COVER stories

OCEAN POLLUTION GOES SOLUTION? 100% ORGANIC Dutch Inventor, Boyan ON COTTON Slat Unleashes “The Ocean Cleanup” on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch 50

Why It’s A BIG Deal 92

PATAGONIA LAUNCHES

‘Action Works’ 44 Get ‘Purified’ By Music & Nature With

NORA EN PURE 66

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JORDAN TAYLOR WRIGHT

Own The Power To Be The Change 10

Innovative Tech For Renewable Clean Energy 58


april CONTENT 10. ‘Mirror Reflections’ With Jordan Taylor Wright: Own The Power To Be The Change

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24. f-stop Gear In Review 28. Ftc Travel Connection 44. Patagonia Launches ‘Action Works’: Discover Environmental Groups To Take Action

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50. Ocean Pollution Solution? Dutch Inventor Boyan Slat Unleashes “The Ocean Cleanup” On The Great Pacific Garbage Patch 58. Resonance Science Foundation On The Science Of Innovative Technologies For Renewable Clean Energy And Novel Propulsion 66. Get ‘Purified’ On Nature & Music With Nora En Pure

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72. Yoga For Musicians With Hip Hop Artist & Meditation Guide Sunny Dilinger 78. Four Eco-Friendly Music Festivals That Aim To “Leave No Trace” 82. The Most Sophisticated House Music

s rt s o sp nes it &f

86. Top 7 Dynamic Outdoor Athletic Activities In Nature 92. Eco-Conscious prAna Goes 100% Organic On Cotton Apparel. Why It’s A Big Deal 98. Hiit Yoga With David Ryan Fitness 102. The Wanting Mind

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106. Vitajuwel Gem Water Bottles In Review 108. Healing Nature Of Art Botanica Goes Beyond Aesthetics

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TRAVEL

10. 24. 28. 8

‘Mirror Reflections’ With Jordan Taylor Wright: Own The Power To Be The Change f-stop Gear In Review FtC Travel Connection

FACE the CURRENT MAGAZINE


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FtC travel

‘Mirror Reflections’ With Jordan Taylor Wright

Own The Power To Be The Change Interview By Sasha Frate For a man that prefers to lead a label-free life, Jordan Taylor Wright is many things; he’s a vegan, filmmaker, adventurer, and a proponent of climate change awareness. He is the founder of Taylor Cut Films and has worked with Usher, Justin Bieber, Jennifer Lopez,The Chainsmokers, and Martin Garrix. He has also created and starred in holiday campaigns for Tiffany & Co., Audi, Ferragamo, and Aloft Hotels. While these are impressive career points for Wright, what is most important to him is mindful meditation, living in the present, and expressing oneness with those he encounters. His book and upcoming movie dive deeper into these subjects and highlight the ways he has attained success in his life.

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Seeing how beautiful this earth is would hopefully motivate any person to realize that this is our home and we are very much connected with it. We’re sustained by it, so let’s treat our Mother with respect because she deserves it and so do we.

Sasha Frate: As an avid adventurer and someone who recognizes our oneness and connection with nature, how and why have you started to raise awareness about climate change and advocate for environmental conservation? Jordan Taylor Wright: Seeing how beautiful this earth is would hopefully motivate any person to realize that this is our home and we are very much connected with it. We’re sustained by it so let’s treat it

as such. I love trees, plants, animals, the ocean, and breathing fresh air. The way we consume meat and the way we treat (animals) is directly affecting the amount of CO2 that’s in the atmosphere. If we all consumed even just 25% less meat, we would be able to drastically reverse what we are currently doing to the climate. Let’s treat our Mother with respect because it deserves it and so do we. Traveling is an amazing way to open yourself up…and if you don’t have the means to travel, just save

up a few hundred dollars and go somewhere within (your) country – there’s diversity everywhere if you allow yourself to experience it. Traveling is a beautiful way to have a mirror-reflection of oneness because you realize “Oh, (other people) feel just like I feel and they experience just like I experience. They are just coming from a different perception. What if I came from their perception for a second?” You get to have empathy, which is an amazing thing to have. www.facethecurrent.com

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SF: There is now growing concern around the huge increase in social media-fueled tourism and its effects on remote places. Adventure-travel has been on the rise but so have ecotourism, conscious travel, and sustainable travel. What does conscious and stainable travel mean for you and why do you believe it’s important for people to take this approach when possible?

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JW: What are your intentions? Why you are going to these places? Instagram and social media are beautiful outlets to share, express and connect but, why are you doing it? Are you doing it because you want to portray a facade or a lifestyle to make other people jealous? Are you trying to fill a void within yourself because of your current unhappiness? Are you doing it because you really want to see the world and experience as much beauty as you can while we’re within this human

vessel? Intention is everything. If your intention is to feel and experience as much love as possible, you can be a beautiful mirror-reflection for other people to feel and experience love as well.You’re inherently going to have a conscious travel experience because you’re not travelling just to stay at a luxurious 5-star resort. You’re doing it because you want to feel what it’s like to actually live there. It’s just reworking your intention. Social media is beautiful in that way because people are seeing


As an adult, you get to re-program and delete all of these societal notions. Your brain is a computer and your ego is an operating system, so let’s do a system reset and start from a base-point of nothing.

this mirror-reflection of how much beauty actually exists within the world. There are a lot of beautiful creators on social media but there are a lot of people that are (creating) to cause envy or because they think that it is what people want to see. Intention is very important; if we can align ourselves with the correct intentions, then our external world will be that of our intentions. Hopefully, this allows people to just (look) within themselves and ask

“Why am I doing this? Am I currently happy?” SF: What do you mean by “everyone is an explorer?” Would you say you’ve always been an explorer; an adventurer? JW: It starts with exploring within yourself, within your own imagination. It’s just being in a state of meditation and allowing whatever you’re

feeling to be the visual projection of what you are experiencing. So, as children we can be in our bedroom and think the floor is lava and that we’re jumping from volcano to volcano.You are allowing yourself to be open to channeling light and creativity that’s within you without being programmed and subjected to what society has to say. (As adults,) you get to re-program and delete all of these (societal) notions.Your brain is a computer and your ego is an operating system so let’s do a system reset and start from a basepoint of nothing.You can call it law of attraction, you can call it karma; you can call it whatever. It’s our internal feeling becoming that of our external world. If you are traveling to beautiful places but you are still operating from your ego and mind-body, you’re not actually there.You can be in the most beautiful rain forest in Costa Rica but if you’re thinking about the work you have to do on Monday when you get back, or the stresses that you have, or the sadness of a break-up, then are you truly there? It’s about the allowance to just be within yourself and just witness everything. We get to become not only an explorer within our own minds, but within this physical realm as well. SF: You’ve worked with some big names through your production company,Taylor Cut Films, including Usher, J.Lo, Chainsmokers, and Justin Bieber, to name a few. Where do you source your inspiration for the videos you create and how does starring in some of the videos you produce help you to keep true to your vision? JW: It’s about learning that you are a faucet. The creativity is always flowing – it’s always there, it’s just whether or not you’re blocking it. Creating with these beautiful people was an alignment…when I www.facethecurrent.com

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was creating with Usher, I had just graduated school and he was starring in an off-Broadway show. We just connected because I resonated with (his) music so it was effortless to kind of allow that to flow. I love making movies. (Taylor Cut Films) is in production of a film right now… and when you are all channeling one visual and you are all creating together to make this one story, it becomes something much larger than yourself. It’s currently where (the world is) heading, especially with all these amazing social movements that are happening. It’s exciting to see that people are operating from their heart-space and they’re willing to do it with a lot of other amazing people as well.

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the presence of creative (minds) that are high-up within their industries, allowed me to have a realization that creating with these people isn’t going to make me happier. It’s a beautiful collaboration that gets to happen, but if I am doing it because I want JW: I think it’s been a beautiful to be able to say “I created with mirror-reflection. When I first started, Usher or Justin Bieber,” then it’s the I was creating from a place of ego wrong intention. It’s about creating in a sense that I wanted to create, with other beautiful creative (minds) but I also wanted to make money. I so you can make something larger also wanted to have recognition and together. In that way, it’s a beautiful I wanted people to validate what mirror- reflection to see that people I was doing. A lot of us are scared of certain statures aren’t more or of dying and (therefore) want the less happy than you just because they life we’re living to have some merit have money and fame. My analogy is and some value. For some reason, that you are playing Mario, running we hold merit and value in other around within his world, having fun people’s recognition rather than our and then, because of where you’re own happiness. Being with icons, or in SF: What has been your biggest takeaway in working with celebrity talents, and how has this experience shaped your path and content creation process?


Allow the money to be a reward, like sprinkles on top of a vegan ice cream sundae. If you start making money by operating from your heart-space, then you can use that to re-energize and re-fuel everything that you’re making. It then becomes a self-sustained eco-system of love, creativity and gratitude, as opposed to a black-hole of wanting.

allowing yourself to go, you stumble upon gold coins. It’s not that you aim to get all those coins because then, ultimately, the journey is no longer fun. Allow the money to be a reward, like sprinkles on top of a vegan ice cream sundae. If you start making money by operating from your heart-space, then you can use that to re-energize and re-fuel everything that you’re making. It then becomes a self-sustained eco-system of love, creativity and gratitude, as opposed to a black-hole of wanting. SF: For the Justin Bieber music video “Company,” what elements/scenes from that video did you produce? It looks like a massive project to capture everything that is featured in

this video. JW: The “Company” video was shot and edited by my friend Rory Kramer, and then I colored it for him. He was touring with the Chainsmokers and he came home one weekend to put together a video for “Closer” which was going to be their next single. I had footage that I had already shot and I gave all of it to him to create something larger. We spent two days just having fun in Malibu and then that next week, I believe, (the video) came out. I remember he said to me “I think the song is going to be really big. It might have 100 million views.” I was excited just to be able to create something with him. Now it has 2 billion views and it’s a very humbling experience. We created it because we

wanted to create something together. We didn’t go into it like “Oh, we’re two super filmmakers that are going to make something awesome.” That’s not how the universe works.You do it because you love it and then all of a sudden other people love it. In terms of my relationship with Justin...I get to have all these really intimate and amazing experiences with him based on normal life interactions. When I was touring with Usher, (Justin and I) were in the studio together, or it was his birthday party, or it was getting dinner or playing table tennis. It’s just a blessing to be able to see (Justin) for who he is. The reason he’s even successful is because he loves (his craft) and he’s incredibly talented at everything that he does. It’s amazing to call him a friend. www.facethecurrent.com

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We can be a mirror for other people to see happiness and they can look into it and hopefully it feels good for them. You can’t change people. You can only give them a different lens to look through and a different mirror to look into. It’s about removing all of the external attachments and layers that we currently hold. Society puts a lot onto us and we get to remove it if we want to.

SF: My take-away from watching (the “Company” video) is it really humanized him.You normally just see an ego-type of vision in the way that he’s portrayed the majority of the time.The type of scenes that you captured with him, and the behind-the-scenes, peeled off those layers and really humanized him which was really nice. JW: We’re all the same at our core; we’re all that light. We’re all mirrorreflections of light; we just come from different perceptions. The only thing that’s separating us is our mind; our projection of our reality. We can be a mirror for other people to see happiness and they can look into it and hopefully it feels good for them.

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You can’t change people.You can only give them a different lens to look through and a different mirror to look into. It’s about removing all of the external attachments and layers that we currently hold. Society puts a lot onto us and we get to remove it if we want to. SF: With your production company, you work with a lot of different types of content creation, including landscape, editorial, portrait photography, commercials, music videos, and films. Do you have a favorite area to work in and what would be your top 3 tips for those wanting to enhance their content creation to create the compelling digital narratives?

JW: I don’t have a favorite. It’s all what the feeling is within the moment. I just got back from Alaska. We are filming a scene for our movie with the Northern Lights and there were moments where I wanted just to appreciate them, there were moments where I wanted to take a time-lapse, and there were moments where I wanted video footage. It’s really however you want the medium to express the story. The advice I’d give would be: What’s the story you want to tell and why do you want to tell it? Is it through a photo? Is it writing into a notebook? What is the story and why are you expressing it? We all share this same internal light so (whatever you do) is going to feel true to somebody else as well. Just allow whatever true feelings are


happening to pass through you and then just continue to practice doing it because that’s what it is to grow. Even if the video, photo or whatever it may be doesn’t come out exactly the way you wanted it to, you’re doing something true. We all deserve to feel that trueness. SF: How would you describe your ‘road trip style?’ Do you keep it spontaneous or are you the “plan 3-6-12 months ahead” kind of road-tripper? JW: I don’t expect or plan anything. I have a general wanting or a notion of what feels good and I allow that to be the direction in which I am heading. But no, even for this past trip to Alaska, I was flying back from Oregon where we were shooting a scene

from the movie in a treehouse and on the flight I just became compelled to write another scene with the Northern Lights. I wrote the scene on the plane and luckily the crew and cast were there. I remember, in the middle of the flight I went back and spoke to everyone, and we all got excited. We ended up booking the flights three days later. We had members on the team that were like “are the Northern Lights even happening around this time of the year?” It just felt right to me. The first thing (we saw) the night we landed was the most brilliant, beautiful, bright Northern Lights. It’s about trusting that intuition that we have within ourselves. If you trust that everything is going to be beautiful, then it will all be beautiful and you might end up

stumbling into experiences that you never thought were going to happen. Be open and trust that what you want will actually occur. Life then becomes really beautiful because you’re living within the unknown. SF: You simplify “the truth of our existence” with one simple phrase: “Harmony of mind, body, and spirit.” Why do you believe so many people are out of alignment or ‘harmony’ with these elements and what are some of the things you envision as being helpful to awaken and harmonize people to experience oneness; oneness of mind/body/ spirit and also with humanity and the universe within and around us? www.facethecurrent.com

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JW: As humans, we are just the mind, body and spirit. The spirit is the light that’s within all of us. The reason a lot of people are unaligned right now is because we’ve been operating from our mind-body for a very long time. The ego has been the guiding narrative of who we are. By understanding the body and loving the body, you get to realize that the body is actually an extension of every living thing that’s on this planet; we hold that within our very DNA and it doesn’t change. My book that is coming out within the next two weeks or so is called Forever in the Infinite Now and the three chapters are the mind, body and the spirit. It

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dives a lot deeper into these notions where the mind is your computer and the ego is the operating system. It gives tips and tricks on how to remove programs that have been installed into us by society. The body is our vessel which is also our hard drive so everything we don’t process within our mind-body we then store in our subconscious or within our physical body – that’s why we have aches, pains and ailments. Yoga, breathing, and running are amazing ways to release all of these attachments and blockages within our physical body. Time is a linear construct so if you are thinking about the past you’re living in the

past, if you’re thinking about the future you’re living in the future. The now is infinite and we are observing everything. The book is a beautiful way to get that understanding in (tandem) with the film that we have coming out this summer called “The Discovery of the Divine Consciousness.” It has a lot of visuals that will hopefully touch people. SF: Labels are part of our society and culture – they’re identifiers to understand what people do; you’re an “adventurer,” a “videographer” a “business owner…” Labels can be problematic in the sense


Ultimately, society labels as a way to put people into certain boxes so that way structure can exist – but we aren’t structure. I think even the way content is being created and stories are being told nowadays is removing all that.

JW: Labels are just a bi-product of the ego. Ultimately, society labels as a way to put people into certain boxes

that they often lead to ego (or lack of self-esteem/confidence), and disparity – comparing and spotlighting our differences rather than illuminating our sameness. This is not to devalue unique differences we all possess, because they are of value – this is simply to unveil and remove these labels to illuminate our oneness. Can you share a bit about your approach to dealing with this concept of “labels” and how you create dialogue around this in your content and stories?

so that way structure can exist – but we aren’t structure. I think even the way content is being created and stories are being told nowadays is removing all that. Even the title “The Shape of Water” which won best film...think about that! What is the shape of water? It morphs and that was what del Toro was trying to project. He does it in a way that teaches you to love monsters or love your fears because those don’t exist. Again, it’s a perception. If you perceive something as a monster it’s going to exist but if you love it, is it a monster anymore? No! It’s the same with our demons, our fears, our stressors; same with anything that may be blocking us from

feeling whole and happy. In terms of removing all of these labels… it’s just disassociating yourself from it and realizing you are nothing and everything. That’s all that is. It’s a feeling. It’s a feeling of just being happy because when you’re truly happy and living in the present, you’re not thinking about anything else. SF: Kids are our future. Kids these days are inundated with technology and the world telling them what they should do and what they should look like.You created a short film, “The Fable of the Awakened Child” that speaks to the concept of the innate “knowing” that children www.facethecurrent.com

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have. How do you believe we can better guide our children to “stay woke,” to strengthen and listen to their inner voice so it can overpower the ‘societal voice?’ JW: I think what we admire so much in children is that they are a blank slate or sponge; they are just perceiving the world through the light that’s already in them and they have no notion of what things are until we start to tell them. What’s beautiful about today’s society of children is they are growing up in a world that is more open and liberal than ever before. The movements that

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are happening are because children understand that this world can be something more beautiful. That’s the beauty of social media; even though it may drive some people to want to conform or be something other than that which they are, it’s also allowing them to see a lot more of the world. They can hopefully use that mirror-reflection to feel unity within everyone and I think that’s why these movements are happening. If you have children, allow yourself to be really happy and trust that you are a good parent.Your child just gets to look at this mirror-reflection of happiness and contentment, and then that’s what shapes them. They get to

grow up in a space that is like a tree that is allowed to grow its roots. If you try to grow a giant tree in a box, it’s going to grow up in a form and not be what it could possibly become. Give it the space to grow and allow yourself to grow into what you want to grow into by not labeling yourself. Each generation that comes is stepping into a world that is more open than ever before. I have a lot of faith in the younger generation that’s coming because they have a lot of beautiful notions. SF: How did you discover your love of mindful meditation and living in the now?


JW: It came from wanting to feel good. I always operated from my mind-body in thoughts and in speaking to other people – listening to what other people were saying and knowing whether or not their words resonated. Living within a state of meditation is knowing that you aren’t your thoughts. So, what we’re thinking right now is not what we’re going to be thinking thirty seconds from now or what we were thinking 30 seconds ago. Realize that we are unattached to those thoughts. It can start with just saying words like “thankful” or “gratitude” or “love” and allowing that to be your intention. If you feel overwhelmed,

it’s ok to just sit and close your eyes. Focus on your breathing, feel your stomach fully extend when you breathe in and fully retract when you breathe out. Then you separate yourself from your thoughts and you get back to that centering place. Now you know what that space feels like. Give yourself enough practice to live within that space and then if you start to feel anything other than that, go back to it; it’s always there. SF: You are pretty holistic in your lifestyle .What led you to become a vegan and how do you maintain a balance in the health area of your life with your

constant world-travels and busy work schedule? JW: I realized that I love this planet, I love the animals, and I love this body that I am in. Then I realized that it’s this beautiful vessel that I get to live in within this existence so I want to treat it with respect and treat everything else with respect. I don’t like killing and I (don’t) want to kill. (Eating vegan) is easy and especially with today’s society, it’s becoming a much bigger market. It’s also better for the environment as a whole. Know why you’re eating what you’re eating. If we are putting stuff into our body that isn’t meant to sustain us, www.facethecurrent.com

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we’re not going to feel sustained and we’re not going to feel good. We’re not going to operate the way we’re supposed to operate. Unfortunately, people have been consuming things that are not meant for them for so long and that’s become their baselevel of what they think life should feel like. Try going plant-based for a week or do a cleanse and then you’ll have a new metric of what feels good. SF: Quitting sugar, that feels amazing.That’s so hard for people to do. JW: Eating sugar is a short-term means of feeling good because your taste buds feel really good and you feel really good within that moment. Ultimately, it’s not sustaining you and

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it’s going to lead to another feeling of emptiness. Do things and eat things that are going to allow you to feel good for a longer period of time. (Life) doesn’t have to be these short-term glimpses of happiness – it can be one long infinite moment of happiness. SF: You’re releasing your new book soon, titled Forever in the Infinite Now, which not only has a beautiful visual storytelling element, but you’ve also created audio to accompany the ‘experience.’ Can you share a bit about the concept of this book and why you chose to create this multi-sensory experience with it?

JW: It’s ultimately from the way I was removing “programs” and getting into a state of meditation. I would write down what I was thinking or what was passing through me. That was the start of the book. I am not my mind. I am not my ego. I am not this program. The process of writing is a beautiful way of using your physical body. I would then listen to meditation music or certain frequencies…and that’s how I was able to create the book. For people to read it while listening to music that’s meant for meditation or relaxation, it will hopefully allow them to just get to that place of homeostasis. The first few pages of the book focus on your breathing. That might be a thing that people


My intention is that I love feeling good and happy, and I want other people to feel really good and happy as well. We then all get to feel really good and happy together and that’s a beautiful place to live in.

have never done before. Maybe they have never focused on their breathing, maybe they’ve never meditated. To get to a state of meditation before you even start reading the book means you’re digesting it at the base of who you actually are and hopefully it allows you to resonate with it. My intention is that I love feeling good and happy, and I want other people to feel really good and happy as well. We then all get to feel really good and happy together and that’s a beautiful place to live in. So, I am excited for people to read the book. It’s going to be exciting. SF: Where or what did you study/ research to create your book?

JW: A lot of it is life experience, what feels good and what worked. We have infinite information at our fingertips or literally flowing though us if we open ourselves up to it. Our DNA is that of everything that’s ever existed within the universe and you can tap into that. That isn’t an impossible notion. Science was always my favorite subject in school but science can limit you in that you don’t believe in something bigger. For each (reader) it’s not preaching, it’s presenting a mirror. If you enjoy what you’re looking at and it feels true, then ultimately, that’s your truth. We all hold within us that feeling of truth and it’s just whether we want to believe it or not.

SF: So, it’s kind of a collective of life and personal experience; a self-study. JW: Yes, it’s studying your Zen and studying science. I’ve always been fascinated with as much information as possible but then you reach the point of things that we don’t know. It’s the not-knowing that scares a lot of people. There are things I can’t understand, but I get to witness (them) and I get to express (myself).

ymore info: http://www.taylorcutfilms.com/ Social media: @taylorcutfilms www.facethecurrent.com

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FtC travel

f-stop Gear In Review By Danny McGee - Adventure Photographer

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Complete with the same key features as its larger Mountain Series counterparts, the Lotus blends in just as well in urban settings as it does in the mountains.

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f-stop, a leading innovator in adventure camera carry, created the f-stop pack systems, which is now widely recognized for their rugged build, comfort, and modularity. I never understood the hype surrounding f-stop until I agreed to put the Lotus, one of f-stop’s bags amongst its growing Mountain Series, through its paces. Just as soon as I opened the box I could tell this was a durable, highly versatile bag. At 32 liters, the Lotus is the smallest pack in f-stop’s Mountain Series line-up. But it’s a perfect size for me. I work fast and I don’t want to be switching packs. If you pack light,

it’s big enough to easily get by for a weekend backpacking trip, yet not so big as to be uncomfortable in an urban setting. One of the best features for me is that the main compartment of the bag is easily customizable. The ICU, or Internal Camera Unit, with its interchangeable compartments, can be customized to fit just about every occasion. The heavy duty foam padding and Velcro® straps work together to keep your gear secure, protected and accessible. When you’re ready to shoot, all of your gear inside the ICU is accessible via the back panel opening. I like this

design because it requires you to zip the pack up before putting it on. The upper opening of the pack also has a few zippered compartments, which can be used for important things, like snacks! I like that with the ICU, all your camera gear remains in one place. For example, I was heading to do some canyoneering, which required a waterproof bag. With my f-stop ICU, it was just a matter of taking out of the normal bag and throwing it into the waterproof one, and I didn’t have to worry about my gear rattling around.

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In the past too, if I wanted to use my bag for anything other than photography I would have to remove all my camera gear one piece at a time, and then change the layout and dividers all individually. With the Lotus it’s as easy as removing the ICU and that’s it! You now have a backpack you can throw your laptop

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into and head down to a coffee shop, grocery store, or enjoy a day at the beach. The Lotus also looks and feels great! The overall backpack appearance and neutral color do not draw attention as bag filled with valuable equipment. It also has a large waist strap to

keep the pack secure and alleviate weight from your shoulders. In fact, I’ve gotten compliments on this pack from people while walking through downtown Los Angeles, and also from people in local villages in the jungles of Indonesia (not exaggerating, they loved it!).


Overall, the Lotus proved rugged and dependable. Carrying it, my gear felt secure and solid. I really like the ability to configure the organizational compartments to my needs by getting different ICU sizes. But in my opinion those are not the main reasons to get one of the bags. What I love about f-stop is that they aren’t

just a brand selling products, they are also trying to build a community. This is a community of likeminded people from all over the world who dare to live life to the fullest. They allow all of us, the travelers, adventurers, athletes, artists, and more to share our stories. When you buy an f-stop bag, you’re not just getting

a bag, you’re getting an invite to a community—and I like it here!

ymore info: http://fstopgear.com Shop this featured product: http://fstopgear.com/products/ packs/lotus

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FtC travel

FtC Travel Connection Wanderlusters, Adventurers, Explorers, and Travel Photographers –‘Sharing Our Stories’ ftc travel connection

Amir Zakeri

PLACE I Call Home: HAWAII Instagram: @amirzakeri www.youtube.com/user/amirazakeri/

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What does ‘conscious travel’ mean to you? Conscious travel to me is a mindfulness for the world and other people, their culture and language. It’s about having a different mindset about travel, changing our values and perception of the world and having a common respect for the land of which we visit. The world is everchanging as people’s mindsets are shifting and consciously waking up. People are beginning to sway away from traveling as a mediocre tourist,

not delving into the new domain, learning about it’s people and culture. There is a new beginning of the desire to have more than surface level experiences, people wanting to return home from a trip feeling enlightened and transformed. For me, I feel my first travel experience was the most eye opening, awakening experience of my life. I traveled alone to the Philippines and cruised around with locals, learning about the country and it’s culture on my endeavors. Something that caught my eye was the plastic litter

issue and how many people were ok with littering and not being environmentally responsible. I believe whether you are a local or a tourist it is your responsibility to take care of the land you walk and be mindful of the local environment.

ftC fAce the current

travel connection www.facethecurrent.com

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What are some of your top picks of ways that we can put ‘sustainable travel’ into action? Reading and educating yourself about the country and it’s culture shows a huge respect before visiting. Support local restaurants, farmers markets, hotels and businesses wherever you go. Reduce your single-use plastic use! Many countries, especially Southeast Asia, don’t have clean tap water, requiring you to buy bottled or filtered

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water. To save yourself money and the environment, travel with a water bottle that has a built in filter to clean your water. Use your social influence to raise awareness and inspire others to make these positive changes. It’s essential that we make these small amends and inspire our friends and family to be more conscious travelers. It only takes a few conscious choices to really make a difference and help us to enrich the lives of others on our journeys.


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travel connection

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ftc travel connection

Cody Duncan

PLACE I Call Home: I’m a bit nomadic, so I don’t have one place to call home! Instagram: @thenomad www.thenomadphoto.com

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ftC fAce the current

travel connection

What does ‘conscious travel’ mean to you? Conscious travel to me means taking the time to be prepared before you disembark on your next adventure. For example, when I was still in university I had travelled through Asia during a study abroad program and

was by no means traveling sustainably, however from that trip I observed the conditions and consciously thought about what I could change the next time I visited. When I went back, just this past year to places like Thailand,Vietnam, and Indonesia I remembered how polluted the rivers and beaches were with trash,

specifically plastic bottles. This time around I brought a refillable water bottle that I tried to use whenever possible and tried to get the largest size of water bottles if I had to buy new to reduce the amount of small plastic water bottles I was discarding. What does ‘conscious travel’ mean to you? www.facethecurrent.com

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What are some ways you envision that people can get involved to reduce our carbon footprint, preserve our National Parks and natural landscapes as we explore and experience our world? I have been non-stop traveling for the last 2 years of my life, which forces you to learn how to travel

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light and how to make the most with what you have. I’ve also learned that we as humans really don’t need that much stuff to make us happy. In fact, I believe I am happier now than when I had more material things. From traveling I have realized how much we use and waste on a daily basis, which of course contributes to your carbon footprint. I believe recycling is great and we should all

recycle but the initiative is, in order of importance: reduce, reuse, recycle. People can start reducing their carbon footprint in everyday life by simply consuming less. If we all buy and use less things and then reuse what we do have, we will significantly reduce the effect of our carbon footprint on our home.


What are some of your top picks of ways that we can put ‘sustainable travel’ into action? One of the biggest ways we can put sustainable travel into action is by doing our research before we travel; choosing the right tour company that puts sustainability as one of its primary focuses is key. Just a couple of months ago I visited the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico and I planned to have a more sustainable trip. I did my research and found a tour company that goes above and beyond to reduce their footprint by providing guests with refillable water bottles, transportation that uses

renewable resources, attractions and locations that aren’t damaging to the ecosystem, and the food provided was farmed locally, organically, and sustainably. Another big way we can travel sustainably is by choosing to offset our carbon footprint while flying. Travel, especially international travel, is becoming cheaper and therefore people are flying more. Unfortunately, flying accounts for a huge portion of green house gas emissions. Many airlines offer a chance to offset the cost of your footprint simply by paying for it, the money collected is typically used to fund projects aimed

at investing in renewable energy sources, protecting forests, and reducing carbon emissions. I think these are two incredible easy and simple ways to put sustainable travel into action.

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travel connection

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ftc travel connection

Kevin Eassa

PLACE I Call Home: Ellicott City, Maryland Instagram: @kevineassa www.kevineassa.com

ftC fAce the current

Montserrat, Spain

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travel connection


What does ‘conscious travel’ mean to you? Conscious travel to me means a lot. First and foremost, it means being aware of the world you are entering into, and not just being an obnoxious traveler. Being aware that not everybody has the same upbringing and culture; not everyone has the

same childhood, teenage years, adulthood, or some of the privileges that I personally have been given. It is sometimes hard to grasp, but many of the people you meet while traveling (not necessarily including other travelers) have never left their own country, city, or 5 mile radius. Some people work in a shack selling bottled

water to tourists and never leave that shack their entire life. Conscious travel, among many other things, is having mindfulness to understand people are different, and the world is extremely stratified, it is super important to help these people, to be humble and understanding towards them, and lastly to be extra

Lake Tahoe, California www.facethecurrent.com

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grateful for the privileged life I have been given. There are hundreds of examples of this, every single time I go to Southeast Asia I always have experiences with people who have never left their island or 5 mile radius, because they are born and Silver Falls, Oregon

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do what their parents tell them to, which is to work the family shack, and also because there isn’t really much opportunity to do anything else. People ask me all the time my favorite place in the world, and my answer is always the Philippines and

Indonesia. When I tell locals of those countries that, they are absolutely mesmerized. I think it is because they have a conception towards Americans that we are ‘top of the world,’ I totally understand where they are coming from, and most people don’t


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travel connection

Paris, France www.facethecurrent.com

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What are some ways you envision that people can get involved to reduce our carbon footprint, preserve our National Parks and natural landscapes as we explore and experience our world? People who travel (for the most part) I like to believe are very conscious and sustainable. Traveling opens up people’s eyes, and exposes them to a world that others don’t get to experience, and it is such an amazing and humbling thing. We see people who have nothing when we come from everything, even if we don’t always appreciate it. My friends and I, as influencers, have a duty to help spread awareness and help people enforce sustainable travel. For example, when I post certain photos of beautiful places in the USA, I geotag “Protect our public lands.” People ask me about this all the time, and obviously that’s not an actual location. However people need to be aware that if certain things

Kyoto, Japan

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travel connection

Siem Reap, Cambodia are not cared for and certain actions are not taken, our incredible public lands will no longer be so beautiful. When I travel I also try to recycle every time possible, I pick up trash when I see it, and as hard as it is

for me personally, I try to eat vegan sometimes. I can in no way call myself vegan, but by sometimes choosing a vegan alternative meal, it reduces the impact on animals and lands, and neither were “abused� to get that

final meal. Also, when I roll up to one of the 7 wonders of the world and I see trash, it makes me sad, so I will pick it up in a heartbeat, and I think when people see this, hopefully it inspires them to do the same.

Oregon www.facethecurrent.com

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EXPLORE WITH US FtC

culture fAce the current

44. Patagonia LAUNCHES ‘Action Works’: DISCOVER ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS TO TAKE ACTION 50. Ocean Pollution Solution? Dutch Inventor Boyan Slat Unleashes “The Ocean Cleanup” on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch 58. Resonance Science Foundation on the Science of Innovative Technologies for Renewable Clean Energy and Novel Propulsion

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The Delegate Program:

Offers a innovative learning environment for people interested in exploring a unified science model, its implications and applications in consciousness and technology development and its impact on our daily lives and the state of our planet. Learn & explore alongside Nassim Haramien, Academy Faculty and Delegates from over 80 countries.


BECOME A RESONANCE ACADEMY DELEGATE JOIN US IN PERU For 2 Annual Gathering In 2018 nd

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FtC culture

Patagonia LAUNCHES ‘Action Works’

DISCOVER ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS TO TAKE ACTION By David Aiello When thinking about the environment, I have to remind myself that “the environment” isn’t a just a park or a mountain or a river. It’s the ground we walk on every day—it’s our homes, neighborhoods, cities, the lands we live and play on. We immerse ourselves in it like slipping into an old comfortable shirt. Although in some cases that shirt just isn’t that comfortable anymore.

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Since 1973 Patagonia has provided nearly $90 million to grassroots environmental organizations around the world.

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Credit: Ken Etzel


I like to try to recast any discussion of environmental conservation from a political or economic discourse to one of responsibility. According to an article titled, World Population Growth, published on ourworldindata.org, “Between 1900 and 2000, the increase in world population was three times greater than during the entire previous history of humanity—an increase from 1.5 to 6.1 billion in just 100 years.” That alone should convince us that we all have responsibility to address the resulting impact we are having on this planet. Thankfully, many individuals and businesses are committed to helping protect and preserve the environment. One such organization is Patagonia, a leading designer of outdoor clothing and gear, based in Ventura, California. Since 1973 Patagonia has provided nearly $90 million to grassroots environmental organizations around the world. This assistance in the form of grants are given to hundreds of community-based groups every year who are creating positive change for the planet. Currently about 722 of these “grantees” are based across the United States and are working on issues in the areas of land, water, climate, communities, and biodiversity.

Credit: Ken Etzel

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INTRODUCING PATAGONIA ACTION WORKS This past February, Patagonia launched new tools for individuals to find and connect with grantee organizations working on environmental issues in the same community. “Action Works is a comprehensive online platform that enables our customers to take action to help with local issues in a variety of meaningful ways. It perfectly supports our founder,Yvon Chouinard’s desire to get people to discover and connect with environmental action groups and get involved with the work they do,” explains Sam Merch, Patagonia’s Activism Marketing Coordinator. Action Works helps answer the question, “What can I do

to help?” This platform makes it easy to find and connect with environmental nonprofits who are working every day on local environmental issues. It also provides links for grassroots organizations who are new to Patagonia to apply for funding. Since its launch, the site has been leveraged by hundreds of Patagonia’s grantees in the U.S. to post events, petitions and skill based volunteering opportunities. “The response has been wonderful,” said Merch. “We have seen hundreds of thousands of our customers and online audiences visit the site with many taking actions to support environmental organizations in their local areas, or organizations working on issues they care about.”

Action Works is a comprehensive online platform that enables our customers to take action to help with local issues in a variety of meaningful ways. It perfectly supports our founder, Yvon Chouinard’s desire to get people to discover and connect with environmental action groups and get involved with the work they do.

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Credit: Patagonia


Credit: Ken Etzel A SUCCESS STORY With high-profile organizations like the Nature Conservancy and the Sierra Club, both 2017 grantees, establishing profiles on Action Works, the site is gaining recognition within the conservation community. But Merch is quick to point out that, “Beyond those organizations, our focus is helping local, grassroots efforts to post their opportunities to meet the needs of their calls to action and campaigns.” One such local organization is Pacific Rivers based in Portland, Oregon. Their mission is to protect and restore the watershed ecosystems of the West in order to preserve the region’s freshwater heritage.

Pacific Rivers has been a grantee of Patagonia’s foundation giving for many years. So when they learned of Action Works, they were eager to use it to engage people who are concerned about issues impacting the area’s rivers, waters and fisheries. Executive Director, John Kober explains, “Our use of Action Works has been extremely positive to date. We’ve already connected with talented people who bring technical and scientific expertise that we need through Action Works. For example, we were able to connect with a geomorphologist who is advising us on a clean drinking water analysis that we are currently working on.” www.facethecurrent.com

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Credit: Ken Etzel ALIGNING WITH SHARED VALUES

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Patagonia has been supporting grassroots environmental efforts for over 40 years. They have built relationships with organizations that are working on the root causes of problems and that approach issues with a commitment to long-term change.

The fact that Patagonia is closely aligned with Pacific Rivers, an organization with shard values, differentiates this effort from other similar skill matching sites. Patagonia has been supporting grassroots environmental efforts for over 40 years. They have built relationships with organizations that are working on the root causes of problems and that approach issues with a commitment to long-term change. Merch adds, “Because we believe that the most direct path to real change is through building grassroots momentum, our funding focuses on organizations that create a strong base of citizen support. We vet these organizations carefully, so when our customers and audience see the organizations on Action Works they can be assured they are doing impactful work to protect the wild places and communities we care about.”


Credit: Patagonia

A HERITAGE OF SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY For decades, Patagonia has been channeling their business success to help implement solutions to local environmental issues. They know firsthand how hard it is for nonprofits to stand out and get their message across. Action Works is a new, powerful tool aimed to make these groups more effective and powerful than ever before. It is this devotion to their core value of

environmental responsibility combined with a love of wild and beautiful places that drives Patagonia to continue to inspire and empower others to find solutions to the planet’s environmental issues.

ymore info: www.patagonia.com www.patagonia.com/actionworks www.facethecurrent.com

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FtC culture

Ocean Pollution Solution? Dutch Inventor Boyan Slat Unleashes “The Ocean Cleanup” on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Interview by Sasha Frate | all images provided by the ocean cleanup Here is something scary.The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the largest accumulation of ocean plastic in the world and is located between Hawaii and California.The mass estimated to comprise 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic, spans 617,763 square miles (1.6 million square km), about three times the size of France. Even scarier? It’s not the only marine trash vortex—it’s just the biggest.The Atlantic and Indian Oceans both have trash vortexes. In addition to being harmful to marine life, the debris threatens algae and plankton communities, which are critical to the entire marine food web. Here is something encouraging. Boyan Slat is a Dutch inventor who creates technologies to solve societal problems. He is the founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup, which develops advanced systems to rid world’s oceans of plastic. Even more encouraging? Slat’s company,The Ocean Cleanup, is now preparing to launch the first full-scale operational clean-up system into the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by mid-2018.

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Boyan Slat is the youngest-ever recipient of the United Nation’s highest environmental accolade, the Champion of the Earth. In 2015, HM King Harald of Norway awarded Boyan the maritime industry’s Young Entrepreneur Award. Foreign Policy included Boyan in their 2015 list of preeminent thought leaders. In 2017, he was given the Thor Heyerdahl Award for maritime innovation.

Now meet the amazing man behind The Ocean Cleanup, chosen by TIME Magazine as one of the Best Inventions of 2015, as The Ocean Cleanup shares his amazing insights with Face the Current. TOC talks about how he plans to attack this crisis, while naming the top culprits contributing to this disaster and most important, how Slat thinks he can solve the problem in five years at a fraction of the estimated cost.

www.facethecurrent.com

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A young monk seal on Laysan Island holds a plastic fragment in his mouth.

A bird surrounded by ocean plastic on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Credit: Matthew Chauvin

Sasha Frate: Why did you decide to tackle the ocean as your area of focus for cleanup? The Ocean Cleanup: I was 16 years old, and I was diving in Greece in the summer of 2011, and suddenly I realized I came across more plastic bags than fish. So I wondered “why can’t we just clean this up?” Everyone told me: “Oh there’s nothing you can do about plastic once it gets into the oceans.” I wondered whether that was true. For a high school science project, I dedicated half a year to

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understanding the problem itself, and why it’s so difficult to clean up. This eventually led to the passive cleanup concept being born. SF: At age 19 you invented an ocean cleanup solution that aims to address an area of ocean where “using vessels and nets would [otherwise] take thousands of years and cost billions of dollars to complete.” Named as one of the Best Inventions of 2015 by TIME Magazine, you have come a long way in a very short amount of time. What is the latest status

of The Ocean Cleanup? TOC: Since the announcement of our new system design (from moored to free-floating) in May 2017, the team has worked diligently to move the project from concept to reality. Detailed engineering was conducted, procurements took place and shipping of system elements started early 2018. The assembly site, in Alameda California, kicked-off operations in mid-March. Simultaneously, tests are taking place in the Netherlands, both in the North Sea and in test basins, to assess the


The plastic pollution problem always has been portrayed as something that is impossible to solve. When someone tells you something is impossible, the absoluteness of that statement should be enough to make you wary, and investigate more. History is sort of a long list of things that were impossible, and then were done.

The Ocean Cleanup computer rendering, close-up view. Credit: Erwin Zwart

new screen design, which was chosen to be the best fit in early 2018. After assembly has completed, the Pacific trials for the first system will take place in late spring, 200 nautical miles from the San Francisco coast, as a final rehearsal before the official deployment in mid-2018. The system will reach the patch after three weeks from departure. As this is our first system, we expect to learn from it and find areas of improvement, so we will monitor the system closely for the first 12 months of operation, both at site as

well as with sensors, satellites and cameras. The lessons learned will help us to iteratively improve our system design before we deploy the next cleanup system. We expect to be able to bring back the first batch of plastic to San Francisco in the fall. SF: Someone once told me “you can’t save the world,” and it appears that this is a common belief that limits people from taking any sort of action whatsoever. Has anyone ever told you something similar from the time you were creating your invention or since, and what is

your mindset/philosophy that kept you driving forward with your mission? TOC: The plastic pollution problem always has been portrayed as something that is impossible to solve. When someone tells you something is impossible, the absoluteness of that statement should be enough to make you wary, and investigate more. History is sort of a long list of things that were impossible, and then were done. SF: How can we utilize ocean currents to our advantage to www.facethecurrent.com

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cleanup the “ocean garbage patches” around the globe- and how will the “passive systems” remove half the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in 5 years, at a fraction of the cost? TOC: To actively catch plastic would be costly, labor intensive, harmful for sea life and take thousands of years to conduct. To catch the plastic, we need to act like plastic. We will use the ocean’s currents to carry our 50, 1 km systems throughout the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, moving in the same manner (and patterns) the plastic follows in the accumulation zone. The systems will be slowed by drift anchors, at a depth where the current velocities are lower than on the surface. Thanks to this slower pace, the floating barrier will halt the plastic in its course. This will save vast amounts of time, fuel and manpower as well as be less harmful to sea life, in contrast to actively collecting the plastic by going after it with nets and boats. SF: You’ve identified five major “ocean garbage patches,” but are there others formed or forming that are of growing concern as well? TOC: A year ago, a study was released about a sixth gyre in the

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The Ocean Cleanup research team processes ocean plastic samples in the laboratory.

To actively catch plastic would be costly, labor intensive, harmful for sea life and take thousands of years to conduct. To catch the plastic, we need to act like plastic.


TOC Aerial Expedition

It is not a question of ‘either cleanup OR prevention,’ it’s cleanup AND prevention.

The North Sea prototype assembled, ready for installation, August 2017.

arctic (Andrés Cózar et al: http:// advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/4/ e1600582) This study clearly shows plastic pollution to be a global issue, but it is important to maintain perspective. The concentrations in the Artic accumulation zone are still 1000x lower than in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Furthermore, the study suggests that the microplastics in the Artic are coming from the subtropical gyres (i.e. the 5 known garbage patches), thereby making the cleanup of these areas directly relevant for prevention of further pollution in the Arctic.

SF: You have proven that the input of plastic in the patch is greater than the output. Currently, unless we mitigate the sources, this number will continue to rise. Do you believe we can and will ever trend towards prevention of further trash buildup in the ocean? TOC: In conjunction with the previous question, people need to seriously reconsider their use of plastic, especially single use plastic. It is of course essential to first prevent more plastic from reaching the oceans in the first place, but

that is not a solution for the plastics already trapped in the currents of the gyres. It is not a question of ‘either cleanup OR prevention’, it’s cleanup AND prevention. SF: You are about to launch your system on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and have revealed more hard facts, which include: TOC: We completed the most comprehensive mapping effort of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to date, and found that plastic pollution in this area is 4-16 times worse than previously thought. By comparing to www.facethecurrent.com

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previous research in the field, we can also see that the problem is largely persistent, and it will not go away by itself. Since 92 % of the mass is in the larger objects, there is an urgency to go out there to clean up now, before all of it turns into microplastics. • The GPGP has more than 10 kg of plastic per km2. • It measures 1.6 million square kilometers, three times the size of continental France. • Accumulated in this area are 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic, weighing 80.000 metric tons, the equivalent of 500 Jumbo Jets. • These figures are four to sixteen times higher than previous estimates. • 92% of the mass is represented by larger objects; while only 8% of the mass is contained in microplastics, defined as pieces smaller than 5 mm in size.

Boyan presenting the innovated concept in 2017

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The Next Phase

SF: Where will all this trash go once removed by your system? TOC: Our plan is to recycle the plastic and turn it into feedstock for B2C company products. We hope to be able to fund the expansion of our cleanup, from the North Pacific gyre to the other four gyres, with the help of this revenue. Some of the plastic might also be turned into oil, to power our support vessels.

We have shown ocean plastic is of surprisingly good quality, and can be turned into high quality projects. Imagine your furniture, car bumper and computer screen made out of material, which has been floating in the oceans for years to decades. Several companies have already shown interest in buying up the plastic once we’ve taken it out of the ocean.

ymore info: www.boyanslat.com www.theoceancleanup.com Discover the technology behind the system at: www.theoceancleanup.com/technology Social media: @theoceancleanup and @boyanslat www.facethecurrent.com

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on the Science of Innovative Technologies for Renewable Clean Energy and Novel Propulsion By William Brown, Biophysicist at the Resonance Science Foundation

Sustainability is one of the most critical issues facing humanity.This is not hyperbole, for the reason is unambiguous, sustaining the resource requirements of post-industrial countries, which will soon represent more-and-more nations, is not feasible with the current increasing levels of resource extraction, utilization, and waste. Simply stated, our increasing level of environmental exploitation is unsustainable. Inevitably, non-renewable energy sources will be depleted, leaving us without the means to power our technological civilization. As well, environmental depletion may threaten every vital system on Earth. What we need is a technological revolution that will provide means of producing abundant clean energy, stopping and reversing ecological damage to regenerate the critically diminished biosphere, and giving us the means to move freely from the surface of Earth, not only for exploration and understanding, but also for non-impactful harnessing of metal rich asteroids and waterpacked comets.

IN PERSPECTIVE: SCIENTIFIC ADVANCEMENT AND TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTIONS Note that when the scientific principles and applications of the new understanding of electromagnetic technologies were emerging, it was not at all appreciated how it would significantly transform human civilization. For instance, Heinrich Rudolf Hertz was a German physicist who first conclusively proved the existence of the electromagnetic waves theorized by James Clerk Maxwell’s electromagnetic theory of light. The unit of frequency — cycle per second — was named the “hertz” in his honor. Hertz developed the first radio transmitter, enabling him to conclusively demonstrate the transmission of electric

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“It’s of no use whatsoever[...] this is just an experiment that proves Maestro Maxwell was right—we just have these mysterious electromagnetic waves that we cannot see with the naked eye. But they are there.” Asked about the applications of his discoveries, Hertz replied: “Nothing, I guess.”

“There can be no doubt that the interplanetary and interstellar spaces are not empty but are occupied by a material substance or body, which is certainly the largest, and probably the most uniform, body of which we have any knowledge”

Is there any indication that such a technological revolution is possible? Consider the situation in the 19th century, when scientists elucidated the foundations of electromagnetism and thermodynamics. Once it was known how electromagnetism

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and magnetic field oscillations across free space. However, paralleling the myopia of many modern-day scientists in appreciating the importance and ramifications of emerging unified physics principles like quantum gravity, Hertz did not see any important applications to his discovery--- He stated that:

James Clerk Maxwell (1931-1879)


works scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs where able to rapidly develop the technology of our current era: information transmission via radio waves, microwaves, and electrical signals, electric engines (which can not only be used for propulsion but is the core principle underlying energy generation from solar, wind, hydrodynamic, and geothermal sources), distributed electricity, light bulbs, televisions, to name but a few. Moreover, the principles of thermodynamics allowed for the development and refinement of

engines that powered industry, propelled trains and boats, and later cars and airplanes as well. This was a technological revolution, and it started with foundational science, experimentation, and innovative thinking. To many, we are experiencing an era of emerging science that may very well re-invent society again--specifically, the elucidation of the source of mass and gravity, a theory that seamlessly describes the quantum and relativistic domains: a unified physics of quantum gravity.

We have already seen the transformations brought on by the advancements in information science, infrastructure and technology, and now understanding the source of mass-energy, and its resulting gravitational action, holds the potential to completely revolutionize society in the same way that the elucidation of electromagnetism and thermodynamics did in the 19th century.

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Interestingly, the source of what we consider as substance, or matter, resides in what we consider as “nothingness” or empty space. Scientists who study the source of structure and matter are focused on empty space, what is called the vacuum. Surprisingly, recent advancements in understanding strongly indicate that space is a veritable fluid medium---a concept remarkably similar to the 19th century conception of the luminiferous æther.

When all possible modes of the quantum harmonic oscillators comprising the field fluctuations are added together, it results in an infinite energy-density of the vacuum. Applying a cut-off value to the size of the wavelengths allowed results in a finite, yet still extremely large value of ~1093 grams per cubic centimeter of space. If this number seems large, it’s because it is---being 38 orders of magnitude larger than the total mass-energy of the observable universe.

Obviously, if space is like a fluid, and has properties like torque and geometry, then there must be something substantive to it. Indeed, modern theorists believe that at an infinitesimally small scale (dimensions equivalent to the Planck length, ~10-35m) space is atomistic, that it is made up of “atoms” of spacetime.

Where others saw a crisis in physics, physicist and director of the Resonance Science Foundation Nassim Haramein saw solutions. Instead of ignoring or sweeping the value of the vacuum energy under the rug, Haramein worked with it and eventually discovered how it resolves elusive questions from cosmology to quantum mechanics.

Quantum field theory has a concurrent result, calculations show that there is no such thing as empty space, a true vacuum cannot exist. There are always myriad fluctuations of energy in quantum fields: producing a ceaseless generation of particle-antiparticle pairs, photons, and even fluctuations of the spacetime manifold. What’s more, the amount of energy involved in these fluctuations of the quantum vacuum are far from non-trivial. At the Planck scale, photons have so much energy that they form micro-black holes, the fluctuation of which results in a multiplyconnected geometry---what is often referred to as ‘spacetime quantum foam’.

In the paper Quantum Gravity and the Holographic Mass, he shows how the quantized structure of spacetime forms specific boundary conditions, holographic ratiorelationships, and gradients that are the source of mass and gravity. This quantum gravitational approach works for relativistic objects like astronomical black holes as well for objects of the quantum domain like protons and electrons. With this new understanding of the quantum vacuum, and how it engenders mass-energy, structure, and fundamental forces, the question then becomes: is there any possibility of being able to harness the dynamics of this ubiquitous field for technological applications?


QUANTUM VACUUM ENGINEERING The potential applications of the principles of Unified Physics are remarkable to say the least.The reason is simple: when we have a firm understanding of how the fundamental properties of our world arise, we can harness and direct those processes for novel and beneficial outcomes. For instance, now that we know that the mass-energy of all of the material world is the result of a very specific relationship, or gradient, in the quantum vacuum structure of spacetime, we can engineer technologies that reproduce the same dynamics in a laboratory to extract significant amounts of energy from this fundamental field. Of course, as we utilize this energy, it returns to the quantum vacuum source from which it came and thus nothing is lost or depleted, but by circulating the energy we are now powering our world. This is analogous to putting a turbine in a hydroelectric dam in the path of the flow of a river. The gravitational potential of the water above the dam is given to the turbine and extracted as electric fields from the dynamo of the generator and then the water continues its flow, eventually getting evaporated and raining back into the lake that feeds the turbine. Engineering the quantum vacuum energy is similar in the sense that one must provide an opportunity for the vacuum energy to start flowing through a certain device, whether mechanical or solid state, so that the energy may be extracted in a usable form. Tapping the vacuum energy potential even extremely partially represents an incredible amount of available power. If a fraction of the Planck energy present in a centimeter cube of space was

extracted over time, it could power all of the humanity’s energy consumption for the conceivable future. This energy density is not a product of theory alone. The Casimir effect, and the more recent dynamical Casimir effect, demonstrates that this energy is truly there, and that by creating a small gradient in it, one can cause two plates to be pushed together by the vacuum energy in the case of the classical Casimir experiment, or get photons to emerge directly out of the vacuum as in the case of the dynamical Casimir effect.

HOW LONG COULD YOU POWER THE EARTH WITH 1 CM3 OF VACUUM Well, the vacuum density is 9.85 x 1093 g/cm3, which is 8.85 x 10107 J/cm3. That’s 8.85 x 10107 J in 1 cm cubed of space. For the year 2010, the total world energy consumption per year was ~17.08 terawatts (17.08 x 1012 W) which is equivalent to 17.08 x 1012 x (60 x 60 x 24 x 365) = 5.39 x 1020 J/year … Therefore, with the energy available from just 1 cm3 of space, we can power the Earth at its present rate for 8.85 x 10107J / 5.39 x 1020J/year = 1.64 x 1087 years or a thousand trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion years, a very long time. www.facethecurrent.com

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Understanding the dynamics underlying quantum gravity opens the potential for gravitational modulation or gravitational control as well. The curvature of spacetime described by Einsteinian equations is in fact demonstrated in the holographic mass solution of QGHM to be the result of the comoving spinning Planck field, generating the vorticity in a region of space that curves spacetime. Accurately reproducing these spin dynamics in a laboratory will yield our capacity to engineer spacetime curvature to create gravitational fields in such a fashion as to overcome the local gravitational field of the Earth, and thus transcend the bounds of a civilization confined to the surface of their planet. Of

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course, since

the

biological

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scale and ourselves are made of optimal atmospheric level, habitat and the same material emerging from forest restoration‌ the possibilities the fundamental quantum field, are myriad. understanding the dynamics that are present and engineering energy more info: events in certain local areas could also have enormous beneficial influences Resonance Science Foundation: on our biosphere and our health and https://resonance.is life expectancy.

y

Instead of drawing resources from the environment---a practice that is highly depleting to Earth’s vital ecosystems---this technology holds the possibility of generating near limitless, clean energy that is not impactful to nature. With an abundance of energy, we can put resources into revitalizing diminished ecosystems: de-acidifying the oceans, scavenging all plastics and microplastics, carbon sequestration to an

Resonance Science Academy: https://academy.resonance.is The Connection Universe Film, a documentary film written and directed by Malcom Carter, narrated by Sir Patrick Stewart and featuring the research of physicist Nassim Haramein: http://getconnected.resonance.is


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MUSIC

Get ‘Purified’ On Nature & Music With Nora en Pure Yoga For Musicians with Hip Hop Artist & Meditation Guide Sunny Dilinger FOUR ECO-FRIENDLY MUSIC FESTIVALS THAT AIM TO “LEAVE NO TRACE” the most sophisticated house music

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Get ‘Purified’ On Nature & Music With

Interview By Sasha Frate Daniela Di Lillo, known by her performance name Nora En Pure, is a South African-Swiss DJ and deep house producer. Born of a South African mother and a Swiss father in Johannesburg, Di Lillo migrated to Switzerland soon after she was born. Music was a constant in her home and she gravitated to musical instruments early in her childhood. She first received recognition for her 2013 single Come with Me. Other popular releases include Morning Dew, Lake Arrowhead and Tears in Your Eyes. In July 2016, she was invited to put together a two-hour long mix for Pete Tong’s radio show, BBC’s Essential Mix. Risk takers are rewarded, and Di Lillo has found critical and popular success by deftly combined her South African roots with different and disparate sounds, styles and scenes. She talks to Face the Current about touring, her influences and how staying true to her own raw style has emphatically set her apart from the mainstream.

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Photo Credit: Kevin Eassa


Energy in music and in nightclubs or festivals is so incredible, because it makes people feel so alive with a lot of emotions and it brings so much excitement. Being out in the wilderness is a different kind of energy, but is even more exhilarating because it is so raw and you feel so at one with nature. You cannot compare the two, but it’s amazing to experience both in life.

Daniela Di Lillo: I picked the name when I first started releasing music, so really I didn’t think too much about it! I wanted to choose something a bit different and a bit exotic. The ‘Pure’ in it definitely relates to my sound. SF: Have you always been well balanced from ‘party/dance scene’ to the ‘calm in nature scene?’ Do you find nature inspires your beats?  

Sasha Frate: What’s the story behind your name ‘Nora En Pure’ and show name “Purified

DN: I definitely think my sound is inspired by my South African roots. I always wanted to incorporate elements of nature and wildlife in my music in order to take the listener away and create a strong atmosphere. Whenever I travel, I do my best to get out and explore my surroundings, even if jetlag is telling me to go to bed! SF: How would describe the difference in energy from music and the crowd to the energy of stillness and solitude in nature? DN: Energy in music and in nightclubs or festivals is so incredible,

because it makes people feel so alive with a lot of emotions and it brings so much excitement. Being out in the wilderness is a different kind of energy, but is even more exhilarating because it is so raw and you feel so at one with nature.You cannot compare the two, but it’s amazing to experience both in life. SF: You created a song titled “Diving With Whales;” what all went into creating this track and can you share the story behind this experience? Was it you diving with whales in your recent IG video post? www.facethecurrent.com

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DN: This song is a special one to me as I really, really love the whale sounds in it and how well they go with the piano. I am not sure where this fascination with whales and the ocean comes from, but for me it is something extremely deep and emotional. The video I recently shared on my Instagram wasn’t me diving with the whales, but to do that is a huge dream of mine. I just saw that footage and thought how well it captured what I feel towards nature and these impressive creatures. The caption I wrote, “What are we even?” should touch on the topic of how nature and the planet is so much larger than life, and how people get caught up in our “small” and hectic

lifestyles and tend to forget the bigger picture. Usually when I am out in nature, in stunning places, it always reminds me that the stress I feel in normal life actually means nothing and we take ourselves and our problems way too seriously. I guess most of us could live a much more simple and more meaningful life, but we get caught up. With the record ‘Diving With Whales,’ I tried to express some of these thoughts and feelings and tried to touch the listener right there, just as a reminder that there is much more out there. SF: What is the most soulfilling aspect of your work and

lifestyle? DN: I really live for the music. Music always manages to distract me when I don’t feel great by taking my mind away to another place. The heavy touring can be difficult at times, as it is a lot of alone time and not easy for the body and mind. But then the feedback that I get from people when they tell me how my tracks or performances have affected them in a positive way, makes all the hardcore touring schedules pay off. SF: What has been one of the most welcoming cultures you’ve experienced while touring and traveling?  

Nature and the planet is so much larger than life, and how people get caught up in our “small” and hectic lifestyles and tend to forget the bigger picture. Usually when I am out in nature, in stunning places, it always reminds me that the stress I feel in normal life actually means nothing and we take ourselves and our problems way too seriously.

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DN: I am lucky I can say that I usually receive a really incredible welcome wherever I tour. The Asian culture is definitely very warm and welcoming always, that is super sweet to experience. But the best place for me is returning to South Africa. It is always amazing to be back and I am very grateful for the support I receive back home. SF: In her book Earth is Hiring:The New Way to Live, Lead, Earn and Give for Millennials and Anyone Who Gives a Sh*t, Peta Kelly says “Choosing your alignment and raising your vibration are your greatest gifts to the planet. Period.” Your music definitely has the ability to raise positive vibrations- What is your intention with your music- do you consider it a ‘gift to the planet?’ DN: That would be amazing, but I can’t really judge that. I think my music is quite emotional and most of my sets are quite uplifting so I hope most people leave my shows in a good spirit. SF: Who names the titles of your tracksand what is one of your favorites that you feel is highly appropriate and/or meaningful? DN: I always name my own tracks, but like anything in life, you sometimes ask for some help or suggestions to help me make the final decision! For example the image and scenery I get with ‘Morning Dew’ represents very much the sound and vibe the track should give.You know when there are these misty mornings and the atmosphere is mystical and magical? I think that fits pretty well to the track. SF: Your track “Come With Me” is at nearly 23 million plays on Spotify alone.  What has been the defining point of “success” for you and has this definition changed over time throughout your career?   DN: I don’t really like to check on those numbers, because every track has a certain meaning to me and at times the ones that mean a lot to me are for example not commercial enough or maybe simply don’t evoke the same feelings and have only a small response. I enjoy just taking in the atmospheres during the sets, as that is direct energy from the crowd to you. I think playing Coachella last year was also a real moment for me. Also playing Ultra this year; that worldwide stage was awesome and www.facethecurrent.com 69 Photos Credit: Kevin Eassa


I often find inspiration from a certain sound, sometimes out in nature, or even when I watch something like NatGeo documentaries; or when I go home and head to the South African bush. It’s just so amazing out there and your mind is really able to roam freely and get inspired.

the crowd really amazing! SF: What are some unique elements that go into the creation of your songsfor example do you use visualization, or do you have any techniques for coming up with unique sounds? DN: Yes I definitely have sceneries in my mind that I try to create a matching atmosphere. I often find inspiration from a certain sound, sometimes out in nature, or even when I watch something like NatGeo documentaries; or when I go home and head to the South African bush. It’s just so amazing out there and your mind is really able to roam freely and get inspired.

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SF: Switzerland is touted as “the most beautiful country in Europe;” and Zurich, where you grew up, has been named “the most desirable city in the world with the best quality of life.” How did your environment growing up influence your career path, whether the natural environment, life in Zurich, or other influential factors? DN: For sure we have a great quality of life in Switzerland, and Zurich is a really beautiful city! Being a nature person I definitely prefer Switzerland’s wonderful countryside over the rich and expensive cities. I like simple living and the down-toearth mentality of the people, but sometimes it is also this mentality

that can be in the way if it goes maybe past music and into show business. Generally speaking I think it is safe to say, Swiss people don’t like to go crazy! They like to be collected and calm. But at times on a stage the opposite would be required. Luckily with my music I don’t need that, and I certainly wouldn’t have it in me. SF: You get to tour with some other amazing talents- Autograf, Croatia Squad, Huxley, Sons of Maria ... and many more. How does it feel to kick back off stage and be part of the crowd? DN: Definitely other sets always inspire! I love the Miami Music Week also for this reason! You can catch so many performances of friends or


Photo Credit: Kevin Eassa

new artists, either to just support or enjoy the music or to just watch how a set of someone else translates to the crowd. SF: What are your top five music venues or festivals you believe everyone should experience? DN: It always depends a bit if you are there for the festival experience or really for the music. Of course the bigger, well known festivals will give you incredible stages, show elements, etc, which can be quite mind-blowing, while often the less flashy clubs or small festivals will have great musical talent and amazing crowds that go crazy for good music. Therefore I would suggest a mix: Coachella,

Mysteryland (USA), Shambala for festivals and Output (NY) and Sound (LA) for clubs. SF: What is up and coming for you that we can be on the lookout for?   DN: Soon a remix will be coming out that Sons Of Maria and myself collaborated on. It is a nice deep one with an amazing piano lead. The track is called ‘Vinternatt’ and it is now available for pre-order already. Then I will be playing Tomorrowland again including the Daybreak Session (3 hour opening set of the Mainstage), which is amazing and I’m super excited to do this year again. Also, Panorama festival in NY will be very special for sure, and soon I’ll be up

in the mountains in Canada playing Snowbombing festival. These are some festivals I am very excited for. The summer for sure will be very busy again with residencies in Las Vegas and probably frequent shows in Ibiza or Europe in general.

ymore info: Sphinx Alternative Mix: https://soundcloud.com/ noraenpure/sphinx-alternative-mix1 Ultra 2018 Liveset: https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTtn7Iw4tQ&t=2617s  Pre-order Vinternatt on Beatport: www.classic.beatport.com/ www.facethecurrent.com

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Yoga For Musicians Sunny Dilinger with Hip Hop Artist & Meditation Guide

Interview By Woody Woodrow In this month’s installment of “Yoga For Musicians” I am honored to introduce Sunny Dilinger. Sunny is a hip hop artist and an avid meditation practitioner and guide; an absolute legend! He founded the movement “Women that Meditate,” which is a movement of women who, through their practice, inspire men to meditate.This movement has spread across the United States, and Sunny is starting to take it global. In this interview, he opens up about his journey and shares some meditation techniques as well as his philosophy on life.

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Woody Woodrow: What made you realize the power meditation?

I just kept knocking at this brother’s door like, “What else do you have for me?”

Sunny Dilinger: I’ll start from the very beginning. I moved to Los Angeles to do music and it was magical the way that happened. I met a mentor who’s named RA. He saw I was frustrated at work and in different situations, so one day on lunch break he walked me across the street in Korea Town. We sat underneath the trees, and he didn’t say “Meditate with me,” he, “Close your eyes and breath.” Five minutes after that, a profound experience happened.

WW: Was that one of your first experiences with a flow state in your life? Or had you experienced flow in other areas beforehand?

I heard a voice say, “You are everything.” I felt something. After walking with him and meditating with him I understood something even deeper. I didn’t know what it was but

WW: What inspired your movement “Women that Meditate?” What was your intention when you created it?

SD: Growing up I played sports and played music and there was always a flow in that. It felt effortless. But this was beyond that. It felt like a movie. I’ve never experienced anything like this where everything seemed to be bouncing back and forth from me and to me and I was connected to it.

SD: A relationship; I had many

material possessions. I had been meditating for five years, but everything seemed stiffened and routine. One day I was meditating and I heard a voice say, “If you truly believe in who you are, rid yourself of all imprisonment and make yourself available.” Before I heard that voice, I remember RA had told me, “You don’t have to work these jobs if you don’t want to.” And I said, “What do you mean? I have bills, I have a relationship…” I was thinking all these things, but he looked me in the eye, challenging me once more saying, “You’re much more creative.You can do something and you won’t even have to work at Starbucks.” He would share this with me, but at the time I wasn’t ready to receive that information. www.facethecurrent.com

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But in my meditation when I heard that voice, I remembered what he said and I understood exactly what it meant. I quit the jobs, I concluded the relationship, I gave away everything and asked myself, “What can I give that gives me life in return?” In my meditation one day I realized that I’ve learned more about myself in the relationships I have with women. They were always poking at my weaknesses and helping me turn them into strengths. Then I got the idea to collaborate with women, and bring women together that are meditating and let them be strong, courageous, independent, honorable queens or goddesses. Then men will gravitate towards what they’re doing

and ask, “What’s meditation about?” It’s a simplistic way of having them what meditation is. From feminine to masculine, men will show an appreciation by meditating, too. WW: How do you think, from your experience, men could show up from a place of integrity for women? SD: I’m always going to share this answer because I feel like it was the beginning and will be the omega for me. The more you meditate the more there is this mature intelligence that keeps on breaking through the surface. We’re talking more about us as vibrational beings more than even us as men; recalibrating the masculine and feminine to be one. That’s always

going to be my answer because just by checking in every day I feel like I’m able to show up. WW: If you had a message for the men and women of the world what would it be? SD: Rise up. Don’t be afraid to be that, to embody that, to walk that path. There’s nothing to be afraid of. When you say “yes” to that challenge you’ll be rewarded ten-fold. When I walk, I feel this essence. I can feel the balance of each foot taking a step and I feel like a king. I really enjoy life in that way. I love to believe that we’re meant to express from our greatest selves. If we want to be the greatest, see the greatest. Let’s have our input in that. It’s that simple.

The more you meditate the more there is this mature intelligence that keeps on breaking through the surface.

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WW: Shifting gears now towards meditation, because I know meditation give you the ability to become a superhero or a “king” in your life… What would you say to somebody who wants to meditate but doesn’t know how to start? SD: Well first, I would say, I love where they’re at.You don’t have to know, just be available and open. Then I would say, don’t psych yourself out trying to learn something externally. Try to create your own way of meditating. I strongly suggest that everybody start learning from their own self. How would you create your way? That’s a reference to the

book Siddhartha where Siddhartha met Buddha and Buddha said, “Come and hear my teachings…” something like that. But Siddhartha said, “I’ve got my own path.” I think that’s our compass, that’s our blueprint that’s already within us. We should be able to let that flourish and learn from it and then everything else that comes along will compliment it. WW:Yeah, back to walking your own path. What do you believe is the meaning of our experience here on this planet? SD: I believe we are here to breathe. Everything is breathing. If you look deeper you see that the same life that is within everything is within you.

Once you see it, it awakens, it comes alive. It’s within our water, within our food. If I see you and we are here and without words even being expressed we can look in each other’s eyes and take a deep breath and see life, or see source, or see creator or whatever it’s called. WW: Are there any meditation techniques that you can tell us about? Are there any you prefer to use to reach a state of oneness? SD: Yes. The information about the Seven Chakras came to me, and soon after I found out that the Seven Chakras aren’t bound by the Hindu or the Buddhist teachings. It’s from www.facethecurrent.com

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For anyone who wants to access a supreme state of being, a wholesome state of being, I would suggest for them to meditate on one chakra each day of the week. Starting on Monday, which is the day of the Moon, and ending with the contrasting Sunday, the day of the Sun. When you get to Sunday it’s a celebration because you feel so connected.

many teachings that say these energy circuits, these chakras, are flowing through your body. I was able to receive that, and I thought it was so simple: seven days, Seven Chakras. For anyone who wants to access a supreme state of being, a wholesome state of being, I would suggest for them to meditate on one chakra each day of the week. Starting on Monday, which is the day of the Moon, and ending with the contrasting Sunday, the day of the Sun. When you get to Sunday it’s a celebration because you feel so connected. All the chakras have a definition in terms of the purpose they have. That’s a system or a structure that works for me and I

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promise if it can work for me, it can work for everybody. WW: How would you meditate on a chakra? Is there an intention you set, or a focus on the breath, a center, a spot of the body? SD: I would suggest lying down and putting a Chakra Crystal on the chakra you’re meditating on that day. Then close your eyes and say “Open. Activate. Balance and Heal.” Then say the name of the chakra, for example, Root Chakra. Do that for one minute. Do that again the next day for two minutes, then next day for three minutes. It’s not the same as

a meditation where you need to have your eyes closed for a certain period of time. There are no obstacles or anything that you really need to do. Once you put that awareness on that chakra your body already knows what to do. Within a week you will see a difference, that’s one cycle. This activates the chakras and from there you’ve just gotta keep the wheel turning. WW: If anyone wants to learn more and take your class, because you do teach meditation, where can they go to learn more about you and where could they go to learn more?


One day I realized that I’ve learned more about myself in the relationships I have with women. They were always poking at my weaknesses and helping me turn them into strengths. Then I got the idea to collaborate with women, and bring women together that are meditating and let them be strong, courageous, independent, honorable queens or goddesses. Then men will gravitate towards what they’re doing and ask, “What’s meditation about?”

I was able to be liberated because of “Women that Meditate.” Once it was created I was able to go places,

SD: I want to share that I’m not teaching anything. I’m really just sharing space, sharing whatever is flowing from my heart and the ones before me are creators as well so we’re just sharing, co-creating. I share at Ceremony Meditation in Venice Beach on Mondays and Thursdays at 6:45 pm. Then, outside of Ceremony Meditation, we’re doing “flash mob meditations;” donation meditations out at the beach and more out in nature. As of right now I’m just on Instagram and Facebook.

travel, have people hit me up from all over asking for a ticket and it literally became a movement. I was honored because of the women received me. At first they didn’t even know a man was organizing it and had founded it, but when I shared with them that I founded the movement they were really proud and honored. They shared with me that I was someone they can give permission to do so. It’s as simple as, when you have an idea, look to the universe (or whatever it likes to be called) to assist you and you’ll be flying in no time.

WATCH VIDEO Click Or Scan

ymore info: Instagram: @sunnydilinger and @womenthatmeditate www.facebook.com/sunny.dilinger.1 YouTube: WoodyWoodrowYoga www.facethecurrent.com

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FOUR ECO-FRIENDLY MUSIC FESTIVALS

THAT AIM TO “LEAVE NO TRACE” By Jon Petrich In this era of more eco-conscious individuals and organizations, there are a number of festivals that are taking the initiative to lessen the waste and impact that they leave after the music has stopped. Many festivals are notorious for producing as much waste as a small city over the course of a weekend. From the one time use containers, to construction materials for temporary structures, lost and found items, to human waste; these festivals can make a large impact on the surrounding areas.This not only causes negative implications for the environment but also for the image of these types of events. More and more communities are saying, “We don’t want you trash here!” As the eco-conscious community grows and festival promoters search for ways to be the positive change they want to see, some of the largest events around the world are coming up with ways to lessen their footprint. Below you will see a short list of some of them that are leading the pack in that mission.

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ENVISION

LUCIDITY FESTIVAL

Location: Costa Rica - Rancho La Merced in Uvita Dates: February 22nd – 26th, 2018 (2019 Date TBD) Mission Statement: “As a celebration dedicated to awakening our human potential, Envision provides a platform for different cultures to co-exist in sustainable community, and inspire one another through art, spirituality, yoga, music, dance, performance, education, sustainability and our fundamental connection with nature.” Envision is arguably the most “green” large festival in the world. As can be read in the “8 Pillars” of their mission, two of the values they hold in high regards are: Permaculture: End Single Use, Regenerative Design, Land Stewardship, Reforestation, and Resource Management. Eco Building: Minimum Impact, Renewable materials, integrated systems design, ethical labor sourcing. https://envisionfestival.com/

Location: Santa Barbara – CA Dates: April 6-9 2018 Mission Statement: Lucidity Festival LLC is a collectively owned organization dedicated to creating transformational experiences for individuals and communities; we are a production company, a creative lifestyle for expanding consciousness, and an interconnected community of friends and family. Everything we do revolves around the mission of advancing the following values in the world: Participation and Immersion in the Artistic Process. Personal Growth and Global Healing. Awake and Aware Consciousness. Environmental and Social Responsibility. Family Fun and Creative Play. Communal Reciprocity. Transparency. Lucidity Festival has started an end single use campaign along with the motto of, “LEAVE IT BETTER.” They provide their festival goers a handy checklist to help with the mission. This list includes easy suggestions of how to lessen each person’s impact and waste including: Reduce: purchase items with recyclable packaging. Purchase canned beverages rather than bottled ones. Leave Styrofoam at home. Reuse: Bring your own reusable water bottle, mug and dishware. Avoid single use items: Invest in a 3-5 gallon water container. Leave no trace: Pack it in, pack it out! Bring trash bags, and containers for recycling, landfill, and compost. http://lucidityfestival.com www.facethecurrent.com

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BURNING MAN

Location: Black Rock City, Nevada Dates: Aug 26 – Sept 3 Mission Statement: The mission of the Burning Man organization is to facilitate and extend the culture that has issued from the Burning Man event into the larger world. Though Burning Man does not speak to it directly in their mission or vision, from the beginning it has prided it’s self on “Leave No Trace.” It is expected and ensured that what is packed in, is packed out. At the end of the weeklong festival it is near impossible to recognize that tens of thousands of people were camping out at Black Rock. About the only trace is some tire tracks left in the sand that are quickly blown away by the desert winds. The “leave no trace” culture that has been a part of Burning Man since its inception has quickly spread to most of the individuals. They realize that in order to be in line with that social practice, they must pack lightly and rely on multiple use supplies. http://burningman.org/

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GLASTONBURY FESTIVAL

Location: Worthy Farm, Pilton, Somerset - UK Dates: June 26-30 2019 Throughout its nearly 50-year history, the Glastonbury Festival has been a social leader in the realm of community building, philanthropy and eco-conscious practices. This biennium festival has decided to ban all plastic bottles in 2019. As many people know, this is one of the largest sources of waste and pollution in the world. This will be a huge precedent that they will set for others to follow. In addition to banning plastic bottles, Glastonbury Festival has other existing initiatives including; Don’t Waste a Drop, Leave No Trace, Take It Don’t Leave It, and a friendly request to not pee on the land. They say that it causes toxic pollution of the water table – which can be logical considering 200,000 people attend this event. To assist in this request they provide 1,300 composting toilets that are cleaned throughout the day with staff on call 24/7. http://www.glastonburyfestivals.co.uk/

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FtC ymore info:

music

www.soundcloud.com/semagaray www.facebook.com/semagaraydj www.mixcloud.com/semagaray beachgrooves.com/portfolio-item/ sema-garay/

the most sophisticated house music by Sema Garay presents his favorite monthly recent and upcoming new house music releases with a Top 10 chart that includes a variety of styles from deep house, soulful, and nu-disco, to tech-house and more. Tune in to these tracks by clicking the image or scanning the QR code!

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ARTIST Sebb Junior TITLE We Used To Say (Original Mix) label La Vie D’Artiste Music genre deep house Release 2018-04-13

ARTIST Mirko Deep, Jinadu TITLE Fever (Original Mix) label Dream Beat Rec. genre house Release 2018-04-06

ARTIST Dario D’Attis, Definition, Jinadu TITLE Dreamcatcher label DEFECTED genre HOUSE Release 2018-03-30

ARTIST Davide Squillace, Alex Nazar TITLE The Boogie Man feat. Alex Nazar (Original Mix) label Crosstown Rebels genre deep house Release 2018-03-30

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ARTIST Loure TITLE Smooth Talk label Apparel Music genre DEEP House Release 2018-04-02

ARTIST Armonica, Toshi, andhim TITLE Ngeke (andhim Remix) label MoBlack Records genre AFRO HOUSE Release 2018-04-13

ARTIST Scott Diaz TITLE We Reminisce (Original Mix) label Blockhead Recordings genre DEEP house Release 2018-04-13

ARTIST Lovebirds TITLE Dove Sei (Original Deep Mix) label Sirsounds Records genre NU DISCO Release 2018-04-06

ARTIST KosmetiQ, Paul Foss, H@k TITLE The Foss (H@k Remix) label SP Recordings genre AFRO house Release 2018-04-13

ARTIST Danijel Kostic, Nora En Pure, Sons of Maria TITLE Vinternatt (Nora en Pure & Sons of Maria Remix Edit) label Enormous Chills genre Progressive House Release 2018-04-27 www.facethecurrent.com

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Our Our newnew Spring OurSpring new 2018 Spring 2018 2018 collection collection collection represents represents represents an an an important important important milestone milestone milestone for us: for us:for us: Our new Spring 2018 Every Every ounce Every ounce of cotton ounce of cotton of cotton collection represents an usedused is 100% isused 100% organic. is 100% organic. organic. important milestone for us: Every ounce of cotton used is 100% organic.

FtC fAce the current

sports & FITNESS

86. 92. 98. 84

top 7 Dynamic Outdoor Athletic Activities in Nature Eco-Conscious prana Goes 100% Organic on Cotton Apparel: Why It’s a BIG Deal HIIT YOGA with David Ryan Fitness

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REASONS REASONS REASONS TO TO TO MAKE MAKE TH MAKE ETH SWITCH E SWITCH TH E SWITCH TO TO ORGANIC ORGANIC TO ORGANIC COTTON COTTON COTTON

REASONS TO MAKE E SWITCH PEOPLE PEOPLE > CLOTHING PEOPLE > CLOTHING >TH CLOTHING Farmers Farmers andTO their Farmers and ORGANIC families theirand families their are no families are COTTON no are no

longerlonger exposed exposed longer to harmful exposed to harmful chemicals to harmful chemicals chemicals found found in fertilizers infound fertilizers and in fertilizers pesticides. and pesticides. and pesticides.

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SOIL > CLOTHING Regenerate and biodiversity WATER WATER > CLOTHING WATER > CLOTHING > life CLOTHING

in the soil to improve the health Save 115 Savegallons 115Save gallons of115 water gallons of water whenofwhen you water you when you of our planet. switchswitch one T-shirt one switch T-shirt to one organic toT-shirt organic cotton. to organic cotton. cotton.

WATER > CLOTHING


Follow prAna Ambassadors @annaehrgott and @nolecossart on their journey through our Fair Trade organic cotton factory in Bangalore, India. Watch the video now at prana.com/organiccotton.

Making the switch to organic cotton is important because it drinks less water, uses rainwater more efficiently, eliminates GMOs and harmful chemicals, and so much more. Learn more at prana.com/sustainability www.facethecurrent.com

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FtC culture

top 7 Dynamic Outdoor

Athletic Activities in Nature By Matt Belair The world is one gigantic playground, literally! Somewhere along the line we got serious and forgot how to have fun. We were taught that we had to compete, be the best and fun exploration turned into competition. The world of sport, athletics, movement and outdoor adventure is on the rise. When we are connected to nature we are also more connected with ourselves; we come back to the present moment. I can remember spending entire summers as a kid riding my bike, running, climbing trees, playing in grass and enjoying the outdoors.There are so many ways for us to reconnect with that part of ourselves, and in doing so, develop empowering skills we can take into our daily lives. Each day we leave a trail of our choices, it’s no secret that the human species has not been such a sustainable group. We tend to over consume and our enjoyment often comes at a cost.The beautiful thing about all of the activities below are that they are low impact and environmentally friendly.They are close to earth, natural and close to home.They leave little to no trace on our magical planet and we are rewarded with a natural connection and feeling that money or machinery can’t duplicate or buy.

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Choosing to engage in any of the activities below will certainly improve health, concentration, strength, balance, creativity and more. All of the activities force you into the present moment, require focus, and cannot be mastered. This means that you can enjoy them for a lifetime

knowing there will be always room for growth and exploration. In the sincere pursuit of mastery in any undertaking, along the way the secrets of the universe will reveal themselves. You will discover the secrets of the universe will reveal themselves along the way.

The hope in writing these words is to invite your inner child to come alive. To remember what it was like to fully be in awe of life, to fully engage, explore and to make life as fun as possible!

HERE ARE MY TOP 7 ACTIVITIES FOR CONNECTING WITH NATURE AND DEVELOPING BALANCE. MOUNTAIN BIKING:

Two tires, fore sts trails and pathways are all access ible. The thrill seekers may choose the e xhilarating do wnhill option and some may prefer the be autiful trails and views that reveal themse lves when cross country biking. Biking is a popular worl d wide pheno m ena and commun ity.

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The beautiful thing about all of these activities below are that they are low impact and environmentally friendly. They are close to earth, natural and close to home. They leave little to no trace on our magical planet and we are rewarded with a natural connection and feeling that money or machinery can’t duplicate or buy.

KAYAKING: ty The diverse locations, difficul a and environments accessed on can go kayak are almost limitless.You a lake dle pad the leisurely route and rself you or easy flowing river or test ns in high speed rapids in locatio d ere pow All around the earth. ! by mother nature

ROCK CLIMBING: There has been a recent resurgence in the popularity of rock climbing and bouldering and for good reason. This sport is easily acc essible, the locations are beautiful and the skills required can always be improv ed.You can spend hours bouldering with friends in one location and you could do any number of climbs in spectacul ar locations just as easily.

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HIKING: There is a newly coined term called “forest bathing,� which essentially means get your butt into nature! Almost every city on the planet has beautiful walking trails in the city or within a short drive. Do a search of your surrounding area and connect to nature by simply being in it!

ING:

SWIMM

of wn as one act o n k ly n o Comm d low imp neficial an ur bodies e b t s o m the ro eally e can do fo activities w ibly underutilized. Id r f wate is terr r bodies o ater swimming o s e k la e om p in the w you have s ou can ho ing pool. y e r e h w imm nearby ave to a sw l substance or if you h agica itself is a m ith it has in r te a W cting w and conne benefits. countless

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PARKOUR: Also known as free runn ing is a relatively new and more advanced activity. It combines gymn astics and running with an urban en vironment and the city becomes a playgr ound. If you see some expert videos online you’ll be amazed, however don’t underestimate what a few simple move s can do to help you unlock endless fun and a new view of the city scape!

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F:

FRISBEE GOL

’t w of us who didn There are very fe lf go e be as a kid. Fris throw a Frisbee the er ov l en popping up al w courses have be n ay d exceptionally fu an w ne a as ld golf wor . It’s the same as st re fo e th to in to get ses are set sc and many cour except with a di ple game forests. It’s a sim d an s ee tr in ith ost w ously addicting. M er ng da t ge n ca that to get ves you a reason importantly it gi w a good time ith outside and have friends!

Sports and outdoor activities were always meant to inspire us to get outdoors. We can all get lost in the grind of daily life and forget how easy, fun and simple it can be to get off the couch and get into the park. The list above ranges in level of difficulty and is meant to inspire you to take more action. Being in nature is magical and it is medicine. Some days we may lack motivation to do something and can’t think of anything fun to do. If you can keep it as simple as going for a hike to a beautiful park close by, finding a local

watering hole and going for a swim, or grabbing your bike and going for a cruise you’ll be empowered to take more action. Once outside and engaged you’ll see the other enthusiasts and make friends. As a fun bonus activity you could pick up slacklining and have hours of fun trying to balance on a thin band. The only goal with any of these activities is to get outside and have fun! Be your own inspiration. Nature is medicine, getting outside is a lifestyle and there is endless adventure. Whether you choose to

master a complex extreme sport or simply catch sunsets as often as possible engaging in the outdoors will naturally bring you back into peace, harmony and balance. This is a natural way of living. There are no adults on this planet, just some people pretending more seriously than others, we are all big kids so get outside, play in the dirt and have fun!

ymore info: www.ZenAthlete.com www.MattBelair.com www.facethecurrent.com

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FtC sports

Eco-Conscious

Goes 100% Organic on Cotton Apparel

Why It’s a BIG Deal Interview By David Aiello When selecting your fitness and lifestyle apparel, you choose garments that meet your performance needs as well as your lifestyle needs. That is why many conscious consumers, looking to make a difference with their wallets, want to buy clothes made with a smaller environmental footprint. That sentiment is one of the factors driving prAna’s transition to using 100% organic cotton across its product lines. “prAna is all about sustainability and quality is a sustainable feature,” explains Rachel Lincoln, prAna’s Director of Sustainability and PCT Operatons. “High quality fabrication that is thoughtfully made, from the farm to the factory, is the foundation of a long lasting garment. We want the public to be conscious consumers by selecting fabrics that will last in their wardrobe for years to come. Organic cotton satisfies that requirement.” Lincoln brings up a good point. It is not just the wasteful nature of manufacturing garments, it’s the fact that the clothes we wear often prematurely end up in a landfill. According to a 2016 report by Greenpeace, the average European consumer now buys 60% more clothing items a year and keeps them for half as long as they did 15 years ago.

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THE NEED FOR SUSTAINABILITY IN FASHION Many people who lead active lifestyles may not pay much attention to the environmental issues associated with clothing production and what consumers and fashion brands can do about it. Conventionally grown cotton consumes approximately 25% of the insecticides and more than 10% of the pesticides used by the world’s farmers. Lincoln emphasizes the benefits of organic production systems by counting with her fingers, “First, farmers, their families and consumers are no longer exposed to harmful chemicals. Second, it regenerates life and biodiversity in the soil to improve the health of our planet. And third, we can save

115 gallons of water when you switch one t-shirt to organic cotton.” Facts like that should motivate consumers to learn more about the brands they prefer. Companies like prAna, make an effort to educate consumers through online resources, social media, as well as through statistics on the benefits of organic cotton. According to Lincoln, “We are able to use prAna.com as a great educational resource. We have detailed information about the benefits of organic cotton. We also are able to provide traceability to all of our content claims, linking all the way back to the farm of origin.”

Conventionally grown cotton consumes approximately 25% of the insecticides and more than 10% of the pesticides used by the world’s farmers. “First, farmers, their families and consumers are no longer exposed to harmful chemicals. Second, it regenerates life and biodiversity in the soil to improve the health of our planet. And third, we can save 115 gallons of water when you switch one t-shirt to organic cotton.”

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ENSURING A CREDITABLE PRODUCT Indeed, prAna follows a very robust and thorough traceability program to verify the cotton they procure is actually organic. This includes following product every step along the way from farm to fiber to fabric. “Here at prAna,” Lincoln emphasizes, “any organic content claim we make can be certified to either the Organic Content Standard or Global Organic Textile Standard. Both of these standards define requirements to ensure the organic status of textiles, from harvesting of the raw materials, through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing in order to assure consumers.”

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COTTON IS A GOOD CHOICE prAna believes cotton is a wonderful fabric for active wear. Cotton is breathable, which means it won’t make you sweat more. It can emit less post-workout odor than polyester. It’s relatively easy to maintain, as cotton clothes can typically get thrown in the regular wash cycle. It’s also absorbent, so it can soak up some of the sweat you generate during a workout. But this absorbency can cause it to become dampened. That’s why many trainers suggest you only wear cotton while performing activities that won’t cause you to sweat excessively such as yoga and weight training. To address this concern, the majority of prAna products made from organic cotton are blended with other fibers such as recycled polyester or hemp. “In doing this, we are able to add performance properties to the comfort and easy wear of our organic cotton garments, extending their life,” adds Lincoln.

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THE COST OF ORGANIC “Unfortunately, today, organic cotton does cost more,” explains Lincoln. “While farmers have been using these practices for years, it is definitely more time consuming and requires more experience and skill than conventional cotton farming.” But paying a bit more for an organic product is acceptable for conscious consumers. Lincoln believes that as part of their purchasing decisions, these label readers will seek out and support companies, like prAna, that embrace similar values to their own.

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Paying a bit more for an organic product is acceptable for conscious consumers. Lincoln believes that as part of their purchasing decisions, these label readers will seek out and support companies, like prAna, that embrace similar values to their own.


ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CHORUS OF SUSTAINABLE FASHION We don’t normally associate the fashion industry as being as harmful for the environment as other “dirty” industries. But how materials are extracted and manufactured into garments can have a huge environmental impact. The problem is worsened when manufacturing is shifted to developing countries where regulation is lax. Fortunately, companies like prAna are willing to step up their game to protect our planet. Their new organic cotton supply chain program, designed to reduce waste and pollution, can serve as a model for the others. Lincoln stresses that apparel companies want to deliver a product that consumers want.You can and should let them know that you care how they operate, and what materials they obtain. “We hope that as more consumers press their favorite brands to use more organic, we will all be able to reap the benefits.”

ymore info: #keepcotton100 www.prana.com Green Peace- Press Release

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FtC fitness

HIIT YOGA with

David Ryan Fitness

Do you sometimes struggle with choosing between a fat blasting high intensity workout and a slow relaxing session of mindful stretches? Would you love to do both, but just can’t find the time to fit it all in? If this sounds true to you then I’ve got a treat for you - a great 30-minute routine that combines both HIIT and Yoga.

10 Reps Each | Rest 30 seconds 1. Inchworms down and up

2. Renegade rows

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3. Thrusters

WATCH VIDEO 4. Straight arm sit-up

Get in the best shape of your life this year with David Ryan Fitness

10% off with code FTC10 W W W. DAV I D RYA N F I T N E S S .C O M www.facethecurrent.com

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Water is more than just an assembly of oxygen and hydrogen molecules. It‘s more than just H2O. Scientists have discovered that water has memory and that it can be positively stimulated by sources of vibration and energy—sources like the gemstones in our VitaJuwel gem-water accessories.

BEFORE

AFTER

Learn more at gem-water.com and discover a world of over 20 gem blends that each boost the alkalinity (pH) and oxygen level of your everyday tap or filtered water.

TURN ORDINARY WATER INTO EXTRAORDINARY

FtC

H2O

fAce the current

HEALTH

102. The Wanting Mind 106. VitaJuwel gem water Bottles In Review 108. Healing Nature of Art Botanica Goes Beyond Aesthetics 100

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gem-water.com

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FtC health

The Wanting Mind

Adapted from Dr. Ronald Alexander’s book, Wise Mind, Open Mind: Finding Purpose and Meaning in Times of Crisis, Loss, and Change (New Harbinger Publications, 2009)

As a therapist in Los Angeles I’ve seen more than my share of patients who are dealing with various forms of depression and unhappiness. One common personality trait I’ve found with them is their unwholesome thoughts and beliefs that come from what I call the “wanting mind.” In wanting mind, we feel that our current state of unhappiness can only be cured if we have more money, recognition, fame, or power. Often we cause ourselves needless suffering when we ache for something that lies out of our grasp such as a better job, relationship or recognition or cling in vain to something that has already passed away. Wanting mind can also keep us tenaciously holding on to something negative: an unwholesome belief about how things ought to be or should have been, or an unwholesome emotion such as anger, sadness, or jealousy.

In wanting mind, we feel that our current state of unhappiness can only be cured if we have more money, recognition, fame, or power. Often we cause ourselves needless suffering when we ache for something that lies out of our grasp such as a better job, relationship or recognition or cling in vain to something that has already passed away.

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The reality is that no emotion or state of being, however strong, is permanent and that happiness can’t be found outside of ourselves only within. Buddhists call this phenomenon of endless wanting and dissatisfaction the “hungry ghost.”

When we’re in a state of wanting mind, we’re never satisfied, no matter what we have. If we attain the object of our longing, we simply replace the old desire with a new one. If we achieve revenge; we feel worse than we did before. The problem is that wanting mind is rooted in the incorrect belief that something outside of ourselves is the key to lasting happiness so we look there for the solution. The reality is that no emotion or state of being, however strong, is permanent and that happiness can’t be found outside of ourselves only within. Buddhists call this phenomenon of endless wanting and dissatisfaction the “hungry ghost.”

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I’ve found that younger people put tremendous pressure on themselves to succeed in their careers at a very early age, not allowing themselves to venture out and explore, take risks, make mistakes, discover their talents and passions, and slowly begin formulating a plan for their personal mandala.

This leads to the unwholesome habit of comparison. Some people look at others’ successes and feel deeply envious. They may be angry that they haven’t achieved what they feel entitled to, start to diminish all that’s working for them in their lives, and obsess over what seems to be lacking. Often, I’ve found that younger people put tremendous pressure

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on themselves to succeed in their careers at a very early age, not allowing themselves to venture out and explore, take risks, make mistakes, discover their talents and passions, and slowly begin formulating a plan for their personal mandala. Others often have unrealistic expectations rooted in the narratives spun by popular culture. In movies and television shows for example the difficulties of maintaining and

nurturing relationships are often minimized in favor of a more engaging and unlikely story of couples who meet, fall in love immediately, have great sex as well as an unwavering long-term commitment, and rarely disagree—and if they do, they quickly resolve all their issues. The amount of effort and time that must be invested to foster a healthy relationship is often surprising to people with little experience of such relationships.


One remedy to addressing these underlying, and distorted beliefs of the wanting mind that contribute to the complexities of depression is through a mindfulness meditation practice. I had one client, in particular, who dreamed of being a successful novelist, and became deeply envious of a talented writer who’d written several best-selling novels that had defined a genre and made her famous. This client, who was only a year or two out of college, had already managed to procure a scholarship to a prestigious writing program but felt disappointed in her inability to find a publisher for her novel.

Only through self-love and being in the moment can one open themselves up to the type of creativity they need to improve their circumstances.

Through meditation, the conflicted young woman was able to explore her belief that she should have as much skill and success as someone who had spent many years honing her craft and building her profile among booksellers and readers. By becoming mindful she recognized that she’d been repressing unwholesome feelings of low self-worth. I helped her see that the passion she was devoting to envying this best-selling author’s success could be redirected to more productive activity if she would apply a positive antidote of satisfaction to her wanting mind, which had created a grandiose expectation completely out of proportion to a reasonable level of achievement for a writer just starting out. Only through self-love and being in the moment can one open themselves up to the type of creativity they need to improve their circumstances. By dropping out of wanting mind and negative comparison, you can then drop into an acceptance of what’s ordinary as well as what’s extraordinary within yourself. Each of us has the potential to do something no one else has ever done before, and you open yourself to discovering just what that is when you replace wanting mind and its negative feelings and thoughts with a mind-set of satisfaction.

ymore info: www.ronaldalexander.com www.facethecurrent.com

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FtC health

VitaJuwel

Bottles In Review By David Aiello The ancient Greeks were known for infusing their drinking water with gemstones.They observed that it positively changed the properties of the water.The water later became known as crystal healing water, and was a tradition in many civilizations. VitaJuwel Gem-Water Bottles, of Concord, California, now revisits this ancient practice, by creating gemstone vials to hygienically revitalize drinking water.Their mission is to provide you with homemade, natural gem water, which is like fresh from the spring! VitaJuwel gem vials are made from lead-free glass by a master glass blower and handpicked gems.The crystals are all hand selected, and derived from the earth in their natural form.They will not lose their energy, and will continue to work and infuse water for a lifetime.The company offers several different gem blends, tested by naturopaths and based on the insights of modern crystal healing. Face the Current was able to try the VitaJuwel Gem-Water Wellness Bottle with Rose Quartz, Clear Quartz and Amethyst. This gemstone mix is said to be perfect for those who want their inner beauty to radiate out into the world. While we can’t testify to how much of our inner beauty merged, we can testify to what an amazing product the Gemstone Water Bottle proved to be.

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The bottle itself is a perfect size to carry at about 10-inches tall and 3-inches wide. We were able to fill our bottle with two-cups (16 oz.) of water. Starting from $78, the bottles are made of lead-free, borosilicate glass, and each bottle has two openings. The interchangeable bottom piece infused with a selection of handpicked gems, unscrews to allow you to easily swap it with 17 other carefully selected gemstone blends, one to suite every preference and mood.

state, fresh spring water, is very different from the water out of the faucet.VitaJuwel Gem-Water Bottles can restore water to its natural state. As the back-to-nature trend continues to grow, gem water is becoming a staple. Thanks to Gem-Water we can now be assured we are getting the maximum intended benefits of gem infused water.

The first thing we noticed was just how beautiful our Gem-Water Bottle was. The colors of the gems are vibrant and aesthetically pleasing to look at. That alone made us want to go out and buy additional gemstone blends and ‘collect them all!’ Everyone who has tried the gem treated water, which takes only 7 minutes for the water to be restructured, has agreed that the water tasted more pure, softer, crisper, and delicious. We even tried the Gem-Water Bottle with tea and flavored water, and agreed there was still a noticeable positive difference in taste. The glass bottle opens at both ends for easy cleaning, and while the bottle can go in the dishwasher, the lid and base need to be hand washed. Some of us in the office seem to have slippery hands so we would recommend purchasing Neoprene Hug Sleeve to not only help maintain water temperature, but it also cushions your Gem-Water Bottle from the inevitable impact. Water maybe the Earth’s most valuable commodity, and something we need a lot of each day. Water in its natural

ymore info:

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Healing Nature of Art Botanica

Goes Beyond Aesthetics By David Aiello Over the past half century there has been a steady migration of rural populations to urban centers. As a result, air pollution has increased and green spaces have diminished. In response to this, urban and rural residents are incorporating living green walls (also referred to as vertical gardens or living walls) into their home and work environments to improve their quality of life with the intrinsic

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THE BENEFITS ARE MANY Your living green walls are natural air-filters. They create a cleaner, more invigorating environment that can aid in better health. Much like traditional houseplants, living green walls also metabolize harmful toxins while releasing oxygen. Interior and exterior living green walls function to cool the air in the warm summer months by a process known as “evapotranspiration,” making living green walls natural insulators. Exterior living green walls can reduce wall surface temperatures by as much as 50 degrees °F, resulting in significant energy savings and air conditioning costs. The winter months see the additional advantage of living green walls adding to building insulation, thus reducing energy costs related to heating. On top of this, living green walls can also reduce noise pollution. One of the lesserknown but incredible benefits of living green walls is that they can reduce noise levels in buildings. The vegetation in a living green wall ‘naturally’ blocks high frequency sounds while the supporting structure can help to diminish low frequency noise. Living green walls also have psychological benefits. A study published in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology in 2015 suggests that interaction with indoor plants can reduce physiological and psychological stress. Plants have also been shown to increase feelings of wellness and fast-track recovery in hospital patients. A living wall adds contentment from nature which reminds us of the renewal of spring and the growth of summer –it’s this feeling of life that lifts the spirit. While living green walls are undeniably beneficial, their installation and maintenance costs can be a deterrent. Since the plants are living, they require food, water, and regular pruning and replacement to remain viable; this can be costly both financially and in terms of time management. So how do we capture the health and wellness benefits of a living wall while eliminating its energy, water, and time consumption? Kelley Anderson has the answer. www.facethecurrent.com

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KELLEY ANDERSON USES MOSS ART TO HEAL Kelley Anderson has experienced the healing effect of immersion in nature and acknowledges that we do not often get the chance to realize the therapeutic power it provides. It was this love and passion for nature that drove Kelley Anderson to create Art Botanica. “I have personally experienced nature’s healing power and I feel compelled to bring that energy to others through my art,” she explains, speaking of her botanical installations created using naturally preserved moss. She believes this is the place where healing can begin because when you reconnect with nature, you can reinvigorate your spirit. Based in Los Angeles, Kelley creates custom pieces for home and office spaces, from conception to installation, In fact, a new University of Technology Sydney study shows a 30-60% reduction in staffs’ stress levels and negative feelings when plants were present in their offices. By seeking to immerse others in nature through her botanical art, Kelley aims to elicit an emotional response, increasing awareness of the oneness and connectedness we share with nature and with others.

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Unlike vertical gardens that require intensive water systems and light, Kelley’s botanical art is naturally preserved to maintain its vividness and vibrancy with no upkeep or maintenance. The works are hypoallergenic and release no spores or pollen so you can enjoy their rich colors and textures for decades.

Kelley’s art can be viewed around the globe including installations in Dubai, Australia, Europe, and even India. She recently completed a 75 square foot wall behind the bar of Bellwether, a new farm-to-table restaurant in NewYork.

We’ve all experienced the peace and serenity that the wilderness can bring. Art Botanica captures that positive, healing, and peaceful energy, and brings it into our living spaces so we may reap its rewards indefinitely.

ymore info: https://kelleybotanica.com/ Social: @kelleyartbotanica www.facethecurrent.com

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Fuel for an inspired life. Be your potential.

Issue 18 / April 2018  
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