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Ornamental and Miscellaneous Metal



Fabricator

Shop Talk

Prevent rust on stainless, pg. 44

Biz Side

Make profits count in 2005, pg 68

The official publication of the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association

Tips & Tactics

Get help on change orders, pg. 11

Job Profiles

Coloring and texturing bronze

page 64

January-February 2005 $6.00 US


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President’s Letter

Dedicated to the success of our members and industry. NOMMA Officers President Curt Witter Big D Metalworks Dallas, TX President-Elect Doug Bracken Wiemann Ironworks Tulsa, OK

Chris Connelly DeAngelis Iron Work Inc. South Easton, MA Immediate Past President Chris Maitner Christopher Metal Fab. Inc. Grand Rapids, MI

Vice Pres./Treasurer

Fabricator Directors Breck Nelson Kelley Ornamental Iron LLC Peoria, IL

Rod Stodtmeister Stodtmeister Iron Sparks, NV Sally Powell Powell’s Custom Metal Fab Inc. Jacksonville, FL

Fred Michael Colonial Iron Works Inc. Petersburg, VA

Don Walsh Pro-Fusion Ornamental Iron Inc. San Carlos, CA

Rob Mueller Mueller Ornamental Iron Works Inc. Elk Grove Village, IL

Supplier Directors David T. Donnell Eagle Bending Machines Inc. Stapleton, AL

Gene Garrett Regency Railings Inc. Dallas, TX

Bob Borsh House of Forgings Houston, TX

NOMMA Staff Executive Director Barbara H. Cook

sistant Liz Ware

Meetings & Exposition Manager Martha Pennington

Technical Consultant Tim Moss Managing Editor Rachel Squires Bailey

Communications Mgr. & Editor J. Todd Daniel Administrative As-

2004 Advisory Council Jay Holeman Mountain Iron Fabrications

Lee Rodrigue Virginia Architectural Metals

Tom McDonough Master Metal Services Inc.

Nancy Hayden Tesko Enterprises

Rob Rolves Foreman Fabricators Inc.

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Contributing Writers John L. Campbell William J. Lynott

Have you finalized your 2005 strategic plan? Did you sit down at the end of 2003 and make a list of all the personal and company goals that you wanted to accomplish during the New Year? If you did, have you achieved them all? Some of us may have been fortunate enough to not only have met our goals but exceeded them. If you’re like most, you feel like you haven’t accomplished anything except for working hard while managing to barely keep your head above water. What do you do if you have not met all your goals? Do you quit, blame others, and criticize those who helped set the goals, or do you stop setting goals all together? If you have a five year-plan and set yearly goals to achieve the objectives contained in your plan, then you have a leg up on most small organizations. Over the years, I have read and learned about many goal setting techniques by various authors. The common thread that seems to run through these techniques is: • Create a vision and mission statement. • Develop strategies to achieve your vision. • Set SMART goals. (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Time-bound.) • Have flexibility within your plan.

NOMMA’s roadmap

Your association has been repeating this process since 1998. The initial implementation was not easy, but now it has become our norm and has helped us maintain focus and continuity from year to year. Each year we begin with an aggressive plan to improve in areas that will help us achieve the goals stated in our strategic plan. At times we fall short of achieving everything we set out to do. The reasons for an

unaccomplished goal can vary. It could be that the original assumptions have changed and dictates a correction in our process. Other reasons may be caused by circumstances beyond our control, in which case there may need to be a reevaluation of the goals and course corrections. As these changes relate to your association, the course corrections have been many but the drive and focus never wavers. You have an association that is worthy of your respect and earns it year after year. I encourage all of you to become involved in a way that helps NOMMA achieve its goals. If you want or Curt Witter is need to improve president of the National yourself, company, or organization start Ornamental and Miscellaneous with a strategic plan Metals to create a set of Association. goals with timelines. You will be amazed at what can be accomplished in a relatively short period of time. I recently read a book that simplifies the strategic planning process even further. Titled, Raving Fans it is based on three simple points: • Decide what you want (create a vision). • Discover what the customer wants (make sure your vision and the customer’s vision are aligned). • Deliver your vision, plus 1 percent. I hope you start your New Year with a good plan so that when the end of 2005 arrives, you will be one of the few who not only met their goals, but exceeded them! Members may view NOMMA’s strategic plan in the Member’s Only section at www.nomma.org.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


2005

“The Key to Your

New Orleans, LA March 2-4, 2005

New Products • Networking Special Offers • And MORE!

FREE Trade Show Admission March 2-4, 2005 • New Orleans, LA

Wed. 2:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Thurs. 12:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Fri. 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Hall B-2

Note that the trade show now runs Wednesday through Friday and is NOT open on Saturday. Don’t Miss This Event!

n n See See cutting-edge cutting-edge technologies technologies and and the the latest latest products. products. n n Meet Meet innovative innovative suppliers suppliers from from around around the the world. world. n n Take Take advantage advantage of of on-site on-site show show spespecials cials and and promotions. promotions. n n Enjoy a walk through the Top Job Gallery and see entries for the 2005 Ernest Wiemann Top Job Contest.

FREE TRADE SHOW  TICKET New Orleans, LA - Mar. 2-4, 2005 Complete this form and mail to METALfab, 535 Lakemont Ct., Ste. 200, Roswell, GA 30075, or fax: (770) 518-1292.

To pre-register for the FREE trade show ticket, simply fill out the for m and mail or fax to the address below.* There is no limit to the nu mber of attendees from your compan y, so please dupli cate this form. Questions? Call the National Orna mental & Miscellaneous Me tals Association at (404) 3634009. And for the latest convention information, visit: www.nomm a.org.

* Your badge wil l be waiting in the registration area of Hall B-2. in front

List three products you hope to purchase at METALfab 2005: 1. ___________________________________________________ _______ 2. ___________________________________________________

First Name _________________________________________________________ Last Name _________________________________________________________ Company __________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________ City _____________________________ State _________ Zip _________________ Phone ______________________________ Fax ___________________________

1) q q q q

Primary type of business: Fabricator General Supplier Contractor Other________________

2) q q q q q

Annual gross sales: Below $500,000 $500,000 - $1 million $1 million - $2.5 million $2.5 million - $5 million Over $5 million

3) q q q

Your role in purchasing: Final Say Recommend Specify

4) q q q

Job description: Owner Manager/Foreman Other_______________

Check here q if you are not involved in the business.

E-mail _____________________________________________________________

Children under 14 are not allowed on the trade show floor. Young persons 14-17 must be accompanied by an adult. Cameras and video equipment not permitted.


Ornamental & Miscellaneous Met­al Fab­ri­ca­tor (ISSN 0191-5940), is the of­fi­cial pub­li­ca­tion of the Na­tional Or­na­men­tal & Mis­cel­la­ne­ous Metals As­so­cia­tion (NOMMA). O&MM Fabricator 532 Forest Pkwy., Ste. A Forest Park, GA 30297

Editorial

Send story ideas, letters, press releases, and product news to: Fabricator at address above. (404) 363-4009. Fax: (404) 3661852. E-mail: fabricator@nomma.org.

Advertising

Ads are due on the first Friday of the month preceding the cover date. Send ads on CD to: Fabricator at address above. E-mail ads to: fabricator@nomma.org (max. 5 megs by e-mail). Visit our website for a downloadable media kit: www.nomma.org.

Membership

In addition to the magazine, you’ll enjoy many more benefits as a NOMMA member. To join, call the headquarters office at (404) 363-4009. For a complete list of benefits, refer to the membership ad in this issue.

Classifieds

$25 for up to 35 words, $38 for 36–55 words, $50 for 56–70 words. Send items to: Liz Ware, Fabricator, at address above. Ads may be faxed with credit card info to: (404) 366-1852. Deadline: 2nd Fri­day of the month prior to pub­li­ca­tion.

Subscriptions

Subscription questions? Call (404) 363-4009 Send subscription address changes to: Fabricator Subscriptions, 532 Forest Pkwy., Suite A, Forest Park, GA 30297. Fax: (404) 366-1852. E-mail: fabricator@nomma.org. 1-year: 2-year: 1-year: 2-year:

U.S., Canada, Mexico — $30; U.S., Canada, Mex­i­co — $50; all other countries — $44; all other countries — $78.

Pay­ment in U.S. dol­lars by check drawn on U.S. bank or money order. For NOMMA mem­bers, a year’s sub­scrip­tion is a part of membership dues.

Supplier Directory

Published each December as a separate issue. Space reservation deadline is July 31. Deadline for all advertising materials is August 31. For info, contact Rachel S. Bailey at (404) 363-4009 or rachel@ nomma.org.

Reprints

Reprints of articles are available. For a quote, contact Rachel S.Bailey at (404) 363-4009 or rachel@nomma.org. Opinions expressed in Fabricator are not necessarily those of the editors or NOM­MA. Articles appearing in Fabricator may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express permission of NOMMA. © NOMMA 2005. Circulation: 8,000.

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How to reach us

Editor’s Letter

Exciting changes are taking place at NOMMA After 13 years as Fabricator’s editor, I am taking on new roles at NOMMA. Taking my place, and effective with the March/April issue, is our new editor, Rachel Squires Bailey. The move is a win-win for all of us, and I am thrilled about the many positives that will come from this change. Rachel joined NOMMA in May 2000 as a part-time editorial assistant. During the past four years she has “climbed the ranks” to become associate editor and then managing editor. With her degree in public relations, a master’s degree in English, and experience in both writing and marketing, she is ideally suited for this role. I am happy that NOMMA has provided this opportunity for her to continue growing in her career.

New adventures

As for me, I am continuing as Communications Manager and will have more time to devote to the web, technical projects, and in-house database needs. In 2001, NOMMA took two colossal steps forward by launching the Technical Affairs Division and the NOMMA Education Foundation. To allow these two outreaches to flourish takes a lot of staff work, and much of my time will be spent working on Technical Affairs and Foundation projects. Two of my immediate goals will be to help publish a Trade Practice Guide for the industry and an online Knowledgebase for the membership. Web enhancements

we are looking at include interactive education modules and online video presentations. Looking ahead

After producing 81 issues of Fabricator, not surprisingly this is an emotional time for me. However, I know that the magazine is in excellent hands, and I will still remain involved with the advertising. Exactly two years ago we embarked on Todd Daniel is editor of one of our greatest Ornamental & magazine upgrades Miscellaneous ever by converting Metal Fabricator. the publication to 100 percent digital and hiring a consultant to give us a complete redesign. After two years, we have “shaken out” most of the technical and design bugs, and I feel that Rachel now has a solid foundation for taking the magazine to the next highest level. Summary

In conclusion, I want to thank executive director Barbara Cook for having the long-term vision that continually moves NOMMA forward, and for keeping our jobs interesting and challenging. As NOMMA approaches its 50th anniversary, I believe our industry will see many new programs and products from our association, and I am honored to be a part of this exciting and worthy effort.

While I have also overseen NOMMA’s website since 1996, in my new role I will now have more time to make major improvements to the site. One of the immediate changes you’ll see is a greatly improved online supplier directory. Other projects

Fabricator n January/February 2005


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Reader’s Letters A slight pipe size clarification In the September/October 2004 issue Tim Moss responding to a letter from Matt Cathone states: “...pipe size designation, which is an inside diameter, while...” This is not quite correct. Pipe sizes specify OUTSIDE diameters, but have little relation to the nominal size. These size designations are simply NAMES, not dimensions. For a given pipe size all will have the same O.D., but each schedule will have a different I.D. Schedule 10 pipe, for example, has a much smaller ID than a schedule 80 of the same size designation, but will have the same O.D. The history of these designations is long and fascinating, but not relevant here. Thanks for a great magazine! John L. Odom Ooltewah, TN Technical Consultant Tim Moss replies: It’s true that for a given nominal pipe size, the O.D. remains

the same while the wall thickness will vary. But, the internal diameters are closer to the nominal size. For a more detailed explanation, visit the “Technical Support” area at www. nomma.org. Chapter launches website The Upper Midwest Chapter of NOMMA now has their own website and domain. We can be found at www.nomma-umwc.org. If you are a chapter member, please consider adding this to your bookmarks or “favorites” list, so that you can check back often for news pertaining to the chapter and NOMMA. Also, we still have shirts available in XL and XXL. Lynn Parquette Mueller Ornamental Iron Works Inc. W RI TE !

Looking for help with arch I am a master gardener volunteer of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Agency of Forsyth County, N.C. I am also a volunteer curator of our local Arboretum in Tanglewood Park in Clemmons, N.C. The Arboretum has feature gardens and the Children’s Garden is in need of an arch way at its entrance. I am open to ideas and would like to talk with someone about design and cost. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Connie Little Winston Salem, NC If interested in this project please contact the Fabricator staff at fabricator@ nomma.org or call (404) 363-4009, ext. 15.

Tell us what you think

Mail: Letter to the Editor, c/o Fabricator, 532 Forest Pkwy., Ste. A, Forest Park, GA 30297 E-mail: fabricator@nomma.org Fax: (404) 366-1852. Please include your name, company, address, telephone number, and e-mail. Letters are subject to editing for clarity, grammar, and length.

NE NOMMA Education Foundation F

In partnership with the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association

The NOMMA Education Foundation is committed to providing quality education resources for the industry.

Books • Videos • Sales Aids • CDs

We are proud of our collection of history and design books, which provide thousands of ornamental design ideas. Check out our NEF Education Videos, which are ideal for training employees.

Obtain our catalog for a listing of nearly 50 books, videos, CD’s, and sales aids.

To see a complete listing and to download a free catalog, visit: www. nomma.org/nef or to request a catalog by phone, call (404) 363-4009. January/February 2005 n Fabricator

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Tips & Tactics n

Ask our expert Contact: Jack Kruse,

Mac Metals, Kearny, NJ

Know brass from bronze and avoid costly mistakes Knowing exactly what material you need to order and what you are working with can eliminate potential errors or problems when fabricating that metal. This in turn saves you time and money. By Jack Kruse Mac Metals Inc. As a producer of brass and bronze extrusions, we receive numerous calls from people who use inaccurate terms when requesting material. When purchasing brass or bronze, saying “I want to buy some brass bar” without specifying the alloy is like saying “I want to buy a car” without specifying whether you want a Ford Taurus or Chevrolet Malibu. Let’s try to clear up some common misunderstandings about brass and bronze. If someone handed you a piece of yellow metal and asked you to identify whether it was brass or bronze, could you? Unless you had some psychic ability, the answer is no. The piece would have to be analyzed in a lab to determine whether it was brass or bronze. So, if they can look so much alike, what makes brass and bronze different? Defining terms

The words brass and bronze encompass many different types of brass or bronze, which are referred to as alloys. The word alloy means to mix together. By mixing various other elements with copper, such as zinc, lead, nickel, silicon, manganese, etc., you come up with many different copper alloys. Brasses are alloys whose primary element is copper and the secondary elements is zinc. Many brass alloys have an additional third or more element in them. Bronzes are alloys whose primary element is copper and the secondary elements is, take a guess. Did you say tin? If you did you were partially wrong. At one time this was true. Tin was the only secondary element used in bronze. But today there are bronzes which have little or no tin in them. Aluminum January/February 2005 n Fabricator

bronze’s secondary element is aluminum, and silicon bronze’s is silicon. Neither alloy has tin in it. There are two categories of brass and bronze—wrought and cast. In general, wrought products are produced by some type of working, such as extruding, and castings are molten metal poured into some type of mold. The physical properties of the two are very different. We will only be concerned with wrought alloys in this article—specifically extrusions. Angles, channels, tee, bar, rod, and handrail are forms of extrusion. Brass alloys

Brass alloys are broken down into three categories based on their composition: copper-zinc, copper-zinc-lead, and copperzinc-zinc-tin. The 300 series brasses such as C38500 and C36000 have zinc as the second largest element and lead the third, giving you the leaded brasses. The 200 series brasses such as C22000, C26000, and C27000 have zinc as the second largest element and no lead, giving you the unleaded brasses.

Key terms n Offers reliable, fast, very high-quality cut. n High repeatability due to no wear parts. n No deformation of material. (Laser is closer to machining than plasma.) n Accuracy of cut can be maintained in very thin and pliable materials. n Cuts up to 3/4” steel, 1 /4” stainless, and 1/8” aluminum. n Fabricators can assemble their finished products, instead of cutting parts.

Architectural bronze is a brass alloy

Brass alloy C38500, popularly called architectural bronze, is the most commonly used alloy to produce extrusions for the architectural industry. Its color is somewhat more golden than yellow brass alloys and, most importantly, it is the easiest alloy for mills to extrude into complex shapes. You will find some distributor’s catalogs listing it as “Bronze.” Keep in mind that it is actually brass alloy C38500. They might also use the old designations of 385 or 360, etc., which were replaced by the newer Copper Development Association six-digit designations, i.e., C38500 or C36000. 11


Bronze alloys

Bronze alloys are broken down into five categories: copper-tin, copper-tin-lead, copper-silicon, copper-aluminum, and miscellaneous copper-zinc. Most extruded bronze alloys, such as manganese bronze and silicon bronze, were designated for use in industrial applications, not architectural. They are very strong, hard metals, which are very expensive relative to the common brasses. Nickel silver has no silver

The last alloy to discuss is nickel silver. Nickel silver is very strong and highly resistant to corrosion and wear. Most nickel silver used for extrusions in the U.S. is either C77400 (10 percent nickel) or C77600 (13 percent nickel). The primary element is copper, and the secondary element is nickel. Let’s clarify now that there is no silver in nickel silver! If you mirror polish these nickel silver alloys they will look like chrome with a slight yellow tint. As the nickel content increases, the alloy looks more silvery and less yellow. If the nickel content is low enough, the metal can look like a washed out brass alloy. Left unpolished, nickel silver oxidizes to a dark gray color. Many people use this alloy to achieve the architectural look of

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

stainless steel. The reason being that stainless steel cannot be extruded in complex or thin wall shapes. In addition, the surface quality of stainless steel extrusions is very porous and rough.

Color Samples

Inaccurate commercial names

What about popular non-technical names for some of the metals? Names such as Commercial Bronze and Architectural Bronze are inaccurate and misleading. Why? Because neither is actually bronze. They are technically brass alloys C22000 and C38500 respectively, and their colors and properties are worlds apart. The terms German silver and white bronze for nickel silver are also inaccurate, outdated, and rarely used. Using these popular names is fine, so long as you specify the alloy number along with them. Consult your sales rep

To sum up, the Copper Development Association alloy designations such as C38500 and C36000 are the correct way to specify material when ordering. If you are not sure what the alloy callout is, tell your salespeople what you are looking for and have them explain exactly what it is they are

These samples have been mirror polished and put side-by-side to show the color variations. Starting at the top, the alloy is C36000, then C38500, C77600, C37000 and C48500. Note the C38500 sample is is ever-so slightly more red than the C36000 above.

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2005 “The Key to Your Business

Education

You are invited to join us at METALfab 2005, March 2-5, 2005, New Orleans, LA.

New Course Offering

Also in the Line-Up

We are pleased to announce the following session, which was added after the Convention Guide went to press. The class runs from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 3.

Let Steve Abercrombie help you sharpen your financial skills...

How To Get Paid in Full on Every Job “Learn how to increase profits while preventing losses.” A contractor operating on a 5 percent net profit must do $500,000 worth

of additional work to make up for a $25,000 loss. So it is not surprising that contractors are eager to shift losses on you, even when you are not at fault. Many of the losses suffered by fabricators may be avoided by applying techniques covered in this course.

Items covered in this course include:

• Maximizing your leverage through effective subcontract negotiation. • Strategies for increasing your recovery on change orders and extra work claims. • The three things you must do to protect your right to file delay, interference, and impact claims. • How to make effective modifications of lien waivers to protect your rights. • The ten methods of obtaining payment when your customer can’t pay. During the course you will view sample bid terms and conditions, subcontract addendum, and other sample contracts. About the presenter: Philip Clark Jones is a trial lawyer who specializes in litigation and arbitration of construction claims on both government and private projects. He also acts as a consultant to construction company management on negotiation strategy. Phil is a member of the bars of the District of Columbia, Virginia, and Maryland, and is the founder of the Jones Construction Law Firm, with offices in Washington, DC and Annapolis, MD. He is a nationally recognized speaker on construction law and negotiation.

Hurry and Register for METALfab 2005

Convention Registration: Obtain a Convention Guide and registration form by calling (404) 363-4009, or visit: www.nomma.org. Hotel: Room reservations should be made directly with the hotel. Call (800) 217-2033 or (504) 523-3341. To obtain the special NOMMA rate, make your reservation by Jan. 28, 2005. 16

Back by popular demand we have Steve

Abercrombie with Business Resource Services. Steve taught two classes in 2004 (7 Steps to Fiscal Fitness and Using Breakeven as a Tool) and this year he continues with three more sessions on improving your financial management skills. His background includes 20 years in the consumer, commercial, Steve Abercrombie and small business lending industry, and he is a greatly sought after speaker for trade associations. If you did not attend in 2004, be sure to spend time with Mr. Abercrombie in 2005. On Friday, March 4, he is leading the following two sessions:

Taking the Mystery Out of the Numbers and The Road Map

When you don’t know where you are it’s difficult to chart a future course. These two presentations take the audience beyond the basics of financial statement analysis in a sophisticated, decision-relevant format. Working through real life case studies, participants explore the specific techniques of strategic financial analysis to learn how to solve the problems that cause financial distress and not just the symptoms. Participants will learn about financial ratios and how to use them to analyze their company’s financial performance and to create change for the future. After this presentation, participants will understand what financial statements really tell them about their business and have the expertise and confidence to take action. No prior financial expertise needed to participate in these classes. Fabricator n January/February 2005


How Much Can You Grow?

While growth and recession get measured on the income statement, they get paid for on the balance sheet. Without carefully managing your business’s balance sheet to take positive control of growth, you can fall into the “Financial Gap.” This unique presentation allows participants to access their current survival position as well as get acquainted to the “Sponge Technique,” an innovative, realistic strategy for wringing much needed cash out of a balance sheet.

Additional Classes... Maximizing Your Computer

Chances are you own a computer, but do you know how to use it to its fullest potential? The goal of this class is not to make you a computer expert, but rather to introduce you to resources that can make you more productive. Topics covered in this class include the NOMMA ListServ, communicating with design/build professionals, shopping on-line, PowerPoint, digital photography, and web sites. Of particular interest will be a discussion on how to sell on-line. 21st Century Technology In a Centuries Old Industry

This roundtable discussion covers new technologies and how they can be used in our industry. Examples include laser measuring, digitized layout, cutting techniques, new abrasives, epoxy anchors, adhesives, and more. Scroll Theory & Production

Join master blacksmith Roger Carlsen for a detailed study of scrolls. Learn what forms are good, what is bad, and the different scroll types. You’ll get a first-hand primer on how to utilize math and artistry, and how to make different scroll designs. The presentation also covers joinery, mixing of elements, and aesthetic compatibility. In addition to classroom discussion, there will also be a video presentation. Internal Honesty

It could happen to you! Money is only one of many assets that employees can steal from your company. You January/February 2005 n Fabricator

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must also find ways to protect tools, ideas, technology, office supplies, shop materials, customers, and private business data. This roundtable discussion covers ways to recognize the problem and lessen the risk. Rolling, Bending & Forming

Join exhibitors and the fabricators who use their products on the show floor for a demonstration and discussion. You will visit multiple booths for a presentation of the product possibilities, followed by a question and answer session. Safety

Is your company ready for an emergency? Do you have a disaster plan? Are you CPR certified and do you have the proper first aid supplies on site? Do you meet OSHA requirements for a shop safety program? Find out the answers to these questions and discover how to kick-start your own program. Pneumatics? The Do’s & Don’t’s of Pneumatic Tools

Every thing you need to know about pneumatics is covered in this

session, including proper set-up, proper placement of compressor, piping, dryers, filers, regulators, and valves. Discussions will cover tooling, types of bench tools, hold-downs, and clamps. The class also explores various floor tools such as air hammers and blasters, as well as specialized “home made” tools. Conventional vs. screw type compressors will also be covered.

timedia tour to Big D Metalworks, Dallas, TX; The Iron Hammer, Murray, KY; JC Ornamental Iron Works Inc., Wylie, TX; and Majka Railing Co. Inc., Paterson, NJ. See how each shop manages its workflow from materials delivery to getting the job out the door. The video presentations are a great source of ideas for your own shop.

Gate Operator Coalition Update

Technical Committee - Tim’s Top Ten

While a gate operator installer certification program has been discussed for years, a recent law in Texas has put this idea on the fast-track. Under Texas Senate Bill 1252, which went into effect September 1, installers may be required to hold a certification by a “commission-approved” training program. During this session, members of the Vehicular Gate Safety Coalition will provide an update on their efforts to create a certification program and discuss where the industry is headed. Video Shop Tours

Now in its sixth year, the Video Shop Tours are always a hit at the convention. This year, we take a mul-

Have you ever received the dreaded “red tag” from a building inspector? In this session, NOMMA’s Technical Consultant Tim Moss discusses the “top ten” code concerns faced by fabricators. Learn how codes may be interpreted, how to avoid potential problems, and potential defenses should your project fail inspection. Tim will also take a peek into the future by sharing the latMETALfab 2005 Updates Visit our website for the latest news and updates to the METALfab 2005 education program. You’ll also find a schedule and downloadable convention guide. Visit: www.nomma.org.

2005 “The Key to Your Business

Trade Ameristar Fence Products P.O. Box 581000 Tulsa, OK 74158 918-835-0898 • Fax: 918-877-4454 sirwin@ameristarfence.com Ornamental fence. Apollo Gate Operators 12902 Delivery Dr. San Antonio, TX 78247 210-545-2900 • Fax: 210-545-2915 www.apollogate.com Automatic gate operators. Atlas Metal Sales 1401 Umatilla St. 18

The trade show takes place during the first three days of METALfab 2005, March 2-4. Join Us For the Trade Show! Come visit the METALfab trade show to see the latest products and services from around the world. Note that trade show admittance is FREE (but you must register either in advance or on-site). Also note that the show is only open during specific hours (see schedule next page). Denver, CO 80204 303-623-0143 • Fax: 303-623-3034 www.atlasmetal.com jsimms@atlasmetal.com

Silicon bronze. Julius Blum & Co. Inc. P.O. Box 816 Carlstadt, NJ 07072 201-438-4600 • 800-526-6293 Fax: 201-438-6003 www.juliusblum.com bluminfo@juliusblum.com Stock components for architectural & ornamental ironwork. The Cable Connection 5224 Hwy. 50, E Carson City, NV 89701 800-851-2961 • Fax: 775-885-2734 Fabricator n January/February 2005


www.ultra-tecrailings.com info@ultra-tecrailings.com Cable railing products.

Trade Show Hours

Century Group Inc.                                          P.O. Box 228 Sulphur, LA 70664 337-527-5266 • Fax: 337-312-1170 www.centurygrp.com dpesson@centurygrp.com Precast concrete stair tread.

Wed., Mar. 2........................................................2:30 p.m - 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Mar. 3...................................................12:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Fri., Mar. 4.............................................................8 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Location

METALfab takes place at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd., New Orleans, LA 70130.

drills, hand saws. Cleveland Steel Tool Co. CML USA Ercolina 474 East 105th St. 15256-R6 OH MH 44108 Fabricator Ad-FINAL.qxp8506 12/14/2004 8:30 AM Page 1 North Fairmount Cleveland, Davenport, IA 52806 800-446-4402 • Fax: 216-681-7009 563-391-7700 • Fax: 563-391-7710 www.clevelandsteeltool.com www.ercolina-usa.com kevin@clevelandsteeltool.com dtunis@ercolina-usa.com Ironworkers, portable tooling, magnetic

Quality is always in style

Pipe, tube & profile bending equipment. Colorado Waterjet Co. 5186-F Longs Peak Rd. Berthoud, CO 80513 970-532-5404 • Fax: 970-532-5405 www.coloradowaterjet.com info@coloradowaterjet.com Abrasive waterjet shape cutting services. C.R. Laurence Co. Inc. 2503 East Vernon Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90058 800-421-6144 • Fax: 800-262-3299 www.crlaurence.com crl@crlaurence.com Architectural hardware, door closers, all glass entryways, rails & handrails, transaction hardware.

Quality craftsmanship in an exceptional range of choices

Imperial Style

Master Halco is dedicated to serving professionals who share our commitment to uncompromising quality. Our vast range of styles, materials and options lets you create precisely the right match for every project, no matter what the size. Selecting from our Monumental Iron™ Series allows you to provide your customers with the quality they expect while giving you the profits you deserve. Master Halco stands behind every product with a 15-year limited warranty that's among the most comprehensive in the industry. It's one more reason you can be confident when trusting your reputation to our products. Explore the many ways Master Halco helps create installations you can be proud of. Visit us today at www.FenceOnline.com.

Olde Town

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4000 W. Metropolitan Dr., Suite 400 Orange, California 92868 1.888.MH.FENCE (toll-free) e-mail: info@FenceOnline.com www.FenceOnline.com

Crescent City Iron Supply Inc. 2033 North 17th Ave. Melrose Park, IL 60160 708-345-6660 • Fax: 708-345-6664 www.crescentcityiron.com davejr@cciron.com Custom Orn. Iron Inc. P.O. Box 1583 Glen Allen,VA 23060 804-798-1991 Fax: 804-752-7610 www.customornamentaliron.com jimk@customornamentaliron.com Aluminum railing system. Custom Orn. Iron Works 10 12020 Vulcan Way Richmond, BC V7C 5T4 Canada 604-273-6435 Fax: 604-273-7985 www.customironworks.com bwright@customironworks.com Davison Publishing 3452 Lake Lynda Dr., Ste. 363 Orlando, FL 32817 800-328-4766 Fax: 407-380-5222 www.davisonpublishing.com bill@davisonpublishing.com Fabricator n January/February 2005


Fence blue book, CD, and website.

embossing machines.

D.J.A. Imports Ltd. 1672 East 233rd St. Bronx, NY 10466 718-324-6871 • Fax: 718-324-0726 www.djaimports.com info@djaimports.com Ornamental steel components, stainless steel components, gate & door hardware, cantilever gate system, gate operator.

EURO-FER SRL Viale Dell’Industria 16/18 Castelgomberto, VI 36070 Italy 011-39-044-544-0033 Fax: 011-39-044-544-0351 www.eurofer.com m.mazza@eurofer.com Ornamental wrought iron components for gates, stairs, & windows.

DKS DoorKing Inc. 120 South Glasgow Ave. Inglewood, CA 90301 800-826-7493 Fax: 310-641-1586 www.doorking.com info@doorking.com Gate operators, access control products.

FABCAD.COM 2000 Midway Ave. Petersburg, VA 23803 804-862-8807 Fax: 804-861-6379 www.fabcad.com dave@fabcad.com Ornamental CAD software.

Eagle Bending Machines Inc. P.O. Box 99 Stapleton, AL 36578 251-937-0947 Fax: 251-937-4742 www.eaglebendingmachines.com david@eaglebendingmachines.com Profile/bar benders, ornamental benders,tube/pipe benders, cold/hot

22

Graham Mfg./Anyang Power Hammer                       17781 West Grant Line Rd. Tracy, CA 95391 209-839-0339 Fax: 209-839-1126 bob@anyangusa.com Power hammers & blacksmith tools. GTO/PRO Professional

Access Systems 3121 Hartsfield Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32303 800-543-4283 Fax: 850-580-8816 www.gtopro.com kpitts@gtoinc.com Automated gate operators & related products. Hebo GmbH Am Berg 2 Gemunden, Grusen 35285 Germany 011-49-645-391-3321 Fax: 011-49-645-391-3325 www.heboe.com marketing@heboe.com Wrought iron machine systems. Industrial Coverage Corp. 3237 Route 112, Bldg. 6 Medford, Long Island, NY11763 631-736-7500 • Fax: 631-736-7619 www.industrialcoverage.com Insurance programs designed for NOMMA members. J. Walter Inc. 141 Locust St. Hartford, CT 06114 877-210-7427 • Fax: 860-560-7300 ppuziak@jwalterinc.com

Fabricator n January/February 2005


January/February 2005 n Fabricator

23


Abrasives & chemical tools.

Wrought iron machine systems.

King Architectural Metals 9611 East Int. 30 Dallas, TX 75228 800-542-2379 • Fax: 214-388-9834 www.kingmetals.com cathee.speaks@kingmetals.com Forgings, fence components, gate operators.

Lavi Industries 27810 Avenue Hopkins Valencia, CA 91355 800-624-6225 • Fax: 661-257-4938 www.lavi.com sales@lavi.com Tubings and fittings.

Joachim Krieger eK                                         Auestrasse 51 Wohratal, Halsdorf 35288 Germany 011-49-64-258-1890 Fax: 011-49-642-581-8923 www.wrought-iron-systems.com krieger@wrought-iron-systems.com

Lawler Foundry Corp. P.O. Box 320069 Birmingham, AL 35232 205-595-0596 • Fax: 205-595-0599 www.lawlerfoundry.com bob@lawlerfoundry.com Ornamental metal components, accessories, furniture.

5186-F Longs Peak Road, Berthoud, CO 80513

FRANK MORROW COMPANY

the leading U.S. designer and manufacturer of decorative metal products invites you to view the “Latest & Greatest” in a line of over 2500 decorative metal trims, more than 3000 embossed stampings and new grey cast iron pulls, finials and motif designs. March 2 – 5, 2005 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center

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24

Marks USA 5300 New Horizons Blvd. Amityville, NY 11701 631-225-5400 • Fax: 631-225-6136 www.marksusa.com wjs@marksusa.com Ornamental locksets. Master Halco 4000 West Metropolitan Dr., Ste. 400 Orange, CA 92868 888-MH-Fence • Fax: 714-385-0107 www.fenceonline.com info@fenceonline.com Fencing & gates. Metal Fabrik India 16 Lydia Green, St. Inez Panaji, GOA 403001 India 011-91-832-564-1074 Fax: 011-91-832-222-5928 www.metalfabrik.com sales@metalfabrik.com Ornamental wrought iron railings, gates, components. Mittler Bros. Machine & Tool P.O. Box 110 Foristell, MO 63348 636-463-2464 • Fax: 636-463-2874 www.mittlerbros.com beckham@mittlerbros.com Ultimate tubing notcher. Frank Morrow Company 129 Baker St. Providence, RI 02905 401-941-3900 • 800-956-7688 Fax: 401-941-3810 www.frankmorrow.com gmorrow@frankmorrow.com Decorative metal stampings, metal trims, grey iron & white metal motif castings.

Visit us at METALFab 2005 New Orleans, LA Booth #222

Logical Decisions Inc. 2020 North Sherwood Forest Blvd. Baton Rouge, LA 70815 800-676-5537 • Fax: 800-676-5535 www.ldi.com patty@ldi.com Gate operator & hardware.

New Metals Inc. 5823 Northgate # 2032 Laredo, TX 78041 888-639-6382 • Fax: 888-813-4275 www.newmetals.com nminfo@newmetals.com Decorative expanded metals, gratings, and ornamental iron forgings. NOMMA Fabricator n January/February 2005


Ornamental Metal Parts QUALITY FORGED AND WROUGHT IRON COMPONENTS

NEW METALS ® INC.

5823 Northgate #2032 • Laredo, Texas 78041 Tel: 1-888-New Metals • Fax: 1-888-813-4275 email: info@newmetals.com

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National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association 532 Forest Pkwy., Suite A Forest Park, GA 30297 404-363-4009 • Fax: 404-366-1852 www.nomma.org nommainfo@nomma.org NOMMA is the industry’s trade association. NOMMA Education Foundation 532 Forest Pkwy., Suite A Forest Park, GA 30297 404-363-4009 • Fax: 404-366-1852 www.nomma.org/nef nef@nomma.org

The NOMMA Education Foundation is a charitable education foundation. Ohio Gratings Inc. 5299 Southway St., SW Canton, OH 44706 330-479-4295 Fax: 330-479-3060 www.ohiogratings.com cgriffin@ohiogratings.com Aluminum, stainless steel, and steel bar grating. Pro Access Systems                                         3508 Cherry Palm Dr. Tampa, FL 33619

813-664-0606 Fax: 813-626-0848 www.g8pro.com florida@g8pro.com Gate operators, access controls, gate hardware. Production Machinery Inc. 9000 Yellow Brick Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 410-574-2110 • Fax: 410-574-4790 www.promaco.com info@promaco.com Roll bending equipment. Regency Railings 100 Glass St., Ste. 101 Dallas, TX 75207 214-742-9408 • Fax: 214-742-9402 www.regencyrailings.com regencyrailings@sbcglobal.net Ornamental iron components. Rik-Fer USA 401 South County Line Rd. Franklin Park, IL 60131 630-350-0900 • Fax: 630-350-0902 www.rikferusa.com info@rikferusa.com Italian forgings. Rockite Div. of Hartline Products Co. Inc. 2120 South Green Rd., Ste. 202 Cleveland, OH 44121 216-291-2303 • Fax: 216-291-4482 rockitecement@aol.com Rockite – expanding, fast-setting (15 minutes), pourable, non-shrinking, anchoring, & patching cement. Scotchman Industries Inc. 180 East Hwy. 14 Philip, SD 57567 605-859-2542 • Fax: 605-859-2499 www.scotchman.com info@scotchman.com Ironworkers: 40-120 ton; cold saws: 10”& 14” manual to fully automatic; band saws: manual to fully automatic, vertical contour; belt grinders, tube & pipe notchers, centerless grinders, deburring machines. Sumter Coatings 2410 Hwy. 15 S Sumter, SC 29154 803-481-3400 • Fax: 803-481-3776 cdink@sumtercoatings.com Paints specifically formulated for ornamental iron. Tennessee Fabricating Co. 2025 York Ave. Memphis, TN 38104

26

Fabricator n January/February 2005


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901-725-1548 • Fax: 901-725-5954 www.tnfab.com ken@tnfab.com Cast & forged metals, hardware, patinas.

Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 909-581-3058 • Fax: 909-581-3088 transpacificus@earthlink.net Ornamental iron, aluminum, forging steel, hardware, elbow.

Texas Metal Industries Inc. P.O. Box 154 Crandall, TX 75114 972-288-2333 • Fax: 800-472-3807 dgleaves@txmetal.com Aluminum castings & ornamental hardware.

Tubo Decorado SA de CV Casa Blanca 1014, Col. Casa Blanca San Nicolasde los Garza Monterrey, Nuevo Leon 66480 Mexico 011-52-818-313-9834 Fax: 011-52-818-313-7723 www.tubodecorado.com.mx tubodecorado@tubodecorado.com.mx Decorative steel balusters.

Transpacific Industrial Supply Inc. 9881 6th St., Unit #204

Sumter Coatings

Satin Shield

…Finish That Lasts! Satin Shield Enamel… is recognized as the product of choice for the 21st century, because of its durable rich satin finish which offers a lustrous appearance and lasting protection. A self-priming paint, Satin Shield is designed for “direct-to-metal” applications, ornamental iron and miscellaneous metals (castings, railings, security doors and fences). Available in many colors. Make quick work of painting with Satin Shield, the standard in the industry. We also offer excellent “Gloss Enamels” and a complete line of companion primers. Redi-Spray… is packaged in aerosol cans for quick touch-up and are all filled from the same production batches that are used on your larger jobs. For convenience, ask for Redi-Spray. High Solids Universal Primer… is a premium fast-drying primer combined with excellent corrosion resistance that can be top-coated with most finishes. Available in red oxide and gray. Products are available in gallons, fives or drums and are sold through national distributors. Call for the one nearest you.

Terry Spatz Coleman… our national sales representative, will gladly help in specifying products you need.

Universal Entry Systems Inc. 10237 Berea Rd., Unit G Cleveland, OH 44102 216-631-4777 • Fax: 216-631-4779 jmkopis@yahoo.com Gate operators & access control products. Valley Bronze of Oregon P.O. Box 669 Joseph, OR 97846 541-432-7551 • Fax: 541-432-0255 www.valleybronze.com adstark@valleybronze.com Ornamental metal. The Wagner Companies (R & B Wagner Inc. & J.G. Braun Co.) P.O. Box 423 Butler, WI 53007 888-243-6914 • 414-214-0444 Fax: 214-214-0450 www.wagnercompanies.com info@mailwagner.com Handrail components, cable rail, glass rail components, extrusions-brass, bronze, aluminum pipe and tube-aluminum, brass bronze, stainless. West Tennessee Ornamental 3021 Carrier St. Memphis, TN 38116 866-790-3667 • Fax: 866-545-2569 Ornamental doors, fence, gates, operators,access controls, security door locks & parts. W.G.F. Ironwork Products Center Inc. 14551 Griffith St. San Leandro, CA 94577 510-483-5900 • Fax: 510-483-5903 Ornamental steel products. Wrought Iron Concepts Inc. 724 Rincon Ave. Vista, CA 92083 877-370-8000 • Fax: 877-380-8000 www.wroughtironconcepts.com sales@wroughtironconcepts.com Ornamental metal products.

(800) 589-5545 Be assured, you will receive quality products, competitive pricing and friendly service. We strive to be #1.

Start First with… 28

2410 Hwy 15 South • Sumter, South Carolina 29154 Toll Free 1(888)471-3400 • Local (803)481-3400 Fax 1(803)481-3776

Sumter Coatings and Finish Way Ahead!

This list includes all exhibitors as of Dec. 29, 2004. New exhibitors are continually added. For the latest listings, visit our website regularly: www. nomma.org. Fabricator n January/February 2005


Rik-Fer USA Italian Manufacturer - Distributor of Architectural Forged Ornamental Iron Elements for the Industry

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9800-2

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Technical Issues

Shop Talk

Handrail bracket clearance: Past, present & future n The confusion over handrail bracket clearance has plagued our industry for 15 years. The

good news is that the new ADAAG is acceptable to our industry and will likely remain law for another 12 years. However, the ICC and NFPA codes are revised more regularly and require NOMMA’s continued vigilance. By Tony Leto The Wagner Companies Anyone concerned with handrail bracket clearance would have a hard time using the word “clear” in referring to the various definitions and interpretations in use. With the long-awaited release of the new Americans With Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), it seems like now is an appropriate time for a review.

NOMMA file photo

History

30

While it would seem that installing a handrail is a simple matter, years of confusing standards and misinformation have often made this job a daunting task for fabricators, designers, and manufacturers.

additional reference that handrail had to be between 11/4 inch and 11/2 inch OD. This dictated the use of 11/2 inch OD tubing with brackets that had a projection to center of 21/4 inches. At the time of the publication, there were no commercially available brackets that met this requirement. When questioned, CABO’s position was that the 11/2 inch dimension was meant to be a minimum and the OD dimensions were to allow for pipe size. True to their word, when the 1990 A117 revision was published, it clearly stated that there was to be a 11/2 inch minimum clearance between the wall and the handrail. Further, it also allowed for 11/4 inch to 11/2 inch nominal pipe size (1.66 inch to 1.90 inch OD). And again, the railing world was happy—but not for long. In 1991, the Americans with Disabilities Act became law. Part of the ADA was a published set of guidelines—ADAAG. As it turned out, The

For your information

n

The first reference to a handrail clearance requirement appeared in an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) publication in the early 1970s. It noted that there was to be a clearance of 11/2 inches between a wall surface and a handrail. This dimension was interpreted as being absolute with no variation permitted. It was general practice at the time to use 11/2 inch nominal pipe (1.90 inch outside diameter, or OD) with a bracket that was 21/2 inches to center. The resulting clearance of 1.55 inches was being tagged as not meeting OSHA. On behalf of Wagner and the National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers (NAAMM), Henry Bills attended an OSHA meeting in Florida where he raised the issue. Bills was able to get OSHA to issue a letter to this effect and all was right in the world—until 1986. In 1986, the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) published CABO/ANSI A117.1, Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities. They carried the 11/2 inch clearance between the wall and handrail over into the new document without clarification and added the

Helpful Tips: n Check with your local

authorities as to what code applies. n Don’t be surprised to see

references to obsolete codes. n Be prepared to educate your

local officials on current information. n Confirm bracket dimensions.

About the Author: Tony Leto is executive vice president of The Wagner Companies and former chair of NOMMA’s Technical Committee

Fabricator n January/February 2005


While the Access Board provided clarification on the OD dimensions of the handrail they would not budge on the 11/2 inch absolute dimension between the wall and the handrail. Access Board—the group assembled to create the ADAAG—had great respect for the contents of CABO/ ANSI A117.1 and, in essence, duplicated their publication. Unfortunately, they incorporated the 1986 version and not the 1990 version of the standard. This resulted in two standards being applied to commercial construction. We began to receive reports that railing jobs were being rejected because of issues relating to clearance and handrail size. While The Access Board provided clarification on the OD dimensions of the handrail (allowing for pipe sizes), they would not budge on the 11/2 inch absolute dimension between the wall and the handrail. The only hope was to become involved in the review process and see to it that the dimension was corrected in any subsequent version of ADAAG. In the meantime, ANSI 117.1 was going through its normal review process, and they published a new version of their standard in 1998. While they kept their standard of a 11/2 inch minimum between the wall and handrail, they added a new reference that the horizontal bracket arm had to be 21/2 inches clear from the underside of the handrail. We were again in a situation where 98 percent of commercially available handrail brackets did not meet this requirement. The proponent of this horizontal clearance tried using his success with CABO to add the same requirement to the International Building Code (IBC), International Residential Code (IRC), and ADAAG. It was at this point that NOMMA and its member companies such as R & B Wagner, Julius Blum, and Artistic Railings, stepped forward and began attending hearings to refute the evidence being referenced by the code bodies. January/February 2005 n Fabricator

31


38mm

11/2 min.

ADAAG Handrail Clearance Requirements Section 505.6 states that “horizontal projections shall occur 11/2 inches (38mm) minimum below the bottom of the handrail gripping surface.

The first task was to stop the 21/2 inch clearance requirement from being incorporated into the 2000 IRC and IBC. While we were unable to have the clearance requirement eliminated, we were successful in having the requirement reduced to 11/2 inches to coincide with the minimum requirement from the wall. With this victory, attention was turned to the ICC/ANSI 117.1 Committee and The Access Board. Following months of hearings, both chose to incorporate the less restrictive 11/2 inch horizontal clearance requirement into their final docu-

ments in 2002. A review process followed that postponed the publication of both documents until 2004. The new ADAAG was finally released on July 23, 2004. The 2004 ADAAG states:

505.5 Clearance. Clearance between handrail gripping surfaces and adjacent surfaces shall be 11/2 inches (38 mm) minimum. 505.6 Gripping Surface. Handrail gripping surfaces shall be continuous along their length and shall not be obstructed along their tops or sides. The bottoms of handrail gripping surfaces shall not be obstructed for more than 20 percent of their length. Where provided, horizontal projections shall occur 11/2 inches (38 mm) minimum below the bottom of the handrail gripping surface. The ANSI A117.1-2003 states:

505.5 Clearance. Clearance between handrail gripping surface and adjacent surfaces shall be 11/2 inches (38 mm) minimum. 505.6 Gripping Surface. Gripping surfaces shall be continuous, without interruption by newel posts, other construction elements, or obstructions. The 2003 IBC states:

1009.11.3 Handrail graspability.

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Fabricator n January/February 2005


January/February 2005 n Fabricator

33


have a perimeter dimension of at least 4 inches (102 mm) and not greater than 61/4 inches (160 mm) with a maximum cross section of dimension of 21/4 inches (57 mm).

Handrails with a circular cross section shall have an outside diameter of at least 1.25 inches (32 mm) and not greater than 2 inches (51 mm) or shall provide equivalent graspability. If the handrail is not circular, it shall have a perimeter dimension of at least 4 inches (102 mm) and not greater than 6.25 inches (160 mm) with a maximum cross-section dimension of 2.25 inches (57 mm). Edges shall have a minimum radius of 0.01 inch (0.25 mm).

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1009.11.6 Clearance. Clear space between a handrail and a wall or other surface shall be a minimum of 1.5 inches (38 mm). A handrail and a wall or other surface adjacent to the handrail shall be free of any sharp or abrasive elements. The 2003 IRC states:

R311.5.6.3 Handrail grip size. All required handrails shall be of one of the following types or provide equivalent graspability. 1. Type I. Handrails with a circular

Henry Bills, who recently retired from The Wagner Companies, was an early advocate for practical and consistent handrail dimension requirements. In 1993, he was given the Julius Blum Award for his advocacy work, as well as his many other contributions to the industry.

cross section shall have an outside diameter of at least 11/4 inches (32 mm) and not greater than 2 inches (51 mm). If the handrail is not circular it shall

2. Type II. Handrails with a perimeter greater than 61/4 inches (160mm)shall provide a graspable finger recess area on both sides of the profile. The finger recess shall begin within a distance of 3 /4 inch (19 mm) measured vertically from the tallest portion of the profile and achieve a depth of at least 5/16 inch (8mm) within 7/8 inch (22mm) below the widest portion of the profile. This required depth shall continue for at least 3/8 inch (10mm) to a level that is not less than 13/4 inches (45 mm) below the tallest portion of the profile. The minimum width of the handrail above the recess shall be 11/4 inches (32 mm) to a maximum of 23/4 inches (70 mm). Edges shall have a minimum radius of 0.01 inches (0.25 mm). Helpful tips n Check with your local authori-

America’s #1 Supplier! Since 1959

Jansen Ornamental Supply Co. 10926 Schmidt Rd., El Monte, CA 91733

1-800-423-4494 34

www.jansensupply.com Fabricator n January/February 2005


Easy. It only takes a few words to explain the thousand reasons to use cable. Architectural, open, simple, see-through. Railings, fences, trellises, stairs, canopy supports. Whatever your reason, we have the hardware and the technical support to

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36

Looking ahead

NOMMA file photo

ties as to what code applies. Some installations may be considered ornamental in which case code restrictions do not apply. Always confirm with your local people as to what they are using and how they interpret the codes. n Don’t be surprised to see references to obsolete codes. An immediate switch does not occur when a code is changed. It trickles through the system as each state decides what codes to adopt or revise. n Be prepared to educate your local officials on current information. The code books are hundreds of pages long; bracket and railing references are only on a few pages. n Confirm bracket dimensions. Just because a supplier shows a bracket in a catalog does not guarantee that the bracket meets any code. Suppliers are adding new brackets to expand design options, but it is incumbent on the fabricator to purchase products appropriate for their application. Request CAD or dimensioned drawings when specifying a part.

Despite the great progress that has been made, there is still confusion in the industry. When faced with an architect or inspector who questions you, be prepared to refer them to the appropriate code. Also, note that many jurisdictions are using obsolete building codes, which can add to the confusion.

With the release of the 2004 ADAAG, we can breathe a sigh of relief. It took 12 years to get a new ADAAG, and what is presently there is well within our industry’s ability to abide for another 12 years. However, the IBC and IRC codes come up for review every 18 months, and ICC/ ANSI A117.1 is under continuing review. Additionally, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is working on its own set of code documents. The original proponent of the 21/2 inch vertical bracket clearance sits on the NFPA Means of Egress committee and the current version of that code does require a 21/4 inch vertical clearance. NOMMA has taken a proactive role in dealing with issues. Thanks to Technical Consultant Tim Moss and the Technical Affairs Division, NOMMA maintains maximum awareness and involvement in the code process. NOMMA members may obtain more info on this subject by visiting www.nomma-mem.org and clicking on “Americans with Disabilities Act.”

Fabricator n January/February 2005


What’s new with the latest ADAAG guidelines By Tim Moss NOMMA Technical Consultant On July 23, 2004 the U.S. Access Board announced the release of new design guidelines that cover access for people with disabilities. This is part of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Covered by the guidelines are updated access requirements for facilities, which fall under the ADA legislation. How to achieve accessibility in new construction and alterations, and specifications for various building elements and spaces are detailed in the new guidelines. Examples of building elements include entrances, stairs and ramps, parking, restrooms, and even telephones. The Access Board’s ADA Accessibility Guidelines were originally published in 1991. An extensive review process was used to

update these guidelines. One goal of the revision was to have the guidelines meet the needs of people with disabilities. Another goal was for the guidelines to keep pace with technological innovations. Tim Moss For example, new audio technology is used to create ATM devices that help people with vision or hearing impairments. Another part of this update is to provide harmonization between the guidelines and the model building codes and industry standards. This harmonization has brought improvements to the guidelines as well as to the building codes and important industry standards, including the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

The Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) of 1968 covers Federal buildings. Facilities designed, built, altered, or leased with Federal funds fall under the ABA. The Access Board has also revised its guidelines applying to these facilities. A more consistent level of access is specified under both the ADA and the ABA. According to the announcement statement, “The Board’s guidelines serve as the baseline for standards used to enforce the ADA and the ABA. These standards, which are maintained by other Federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Justice under the ADA, will be updated according to the new guidelines. It is these standards, not the Board’s guidelines that the public must follow.” Excerpted from TechNotes, a bimonthly bulletin for NOMMA members, which is produced by

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Fabricator n January/February 2005


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Focus on Alloys

Shop Talk

Is your stainless steel rusting? n Iron contamination is not the

By John Campbell Like the words “cruel kindness,” stainless

steel appears to be an oxymoron, especially when NOMMA members relate some of their experiences with staining and rusting on fabrications like stainless gates and handrails. The causes are often puzzling. Why does a stainless steel tubular handrail show a pattern of rusting like a barber-pole? Why does a stainless steel gate exposed to a seawater atmosphere bleed rust? What caused the rust on a stainless steel bicycle rack? To find the answers to these questions would take the sleuthing skills of our finest forensic detectives.

Two major possibilities

The experts on stainless alloys conclude that there are two major reasons for rust-like stains on stainless steel. Surface contamination with iron or steel dust particles is the first possibility. Fabricating steel and stainless in the same area is just one of many sources of this contamination. The other cause is penetration of stainless steel’s passivated surface by halogen salts. These complaints occur with installations of AISI 304 stainless near seawater or around a source of halogens like winter street salt or chlorine treated swimming pools. A candid explanation to a customer who wants stainless steel, thinking they’re buying the ultimate insurance against corrosion, may be easier before the purchase than after. What makes an alloy stainless?

An iron base alloy with 12 percent or more chromium is considered a stainless steel. Although there are five types of stainless alloys (ie. ferritic, martensitic, austen40

This stainless steel bank depository is showing significant rust stains. See the related article on page 46 to learn how the author helped to restore the metal to look like new.

itic, precipitation hardening, and duplex) the austenitic AISI 300 series alloys make up over 75 percent of all corrosion resistant applications from handrails to commercial kitchen appliances. Two chromium-iron base alloys with chromium contents of over 12 percent are the ferritic and martensitic. Both are magnetic; and the martensitic alloys like AISI 410 can be heat treated, hardened, and tempered to the desired balance of ductility and hardness. Knives in quality stainless tableware are commonly AISI 410. They’re magnetic; whereas, spoons and forks stamped from AISI 304 are non-magnetic. Adding nickel to chromium-iron alloys produces an austenitic grain structure. The combination of 18 percent chromium-8 percent nickel in the AISI 300 series is typical of these stainless grades. AISI 302 and 303, both of which have carbon contents of .15 percent max., are less corrosion resistant than AISI 304. Additions of sulfur and phosphorous produce the free-machining grade AISI 303. The more popular alloys for sheet, tubing, and pipe are AISI 304 and 316 (.08 percent max carbon). For fabrications where intergranular corrosion is a concern, lower carbon alloys (.03 max),

For your information

n

only cause of rust problems. In this article, we explore additional sources of corrosion as well as solutions.

About the author: Mr. Campbell was formerly self-employed for 26 years with Castings Consultants Inc. and is now a highly regarded industry author and senior writer for Fabricator. He is based in the suburbs of Milwaukee, WI. What is passivation? Passivation is the oxidizing process that causes the chromium in the stainless to combine with available oxygen to form a chromium oxide film. Tip: A way to prevent rusting around heat-affected zones, called sensitization, is to fabricate with alloys of low carbon content or alloys with carbon stabilizing elements like titanium and niobium.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


like AISI 304L and AISI 316L, are available. With only 5 percent to 10 percent ferrite content these alloys in the austenitic annealed condition will be non-magnetic. One caution: do not correlate magnetic permeability with corrosion resistance. Bend an elbow in AISI 304 stainless and the bend becomes magnetic. Cold working changes the grain structure, but not the chemistry. To retain the former austenitic structure requires a solution anneal heat treatment (1895° F for 304 and 2003°– 2048° F for 316 plus a rapid quench), not too practical for a large fabrications. ASTM A-511 covers seamless stainless tubing for general mechanical applications. Specifications for low carbon stainless grades are covered by ASTM A-312. Any fully annealed specification will be more expensive. While on the subject of magnetic permeability, be aware that stainless steel casting alloys known as CF-8 and CF-8M, the cast equivalents of AISI 304 and 316 respectively, may have magnetic properties. The chemistries of the cast stainless alloys are not identical to the wrought alloys; their chemistries are adjusted to enhance fluidity. Casting grades can have a ferrite content up to 15 percent and be within alloy specification. In addition, beware of checking alloy inventory with a magnet. Non-magnetic alloys like Monel (70 Cu-30 Ni) become magnetic in unheated northern warehouses when the temperature drops below zero. How welding changes chromium content

One of the problems with welding stainless steel stems from the carbon’s affinity for chromium. Under welding temperatures carbon will absorb up to 17 times its own weight in chromium, forming chromium-carbides in the heat affected zone (HAZ). That prevents chromium from developing the surface oxides that make the alloys stain resistant. The condition is called sensitization. A solution annealing heat treatment will restore the free chromium; but that’s not always practical with large, rangy fabrications that will warp at high temperature. Another way to January/February 2005 n Fabricator

prevent sensitization is to fabricate with alloys of low carbon content (.03 percent max AISI 304L) or alloys with carbon stabilizing elements like titanium (AISI 321) and niobium (AISI 347). Sensitization explains why rusting on stainless steel fabrications is first noticed around the welds. Those heat affected zones may be depleted of chromium. Normal atmospheric environments are not severe enough to cause intergranular corrosion in a heat affected zone; but rusting will occur adjacent to the welds. When and if intergranular corrosion does occur, the welds fall away from the corroded HAZ like wads of chewed bubblegum. What does the nickel do?

Nickel added to the chromium in the 18-8 stainless alloys stabilizes the austenitic structure and helps improve the passivity of the alloy. In the presence of oxygen, the stainless steels of the 300 series spontaneously develop a chromium oxide film. The oxide films on metals like aluminum and silver are visible. However, chromium

oxides are not visible on stainless. For most fabrications AISI 304 is the stainless alloy of economical choice. To enhance the alloy’s resistance to pitting, molybdenum is added. Alloys with moly additions are AISI 316 (2–3 percent) and AISI 317 (3–4 percent). Both are more resistant to halogen salt exposure. Halogen salts undermine passivation

Chlorides are one of the most common elements in nature, and that whole family of halogen salts, identified by the suffix ine, like chlorine, are active ions, good current carrying electrolytes and highly corrosive to stainless steels. These salts will even destroy Teflon. Stainless steels are not going to resist staining and rusting in saltwater atmospheres without periodic cleaning and passivation. Although passive films form on stainless steels spontaneously in the presence of oxygen, some fabricating specifications mandate chemical passivation in an oxidizing medium like nitric acid. Without a steady supply of

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Blasting stainless with glass beads or silica sand previously used to blast steel will impinge surfaces with iron. Any abrasive used on steel will also impart iron to stainless. oxygen stainless steels will corrode. In halogen salt solutions like salt water copper-nickel alloys such as Monel are more corrosion resistant than stainless steels. Engineering compromises are generally a matter of cost. How does finish affect staining?

Several NOMMA members mentioned that surface finishes affect the resistance of stainless steels to staining. David Lazarus at Polished Metals Ltd. said that 85 percent of their stainless steel sales are shipped with a #8 mirror finish, which could increase the price 33 percent to 40 percent over a #4 satin finish. He believes that the smoother finish is easier to maintain, which makes sense. Rust stains on a satin finish tend to follow the direction of the grinding. One tiny spot bleeds a brown streak an inch long in either direction following the fin-

42

ish crevice. John O’Reilly of MMF Architectural agrees, pointing out how depositions of salt are trapped in the crevices of a brushed finish. In the design stages alloy selection and finish are two important considerations. Wherever salinity is part of the environment, O’Reilly recommends AISI 316 stainless instead of AISI 304 along with a mirror finish. Surface contamination

Iron or steel particles that accumulate on a satin finished handrail are going to rust when exposed to the atmosphere. For this reason, fabricating stainless steel should be done in an area separate from grinding and welding of ferrous alloys. The air in a plant carries metallic dust particles. A finished stainless assembly will often have a static electric charge that attracts and pulls plant dust from the

air. Kane Behling, supervisor of the polishing department at R & B Wagner, cited an example in his own backyard of how iron dust travels. He lives in a suburban community in close proximity to a few manufacturing plants. “I can’t walk across wet grass on my lawn in my stocking feet without collecting rust on my socks.” People, who should know better, make mistakes in handling stainless steels. A foundry producing both carbon steel and stainless once cleaned their stainless steel castings in a Wheelabrator, a device that uses steel shot. Stored outdoors, those castings bled rust like they were cast iron. Blasting stainless with glass beads or silica sand previously used to blast steel will impinge surfaces with iron. Any abrasive used on steel will also impart iron to stainless. Although suppliers like Polished Metals ship their stainless steel products with a vinyl coating, dragging stainless tubing or pipe across steel storage racks is another source of iron

Fabricator n January/February 2005


contamination. Most people in the business know this, but new employees are often unaware of the problem. More important, people in charge of maintaining properties are often unaware of how to clean stainless steel surfaces. One time we vacationed on the island of Vieques, close to Puerto Rica. The villa, where we stayed, stood high on the Atlantic side of the island with stainless steel handrails above the rocks. The railings were badly rusted because the maintenance crew cleaned them with steel wool pads. In tropical climates, under a blis-

tering sun, corrosion accelerates rapidly, whether it is galvanic, crevice corrosion or intergranular. As a general rule, the rate of corrosion doubles for every 18°F increase in temperature. Despite the heat, stainless steel alloys like AISI 316 with a mirror finish, regularly cleaned with plain water, will hold up fairly well in a Floridian atmosphere. How to restore a rusted surface?

To restore a surface that will passivate spontaneously, clean the surface using a mild detergent and warm water. If degreasing is necessary, use a non-chlorinated solvent. Many clean-

ers and bleaches contain chlorides which will leave a residue in the crevices of polished surfaces. There are commercial preparations, both liquids and gels, for removing rust from stainless steel. A hot pickling solution of nitric and hydrofluoric acid (10 percent nitric and 2 percent HF) at 120ºF to 140ºF is the most effective way of removing surface contamination; but, it’s not recommended unless you have the tanks and the safety equipment to handle it. In diluting acids of any kind, never pour water into the acid. Add the acid to the water. Outside jobbing sources, who do both pickling and electro-polishing, often handle large fabrications. Light grinding with clean aluminum oxide abrasives is effective for removing rust stains. Pickling gels are marketed to remove weld stains. With belt sanders it’s possible to put so much heat into the surface that the alloy’s grain structure changes, destroying its natural ability to passivate. Less hazardous solutions of citric acid have successfully removed rust stains. The higher polished surfaces clean better than those with deeper grinding marks. (See article on pg. 46). Although nitric acid and hydrofluoric may impart a more lasting passivating film on stainless, it’s more hazardous to handle. What’s the difference between passivation and pickling?

Passivation is the oxidizing process that causes the chromium in stainless steel to combine with available oxygen forming a chromium oxide film. It can occur naturally or with the help of an oxidizing agent like a solution of nitric and hydrofluoric acids. Citric and phosphoric acids also have passivating affects. Pickling is used more often to remove scale and surface contamination like the chromium depleted layer of stainless steel; yet, it may have passivating affects as well. Pickling is aggressive enough to remove free iron that has begun to rust; whereas, spontaneous passivation will not remove rust or stains. Pickling procedures are 44

Fabricator n January/February 2005


outlined under ASTM A380. Where to place the emphasis

In the care and maintenance of stainless steel good house keeping practices are the rule. To achieve maximum corrosion resistance it’s important to use the alloy that best suits the environment. The frequency and cost of cleaning stainless will be lower than for most other alloys, offsetting the higher cost of the product. Usually, a detergent and warm water will restore a passivated surface. In the example of the all-night depository (see article at right) rust stained by street-salts and automotive exhaust, a citric acid cleaner removed the stains and restored passivation. In selling stainless steel fabrications the manufacturer has the obligation of explaining to the customer how to maintain the product’s lasting beauty.

46

Cleaning Stainless Steel Before and After A test on a nearby night deposit box yields positive results. Kane Behling, the polishing supervisor at R & B Wagner, pointed out that his bank had a stainless steel all-night depository that was a good example of stainless steel rusting. “It makes we sick, every time I visit the drive-through (and see that),” Behling explained. “Go, look for yourself.” Sure enough, the depository Behling spoke of showed corrosion some authorities describe as teastains; others refer to the discolor-

ation as rouging. Having read a little about products touted for cleaning, I decided to try one. Getting a sample product for testing was a lot easier than getting the bank’s approval. Bank managers are skeptic when someone volunteers to clean their bank depository. Doing it for free fueled their skepticism. To obtain permission required a few telephone calls out-of-state, a discussion with their contract maintenance firm, and Continued on next page

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Cleaning Stainless finally, notification of the local police. I didn’t want to be intercepted by an officer itching to collar a bank robber or interrupted while photographing and cleaning a money-drop before the bank opened. The Saturday I chose to test a citric acid cleaner turned out to be a rainy morning with a chilly temperature of 39º F , not the best temperature for testing any acid cleaning compound.

Fortunately, the all-night depository was under roof, adjacent to the drivethrough window. Lee Kremer, President of Stellar Solutions in Algonquin, IL, supplied a spray bottle of their CitriSurf 77 Plus®, which he recommended for the removal of rust stains on stainless as well as for passivating the surface. At 7 a.m., before turning our clocks back in late October, the ambient lighting

FPO

48

continued

was poor. Nevertheless, I took several photos of the depository, a product of the Hamilton Safe Company. After donning a pair of latex gloves, I sprayed the entire stainless surface with the citric acid product. The top section of the depository appeared to have a #4 finish, unidirectional, horizontal to the driveway. That section showed the worst brown staining, stains that ran perpendicular to the finish. The depository was installed flush to the brick masonry of the bank, which made me wonder if there was some residue from the masonry that ran onto the top panel. Masons commonly use a hydrochloric acid solution to clean cement-work; and stainless steel doesn’t take kindly to reducing acids like HCL or any chloride influence. That’s possibly one reason for the top section of the depository showing the worst staining. I finished spraying in less than a minute. Making an allowance for the cold temperature, I ate breakfast at a local restaurant, allowing the acid solution a good half-hour to work before rinsing the surface. I returned at 7:35 a.m. and sprayed water on the depository, then wiped it as dry as possible with a clean cloth. The stains on the top section were less obvious, but not completely removed. The more highly polished side panels and recessed surfaces cleaned beautifully, which confirmed David Lazarus’ belief (Polished Metals Ltd.) that mirror finishes are easier to maintain. I sprayed the top section again with the acid solution and using a dry ScotchBrite® pad applied a little elbow-grease. Satisfied that the depository looked 100 percent better than before, I took some final photos and left the bank before it opened. The Citri-Surf 77 Plus®, one of many such products marketed by Stellar Solutions, did a quick, effective cleaning job. The product meets the requirements of ASTM A-967, which replaces QQ-P-35C, for cleaning and passivating stainless steels. A similar cleaning should be performed two or three times a year to maintain the stainless steel brightness. —John Campbell Fabricator n January/February 2005


Biz Side

Seven ways to simplify your life and boost profits in 2005 What you’ll learn! n Simple tips such as consolidating your communication technology providers and utilizing money market accounts for idle cash can help increase your profits. Rather than making bold New Years resolutions that you can’t keep, instead focus on little changes you can do to reduce costs and squeeze out more profits.

The trouble with New Year’s resolutions is

their limited shelf life. By the time you read this, the huge majority of 2005 resolutions— personal and business—will be little more than hazy memories. The main reason for such lack of commitment, say the experts, is the impossibly difficult demands that most New Year’s resolutions place on well-meaning but naïve pledgers. When it comes to your shop in 2005, there’s no need to make ambitious but unattainable promises. Here are seven easy steps you can take to lower expenses and pump up your net income in the New Year. tip

1

Slash your costs for keeping in touch

As far as communication is concerned, you’ve never had it so good. With your cell phone, pager, broadband Internet access, and regular telephone service, you’re never far from anyone you want to reach (or anyone who wants to reach you). The trouble is that you’re probably paying a lot more than you realize for all that techno-communication. If you’re like most January/February 2005 n Fabricator

business owners, you added individual services one at a time, paying top dollar for each. One way to lower these costs is to take advantage of the bundled plans now offered by most providers. These plans range from unlimited local and long distance telephone calling to singleprovider telephone, Internet connection, cable TV, and cell phone service. Contact your primary provider to see what bundled plans are available in your area. In addition to saving you money, dealing with one company will greatly simplify your bill-paying routine. tip

2

Take charge of your cash flow

Generating revenue is only the first step on the rocky road to a healthy P&L (profits and loss) statement. Next comes the job of controlling expenses. The final step, managing cash flow, is the easiest of the three to overlook—and one of the easiest ways to ratchet up your bottom line. The first rule of professional cash management is: never allow ANY of your money to lie idle. If you don’t already have one, open a money market account at your bank. Then ask the bank to link it to your busi-

For your information

n

By William J. Lynott

Quick tips:

• Keep a minimum balance in a checking account and transfer cash from an interest bearing account only as needed to cover checks written. • Organize your paperwork before giving it to your accountant. • An after-tax dollar is worth much more than a before-tax dollar. • Consider setting up a tax-deferred savings plan for your company. About the author: William J. Lynott is a freelance business writer for the manufacturing and construction industries.

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ness checking account for telephone or online transfers. Deposit all daily receipts into the money market account where they will immediately start drawing interest. NEVER deposit receipts directly into your checking account. Keep a minimum balance in the checking account and transfer cash only as needed to cover checks written. The interest generated by this simple procedure amounts to found money that will flow directly to your bottom line. tip

3

Give your accountant a cut in pay

Sure, you hate paperwork and record keeping. Don’t we all? But if you find yourself scrambling to find receipts and other records at tax time every year, you’re probably costing yourself some real money. “In the accounting and legal professions, time is the product,” says Carol Katz, CPA, Leonard J. Miller & Associates, Baltimore, MD. “So, the less time it takes the less the

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product costs.” CPA Tom Normoyle, Huntingdon Valley, PA agrees. “When clients present me with a shoe box full of unsorted papers, I have to charge them for the hours it takes to make sense of them,” he says. “A simple filing system that separates records of different types is one sure way to reduce my fee.” Normoyle says that even the simplest of systems, one file for income and one for expenses can be a money saver. But going a step further by separating expense files into categories such as payroll, office supplies, charitable donations, capital purchases, and taxes can really make a difference in how much time it takes to prepare tax returns. Genevia Gee Fulbright CPA, Senior Finance Advisor with the National Association of Black Accountants adds, “A great way to save money on accounting bills is to use accounting software that is compatible with the software your accountant uses.

“And remember, accountants like things to be in balance, so make sure that you or your office manager reconciles your bank statements each month. This will reduce fees by eliminating time your accountant has to spend tracking down unaccounted for outstanding items.” tip

4

Save money even while you’re paying bills

No one enjoys paying bills. That’s why we sometimes postpone that nasty job to the point of risking late payment fees and stains on our credit reports. Paying bills may never be fun, but new technology has made the task quick, easy, and a little less costly. Nearly all banks are online these days and most offer free (or almost free) online bill paying. Once you sign up and choose a password, you log on to the bank’s web site where you enter the payee’s name and address, phone number, and the amount to be paid. The bank takes over from there,

Fabricator n January/February 2005


either by mailing a check to the payee or making an electronic transfer of the money. You need enter the information for each payee only once. The bank then stores that information so that next time, you just click on the payee’s name. You save time, the cost of postage, buying checks, and trips to the post office. What are you waiting for? tip

5

Get Uncle Sam’s hands out of your pocket

Even with the best tax management techniques, Uncle Sam will manage to take a ravenous bite out of your income. That’s why you can’t afford to get careless with those little details that can trim your tax bill to the allowable minimum. Never allow yourself to forget that a dollar saved by reducing your tax bill (an after-tax dollar) is worth much more than a dollar in increased revenue (a beforetax dollar). Ellen Rogin, CPA, Northfield, IL says that establishing a tax deferred savings plan for your business is one of today’s most important tax reduction techniques. “The best type of plan for you will depend upon the legal structure of your business and the number of employees. If you don’t already have a plan, either a simple IRA or a SEP plan may be best for you.”  In a Simple IRA, participants may defer up to $10,000 for 2005 (up to $12,000 for those who are over age 50).  A SEP plan is similar and allows higher deductions. Says Rogin, “Both the Simple and the SEP plans are inexpensive to establish, and tax reporting is minimal. Basically the benefit of having these plans is not only the tax savings (which is based on the amount contributed), but also your ability to save for retirement on a tax deferred basis.” Depending on the size of your business, Katz recommends installing a so-called cafeteria plan to supplement the pension plan; a cafeteria plan (also called a Section 125 Plan after the Internal Revenue Code section) can be used when the employer has health insurance premiums that January/February 2005 n Fabricator

the employees pay for in full or in part. By having the premiums paid through the cafeteria plan (called a premium only plan or POP), the premium amounts avoid income and payroll taxes for the employee and payroll taxes for the employer. Your accountant or financial planner can advise you on the best retirement plan for your business. “If you use credit to finance any of your business purchases, don’t forget that the interest and carrying charges are fully tax-deductible,” says John Concannon, CPA, Rothstein Kass, Roseland, NJ. “This shouldn’t be an

incentive to get into debt, but can help to offset the cost of loans you may need to grow your practice.” Concannon also points out that uncollectible accounts receivable may be tax deductible in businesses that use the accrual basis for accounting. “Go over any unpaid debts with your accountant to determine whether they are eligible for the deduction,” says Concannon. There are, of course, a nearly infinite number of ways to minimize your income taxes. That’s why it’s wise to ask for your accountant’s advice on additional steps you can take to trim

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6

your tax bills.

Dig yourself out from under all that paper

With all the paper you’re required to slog through for business purposes, you don’t need to add to the burden in the office or at home. Sure, we all hang on to reams of paper because of the nagging worry that we might need it some day. Most of it, however, will never see the light of day. One organizing professional suggests these guidelines for hanging on to paper: n Credit card and ATM receipts. Keep them only until your monthly statement arrives. n Monthly bank, brokerage, and credit card statements. Hang on to them until you get the year-end one. Then, dump the rest. n Year-end statements and tax returns. You should keep these for seven years. Unfortunately, there are some records you’ll need to keep indefinitely. Insurance policies still in effect,

medical records, home improvement receipts, and mortgage papers. Of course, you’ll want to keep major appliance warranties until they expire. Once you’ve conquered the paper dragon, keep him away from your door by signing on at www.dmaconsumers.org to get your name off junk mail lists. tip

7

Get rid of insurance you don’t need

The cost of insurance is a major burden for most business owners these days. That’s why it’s important to cut through the smog generated by the insurance industry. In addition to your business insurance, there are only five other types that you must have: life, health, disability (as long as you’re working), homeowners, and auto. For most people, the rest are a waste of money. Life insurance on your kids is a classic example of insurance you don’t need (unless you’re raising a future Shirley Temple). Flight insur-

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ance sold at airports is probably one of the poorest investments you can make. Despite the threat of terrorism, air travel is one of the safest forms of transportation. It’s so seldom that a claim is placed against one of these policies that only about five cents of each dollar goes to pay claims. How about cancer insurance? Some insurance consultants say that it never makes sense to insure against a single disease. Buy cancer insurance, and you’ll probably die from a stroke or get run over by a bus. Never agree to credit life insurance or to car rental insurance. Your own auto policy or credit card will probably cover that base. You get the idea. Once you’ve pared things down to those five types, look into consolidating some of those policies with one company. That’s another money saver. Now, even if you’ve already broken those 2005 resolutions, these easy-tofollow steps can help you to a more prosperous New Year.

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Fabricator n January/February 2005


Biz Side

The American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 What you’ll learn!

By Mark E. Battersby It began as a bill to compensate exporters for

the repeal of a controversial $5 billion annual tax break labeled as an “illegal trade subsidy” by the World Trade Organization. That bill, the fifth major tax cut in four years, ballooned into a $145-billion tax law, the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004, containing tax breaks— and new restrictions—for every ornamental and miscellaneous metal fabricator. Over 630 pages long, with over 270 provisions, that new tax law contains something for many “special interest” groups, not to mention quite a few metal fabricating businesses. Surprisingly, however, the $145-billion cost of this new bill is expected to be completely offset by a number of revenueproducing provisions. Those revenue-raising provisions are, for the most part, permanent while the majority of tax cuts have only a temporary life. What’s more, many of the provisions in the new law require immediate action to maximize benefits and avoid problems. Remember, however, effective dates vary from provision to provision. Thus, while the approach taken by our lawmakers may have reduced tax bills

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

at no cost to the Treasury, the bottom-line effect may be confusion. Manufacturers’ deductions

When is a tax cut not a tax cut? When it is a deduction, as is the case with the biggest provision in the new law. Expected to generate tax savings of more than $75 billion over the next decade, the centerpiece of the law effectively lowers the tax rate, from 35 percent to 32 percent, for all so-called “domestic producers.” Although the new deduction is available to metal fabricators operating as regular C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, cooperatives, and others, our lawmakers’ extremely broad definition of “manufacturers and domestic producers” may not include your metal fabricating operation. As defined by our lawmakers, “manufacturer,” includes not only traditional manufacturers but “producers” in the areas of construction, engineering, energy production, computer software, and films and videotapes as well as the processing of agricultural products. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) now must decide which “domestic produc-

Though touted as a job creation bill, the Act is actually a major overhaul of business taxes.

For your information

n

n The American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 may impact your metal fabricating business with either lower effective tax rates or increased restrictions and penalties.

What to watch out for: • An extremely broad definition of “manufacturers and domestic producers,” may not include your metal fabricating operation. • Extended 2002 rules that raised the threshold for Section 179 write-offs from $25,000 to $100,000 may still apply for you. • The new law attempts to reform and simplify the tax treatment of S corporations to encourage their growth. About the author: Mark E. Battersby is a longtime freelance writer for Fabricator. He is also a columnist, lecturer, and author of five books. He is based in Ardmore, PA, a suburb of Philadelphia.

75


ers” actually qualify. For those metal fabricating operations that do qualify, beginning next year, the new law contains a nine percent deduction (equal to a 3 percent rate cut) on all manufacturing activity undertaken in the U.S.—whether it is exported or not. When fully phased in

by 2010, the deduction will be equal to 9 percent of the lesser of: • Income from qualified production activities for the year; or • Taxable income for the year. Although it was created to help cushion the blow of repealing an almost $50 billion tax break, this bill is

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also about jobs. Thus, lawmakers limited the total deduction to an amount equal to 50 percent of the W-2 wages paid by the metal fabricating operation during the tax year. Faster write-offs, lower tax bills

Although some metal fabricating operations will benefit from a new lower tax rate for “manufacturers,” all should benefit from the provision that extended the 2002 rules that raised the threshold for Section 179 write-offs from $25,000 to $100,000. This special, first-year expensing write-off for equipment costs is still reduced by the amount by which the cost of qualifying property placed in service by the fabricator exceeds $400,000. Originally designed as a temporary measure to stimulate the economy, the write-off was scheduled to drop back to $26,000 in 2006. Not only have the higher caps been extended through 2007, the threshold has been indexed for inflation. In 2004, it is $102,000, with a $410,000 cap. This change carries the indexing through to 2007 as well. On the depreciation front, lawmakers created a 15-year recovery period for qualified leasehold improvements. Thus, any fabricator that modifies, adapts, or adds to the operation’s business premises between October 22, 2004 and before January 1, 2006, will qualify for a 15-year write-off period for the cost of the improvements. The old rules required leasehold improvements or additions to be depreciated using straight-line depreciation over the same 39-year period as business property. A qualified leasehold improvement is defined as an improvement to the interior of a building, made by either the lessor or the lessee and placed in service more than three years after the building was first placed in service. S corporations

Despite the popularity of limited liability companies (LLCs) and other partnership-type entities, S corporations remain the fastest-growing type of business entity. A metal fabricating 76

Fabricator n January/February 2005


For those metal fabricating operations that do qualify, beginning next year, the new law contains a nine percent deduction (equal to a 3 percent rate cut) on all manufacturing activity undertaken in the U.S. business operating as an S corporation passes through income and loss to shareholders. The shareholder takes into account their share of these items on their individual tax returns. The new law attempts to reform and simplify the tax treatment of S corporations so as to encourage their continued growth as the nation’s leading job-creating force. The new law, for example, allows family members to elect to be treated as one shareholder for purposes of determining the number of shareholders of an S corporation. It also increases the maximum number of S corporation shareholders from 75 to 100. Under current law, most family members are treated as separate shareholders, which limits a metal fabricating business’s ability to diversify its investors and therefore better withstand business fluctuations. Now, a husband and wife can include a child or children as S corporation shareholders. They can treat all of them as one shareholder. On another front, those losses and deductions disallowed because an S corporation shareholder had an insufficient basis in the stock are usually lost once the shares are transferred. Now, thanks to the new law, suspended losses and deductions may be transferred to a spouse or former spouse as part of a divorce settlement. The suspended loss or deduction will be treated as incurred by the S corporation in the succeeding tax year for purposes of these unique transfers. The new law will also: n Allow employee stock ownership plans (ESOPs) to repay exempt loans from an S corporation using the proceeds from the S corporation and accomplish it all without jeopardizing the status of the ESOP. n Ease the rules for determining January/February 2005 n Fabricator

*Straighten

77


potential current beneficiaries of an electing small business trust; Obviously, those fabricators reorganizing an existing business—or starting a new business—will, naturally want to look long and hard at the new S corporation rules and the many benefits these entities offer.

inversions,” which involve a company switching its headquarters in name only to an overseas tax haven to lower or eliminate U.S. taxes. In reality, the clamp down on companies that move their headquarters to post office boxes in offshore tax havens, are not as strong as many lawmakers would While the bill has many far-reaching provisions, the ultimate goal of have preferred. The law does Miscellaneous and the define “inversion” but is not the legislation is to get Americans back to work. downside retroactive. As mentioned, the “cost” of this loopholes as well as other revenueThere is also a provision that new law to the U.S. Treasury will raising measures. The law takes aim requires increased reporting for be offset by closing a number of tax at companies conducting “corporate noncash charitable contributions. It extends to incorporated metal fabricators, the requirement that a donor obtain a qualified appraisal of the donated property if the amount of the claimed deduction is more than $5,000. Similarly, if the amount of that contributed property, other than cash, inventory, or publicly-traded securities, exceeds $500,000, the appraisal must be attached to the annual tax return. As for those tax schemes utilized by so many fabricators to shelter profits and sale proceeds from the tax collector’s grasp, the new law contains 21 provisions that crack down on tax shelters and so-called “abusive” tax transactions. The new law also requires both companies and individuals to disclose to the IRS details about tax shelters and boosts penalties for failing to do so, penalties for failing to report a tax shelter. For returns and statements due after October 22, 2004, the law adds a new penalty for failing to disclose reportable transactions regardless of whether the transaction ultimately results in an understatement of tax. The penalty is $10,000 for an individual ($50,000 for businesses). If the shelter is a “listed transaction” the penalty skyrockets to $200,000 ($100,000 for individuals). For those fabricators who may be less than truthful on their business or personal tax returns, the new law also creates a new accuracy-related penalty for reportable and listed transactions. Lawmakers granted the IRS discretion 78

Fabricator n January/February 2005


in applying the penalties. The IRS is likely to continue its “carrot and stick� approach with taxpayers suspected of participating—or promoting—abusive shelters. Summary

Will your metal fabrication operation join the restaurant owners, Hollywood producers, makers of bows, arrows, tackle boxes and sonar fish finders, NASCAR track owners, native Alaskan whalers, and even importers of Chinese ceiling fans, all of whom will benefit from the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004? Regardless of whether the new law’s impact on your metal fabricating business is mainly from the lower effective tax rates or from the increased restrictions —and penalties—that impact will be noticeable. Two questions that need to be answered are: how will your bottom-line be affected and will your metal fabricating operation qualify as a “manufacturer� under the IRS’s soon-to-be released guidelines?

     

    

The American Jobs Creation Act of 2004: A ‘Plain English’ Summary Considered the first major restructuring of business taxes since 1986, the new American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 promises $137 billion in tax cuts over the next 10 years. Essentially, there are three main components to the legislation: tax relief ($77 billion), tax reform for multinational firms ($43 billion), and another 40 or so provisions aimed at income tax reduction ($10 billion). Also included in the act are individual tax cuts and excise tax reforms. The centerpiece of the Act is a 9 percent deduction for domestic manufacturing income. Other specific highlights include: n Temporary tax break for repatriated income. n Reforms of the Subpart F and foreign tax credit rules. Funding for this tax relief is com-

ing from the repeal of extraterritorial income (ETI) tax provisions that were deemed illegal by the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as other tax increases. Much of the tax increases will come from provisions that crack down on loop holes and tax shelters. The remainder of the revenue will come from extensions of IRS and Customer user fees, excise tax increases, and administrative changes. Passage of the bill means new tax-planning opportunities for businesses, but also new challenges. For a complete overview of the bill, Deloitte & Touche USA LLP has prepared a free, downloadable booklet. It is available at www.deloitte. com. Sources: Library of Congress “Thomas� website, Deloitte & Touche USA LLP.

Germany

  Â   Â? January/February 2005 n Fabricator

Tel. 480-357-2836 Fax -354-4524

79


NOMMA Nationwide Supplier Members As of October 29, 2004; Bold denotes new members A Cut Above Distributing 800-444-2999 Action Ornamental Iron 901-795-2200 Advanced Measuring Systems 888-289-9432 Allen Architectural Metals Inc. 800-204-3858 Alloy Casting Co. Inc. 800-527-1318 American Punch Co. 800-243-1492 American Stair Corp. 800-872-7824 Ameristar Fence Products 888-333-3422 Apollo Gate Operators 210-545-2900 Architectural Iron Designs Inc. 800-784-7444 Arteferro Miami LLC 305-836-9232 Artezzi 800-718-6661 Artist Supplies & Products 262-797-8101 Atlas Metal Sales 800-662-0143 Aztec Castings Inc. 800-631-0018 Julius Blum & Co. Inc. 800-526-6293 J. G. Braun Co. 800-323-4072 Builders Fence Co. Inc. 800-767-0367 Byan Systems Inc. 800-223-2926 C.R. Laurence Co. Inc. 800-421-6144 The Cable Connection 775-885-1443 California Tool & Die 626-969-1821 Carell Corp. 251-937-0947 Chamberlain 800-282-6225 Classic Iron Supply 800-367-2639 Cleveland Steel Tool Co. 800-446-4402 CML USA Inc. 563-391-7700 Colorado Waterjet Co. 970-532-5404 Crescent City Iron Supply Inc. 800-535-9842 Custom Orn. Iron Works Ltd. 604-273-6435 D & D Technologies (USA) Inc. 800-716-0888 D.J.A. Imports Ltd. 800-933-5993 DAC Industries Inc. 800-888-9768 Decorative Iron 888-380-9278 DécorCable Innovations 312-474-1100 DKS, DoorKing Systems 800-826-7493 Robert J. Donaldson Co. 856-629-2737 Eagle Bending Machines Inc. 251-937-0947 Eastern Metal Supply Inc. 800-343-8154 Eastern Ornamental Supply Inc. 800-590-7111 Elegant Aluminum Products Inc. 810-293-1020 Encon Electronics 800-782-5598 EURO-FER SRL 011-39-044 5440033 Euro Forgings Inc. 800-465-7143 FABCAD.COM 800-255-9032 FabTrol Systems Inc. 541-485-4719 Feeney Wire Rope & Rigging Inc. 510-893-9473 The G-S Co. 410-284-9549 80

Gates and Controls 206-767-6224 Geo. Bezdan Sales Ltd. 800-663-6356 Glaser USA 888-668-8427 Glasswerks LA Inc. 323-789-7800 GTO Inc. 800-543-4283 Hartford Standard 270-298-3227 Hayn Enterprises LLC 860-257-0680 Hebo / Stratford Gate Systems 503-658-2881 House of Forgings 281-443-4848 Indiana Gratings Inc. 800-634-1988 Innovative Hinge Products Inc. 817-284-3326 Interstate Mfg. Associates Inc. 603-863-4855 The Iron Shop 800-523-7427 ITW Industrial Finishing 630-237-5159 Jamieson Mfg. Co. 214-339-8384 Jansen Ornamental Supply Co. 800-423-4494 Justin R.P.G Corp. 310-532-3441 King Architectural Metals 800-542-2379 Krieger eK Wrought Iron Systems 011-49-64-258-1890 Lavi Industries 800-624-6225 Lawler Foundry Corp. 800-624-9512 Lewis Brass & Copper Co. Inc. 800-221-5579 Liberty Brass Turning Co. 800-345-5939 Logical Decisions Inc. 800-676-5537 Mac Metals Inc. 800-631-9510 Marks U.S.A. 631-225-5400 Master-Halco 888-643-3623 Matthews International Corp. 412-571-5548 Metal Amoré 760-747-7200 Mittler Bros. Machine & Tool 800-467-2464 Frank Morrow Co. 800-556-7688 Multi Sales Inc. 562-803-3552 New Metals Inc. 888-639-6382 Ohio Gratings Inc. 800-321-9800 Omega Coating Corp. 888-386-6342 Orange Steel & Orn. Supply 305-805-6000 Overseas Supply Inc. 800-724-1018 Polished Metals Ltd. 908-688-1188 Production Machinery Inc. 410-574-2110 R & B Wagner Inc. 800-786-2111 R & S Automation Inc. 510-357-4110 Regency Railings Inc. 214-742-9408 Rik-Fer USA 877-838-0900 Robertson Grating Products Inc. 877-638-6365 Robinson Iron Corp. 256-329-8486 Rockite, Div. of Hartline Prod. Co. 216-291-2303 Rogers Mfg. Inc. 940-325-7806 Sahinler Form Metal San. Ve Tic. 011-90-224-455-5465 Fabricator n January/February 2005


Scotchman Industries SECO South Sequoia Brass and Copper Sharpe Products Sparky Abrasives Stairways Inc. Steel Masters Inc. Stephens Pipe and Steel LLC Steptoe & Wife Antiques Ltd. Striker Tool Co. (USA) Inc. Sumter Coatings Inc. Tennessee Fabricating Co. Texas Metal Industries Texas Stairs & Rails Inc. Transpacific Industrial Supply Co.

605-859-2542 888-535-7326 800-362-5255 800-879-4418 800-328-4560 800-231-0793 602-243-5245 800-451-2612 800-461-0060 916-374-8296 888-471-3400 800-258-4766 800-222-6033 281-987-2115 909-390-8885

Tri-State Shearing & Bending Triebenbacher Bavarian Iron Triple-S Chemical Chemical Prod. Tubo Decorado SA de CV Universal Entry Systems Inc. Universal Mfg. Co. Inc. Valley Bronze of Oregon W.G.F. Ironwork Products Center Inc. West Tennessee Ornamental Door Wrought Iron Concepts Inc. XCEL Distribution Yavuz Ferforje A.S. *Join NOMMA

718-485-2200 800-522-4766 800-862-5958 800-345-5939 800-837-4283 800-821-1414 541-432-7551 510-483-5900 901-346-0662 877-370-8000 909-392-0808 011-90-258-2691664 404-363-4009

New NOMMA Members As of October 29, 2004; Asterisk denotes returning members A-1 Wrought Iron Fencing & Furniture Prairieville, LA James P. Martin Fabricator ABC Ornamental Ironworks LLC Hyattsville, MD Antonio Martinez Fabricator Ameristar Fence Products Tulsa, OK Vona Cox Nationwide Supplier Austin Ornamental Inc. Pflugerville, TX Connie Gossard Fabricator Blue Metal Works LLC Indianapolis, IN Jim Welsh Fabricator Brace Point Railings* Seattle, WA Marty Lyons Fabricator Creative Gate January/February 2005 n Fabricator

Factory Redwood City, CA Jose Moreno Fabricator Decorative Iron Inc. Bothell, WA Keith Dickie Fabricator Gulf Coast Metal Works Inc. Cape Coral, FL Barry Crumpler Fabricator

Los Angeles, CA Philip Rohan Fabricator Jamie MacDonald Blacksmithing Woodside, CA Jamie MacDonald Fabricator Metals World Co.* Safat, Kuwait Hratch Berberian Fabricator

Iron Beauty Feasterville, PA Roman Klyachkivsky Fabricator

Lance Olson Custom Orn. Iron Parma, MI Lance Olson Fabricator

Jones Valley Iron Works* Birmingham, AL Ray White Fabricator

Old World Wrought Iron Co. Paducah, KY LaDonna Stamper Fabricator

Logical Decisions Inc. Baton Rouge, LA Patty Krake Nationwide Supplier Lost City Ironworks Inc.

Ornamental Décor Valencia, CA Shemon Baharouzi Fabricator Residential Iron Work Ellisville, MS

Sid P. Strickland Fabricator RK Stairs.biz Reseda, CA Roger Kukuczka Fabricator Smith’s Ornamental Spokane, WA Jacob Smith Fabricator Spiral Stairs of America* Erie, PA Jon Whaley Fabricator Tin Roof Unlimited Inc. Marietta, GA Andy Fogarty Fabricator Trinity Stairs Inc. Frisco, TX Richard Bush Fabricator

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What’s Hot? n Biz Briefs Get handouts from ASA’s Leadership Forum Presentations and handouts from the educational sessions at ASA Leadership Forum 2004, held October 2–4, 2004 are now available in the Contractors’ Knowledge Bank, ASA’s online searchable database. To access these Adobe PDF downloadable documents, visit www.contractorsknowledgenetwork.org and click on the Knowledge Bank link. Enter “Leadership Forum 2004” in the search field and search by document description. Some documents are viewable only to ASA members.

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Inside Biz Briefs................................... 78 Coming Events..................... 80 NOMMA News...............82 Chapter Contacts............... 83

People.......................................... 84 Literature........................86 Products..................................... 87

State public policies fail construction subcontractors A report recently issued by the American Subcontractors Association (ASA) reveals how state public policies deny basic rights, such as getting paid for work performed, to construction subcontractors and supplies. ASA found that public policies on payment assurance, subcontracts, risk transfer issues, and bid shopping “create a risk-laden and low profit-margin business environment” for construction subcontractors and suppliers. The report is called “The ASA Report: The Policy Environment in the States,” and it shows that all states scored an F, except New Mexico, which scored a D, on a

multi-tiered assessment. ASA calculated the overall grade for each state by scoring key state public policy areas, such as prompt payment protections; treatment of pay-if-paid clauses; and mechanic’s lien protections. The overall low-performers were the District of Columbia and Wyoming “State laws simply do not make the grade for subcontractors,” said 200405 ASA President Mat Glover, president of Glover Masonry Associates, Arvada, CO. “‘The ASA Report’ demonstrates that no states public policies adequately address the needs of the construction industry. The issues that

Fabricator n January/February 2005


matter to construction subcontractors and suppliers remain distant from the minds of many legislators and other public officials, and ‘The ASA Report’ serves as a call to arms to the construction industry to change that fact.” To promote “The ASA Report’s” findings, ASA is contacting the media, legislators, and other public officials across the country. ASA has

Cartoon

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

also kicked off a publicity campaign to warn subcontractors of deficits in their state laws, to provide advocacy information to help change laws, and to educate subcontractors about the need to remain vigilant when negotiating contracts in a harsh public policy environment.

Biz Briefs ASA identifies design disclaimers as a threat Problem: There are documented cases in which a 20- or 30-word phrase buried in the subcontract agreement or the specifications have cost subcontractors tens of thousands of dollars by removing risk and responsibility from the owner and general contractor and shifting it to the subcontractor. Solution: Safeguard against such a catastrophe by assigning a staff person with a good eye for detail and knowledge of contract terms to go over contracts. To learn more about disclaimers see the American Subcontractors Association’s (ASA) Stand Up! white paper, “Design Risk: Disclaimers of Plans and Information,” available on the ASA web site. Contact: ASA, Ph: (703) 6843450; Web: www.asaonline.com/ Web/StandUp.htm;

83


What’s Hot n? Coming Events November 23, 2004– February 27, 2005

Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists

The National Ornamental Metal Museum presents Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists, celebrating the Japanese tea ceremony kettle as a living tradition and source of inspiration to American artists. The exhibition features four Japanese kettle artists and two American metalworkers: Suzuki Morihisa Shiko, Eda Kei’ichi, Miya Nobuho, Timothy Lloyd, Nagano Retsu, Wayne Potratz. Contact: National Ornamental Metal Museum, Ph: (901) 7746380; Web: ww.metalmuseum. org.

84

FABTECH and AWS combine next year for one big show Organizers of FABTECH and the American Welding Society (AWS) show will combine efforts to present one big show next year. Attendees from both shows suggested interest in an all encompassing show that features all welding and fabricating processes used by metalworking manufacturers. So the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association (FMA) have agreed to host FABTECH International in conjunction with AWS. The new show is called FABTECH International and The AWS Welding Show and debuts November 14–16, 2005 at Chicago’s McCormick Place. “This alliance is a highly effective way to serve manufacturing companies even better than we have in the past. Our customers have asked for expanded access to metalworking and fabricating technologies and we are pleased

to have been able to respond while at the same time consolidating two good shows to help reduce exhibitor costs,” said Nancy Berg, SME executive director and general manager. FABTECH and AWS will conduct independent professional conferences and educational programs during the 2005 show. While AWS focuses its technical programming on welding and allied processes, FABTECH features manufacturing technologies. “This is a good move for the industry,” Gerald M. Shankel, FMA president and CEO said. “The AWS Welding Show brings an in-depth level of welding and cutting technologies and, together with FABTECH’s unmatched quality of fabricating machinery, will offer a first-rate venue.” Contact: FMA, Web: www.fmafabtech.com.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Free galvanizing seminar upon request The American Galvanizers Galvanizers Association (AGA) announces the availability of its free Galvanize It! seminar. The seminar educates architects, engineers, and other members of the specifying community on hot-dip galvanizing for corrosion protection. The accredited seminar is available at your location upon request, and it is free. Available in one-, two-, and fourhour formats, Galvanize It! seminar attendees earn continuing education

credits from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and/or professional development hours from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). Topics include: corrosion theory, design of steel products for quality galvanizing, the galvanizing process, pertinent ASTM specification, inspection, and painting over the galvanized coating. Contact: AGA, Ph: (800) 468-7732; Web: www.galvanizeit.org/seminars; E-mail: aga@galvanizeit.org.

Classes for machining and grinding emlpoyees TechSolve Inc., based in Cincinnati, OH, announces spring 2005 dates for its public training classes on grinding and machining. Seven different courses are offered in December 2004 and in April and June 2005, such as Decision Tools for a Lean Machining Environment; Practical Machining Principles for Shop Application; Introduction to High Performance /

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

High Speed Machining, and Grinding Principles & Practice. According to TechSolve all classes are offered from a non-commercial, unbiased approach. On-site training is also available for companies with 10 or more participants. Contact: TechSolve Inc., Ph: (800) 345-4482; Web: www.techsolve.org/ events_training.

Coming Events March 2–5, 2005

METALfab 2005

Don’t miss the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association’s annual trade show and convention in New Orleans March 2–5, 2005. Join hundreds of fabricators from around the world for four days of learning, networking, and seeing the latest products. The trade show will be held during select hours at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The Hotel Monteleone is accepting reservations for METALfab 2005 guests at a special group rate. Reservation deadline is January 28, 2005. Contact: NOMMA, Ph: (404) 363-4009; Web: www.nomma.org.

85


What’s Hot n? Coming Events November 23, 2004– February 27, 2005

Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists

The National Ornamental Metal Museum presents Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists, celebrating the Japanese tea ceremony kettle as a living tradition and source of inspiration to American artists. The exhibition features four Japanese kettle artists and two American metalworkers: Suzuki Morihisa Shiko, Eda Kei’ichi, Miya Nobuho, Timothy Lloyd, Nagano Retsu, Wayne Potratz. Contact: National Ornamental Metal Museum, Ph: (901) 7746380; Web: ww.metalmuseum. org.

86

FABTECH and AWS combine next year for one big show Organizers of FABTECH and the American Welding Society (AWS) show will combine efforts to present one big show next year. Attendees from both shows suggested interest in an all encompassing show that features all welding and fabricating processes used by metalworking manufacturers. So the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association (FMA) have agreed to host FABTECH International in conjunction with AWS. The new show is called FABTECH International and The AWS Welding Show and debuts November 14–16, 2005 at Chicago’s McCormick Place. “This alliance is a highly effective way to serve manufacturing companies even better than we have in the past. Our customers have asked for expanded access to metalworking and fabricating technologies and we are pleased

to have been able to respond while at the same time consolidating two good shows to help reduce exhibitor costs,” said Nancy Berg, SME executive director and general manager. FABTECH and AWS will conduct independent professional conferences and educational programs during the 2005 show. While AWS focuses its technical programming on welding and allied processes, FABTECH features manufacturing technologies. “This is a good move for the industry,” Gerald M. Shankel, FMA president and CEO said. “The AWS Welding Show brings an in-depth level of welding and cutting technologies and, together with FABTECH’s unmatched quality of fabricating machinery, will offer a first-rate venue.” Contact: FMA, Web: www.fmafabtech.com.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Free galvanizing seminar upon request The American Galvanizers Galvanizers Association (AGA) announces the availability of its free Galvanize It! seminar. The seminar educates architects, engineers, and other members of the specifying community on hot-dip galvanizing for corrosion protection. The accredited seminar is available at your location upon request, and it is free. Available in one-, two-, and fourhour formats, Galvanize It! seminar attendees earn continuing education

credits from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and/or professional development hours from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). Topics include: corrosion theory, design of steel products for quality galvanizing, the galvanizing process, pertinent ASTM specification, inspection, and painting over the galvanized coating. Contact: AGA, Ph: (800) 468-7732; Web: www.galvanizeit.org/seminars; E-mail: aga@galvanizeit.org.

Classes for machining and grinding emlpoyees TechSolve Inc., based in Cincinnati, OH, announces spring 2005 dates for its public training classes on grinding and machining. Seven different courses are offered in December 2004 and in April and June 2005, such as Decision Tools for a Lean Machining Environment; Practical Machining Principles for Shop Application; Introduction to High Performance /

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

High Speed Machining, and Grinding Principles & Practice. According to TechSolve all classes are offered from a non-commercial, unbiased approach. On-site training is also available for companies with 10 or more participants. Contact: TechSolve Inc., Ph: (800) 345-4482; Web: www.techsolve.org/ events_training.

Coming Events March 2–5, 2005

METALfab 2005

Don’t miss the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association’s annual trade show and convention in New Orleans March 2–5, 2005. Join hundreds of fabricators from around the world for four days of learning, networking, and seeing the latest products. The trade show will be held during select hours at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The Hotel Monteleone is accepting reservations for METALfab 2005 guests at a special group rate. Reservation deadline is January 28, 2005. Contact: NOMMA, Ph: (404) 363-4009; Web: www.nomma.org.

87


What’s Hot n? Coming Events November 23, 2004– February 27, 2005

Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists

The National Ornamental Metal Museum presents Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists, celebrating the Japanese tea ceremony kettle as a living tradition and source of inspiration to American artists. The exhibition features four Japanese kettle artists and two American metalworkers: Suzuki Morihisa Shiko, Eda Kei’ichi, Miya Nobuho, Timothy Lloyd, Nagano Retsu, Wayne Potratz. Contact: National Ornamental Metal Museum, Ph: (901) 7746380; Web: ww.metalmuseum. org.

88

FABTECH and AWS combine next year for one big show Organizers of FABTECH and the American Welding Society (AWS) show will combine efforts to present one big show next year. Attendees from both shows suggested interest in an all encompassing show that features all welding and fabricating processes used by metalworking manufacturers. So the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association (FMA) have agreed to host FABTECH International in conjunction with AWS. The new show is called FABTECH International and The AWS Welding Show and debuts November 14–16, 2005 at Chicago’s McCormick Place. “This alliance is a highly effective way to serve manufacturing companies even better than we have in the past. Our customers have asked for expanded access to metalworking and fabricating technologies and we are pleased

to have been able to respond while at the same time consolidating two good shows to help reduce exhibitor costs,” said Nancy Berg, SME executive director and general manager. FABTECH and AWS will conduct independent professional conferences and educational programs during the 2005 show. While AWS focuses its technical programming on welding and allied processes, FABTECH features manufacturing technologies. “This is a good move for the industry,” Gerald M. Shankel, FMA president and CEO said. “The AWS Welding Show brings an in-depth level of welding and cutting technologies and, together with FABTECH’s unmatched quality of fabricating machinery, will offer a first-rate venue.” Contact: FMA, Web: www.fmafabtech.com.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Free galvanizing seminar upon request The American Galvanizers Galvanizers Association (AGA) announces the availability of its free Galvanize It! seminar. The seminar educates architects, engineers, and other members of the specifying community on hot-dip galvanizing for corrosion protection. The accredited seminar is available at your location upon request, and it is free. Available in one-, two-, and fourhour formats, Galvanize It! seminar attendees earn continuing education

credits from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and/or professional development hours from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). Topics include: corrosion theory, design of steel products for quality galvanizing, the galvanizing process, pertinent ASTM specification, inspection, and painting over the galvanized coating. Contact: AGA, Ph: (800) 468-7732; Web: www.galvanizeit.org/seminars; E-mail: aga@galvanizeit.org.

Classes for machining and grinding emlpoyees TechSolve Inc., based in Cincinnati, OH, announces spring 2005 dates for its public training classes on grinding and machining. Seven different courses are offered in December 2004 and in April and June 2005, such as Decision Tools for a Lean Machining Environment; Practical Machining Principles for Shop Application; Introduction to High Performance /

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

High Speed Machining, and Grinding Principles & Practice. According to TechSolve all classes are offered from a non-commercial, unbiased approach. On-site training is also available for companies with 10 or more participants. Contact: TechSolve Inc., Ph: (800) 345-4482; Web: www.techsolve.org/ events_training.

Coming Events March 2–5, 2005

METALfab 2005

Don’t miss the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association’s annual trade show and convention in New Orleans March 2–5, 2005. Join hundreds of fabricators from around the world for four days of learning, networking, and seeing the latest products. The trade show will be held during select hours at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The Hotel Monteleone is accepting reservations for METALfab 2005 guests at a special group rate. Reservation deadline is January 28, 2005. Contact: NOMMA, Ph: (404) 363-4009; Web: www.nomma.org.

89


What’s Hot n? Coming Events November 23, 2004– February 27, 2005

Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists

The National Ornamental Metal Museum presents Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists, celebrating the Japanese tea ceremony kettle as a living tradition and source of inspiration to American artists. The exhibition features four Japanese kettle artists and two American metalworkers: Suzuki Morihisa Shiko, Eda Kei’ichi, Miya Nobuho, Timothy Lloyd, Nagano Retsu, Wayne Potratz. Contact: National Ornamental Metal Museum, Ph: (901) 7746380; Web: ww.metalmuseum. org.

90

FABTECH and AWS combine next year for one big show Organizers of FABTECH and the American Welding Society (AWS) show will combine efforts to present one big show next year. Attendees from both shows suggested interest in an all encompassing show that features all welding and fabricating processes used by metalworking manufacturers. So the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association (FMA) have agreed to host FABTECH International in conjunction with AWS. The new show is called FABTECH International and The AWS Welding Show and debuts November 14–16, 2005 at Chicago’s McCormick Place. “This alliance is a highly effective way to serve manufacturing companies even better than we have in the past. Our customers have asked for expanded access to metalworking and fabricating technologies and we are pleased

to have been able to respond while at the same time consolidating two good shows to help reduce exhibitor costs,” said Nancy Berg, SME executive director and general manager. FABTECH and AWS will conduct independent professional conferences and educational programs during the 2005 show. While AWS focuses its technical programming on welding and allied processes, FABTECH features manufacturing technologies. “This is a good move for the industry,” Gerald M. Shankel, FMA president and CEO said. “The AWS Welding Show brings an in-depth level of welding and cutting technologies and, together with FABTECH’s unmatched quality of fabricating machinery, will offer a first-rate venue.” Contact: FMA, Web: www.fmafabtech.com.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Free galvanizing seminar upon request The American Galvanizers Galvanizers Association (AGA) announces the availability of its free Galvanize It! seminar. The seminar educates architects, engineers, and other members of the specifying community on hot-dip galvanizing for corrosion protection. The accredited seminar is available at your location upon request, and it is free. Available in one-, two-, and fourhour formats, Galvanize It! seminar attendees earn continuing education

credits from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and/or professional development hours from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). Topics include: corrosion theory, design of steel products for quality galvanizing, the galvanizing process, pertinent ASTM specification, inspection, and painting over the galvanized coating. Contact: AGA, Ph: (800) 468-7732; Web: www.galvanizeit.org/seminars; E-mail: aga@galvanizeit.org.

Classes for machining and grinding emlpoyees TechSolve Inc., based in Cincinnati, OH, announces spring 2005 dates for its public training classes on grinding and machining. Seven different courses are offered in December 2004 and in April and June 2005, such as Decision Tools for a Lean Machining Environment; Practical Machining Principles for Shop Application; Introduction to High Performance /

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

High Speed Machining, and Grinding Principles & Practice. According to TechSolve all classes are offered from a non-commercial, unbiased approach. On-site training is also available for companies with 10 or more participants. Contact: TechSolve Inc., Ph: (800) 345-4482; Web: www.techsolve.org/ events_training.

Coming Events March 2–5, 2005

METALfab 2005

Don’t miss the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association’s annual trade show and convention in New Orleans March 2–5, 2005. Join hundreds of fabricators from around the world for four days of learning, networking, and seeing the latest products. The trade show will be held during select hours at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The Hotel Monteleone is accepting reservations for METALfab 2005 guests at a special group rate. Reservation deadline is January 28, 2005. Contact: NOMMA, Ph: (404) 363-4009; Web: www.nomma.org.

91


What’s Hot n? Coming Events November 23, 2004– February 27, 2005

Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists

The National Ornamental Metal Museum presents Kettles: Japanese Artistry and American Artists, celebrating the Japanese tea ceremony kettle as a living tradition and source of inspiration to American artists. The exhibition features four Japanese kettle artists and two American metalworkers: Suzuki Morihisa Shiko, Eda Kei’ichi, Miya Nobuho, Timothy Lloyd, Nagano Retsu, Wayne Potratz. Contact: National Ornamental Metal Museum, Ph: (901) 7746380; Web: ww.metalmuseum. org.

92

FABTECH and AWS combine next year for one big show Organizers of FABTECH and the American Welding Society (AWS) show will combine efforts to present one big show next year. Attendees from both shows suggested interest in an all encompassing show that features all welding and fabricating processes used by metalworking manufacturers. So the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association (FMA) have agreed to host FABTECH International in conjunction with AWS. The new show is called FABTECH International and The AWS Welding Show and debuts November 14–16, 2005 at Chicago’s McCormick Place. “This alliance is a highly effective way to serve manufacturing companies even better than we have in the past. Our customers have asked for expanded access to metalworking and fabricating technologies and we are pleased

to have been able to respond while at the same time consolidating two good shows to help reduce exhibitor costs,” said Nancy Berg, SME executive director and general manager. FABTECH and AWS will conduct independent professional conferences and educational programs during the 2005 show. While AWS focuses its technical programming on welding and allied processes, FABTECH features manufacturing technologies. “This is a good move for the industry,” Gerald M. Shankel, FMA president and CEO said. “The AWS Welding Show brings an in-depth level of welding and cutting technologies and, together with FABTECH’s unmatched quality of fabricating machinery, will offer a first-rate venue.” Contact: FMA, Web: www.fmafabtech.com.

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Free galvanizing seminar upon request The American Galvanizers Galvanizers Association (AGA) announces the availability of its free Galvanize It! seminar. The seminar educates architects, engineers, and other members of the specifying community on hot-dip galvanizing for corrosion protection. The accredited seminar is available at your location upon request, and it is free. Available in one-, two-, and fourhour formats, Galvanize It! seminar attendees earn continuing education

credits from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and/or professional development hours from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). Topics include: corrosion theory, design of steel products for quality galvanizing, the galvanizing process, pertinent ASTM specification, inspection, and painting over the galvanized coating. Contact: AGA, Ph: (800) 468-7732; Web: www.galvanizeit.org/seminars; E-mail: aga@galvanizeit.org.

Classes for machining and grinding emlpoyees TechSolve Inc., based in Cincinnati, OH, announces spring 2005 dates for its public training classes on grinding and machining. Seven different courses are offered in December 2004 and in April and June 2005, such as Decision Tools for a Lean Machining Environment; Practical Machining Principles for Shop Application; Introduction to High Performance /

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

High Speed Machining, and Grinding Principles & Practice. According to TechSolve all classes are offered from a non-commercial, unbiased approach. On-site training is also available for companies with 10 or more participants. Contact: TechSolve Inc., Ph: (800) 345-4482; Web: www.techsolve.org/ events_training.

Coming Events March 2–5, 2005

METALfab 2005

Don’t miss the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association’s annual trade show and convention in New Orleans March 2–5, 2005. Join hundreds of fabricators from around the world for four days of learning, networking, and seeing the latest products. The trade show will be held during select hours at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The Hotel Monteleone is accepting reservations for METALfab 2005 guests at a special group rate. Reservation deadline is January 28, 2005. Contact: NOMMA, Ph: (404) 363-4009; Web: www.nomma.org.

93


What’s Hot n?

Advertiser’s index FABTECH and AWS combine next year for one big show

U in

Pg Company Name Contact 26 44 Acme Metal Spinning www.Acmemetalspinning.com 49 37 AFA www.americanfenceassoc.com 80 Coming Events cating technologies and we are pleased Organizers of FABTECH and the 46 All-O-Matic www.allomatic.net 86 to have been able to respond while at American Welding Society4 (AWS) American Punch www.ampunch.com 45 same time consolidating two good show will combine efforts to present November 23, 2004– 3 Architecturalthe Iron Designs www.archirondesign.com to help costs,” one big show next year. Attendees February 27, 2005 31 Architecturalshows Products reduce exhibitor www.outwater.com P g Company Name said Nancy Berg, SME executive direc- Contact from both shows suggested interest Kettles: Japanese Artistry Arch 90 ABANA www.abana.org 44 Acme tor Metal Spinning www.Acmemetalspinning.com and American Artists and general manager. in an all encompassing show that fea81 Atlas Metal Sales www.atlasmetal.com 84 37 AFA www.americanfenceassoc.com FABTECH and AWS will conduct tures all welding and fabricating proThe National Ornamental 71 61 Birchwood Casey www.birchwoodcasey.com 46 All-O-Matic www.allomatic.net independent professional conferences cesses used by metalworking manufacMetal Museum presents Kettles: 33 50 Julius Blum & Co. Inc. www.juliusblum.com 4 American Punch www.ampunch.com 4 andJ.G. Braun 2 turers. So the Society Use this index as a handy guide for contacting suppliers. Firms 60 Japanese Artistry and American American Architectural Iron Designs www.archirondesign.com in boldface3 are first-time advertisers. 66 Co. www. educaof Manufacturing Artists, celebrating the Japanese Punch www. 31 Architectural Products www.outwater.com 85 jgbraun.com tional Engineers (SME) and ceremony Name kettle as a living tra Pg tea Company Contact 80 K Dahl 90 ABANA Glass Studios www.kdahlglass.com ampunch.com www.abana.org 72 42 The Cable Connection www.thecableconnection.com programs during the 2005 show. While the Fabricators and Manufacturers dition andMetal source of inspiration to 44 Acme Spinning www.Acmemetalspinning.com 86 Kayne & SonAtlas Metal Sales www.kayneandson.com 3 Architectural Iron Designs www.archirondesign.com 81 www.atlasmetal.com 40 30 CAME (America) LCC www.cameamerica.com 37 AFA www.americanfenceassoc.com 45 King Architectural Metals www.kingmetals.com AWS focuses its technical programAssociation (FMA) have agreed to American artists. The exhibition 31 Birchwood ArchitecturalCasey Products www.outwater.com 61 www.birchwoodcasey.com 68 63 Carell Corporation www.carellcorp.com 46 All-O-Matic www.allomatic.net 84 Joachim Krieger www.wrought-iron-systems.com ming on welding and allied processes, host FABTECH International in confeatures four Japanese kettle artists 90 ABANA www.abana.org 50 Julius Blum & Co. Inc. www.juliusblum.com 82 51 Classic Iron Supply www.classicirononline.com 4 American Punch www.ampunch.com 71 Laser Precision www.laserprecisioncutting.com FABTECH features manufacturing junction with AWS. The new show is and two American metalwork81 J.G. AtlasBraun MetalCo. Sales www.atlasmetal.com 60 www.jgbraun.com 20 25 Cleveland Steel Tool Co. www.clevelandsteeltool.com 3 Architectural Iron Designs www.archirondesign.com 33 Lawler Foundry Corp. www.lawlerfoundry.com technologies. called FABTECH International and ers: Suzuki Morihisa Shiko, Eda 61 The Birchwood Casey www.birchwoodcasey.com 42 Cable Connection www.thecableconnection.com 52788 CML USA Inc. www.ercolina-usa.com 31 Architectural Products www.outwater.com 2 Lewis Brass & Copper Co. Inc. www.lewisbrass.com “This is a good move for the The AWS Welding Show and debuts Kei’ichi, Miya Nobuho, Timothy 50 CAME Julius Blum & Co.LCC Inc. www.juliusblum.com 30 (America) www.cameamerica.com 54 89 COLE-TUVE Inc. www.coletuve.com 90 ABANA www.abana.org 66 Liberty Ornamental Products (800) 636-5470 industry,” Gerald M. Shankel, FMA November 14–16, 2005 at Chicago’s Lloyd, Nagano Retsu, Wayne 60 Carell J.G. Braun Co. www.jgbraun.com 63 Corporation www.carellcorp.com 53 65 Colorado Waterjet Co. www.coloradowaterjet.com 81 Atlas Metal Sales www.atlasmetal.com www.lindblademetalworks.com president and CEOwww.thecableconnection.com said. “The AWS McCormick Place. 85 Lindblade Potratz. 42 Classic The Cable 51 IronConnection Supply www.classicirononline.com 87 70 COMEQ Inc. www.comeq.com 61 Contact: Birchwood Casey Ornamental www.birchwoodcasey.com Marks U.S.A. www.marksusa.com brings an www.cameamerica.com in-depth “This alliance is a 72 highly effective National 30 Cleveland CAME Welding (America) LCC Co. 25 SteelShow Tool www.clevelandsteeltool.com 80 Crescent City Iron Supply www.fenceonline.com (800) 535-9842 86 50 Julius Blum & Co. Inc. www.juliusblum.com 40 Master-Halco 63 CML CarellUSA Corporation www.carellcorp.com 88 Inc. www.ercolina-usa.com level of welding and cutting technoloway to serve manufacturing companies Metal Museum, Ph: (901) 77423 D & DMachine Technologies (USA) www.mittlerbros.com Inc. www.ddtechusa.com 21 60 J.G. Braun Co. www.jgbraun.com 68 Mittler Bros. & Inc. Tool 51 Classic Iron Supply www.classicirononline.com 89 COLE-TUVE www.coletuve.com gies and, together with FABTECH’s even better than we have in the past. 6380; Web: ww.metalmuseum. 14 D.J.A Imports Ltd. www.patmooneysaws.com www.djaimports.com 41 42 The Cable Connection www.thecableconnection.com 82 Pat Mooney Inc. 25 Colorado Cleveland Steel Tool Co. ofwww.clevelandsteeltool.com 65 Waterjet Co. www.coloradowaterjet.com unmatched quality fabricating Our customers have asked for expandorg. 56 70 Metal DAC Industries Inc. www.dacindustries.com 30 CAME (America) LCC www.cameamerica.com 20 Multi G Boutin Inc. (418) 88 COMEQ CML USA Inc. www.ercolina-usa.com 70 Inc. www.comeq.com machinery, will offer a first-rate ed access to metalworking and 57 fabriDecorative Iron www.decorativeiron. 85 63 Carell Corporation www.carellcorp.com 527-7700 89 Crescent COLE-TUVE www.coletuve.com 80 CityInc. Iron Supply (800) 535-9842 12 com 51 Classic Iron Supply www.classicirononline.com 54 Multi Sales www.multisalesinc.com 65 Inc. Colorado Waterjet Co. www.coloradowaterjet.com 23 D & D Technologies (USA) Inc. www.ddtechusa.com 10 34 DKS, DoorKing Systems www.doorking.com 25 Cleveland Steel Tool Co. www.clevelandsteeltool.com 53 New Metals Inc. Imports www.newmetals.com 70 D.J.A COMEQ Inc. Ltd. www.comeq.com 14 www.djaimports.com 83 63 Hill Eagle Bending www.eaglebendingmachines.com 88 CML USA Inc. www.ercolina-usa.com 87 Oak Iron Works www.bigbluhammer.com 80 DAC Crescent City Iron Supply (800) 535-9842 70 Industries Inc. www.dacindustries.com Eastern Metal Supply Inc. www.jointjigger.com www.easternmetal.com 24 89 COLE-TUVE Inc. www.coletuve.com 86 Ol’18 Joint Jigger Inc. 23 Decorative D & D Technologies (USA) Inc. www.ddtechusa.com 57 Iron www.decorativeiron. 62 Eberl Iron Works Inc. www.eberliron.com 29 65 Colorado Waterjet Co. www.coloradowaterjet.com 21 PLASMA CAM Inc. 14 D.J.A Imports Ltd. www.plasmacam.com www.djaimports.com com 61 49 Encon Electronics www.enconelectronics.com 70 COMEQ Inc. www.comeq.com 41 Production Inc. Systems www.promaco.com 70 Machinery DAC Industries Inc. www.dacindustries.com 34 DKS, DoorKing www.doorking.com www.entryproducts.com 95 80 Crescent City Iron Supply (800) 535-9842 56 R 58 EntryProducts.com & B Wagner Inc. www.rbwagner.com 57 Eagle Decorative Iron www.decorativeiron. 63 Bending www.eaglebendingmachines.com www.fabcad.com 39 23 D & D Technologies (USA) Inc. www.ddtechusa.com 85 R 19 FABCAD.com & D Hydraulics Metal Supply Inc. www.rdhs.com com Eastern 18 www.easternmetal.com 20 Gatekeepers Inc. www.gatekeepers.net 62 14 D.J.A Imports Ltd. www.djaimports.com 12 Regency Railings www.regencyrailings.com 34 DKS, DoorKing www.doorking.com 62 Eberl Iron WorksSystems Inc. www.eberliron.com 48 Glaser USA www.glaser.de 48 70 DAC Industries Inc. www.dacindustries.com 10 Rik-Fer 49 USA Encon (630) 350-0900 63 Eagle Bending www.eaglebendingmachines.com Electronics www.enconelectronics.com 79 Graham Manufacturing www.rogers-mfg-inc.com www.anyangusa.com 32 57 Decorative Iron www.decorativeiron. 83 Rogers Mfg.Eastern Inc. 18 Metal Supply Inc. www.easternmetal.com 58 EntryProducts.com www.entryproducts.com 89 The G-S Co. www.g-sco.com 81 com 24 Scotchman Industries www.scotchman.com 62 Eberl Iron Works Inc. www.eberliron.com 19 FABCAD.com www.fabcad.com 9 Hawke Industries (909) 928-9453 36 34 DKS, DoorKing Systems www.doorking.com 29 Sharpe Products www.sharpeproducts.com 49 Gatekeepers Encon Electronics www.enconelectronics.com 20 Inc. www.gatekeepers.net 28 38 Hebo GmbH www.heboe.com 63 Eagle Bending www.eaglebendingmachines.com 61 Simsolve (909) 737-2480 58 EntryProducts.com www.entryproducts.com 48 Glaser USA www.glaser.de 55 65 International Gate Devices www.intlgate.com 18 Eastern Metal Supply Inc. www.easternmetal.com 95 Sparky Abrasives Co. (800) 328-4560 19 FABCAD.com www.fabcad.com 79 Graham Manufacturing www.anyangusa.com 96 TheInc. Iron Shop www.theironshop.com 67 62 Eberl Iron Works Inc. www.eberliron.com 39 Stairways www.stairwaysinc.com 20 The Gatekeepers www.gatekeepers.net 89 G-S Co. Inc. www.g-sco.com 66 Ironwood LLC www.powerhammers.com 78 49 Encon Electronics www.enconelectronics.com 62 Steptoe & Wife 48 Glaser USA www.glaser.de 9 Hawke Industries www.steptoewife.com (909) 928-9453 58 EntryProducts.com www.entryproducts.com 48 StingerPower Inc. GmbH 79 Hebo Graham Manufacturing www.miterzall.com www.anyangusa.com 38 www.heboe.com 19 FABCAD.com www.fabcad.com 32 Striker 65 Tool International Co. (USA) Inc. www.strikertools.com 89 The G-S Co. www.g-sco.com Gate Devices www.intlgate.com 20 Gatekeepers Inc. www.gatekeepers.net 81 Striker 96 Tool Co. (USA) Inc. www.strikertools.com 9 The Hawke (909) 928-9453 IronIndustries Shop www.theironshop.com 48 Glaser USA www.glaser.de 36 Sumter66 Coatings 38 HeboInc. GmbH www.heboe.com Ironwood LLC www.sumtercoatings.com www.powerhammers.com 79 Graham Manufacturing www.anyangusa.com 28 Sur-Fin26 Chemical Corp. 65 Jansen International Gate Devices www.intlgate.com Ornamental www.patinausa.com www.jansensupply.com 89 The G-S Co. www.g-sco.com 55 Tennessee Co. Inc. www.tnfab.com 96 Fabricating The Iron Shop www.theironshop.com 49 Jesco Industries www.jescoonline.com 9 Hawke Industries (909) 928-9453 67 Tennessee Fabricating Co. www.tnfab.com 38 Hebo GmbH www.heboe.com 78 Texas Metal Industries www.txmetal.com 65 International Gate Devices www.intlgate.com 83 Tornado Supply www.owi-inc.net 96 The Iron Shop www.theironshop.com 90 Traditional Building www.traditional-building.com 66 Ironwood LLC www.powerhammers.com 42 Triple-S Chemical Products www.ssschemical.com 26 Jansen Ornamental www.jansensupply.com 82 Tri-State Shearing & Bending (718) 485-2200 49 Jesco Industries Inc. www.jescoonline.com 87 Universal Entry Systems Inc. (800) 837-4283

Advertiser’s index

Advertiser’s index

Advertiser’s index

94

Fabricator n January/February 2005


Use this index as a handy guide for contacting suppliers. Firms n boldface are first-time advertisers.

Free galvanizing upon request, and it is free.

Jansen Ornamental www.jansensupply.com The American Galvanizers Available in one-, two-, and fourJesco Industries Inc. www.jescoonline.com Galvanizers Association (AGA) hour formats, Galvanize It! seminar K Dahl Glass Studios www.kdahlglass.com announces the availability of its free attendees earn continuing education Kayne & Son www.kayneandson.com King Use this index as a handy guide for contacting suppliers. Firms credits from the American Institute of

Architects (AIA) and/or professional development hours from the National 66 K 80 Ironwood DahlGalvanize Glass LLCStudios It! seminar. www.powerhammers.com www.kdahlglass.com The seminar Council of Examiners for Engineering hitectural Metals www.kingmetals.com 26 86 Jansen Kayneeducates &Ornamental Son architects, www.kayneandson.com www.jansensupply.com engineers, and and Surveying (NCEES). Topics Joachim Krieger www.wrought-iron-systems.com 49 45 Jesco King Architectural Industries Inc. Metals www.jescoonline.com www.kingmetals.com other members of the specifying cominclude: corrosion theory, design of Laser Precision www.laserprecisioncutting.com 80 84 K Joachim Dahl Glass Krieger Studios www.wrought-iron-systems.com www.kdahlglass.com munity on hot-dip galvanizing for steel products for quality galvanizLawler Foundry Corp. www.lawlerfoundry.com 86 71 Kayne Laser Precision & Son www.laserprecisioncutting.com www.kayneandson.com ing, the galvanizing process, pertinent accredited Lewis Brasscorrosion & Copperprotection. Co. Inc. The www.lewisbrass.com 45 33 King Lawler Architectural Foundry Corp. Metals www.lawlerfoundry.com www.kingmetals.com Liberty Ornamental Products (800) 636-5470 ASTM specification, inspection, and seminar is available at your location in boldface are first-time advertisers.

84 Lewis 2 Joachim Brass Krieger & Copper Co. www.wrought-iron-systems.com Inc. www.lewisbrass.com Lindblade www.lindblademetalworks.com 66 71 Liberty Laser Precision Ornamental Products www.laserprecisioncutting.com (800) 636-5470 Marks U.S.A. www.marksusa.com 85 33 Lindblade LawlerClasses Foundry Corp. www.lindblademetalworks.com www.lawlerfoundry.com for machining and grinding emlpoyees Master-Halco www.fenceonline.com 72 2 Marks Lewis Brass U.S.A. & Copper Co. Inc. www.lewisbrass.com www.marksusa.com Mittler Bros. Machine & Tool www.mittlerbros.com High Speed Machining, and Grinding TechSolve Inc., based inwww.fenceonline.com Cincinnati, 66 Liberty Ornamental 40 Master-Halco Products (800) 636-5470 Pat MooneyOH, Inc. announces spring www.patmooneysaws.com 2005 dates for Principles & Practice. 85 Mittler 68 Lindblade Bros. Machine &www.lindblademetalworks.com Tool www.mittlerbros.com Multi Metal Gpublic Boutin Inc. classes on grind- (418) According to TechSolve all classes its training 72 82 Marks Pat Mooney U.S.A. Inc. www.patmooneysaws.com www.marksusa.com -7700 are offered from a non-commercial, andGmachining. Seven www.fenceonline.com different 40 Master-Halco 20 Multi ing Metal Boutin Inc. (418) Multi Sales courses Inc. are offered in www.multisalesinc.com unbiased approach. On-site training December 2004 68 527-7700 Mittler Bros. Machine & Tool www.mittlerbros.com New Metals Inc. www.newmetals.com is also available for companies with 10 and in April and June 2005, such as 82 Multi 54 Pat Mooney Sales Inc. Inc. www.patmooneysaws.com www.multisalesinc.com Oak Hill Iron Works www.bigbluhammer.com or more participants. Decision Tools for a Lean Machining 53 20 New MultiMetals Metal Inc. G Boutin Inc. www.newmetals.com (418) Ol’ Joint Jigger Inc. www.jointjigger.com 527-7700 87 Oak Hill Iron Works Practical Machining www.bigbluhammer.com Contact: TechSolve Inc., Ph: (800) Environment; PLASMA CAM Inc. www.plasmacam.com 54 Ol’ 86 Multi Joint Sales Jigger Inc. Inc. www.multisalesinc.com www.jointjigger.com 345-4482; Web: www.techsolve.org/ Principles for Shop Application; Production Machinery Inc. www.promaco.com 53 PLASMA 21 New Metals CAMInc. Inc. to High Performance www.plasmacam.com www.newmetals.com events_training. Introduction / R & B Wagner Inc. www.rbwagner.com 41 87 Production Oak Hill IronMachinery Works Inc. www.bigbluhammer.com www.promaco.com R & D Hydraulics www.rdhs.com 56 86 R Ol’&Joint B Wagner Jigger Inc. Inc. www.jointjigger.com www.rbwagner.com Regency Railings www.regencyrailings.com 85 21 R PLASMA & D Hydraulics CAM Inc. www.plasmacam.com www.rdhs.com Rik-Fer USA (630) 350-0900 41 12 Production Regency Railings Machinery Inc. www.regencyrailings.com www.promaco.com Rogers Mfg. Inc. www.rogers-mfg-inc.com 56 10 R Rik-Fer & B Wagner USA Inc. www.rbwagner.com (630) 350-0900 Scotchman Industries www.scotchman.com 85 Rogers 83 R & D Hydraulics Mfg. Inc. www.rogers-mfg-inc.com www.rdhs.com Sharpe Products www.sharpeproducts.com 24 12 Scotchman Regency Railings Industries www.regencyrailings.com www.scotchman.com Simsolve (909) 737-2480 29 10 Sharpe Rik-Fer USA Products www.sharpeproducts.com (630) 350-0900 Sparky Abrasives Co. (800) 328-4560 83 61 Rogers Simsolve Mfg. Inc. www.rogers-mfg-inc.com (909) 737-2480 Stairways Inc. www.stairwaysinc.com 24 Sparky 95 Scotchman Abrasives Industries Co. www.scotchman.com (800) 328-4560 Steptoe & Wife www.steptoewife.com 29 Stairways 39 Sharpe Products Inc. www.sharpeproducts.com www.stairwaysinc.com StingerPower Inc. www.miterzall.com 61 62 Simsolve Steptoe & Wife www.steptoewife.com (909) 737-2480 Striker Tool Co. (USA) Inc. www.strikertools.com 95 48 Sparky StingerPower Abrasives Inc. Co. www.miterzall.com (800) 328-4560 Striker Tool Co. (USA) Inc. www.strikertools.com 39 Striker 32 Stairways Tool Inc. Co. (USA) Inc. www.stairwaysinc.com www.strikertools.com Sumter Coatings Inc. www.sumtercoatings.com 62 Striker 81 SteptoeTool & Wife Co. (USA) Inc. www.steptoewife.com www.strikertools.com Sur-Fin Chemical Corp. www.patinausa.com 48 36 StingerPower Sumter Coatings Inc. Inc. www.sumtercoatings.com www.miterzall.com Tennessee Fabricating Co. www.tnfab.com 32 28 Striker Sur-Fin Tool Chemical Co. (USA) Corp. Inc. www.strikertools.com www.patinausa.com Tennessee Fabricating Co. www.tnfab.com 81 55 Striker Tennessee ToolFabricating Co. (USA) Inc. Co. www.strikertools.com www.tnfab.com Texas Metal Industries www.txmetal.com 36 67 Sumter Tennessee Coatings Fabricating Inc. Co. www.sumtercoatings.com www.tnfab.com 28 78 Sur-Fin Texas Metal Chemical Industries Corp. www.patinausa.com www.txmetal.com 55 Tornado 83 Tennessee Supply Fabricating Co. www.owi-inc.net www.tnfab.com 67 Traditional 90 Tennessee Building Fabricating Co. www.traditional-building.com www.tnfab.com 42 78 Triple-S Texas Metal Chemical Industries Products www.ssschemical.com www.txmetal.com 82 83 Tri-State Tornado Shearing Supply & Bending www.owi-inc.net (718) 485-2200 87 90 Universal TraditionalEntry Building Systems Inc. www.traditional-building.com (800) 837-4283

January/February 2005 n Fabricator

Coming Events March 2–5, 2005

METALfab 2005

Don’t miss the National Ornamental & Miscellaneous Metals Association’s annual trade show and convention in New Orleans March 2–5, 2005. Join hundreds of fabricators from around the world for four days of learning, networking, and seeing the latest products. The trade show will be held during select hours at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. The Hotel Monteleone is accepting reservations for METALfab 2005 guests at a special group rate. Reservation deadline is January 28, 2005. Contact: NOMMA, Ph: (404) 363-4009; Web: www.nomma.org.

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Metal Moments Brazing underwater, it’s no fisherman’s tale.

Guest column Bob Heath has written several articles that have appeared in various NOMMA publications. To view previously published articles by Bob Heath, visit: www.nomma.org or call (404) 363-4009.

n Bob Heath shares an incredible welding story from his

past. See what a tiny acy tip, a lot of experience, and little creativity can achieve. maybe find a fish with a hook golf course is in its mouth and fad out behind 2 this afterAbout twenty years ago story. noon.” By Bob Heath

when I was a military retiree, I planned to open up a shop and go into business for myself. So I took a welding class at my local vocational school to learn as much as I could to prepare for that. I even read the text books and studied our assignments. I enjoyed having a slight edge on the other classmates because I was about 20 years their senior. Being eager to learn I even volunteered for special projects. The instructor knew I was able to braze, so one day he gave me a chance to demonstrate my proficiency, despite being a beginner in the class. I think the teacher was trying to show several senior students that he could replace them on the special projects any time he desired. Those closest to completing the course normally received those assignments. One day the superintendent of the Vocational School brought a pair of Bausch & Lomb aviator sunglasses (expensive, top of the line) into the welding shop and asked to have the frame repaired. The frame was broke in half above the hinge for the ear piece. This allowed the left piece of glass to fall out of its place in the frame. He handed the frame and piece of glass to the instructor and said, “See what you can do; let me know when you are finished. My Tee time at the

The instructor nodded his head, indicating he got the message. This was my second big opportunity to make our welding instructor look good. I asked the instructor if I could do the project for him. He nodded again and said, “Sure.” I left the office with my prize and headed for my booth to investigate the situation and plan a course of action. I realized if I brazed the frame together with the eyeglass out, I ran the risk of not being able to put it back in or breaking the glass trying. If I brazed the frame with the glass intact, I also risked breaking the glass again. What did I get myself into? Suddenly the answer flashed in my mind. I went over to the tool room and picked out the smallest acetylene tip for our torch that was available and the smallest brazing rod from the storage cabinet. Then I rolled out the cart with the acetylene torch over to the quench tank. I went over to a friend of mine and requested some help with my project. I gave him a briefing of what I intended to do. He smiled. I put the tip in the torch and lit it. I had never used anything so small before and wondered if it would stay

Bob Heath has been an active member of NOMMA since 19 and has led several education sessions at METALfab.

lit as I adjusted the pressure, but it did. My helper followed my instructions to the letter, “A little higher, hold it, hand me the rod.” I moved the rod into the tiny flame to preheat it, dropped the torch down to the work, and in a split second the brass frame turned red. At the same time I dropped the rod to the red spot. Poof . . . the brass rod flowed instantly making a perfect braze on the red spot. Boy! Did it look good! The color of the new braze matched the color of the brass frame exactly. The repair job was complete, and it was unnoticeable. My heart pounded with excitement. I told my helper to take it into the office and show it to our instructor. I stood by the work area and watched through the large window, which allowed the instructor to see the entire shop. The helper told the instructor, “Bob, did a good job on the glasses,” to which he replied, “Let me see. Yeah, it does look great. How did he

2005 01 fab  
2005 01 fab