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7th National Session OF

EYP-Ukraine

RESOLUTION BOOKLET 6-10 February, 2013 Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine


PROGRAMME  OF  THE  GENERAL  ASSEMBLY     Sunday,  February  10   Opening  of  General  Assembly   1.  Special  Committee  on  Organised  Crime,  Corruption  and  Money  Laundering   2.  Committee  on  Employment  and  Social  Affairs   Lunch   3.  Committee  on  Foreign  Affairs   4.  Committee  on  Regional  Development   5.  Committee  on  Civil  Liberties,  Justice  and  Home  Affairs   Coffee  Break   6.  Committee  on  Industry,  Research  and  Energy   7.  Committee  on  Culture  and  Education   8.  Committee  on  International  Trade   Coffee  Break   Closing  Ceremony  

2  


M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   S PECIAL   C OMMITTEE  ON   O RGANISED   C RIME ,   C ORRUPTION  AND   M ONEY   L AUNDERING   Generating   an   estimated   $32   billion   dollars   annually,   human   trafficking   is   the   fastest-­‐‑growing   criminal  activity  in  the  world  along  with  arms  and  drug  trafficking.  Alarmed  by  the  widespread   of   this   phenomenon   in   both   the   EU   and   its   neighbour   countries,   the   European   Commission   adopted  the  "ʺEU  Strategy  towards  the  Eradication  of  Trafficking  in  Human  Beings  (2012-­‐‑2016)”.   Is  this  a  sufficient  answer  to  this  hideous  crime?  Which  steps  can  be  taken  to  protect  the  victims   of  human  trafficking?   Submitted  by:  

Kingsley  Ajakpa  (UA),  Valeriya  Boyko  (UA),  Vladyslav  Bryanyk  (UA),  Khrystyna   Franchuk  (UA),  Mykhailo  Iskra  (UA),  Ekaterine  Jikia  (GE),  Vitaly  Koshitsky  (UA),   Bogdan   Kozub   (UA),   Lyuda   Krasnytska   (UA),   Natalia   Lehka   (UA),   Inna   Shcherbyna   (UA),   Nazar   Tkachuk   (UA),   Olena   Yermakova   (UA),   Kristina   Chelmakina  (Vice-­‐‑President,  UA),  Nora  Wilhelm  (Chairperson,  CH)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Noting  with  deep  concern  that  2.7  million  people  are  being  trafficked  each  year  around  the  world,  out  of   which  66  per  cent  are  women,  13  per  cent  girls,  12  per  cent  men  and  9  per  cent  boys  ,1   B. Keeping  in  mind  that  human  trafficking  includes  practices  such  as:   i)

forced  labour  or  services,  

ii) sexual  exploitation,   iii) slavery  and  servitude,   iv) debt  bondage,   v) forced  removal  of  organs,   C. Affirming  that  human  trafficking  is  caused  by:   i)

the  low  level  of  awareness  about  the  issue  among  the  citizens  of  the  EU  and  its  neighbouring   countries,  

ii) poor  economic  conditions,  such  as  poverty  and  unemployment,  which  increase  the  vulnerability  of   particular  groups  of  people  making  them  potential  victims  of  human  trafficking,   iii) high  business  profits  for  the  perpetrators,     D. Contemplating  the  low  level  of  international  cooperation  between  governments  as  well  as  non-­‐‑ governmental  organisations  (NGOs)  regarding  violations  of  human  rights,  such  as  human  trafficking,   E. Fully  aware  of  the  existence  of  the  United  Nations  Palermo  Protocol  on  Trafficking  in  Human  Beings  and   the  Council  of  Europe  Convention  on  Actions  against  Trafficking  in  Human  Beings,     1

The Globalization of Crime: A Transnational Organized Crime Threat Assessment, UNODC, 2010 3  


F.

Noting  with  regret  that  only  61  countries  have  a  special  law  on  human  trafficking  and  that  there  is  no   special  penalty  for  this  hideous  crime,  

G. Observing  that  the  work  of  the  police  and  investigators  lacks  transnational  coordination  and  efficiency,   resulting  in  a  very  low  conviction  rate,   H. Convinced  that  free  border  crossing  inside  the  Schengen  Area  and  ineffective  border  security  systems  in   the  post-­‐‑soviet  countries  due  to  corruption  facilitate  human  trafficking,   I.

Affirming  that  the  lack  of  international  monitoring  systems  and  the  difficulty  to  find  data  on  human   trafficking  result  in  the  inability  to  evaluate  the  efficiency  of  the  implemented  measures,  

J.

Seeking  more  rehabilitation  centres  and  programmes  for  victims  of  trafficking  and  more  educational   centres  for  specialists  who  work  with  them,  

K. Realising  that  the  influence  of  the  EU  is  limited  and  restricted  to  recommendations  within  the  Member   States  and  the  neighbouring  countries,   L. Further  noting  that  sovereign  countries  might  only  accept  the  “EU  Strategy  towards  the  Eradication  of   Trafficking  in  Human  Beings  (2012-­‐‑2016)”  (the  Strategy)  and  other  measures  to  stop  human  trafficking  if   they  are  provided  with  an  incentive,  such  as  the  EU  membership  or  another  kind  of  political  or  financial   incentive,   M. Viewing  with  appreciation  the  Strategy  as  an  important  step  towards  the  eradication  of  human  trafficking;   N. Further  noting  several  drawbacks  of  the  Strategy,  including:   i)

the  insufficient  precision  and  explanation  of  the  actions  stated,    

ii) the  exclusively  dispositive  character  of  the  proposed  measures;  

    1.

Calls  upon  the  creation  of  a  joint  convention  introducing  a  common  set  of  laws  in  order  to  eradicate   human  trafficking  and  protect  the  victims  both  in  the  EU  Member  States  and  neighbouring  countries;  

2.

Has  resolved  to  provide  financial  support  to  EU  neighbouring  countries  in  order  for  them  to  adopt  the   aforementioned  convention  and  launch  the  process  of  international  data  collection  on  citizens  for  the   purpose  of  human  trafficking  investigations;    

3.

Encourages  educational  courses  for  different  segments  of  society,  such  as:  

4.

a)

safe  reintegration  into  the  community,  

b)

self-­‐‑development  opportunities,  such  as  affordable  education  and  employment,  

c)

trainings  for  psychotherapists  working  with  the  victims  of  human  trafficking,  

d)

providing  capacity  building  of  police  officers,  security  workers  and  border  customs  officers  on   human  trafficking  counteraction,  

e)

introductory  courses  on  human  trafficking  in  European  school  curricula  as  a  preventive  measure;  

Urges  the  implementation  of  the  following  prevention  and  punishment  measures  for  traffickers:   a)

systematic  reporting  of  the  traffickers’  names  to  international  security  organisations,  

b)

transnational  cooperation  between  police  forces,   4  


c)

banning  the  criminals  from  holding  a  certain  position  and  engaging    in  certain  activities,  in  particular   governmental  positions  and  activities  similar  to  the  occupation  previously  held  by  the  trafficker,  

d)

prohibition  of  entering  venues  related  to  the  previously  held  occupation,    

e)

establishment  of  permanent  control  by  the  authorities  of  former  traffickers,  including  regular  checks   of  their  location  and  current  occupation;  

5.

Supports  the  further  diffusion  of  educational  materials  on  human  trafficking  in  educational   establishments  and  employment  centres;  

6.

Reaffirms  the  necessity  of  raising  awareness  of  human  trafficking  by:   a)

increasing  the  media  coverage  on  the  issue,    

b)

promoting  events  like  the  EU  Day  Against  Trafficking  in  Human  Beings  (October  18),  

c)

encouraging  NGOs  to  implement  counter  human  trafficking  projects;  

7.

Draws  attention  to  the  risks  of  online  recruitment  which  may  lure  an  applicant  into  a  human  trafficking   situation  and  the  need  to  promote  state  employment  websites;  

8.

Proclaims  the  establishment  of  a  special  European  State  Counter-­‐‑Trafficking  Agency;  

9.

Authorises  the  confiscation  of  convicted  traffickers’  money  and  property  followed  by  their  donation  to  the   Agency;    

10. Designates  the  abovementioned  Agency  to  be  responsible  for  the  witness  and  victim  of  human  trafficking   protection  and  the  provision  of  the  following  elements  across  Europe:   a)

rehabilitation  programmes,  

b)

psychological  counselling,  

c)

medical  treatment,  

d)

assistance  with  job  search,  

e)

a  safe  living  environment,    

f)

reintegration  support;    

11. Endorses  the  improvement  of  the  Strategy  in  terms  of  formulation  and  efficiency.      

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M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   E MPLOYMENT  AND   S OCIAL   A FFAIRS   In   March   2012,   Spain   and   Greece   passed   the   unenviable   landmark   of   50   per   cent   youth   unemployment.   According   to   the   European   Commission,   such   rise   in   youth   unemployment   in   some   Member   States   could   pose   a   “serious   threat   to   social   cohesion”.   Facing   the   challenge   of   incredibly  high  youth  unemployment  rates  in  Europe:  What  labour  market  reforms  are  necessary   to   implement   in   order   for   the   current   generation   of   European   youth   not   to   become   irreversibly   excluded  from  the  labour  market?  

  Submitted  by:  

Tinatin   Akhvlediani   (GE),   Artem   Hrytsak   (UA),   Natalia   Snegur   (UA),   Yaroslav   Nemesh   (UA),   Peter   Vladimirov   (UA),   Katherine   Taraban   (UA),   Valeria   Tkachenko   (UA),   Valeria   Nikitenko   (UA),   Julia   Chepa   (UA),   Ievgenii   Burlaka   (UA),   Kateryna   Bolonnikova   (UA),   Anastasiya   Pryymachuk   (UA),   Roksolana   Pidlasa  (Chairperson,  UA),  Francesco  Colin  (Chairperson,  IT).  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Observing  difficulties  in  school-­‐‑to-­‐‑work  transition  decreasing  the  chances  of  graduates  to  find  a  suitable   job,   B. Noting  with  deep  concern  the  fact  that  the  lack  of  informal  education,  such  as  training  courses  and   internships,  leads  to  insufficient  qualifications  of  the  young  generation,   C. Aware  of  the  existence  of  four  million  unfilled  vacancies  in  all  the  EU  Member  States,  as  reported  by  the   European  Commission  (EC),   D. Deeply  concerned  by  mismatches  in  demand  and  supply  in  the  labour  market,   E. Deeply  disturbed  by  the  brain  drain  within  the  EU  caused  by  unsatisfactory  economic  conditions,     F.

Deeply  regretting  social  problems  caused  by  youth  unemployment  such  as:   i)

higher  crime  rates,  

ii) a  variety  of  psychological  illnesses,  which  may  lead  to  extremely  negative  consequences,   iii) the  decrease  in  life  span  among  the  youth,   G. Alarmed  by  the  high  level  of  unemployment  resulting  in  budget  deficit  and  the  plummeting  of  numerous   Member  States’  Gross  Domestic  Products  (GDPs),   H. Contemplating  an  unfavourable  legislative  background  unable  to  support  business  start-­‐‑ups  and  small   and  medium  enterprises  (SMEs),   I.

Realising  the  fact  that,  according  to  the  EC  reports,  the  level  of  youth  unemployment  in  Spain  and  Greece   has  reached  56  and  57  per  cent  respectively,  causing  the  exclusion  of  the  young  generation  from  the  labour   force;    

  6  


1.

Recommends  the  establishment  of  career  consultation  centres  coordinated  by  Member  States’  Ministries  of   Education  which  will  be  responsible  for:   a)

providing  expert  guidance  for  future  graduates,  

b)

supporting  professional  orientation  for  senior  students;  

2.

Further  recommends  the  urgent  implementation  of  the  Employment  Package  launched  by  the  EC;  

3.

Calls  upon  the  Member  States  to  enrich  higher  education  curricula  with  mandatory  internships  and   probation,  in  order  to  provide  graduate  with  professional  experience  and  social  skills;  

4.

Encourages  the  introduction  of  a  Europe-­‐‑wide  survey  investigating  demand  and  supply  in  the  labour   market;  

5.

Calls  for  governmental  financial  support  for  educational  programmes  focusing  on  highly  demanded  fields   in  order  to  tackle  the  mismatch  in  the  labour  market;  

6.

Urges  the  European  Central  Bank  and  Central  Banks  of  the  Member  States  to  provide  financial  incentives   for  business  start-­‐‑ups  and  SMEs  creating  new  vacancies,  such  as  tax  benefits  and  lowering  interest  rates.  

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M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   F OREIGN   A FFAIRS   Lack  of  civil  liberties  and  thousands  of  political  prisoners  keep  Belarus  –  the  last  dictatorship  in   Europe  –  outside  the  democratic  shield  of  the  Council  of  Europe,  whilst  the  “Tymoshenko  case”   caused  Ukraine  to  be  downgraded  amongst  the  partly  free  countries  in  the  2012  Freedom  in  the   World   report.   How   and   to   which   extent   should   the   EU   respond   to   political   repression   in   the   neighbouring  countries?  

  Submitted  by:  

Ivan   Chaika   (UA),   Okechukwu   Egbete   (UA),   Marichka   Ihnatova   (UA),   Mari   Kapanadze  (GE),  Ilya  Koshytsky  (UA),  Kostyantyn  Lyabuk  (UA),  Inna  Ostapenko   (UA),   Mike   Rozhkov   (UA),   Elizaveta   Skorobreschuk   (UA),   Oleksandra   Tychina   (UA),  Victoriya  Yashchuk  (UA),  Mykola  Zhuk  (UA),  Iryna  Garbuz  (Chairperson,   UA),  Marko  Fischer  (Vice-­‐‑President,  DE)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Deeply  concerned  by:     i)

open  cases  of  fraud  and  restrictions  against  opposition  parties  participating  in  elections  in  Ukraine,  as   well  as  the  “Tymoshenko  case”,  

ii) political  repression,  occurring  cases  of  preferential  justice  and  the  lack  of  an  independent  judiciary   system  in  Belarus,   B. Taking  into  consideration  political,  economic  and  personal  pressure  of  external  actors  on  the   aforementioned  states,   C. Deeply  disturbed  by  the  lack  of  civil  liberties,  democracy  and  respect  of  human  rights  in  certain  post-­‐‑ soviet  countries,  further  leading  to  the  rise  of  authoritarian  forms  of  governance  in  Eastern  Europe,   D. Aware  of  the  loopholes  in  the  legislation  of  neighbouring  countries,  resulting  in  a  decline  of  democratic   standards,  as  well  as  of  the  discrepancy  between  existing  political  model  and  constitutional  principles,   E. Observing  the  divergent  stance  of  the  Belarusian  society  towards  their  political  system  leading  to  an   absence  of  common  vision  regarding  the  future  of  the  country,     F.

Taking  into  account  the  different  sanctions  applied  by  the  EU  to  address  the  unfavourable  development  in   Belarus  such  as  the  blocking  of  bank  accounts  and  ambassadorial  withdrawals,  

G. Realising  that  the  Ukrainian  society  is  divided  between  pro-­‐‑European  and  pro-­‐‑Russian  sympathies  and   recent  violation  of  democratic  principles  are  restraining  further  development  of  the  EU-­‐‑Ukraine   relationship,   H. Drawing  attention  to  the  limited  ability  of  the  EU  to  change  the  situation  in  Ukraine  and  Belarus  due  to:     i)

the  lack  of  a  legal  basis  for  the  EU’s  political  interventions  in  these  countries,  

ii) the  dependence  of  Ukraine  and  particularly  Belarus  on  Russia  and  its  subsequent  influence  on  the   governments  in  both  states,   8  


I.

Emphasising  the  crucial  role  of  Ukraine  for  both  Russia  and  the  EU  amid:   i)

strong  economic  and  trade  relationships,  

ii) the  desire  of  both  stakeholders  to  achieve  access  to  the  Ukrainian  market;   1.

Encourages  the  EU’s  neighbouring  countries  to  increase  their  efforts  to  achieve  a  common  standard  for   both  their  national  legislation  as  well  as  that  of  the  EU;  

2.

Calls  upon  the  EU  to  strongly  urge  Belarus  to  immediately  release  and  rehabilitate  all  political  prisoners;  

3.

Supports  the  creation  of  guidelines  for  the  aforementioned  countries  in  order  to  achieve  equality  of  the  de   jure  and  de  facto  situation  regarding  civil  liberties,  democracy  and  human  rights;  

4.

Encourages  Russia,  considering  its  officially  respectful  attitude  toward  civil  liberties,  to  positively   influence  the  state  of  democracy  and  human  rights  in  Belarus;  

5.

Requests  that  if  the  previously  proposed  measures  regarding  Belarus  prove  to  be  unsuccessful,  the  EU   shall  consider  further  action,  including  peace-­‐‑keeping  actions;  

6.

Endorses  a  productive  and  long-­‐‑lasting  co-­‐‑operation  between  the  EU  and  Ukraine  in  order  to  decrease   Ukrainian  dependence  on  Russia;    

7.

Recommends  to  promote  Ukraine  as  a  competitive  and  potentious  partner  for  the  EU,  emphasising  the   mutual  benefit  for  both  parties  from  further  co-­‐‑operation;  

8.

Suggests  to  ammend  the  Association  Agreement  between  the  EU  and  Ukraine  by  adding  a  guarantee  for  a   full  EU  membership  of  Ukraine  as  soon  as  all  the  requested  reforms  regarding  democracy  and  civil   liberties  have  been  fully  implemented;  

9.

Urges  Ukraine  to  fully  respect  the  democratic  and  civil  rights  of  its  citizens,  release  all  political  prisoners,   create  a  stimulating  environment  for  small  and  medium  enterprises  and  guarantee  safety  for  European   investments;  

10. Further  recommends  that,  in  return  for  the  implementation  of  the  measures  proposed  in  Operative  Clause   9,  the  EU  shall  grant  the  following  benefits  to  Ukraine:   a)

visa-­‐‑free  entrance  to  the  EU  for  a  specific  group  of  Ukrainian  citizens  such  as  students,  NGO   representatives,  artists,  scholars  and  athlets,  

b)

more  favourable  provisions  of  the  EU-­‐‑Ukraine  Trade  Agreement  for  Ukraine;  

11. Declares  accordingly  that,  should  these  changes  not  been  adopted,  the  EU  shall:     a)

cease  all  forms  of  direct  budgetary  financial  support  to  the  Ukrainian  government,    

b)

call  upon  the  International  Monetary  Fund  to  suspend  further  state  loans  to  Ukraine;  

12. Raises  awareness  of  the  necessity  of  a  more  objective  and  complete  European  media  coverage  of  events   and  developments  in  Ukraine.    

9  


M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   R EGIONAL   D EVELOPMENT   Urban  green  space  is  vital  for  city-­‐‑dwellers,  because  it  provides  such  benefits  as  recreational  and   educational   opportunities,   aesthetic   experience   and   a   healthy   environment.   However,   with   growing  land  and  real  estate  prices  and  current  level  of  urbanization,  the  development  of  green   areas  often  collides  with  industrial  and  commercial  interests.  Economy  versus  ecology:  how  can   we  sustainably  transform  our  cities  to  be  a  greater  part  of  the  green  economy?   Submitted  by:  

Anna   Burkut   (UA),   Pavlo   Fedoriv   (UA),   Valeriya   Korinovska   (UA),   Oksana   Krupii  (UA),  Anastasiia  Lavoshnikova  (UA),  Varvara  Loskutnikova  (UA),  Mariya   Petrenko   (UA),   Yura   Poritskii   (UA),   Evhenii   Shatskyi   (UA),   Maria   Shcherbak   (UA),   Volodymyr   Sytnyk   (UA),   Dmytro   Kharchenko   (Chairperson,   UA),   Laura   Léotoing  (Vice-­‐‑President,  FR)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

A. Bearing   in   mind   the   World   Health   Organisation   (WHO)   standards   stating   that   every   city   should   have   a   minimum  of  9  square  metres  of  green  space  per  capita,   B. Taking  into  account  that  close  to  45  million  people  living  in  the  European  Union  (EU)  have  limited  access   to  green  spaces  in  urban  areas,  with  just  2  to  13  per  cent  of  the  city  area  occupied  by  green  spaces,     C. Aware  of  the  increasing  urbanisation  and  high  population  density  in  Europe,   D. Recognising  the  demographic  and  immigration  reasons  for  population  growth  in  urban  areas  leading  to   the  lack  of  resources,  such  as  living  space,  energy,  clean  water  and  air,   E. Concerned  with  the  lack  of  awareness,  motivation  and  involvement  of  the  city-­‐‑dwellers  in  the  process  of   solving  environmental  and  land  management  issues,   F.

Reaffirming  the  importance  of  green  areas,  as  well  as  all  the  benefits  they  offer  the  city-­‐‑dwellers,  

G. Deeply   disturbed   by   the   lack   of   professionalism,   scientific   awareness,   corruption   and   ignorance   among   the  local  authorities,   H. Noting  with  regret  the  presence  of  ineffective  city  planning  and  development  leading  to  social  instability   and  environmental  negligence,   I.

Alarmed  by  the  environmental  pollution  caused  by  factories,  plants,  transport  emissions  and  mass  public   events,  

J.

Realising  the  improper  usage  of  large  territories  for  dumps  and  landfills  and  the  poor  organisation  of  the   latter,  

K. Deeply  concerned  by  the  damaging  impact  the  urbanisation  has  both  on  the  society  and  the  environment   due  to  ineffective  distribution  of  natural  resources  and  high  costs  of  environmentally  friendly  initiatives,   L. Deeply  conscious  of  the  prejudice  against  green  spaces  being  economically  beneficial,   M. Taking  note  of  the  lack  of  investments  into  green  initiatives,   10  


N. Affirming   the   definition   of   green   cities   by   the   United   Nations   Environment   Program   (UNEP)   as   environmentally  friendly  cities  that:   i)

offer  a  high  quality  urban  environment  for  all  city-­‐‑dwellers,  

ii) facilitate  the  progress  towards  sustainable  development  and  consumption  of  natural  resources,   iii) enable  effective  funding  distribution  for  environmental  programs  within  the  city,   O. Contemplating  the  fact  that  according  to  the  International  Panel  on  Climate  Change  (IPCC)  30  per  cent  of   energy  used  in  buildings  could  be  reduced  with  net  economic  benefits  by  2030,   P. Guided   by   the   estimation   that   within   twenty-­‐‑four   hours   twenty   trees   will   absorb   the   air   pollution   produced  by  driving  a  car  for  sixty  miles;  

    1.

Encourages   governments   to   make   it   compulsory   for   local   authorities   to   adhere   to   the   “green   space”   standard  in  the  process  of  urban  planning  and  reconstruction;    

2.

Recommends   independent   agencies   and   public   counsels   to   further   control   the   implementation   of   environmental  standards  and  legislation;  

3.

Urges  the  municipal  governments  to  use  the  support  of  the  EU  funds  and  private  investments  available  in   order  to:   a)

reconstruct  old  or  unused  buildings  to  preserve  space  for  urban  green  areas,  

b)

provide  stakeholders  with  trainings  on  the  implementation  of  effective  city  planning  strategies;  

4.

Calls  for  planting  trees  on  the  ineffectively  used  territories  as  well  as  in  the  most  polluted  and  degraded   zones;    

5.

Further   calls   for   using   green   roofs   as   a   means   of   providing   green   areas   in   the   cities   with   the   highest   population  density;  

6.

Further  recommends  the  development  of  eco-­‐‑friendly  city  public  transportation  systems;  

7.

Further  encourages  city-­‐‑dwellers  to  limit  the  use  of  private  cars  replacing  them  with  bicycles  and  walking   in  order  to  decrease  land  used  for  roads;  

8.

Expresses   its   hope   that   the   local   authorities   would   take   responsibility   for   the   implementation   of   city   planning  laws  for  green  initiatives  in  cities;  

9.

Supports  the  implementation  of  legislation  establishing  size  standards  for  construction  in  order  to  prevent   a  high  concentration  of  entrepreneurs  in  urban  spaces  and  move  their  offices  outside  the  cities’  limits;  

10. Realising  the  need  to  make  European  urban  production  greener  thus  bringing  considerable  employment   opportunities;   11. Calls   for   environmental   non-­‐‑governmental   and   non-­‐‑profit   organisations   (NGOs   and   NPOs)   to   improve   the   quality   of   existing   urban   green   areas   by   planting   new   trees,   modifying   roads   and   buildings,   establishing  new  parks  and  recreation  zones;   12. Emphasises  the  need  to  tackle  the  issue  of  combat  illegal  landfill  sites;   13. Further   authorises   municipal   governments   to   involve   experts   in   landfill   planning   in   the   re-­‐‑planning   of   existing  landfill  sites  in  order  to  decrease  the  area  they  occupy.   11  


M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   C IVIL   L IBERTIES ,   J USTICE  AND   H OME   A FFAIRS   While  Russian  keeps  being  the  mother  tongue  for  more  than  20  per  cent  of  the  population  of  the   Baltic   countries,   a   number   of   minority   languages,   such   as   Welsh,   Irish,   Basque   and   Galician,   struggle  to  survive  due  to  the  overwhelming  pressure  from  the  more  widely  spread  English  and   Spanish.  Language  as  a  part  of  cultural  heritage  and  civic  identity:  How  should  the  EU  ensure  the   protection   of   minority   languages   and   their   cultural   added   value,   in   order   to   fully   respect   the   equal  status  of  linguistic  minorities?  

  Submitted  by:  

Ibrahim   Alonge   (UA),   Denys   Andrushchenko   (UA),   Yelyzaveta   Buben   (UA),     Polina   Budyanska   (UA),   Iulian   Doni   (MD),   Anna   Kalakutska   (UA),   Alyona   Kovtun  (UA),  Alexandra  Krivoruchko  (UA),  Yana  Kumpanenko  (UA),  Alexander   Melnic   (UA),   Vladislav   Prokopenko   (UA),   Olha   Sholok   (UA),   Taras   Turianyn   (UA),   Ndubueze   Egbulefu   (Chairperson,   UA),   Marilou   Pelmont   (Chairperson,   FR)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Fully  aware  of  the  existence  of  the  European  Charter  for  Regional  or  Minority  Languages  and  its  generally   efficient  role  in  protecting  minority  languages,   B. Observing  draw  backs,  gaps  and  limitations  present  in  the  Charter,   C. Fully  convinced  that  languages  are  a  unique  part  of  every  culture  and  identity,   D. Bearing  in  mind  the  difference  between  regional  and  minority  languages,   E. Noting  with  regret  the  inability  of  minority  language  speakers  to  protect  their  rights  and  language,   F.

Noticing  the  declining  interest  of  minority  language  speakers  in  developing  and  maintaining  their  native   languages,  

G. Deeply  concerned  that  majority  languages  might  overwhelm  minority  languages,   H. Deeply  regretting  the  fact  that  many  governments  do  not  support  and  promote  some  or  all  minority   languages  spoken  on  their  territory,   I.

Taking  into  account  that  minority  languages  are  not  widely  used  in  mass  media,  social  networks  and  the   entertainment  industry,  

J.

Observing  the  fact  that  minority  languages  are  not  represented  in  the  regional  economic  structure  of   European  countries,  

K. Emphasising  that  young  people  often  lack  knowledge  of  the  languages  of  their  region,   L. Taking  into  consideration  that  minority  languages  are  seen  as  a  cause  of  separatist  tendencies  in  some   countries;   12  


1.

Calls  for  the  creation  of  specific  committees  on  minority  languages  on  the  regional,  state  and  European   levels;  

2.

Recommends  the  implementation    of  cultural  tools  promoting  minority  languages,  such  as:  

3.

a)

Exposure  through  internet  sources,  

b)

Mass  media,  including    television,  newspaper  and  radio;  

Supports  an  increased  integration  of  minority  languages  into  the  education  process  by:   a)

Adding  innovative  language  classes    in  schools  involving  games,  songs,  plays  and  cartoons,  

b)

Establishing  minority  language  classes  for  adults;    

4.

Trusts  that  Public  Relation  campaigns  and  promotional  videos  will  insure  the  popularity  of  minority   languages;  

5.

Further  requests  the  provision  of  grant  and  tender  systems  for  local  business  operating  in  minority   languages;  

6.

Urges  the  support  of  literature,  music  and  films  produced  in  minority  languages  by  providing  grants  and   special  funds;  

7.

Recommends  the  organisation  of  minority  language  competitions  by  state  authorities  and  the  private   sector;  

8.

Endorses  the  creation  of  cultural  establishments  in    every  region  of  a  minority  language  with  a  unique   atmosphere;  

9.

Stresses  the  importance  of  regular  cultural  events  for  minority  language  areas.  

13  


M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   I NDUSTRY ,   R ESEARCH  AND   E NERGY   With   the   current   dependence   on   energy   imports   from   the   third   countries   and   constantly   rising   fuel   prices,   energy   efficient   technology   can   be   seen   as   Europe'ʹs   biggest   unexploited   energy   source.   What   strategy   should   the   Member   States’   governments   adopt   in   order   to   reach   sustainable   energy   consumption,   as   well   as   the   development   and   diffusion   of   energy   efficient   technology?  

  Submitted  by:  

Stefaniya   Chub   (UA),   Orest   Firsov   (UA),   Liliya   Illiushko   (UA),   Anna   Illyashyk   (UA),   Sviatoslav   Kalantieiev   (UA),   Yurii   Moroz   (UA),   Avtandil   Pataridze   (GE),   Olena  Polovina  (UA),  Oleksii  Prylipka   (UA),   Nadiia   Telenchuk   (UA),   Oleksandr   Yaroshchuk   (UA),   Uchenna   Egbete   (Chairperson,   UA),   Anna-­‐‑Helena   Saarso   (Chairperson,  EE)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Deeply  concerned  by  the  strong  dependence  of  European  countries  on  conventional  energy  resources,     B. Alarmed  by  the  dependence  of  European  countries  on  energy  imports  from  third  countries,   C. Fully  aware  of  the  increasing  need  for  finite  energy  resources,   D. Emphasising  the  lack  of  cooperation  between  European  countries  on  a  united  energy  strategy,   E. Further  noting  flaws  in  energy  systems  such  as:   i)

Low  efficiency,    

ii) Lack  of  energy-­‐‑saving  filtering  systems,   F.

Observing  the  lack  of  proper  insulation  of  public  buildings,  

G. Taking  note  of  inefficient  usage  of  recycled  waste  as  an  energy  source  and  production  material,   H. Further  noting  the  lack  of  involvement  of  the  private  sector  in  the  introduction  of  efficient  energy   technologies  due  to  the  lack  of  incentives,   I.

Deeply  concerned  by  the  power  of  monopolies  in  the  energy  supply  market  leading  to:   i)

High  fuel  prices,    

ii) Political  friction  and  intimidation  between  European  countries  and  some  supplier  countries  such  as   Russia,   J.

Recognising  the  lack  of  research  on  alternative  energy  sources  and  development  of  sustainable  and  safe   energy  technologies,  

K. Noting  with  regret  the  indifference  of  people  towards  their  individual  carbon  footprint,     L. Realising  that  energy  efficient  technologies  are  not  affordable  leading  to  their  improper  or  no   implementation  or  the  absence  of  such;   14  


1.

Calls  upon  European  governments  to  provide  incentives  for  companies  investing  in  energy  efficiency  and   renewable  energy  technologies  in  the  form  of:   a)

Reduced  taxes,  

b)

Subsidies;  

2.

Further  requests  public  and  private  bodies  to  provide  grants  for  investments  in  the  energy  efficiency   research  and  projects;  

3.

Emphasises  the  need  for  the  combination  of  efficient  and  renewable  energy  sources  on  the  international   level;  

4.

Further  urges  European  countries  and  non-­‐‑governmental  organisations  (NGO)  to  organise  and  promote   tenders  for  new  initiatives,  projects  and  research;  

5.

Expresses  its  hope  that  European  governments  will  prioritize  green  initiatives  and  the  improvement  of   existing  technologies  in  the  energy  sector;  

6.

Further  urges  European  countries  to  adopt  of  a  mandatory  energy  efficiency  monitoring  system  for   businesses  and  industries;  

7.

Emphasises  the  need  for  the  energy  market  to  be  open  to  new  suppliers;  

8.

Endorses  the  improvement  of  the  license  and  patent  trading  system;  

9.

Encourages  the  implementation  of  energy  efficiency  standards  in  state  construction,  such  as  Passive   House  Standard;  

10. Further  encourages  the  construction  of  trade-­‐‑in  points  and  the  provision  of  favourable  conditions  for   exchanging  used  electronics  for  new  ones;   11. Recommends  the  introduction  of  new  technologies  for  energy  extraction  in  recycling  plants;   12. Further  recommends  reducing  energy  losses  by  using  energy  filters  and  condensators;   13. Calls  for  an  increase  in  awareness  on  sustainable  energy  issues  by:   a)

Conducting  conferences,  

b)

Promoting  these  through  social  networks,  

c)

Organising  media  campaigns  

d)

Implementing  educational  programs  in  schools;  

14. Calls  for  the  implementation  of  energy  saving  methods  in  elements  of  infrastructure,  such  as  street  lights,   billboards  and  transport  systems.  

15  


M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   C ULTURE  AND   E DUCATION   Higher  education  in  Europe:  According  to  the  Times  Higher  Education  Report,  most  of  the  top-­‐‑ ranked  universities  are  located  outside  Europe,  with  such  countries  as  Ukraine  having  no  higher   education   facility   in   the   world'ʹs   top-­‐‑1000.   While   the   new   Erasmus   for   All   programme,   to   be   launched   in   2014,   aims   to   unlock   potential   of   young   people   regardless   of   their   economic   background,   top-­‐‑ranked   universities   often   impose   high   tuition   fees.   Which   actions   should   be   taken  in  order  to  boost  the  quality  of  education  in  the  European  Universities?  

  Submitted  by:  

Vasyl   Antoniuk   (UA),   Solomiia   Dmytruk   (UA),   Iryna   Dobrohorska   (UA),   Irina   Ivasishin   (UA),   Iryna   Lukianenko   (UA),   Pavel   Lysenko   (UA),   Iryna   Narozhna   (UA),  Valeriya  Radkevych  (UA),  Alexandra  Shabelnikova  (RU),  Anastasia  Somyk   (UA),   Alex   Syrota   (UA),   Vira   Sytnyk   (UA),   Anton   Verkhovodov   (UA),   Tetiana   Korniichuk  (Chairperson,  UA),  Daniels  Griņevičs  (Chairperson,  LV)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Deeply  concerned  by  the  lack  of  financial  support  for  universities  due  to  differing  economic  situation  in   the  European  countries,     B. Realising  the  difficulties  students  encounter  in  acquiring  information  about  exchange  programmes,   C. Noting   with   regret   the   absence   of   a   common   European   system   for   applying   to   higher   education   establishments,   D. Bearing  in  mind  the  necessity  of  an  internationally  recognised  educational  credit  transfer  system,   E. Taking   into   account   the   difficulties   foreign   exchange   students   can   experience   when   settling   in   the   local   community,   F.

Observing   the   non-­‐‑correspondence   of   the   current   European   education   system   with   the   demands   of   the   labour-­‐‑market,  which  results  in  the  inability  to  secure  working  places  for  graduates,  

G. Emphasising  the  need  to  create  a  common  educational  standard  for  European  universities,   H. Desiring  higher  mobility  of  professors,   I.

Recognising  that  student  self-­‐‑governing  bodies  of  the  universities  do  not  have  enough  authority  over  the   decision  making  processes  of  the  respective  universities,  

J.

Convinced  that  an  educational  approach  focussing  on  a  wide  spectrum  of  subjects  and  a  large  number  of   faculties  at  universities  is  likely  to  result  in  a  lower  quality  of  education,  

K. Seeking  to  develop  a  system  of  preparatory  courses  for  high-­‐‑school  graduates  applying  to  universities,   L. Encouraging  experience  sharing  amongst  students  with  regards  to  exchange  programmes;  

  1.

Expresses  its  appreciation  towards  the  Bologna  Process;   16  


2.

3.

Congratulates  the  Erasmus  for  All  programme  for  taking  first  steps  in  reaching  its  aims,  in  particular:   a)

to  unlock  the  full  academic  potential  of  young  people  regardless  of  their  economic  background,  

b)

to  improve  the  student  and  faculty  mobility;  

Authorises   the   creation   of   a   Common   European   Education   Platform   based   on   the   Eurydice   Network,   which  includes:   a)

a  database  of  universities  and  exchange  programmes,  

b)

information  on  financial  support  opportunities,  such  as  grants,  loans  and  scholarships,  

c)

a  common  European  Application  System,  

d)

a  student  network  platform  for  sharing  exchange  experience;  

4.

Further  invites  non-­‐‑governmental  organisations  (NGOs)  and  the  EU  authorities  to  support  the  inclusion   of  the  EU  aspiring  countries  and  neighbouring  states  into  the  higher  education  system  of  the  EU;  

5.

Calls  for  simplifying  the  social  integration  of  exchange  students  via:   a)

intercultural  communication  courses  at  the  universities,  

b)

interaction  groups  consisting  of  exchange  students  and  local  volunteers;  

6.

Further   invites   every   university   to   establish   self-­‐‑governing   bodies   that   include   representatives   of   the   students  councils,  university  management  and  the  local  government;  

7.

Calls  for  an  improvement  of  the  cooperation  between  European  Universities  within  the  framework  of  the   European  University  Foundation  (EUF);  

8.

Requests   the   creation   of   the   Vacancies   and   Employers   Database   by   universities’   employment   departments;  

9.

Approves   of   the   potential   for   combining   academic   and   work   experience   when   participating   in   an   exchange  programme,  as  described  in  the  Joint  Statement  of  Erasmus  Student  Network  and  the  EUF;    

10. Supports  constant  research  on  the  changing  labour  market  demands  and  the  subsequent  adaptation  of  the   educational  programmes  accordingly;   11. Urges  to  reform  the  education  system  by:   a)

amending  the  Bologna  Declaration  in  order  to  enable  the  students  to  choose  and  change  the  courses   during  the  first  two  years  of  studies  in  the  universities  included  in  the  Bologna  Process,    

b)

ensuring  supranational  control  of  the  implementation  of  the  abovementioned  amendment;  

12. Further   requests   to   narrow   the   specialisation   of   small   and   medium   sized   universities   by   the   respective   authorities;   13. Encourages  the  creation  of  a  working  group  consisting  of  the  representatives  of  national  governments,  the   EU   institutions   and   other   stakeholders   to   analyse   the   cost-­‐‑efficiency   of   higher   education   in   Europe   and   develop  recommendations  for  increasing  its  accessibility.         17  


M OTION  FOR  A   R ESOLUTION  BY   T HE   C OMMITTEE  ON   I NTERNATIONAL   T RADE   With  645  violations  of  intellectual  property  rights  per  day,  China  causes  a  damage  of  56,2  billion   Euro   to   the   EU   economy   on   a   monthly   basis.   At   the   same   time,   all   European   countries   stay   dependent  on  the  cheap  imports  from  China.  Emerging  powers,  rivals,  partners:  how  should  the   EU-­‐‑China  trade  co-­‐‑operation  look  like?     Submitted  by:  

Mariya   Denysenko   (UA),   Marta   Franchuk   (UA),   Ani   Gelashvili   (GE),   Sergey   Koshelev   (UA),   Anastasiia   Kradetska   (UA),   Irina   Kravchuk   (UA),   Olga   Liakhovska   (UA),   Dmytro   Melnyk   (UA),   Pavel   Shevchenko   (UA),   Angelina   Tarashevska   (UA),   Vasyl   Tsyktor   (UA),   Alexander   Zhuk   (UA),   Lidiia   Zhgyr   (Chairperson,  UA),  Nathan  Hunter  (Chairperson,  UK)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,  

  A. Taking  into  consideration  the  EU-­‐‑China  Trade  and  Economic  Cooperation  agreement  of  1985,  replaced  by   the   Partnership   and   Cooperation   Agreement   (PCA)   in   January   2007,   both   aiming   to   improve   future   bilateral  investment  relations,   B. Taking   note   of   the   existence   of   the   State   Intellectual   Property   Office   (SIPO),   World   Intellectual   Property   Organisation,  (WIPO)  and  World  Trade  Organisation  (WTO),   C. Noting   with   approval   the   fact   that   China’s   General   Administration   of   Customs   received   an   award   from   the  Global  Anti-­‐‑Counterfeiting  Group  (GACG),   D. Having  studied  the  fiscal  gap  in  the  EU-­‐‑Chinese  trade  revealing:   i)

the   volume   of   goods   exported   to   China   constituting   113,1   billion   Euro,   and   imported   from   China   constituting  281,3  billion  Euro  in  2010,  

ii) the  amount  of  services  exported  to  China  in  2009  compiling  18  billion  Euro,  while  import  constituted   13  billion  Euro,   iii) the   size   of   Foreign   Direct   Investment   (FDI)   to   China   amounting   to   5,3   billion   Euro,   while   the   FDA   from  China  constituted  0,3  billion  Euro;   E. Observing   that   the   European   Commission   redefined   their   Sino-­‐‑European   relationships   in   2007   as   «EU-­‐‑ China:  Closer  futures,  growing  responsibilities»,   F.

Guided  by  the  fact  that  the  economy  of  the  EU  is  heavily  dependent  on  imports  from  China,  

G. Noting   with   regret   the   grave   economic   consequences   that   the   presence   of   Chinese   counterfeit   goods   at   European  market  has  for  the  EU,   H. Alarmed  by  the  lack  of  efficiency  of  Intellectual  Property  Rights  (IPR)  protection,   I.

Deeply  disturbed  by  the  current  low  operational  capacity  of  treaties  between  the  EU  and  China;  

 

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1.

Calls   for   the   improvement   of   the   EU   relationship   with   its   existing   trade   partners,   such   as   Taiwan   and   Vietnam;  

2.

Encourages  the  EU  to  increase  its  own  production  by:   a)

lowering  taxes,  

b)

offering  grants  and  subsidies;  

3.

Further   requests   the   EU   to   share   its   experience   with   China   in   combating   piracy   and   the   distribution   of   counterfeit  products;  

4.

Recommends  international  organisations  to  encourage  the  national  governments  to  pass  strict  legislative   guidelines  on  IPR  control;  

5.

Approves   the   EU   taking   more   radical   actions   towards   Chinese   exporters   of   fake   products   through   political  and  economic  measures;  

6.

Further   invites   the   arrangement   of   annual   conferences   for   private   businesses   from   the   EU   and   China   aimed  to  improve  the  terms  of  trade  for  both  parties;  

7.

Considers  giving  the  executive  power  to  the  WTO  Council  for  trade-­‐‑related  aspects  of  IPR  to  monitor  EU-­‐‑ China  cooperation  in  trade  as  well  as  the  actions  of  the  Chinese  government  on  IPR  protection;  

8.

Urges  the  Member  States  to  increase  tariffs  on  Chinese  imports  in  order  to  compensate  for  losses  caused   by  IPR  violations  in  China.  

 

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2013-02 7th National Selection_Resolution Booklet