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resolution booklet 11th national conference of the european youth parliament latvia


Order of the General Assembly 9:00 - 9:20

Opening of the GA

9:20 - 10:05

1st Committee – LIBE II

page

4

10:05 - 10:50

2nd Committee – CULT I

page

6

10:50 - 11:10

Tea break

11:10 - 11:55

3rd Committee – CULT II

page

8

11:55 - 12:40

4th Committee – BUDG

page

10

12:40 - 13:25

5th Committee – ENVI

page

12

13:30 - 14:40

Lunch

14:45 - 15:30

6th Committee – AFET

page

14

15:30 - 16:15

7th Committee – EMPL

page

16

16:15 - 17:00

8th Committee – LIBE I

page

18

17:00 - 17:15

Tea break

17:18 - 18:30

Closing Ceremony

2


GA Procedure 1.

Reading of the operative clauses

2.

Defence speech (3 minutes)

3.

Attack speech (3 minutes)

4.

Response to the attack speech (1 minute)

5.

Points of Information

6.

Open debate

7.

Summation speech (3 minutes, 1 or 2 people)

8. Voting

Basic Tips for a Successful General Assembly 1.

Speak clearly and slowly so that everybody can hear you.

2.

Be respectful of the work that has been put into the resolution of other

committees. Give them the attention they deserve.

3.

At the General Assembly you are simulating what it is like to be a real

parliamentarian. We therefore expect you to use formal language

and show exemplary behavior inside the venue.

4.

Try to make points of discussion instead of asking questions. Often,

questions are hidden arguments. You come off much stronger if you

explain the point that you want to make, as it allows the rest of the

delegates to follow your train of thought.

5.

Challenge yourself: make sure that you contribute at least once to the

debates, preferably more!

3


Motion the

Committee

on

for a

Resolution

Civil Liberties, Justice (LIBE II)

by

and

Home Affairs

ii

Diversifying marriage: should Member States legalise same-sex marriage? To what extent should the EU protect LGBT rights? Submitted by: Ieva Elizabete Ērgle, Diāna Greiškāne, Lolita Irbe, Triin Kaup (EE), Kristīne Mēnese, Ilvija Mežiņa, Ilze Mežinska, Olga Sitinska, Reinholds Švarcs, Willem Koelewijn (Chairperson, NL), Ieva Pastare (Chairperson, LV) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Believing that same-sex and heterosexual couples are equal and therefore should be treated equally, B. Aware of the low public support for same-sex marriage in certain Member States, such as Romania (11 percent), Latvia (12 percent) and Cyprus (14 percent), C. Realising that the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union guarantees the right to marry and found a family in accordance with national legislation, D. Recognising that people with religious or conservative views often criticise LGBT rights, E. Noting with regret that currently only seven Member States allow same-sex couples to adopt, whereas ten Member States allow stepchild adoption, F. Affirming that same-sex couples are equally capable of raising children as heterosexual couples, G. Taking into consideration that LGBT stereotyping damages the position of LGBTs in society and fosters discrimination and aggression against them, H. Noting with deep concern that 47 percent of LGBTs in the EU state that they have been discriminated against over the last twelve months, I. Deeply disturbed by the fact that 67 percent of LGBTs in the EU report to have been discriminated against during their schooling before the age of eighteen, J. Fully alarmed by the fact that 20 percent of LGBTs in the EU claim to have been discriminated against whilst being employed or seeking to be employed over the last twelve months, K. Disappointed by the fact that 22 Member States do not allow homosexual men to donate blood;

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1. Calls upon Member States to legalise same-sex civil unions that grant same-sex couples the same rights as heterosexual couples in civil marriages; 2. Encourages Member States to legalise stepchild adoption by same-sex couples in a civil union, upon the introduction of same-sex civil unions; 3. Supports the legalisation of adoption by same-sex couples in a civil union, after same-sex civil unions and stepchild adoption have been successfully implemented; 4. Emphasises that the adoption procedure and requirements should be equally applied to both heterosexual and same-sex couples; 5. Requests Member States to take measures to improve public awareness about same-sex and heterosexual couples’ equal capability of raising children; 6. Further requests Member States to provide LGBTs with the possibility to attend trainings that will allow them to act upon discrimination and aggression towards them; 7. Recommends the intensification of advertising about support centres and help lines for LGBT that face social pressure, discrimination or aggression; 8. Further recommends Member States to include educational programmes about equality and LGBT rights in elementary schools’ curricula; 9. Calls for Member States to coordinate seminars for teachers on the subject of LGBT rights; 10. Invites Member States to allow blood donations by homosexual men.

5


Motion the

Committee

on

for a

Culture

Resolution and

by

Education I (CULT I)

With decreasing numbers of students in remote regions leading to school closures: how to balance the need for sufficient student numbers with the demand for schools close to home? How can quality education be ensured in parts of Europe with a declining population? Submitted by: Aija Albertiņa, Dārta Galiņa, Rihards Goldmanis, Dāniels Jukna, Giedrė Kazokaitė (LT), Līna Lontone, Laine Una Melkerte, Aleksejs Murins, Anna Elīna Vītola, Reinis Tutāns (Chairperson, LV), Kati Pärn (Vice-President, EE) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Deeply concerned by the low number of students in remote region schools, B. Noting with regret that schools in remote regions are insufficiently funded, C. Taking into consideration that families are forced to migrate due to the lack of career opportunities and quality education, D. Further noting that emigration from remote regions causes school closure, E. Bearing in mind that schools in rural regions are disadvantaged regarding infrastructure, technical equipment and pedagogical methods, F. Fully aware that the financial model Money Follows Student in Latvia has a negative effect on schools in remote regions by attracting teachers to city schools that offer higher salaries, G. Deeply concerned that infrastructure in rural regions is less developed than in cities, hence resulting in fewer employment opportunities, H. Regretting that high school students prefer to live in areas with better career prospects and facilities;

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1. Urges schools in remote regions to modernise teaching methods with the help of additional materials and courses for teachers; 2. Recommends remote regions to have several primary schools and one secondary school; 3. Further requests local municipalities to provide student housing for upper-secondary school students; 4. Calls for municipalities to provide a free lease on land to entrepreneurs to establish enterprises, on the condition of repayment of the costs of the land once it makes profit; 5. Encourages schools in remote regions to implement cloud computing; 6. Approves the organising of international forums on pedagogical methods for education functionaries in different Member States; 7. Further recommends increasing spending on award systems for high-achieving students, such as camps and excursions; 8. Encourages municipalities to increase budgets for schools in remote regions; 9. Calls for schools in remote regions to host lectures about local employment opportunities by experts from fields such as agriculture, forestry and industry.

7


Motion the

Committee

on

for a

Culture

Resolution

and

by

Education II (CULT II)

In light of discussions in Latvia concerning the role of the Russian language in society, and with respect for diversity as a founding principle of the EU: to what extent should minority languages be recognised by Member States? How can the EU play a supportive role? Submitted by: Austris Cīrulnieks, Dace Dreimane, Rota Guļevska, Vita Jurāne, Liisa Rajamets (EE), Dita Sisene, Klaudija Trušele, Viktorija Zača, Iryna Garbuz (Chairperson, UA) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Guided by the fact that linguistic diversity is acknowledged as a citizen’s right in Articles 21 and 22 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU, B. Seeking Member States’ support in protecting minorities and their languages, C. Deeply disturbed by the risk of extinction of certain minority languages, D. Taking into consideration that the country’s economic and social stability is affected when minorities demand independence, E. Fully alarmed by the fact that social services are not equally accessible to different linguistic communities within Member States, F. Emphasising that most minorities cannot get secondary nor higher education in their native language, G. Seeking to improve interaction between linguistic communities within Member States, H. Concerned by the lack of possibilities for minorities to receive information through mass media in their native language;

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1. Supports the current policies of the European Commission regarding the status of minority languages; 2. Encourages all Member States to sign and ratify the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages; 3. Calls for the improvement of the existent communication technologies for minorities; 4. Urges Member States to provide a broader range of secondary and higher education curriculums for linguistic communities in Member States; 5. Recommends the European Bureau for Lesser-Used Languages to hold regular official conferences and unofficial meetings for linguistic communities; 6. Endorses cooperation between non-governmental organisations that seek to defend the interests of minorities; 7. Insists on creating mass media products in minority languages.

9


Motion the

for a

Committee

on

Resolution

by

Budgets (BUDG)

Determining the EU´s direction for the future: What priorities should the new EU budget fund and how should the budgetary resources be distributed between these priorities? Submitted by: Daniels Gamarra, Bils Gūtfricis, Kārlis Jonāss, Alens Juns, Lauris Lauža, Katrīna Lazdiņa, Katrīna Marija Sitniece, Paula Anna Svarinska, Kristina Tetianec (LT), Emīls Zaščerinskis, Mareks Zēvalds, Anna-Helena Saarso (Chairperson, EE), Arnolds Eizenšmits (Vice-President, LV) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Believing that at 1.12% of Member States’ Gross National Income (GNI), the EU budget is insufficient to cover all its needs, B. Deeply concerned that there is not enough flexibility between different areas of spending within the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), C. Alarmed by the misuse of EU resources, aggravated by inefficient supervision of EU-funded projects, D. Noting with deep concern the significant gap between living standards in Member States, E. Deeply disturbed by the high unemployment rate in many Member States, especially in less developed regions and amongst youth, F. Recognising that higher education often does not provide the professional skills necessary for successful participation in the labour market, G. Noting with regret that higher education is expensive in most of the Member States, H. Realising that increased mobility of full-time students pursuing highly demanded degrees can contribute to solving youth unemployment, I. Having studied that only 30% of the total budget for the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) is spent on the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD), J. Taking note of low efficiency and high costs of production in the agricultural sector of the EU due to the large number of small farmers, K. Keeping in mind that two-thirds of the food that the EU imports comes from developing countries, L. Convinced that the EU’s spending to deal with environmental issues is insufficient;

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1. Urges the establishment of a Flexibility Fund that would channel surplus resources to policy areas in need of extra financing; 2. Requests allocating 10% of surplus funds to the suggested Flexibility Fund and 90% to the respective fund’s budget for the next year; 3. Recommends increasing the funding of the European Anti-Fraud Office; 4. Calls for the EU to increase its spending on the European Regional Development Fund; 5. Further requests prioritising projects that tackle unemployment in rural areas; 6. Approves financially supporting enterprises that provide internships for university students and graduates in fields where demand on the labour market is highest; 7. Encourages the increase of EU spending on educational exchange programmes; 8. Supports the establishment of an EU Student Loan Fund which would provide financial aid to students acquiring degrees in the fields of foremost importance for their country of origin; 9. Further recommends increasing the share of funding allocated for the EAFRD to 40% of the total CAP budget; 10. Calls upon the EU to financially support the merging of small farmers and encourages knowledge sharing with experts in the field; 11. Has resolved to increase the funding allocated to the development of environmentally friendly transport, renewable energies and nature preservation.

11


Motion the

Committee

on

for a

Resolution

by

Environment, Public Health (envi)

and

Food Safety

Decades of urbanisation: with Europeans continuing to move to the cities, what policies are necessary to ensure the protection of public health and a reduction of environmental damage in Europe’s major cities? Submitted by: Kristīne Fainveica, Jānis Igaunis, Karolīna Jankovska, Maija Krastiņa, Ričards Križanovskis, Viktorija Leimane, Marta Mauriņa, Anette Piirsalu (EE), Stanislavs Tatriks, Mazens Zibara; Rucsandra Pintea (Chairperson, RO), Anrijs Šimkus (Chairperson, LV) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Fully alarmed that the high level of air pollution in the EU results in negative health effects, such as: i) 500,000 annual cases of premature death, ii) 30% of the EU population under 18 suffering from asthma and heart conditions, B. Deeply concerned that 5,000 tons of CO2 emissions were recorded by the EU in 2010 and this number has been annually increasing, C. Alarmed by the fact that in some Member States only 20% of the water available in an urban area is potable, due to severe pollution, D. Convinced that insufficient water treatment facilities lead to an increase in the number of bacterial disease infestations, E. Deeply disturbed that each EU citizen annually generates five tons of waste, almost half of which is disposed in landfill sites, F. Keeping in mind the environmental impact of wasted food in Europe’s major urban areas, G. Disappointed by the flawed infrastructure of medical care systems across Europe;

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1. Encourages the EU to start a programme for building rehabilitation across Europe in order to decrease the level of energy consumption; 2. Recommends local and national governments to establish low-emission zones by: a)

supporting the use of public transport,

b)

implementing bicycle sharing systems in extensive urban areas,

c)

lowering the environmental tax for cars which are powered by sustainable energy;

3. Endorses Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) to create Vertical Farms and green roofs both in suburbs and central areas; 4. Further recommends the EU to introduce criteria for factory water filtering systems; 5. Supports investing in new water cleansing methods such as microbial fuel cells and reverse osmosis; 6. Urges national governments to improve waste management systems by: a)

providing free of charge recycling services,

b)

introducing an additional tax on unsustainable and non-recyclable materials;

7. Has resolved for the EU to implement organic waste incineration plants in major European urban areas that will reduce organic waste on landfill sites, as well as produce biogas; 8. Calls upon Member States to improve their health care systems by creating new medical facilities and improving the existing ones.

13


Motion

the

Committee

Resolution by Foreign Affairs (AFET)

for a

on

After putting a hold to the rebel advance and gaining back control over the north, the French intervention in Mali has achieved its initial objective. How can the EU and its Member States contribute to a durable solution of the conflict? Submitted by: Toms Bogdānovs, Arta Briede, Anna Beatrise Brīvlauka, Kristīne Ozoliņa, Fiona Rakus (DE), Vladislavs Saiko, Rūdolfs Oto Selga, Anete Vugule, Viktorija Zakarkeviča, Jānis Zālīte, Sigita Zvejniece, Niklāvs Matusevičs (Chairperson, LV), Bircan Kilci (Vice-President, TR) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Believing that the French intervention in Mali has achieved its initial objective of halting terrorist group attacks on the Malian State, B. Observing that the Malian Army is undergoing military training provided by UN peacekeepers and the EU as it is not currently able to secure and protect Mali, C. Bearing in mind that a rebellion by the Tuareg National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) in 2012 established the unrecognised state of Azawad, which occupied 60% of Mali’s territory, D. Noting with approval that the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) was the first one to send troops to help stabilise the situation and subsequently continued to support the French troops, E. Convinced that the French intervention resulted in a reduction of: i) Al-Qaeda presence in Mali, i) Influence of the radical Islamist group Ansar Dine, F. Taking into account that France was invited to intervene in Mali by the Malian president Dioncounda Traoré rebel groups started approaching the capital, G. Viewing with appreciation that international donors have contributed 3.25 billion Euros to Mali’s development, including the EU’s donation of 1.35 billion Euros, H. Expressing its satisfaction about the Resolution 2085 adopted by the UNSC that allows the establishment of an international force to support Mali in its fight to restore the territorial integrity of Northern Mali, I. Concerned that the recent Presidential elections showed certain obstacles to a fair vote, such as the requirement of photos and full documentation, as well as a lack of accessible decentralised voting centres,

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J. Noting with deep concern that the aforementioned obstacles will lead to the Mali’s population not being democratically represented by its government, K. Fully alarmed that tensions between the Tuaregs and other ethnical groups, such as the Songhai and the Fulani, have been on-going since 1916, L. Expressing its appreciation that 6,000 UN peacekeeping troops have already been deployed to ensure safety as the ECOWAS and the French troops are being withdrawn, M. Keeping in mind that Tuaregs who served in Gaddafi’s Islamic legion have started to return since 2011, taking weapons and becoming part of the already on-going conflict in Mali;

1. Calls for improved border control provided by the EU forces and UN peacekeeping troops; 2. Emphasises the importance of continuing trainings of the Malian army led by the UN until they accumulate the knowledge, resources and people needed to protect their country on their own; 3. Trusts that after the Malian army will be able to provide security by itself, the peacekeeping troops will withdraw and the border control will be handed over to the Malian army; 4. Further invites the EU to host a summit between the leaders of the movements and tribes in Mali with the help from ECOWAS, to reach a ceasefire and a peaceful longterm solution; 5. Encourages cancelling the Malian presidential election results, while ensuring a new democratic vote through measures including election observers and voting centres around the country; 6. Requests improving the electoral system in Mali by: a) Simplifying the needed documents for voters, b) Providing Malian refugees in the EU an opportunity to vote in their respective embassies, c) Ensuring voting centres across Mali; 7. Supports the continuation of the UN peacekeeping mission in Mali ensuring safety of the population and the state of Mali; 8. Recommends using the donated money to establish a programme to rebuild the infrastructure of Mali and secure the area with peacekeeping troops, in order to: a) Encourage the refugees to return,

b) Provide a safe transportation back to Mali.

15


Motion the

Committee

on

for a

Employment

Resolution and

Socıal

by affaırs

(EMPL)

With Roma migrants struggling to intergrate and facing increasing abuse, France is proposing voluntary repatration as the solution. How can the EU act to ensure the social and economic inclusion of its largest ethnic minority? Submitted by: Anete Āzena, Ausma Cīrulniece, Daniels Dakars, Anna Hagarová (CZ), Krista Hūna, Dāvis Mednis, Margarita Nikolajeva, Sintija Nīcgale, Sabīne Ščegoļeva, Niks Bērziņš (Chairperson, LV), Tuna Dökmeci (Chairperson, TR) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Deeply concerned that Roma people face discrimination regarding education and housing, B. Realising that the lack of valid identification papers among Roma results in denial of medical service and police protection, C. Further noting that the Roma are disadvantaged in the labour market due to ethnic discrimination, D. Deeply disturbed that the aforementioned facts aggravate poverty and cause lower living standards, E. Observing that the lack of a common Roma identity, caused by differences in language, culture and religion, hinders the efforts to integrate Roma people in society, F. Noting with deep concern that crimes committed by Roma people worsen their image in Europe, G. Fully aware that the Gypsy Law often prevents the Roma from complying with the written law of the Member States, H. Noting with regret that the previous attempts made by individual Member States to deal with issues concerning the Roma have been perceived as a violation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, I. Expressing appreciation for the recent creation of an EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies by 2020,

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J. Alarmed by the lack of awareness about the Roma community and the problems they face, K. Convinced that it is necessary to increase Roma compliance with written law and reduce the reasons for Roma people to commit crimes;

1. Calls for the establishment of housing, scholarship and exchange programmes in collaboration with the European Training Fund and the European Social Fund;

2. Encourages Member States to facilitate the acquisition of citizenship for the Roma in their respective countries; 3. Calls upon Member States to grant Roma people full access to vocational trainings;

4. Strongly recommends each Member State to create and adapt their own Roma integration strategies in compliance with the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies up to 2020;

5. Emphasises the need for strict European Parliament supervision of the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies up to 2020;

6. Further recommends the European Social Fund to provide funding in order to improve current media campaigns, such as DOSTA!, which aim to increase awareness on the Roma community;

7. Invites Roma NGOs, such as the European Roma Rights Centre, to host informative public events and make documentaries about the Roma.

17


Motion the

Committee

on

for a

Resolution

Civil Liberties, Justice (LIBE I)

by

and

Home Affairs I

Immigration provides challenges and opportunities for both social stability and economic growth. Taking that into account, what changes to immigration policies are necessary within the EU? Submitted by: Kate Jansone, Valērija Kovaļeviča, Linda Līva Mora, Dita Nitiša, Līva Orleāne, Linda Rušeniece, Marta Suharevska, Luīze Marija Zalcmane, Kristaps Zeltiņš, Gundega Ēlerte (Chairperson, LV), San Puri (Chairperson, UK) The European Youth Parliament Latvia, A. Convinced that a high immigration rate and cultural differences in society stimulate xenophobia which causes social instability, B. Aware that a cohort of immigrants in the EU are involving themselves with the black economy, by working illegally and thus avoiding tax payments, causing financial unsustainability in the government budgets, C. Disappointed by the inefficiency of Frontex in assuring security among external borders, causing easy entry of irregular migrants, D. Alarmed by increasing numbers of irregular migrants due to the lack of visa duration control, E. Taking into consideration that the lack of integration of immigrants contributes to the rising unemployment rate in the EU from 9.7% in 2010 to 10.7% in 2012, F. Noting that some Member States have difficulty coping with the increasing numbers of asylum seekers, G. Noting with regret that the EU is working on attracting highly educated immigrants regardless of the fact that there is a high unemployment rate among highly-educated locals, H. Concerned by the unequal distribution of immigrants within Member States because of concentration in particular areas;

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1. Recommends an increased fine and harsher prison sentences for any crime related to xenophobia, committed by both locals and immigrants; 2. Authorises the action of: a) Raising fines for illegally working employees, b) Financial punishment, shutting down the business and increasing prison sentences on employers of irregular immigrants; 3. Encourages Member States struggling with immigration to allocate resources into Frontex in order to increase its authority and impact; 4. Draws attention to the needs of optimising visa regulation within Member States in order to avoid an increase in the amount of immigrants breaching the terms of their visa by: a) Creating a safe, confidential database about current immigrants, b) Introducing a system of reports from immigrants to the authorities; 5. Urges the EU to cooperate with national governments and organise obligatory lectures and courses for immigrants regarding native language, cultural studies, and career possibilities; 6. Further recommends EU investment to accelerate and improve the selection process of asylum seekers, as well as providing primary necessities for the applicants during the process; 7. Calls for current EU institutions, for example the EU Immigration Portal, to collect and update the statistics of the required amount of professionals in a specific area of their work field in each Member State; 8. Encourages Member States to offer benefits to unpopular destinations, such as temporary free accommodation for regular immigrants, as well as limiting entry into popular and overpopulated destinations.

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F:

PPORT O U S H IT W D E IS N ORGA

5. VSK.

5. VSK.


Resolution booklet of the 11th National Conference of EYP Latvia