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Resolution  Booklet  

Batumi  4th     International  Forum     18  -­‐23  July,  2012  Batumi,  Georgia

 


Committee topics   1.  AFET  –  Committee  on  Foreign  Affairs   The  Black  Sea  countries:  how  should  the  young  states  cooperate  and  what  role  should  the  EU   take  in  this  region?     2.  CULT  –  Committee  on  Culture  and  Education   Whilst  the  interest  in  technological  professions  and  subjects  of  study  is  steadily  decreasing,  it   is  evident  that  for  a  sustainable  future  development,  Europe  needs  technically  skilled   personnel.  How  can  the  attractiveness  of  technological  and  scientific  courses  be  increased   without  detracting  valuable  students  from  other  disciplines  or  negatively  influencing  the   freedom  of  choice?     3.  DROI  –  Committee  on  Human  Rights   The  Anti-­‐Counterfeiting  Trade  Agreement  has  been  recently  rejected  by  the  European   Parliament  after  lengthy  consideration  and  vast  protests  across  Europe.  What  alternatives  to   the  current  intellectual  property  rights  model  would  boost  growth  and  innovation?     4.  ITRE  –  Committee  on  Industry,  Research  and  Energy   Whilst  bio-­‐fuels  made  from  crops  are  increasingly  popular  among  environmental-­‐friendly   stakeholders,  their  impact  on  food  prices  and  the  environment  remains  disputable.  What   measures  can  be  taken  to  promote  alternative  sources  of  bio-­‐fuels  in  order  to  minimise  the   negative  influence  of  their  production  on  the  food  market  and  ensure  small  ecological   footprint?     5.  IMCO  –  Committee  on  Internal  Market  and  Consumer  Protection   Corporate  social  responsibility  has  become  an  essential  part  of  any  business  strategy  in   Europe.  Which  measures  should  the  EU  offer  to  make  companies  more  socially  oriented?     6.  AFCO  –  Committee  on  Constitutional  Affairs   In  the  light  of  the  recent  European  Council  summit  in  Brussels,  what  structural  reforms  of  EU   should  the  leaders  have  agreed  on  to  pave  the  way  out  of  the  economic  downturn?  How  could   the  balance  between  the  austerity  and  growth  be  ensured?     7.  ENVI  –  Committee  on  Environment,  Public  Health  and  Food  Safety   Healthcare  of  the  future:  what  innovative  solutions  can  we  offer  to  promote  healthy  lifestyle   and  consequently  decrease  health-­‐related  public  spending?    

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

M OTION F OR T HE R ESOLUTION BY T HE C OMMITTEE ON F OREIGN A FFAIRS The  Black  Sea  countries:  how  should  the  young  states  cooperate  and  what  role  should   the  EU  take  in  this  region?   Submitted  by:   Fakhrintaj   Abdullazadeh   (AZ),   Rusudan   Bragvadze   (GE),   Tamta   Gelashvili   (GE),   Vahe   Khumaryan   (AM),   Maia   Kapanadze   (GE),   David   Lomidze   (GE),   Tamar   Matiashvili   (GE),   Lela   Merabishvili   (GE),   Elene   Mgeladze   (GE),   Ganna   Tokarenko   (UA),   Kateryna   Baskenova   (Chairperson,  UA),  Giorgi  Tabagari  (Vice  president,  GE).  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,    

A. Welcomes  the  Black  Sea  Synergy  plans  concerning  environment,  energy  and  transport,   B.

Expresses  its  appreciation  for  the  successful  cooperation  between  the  Baltic  Sea  countries,  

C.

Affirming  the  Black  Sea  Economic  Cooperation  (BSEC)  renovation  plan  introduced  by  the  Commission   on  the  Black  Sea,  

D. Fully  alarmed  by  the  conflicts  among  the  Black  Sea  countries,  such  as  territorial  disputes,  lack  of   economic  cooperation  and  ineffective  or  non-­‐existent  diplomatic  relations,     E.

Taking  into  account  the  absence  of  free  trade  agreements  among  the  Black  Sea  countries  as  well  as   between  them  and  the  European  Union  (EU),  

F.

Aware  of  the  limited  involvement  of  the  EU  in  Black  Sea  region,  

G.

Bearing  in  mind  that  the  Black  Sea  countries  face  common  environmental  challenges,  

H. Noting  with  regret  the  inefficient  usage  of  natural  resources  in  the  region,   I.

Realising  the  limited  engagement  of  civil  society  in  discussing  common  challenges,  

J.

Emphasising  the  lack  of  mobility  in  the  region;  

1.

Calls  upon  the  Black  Sea  states  to  establish  a  Black  Sea  Assembly  following  the  example  of  Baltic  

 

countries;   2.

Recommends  the  EU  to  encourage  the  governments  of  Black  Sea  states  to  re-­‐establish  diplomatic  ties  by   opening  embassies  and  consulates;  

 


3.

Further  invites  the  EU  to  act  as  a  negotiator  between  the  countries  of  the  Black  Sea  region;    

4.

Draws  attention  to  the  necessity  to  review  the  legality  of  embargoes;  

5.

Invites  the  Black  Sea  countries  to  sign  free  trade  agreements  among  them  and  the  EU;  

6.

Supports  the  promotion  of  intercultural  dialogue  by:   a) initiating  regional  exchange  programmes,     b) holding  regional  workshops,  conferences  and  seminars,   c) organising  cultural  events,  festivals,   d) building  networks  linking  similar  local  NGOs;  

7.

Calls  for  negotiations  led  by  Black  Sea  EU  states  to  be  aimed  at  the  implemention  of  a  common   legislative  framework  concerning  environmental  issues;  

8.

Endorses  the  creation  of  a  scientific  organisation  in  order  to  maximise  the  use  of  natural  resources  and   the  collaboration  with  already  existing  initiatives,  such  as  the  DANUBE  project.    

 

 

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

M OTION F OR T HE R ESOLUTION B Y T HE C OMMITTEE O N C ULTURE A ND E DUCATION Whilst  the  interest  in  technological  professions  and  subjects  of  study  is  steadily   decreasing,  it  is  evident  that  for  a  sustainable  future  development  Europe  needs   technically  skilled  personnel.  How  can  the  attractiveness  of  technological  and  scientific   courses  be  increased  without  detracting  students  from  other  disciplines  or  negatively   influencing  the  freedom  of  choice?    

Submitted   by:       Vazha   Chanchibadze   (GE),   Anna   Daghlaryan   (AM),   Irakli   Grdzelishvili   (GE),   Tamta   Jugashvili   (GE),   Sabina   Kalashova   (AZ),   Anastasia   Kazakova   (RU),   Lukasz   Jacek   Matuszewski   (PL),   Akaki   Shekeladze   (GE),   Maksym   Sijer   (PL),   Nino   Ushikishvili   (GE),   Oleksandra   Gipsh   (Chairperson,   UA)    

The  European  Youth  Parliament,     K. Alarmed  by  the  lack  of  motivation  among  students  to  study  technological  subjects  caused  by:  

L.

i)

insufficient  awareness  about  study  opportunities,  

ii)

low  job  market  perspectives,  

Noting  with  regret  the  replacement  of  human  resources  by  automated  ones  (computers,  robots,  etc.),  

M. Deeply  concerned  by  the  difficulties  to  get  a  proper  education  in  technological  fields  caused  by:  

i)

ineffective  teaching  methods,  

ii)

lack  of  student-­‐centered  approach,  

iii)

lack  of  motivated  and  qualified  teachers,  

N. Taking  into  account  negative  perceptions  in  society  towards  opportunities  in  technological  fields,   O. Deeply  disturbed  by  the  inefficiency  of  labour  unions  in  improving  the  position  of  scientific  and   technology  students  in  society,   P.

Observing  ineffective  European  inter-­‐state  educational  cooperation  caused  by  improper   implementation  of  the  Bologna  and  Lisbon  Strategies  by  European  countries;      

 


1.

Encourages  society  to  draw  more  attention  to  scientific  subjects  by  means  of:   a) the  government  building  up  scientific  centers,   b) organising  public  demonstrations;  

2.

Further  recommends  providing  schools  in  Europe  with  specific  laboratories  and  necessary  equipments   for  teaching  technological  subjects;  

3.

Calls  for  creating  experimental  areas  surrounding  of  technological  universities  in  order  to  provide   students  with  working  places  and  opportunities  to  gain  experience;  

4.

Calls  for  organising  meetings  and  conferences  between  students  and  successful  scientists  in  order  to   raise  the  students’  awareness  in  technical  fields;  

5.

Further  requests  labour  unions  to  fulfill  their  role  more  actively  by  means  of:   a)

increasing  public  awareness  on  opportunities  within  technological  fields,  

b)

offering  alternative  and  well-­‐paid  vacancies  for  students  of  technical  background;  

6.

Recommends  increasing  the  number  of  student  competitions  in  technological  subjects;  

7.

Draws  attention  to  providing  more  internships  for  technological  students  in  order  to  gain  work   experience;  

8.

Encourages  organising  special  seminars  and  conferences  for  teachers  in  order  to  share  their  teaching   methods  of  technological  subjects;  

9.

 

 

Further  invites  European  countries  to  follow  the  Bologna  agenda  in  order  to  cooperate  more  efficiently.  

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

M OTION F OR T HE R ESOLUTION B Y THE COMMITTEE ON HUMAN RIGHTS The  Anti-­‐Counterfeiting  Trade  Agreement  has  been  recently  rejected  by  the  European   Parliament  after  lengthy  consideration  and  vast  protests  across  Europe.  What   alternatives  to  the  current  intellectual  property  rights  model  would  boost  growth  and   innovation?     Submitted  by:  

Tinatin   Baratashvili   (GE),   Ani   Gelashvili   (GE),   Zura   Giorgobiani   (GE),   Ketevan   Gvazava   (GE),   Nana  Kharabadze    (GE),  Veriko  Mkheidze  (GE),  Iuliia  Obikhod  (UA),  Ninia  Pataraia  (GE),  Hovsep   Patvakanyan     (AM),   Hrystina   Pasechko   (UA),   Ádám   Tóth-­‐Kása   (HU),   Piecewicz   Witold   (PL),   Mariam  Tchubabria  (Chairperson,  GE).  

  The  European  Youth  Parliament,     A. Deeply  concerned  by  the  negative  effects  of  counterfeit  products  on  consumers  and  economic   performance,   B.

Fully  alarmed  by  the  fact  that  enforcing  a  ban  on  counterfeit  goods  could  increase  the  price  levels  in  the   affected  industries,  

C.

Further  noting  that  piracy  and  counterfeiting  results  in  tax  losses  thereby  causing  market   underutilisation  for  tax  revenues,  

D. Realising  that  prevention  of  counterfeit  products  from  appearing  on  markets  does  not  necessarily  boost   innovation,   E.

Deeply  disturbed  that  public  is  not  involved  in  the  negotiation  process,  

F.

Emphasising  that  certain  aspects  of  the  recently  proposed  Intellectual  Property  Rights  models   contradict  the  EU  Convention  on  Human  Rights,  

G.

Noting  with  regret  that  customers  face  difficulties  in  differentiating  original  and  falsified  products;  

1.

Calls  for  the  creation  of  monitoring  institutions  in  the  EU  for  overseeing  the  web-­‐pages  that  sell  

   

counterfeit  products;  

 


2.

Proposes  progressive  subsidy  schemes  to  producers  for  stabilising  the  average  price  in  the   pharmaceutical  industry  in  the  short  run  and  gradually  adjusting  it  to  the  lowest  price  in  the  long  run;  

3.

Recommends  monitoring  only  the  online  services  of  counterfeit  sellers,  rather  than  overseeing   individual  users  and  possibly  breaching  their  human  rights;  

4.

Further  requests  involvement  of  general  public  in  the  decision-­‐making  process  through:   a) permanent  television  broadcasting  of  the  negotiation  process,   b) internet  discussions,   c) their  presence  in  the  European  Parliament;  

5.

Further  recommends  the  following  progressive  sanctions  to  be  applied  in  cases  of  counterfeiting:   every  violation  to  result  in  the  full  seizure  of  generated  income  from  the  deed,  and  for,   a) first-­‐time  violation,  a  fine  of  an  additional  25%  of  the  accumulated  income,   b) second-­‐time  violation,  a  fine  of  an  additional  50%  of  the  accumulated  income,   c) third-­‐time  violation  a  fine  of  an  additional  100%  of  the  accumulated  income,   with  a  further  violation  to  result  in  a  10  year  long  imprisonment;  

6.

Approves  conducting  a  public  awareness  campaign  on  how  to  differentiate  the  original  from  falsified   products.  

 

 

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

M OTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY T HE C OMMITTEE ON I NDUSTRY , R ESEARCH AND E NERGY Whilst  bio-­‐fuels  made  from  crops  are  increasingly  popular  among  environmental-­‐ friendly  stakeholders,  their  impact  on  food  prices  and  the  environment  remains   disputable.  What  measures  can  be  taken  to  promote  alternative  sources  of  bio-­‐fuels  in   order  to  minimise  the  negative  influence  of  their  production  on  the  food  market  and   ensure  small  ecological  footprint?    

Submitted  by:   Mariam   Chelidze   (GE),   Huseyn   Damirzade   (AZ),   Nino   Gigani   (GE),   Anna   Kondratiuk   (UA),   Eugene   Kostev   (BY),   Nino   Lekishvili   (GE),   Lili   Macharashvili   (GE),   Elene   Mchedlishvili   (GE),   Ketevan  Mkervalishvili  (GE),  Nino  Pridonishvili  (GE),  Tudor  Profir  (RO),  Orkhan  Salimov  (AZ),   Giorgi  Tsotsoria  (GE),  Dominic  Degen  (Vice  President,  CH),  Tinatin  Janjghava  (Chairperson,  GE).    

The  European  Youth  Parliament,    

A. Realising  the  negative  influence  on  the  environment  of  the  use  of  fossil  fuels,   B.

Deeply  concerned  by  the  scarcity  of  lands  used  to  produce  raw  materials  for  bio-­‐fuel,    

C.

Alarmed  by  rising  food  prices  caused  by  the  use  of  crops  for  the  production  of  bio-­‐fuel,  

D. Deeply  disturbed  by  the  incompatibility  of  resource  costs  of  bio-­‐fuel  with  its  benefits,   E.

Taking  into  account  insufficient  investments  in  technology  for  the  completion  of  the  transition  between   the  first  and  second  generation  bio-­‐fuels,  

F.

Bearing  in  mind  the  bio-­‐fuel  dependency  on  weather  and  natural  disasters,  

G.

Further  noting  the  lack  of  awareness  concerning  bioenergy,  

H. Deeply  regretting  the  lack  of  supervision  and  control  of  stake-­‐holders  and  their  financial  health  within   the  bio-­‐fuel  market;       1.

Calls  for  increasing    the  number  of  areas  for  bioenergy  production  by  means  of:   a) fertilising  semi-­‐deserts,   b) creating  artificial  islands,   c) finding  uninhabited  land;  

 


2.

Calls  for  the  imposition  of  sanctions  for  felonies  in  bio-­‐fuel  production;  

3.

Draws  attention  to  the  need  to  increase  the  share  of  waste  by-­‐products  of  food-­‐based  agriculture  in  bio-­‐ fuel  production;  

4.

Further  recommends  conducting  scientific  research  on  ways  of  increasing  plant  productivity;  

5.

Endorses  promotion  of  the  use  of  alternative  energies  such  as  solar  or  wind  energy  in  the  production  of   bio-­‐fuels;  

6.

Recommends  private  entities,  governmental  and  non-­‐governmental  organisations  to  invest  in  bio-­‐fuel   technology  and  setting  low-­‐tax  policies;  

7.

Encourages  increasing  the  number  of  greenhouses  in  seismologically  inactive  zones;  

8.

Supports  raising  awareness  of  bio-­‐fuels  by  means  of:   a) media  campaigns,   b) public  lectures,     c) workshops,   d) information  booklets,   e) eco-­‐games;  

9.

Further  requests  creating  monitoring  groups,  concentrating  solely  on  controlling  stakeholders  involved   in  the  production  of  bio-­‐fuel.  

 

 

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY THE COMMITTEE ON INTERNAL MARKET AND CONSUMER PROTECTION Corporate  social  responsibility  has  become  an  essential  part  of  any  business  strategy  in   Europe.  Which  measures  should  the  EU  offer  to  make  companies  more  socially   oriented?    

Submitted  by:   Anastasia  Dgebuadze  (GE),  Nino  Gabunia  (GE),  Nana  Gurgenidze  (GE),  Tamar  Mujirishvili  (GE),   Tinatin   Murgulia   (GE),   Orkhan   Naghiyev   (AZ),   Polina   Nekhviadovich   (PL),   Majd   Nofal   (PS),   Inessa   Steklova   (RU),   Revaz   Tchanishvili   (GE),   Vasyl   Tsyktor   (UA),   Tamar   Sutidze   (GE),   Vladimer  Utmelidze  (GE),  Davit  Makashvili  (Chairperson,  GE)  

The  European  Youth  Parliament,     A. Bearing  in  mind  that  public  trust  towards  the  business  sector  dropped  in  Europe  due  to  the  financial   crisis,     B.

Noting  with  regret  that  Small  and  Medium-­‐sized  Enterprises  (SMEs)  lack  financial  and  administrative   resources  to  conduct  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  (CSR)  activities,  

C.

Noting  with  approval  that  CSR  campaigns  are  usually  used  as  a  tool  within  companies’  PR  and  marketing   strategy,  

D. Observing  a  lack  of  reliable  information  regarding  CSR  activities,   E.

Drawing  attention  to  the  fact  that  the  concept  of  CSR  is  hardly  known  among  companies  in  Central  and   Eastern  Europe,    

F.

Realising  that  the  financial  crisis  led  to  a  reduction  in  CSR  activities,  

G.

Realising  that  the  majority  of  CSR  campaigns  are  conducted  by  large  corporations,  while  99%  of   European  businesses  are  SMEs;  

 

 

1.

Recommends  conducting  trainings  and  conferences  regarding  the  concept  of  CSR  aimed  at  managers;  

2.

Encourages  EUROSTAT  to  monitor  the  CSR  activities  more  intensively;  

3.

Reaffirms  the  necessity  of  the  European  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  Award;  


4.

Further  requests  helping  SMEs  to  be  more  involved  in  CSR  activities  by:   a) having  meetings  between  SMEs  representatives  and  CSR  organisations  ,   b) suggesting  to  them  to  cooperate  with  each  other  to  strengthen  their  CSR  campaigns  ;  

5.

 

 

Further  recommends  reducing  taxes  for  those  companies  producing  environmentally  friendly  products.  

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

M OTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY T HE C OMMITTEE ON C ONSTITUTIONAL A FFAIRS In  the  light  of  the  recent  European  Council  summit  in  Brussels,  what  structural  reforms   of  EU  should  the  leaders  have  agreed  on  to  pave  the  way  out  of  the  economic   downturn?  How  could  the  balance  between  the  austerity  and  growth  be  ensured?    

Submitted  by:   Tinatin   Bliadze   (GE),   Tamar   Chkhaidze   (GE),   Mate   Dvalishvili   (GE),   Jakob   Etzel   (AT),   Anita   Garnuszek   (PL),   Victoria   Klimova   (UA),   Gergő   Kocsis   (HU),   Narmin   Mamedova   (AZ),   Nino   Melikidze   (GE),   Irakli   Meskhi   (GE),   Mariam   Mtsituridze   (GE),   Koba   Narimanishvili   (GE),   Ani   Nozadze  (Chairperson,  GE),  Oleg  Shimanskyy  (President,  UA).    

The  European  Youth  Parliament,     A. Alarmed  by  the  imbalance  between  austerity  and  growth  measures  across  the  European  Union  (EU),   B.

Deeply  concerned  by  the  excessive  sovereign  debt  in  certain  Member  States,  including  Portugal,  Ireland,   Italy,  Greece  and  Spain,    

C.

Realising  the  negative  consequences  that  the  EU  might  face,  in  case  of  a  Member  State’s  default,  due  to   strong  economic  and  political  interdependency  within  the  Union,  

D. Noting  with  regret  the  lack  of  trust  among  creditor  and  debtor  Member  States,   E.

Alarmed  by  inadequate  or  non-­‐existent  implementation  of  the  austerity  measures  to  ensure  compliance   with  the  Convergence  Criteria  laid  down  in  the  Maastricht  Treaty  by  Eurozone  Member  States,  

F.

Bearing  in  mind  that  the  length  of  the  decision-­‐making  process  within  the  EU  limits  its  ability  to  allocate   immediate  financial  assistance;        

1.

Authorises  the  European  Central  Bank  (ECB)  to  counsel  Member  States  on  their  national  fiscal  policies   and  give  formal  advice  before  adopting  national  financial  legislation;  

2.

Requests  the  ECB  to  define  a  set  of  benchmarks  indicating  whether  the  state  should  be  provided  with   bailout  funding;  

 


3.

Recommends  the  ECB  to  provide  public  reports,  quarterly,  on  the  financial  conditions  of  the  Member   States;  

4.

Authorises  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union  to  decide  upon  the  extent  of  automatic  sanctions   imposed  on  the  Member  States  who  are  not  fulfilling  austerity  requirements,  

5.

Calls  for  the  scale  of  the  sanctions  to  depend  on  the  severity  of  violation  and  include  financial  penalties   and/or  a  suspension  of  the  right  to  vote  in  the  Council  of  the  European  Union  for  up  to  six  months;  

6.

Urges  the  European  Union  to  collect  20%  of  national  fuel  tax  revenues  and  make  them  available  through   the  European  Investment  Bank  as  additional  funding  for  growth.  

 

 

 


Batumi,  July  2012  

M OTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY T HE C OMMITTEE O N E NVIRONMENT , P UBLIC H EALTH A ND F OOD S AFETY Healthcare  of  the  future:  what  innovative  solutions  can  we  offer  to  promote  healthy   lifestyle  and  consequently  decrease  health-­‐related  public  spending?    

Submitted  by:   Mariam   Chachua   (GE),   Marcin   Chrosciel   (PL),   Elene   Eristavi   (GE),   Nino   Kalmakhelidze   (GE),   Tamari   Khokhobashvili   (GE),   Giorgi   Kolbaia   (GE),   Gergo   Lakatos   (HU),   Mariam   Lataria   (GE),   Giorgi   Metskhvarishvili   (GE),   Anzhela   Movsisyan   (AM),   Denys   Nedin   (UA),   Iryna   Selska   (UA),   Lasha  Vashakidze  (GE),  Tornike  Zurabashvili  (Chairperson,  GE)    

The  European  Youth  Parliament,    

A. Bearing  in  mind  the  gradually  increasing  public  spending  on  the  healthcare  sector,   B.

Taking  into  account  the  low  level  of  transparency  of  health-­‐related  public  spending,  

C.

Recognising  the  lack  of  efficient  disease  prevention  programmes,  

D. Noting  with  regret  the  absence  of  a  systematic  approach  towards  healthcare,   E.

Deeply  disturbed  by  the  lack  of  sports  infrastructure,  

F.

Alarmed  by  the  insufficient  food  control  mechanisms  in  Europe,  

G.

Having  considered  the  regular  consumption  of  unhealthy  food  as  a  cause  of  obesity  and  related  diseases,  

H. Keeping  in  mind  the  low  level  of  public  interest  in,  and  awareness  of,  possible  side-­‐effects  of  food   products,   I.

Emphasising  the  lack  of  information  about  genetically  modified  products,  

J.

Deeply  concerned  by  the  number  of  people  addicted  to  alcohol,  tobacco  and  drugs  due  to:   i)

high  level  of  stress,  

ii)

the  presence  of  legal  drugs  in  Europe,  

K. Noting  with  regret  the  existing  level  of  air  pollution  caused  by  factories  and  means  of  transportation;      

 


1.

Calls  for  support  of  organisations  responsible  for  monitoring  transparency  of  health-­‐related  public   expenditure;  

2.

Recommends  that  European  governments  provide  society  with  existing  sport  facilities  for  free;  

3.

Recommends  that  food  stores  create  separate  sections  for  genetically  modified  food  and  organic   products;  

4.

Calls  upon  the  European  Union  Member  States  to  impose  additional  taxes  for  products  of  low  nutritional   value,  and  to  provide  subsidies  for  healthy  food;  

5.

Affirms  the  creation  of  a  pan-­‐European  web-­‐site  providing  information  about  potential  side  effects  of   food  products;  

6.

Supports  strengthening  the  role  of  environmental  managers,  employed  by  external  food  control   agencies  and  exercise  their  supervisory  duty  in  businesses;  

7.

Further  encourages  celebrities  to  promote  a  healthy  lifestyle;  

8.

Encourages  the  inclusion  of  educational  materials  on  healthy  lifestyle  in  school  curriculums;  

9.

Suggests  introducing  an  obligation  for  employers  to  allow  days-­‐off  for  medical  screening;  

10. Calls  for  the  promotion  of  cycling  through;   a) establishing  free  cycle  rental  spots,   b) creating  special  cycling  trails;   11. Further  recommends  European  governments  to  make  the  use  of  industial  filters  mandatory.    

 


This is a resolution booklet of the 4th Batumi Int. Forum