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Resolution Booklet Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of EYP Finland 8–10 November 2013


Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

European Youth Parliament (EYP) – The EYP, founded in 1987, is one of the largest European platforms for intercultural encounters, political educational work and the exchange of ideas among young people. Its mission is to support the development of young people into politically aware and responsible citizens by involving them in European political thinking and promoting intercultural understanding. Each year, the EYP involves thousands of young people in voluntary roles in 41 European countries. The EYP is a programme of the Schwartzkopf Foundation. European Youth Parliament Finland (EYP Finland) – EYP Finland, founded in 2001, is the National Committee   of   the   EYP   in   Finland.   The   Regional   Sessions   are   part   of   EYP   Finland’s   annual   Your   European Citizenship campaign, funded by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and various other local and national partners.

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

Programme of the General Assembly 08:00 08:15 08:55 09:35 10:05 10:30 11:10 11:50 12:30 13:30 14:10 14:50 15:30 17:00

Opening of the General Assembly Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Foreign Affairs Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Regional Development II Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Security and Defence Coffee Break Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on International Trade Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Culture and Education Lunch Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Constitutional Affairs Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Regional Development I Motion for a Resolution by the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy Closing Ceremony Departures

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

Procedure of the General Assembly General rules The wish to speak is indicated by raising the Committee placard. Each committee may use only one Committee placard. The authority of the Board is absolute. Procedure and time settings 1. Presenting of the Motion for a Resolution 2. Presenting of the Friendly Amendments 3. Reading of the operative clauses 4. Three minutes to defend the Motion for a Resolution 5. Three minutes to attack the Motion for a Resolution 6. One minute to respond to the Attack Speech 7. General debate 8. Three minutes to sum up the debate 9. Voting procedure 10. Announcing the votes

Point of information During points of Information, the committee placard may be raised and delegates can ask the proposing committee to clarify specific words and abbreviations. Note that points of information must ask for a factual answer. All other points must wait until the general debate. Friendly Amendment A last-minute modification to the Motion for a Resolution by the Proposing Committee. Amendments are to be handed in to the Board at least two Resolutions before the Resolution in question, or as soon as possible for the first Resolutions of the General Assembly. Point of Personal Privilege Request for a Delegate to repeat a point that was inaudible. Failure to understand the language being spoken does not make for a Point of Personal Privilege.

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

Direct Response Once per debate, each Committee may use the Direct Response sign. Should a Delegate raise the sign during the open debate, he/she will immediately be recognised by the Board and given the floor as soon as the point being made is concluded. A Direct Response can only be used to refer to and discuss the point made directly beforehand. If two or more Direct Responses are requested at once, the Board will decide which Committee to recognise. In this case, the second Direct Response shall only be held if it can be referred to the first Direct Response, so on and so forth. Point of Order These can be raised by the Chairperson if a Delegate feels the Board has not properly followed parliamentary procedure. Ultimately, the authority of the Board is absolute. Defence Speech One member of the Proposing Committee delivers the Defence Speech from the podium. It is used to explain the rationale of the overall lines of the Resolution and convince the Plenary that the Resolution is worthy of being adopted. This speech can last a maximum of three minutes. Attack Speech An individual Delegate from a Committee other than that proposing the Resolution at hand delivers an Attack Speech from the podium. It reflects an individual opinion and is used to point out the flaws of the approach taken by the Proposing Committee and should propose alternative solutions. This speech can last a maximum of three minutes. Summation Speech One or two members of the Proposing Committee deliver the Summation Speech from the podium; the microphone can only be passed once. It is used to summarise the debate, respond to main, selected criticism and to once more explain why the chosen approach is the most sensible. This speech can last a maximum of three minutes.

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Tampere'2013'–'Regional'Session'of'European'Youth'Parliament'Finland' General'Assembly,'10'November'2013' ' '

! Voting!Results!of!the!General!Assembly! ! Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Foreign!Affairs!! ! With'74'votes'in'favour,'6'votes'against,'three'abstentions'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'passed.' ' Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Regional!Development!II! ! With'29'votes'in'favour,'53'votes'against,'one'abstention'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'did!not! pass.' ! Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Security!and!Defence! ' With'18'votes'in'favour,'64'votes'against,'one'abstention'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'did!not! pass.' ! Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Employment!and!Social!Affairs! ' With'52'votes'in'favour,'30'votes'against,'one'abstention'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'passed.! ' Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!International!Trade! ! With'81'votes'in'favour,'1'vote'against,'one'abstention'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'passed.' ' Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Culture!and!Education! ! With' 47' votes' in' favour,' 28' votes' against,' seven' abstentions' and' no' absent' delegates,' the' motion' passed.! ' Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Constitutional!Affairs! ! With'51'votes'in'favour,'29'votes'against,'two'abstentions'and'one'absent'delegate,'the'motion'passed.' ' Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Regional!Development!I! ! With'32'votes'in'favour,'45'votes'against,'five'abstentions'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'did!not! pass.' ' Motion!for!a!Resolution!by!the!Committee!on!Industry,!Research!and!Energy! ! With'54'votes'in'favour,'26'votes'against,'two'abstentions'and'no'absent'delegates,'the'motion'passed.' ' '

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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With over 100 000 dead, and millions of refugees, the Syrian civil war has become one of the worst humanitarian crises of the decade. As talk of the possibility of military intervention increases, what stance should the EU take in international efforts to cease the violence in Syria? Submitted by:

Emma Andersson (Sammon keskuslukio), Nadia Ariad (European Schooling Helsinki), Samuel Bashmakov (Sammon keskuslukio), Max Grönroos (Svenska Samskolan i Tammerfors), Erik Ingreus (Svenska Samskolan i Tammerfors), Margit Marjokivi (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Juhani Marjomaa (Joensuun lyseon lukio), Jussi Määttä (Tampereen lyseon lukio), Rostislav Pasti (Tammerkosken lukio), Jussi Poikkeus (Kankaanpään yhteislyseo), Emilia Puustinen (Tammerkosken lukio), Oskari Räsänen (Padasjoen lukio), Kian Hunziker (Chairperson, CH), Bilge Özensoy (Chairperson, TR)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Alarmed by the uncertain political outcome of a possible change of power in Syria caused by a variety of parties claiming political legitimacy, B. Noting with concern the current lack of communication and coordination among oppositional entities and between these entities and the Syrian government, C. Deeply concerned by the continuous threat to civilians posed by chemical weapons still in possession of the Syrian government, D. Noting with satisfaction the current work of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons1 (OPCW) which has already resulted in the destruction of most chemical weapons production facilities in Syria, E. Fully aware of the rising number of Syrian refugees fleeing country to avoid the widespread violations of human rights and violence within domestic territory, F. Noting with regret that the Russian Federation and the USA have conflicting positions on the Syrian civil war and influence the concrete actions of the international community by vetoing decisions in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC);

1. Calls upon the EU to prolong the arms embargo and impose additional economic sanctions on the Syrian government to apply further pressure on the Assad regime;

Intergovernmental organisation promoting and verifying the adherence to the Chemical Weapons Convention which prohibits the use of chemical weapons and requires their destruction. 1

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

2. Emphasises the need to implement targeted humanitarian aid programmes to protect civilians and correct the negative effects that the aforementioned economic sanctions might have on the population; 3. Requests the engagement of independent peace ambassadors aiming at providing a platform for negotiations between the Syrian: a) oppositional groups in order to facilitate their unification, b) government and the common representatives of the opposition; 4. Urges the EU to initiate negotiations between China, Russia and the USA in order to reach a compromise regarding the conflict in Syria; 5. Reaffirms the execution of all action needed for the destruction of chemical weapons in Syria by providing full support to the OPCW; 6. Encourages the international community to stop military support to all actors involved in the Syrian civil war.

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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Building the periphery: mechanisms such as the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund play an important role in developing the peripheral areas of Europe, but they are also costly. Keeping in mind that metropolitan areas are the primary motors of growth, how should the EU best support its peripheral areas to suit the needs of their population? Submitted by:

Maisa Borg (Tampereen lyseon lukio), Annika Halme (Tampereen klassillinen lukio), Sanni Heikkinen (Rauman lyseon lukio), Tarmo Hyytiäinen (Joensuun lyseon lukio), Jesse Kareinen (Järvenpään lukio), Kaisa Makkonen (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Alexia Mercouri (European Schooling Helsinki), Milja Miettinen (Tampereen klassillinen lukio), Fred Saxberg (Svenska Samskolan i Tammerfors), Fanni Tossavainen (Sammon keskuslukio), Ira Vainikainen (Jyväskylän lyseon lukio), Tim Backhaus (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Bearing in mind that funding of the Regional Policy of the EU amounts to 35,7% of the total budget of the EU2, B. Recognising that some Member States are not satisfied with the allocation of the Structural Funds3 and the Cohesion Fund4, C. Realising that Poland, Spain and Italy are the three Member States which receive the majority of the allocated funds whereas Germany, France and Italy are the main net contributors, D. Fully aware of the criticism and complexity of bureaucratic administration causing the ineffective distribution of the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund, E. Emphasising the importance of recognising the national differences and increasing self-sufficiency in the peripheral areas; 1. Encourages local   authorities   to   make   the   peripheral   areas’ decision-making and development process more accessible to the citizens influenced by it; 2. Recommends that research conducted in peripheral regions should be focused on finding the opportunities and competitive advantages of each region; EU Cohesion Funding - Key Statistics, INFOREGIO, European Commission, August 2013 The Structural Funds are divided into two different Funds. The Regional Development Fund (ERDF) provides support for the creation of infrastructure and productive job-creating investment, mainly for businesses. The European Social Fund (ESF) contributes to the integration of the unemployed and disadvantaged into the job market mainly by funding training measures. 4 The Cohesion Fund contributes in the field of environment and Trans-European Networks (TEN-T). 2 3

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

3. Calls upon the EU to promote and facilitate private investments in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) located in peripheral areas; 4. Endorses a closer monitoring of the financial instruments of the Cohesion Policy of the EU by both the European Commission and managing authorities of Member States; 5. Urges peripheral areas to maintain their cultural heritage while becoming equally attractive and accessible to metropolitan areas through investments in; a)

transportation networks,

b)

education and research,

c)

telecommunication services (i.e. high speed Internet, mobile networks, etc.)

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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In the aftermath of the NSA spying scandal it has become clear that large-scale electronic surveillance is a global phenomenon. How should the EU and its Member States respond to the threat foreign surveillance poses to information security of European organisations and citizens? Submitted by:

Siiri Innanen (Kallaveden lukio), Juuso Järviniemi (Tampereen lyseon lukio), Arttu Lehtonen (Sammon keskuslukio), Jonna Miettinen (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Samuel Nuotio (Svenska Samskolan i Tammerfors), Artturi Oesch (Lahden yhteiskoulun lukio), Kati Pitkäjärvi (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Saska Sandblom (Padasjoen lukio), Taneli Taipale (Lahden yhteiskoulun lukio), Kristian Taurio (Tammerkosken lukio), Teemu Weckström (Järvenpään lukio), Sara Kalkku (Chairperson, FI), Katerina Zejdlova (Chairperson, CZ)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Aware that intelligence agencies such as the National Security Agency (NSA) as well as individual hackers collect restricted information of EU citizens and officials, B. Observing the reasons for electronic surveillance carried out by intelligence agencies, such as: i) national security maintenance (e.g. terrorism prevention), ii) acquisition of confidential information, iii) preventing industrial espionage, C. Realising the importance of both national security and privacy protection as well as the necessity to strike a balance between the two, D. Noting with deep concern that storing personal data in digital environments allows for an increased risk of leakage of information, E. Disturbed by the lack of critical judgment of individuals to assess the dangers of sharing their personal information online, F. Recognising that the illegal collection of data has had a deteriorating effect on the bilateral relations between the EU and the USA, G. Acknowledging the importance of the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA)5 and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS)6 in the field of protection of information;

ENISA is an agency responsible for improving the network and information security in the EU as well as a body of expertise set up to carry out specific technical tasks and advise the European Commission in strategic policy making. 5

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

1. Urges the establishment of an EU-wide agency aimed at preventing cyber-attacks against the EU citizens and institutions in cooperation with the similar EU and non-EU agencies; 2. Proclaims that the cooperation with non-EU authorities contributes to mutual understanding resulting in the abolition of reciprocal electronic surveillance; 3. Guarantees that the agency would not conduct electronic surveillance on any individual or organisation unless suspicion of felony or criminal activity call for immediate action; 4. Authorises the agency to acquire information concerning personal identification for its centralised data   bank   from   the   databases   of   the   Member   States’   governments   in   order   to   facilitate the functioning of the agency; 5. Calls upon the agency to hire European information security experts following the ENISA guidelines; 6. Strongly recommends Member States’   governments to regularly test their databases through cyber-attack simulations such as Cyber Europe7; 7. Expresses its hope for shutting down the PRISM8 programme; 8. Urges the EU to raise citizens’  awareness  on  ways of securing their personal data through: a) the  “Stay  Secure  Online”  media  campaign, b) European Cyber Security Awareness Week, c) experts in the cyber security field attending school lectures, d) education of the senior citizens in the field internet usage.

EDPS is an independent supervisory authority devoted to protecting personal data and privacy through monitoring the   EU   administration’s   processing   of   personal   data   and   advising   the   EU   institutions   on   policies   and   legislation   concerning privacy issues. 7 Cyber Europe is a pan-European cyber security exercise conducted through a day-long simulated cyber-attack on Europe’s  critical  information  infrastructures.  It  was  conducted  by  ENISAin  2010  and  2012. 8PRISM is a mass electronic surveillance data mining program known to have been operated by the NSA. 6

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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The challenge of dramatically high youth unemployment rates: How should European governments best offer opportunities to those aged 16–24 to ensure that the current generation of European youth does not become irreversibly excluded from the labour market? Submitted by:

Viivi Altonen (Sammon Keskuslukio), Melina Hakala (Ikaalisten Yhteiskoulun lukio), Iida Hakamaa (Svenska Samskolan), Väinö Haapamäki (Joensuun Lyseon lukio), Inka Jalovaara (Tammerkosken lukio), Noora Kalli (Ikaalisten Yhteiskoulun lukio), Neele Koskinen (Sammon Keskuslukio), Niklas Laakkonen (Rauman lukio),Toni Mäkelä (Ikaalisten Yhteiskoulun lukio), Julianna Merikoski (Tampereen Yhteiskoulun lukio), Liisa Piippo (Svenska Samskolan), Nelli Vanninen (EteläTapiolan lukio) Johanna Viilo (Svenska Samskolan), Ada Aadeli (Chairperson, FI), Roksolana Pidlasa (Vice-President, UA)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Noting with regret that the rate of unemployment among the youth equals to more than twice the general unemployment rate within the EU9, B. Deeply disturbed of the highly variant youth unemployment rates among the EU Member States (i.e. Germany – 7.9% and Greece – 57.3%10), C. Noting with deep concern that prolonged unemployment increases the chances of social exclusion and decreases future career prospects, D. Keeping in mind that high unemployment benefits in wealthier Member States may prevent individuals from actively seeking employment, E. Having considered the limitations  on  private  companies’  hiring  agenda  accentuated  by: i)

the increase of the retirement age,

ii) limited resources to invest in developing human capital ; F. Bearing in mind the social consequences of high unemployment rates that could potentially lead to social marginalisation, G. Noting with regret the effects that structural unemployment11 has   had   on   Member   States’   employment markets structure,

Unemployment Rate by Sex and Age Groups - Monthly Average, %, European Commission, Eurostat, October, 2013 Unemployment Rate by Sex and Age Groups - Monthly Average, %, European Commission, Eurostat, October, 2013 11 Structural unemployment occurs when the workers available at the labour market mismatch the  employers’  demand. 9

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

H. Recognising the high competition among post-graduates of certain fields of studies (such as economics legal studies, etc.) and their high expectations of future working conditions and compensation, I.

Noting with approval the Youth Opportunities Initiative12 and the Youth Guarantee scheme13;

1. Trusts in the future development of tailored national Youth Guarantee Implementation Plans; 2. Recommends calculating unemployment benefits in proportion to the duration of the unemployment period; 3. Emphasises the necessity of a frequently updated employment database that will offer citizens information on job opportunities and job market news; 4. Endorses the provision of tax concessions private companies and organisations that hire young employees; 5. Congratulates the further implementations of both the Youth Guarantee scheme and the Youth Opportunities Initiative; 6. Encourages providing internships to the curricula of secondary and tertiary educational institutions; 7. Further  recommends  that  Member  States’  national  governments  provide a support framework to young entrepreneurs with market potential; 8. Calls upon the additional creation of higher education programmes in the fields with stronger employment prospects.

Youth Opportunities Initiative aims to support unemployed young people through the greater use of European Social Fund, promotion of cross-border job seeking, stronger partnerships between political authorities, business and trade unions at EU, national, regional and local levels policy guidance and assistance from the European Commission. 13 Youth Guarantee scheme implies that all young people under 25 – whether registered with employment services or not – get a good-quality, concrete offer within 4 months of them leaving formal education or becoming unemployed. 12

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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Exporting for growth: with small and medium size enterprises building the backbone of the EU economy, how can the EU further promote the internationalization of SMEs in order to help them access international trading markets? Submitted by:

Laura Haavisto (Rauman lukio), Janne Kainulainen (Joensuun Lyseon lukio), Heini Nurminen (Tammerkosken lukio), Inka Ovaska (Tampereen Yhteiskoulun lukio), Lotta Salminen (Luostarivuoren lukio), Otto Siikasmaa (Svenska Samskolan), Noel Snygg (Sammon Keskuslukio), Maiju Tanskanen (Mikkelin lukio), Iida Tarko (Svenska Samskolan), Astrid Yorke (European Schooling Helsinki), Mico Sjöberg (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Aware of the fact that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) amount to 99% of the EU businesses14, B. Noting with regret that only a quarter of all EU SMEs15 have successfully internationalised their respective operations, C. Realising that internationalisation of SMEs increases employment opportunities in the EU, D. Keeping in mind that SMEs’ lack of foreign contacts, financial and human capital resources, as well as cultural differences and language barriers hinders internationalisation, E. Fully aware of the shortfall of information regarding: i)

access to finance,

ii) practical methods of expanding abroad, iii) Small Business Act for Europe16, F. Contemplating a strategy according to which European SMEs could compete in other markets focusing on quality and innovation rather than price competition,

Fact and figures about the EU´s Small and Medium Enterprise (SME), European Commission, 2013 Opportunities for the Internationalisation of SMEs, European Commission, DG Enterprise and Industry, 2011 16 Small Business Act for Europe reflects the Commission's political will to recognise the central role of SMEs in the EU economy and for the first time puts into place a comprehensive SME policy framework for the EU and its Member States. 14 15

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

G. Observing that current corporate tax systems vary between Member States and high export costs negatively impact the efforts of SMEs to internationalise their operations; 1. Supports EU subsidies towards SMEs aiming to internationalise and strengthen their exportoriented operations; 2. Recommends the promotion of networking between SMEs with functional international activities; 3. Further recommends promoting entrepreneurship among young people to invest in the human capital of the EU; 4. Urges the establishment of a single database containing information regarding internationalisation activities of SMEs; 5. Approves establishing closer cooperation between the EU and partner countries in the field of education, such as common language schools, university exchanges, etc.; 6. Calls upon increasing investment in research and development (R&D) so as for European products to outcompete domestic products in emerging markets both in quality and innovation; 7. Considers negotiating multilateral trade agreements with major trade partners of the EU thus allowing SMEs to effectively penetrate foreign consumer markets.

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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E DUCATION

With research confirming that 1 in 5 young people are experiencing a mental health problem at any one time, what steps can European governments take to support positive mental health for young people? Submitted by:

Kajsa-Lotta Hallin (Svenska Samskolan), Kristiina Komu (Tampereen Lyseon lukio), Paavo Kähkönen (Joensuun Lyseon lukio), Emilia Lehtonen (Jyväskylän Lyseon lukio), Nea Lepaus (Svenska Samskolan), Iiris Lepistö (Sammon Keskuslukio), Tessa Länsipuro (Tammerkosken lukio), Toni- Markus Mäkelä (Ikaalisten Yhteiskoulun lukio), Carin Ollinen (Svenska Samskolan), Kamilla Sjöblom (Luostarivuoren lukio), Victoria Tzitzis (Lahden Yhteiskoulun lukio), Rebekka Vuorio (Sammon Keskuslukio), Madlaina Michelotti (Chairperson, CH), Dimitris Zacharias (President, GR)

The European Youth Parliament, B. Deeply concerned by the stigma associated with mental health problems in comparison with physical health problems: i)

further adding pressure on the victims,

ii)

making it harder for them to seek help;

C. Noting with regret the lack of resources invested in mental healthcare and the misallocation thereof, D. Deeply disturbed by the minimal average total expenditure of European countries spent on healthcare totalling to 5.8%17, E. Alarmed by the perception that healthcare systems have of young people, who are frequently like a burden as opposed to being treated as individuals with severe diseases that need to be treated, F. Taking into account that young people are afraid to get help and confide with professionals because of the lack of confidentiality present in certain counselling systems, G. Bearing in mind the emotional instability mental health problems can impose on individuals, which can lead to poor decision-making in the forms of: i)

an increase in drug abuse, crime and violence,

ii)

a decrease in productivity levels,

"Mental Health: Facing the Challenges, Building Solutions." Report from the WHO European Ministerial Conference. Proc. of Mental Health: Facing the Challenges, Building Solutions, Denmark, Copenhagen. World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, n.d. Web. 1 Oct. 2013 17

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

H. Fully aware of the varying degrees of mental health problems, ranging from self-esteem issues to disorders like bipolarity, I.

Deeply disturbed by the lack of accurate information concerning mental health portrayed by the media to the public;

1. Encourages healthcare institutions to employ media campaigns to reduce the stigma associated with them through depicting a realistic representation of a range of mental health problems; 2. Supports European governments in improving mental health education by standardising a health curriculum to be introduced at the age of 13; 3. Requests European governments to introduce guidelines for mental health institutions to ensure equality in treatment, particularly referring to treatment procedures and the ratio of staff members to patients; 4. Emphasises the need for health institutions to centrally collect and share quantitative data relating to mental health problems aimed at both: a) convincing the public of the presence and magnitude of such problems, b) increasing government spending for the treatment thereof; 5. Recommends counselling systems to offer full patient confidentiality to minors, in order to encourage them to use the available support mechanisms; 6. Urges European governments to implement a youth insurance system, which will focus on alleviating stress by ensuring graduates with further education or job opportunities; 7. Supports non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in arranging activities aimed at promoting positive mental health, such as: a) sport activities, b) peer support groups, c) performing arts clubs.

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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The democratic deficit: in the 2009 elections of the European Parliament almost three quarters (71%) of voters aged 18–24 abstained from voting. How best should the EU fix its democratic deficit and restore the enthusiasm of its youth for the European project?

Submitted by:

Henna Jaakkola (Luostarivuoren lukio), Reetta Meriläinen (Kuopion lyseon lukio) Petra Nieminen (Rauman Lyseon lukio), Stella Pirskanen (European Schooling of Helsinki),Sara Reinikainen (Tampereen Yhteiskoulun lukio), Henna Salminen (Kankaanpään Yhteislyseo), Silja Salomaa (Sammon Keskuslukio), Tariq Sediqi (Sammon Keskuslukio), Kimi Uosukainen (Lahden yhteiskoulun lukio), Veronica Viljanen (Svenska Samskolan), Charlotta Lahnalahti (Vice-President, FI), Dennis Patriarcheas (Chairperson, GR)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Deeply disturbed by the difference in the interests of the Member States, EU citizens and the EU institutions, B. Noting with approval the Lisbon Treaty amendments to the legislative procedure that emphasise the equality of the European Parliament (EP) and the Council of the European Union in decision making, C. Noting with regret the superior role of the European Commission in the legislative procedure, D. Observing  the  lack  of  the  citizens’  representation  at  certain  levels  of  the  decision-making process, E. Aware that EU citizens lack the understanding of the EU decision-making process as well as the interaction of actors and institutions in the legislative procedure, F. Noting with deep concern the growing popularity of Euroscepticism caused by: i) ii)

the effects of the financial crisis, increasing unemployment rates,

iii) protracted decision-making and law-making in the EU, iv) the inequitable distribution of resources among the Member States,

G. Expressing its appreciation towards European Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) launching campaigns targeted to the European youth emphasising the promotion of the 2014 EP elections and further civil participation; 19


Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

1. Expresses its hope to ensure the participation of candidates under the age of 29 in upcoming elections by calling upon: a) the support for young Members of the European Parliament (MEP), b) further negotiations on age quota places in the EP; 2. Supports further research in online voting methods to raise voter turnout in the EU elections; 3. Recommends  the  creation  of  a  functioning  model  of  NGOs’  presence at hearing sessions of the EP; 4. Emphasises the importance of political transparency and therefore bringing EU institutions closer to the citizens through open access to official documentation and transparent institutional operations; 5. Reaffirms the need to strengthen the common European identity in order to raise civil participation.

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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ON R EGIONAL D EVELOPMENT I

Reviewing the Catalan, Scottish and Flemish experience: with breakaway regions sending the EU into  legally  and  politically  unmapped  territory,  what  should  be  the  EU’s  stance  towards  secession   movements within its borders and the potential of newly emerging sovereign states within EU territory? Submitted by:

Daria Dorpeko (European Schooling Helsinki), Wilma Heimo (Sammon Keskuslukio), Sini Immonen (Kuopion Lyseon lukio), Marja-Liisa Kitacheva (Luostarivuoren lukio) Elisa Lahtero (Padasjoen lukio), Ville Leppänen (Joensuun Lyseon lukio), Verna Lukka (Lahden Yhteiskoulun lukio), Wille Luosa (Tammerkosken lukio), Timo Rantala (Lahden Yhteiskoulun lukio), Salla Toivanen (Joensuun Lyseon lukio), Tuusa Eriksson (Chairperson, FI), Natalia Vagena (Chairperson, GR)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Alarmed by the underrepresentation of regions with secessionist movements (i.e. Catalonia) in the decision-making process of the country as a result of political, cultural and historical differences, B. Deeply concerned by the lack of a common EU policy regarding countries aspiring for independence, C. Further noting the absence of jurisdiction concerning the re-application for EU membership from regions that wish to separate themselves from the countries they currently belong to, D. Recognising the potential for conflict between supporters of separatist movements and national governments, E. Keeping in mind the possible economic and political struggles newly segregated states may experience, F. Realising the possibility of a domino effect in secessionist movements, G. Noting the probable increase of bureaucracy in the EU as a result of accession of new Member States; 1. Recommends the EU Member States to increase the autonomy of regions with separatist movements; 2. Calls for national expenditure policies to allocate funding to less wealthy regions of a country and secessionist regions to be granted freedom to allocate funding on their own accord;

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

3. Expresses its hope for the Committee of the Regions18 to supervise the use of the aforementioned expenditure policies; 4. Draws attention to the necessity of strict guidelines for the recognition of newly formed states in order to prevent a domino-effect in secessionist movements; 5. Urges every new segregated state to re-apply for EU Membership; 6. Further recommends the EU to install a non-partisan moderator in negotiations between regions with secessionist movements and the states in order to reduce tension.

Committee of the European Parliament consisting of regional and locally elected representatives from the 28 EU Member States 18

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

M OTION THE

C OMMITTEE

FOR A

R ESOLUTION

BY

ON I NDUSTR Y , R ESEARCH AND E NERGY

The post-Fukushima Europe: with the challenge of balancing environmental sustainability, security and the need for cheap energy, what role should nuclear energy play in the EU Member States’  energy  strategies? Submitted by:

Otto Halminen (Svenska Samskolan), William Lindroos (Svenska Samskolan), Joakim Kärkäs (Joensuun Lyseon lukio), Matin Moradi (Sammon Keskuslukio), Adaliina Ollikainen (Sammon Keskuslukio), Vilma Perheentupa (Luostarivuoren lukio), Nikolas Petersen-Dyggve (Svenska Samskolan), Elsi Soininen (Tampereen Yhteiskoulun lukio), Francesco Delorenzi (Chairperson, BE), Riikka Nieminen (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Alarmed by the current situation indicating that the future energy needs of the EU cannot be sustainably fulfilled, B. Noting with regret the lack of a proper method of disposal of the radioactive waste produced during the process of nuclear fission, C. Realising the potential of nuclear fusion as an environmentally friendly way to produce nuclear energy, D. Desiring a more objective approach by the media regarding the use of nuclear energy, E. Stressing out that no Member State should be fully dependent on any single energy source, F. Bearing in mind the EU 20-20-20-target demanding emissions to be reduced by 20%19 until 2020, G. Taking into account that Member States’   governments have been granted freedom in choosing which measures to adopt so as to reach the EU 20-20-20 target;

1. Supports the upcoming devolution in the use of nuclear fission and the future commercialisation of nuclear fusion as a substitute;

The  EU’s  Energy  2020  strategy,  also  known  as  “20-20-20 –target”  aims  at  20%  reduction  in  emissions,  increasing  the   share of the renewable energy to 20% and reducing the energy consumption by 20% 19

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

2. Urges the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG)20 to encourage Member States to utilise nuclear fusion as an effective way to produce energy; 3. Calls for a more balanced division in the use of different energy resources to ensure that no Member State relies mainly on one source of energy; 4. Supports more research in renewable energy sources in order to increase their potential as an efficient way of producing energy in a sustainable manner, steadily outclassing nuclear power; 5. Calls upon the EU and its Member States to eagerly promote a lifestyle requiring less energy consumption in order to reach the 20-20-20 targets; 6. Recommends the promotion of education in the field of nuclear energy with the aim of enhancing research and development.

ENSREG assists the Member States on nuclear safety and develops guidelines for nuclear power exploitation which it communicates to the European Commission 20

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of European Youth Parliament Finland General Assembly, 10 November 2013

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Tampere 2013 – Regional Session of EYP Finland is supported by

Rantatien Öljykeskus

Pohjois-Hämeen Hippos ry

European Youth Parliament Finland has received funding from the Ministry of Education and Culture and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in 2013.

European Youth Parliament Finland – EYP-Finland ry Uudenmaankatu 15 A 5, 00120 Helsinki http://www.eypfinland.org eyp@eypfinland.org


Tampere 2013 - Resolution Booklet