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JOENSUU 2013 19th National Session of European Youth Parliament Finland

Resolution Booklet 19th National Session of European Youth Parliament Finland Joensuu, 11–14 January 2013


! ! ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 08:00 – 08:15 08:15 – 08:50 08:50 – 09:30 09:30 – 10:00 10:00 – 10:35 10:35 – 10:50 10:50 – 11:25 11:25 – 12:00 12:00 – 12:35 12:35 – 13:10 13:10 – 14:00 14:00 – 14:35 14:35 – 15:10 15:10 – 15:45 15:45 – 16:00 16:00 – 16:30

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Opening of the General Assembly Committee on Employment and Social Affairs I – Passed Committee on Employment and Social Affairs II – Did not pass Address by the Prime Minister Committee on Foreign Affairs – Passed Break Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs – Did not pass Committee on Security and Defence – Passed Committee on Industry, Research and Energy – Passed Committee on Regional Development – Passed Lunch Committee on International Trade – Passed Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development – Did not pass Committee on Development – Passed Break Closing Ceremony


! ! PROCEDURE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY General rules The wish to speak is indicated by raising the committee placard. The authority of the board is absolute. Procedure and time settings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Presenting the committee topic Points of information Three minutes to defend the motion for a resolution Three minutes to attack the motion for a resolution One minute to respond to the attack speech 15 minutes of open debate Three minutes to sum up the debate Voting procedure Announcing the votes

Friendly amendment Friendly amendment is a last-minute modification to the motion for a resolution by the proposing committee. They are to be handed in to the board two resolutions before the resolution in question. Point of information Point of information is a request for a brief explanation of a specific word or an abbreviation. Point of personal privilege Point of personal privilege is a request to repeat a point that was inaudible. Point of order Point of order is used when a delegate feels that the board has not properly followed the parliamentary procedure. A chairperson uses the placard after a request from a delegate. Direct response Each committee may use the direct response placard once per debate. Should a committee raise the committee placard and the direct response sign, the board will recognise the committee immediately. The direct response sign is used to answer the point made directly beforehand.

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! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

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MOTION THE

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RESOLUTION

EMPLOYMENT

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SOCIAL AFFAIRS I

After the arguably unsuccessful “Science, it’s a girl thing!” campaign by the European Commission: going beyond mere media campaigns, how should the EU make careers in science more attractive to young people, both female and male, and better ensure a successful and sustainable future for European science? Submitted by:

Susanna Ahonen (Turun normaalikoulun lukio), Katariina Collander (EteläTapiolan lukio), Zamzam Elmi (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Mikko Kauppila (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Katarina Knuuttila (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Alexia Mercouri (European Schooling Helsinki), Meri Mäkelä (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Susanna Paakkinen (Kuopion klassillinen lukio), Saara Rissanen (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Daniela Westerlund (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Ida Wrange (Joensuun lyseon lukio), Mari Ylivaikko (Oulun suomalaisen yhteiskoulun lukio), Erik Youmans (Raision lukio), Randolf Carr (Chairperson, DE)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Alarmed by the fact that the long-term economic success and innovativeness of the European science landscape is threatened by a shortage of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) graduates and potential new students in upcoming years, B. Noting that the EU is concerned that young potential scientists are unmotivated due to a changed work ethic, C. Fully recognises the stereotypes which regard scientific careers as life-consuming and attainable only for an elite group, D. Recalling that a loss of interest in sciences has resulted because youth find them complicated and detached from real life, and their science education too unpractical, E. Noting with concern that science courses lack practical application and that educational methods and material in science subjects are often non-stimulating or outdated, F. Deeply concerned about the lack of promotion of scientific careers, events and competitions, G. Noting with regret the insufficient cooperation between schools and professional science institutions, H. Noting with deep concern the fact that science students studying in Europe often continue their career abroad after finishing their degree, I.

Aware that women are discouraged from pursuing careers in STEM professions by the lack of role models in leading positions and provisions for maternal needs;

1.

Calls for universities to take science course applicants’ extracurricular and non-science related activities particularly into account, to demonstrate an individual’s motivation and perseverance on long-term tasks;

2.

Urges the authorities of European school systems to invest in making science teaching more effective and practical by introducing and utilising methods of Inquiry Based Science Education (ISBE), such as: a)

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individualised experiments designed and conducted by students,


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excursions and field work in real scientific environments,

c)

contemporary multimedia teaching materials;

3.

Calls for compulsory advanced vocational trainings on ISBE methods for school and university teachers;

4.

Strongly requests universities and research institutions to provide primary and secondary schools with experts and role models in their science teaching, through: a)

universities creating paid positions for graduate-level STEM students as part-time science teaching assistants at high schools,

b)

occasional lessons held by scientific professionals as guest instructors, to conduct currently relevant practical experiments and personal life experience as a scientist,

c)

opportunities for primary and secondary school students to visit workplaces at universities and scientific institutions to observe and participate in practical scientific work;

5.

Emphasises the need for the EU and scientific foundations to promote science events, competitions and summer schools to pupils in order to inspire more students to pursue higher education and careers in science;

6.

Supports and calls for incentives by science institutions and universities for recently graduated scientists to stay in Europe, such as financial foundations and long-term projects to enable them to conduct original research;

7.

Urges the EU to encourage women in pursuing science studies through:

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a)

setting a standard for facilitating continued course enrolment during maternity leave in between long periods of study at university,

b)

informing female science students about prospects for both a career as a scientist and having a family by arranging conferences with female scientists who have succeeded in balancing both a professional career and family.


! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

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EMPLOYMENT

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S O C I A L A F F A IR S II

The ageing population: with fragile pension systems, talks of labour shortage and increasing demand for health care services, how should the European governments best prepare for the coming era of an ageing continent, and what role should the EU play in it? Submitted by:

Venla Aaltonen (Kupittaan lukio), Eveliina Hannikainen (Etelä-Tapiolan lukio), Nina Huovinen (Oulun seudun ammattiopisto), Iida Kalliokoski (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Teodora Kesäläinen (Oulun suomalaisen yhteiskoulun lukio), Lars Kieni (CH), Santeri Kilupy (Etelä-Tapiolan lukio), Kristian Käsinger (DE), Lotta Moisala (Lahden yhteiskoulun lukio), Venla Myllyrinne (Salon lukio), Henriikka Tirronen (Mikkelin lukio), Lukas Rosenkranz (Chairperson, DE)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Emphasising the need to ensure a dignified life free of the fear of poverty for all retirees, B. Taking into account the ageing of the European population caused by: i)

an increase in life expectancy at a rate of 2-3 months per year,

ii)

a decreasing fertility rate of 1.6 children per woman,

C. Aware of difficulties concerning the reconciliation of work career and family life for women which prevents them from starting a family in order not to jeopardize their occupational development, D. Believing that the principles of intergenerational justice should be the guidelines for future reforms of pension systems, E. Observing varieties among the Member States' pension systems such as different pensionable ages, F. Alarmed by inflexible regulations on pensionable ages, which do not reflect retirees' individual situations, G. Noting with regret the fact that some Member States have established a gap between the pensionable age of men and women, H. Fully alarmed by the fact that baby boomer generation will soon be retiring, I.

Concerned by the dramatic change in the old-age dependency ratio caused by the shrinking share of the working aged population from 67% to 56% by 2060,

J.

Bearing in mind the possibility of a future labour shortage of 20 million skilled jobs left vacant by 2050,

K. Deeply concerned of the disadvantaged labour market position of the old generation due to potential health care costs for employers and lower flexibility compared with younger workforce, L. Having considered the work experience and knowledge of older employees to be a valuable resource for their respective employers and fellow co-workers, M. Recognising rising expenditures for health care services which are accelerated by the more frequent occurrence of age-related diseases (e.g. dementia and diabetes);

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Recommends the introduction of EU legislation that safeguards the right of daily childcare for all children of fulltime working parents;

2.

Supports the establishment of a basic child benefit systems in all Member States;

3.

Calls for an EU-wide implementation of pensionable corridors to replace fixed pensionable ages which should:

4.

a)

be set up by individual Member States,

b)

have a minimum length of 3 years during which employees can choose their date of retirement,

c)

offer the opportunity for employees to gain additional public mandatory pension funds;

Urges the EU to legislate the right for employees to keep working after passing the maximal pensionable age set by the pension corridor under following conditions: a)

passing a health check confirming the capability of working in the respective occupation,

b)

not gaining additional public mandatory pension funds during this time;

5.

Encourages the EU to enforce an equalisation of pensionable ages of men and women within the Member States;

6.

Suggests further participation of the EU in international research projects in order to evaluate different pension systems;

7.

Requests the EU to introduce a programe that offers scholarships to foreign students from non Member States which would enable them to work and study inside the EU;

8.

Authorises the EU to support private companies in bearing financial losses due to long term health problems of their employees;

9.

Emphasis the need for awareness of the importance of health protection through the promotion of a healthy lifestyle and regular health checks.

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! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

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MOTION THE

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F O R E IG N A F F A IR S

Responsibility to protect: what role should the EU take in dealing with the violent suppression of civil movements in non-Member States, such as in the cases of Libya and Syria? What should the correct balance between diplomatic, military and civil measures be? Submitted by:

Matteo Bernasconi (CH), Anthony Fedorov (European Schooling Helsinki), Emil Ehnström (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Niina Hallberg (Viitasaaren lukio), Solja Harjusalmi (Savonlinnan taidelukio), Irina Hasala (Jyväskylän lyseon lukio), Karoliina Karhu (Savonlinnan lyseon lukio), Isabella Knopman (Ekenäs Gymnasium), Mathieu Lohr (LU), Emilia Ovaska (Savonlinnan taidelukio), Ella Palkoaho (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Ilari Vanamo (Turun lyseon lukio), Oona Kiiskinen (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Desiring to formulate a more unified foreign policy approach for the EU, B. Deeply concerned by the current lack of coherence in foreign policy, C. Fully aware that internal tensions, such as religious and ethnic ones, are often the cause of conflicts in third countries, D. Guided by the United Nations (UN) Principle ‘Responsibility to Protect’1 the EU commits to respect the sovereignty of other states, E. Noting with deep concern the possibility of increased refugee flows to the surrounding areas due to the conflicts in third countries, F.

Deeply regretting the humanitarian aid not reaching certain countries in need,

G. Realising the lack of agreement on measures to be taken by the international community, H. Noting with approval the existing democratic structures in post-conflict countries, I.

Expecting to enable a quicker and more effective response to major crises,

J.

Bearing in mind that the EU considers military action as a last option;

1.

Urges for the improvement of the Common Foreign and Security Policy2 and the European External Action Service3;

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to Protect (RtoP) is an international security and human rights norm to address the international community’s failures to prevent crimes against humanity. 2 Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) aims to strengthen the EU’s ability to take action through Conflict Prevention and Crisis Management. 3 European External Action Service (EEAS) is the EU’s diplomatic corps that supports the EU foreign affairs chief in conducting the common foreign and security policy.!

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Endorses to enforce the economic and diplomatic sanctions that target the regime’s ability to suppress civilian movements;

3.

Urges to offer assistance in:

4.

5.

6.

a)

the establishment of democratic institutions,

b)

the enforcement of fundamental human rights;

Expresses its hope to provide aid to countries affected by the refugee flows by: a)

working in cooperation with non-governmental organisations and governments,

b)

continuing to support the Temporary Protection Directive;

Accepts that the outcome of a major humanitarian crisis can be affected by compromises such as: a)

lifting certain sanctions in order to allow humanitarian aid to reach the country,

b)

pressuring the international community to indirectly influence the regime in question;

Further encourages diplomatic negotiations and the sharing of military capacities and infrastructures when having to resort into military action a)

amongst the EU Member States,

b)

with regional partners, such as the Arab League;

7.

Further requests supporting the existing democratic structures by fostering diplomatic and economic relations for example through Association Agreement and the European Neighbourhood Policy;

8.

Calls for closer communication between the EU institutions in order to prevent issues such as contradictory statements.

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! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

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MOTION THE

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RESOLUTION

E C O N O M IC

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M O N E T A R Y A F F A IR S

Rebuilding the Eurozone: with the sovereign debt crisis continuing to threaten the existence of common currency, what should the future model of the monetary union be? Does the answer lie in further centralization of the financial system or stronger national sovereignty over financial matters? Submitted by:

Minttu Bergendahl (Puolalanmäen lukio), Henriikka Hakala (Puolalanmäen lukio), Ville Karppi (Uudenkaupungin lukio), Henni Roini (Sammon keskuslukio), Viktor Magnus Salenius (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Jade Jiménez Salgado (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Alexander Seppälä (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Joona Silvola (Uudenkaupungin lukio), Margus Toots (EE), Alma Vänttinen (Sammon keskuslukio), Yannick Weber (CH), Willem Koelewijn (Chairperson, NL)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Noting with deep concern the persistence of the European sovereign-debt crisis, B. Deeply regretting that the convergence criteria, as agreed upon in the Treaty on European Union1, have been violated, C. Concerned by the irresponsible spending behaviour of several Member States, D. Recognising the different economic landscapes within the Eurozone, E. Realising that public opinion on the degree of centralisation of the monetary union strongly varies across the Eurozone, F. Taking into account the increased volatility of European markets, having resulted in capital flight, G. Fully aware of the negative effects of austerity measures on economic growth, H. Emphasising that Member States have failed to reduce their deficits in times of economic growth, I.

Alarmed by the lack of common banking supervision and regulation in the Eurozone,

J.

Taking into consideration that the European Central Bank’s (ECB) mandate has been insufficient to effectively tackle the European sovereign-debt crisis;

1.

Recommends to the European Commission (EC) to more leniently interpret the deficit rules as established in the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance in the Economic and Monetary Union2;

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The Treaty on European Union, also known as the Treaty of Maastricht, established both the EU and the European Monetary Union (EMU). According to the convergence criteria, EMU-members are not allowed to have a deficit of over 3.0% of the gross domestic product (GDP), or a debt of over 60% of GDP. 2 The Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance in the Economic and Monetary Union, also known as the Fiscal Compact, aims to enforce the convergence criteria. The rules include that general budget deficit should be less than 3.0% of GDP. Member States that breach this obligation can be fined up to 0.1% of GDP.

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Calls upon the EC to allocate more funds to activities that generates economic growth, such as innovation and research;

3.

Encourages Member States to abstain from adopting austerity policies until stable economic growth is achieved;

4.

Supports the creation of a banking union, which includes: a)

a Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM),3

b)

the European Stability Mechanism (ESM)4 as a lender of last resort,

c)

a Eurozone-wide deposit insurance scheme,

d)

a common Eurozone-wide resolution fund with a common resolution authority, the European Resolution Authority (ERA);

5.

Recommends that all non-Eurozone Member States should have the opportunity to become part of the SSM;

6.

Further recommends that the ECB be allowed to apply quantitative easing (QE)5;

7.

Declares that, after the European sovereign-debt crisis, bailouts of individual Eurozone countries shall no longer be executed;

8.

Further declares that, in the future, controlled exits from the Eurozone should be made possible.

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The Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM) is a mechanism in which all Eurozone banks are under the supervision of the ECB, in close cooperation with national central banks. 4 The European Stability Mechanism (ESM) is an organization funded by all Eurozone countries, that provides Eurozone countries in financial difficulties with financial support. 5 Quantitative easing is a monetary policy in which a central banks buys financial assets of private institutions to stimulate the financial markets, when more conventional methods have previously failed.

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! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

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MOTION THE

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RESOLUTION

SECURITY

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DEFENCE

Hacked passwords, identity theft and the power of the Anonymous: with hackers outsmarting engineers, institutions and citizens are subject to attack. What measures should the EU take to better ensure cyber-security and the protection of personal data? Submitted by:

Axel Idström (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Veronika Jalas (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Johannes Kivelä (Mäntän lukio), Anna Lagerroos (Puolalanmäen lukio), Lauri Lahtinen (Turun lyseon lukio), Christopher Nölte (DE), Martin Ollinen (Svenska samskolan i Tammerfors), Ian Perring (Turun lyseon lukio), Hanna Peurala (Sammon keskuslukio), Milla Rytkönen (Kuopion lyseon lukio) Tanja Turunen (Savonlinnan lyseon lukio), Sara Välimäki (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Keijin Zhou (Luostarivuoren lukio), Petya Koleva (Vice-President, BG)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Fully aware that cyber crime is a global issue which is not restricted to national borders, B. Recognising that the regulation of cyber security is currently a national prerogative of the different Member States, C. Emphasising the efforts of the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA)1 to: i)

Collect and analyse data on security incidents in Europe and emerging risks,

ii)

Promote risk assessment and risk management methods to enhance capability to deal with information security threats,

iii)

Raise awareness between different actors in the information security field, notably by developing publicprivate partnerships with industry in this field,

D. Noting with approval the establishment of the Computer Emergency Response Team of the EU (CERT-EU)2, E. Observing that not all hackers pursue their work with malicious intent, F. Noting with satisfaction the progress of ENISA’s Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIIP) and Resilience Unit in organising complex, multinational and multi stakeholder cyber exercises (e.g. Cyber Europe 2010, Cyber Atlantic 2011, Cyber Europe 2012), G. Taking into consideration that a large percentage of EU citizens lack awareness regarding cyber crime and security, H. Observing that the responsibility for cyber security lies with Service Providers (SPs)3,

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ENISA is an Agency of the EU that works with EU institutions and Member States, seeking to develop a culture of Network and Information Security for the benefit of citizens, consumers, business and public sector organisations in the EU by sharing best practices and giving recommendations. 2 CERTs are closely connected teams of information security experts that react to cyber threats. They also provide a comprehensive portfolio of other security services for their customers, such as alerts and warning, advisories and security training. CERT-EU was established with the mission to safeguard institutions within the EU.!!

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Deeply concerned by the fact that Service Providers are not legally bound to a common European security standard;

1.

Encourages the stregthening of pan-European, as well as international cooperation regarding information security;

2.

Strongly recommends the adoption of a common EU legal framework regarding cyber security;

3.

Endorses the strengthening of ENISA by increasing the scale of its operations and expanding its activities;

4.

Welcomes the co-operation between CERT-EU and hackers committed to using their skills to combat cyber crime;

5.

Calls upon the CIIP to organise and oversee annual EU-wide cyber security exercises;

6.

Further invites all Member States to regularly participate in multinational cyber tests in order to ensure a high level of information security within the EU;

7.

Supports the introduction of cyber security modules in the national IT curriculum of all Member States in order to provide specific education in cyber security;

8.

Calls for the establishment of a legally binding framework that will ensure a common EU-wide standard regarding cyber security of SPs.

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An SP is a company that provides organisations with storage, processing, network and Internet services.


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INDUSTRY, RESEARCH

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ENERGY

The post-Fukushima Europe: with the challenge of balancing environmental sustainability, security and the need for cheap energy, what role should nuclear energy play in EU Member States’ energy strategies? Submitted by:

Valerie Berger (Kuopion klassillinen lukio), Salla Haaparanta (Mikkelin lukio), Jussi Hakosalo (Puolalanmäen lukio), Alvar Huhtanen (Etelä-Tapiolan lukio), Alarik Jägerhorn (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Leo Larjanko (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Sara Laurikainen (Kuopion yhteiskoulun musiikkilukio), Eero Liikanen (Mikkelin lukio), Hans Näsman (Turun normaalikoulun lukio), Katariina Suorsa (Oulun suomalaisen yhteiskoulun lukio), Silja Tuovinen (Oulun suomalaisen yhteiskoulun lukio), Sofia Westerlund (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Guided by the need to replace fossil fuels with alternative energy sources in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and ensure secure, sustainable and cheap energy in Europe, B. Realising the fact that Europe lacks the resources to base its energy production solely on renewable energy, C. Believing that nuclear energy is currently the only feasible and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, D. Aware of the fact that renewable energy still lacks the cost-efficiency of fossil fuels and nuclear energy, E. Keeping in mind the lack of means to store renewable energy for later usage, F.

Deeply regretting the slow progress in nuclear fusion energy research,

G. Alarmed by the fact that nuclear waste will be hazardous for a long period of time and has to be safely stored, H. Acknowledging Europe as a leader in nuclear safety, yet realising the need for improvements, I.

Recognising the need for tighter market cooperation between the EU Member States in order to remain competitive in the global energy market as well as control the prices within the EU;

1.

Requests using nuclear fission as bridge technology to move from fossil fuels to more sustainable energy sources such as renewable- and fusion energy;

2.

Supports the EU’s already existing 2020 goals1 and Energy Roadmap 20502;

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1 The EU has committed to reducing 20% of its energy consumption, increasing the share of renewable energy in its energy mix by 20%, and increasing its energy efficiency by 20%.! 2 The Energy Roadmap’s key goals are to increase energy savings, increase the share of renewable energy sources, build infrastructure necessary for energy transmission, integrate the European energy market and invest in low-carbon technology. !

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Calls for the continuing allocation of funds to research and development of the efficiency and the storage of renewable energy and fusion energy through global cooperation projects such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)3 in order to secure sustainable and efficient energy sources in the future;

4.

Emphasises the need to deposit the radioactive nuclear waste to guarded, well-managed and monitored underground repositories;

5.

Calls upon the EU to fund research in order to develop the possibility to re-use nuclear waste in breeder reactors;

6.

Urges Member States to conduct stress tests on nuclear power plants, arrange staff training for emergency situations, and increase the endurance of the emergency mechanisms;

7.

Approves the integration of the European energy market as planned in the EU’s Energy Roadmap 2050 in order to achieve cheaper and more accessible energy for all Member States.

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"!ITER is an international nuclear fusion research and engineering project aiming to make the transition from experimental studies on nuclear fusion energy to full-scale electricity production possible.

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R E G IO N A L D E V E L O P M E N T

Building the periphery: mechanisms such as the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund have played an important role in developing the peripheral areas of Europe, but they are also costly. Keeping in mind that metropolitan areas are the primary motors of growth, how should the EU best support its peripheral areas to suit the needs of their population? Submitted by:

Roosa Eskola (Turun normaalikoulun lukio), Väinö Haapamäki (Joensuun lyseon lukio), Jyri Hoffrén (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Rita Häkkinen (Mikkelin lukio), Kielo Isomäki (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Karoliina Knuutinen (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Aino Laine (Turun klassikon lukio), Alexandrine Lindstedt (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Alex Nevrov (European Schooling Helsinki), Nelly Töyrylä (Lahden yhteiskoulun lukio), Lars Melakoski (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Recognising the fact that the allocation of Structural Funds1 does not always answer the needs of the population, B. Aware of the complexity of funding mechanisms used and the auditing and evaluation of them, C. Alarmed by the insufficient research on the regions which need the Structural Funds causing ineffective allocation of them, D. Acknowledging the lack of job opportunities and highly-educated employees in the peripheral areas, E. Realising that the aging population creates a need for big facilities such as hospitals and nursing homes, F. Deeply concerned that peripheral areas are not offering appealing modern-day conveniences, G. Fully alarmed by the lack of infrastructure within and between peripheral regions; 1.

Encouraging easily approachable interaction between the local population and decision makers through methods such as public conversing events;

2.

Recommends simplifying the funding mechanism by:

3.

a)

directing the money straight to the target area,

b)

sanctioning the misuse of funding by declining future Structural Fund applications for a certain period,

c)

setting a project-specific supervisor to follow-up the project;

Endorses the creation of non-governmental committees, consisting of both experts and laymen, making the research on regions in need of Structural Funds more effective;

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1 Structural funds are funds intended to facilitate structural adjustment of specific sectors, regions, or combinations of both, in the European Union. They include the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the European Social Fund (ESF), the Guidance Section of European Agricultural Guidance and Guarantee Fund (EAGGF) and the Financial Instrument for Fisheries Guidance (FIFG).!

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Calls for co-operation between the EU and local governments to provide economic privileges to private companies and social service facilities located in the periphery;

5.

Expresses its hope for the new hospitals and nursing homes to be built in peripheral regions;

6.

Supports offering both social- and cultural services in the periphery, providing living standards equal to metropolitan areas;

7.

Further requests improving transportation between and within the periphery, rather than building even more infrastructure between the periphery and metropolitan areas.

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INTERNATIONAL TRADE

The rise of the East: with China expected to surpass the United States as the world’s foremost economic power even sooner than expected, where should the priorities of the EU lie in building its economic relations on the global arena? Submitted by:

Malviina Heinä (Salon lukio), Elias Julkunen (Kuninkaantien lukio), Sara Kalkku (FI), Niko Lammi (Uudenkaupungin lukio), Aksel Rytsölä (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Xiaowen Sun (Jyväskylän lyseon lukio), Aino Tamminen (Salon lukio), Elina Tuomikoski (Tapiolan lukio), Johanna Viitanen (FI), Reetta Välimäki (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Peppi Väänänen (Etelä-Tapiolan lukio), Astrid Yorke (European Schooling Helsinki), K!rlis Caune (Vice-President, LV)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Noting with deep concern that the EU’s competitiveness does not reach its full potential, B. Recognising that EU’s largest trading partners are the United States of America (US) and China therefore they are dependent on each other, C. Alarmed by the existing trade barriers between the EU and the US such as custom fees, D. Aware of China’s drastic economic growth in last decades due to which its economy will be the biggest in the world and it has become the largest exporter in the global economy, E. Welcoming the fact that China joined the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in 2001, therefore easing trade and improving trade relations, F. Recognising Africa as increasingly attractive to foreign investments, G. Convinced that the EU wants to see China tackling such major issues as: i)

lack of general human rights e.g. freedom of speech,

ii)

high pollution levels,

iii)

widespread corruption,

iv)

lack of democratic elements in the decision making process,

H. Bearing in mind that we cannot affect China’s internal affairs by the measure of economic sanctions; 1.

2.

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Emphasises the EU to face competitiveness by investing in: a)

education,

b)

research,

c)

technological infrastructure;

Demands an increase in trade with other countries than our main trading partners, to lessen our dependency;


! ! 3.

Supports the implementation of the Trans Atlantic Free Trade Area in order to improve and strengthen already existing economic relations;

4.

Affirming that Chinese investors are welcomed in Europe by providing a fair, open and transparent market;

5.

Congratulates China on implementation rules of the WTO and encourages further development in striving for becoming a reliable player within the global market;

6.

Recommends lowering import and export tariffs with the African countries that are members of the WTO;

7.

Endorses the positive increase in Chinese welfare standards caused by economic growth;

8.

Encourages bringing up severe internal issues expressing both appreciation and hope for further development, when negotiating with China.

!

!


! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

!

MOTION THE

COMMITTEE

ON

FOR A

RESOLUTION

AGRICULTURE

AND

BY

RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Feeding the continent: with the Common Agricultural Policy representing a half of the EU’s budget, should the EU continue subsidising agriculture in its Member States or rely on other measures or areas of the globe in securing its food supply? Submitted by:

Tatu Han (Puolalanmäen lukio), Pauliina Jokela (Kauniaisten lukio), Tuulia Karvinen (Kauniaisten lukio), Henna Korvenoja (Tapiolan lukio), Patrik Kumpulainen (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Aurora Lehtinen (Kauniaisten lukio), Wilhelm Sanmark (Gymnasiet Lärkan), Tom-Henrik Sirviö (Kallaveden lukio), Susanna Tenhonen (Savonlinnan taidelukio), Janne Töykkälä (Luostarivuoren lukio), Marika Ventovuori (Turun lyseon lukio), Marja Pentikäinen (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Deeply concerned about the EU becoming more dependent on import thus becoming increasingly vulnerable to external threats, B. Believing that farms need more help in reaching their full potential regarding productivity, C. Alarmed by the fact that a significant amount of farmers in Member States are getting closer to the retirement age in the near future, D. Keeping in mind that also Non-member States subsidise agriculture, E. Realising that it is not an ecologically sustainable solution to import food to the EU on a continuously growing scale, F.

Desires the EU to obtain more information about genetic engineering,

G. Having studied that some Non-member States have unsuccessfully reduced their farm subsidies, H. Bearing in mind that worldwide food production should be increased by 70% in less than forty years according to the United Nations due to growing population; 1.

Emphasises the need of sufficient food production in Member States to guarantee food supply in case of natural disasters or wars in other continents;

2.

Furthermore recommends the EU to strive for greater self-sufficiency in food production in order to become more environmentally friendly;

3.

Trusts that without adequate self-sufficiency in food production the EU would have little influence on food prices in the global market;

4.

Calls upon additional funding for research on genetic engineering to achieve:

!

!

a)

enhanced crops with new plant varieties designed for harsh environment, quick, denser growth and reproduction,

b)

protection for the plants as well as the environment surrounding them;


! ! 5.

Proposes the introduction of progressive agricultural subsidies in the EU based on income;

6.

Requests the EU to support commencing farmers through scholarships and low interest loans.

! !

!

!


! ! Joensuu, 14 January 2013

!

MOTION THE

FOR A

C O M M IT T E E

RESOLUTION ON

BY

DEVELOPMENT

Dead aid? Combined, the European Commission and the EU Member States constitute the single largest donor of development aid, but the effectiveness of development aid is frequently questioned. How should the EU make sure the European development funds are best utilised to secure a better economic and political future for the developing world? Submitted by:

Juhani Ahokas (Etelä-Tapiolan lukio), Venla Hannuksela (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Sini Immonen, (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Katriina Kivinen (Jyväskylän lyseon lukio), Linda Lammensalo (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Niko Nieminen (Ylöjärven lukio), Kaisa Peiponen (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Juuli Salonen (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Pieta Salonen (Tampereen yhteiskoulun lukio), Riku Suvitie (Salon lukio), Tuuli Toivonen (Lahden yhteiskoulun lukio), Anna Turunen (Kuopion lyseon lukio), Asta Valjakka (Salon lukio), Hammu Varjonen (Chairperson, FI)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Welcoming the ambitious goals of the EU’s Agenda for Change,1 B. Approving that the Agenda for Change is in line with the United Nations’ (UN) Millennium Development Goals,2 C. Observing the agenda’s lack of practical guidelines for increasing the efficiency of development aid, D. Realising the lack of harmonisation of the development policies of the EU and its Member States, resulting in overlapping aid such as high administration costs and repetitive aid-projects, E. Keeping in mind that external aid can have a passivising effect on developing countries’ governments and societies, F. Believing the developing countries’ long term economic development is not supported enough, G. Fully aware that due to corruption, allowed by i.e. lack of budgetary transparency, an alarmingly large amount of aid is wasted, H. Deeply concerned that Official Development Assistance3 (ODA) does not reach the poorest citizens of developing countries, as they are the group of people who suffer the most from corruption, I.

Alarmed by the fact that approximately one half of ODA consists of so called phantom aid, which includes such aspects as high administration costs and tied aid;

1.

Recommends the EU to offer budget support to less developed countries taking responsibility of development projects, thus strengthening their own government systems;

2.

Further recommends the need for this support to be directed primarily to projects that enhance good governance in the long term, i.e. public education projects;

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "!EU’s

development policy agenda issued in 2011, which emphasizes the need to further centralize development aid. The UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals set in 2000 aim to guarantee basic human rights to all people. 3 ODA is development aid issued by national governments, which aims at economic development. 2

!

!


! ! 3.

Authorises the establishment of a committee consisting of representatives from the Member States and the European Commission to harmonise the allocation of European ODA;

4.

Calls for the EU to increase the transparency of development projects by: a)

supporting anti-corruption agencies such as Non-Governmental Organisations,

b)

conditioning budget support on the accessibility of public expenditure tracking results;

5.

Calls for the EU to support local entrepreneurship by supporting non-profit development funds giving loans to underprivileged people in developing countries, such as Women’s Bank;

6.

Encourages the EU to support fair trade in order to ensure that producers in developing countries get a fair profit from their products on the global market.

!

!


Joensuu 2013 – the 19th National Session of European Youth Parliament Finland is supported by

European Youth Parliament Finland has received funding from the Ministry of Education and Culture and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in 2012.

European Youth Parliament Finland – EYP-Finland ry Hämeenpuisto 17–19 A 10, 33210 Tampere http://www.eypfinland.org eyp@eypfinland.org

Joensuu 2013 – Resolution Booklet  

Resolution Booklet of Joensuu 2013, the 19th National Session of EYP Finland.

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