Exposed Magazine August 2022

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AUG 2022

PROUDLY SUPPORTING

A NEW SNACK FOR US TO RELISH

CRUNCH TIME

TRAMLINES 2022 // DOCFEST // DANCE IN THE GARDENS // BONGO’S BINGO XL // NEW OPENINGS // SUMMER EVENTS


TA PAS

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CUBAN

Cubana Bottomless Brunch Every FRIDAY, Saturday & Sunday, & morning & afternoon TA PAS

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CUBAN

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At Cubana, it’s so much more than just the fabulous drinks on offer!

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BOTTOMLESS

We wanted to raise the bar with our unique BB offering and provide a package which includes a substantial and wide selection of top quality food. Our talented chefs have put together a delicious combination of Spanish and Latin brunch dishes for you all to enjoy alongside the usual on tap supply of Prosecco, Sangria, premium cocktails and more.

BRUNCH @

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CUBAN

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Choose two dishes from our mouth watering brunch menu AND We’ll keep the drinks flowing… Sitting times: starting at 11.30am through until 2.15pm Packages and pricing: STARTING FROM £28.50 - £46.50 per person

Bookings & INFO SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO OR FOR BOOKINGS, PLEASE COMPLETE THE ONLINE ENQUIRY FORM AT: www.cubanatapasbar.co.uk/request.php YOU CAN ALSO CALL ON 01142 760475 OR EMAIL US info@cubanatapasbar.co.uk

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SOCIAL DANCE

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AFTER EVERY CLASS!

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YOUR CHANCE TO PRACTICE!

Give our DANCE CLASSES A Go! Cubana’s extremely popular, various dance classes are in full swing – why not give one or more of them a go! There is a ‘social’ dance session after each of the classes where you can practice the T A Pyou A S R waiting E S T A U R A for? N T &Full C U Bdetails A N B A R on the website. moves you’ve just mastered – what are

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SALSA & BACHATA

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SATURDAY AFTERNOONS R E STAU R A N T

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CUBAN

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Satu

ns afternoo

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EVERY Sunday

It’s all about the hot Latin moves @ Cubana

CUBAN

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CUBAN

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CUBAN

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FANCY LEARNING TO TANGO?

EVERY MONDAY from 8pm to midnight DISCOVER TANGO DANCE WITH A PLAYFUL APPROACH, ENJOYING THE DANCE, THE MUSIC AND THE CULTURE! EVERYONE IS WELCOME IN OUR INCLUSIVE, FUN AND FRIENDLY LESSONS.

3:30-5:00pm

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SUNDAY EVENINGS

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(CUBANA DOWNSTAIRS BAR)

Salsa classes every Saturday afternoon

SALSA FUSION

R E STAU R A N T

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Tango

A SALS rday

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SUNDAY AFTERNOONS TANGO - SUNDAY AFTERNOONS

SALSA CLASSES TA PAS

TANGO CLASSES

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One lesson for all levels

KIZOMBALuCLASSES a cas Gastiaren We will explore the basics and the technique focusing on the connection and improvisation and at the same time will dive into new and experimental movements of the new and modern tango style.

with

(Bueno&s Aires) £8 PER CLASS EVENINGS MONDAY man & Melanie Jar

SOCIAL DANCE From PASSIONATE, ROMANTIC, INSPIRING, 10pm NO PARTNER EVERY MONDAY from toELEGANT midnight EXCITING,8pm ADDICTIVE, TA PAS

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5pm. SOCIAL DANCE

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Kizomba

REQUIRED

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Inquiries please call

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01142 760475

Slow, smooth, sensual...

SOCIAL DANCE From 10pm COME AND LEARN KIZOMBA WITH CUBANA’S RESIDENT DANCE TEACHER

Kizomba AND DJ, ANTONIO ‘SABROSO’.

PRICES: £6 FOR 1 OR £10 FOR 2 CLASSES ON THE NIGHT.

NUS - £5 FOR 1 LESSON AND £8 FOR 2 CLASSES ON THE NIGHT Beginner > 8pm – 9pm

With Iván Garcia • Sundays FROM 7PM

Fun and inclusive Salsa Fusion dance classes for all levels

BACHATA CLASSES SALSA FUSION blends together the steps and rhythms of salsa styles from as far afield as Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico and New York.

> BEGINNERS 7pm–8pm

SALSA FUSION incorporates precision, speed, and beauty of dance mixing Salsa styles from across the Americas with Hip hop, Afro Cuban Jazz, Timba, Boogaloo and more, breaking down the movements into individual steps.

> IMPROVERS 8.15–9.15pm

TUESDAY EVENINGS

> LATIN DANCE SOCIAL 9.15pm – Midnight

SALSA FUSION is more than just expressing purely the melody, this newest style of Salsa dancing interprets the musical instruments within the songs, hitting the trumpets, TA PAS R E STAU R A N T CUBAN BAR bongos, timbales, congas, and all types of music flavours with dance movement

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SALSA FUSION will take place every Sunday evening and provide a night of high energy dance and authentic Latin vibes.

PRICE: £7 for 1 class £12 for 2 classes (NUS £6 and £10)

TuesdayS from 7:30

After the lessons finish at around 9.15pm we’ll be hosting BARRIO LATINO, a Latin dance social where Ivan and guest DJs will be mixing the Latin rhythms through to midnight.

PURABACHATA For bookings & Inquiries Call 01142 760475 TA PAS

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C UBAN ATAPASBAR.C O.UK

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C UBA N ATA PAS BA R .C O.UK

Kizomba is the latest sexiest Afro dance craze originating in Angola. Kizomba music emerged as a modern music genre of Semba with a sensual touch mixed with African rhythm. Kizomba music is characterised by a slower and romantic rhythm, with mainly Portuguese lyrics.

LEARN HOW TO SALSA FUSION We’re delighted to announce a brand-new Latin dance night for all the Salseros out there who just want to dance. The classes will be led by the talented, charismatic, and well-respected dance tutor IVAN GARCIA.

CUBAN

CLASS followed by SOCIAL DANCE NIGHT

alsa fusion!

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Anyone can take the classes whether you have danced before or not there’s no need to bring a partner, the classes are always inclusive, fun and welcoming. A great place to make friends and become part of the tango community.

IMPROVER > 9pm – 10pm

P lus!

CLASS followed by SOCIAL DANCE DJ!... NIGHT UK’s no:1 Kizomba

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ANTONIO ‘AKA SABROSO’ PLAYS FROM 10PM Slow, smooth, sensual...

SWING & LINDY HOP

Kizomba is the latest sexiest Afro dance craze originating in Angola. Kizomba music emerged as a

modern music of Semba a sensual touch mixed with African rhythm. Kizomba music.CO.UK is For bookings & genre Inquiries Call with 01142 760475 CUBANATAPASBAR characterised by a slower and romantic rhythm, with mainly Portuguese lyrics.

COME AND LEARN KIZOMBA WITH CUBANA’S RESIDENT DANCE TEACHER AND DJ, ANTONIO ‘SABROSO’.

WEDNESDAY EVENINGS

PRICES: £6 FOR 1 OR £10 FOR 2 CLASSES ON THE NIGHT.

NUS - £5 FOR 1 LESSON AND £8 FOR 2 CLASSES ON THE NIGHT Beginner > 8pm – 9pm

IMPROVER > 9pm – 10pm

s! UK’s no:1 Kizomba DJ!... PluANTONIO fr ee ! ‘AKA SABROSO’ PLAYS FROM 10PM TA PAS

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SWING

For bookings & Inquiries

DANCE CLASS

ALL LEVELS - 8.30p CUBANATAPASBAR.CO.UK m

Call 01142 760475

FREE ENTRY ALL NIGHT!

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DANCE CLASS

BACHATA DANCE CLASSES

With Iván Garcia & Freddie Garland Iván and Freddie have joined forces again - to present Bachata at Cubana – every Tuesday evening. Bachata is a genre of Latin American music that originated in the Dominican Republic. It is a fusion of southwestern European influences, mainly Spanish guitar music, with some remnants of indigenous Taino and Sub Saharan African musical elements.

Call 01142 760475

> BEGINNERS 7.30-8.30pm > IMPROVERS 8.45-9.45pm > SOCIAL DANCING AFTERWARDS UNTIL LATE

Combining Iván’s deep knowledge and teaching experience

PRICE:S1 £7 2JG for 1 class with Freddie’s unique understanding of movement, style UNIT 4 LEOPOLD SQUARE, SHEFFIELD and technique, the Tuesday Bachata classes will provide £12 for 2 classes a special and exciting journey into the roots of Bachata and its many forms.

NUS: £6 and £10

ALL LEVELS - 8.30p m

BIG SWING EVERY WEDNESDAY & TA PAS

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FREE ENTRY ALL NIGHT!

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THE BIG SWING IS AN EXCITING NIGHT OF UPBEAT JAZZ AND SWING FROM 8pm IN THE CUBANA DOWNSTAIRS LOUNGE BAR.

CUBANATAPASBAR.CO.UK

A raucous mix of live music “ and dancing that everyone can’t help getting involved in!

NDS LIVE BA


OEC Sheffield

£33 PP

s 0 9 s c i s s a l c l ub c Taking you back to the 90s with old skool floorfillers

02 . 0 9. 2 02 2 3 COURSE DINNER LIVE TRIBUTE

FROM THE MANYTONICS

DJ

T: 0114 232 0266 E: events@oecsheffield.co.uk

www.oecsheffield.co.uk The OEC . Penistone Road . Sheffield . S6 2DE


CASINO . RESTAURANT . BAR

WINE & DINE

INCLUDES A GLASS OF WINE and a main course FROM OUR RESTAURANT DINNER MENU

£12.99 N A P O L EO N S C A S I N O & R E S TAU R A N T, 17 L I V E S E Y S T R E E T, S H E FFI E L D, S 6 2B L 0114 285 5566

SHEFFIELD@NAP OLEONS-C A SINOS .CO.UK

w w w.n a p ol eons-ca sino s.co.uk /SHEF F IEL D * Ts and Cs apply.


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FEATURES 26: SPICY STUFF

To celebrate the launch of HENDO’S, a welcoming foray into the snack market from the mighty Henderson’s Relish, we take a look at the history of Sheffield’s favourite sauce.

14: DANCE IN THE GARDENS

Born and raised in Barnsley, classical dancer Tala Lee-Turton made history as only the third British female to graduate from the world-famous Bolshoi Ballet Academy. This month, Tala is bringing an immersive dance show at Botanical Gardens. We went to find out more.

21: TRAMLINES REVIEWED

Our web ed Ash Birch witnessed all the action first-hand and you can relive the 13th instalment of Tramlines Festival with him.

32: THAT’S A WRAP

From Brett Morgen’s awardwinning Bowie epic to a hugely influential council house in Handsworth, Exposed writers pick out the stories that captivated them at this year’s DocFest.

70: THE BEAUTIFUL GAME

Coinciding with the UEFA Women’s Euros, Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery will host an exhibition of painting, photography, film and collage celebrating football culture. Find out more about the Football Art Prize here.

REGULARS

10: CITY VIEWS 45: FOOD & DRINK 58: NIGHTLIFE 63: MUSIC 78: CULTURE

A hearty ‘ayup’ to you all - and thank you for picking up the August issue of Exposed! I’m glad to report that I’m writing this month’s column in an uncharacteristically chipper mood. The editor’s letter is usually one of the final jobs during deadline week and, more often than not, it’ll be written in hasty fashion (not to mention well after work hours) while our long-suffering designer makes some final adjustments and barks at me for outstanding copy. But today is different. Today it’s Tramlines Friday. Everyone in the office is excitedly nattering about their festival plans, a few pre-drinkers in band tees can be seen milling around our office in Kelham Island, and I’ll soon be meeting some pals in town before heading to Hillsborough for what I’m sure will be another memorable weekend of live music. Then, once I’ve had my fill of Sheff ’s biggest party, I’m off on my jollies for a week - making a beeline for Leeds/Bradford airport following Madness’ closing set. Not too shabby, eh? A big shoutout to our wonderful web editor, Ash Birch, who’s kindly agreed to step into both mine and our absent designer’s shoes to finish this issue off. Not all heroes wear capes, etc, but they do sometimes come with big, bushy beards. You can read Birchy’s comprehensive review of Tramlines ‘22 over on page 20. Another big event which made its way straight onto the summer highlights reel was the return of Sheffield DocFest, our very own international film festival, and Messrs Perkins, Birch and Leaney have done a wonderful job of sifting through the wealth of heartwrenching, uplifting and thought-provoking documentaries on offer to reflect on the stories that stuck with them (p.32). August is often touted as a quiet month in Sheffield, the postfestival hangovers combined with a mass student exodus, but there’s still plenty of interesting stuff to get stuck into. From immersive dance experiences in Botanical Gardens (p.14) to prestigious new art exhibitions (p.70) and open-air cinema evenings (p.64), there’s more than enough going on to make sure you see out the summer in style. And that’s all before we get onto new places/things to sample: cocktail terraces on Abbeydale Road (p.48), Indian street food in Kelham (p.45), cafes in historic locations (p.53), indie bars in historic pubs (p.48), and a brand new snack from our beloved Henderson’s Relish (p.26). Tasty stuff, no? I’ll leave you to plan out your month now, and hopefully we’ll see you again in September! Have a good’un. JF x

GAFFERS

Phil Turner (MD) phil@ exposedmagazine. co.uk Nick Hallam (Sales Director) nick@ exposedmagazine. co.uk

FINANCE

Lis Ellis (Accounts) accounts@ exposedmagazine. co.uk

GRAFTERS

Joe Food (Editor) joe@exposedmagazine. co.uk Ash Birch (Online Editor) ash@exposedmagazine. co.uk

GI’ US A HAND PLZ Mark Perkins, James Leaney, Adele Parr

COVER IMAGE

Rob Nicholson // Pedalo Photography

THE BUSINESS STUFF

EXPOSED IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY BLIND MICE MEDIA LTD UNIT 1B RIALTO 2 KELHAM SQUARE KELHAM RIVERSIDE SHEFFIELD S3 8SD The views contained herein are not necessarily those of Blind Mice Media Ltd and while every effort is made to ensure information throughout Exposed is correct, changes prior to distribution may take place which can affect the accuracy of copy, therefore Blind Mice Media Ltd cannot take responsibility for contributors’ views or specific entertainment listings.

WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 7



IMAGE: LINDSAY MELBOURNE

UPFRONT

155k

WHAT A DO...

PEOPLE REPORTED TO HAVE CELEBRATED TRAMLINES WEEKEND, EITHER AT THE MAIN FESTIVAL SITE OR FRINGE EVENTS.

140+

ACTS PLAYED AT HILLSBOROUGH PARK - FROM MUSICIANS AND COMEDIANS TO SLAM POETS AND BRASS BANDS.

40K

OVERALL NUMBER OF TICKETS SOLD FOR THIS YEAR’S TRAMLINES FESTIVAL, ANOTHER SELLOUT EVENT.

Wow. The 13th instalment of Tramlines Festival was yet another corker of an event, with Sheffield once again representing and bringing the party to Hillsborough park and a wide selection of fringe venues across the city. Read our full review over on page 20. WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 9


MY A-Z OF SHEFFIELD

We recently had Swedish friends visiting Sheffield for the Women’s Euros in July and obviously wanted to show them a warm Yorkshire welcome. It got us thinking, ‘Where shall we go and what do we show them?’ A friend from London once said to me, “Sheffield, never knowingly oversold.” He went on to say how he was pleasantly surprised at what he saw when he came up earlier this year and it got me thinking about all the places in Sheffield I love that people may not know about. So, I thought I’d spell it out via a Steel City alphabet for anyone who visits. In fact, it’s a list for anyone who lives here too. So, go on, get yourself out there and be a tourist in your own city – it’s as easy as ABC!

A

bbeydale Industrial Hamlet: many, many happy memories from school trips from days gone by.

C

utler’s Hall: one of the city’s biggest secrets that really shows our history. I was blown away the first time I ever went in – I’d walked past it so many times. Check out the massive goblets!

D

BY ANDY HANSELMAN

evonshire Chippy: Sheffield’s finest fish and chips (especially at 11.00pm on a Friday night!).

A FRIEND FROM LONDON ONCE SAID TO ME, “SHEFFIELD, NEVER KNOWINGLY OVERSOLD.” HE WENT ON TO SAY HOW HE WAS PLEASANTLY SURPRISED AT WHAT HE SAW WHEN HE CAME UP...

ndcliffe Park: just one of the city’s wonderful parks, but don’t forget Graves, Firth, Millhouses, Hillsborough, Devonshire Green and lots of others – it’s a very green city!

Breweries: we’ve got lots of them!

Abbeydale, Kelham Island and Fuggle Bunny to name but a few. I’d say that Triple Point is my favourite.

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E

F

riendly people: you’ll find them wherever you go. I always remember the look on a southerner friend of mine’s face when a lady just started chatting to her at the bus stop.

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ardens: Peace, Botanical, Winter – all perfect for a summer stroll.

H

ills: all seven of them – just like Rome!

Love You… Will U Marry Me?: the iconic sign on Park Hill Flats is back and always worth a look.

J

arvis Cocker: the artist’s brilliant poem on the side of a Sheffield Hallam building [The Forge,

ANDY IS A MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER HELPING BUSINESSES, THEIR LEADERS AND PEOPLE CREATE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE. 10 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK


London Road] is cool, and you can also read Andrew Motion’s ‘What If?’ as you arrive in the centre from the train station.

K

elham Island: lots of wonderful bars and restaurants often housed in beautiful buildings.

L

eadmill: so many amazing nights over the years – let’s keep it going!

M

cKee: Pete’s a Sheffield hero and his shop on Sharrow Vale Road is always worth a visit.

N

ew Era Development: bringing some wonderful ‘eastern promise’ to Sheffield.

O

ur Cow Molly Ice Cream: Sheffield legends!

P

eak District: we’ve got beautiful scenery just a few minutes’ drive away.

Q

uality Restaurants: Jöro, Rafters, Domo and Native to name just a few.

Relish: it has to be Hendersons! Sheffield United’s Bramall Lane: the

oldest professional football ground in the world. We’re all Blades, aren’t we?

T

heatres: some of the finest in the country. Take your pick: Crucible, Lyceum, Studio, Lantern, Merlin, Montgomery…

U

rban Caving: explore the underground Megatron and River Sheaf culverts.

V

ideo Games Museum: an immersive look back in history to the days of PacMan, Super Mario and Donkey Kong.

W

omen Of Steel Statue: outside the City Hall you’ll find a tribute to some of Sheffield’s finest.

X

tra (sic) special independent businesses: the backbone of our city, from traditional handcrafted silverware manufacturers like Chimo Holdings to dynamic technology world leaders like Twinkl and WanDISCO.

Y

ellow Arch Studio: they’ve hosted Kylie Minogue, Goldfrapp, James, Tony Christie, Richard Hawley over the years, and of course, they were the birthplace of Arctic Monkeys’ first album.

Z

zzz: time to sleep after all that excitement (OK, I admit it, I couldn’t find a ‘Z’!). So, that’s my Sheffield A-Z. How many places have you sampled and where else would you recommend?

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For a future in flowers Introduction to Professional Floristry begins on 29th September, 10 Week course Ground Floor, Eagle Works, Cotton Mill Walk Little Kelham S3 8DH 0114 322 2820 hello@thefloristryschool.co.uk | thefloristryschool.co.uk @thefloristryschoolsheffield


UPFRONT

2. WE TRAIN LIKE ATHLETES It’s hard work and all about conditioning your body, even when you don’t have a production coming up. It takes a long time to warm up (at least 45 minutes first thing every morning) and a lot of training every day – we can’t just jump up and do a pirouette for you! When you do have a production coming up, you’re usually looking at morning technique classes followed by five or six hours of rehearsals. It’s pretty much constant and very full-on.

THINGS YOU ONLY KNOW IF YOU ARE A...

CLASSICALLY TRAINED BALLET DANCER 1. WE DON’T LISTEN TO CLASSICAL MUSIC ALL THE TIME There’s a bit of a misconception that we do. We might dance to classical music at shows, but I listen to a wide range of music. I’m a big fan of indie bands (being from South Yorkshire, the Arctic Monkeys are up there!) and I’m also into electronic music and a lot of synth-based stuff.

3. THERE’S NO WOOD IN BALLET SHOES

People have asked me that one before, “Is there wood in your shoe?” There isn’t. In fact, it’s usually more like a paper mache sort of material. The type I wear are made out of plastic, which helps to keep their shape; you can also put them in the wash and they last longer. I can keep my shoes for about a year, which is actually quite unusual – some dancers have to get new shoes after almost every performance.

4. ON THE TOPIC OF SHOES, THEY CAN BE VERY PERSONAL

When you buy pointe shoes, they come without ribbons or elastics. You have to add all that by yourself. It’s quite a personal ritual and everyone does them slightly differently. I don’t do ribbons anymore, I’m done with them, so it’s just two crossed elastics for me now.

5. WE’RE NOT ALL SUPER PRIVILEGED

Of course, we all check our privilege. My mum fundraised so much to send me to the Bolshoi, so I’m super grateful for that because I know not everybody has that support. That said, the ballet world does get a bad rap at times. The general consensus is that everybody is really posh, and that’s not the case. In fact, I found in Russia that more dancers were from working-class backgrounds. But certainly in the UK people are surprised when they hear my Barnsley accent!

Born and raised in Barnsley, classical dancer Tala Lee-Turton made history as only the third British female to graduate from the world-famous Bolshoi Ballet Academy in its then 245-year history. Today she’s Creative Producer and Founder of Tala Lee-Turton Productions and a freelance professional dancer. Turn the page for our interview with Tala, who’ll be bringing a very special music and dance experience to Botanical Gardens this month. PHOTO: XENIA / ZAVOD STUDIO WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 13


UPFRONT // DANCE IN THE GARDENS

DANCE IN THE GARDENS WORDS: JOSEPH FOOD

Brought to you by Tala Lee-Turton Productions, No Time Like The Present is an immersive dance and music experience which will be presented for the first time at Sheffield Botanical Gardens this month. Ahead of the show, we spoke to Barnsley-born Tala, a dancer and creative producer whose talent has seen her journey from Yorkshire to train at the famed Bolshoi Ballet Academy in Moscow. After two years in the making, she spoke of her excitement in bringing this innovative performance to the Steel City. You started dancing at such a young age. Can you recall what first brought about that attraction? Yes, at four years old my mum took me to the local dance club, just to make friends I think. None of us thought I’d have the journey I’d have, one full of ups and downs, all the way to being a creative producer today, where I can make my own work. Can you take us through some key parts of that journey and how it has led to your own production company? A big part of that was training at the Bolshoi Ballet Academy in Moscow, later becoming only the 14 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

third British female to graduate in its 245-year history. I was in Russia for about seven years altogether, returning to the UK just before the pandemic where I freelanced with companies like English National Ballet. During the pandemic, like many others, I found the time for some self-reflection and concluded that my career so far has been spent dancing other people’s work. I also knew that the most enjoyable working environments for me were the hugely creative ones where the production was inspired by very diverse influences, so I made the decision to start my own company to provide those types of creative opportunities for myself and others. What specifically was the ethos when you set up Tala-Lee Productions? The main aim is to connect creatives and audiences to socially and emotionally impactful dance experiences. We want to challenge traditional boundaries and conventions of the ballet industry. PHOTOGRAPHY: (TOP/BOTTOM): XENIA / ZAVOD STUDIO


DANCE IN THE GARDENS // UPFRONT PHOTO: DARIAN VOLKOVA

About Dance in the Gardens How do you challenge those boundaries and conventions? I suppose, as someone with a diverse background in terms of my dual heritage and working-class origins, I’ve been able to view the ballet industry from a fairly different perspective. It’s an exciting premise to bring that perspective to classical ballet works, connecting creatives to productions that people might not expect when they think of ballet. People may expect stuff like The Nutcracker and Swan Lake, but there’s so much more to it. If you take this physicality of what we do and apply it to a different, diverse story that comes from somewhere you wouldn’t normally associate with classical ballet, then you can get epic results. That’s what we’re exploring with No Time Like the Present. The dancers will be performing to a synth-pop score, which of course has historical roots in the city. Was that a deliberate choice? It was a deliberate choice, but not necessarily for that reason. The music was chosen to be nothing like what you’d imagine for a ballet. It entertains and provokes at the same time. The composer Grace Stubbings did a fantastic job; it makes you want to get up and dance. What sort of narratives and themes run through No Time Like the Present? First and foremost, it’s a dance and music experience – an invitation for the audience to lose themselves in the music, the movement and the beautiful natural environment. Having the production outdoors in the beautiful green spaces of South Yorkshire is so important; sometimes the walls of a theatre can be intimidating, so to bring the work into a space that people are familiar with, a place they often walk through and relax in, it can hopefully show how we’re trying to move away from traditional conventions of ballet. Moreover, it’s an immersive space where people can have a good time, enjoy the food and drink on offer, get a seat, and really sink into the show itself: five female dancers exploring our inner narratives and sharing that with the audience. The atmosphere is more something you’d find at music events and festivals.

No Time Like The Present is a dance and music experience for everone. You will encounter five dancers performing to a synth-pop score composed specifically for the production, performed for 40 minutes without a break. Doors open from 6pm on both nights. The ambient soundtrack is scheduled to begin from 6:30pm with the performance commencing at 7pm and finishing by 7.45pm. The creative team will be available to chat following the performance and there will be a Q&A with Tala. The Botanical Gardens will remain open until 8.30pm and there will be a selection of food and drink traders to cater for your needs throughout the evening.

Dance in the Gardens: No Time Like The Present will take place at the Botanical Gardens on 24th and 25th August and at Wentworth Woodhouse, Rotherham, from 19th – 21st and 26th – 28th August. Tickets are priced between £10-£16 and available from talaleeturton.com.

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hidden gem

UPFRONT

FORGE DAM CAFÉ Hidden on the outskirts of the city, away from the busy metropolis of Sheffield centre, Forge Dam café offers a peaceful escape into the countryside. Forge Dam Café is a family affair which was handed down to Nick Dunn, who was nearly born in the cottage next door! Fast forward a few years and Nick chose to abandon his career in the private sector to take over the timberframed café nestled in the heart of the park. By forging a path for the Forge Dam Café in the 21st Century, they have replaced instant coffee with the highest quality barista-style coffee and expanded the menu to include a little something for the whole family. Whether you’re walking past with the dogs and fancy a cuppa, or you’ve parked your bike in their 16 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

designated cycle storage so you can enjoy a hearty burger and chips, there’s always a solid selection of scran to peruse. The menu changes to reflect seasonality and caters to meateaters, veggies, vegans and the gluten-free patrons, meaning you’ll never get bored of the tasty treats on offer. The venue itself was originally Walkley Methodist Hall before it was dismantled and brought down the valley nearly 100 years ago. The café is a part of Sheffield’s cultural heritage and contributes to the environmental conservation of the city’s green spaces by encouraging

people of all walks of life to get out into nature! Bordered by expansive parkland, a play area, a ball pool and a reading corner (stocked with books for all ages), the team’s pride in maintaining their local community is heart-warmingly prevalent. Over the summer, head down for iced coffees and ice creams and enjoy a corner of the great outdoors! The café is open every day, 9:30-5, with free parking nearby and a local bus route bringing you almost right to the venue! For more information on opening times, updates and special events, head over to @forgedamcafe


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TRAMLINES REVIEW SING WHEN YOU’RE WINNING

Sheffield’s biggest and most famous party made its triumphant return to Hillsborough Park across the weekend of 22 - 24 July. Ash Birch reflects on how the festival fared.

IMAGE: LINDSAY MELBOURNE

TRAMLINES

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Well, wasn’t that a banger of a weekend? The 2022 follow-up to Tramlines 2021: The Event’s Research Programme edition was an absolute belter, and while it wasn’t exactly subdued last year (if you think back to Dizzy Rascal going off in the late Sunday afternoon sun, it was positively bouncing), there was still a lingering air of apprehension after spending most of the previous couple of years in doors worrying. It took a bit of mindset adjusting to get into the swing of things last year. Not so this year. Rightly or wrongly, Covid worries are seemingly a thing of the past for the majority and thousands of pals dived headfirst into a weekend of dancing, singing and bouncing to hundreds of acts, including headliners Sam Fender, Kasabian and Madness. There is still something lovely and extremely heart-warming about seeing people enjoying themselves again. At being allowed to mix freely again. The previous year’s trials have only served to make people appreciate what they were missing. Without getting too deep, there’s always been something pretty magical about plugging into the cosmos and connecting with thousands of people at the same time at a festival, and that human instinct is to be cherished even more after the period of famine we were all forced to endure. Not even getting a bit soggy on the first and last days was enough to put people off having fun this year. Anyway, onto the thing that brought us all together – the music. Recent tradition has dictated that the Friday evening of Tramlines is reserved largely for guitar bands and that held true with performances from Harri Larkin and Shed Seven to kick us off on the main stage, followed later by James and headliner Sam Fender. However, one of my highlights on the Friday evening came from an unexpected and decidedly more urban source, as Bad Boy Chiller Crew kicked right off on the T’Other Stage. It should come as no surprise, as if you come to Sheffield and play anything vaguely bassline, you’re going to get a reaction. Young ‘uns earning their chops, were joined by older heads who did it all the first time around, buzzed to be getting the chance to relive a misspent youth. Oi oi! Right across the weekend, the smaller stages punched above their weight. Working Men’s club on the Leadmill stage proved why they’re being compared to New Order with a Hacienda tinged dance set, while Yard Act closed the stage on the Sunday evening with a raucous party, due, in part, to lead singer James Smith’s admission that he’d been taking advantage of the hospitality in the Hillsborough Stadium’s dressing rooms all afternoon! The hugely enjoyable Open Arms returned and after an impromptu appearance during Sam Fender’s Friday night headline slot, Shaun Williamson (remember Barry from Eastenders?) brought his popular ‘Barrioke’ back to the pub party tent. For most though, the highlight away from 22 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

IMAGE: LINDSAY MELBOURNE

TRAMLINES


IMAGE: LINDSAY MELBOURNE IMAGE: CAROLINE FARUOLO

IMAGE: LINDSAY MELBOURNE

IMAGE: CAROLINE FARUOLO

Nulty’s Main Stage this year had to be one of Sheffield’s own. Over at the T’Other stage, Self Esteem fans spilled out of the tent’s boundaries, trying to catch a glimpse of Sheffield’s hottest property. She didn’t disappoint (apart from possibly the odd Blade, as the infamous Glastonbury Meadowhall bra made way for a fresh Wednesday shirt). On what was a drizzly final day, a ray of sunshine came in the form of Tramlines legend Jon McClure, who took to the stage following an introduction from Sunday League side, the the Royal Oak’s assistant manager, Steve Bracknell. Reverend and the Makers hit the stage and wouldn’t you know it, they brought the sunshine with them. Then they left, and it rained again. Those were just a few key musical highlights from a weekend rounded off in style with a typically knee hiking set from Suggs and the Madness legends. The perfect end to a very special weekend. Let’s do it all again next year, yeah?

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Something to

RELISH BY JOE FOOD

What’s that? Steel City icon Henderson’s Relish have released a tasty new snack? Could this summer GET any better? You heard right, kids. The mighty Henderson’s have recently announced the launch of HENDO’s, a brand-new soya and potato snack that perfectly captures the taste of our beloved sauce. Available in single portion 23g bags, which are ideal for packed lunches and on-the-go munching, the new savoury snacks began rolling off the production line last month and are now available at local retailers, food outlets and licensed premises across the city. Henderson’s Relish General Manager, Matt Davies, told Exposed: “We’re delighted with the new HENDO’S, they taste great! These snacks are suitable for vegans and vegetarians, are gluten-free, and healthier than fried crisps – they are lower in fat, sugar and salt.” Mr. Davies added: “This won’t put an end to the practice of pouring Relish into a bag of ready salted. I know that’s a Henderson’s habit for many Sheffielders! But new HENDO’S are an easier way of getting the taste of Henderson’s Relish when you’re on the go, or in the pub.” As of this month, you should be able to get hold of the new snack at a wide range of Sheffield venues, but you can also order a full case of 24 via the website (www. hendersonsrelish.com) – that should keep you occupied for a least or week or so!

Fancy stocking HENDO’s? Contact them via email at sales@ hendersonsrelish.com. Deliveries to trade customers will be made daily.

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PHOTO: ROB NICHOLSON // PEDALO PHOTOGRAPHY

Strong and Northern

Henry Henderson blended the first batch of his famous Relish in 1885. More than 130 years later, it’s still made in Sheffield to a secret family recipe – a blend including tamarinds, cayenne peppers, vinegar, garlic, and cloves. Henderson’s Relish is splashed on almost any dish, from pies and stews to all kinds of meat, fish, and vegetables. Find out more at www. hendersonsrelish.com.

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SOMETHING TO RELISH

HENDO’S: A HISTORY In celebration of Henderson’s Relish moving forward with a brand-new product launch, Exposed takes a look back at the story of Sheffield’s favourite spicy sauce.

In a city which has given the world so much in the form of manufacturing, music, film, art and sport, Henderson’s Relish remains a source (or should that be sauce?) of great admiration for Sheffielders. It embodies the very essence of what makes the city great; it’s the cultural lifeblood behind its character and easily the region’s favourite table sauce. The story of Henderson’s Relish began in 1885, at the general store of Henry Henderson. In his occupation as a drysalter and wholesale chemist, he would blend ingredients to create various mixtures which he would then sell from his premises on Broad Lane. This pioneer first sold his creation from large wooden barrels that filled customers’ glass bottles with a spicy sauce unlike any other, for just a penny apiece. Henderson’s Relish was a success from the beginning. He continued to sell barrel after barrel until 1910, the year in which a pickle manufacturing company called Shaws of Huddersfield saw enough potential to make Henderson an offer to purchase the business. The bid was accepted, and the company moved less than half a mile up the street to their second address and first factory at 66 Leavygreave Road. George Shaw’s daughter Miriam married a gentleman called Charles William Hinksman and the company became limited in 1940, as Hinksman purchased it from Shaws. It was during Mr Hinksman’s tenure that the decision was made to move premises to the now iconic Sheffield address on Leavygreave Road, where it became a local landmark as the Henderson’s Relish factory. Charles Hinksman later remarried Gladys Freeman and, following his death, the company was passed on to her. It has remained in the hands of the Freeman family ever since. In 1991, ownership of the company was passed to Dr Kenneth Freeman, a retired GP who, although not living in Sheffield, made weekly visits to mix the secret recipe. During these years, Dr Freeman oversaw ground-breaking developments in the company’s profile alongside his wife Pamela. Henderson’s Relish was listed 28 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK


SOMETHING TO RELISH in only one local supermarket, the Co-op. Deliveries to local customers were made in an old Land Rover van; the boot stacked high with cases for the driver to unload at corner shops and independent retailers around the city. Pamela and Dr Freeman began to visit various supermarket chains, carrying a bottle of Henderson’s to tempt potential buyers. Their hard work eventually paid off and Sainsbury’s became the company’s largest supermarket partner in 1996. From that point on, the product started to sell itself as more local supermarkets came on board; Henderson’s Relish quick;y became much more accessible to its adoring Sheffield audience and word started to spread further afield. The success of Henderson’s in its hometown had previously been a rather modest, understated affair. Yet over the last decade or so, the Henderson’s Relish brand has gained ‘cult status’ in the city. As a selection of famous fans such as Richard Hawley continue to sing its praises, Sheffield locals show great pride in the iconic bottle with its orange label, inspiring everything from poems and artworks to some rather suspect tattoos. Special customised labels have also been commissioned with nods to local legends likes Arctic Monkeys, Toddla T and Pete Mckee, not to mention iconic events such as Tramlines, Bears of Sheffield and the Tour de Yorkshire. November 2013 marked the end of an era for Henderson’s Relish, which saw the company move from the humble Leavygreave Road building to new premises at Sheffield Parkway Business Park. It only helped the brand to grow further, however, and these days shops stocking Henderson’s can be found as far away as Whitby, Filey, Scotland – and even London! Bottles of Henderson’s Relish are dispatched around the world on a regular basis. While filming Sharpe in 2008, Sean Bean ordered a batch of Henderson’s to his film set in India. In 2009, Dr Freeman sent litre bottles of Henderson’s to troops serving in Afghanistan. And, in 2014, more giant bottles were sent out to a Sheffield soldier at the request of his wife, inadvertently converting an entire squadron into Henderson’s addicts by doing so! Customers in Singapore, Australia, the United States and even Hong Kong have all been in touch with the Henderson’s Relish sales department. Families have been known to send bottles over to their kin living in New Zealand, Spain and Canada. It’s fair to say that despite its local connotations, Henderson’s Relish certainly gets around! Miniature bottles were a popular addition to this growing trend. Starting life as ‘Holiday Hendo’s’ – for Sheffielders to take away where their special sauce couldn’t be found – the 31ml glass bottles are now an essential travel accessory and wedding favour. An online presence has allowed the company to send its famous product around the world at the click of a button; you can now purchase Henderson’s memorabilia ranging from cufflinks to cycling jerseys! In 2018, there was another significant change as the company launched an updated label design, with the words ‘Strong & Northern’ serving as the centrepiece of the bottle. Henderson’s also sourced a new, more sustainable glass supplier situated just a few miles from the factory. Today each bottle of relish is made from 30% recycled glass. Local nostalgia helps brands like Henderson’s Relish to preserve and celebrate its proud heritage in Sheffield, but they are not afraid to move forward and try something new either. The latest innovation sees the release of HENDO’s, a gluten-free vegan and vegetarian-friendly savoury snack made from soya and potato. Available city-wide as of this month, the Exposed team have already had a taste and reckon they’ve got a winner on their hands. Excitingly, HENDO’s will be available in single bag portions, allowing Sheffielders to get a taste of the sauce on the go or in their pack-up. So, there you have it: a potted history of Henderson’s Relish. After 130+ years it remains a beloved brand and independent family business with deep roots and pride in the Sheffield community. Its success has seen it become a Sheffield institution, adorning the kitchen tables and cupboard shelves of South Yorkshire families across the generations – and hopefully for many more to come! WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 29


ORCHARD SQUARE

SUMMER IN THE SQUARE Enjoy free events, music and plenty of offers for all the family this holiday at Orchard Square. Summer has arrived at Orchard Square, Sheffield’s premier shopping & leisure destination located in the heart of the city, with a sizzling menu of fun-packed entertainment for all the family to enjoy. The Square will play host to Sheffield Bricktropolis this summer – a FREE trail across the city taking visitors on a journey through time with 15 awe-inspiring dinosaur-themed brick models. For any budding palaeontologists out there, this event is set to be roar-some. Brought to the city by Sheffield Bid, Bricktropolis is taking place between 6th – 21st August. Further information can be found at: sheffieldbricktropolis.com For even more family entertainment this holiday, Sheffield Plate in the Square will be hosting various events across the summer. Enjoy Summer Themed Tea Parties every Wednesday in August, with tickets priced at £10 per person, as well as a Disney Drawing Session, priced at £15 per person. There will be a wide range of food and drink choices available all under the same roof. Keep an eye on their socials for further information and ticket announcements. Orchard Square Waterstones will also be holding various events including treasure hunts and colouring

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activities, alongside author readings this summer – visit their website for more information at waterstones.com/events. To help ensure the summer vibes, the Square will be hosting live music from local artists across August with a dedicated Music in the Square event taking place on Friday 12th August from 8pm seeing Boxie Music teaming up with Sheffield Creative Guild - and Karma Leon Kabaret presenting Sin City on Friday 29th July. Speed dating is also on the menu at Sheffield Plate for those looking for some Summer Lovin’ – plus a weekly Wednesday quiz night (no booking required - just turn up and find a table!). What’s more, popular food outlet Terrace Goods has launched a brand-new lunchtime menu and meal deal –featuring small plates and side options alongside the classics. The bustling restaurant/bar will also be launching a brand-new DJ booth and sound system this summer. While on the subject of bars, Cheap Dates, the New York-style dive bar which opened in June, is now offering

a brand-new live music schedule - with karaoke coming soon too! Check out @cheapdatesbar for further information. Orchard Square will also see the return of the popular Makers’ Market this summer, with a wonderful lineup of local makers and a free family-friendly art activity. Head down and see if you can bag a bargain or two! Commenting on the full summer lineup, Orchard Square Manager Shay Murray said: “We have worked with our retailers to ensure fun-filled entertainment for all the family to enjoy this holiday. “There are some fabulous events and offers available for our visitors and shoppers to help ensure that Orchard Square is on everyone’s list this summer. We look forward to welcoming you.” Orchard Square is based in the heart of Sheffield, just off Fargate, offering an exciting line-up of more than 30 retail brands, independents and food and drink establishments. More info at orchardsquare.co.uk.



PICTURE: RL LLEWELYN

PICTURE: CHIJIA HUA

OUR PICK OF 2022’S DOCFEST...

PICTURE: CHIJIA HUA

docfest

22

Man on Earth Director: Amiel Courtin-Wilson DocFest rounded off the weekend portion of its programme with the premiere of Man on Earth, part of its International Competition. This strand of the fest covers a wildly diverse range of international premieres and subject matter, and none more niche, in fact, than Man on Earth, which made for a somewhat sombre Sunday night screening at The Light Cinema. Man on Earth follows Bob, a 65-yearold Jewish New Yorker, who after living with Parkinson’s Disease for four years has decided to end his own life using Washington State’s ‘Dying with Dignity’ legislation (imagine a country where you can be euthanised legally, but it’s illegal to have an abortion!). The film captures the last week of Bob’s life with intimate and at times wincingly up close and personal access as he faces his own mortality, wrestles with the choice he’s made and its effect on others and reckons with the legacy he’s leaving behind. Part of that legacy is his son, Jessie,

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who has ‘stepped up’ for his dad in those final days, becoming his primary caregiver and meds dispenser. Jessie is the first to admit that he’s ‘not a people person’ and struggles with empathy, leading to an at times strained, but never unaffectionate, relationship between father and son. We learn from the filmmaker after the screening that Jessie also died in a car accident just six months after the film was completed, the knowledge of which adds yet another layer of tragedy. At the heart of the documentary is a meditation on time. Bob feels he often has no real concept of it as he staves off the boredom of those final days doing quizzes with Alexa, while at the same time there is an urgency to tie up loose ends and a feeling there simply isn’t enough time. One of the loose ends is Bob’s other son, who can’t bring himself to come to Bob’s death and is instead at a martial arts competition he’s competing in. One of the most gutwrenching scenes is their final phone call, which ends with Bob throwing the phone on the bed and collapsing to the

the

stories that stayed with us

floor, almost apoplectic with grief. Given the nature of the subject matter and scenes like the one described above, it’s obviously powerful stuff; but it also isn’t without its humour and warmth either, and is surprisingly uplifting at times. The unrelenting tragedy of it all might have been unbearable if Bob himself wasn’t such a funny guy, and his sense of humour remains charmingly dark right to the end. And it is a definitive end. It’s a disconcerting


MAN ON EARTH

PICTURE: MINGTONG CHEN

STUDIO ELECTROPHONIQUE

Exposed writers on their pick of the bunch from this year’s celebration of documentary filmmaking.

experience to watch a film, and get to know a character, knowing in the final scene you’re going to watch him die. The finality of it is heartbreaking. The final scene lingers tight on Bob’s face after he’s been given the ‘the mix’ that has knocked him unconscious and will ultimately end his life, before cutting to a shot of Bob hovering in a doorway before retreating into the bedroom where most of the film is shot, and then

Studio Electrophonique Director: Jamie Taylor Ken Patten and his Studio Electrophonique is a piece of Sheffield music history that almost disappeared unheralded into the mist of time. Jarvis Cocker opens the film, talking about how, at the start of his musical career, he was told he should save up some money and go see ‘The Colonel’ in his recording studio to make some demos. The studio turned out to be in a semi-detached house in Handsworth. Ken (The Colonel) was a car mechanic and panel-beater, who was fascinated by sound and recordings and had set up a studio from his council

cutting back to Bob as he slips away. The genesis for Man on Earth came out of director Amiel Courtin-Wilson’s work on another documentary, Traces, but it was actually Bob’s idea. As a frustrated performer, Bob gives a staggering amount of access to himself in those final days and in return the piece gives a powerful insight into a relatively new phenomenon. Ash Birch

house. The synthesisers had to be perched on a coffee table, and other parts of the house were utilised as needed. The drum kit went into the bedroom; the singers were in the kitchen extension. He called it Studio Electrophonique – although everyone just referred to it as ‘Ken Patten’s’ – but the name seemed to attract the more electronic acts, which was a perfect match in Sheffield in the late 70s/early 80s. Also, these bands weren’t loud enough to annoy the neighbours, as they could do it all on headphones. Adi Newton, who went on to form Clock DVA, and Martyn Ware of Human League and Heaven 17 both recall creating soundscapes rather than music, which

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THE STORIES THAT STAYED WITH US

Our pick of 2022’s DocFest...

PICTURE: DAVID CHANG

PICTURE: NICK HARDY

PONGO CALLING

formed demo tapes for them to take to record companies in London. Yet, if you ask musicians from Sheffield today, almost no-one remembers Ken or his studio despite many Sheffield bands going there to record right up to the 90s, making this one of the great untold stories of pop. Ken died in the 90s, at the age of 66, and Jamie Taylor’s wonderful, engaging film embarks on a hunt to discover more about him, celebrate what he achieved, and make sure his name isn’t forgotten. He talks to neighbours, discovers what happened to some of Ken’s equipment and at one point meets John Umpleby, Ken’s son-in-law, who hands over a couple of carrier bags full of cine film unseen for 30 years. He meets Michelle, Ken’s daughter, and even persuades the current occupants of the house to let him film in Ken’s kitchen extension, where so much of the history of music in Sheffield was made. Jarvis Cocker tells how he managed to give one of the cassettes of music made in Ken’s house to John Peel

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when he appeared in Chesterfield. He promised he’d listen in his car on the way home. He did, and Pulp were invited onto his show. In the film, Jarvis says, “It was an absolutely key thing in the development of my musical career. We were still at school.” It is an indication of how Ken directly influenced the musical landscape, not just in Sheffield but for British pop music as a whole. Mark Perkins Pongo Calling Director: Tomáš Kratochvíl Pongo Calling tells the remarkable story of a lorry driver in Manchester who became an unlikely social media sensation, founded a refugee charity and became an influential voice for change. Stefan Pongo came to the UK from the Czech Republic 13 years ago, along with his family. He obtained UK citizenship while keeping his Czech nationality, but primarily regards himself as a member of the Roma community. When Milos Zeman, the president of the Czech Republic,

branded 90% of Roma as workshy and lazy, Stefan was annoyed. So annoyed, in fact, that he went online and encouraged the Roma community to send him photos of themselves working. Without realising, and while still working as a HGV driver around Europe, the live streams he made from the cab of his lorry went viral. People from far and wide shared videos and a mass protest movement started to form, to the point where President


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THE STORIES THAT STAYED WITH US

Our pick of 2022’s DocFest...

DANCING PINA

NO PLACE FOR YOU IN OUR TOWN

Zeman was challenged by reporters to respond to the online backlash against his uncaring comments. Stefan was becoming a voice and wanted to help the most deprived Roma communities, so he formed the Czech Slovak Roma Union, which raised funds to provide this assistance. In the film, there is some harrowing footage as the director follows Stefan driving a van loaded with supplies to be delivered to a community in Slovakia. Even though he knows that his efforts are only a sticking plaster, that real change cannot come until attitudes change, he fights on. The film takes a shocking turn at the end but stands as a powerful celebration of what one man can achieve. I managed a word with one of his sons, David, ahead of the screening, and he was clearly very proud of his dad’s legacy, telling me: “Lots of people claim to be helping the Roma people, but my dad created a public account for donations, and actually drove a van himself and went to help these cut-off settlements.” Director Tomáš Kratochvíl has crafted

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a small masterpiece here, capturing the essence of an ordinary – but at times extraordinary – family man simply doing what he thinks is the right thing. No voice-over, no grandstanding here, just a remarkable story of a reaction to intolerance towards minorities that is as relevant today as it has ever been. Mark Perkins Dancing Pina Director: Wim Wenders There’s a tried and tested rule I subscribe to when it’s DocFest time: however slight the story might seem, a well-made documentary will confound your expectations. Pina Bausch was one of the most important choreographers of our time. Her work and influence have been well documented, both throughout her life and since her death in 2009. This film follows rehearsals for two shows being prepared to mark the 10th anniversary of her death. The stage directors are both former dancers with Bausch’s ensembles, and the shows they have chosen

to bring back to the stage are taken from early in her career. The Semperoper Ballet in Dresden are working on the 1974 dance opera Iphigenie auf Tauris, while at the École des Sables in Dakar, dancers from all over Africa prepare for the choreographer’s sublime 1975 interpretation of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. The rehearsal footage, filmed simultaneously in Germany and in Senegal, is mesmerising from the start and illustrates dance as a universal language which transcends the spoken word; it can communicate with an audience, whatever language they speak. It soon becomes clear that these new performances are not intended to be copies of long-ago staged shows, but they are fresh and new so that audiences experience a unique version. Bausch was famed for the intimate involvement of her dancers within productions, with the expectation that each one brings part of themselves to the performance. She also railed against the idea that there was an ideal body shape for a dancer, and encouraged performers who had at times been told dancing wasn’t for them. Many of the dancers, particularly those from Africa, faced opposition from their families and communities when they decided to become professional dancers. This forms the heart of the film, which soon becomes more about the performers than it is about the dance performance. Florian Heinzen Ziob has created a marvellous, intimate record of the creative processes behind a stage show, with some astonishing cinematography. In particular, some of the Senegal scenes on the beach, which are stunning. Mark Perkins No Place for You in Our Town Director: Nikolay Stevanov In 2011, the Bulgarian Football Union was fined 40,000 euros following the racist abuse England players received at a European


PICTURE: DAVID CHANG

MOONAGE DAYDREAM

social realities of these individuals, many of whom spout irrevocably damning slurs and ideologies. In this way, the film challenges us, not in any way to like these people, but to understand some of the social factors which have led them to this lowest form of comradery and communal identity. While the documentary features a number of Minyor’s ‘ultras’ (extreme groups of fans associated with violence), we follow the story of Tsetso, a single father who grapples with identity, health issues and his duties as a role model to his son. Ultimately, it is this prolonged exposure and interaction with the camera which, when removed from the bravado and animosity of his gang, allows the audience to develop genuine emotional insight into Tsetso’s mindset. Tsetso’s gradual familiarisation with the camera is visible throughout the film’s duration, as he becomes ever more candid about his aspersions around the ideology and lifestyle he has fallen in to. This is typified in his battle to become a positive role model for his son: fishing trips between the two include tales of his youth and lessons in the craft, providing brief respite from the violent culture that threatens to consume his identity. In exploring this collision of fatherhood and masculinity against repugnant notions of fascism and hate, Stefanov walks a tight-rope. Challenged with weighting the revealing investigation of the gang as individuals in contrast to his exposure of the ideological extremes of far-right hooligan groups, I would argue he does so with impeccable balance. Make no mistake, the documentary reveals humanity in all its focus, but Stevanov pulls no punches in conveying the vile extent to which this group are committed to finding some form of identity. We see Tsetso struggle to inflate an air bed while a swastika tattoo stands brazen across his chest, while in another scene fans worry about covid passes while being asked to hide their knuckle dusters. All of which comprises the story of a man living in a social reality which, to some extent, he clearly hates. James Leaney

Moonage Daydream Director: Brett Morgen Far from your standard rockumentary, Moonage Daydream is a visual and sonic assault. No talking heads, very little biographical information, just raw Bowie jumping off the screen. Championships qualifier in Sofia. In 2019, a repeat of the fixture was halted twice Writer, director and editor, Brett Morgen due to Nazi salutes and racist chanting. While hooliganism, racism and hate speech (Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, among extreme sects of football fans is visible across the globe, with the UK being Crossfire Hurricane), warns us before no exception, Bulgaria’s football culture remains particularly infamous within the the film starts that the movie is very sport. loud, prompting a mass exodus to collect In exploring the darkest side of the beautiful game, Director Nikolay Stefanov some complimentary ear plugs from the brings us his feature debut – a gritty, surprisingly intimate portrait of the theatre entrance, rather derailing Brett’s supporters of Minyor Pernik, a side fighting for promotion from Bulgaria’s third opening speech. But with hindsight, that division. Following the collapse of communism and the coal industry in Pernik, kind of felt in-keeping with the anarchic we are introduced to a struggling town where sons fight to emulate the identities of style of filmmaking we were then treated their fathers’ grandfathers as the masculine, hard-working backbone of Bulgaria. to, and he wasn’t lying either, the musical Through his use of handheld cameras, Stefanov brings the themes of masculinity, montages roar off the screen at you – it’s poverty and fatherhood into focus as underpinning features of this complex bloody loud! narrative. Perhaps most admirable is the bravery with which Nikolay approaches The ear bleeding is mostly limited this project. Not simply through ingratiating himself within this violent sub-culture, to these musical montages and rare but most significantly in attempting to provide some level of understanding to the unseen footage of live performances.

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THE STORIES THAT STAYED WITH US

Our pick of 2022’s DocFest...

A BUNCH OF AMATEURS

Performances which are visceral and unrelenting (did I mention it was loud?). These bursts of volume punctuate the narrative, as much as there is one, loosely following the basic, distinct stages of Bowie’s career. They are often intertwined with interview snippets, in which Bowie remains admirably patient, honest and witty in the face of some pretty idiotic lines of questioning from the conservative press (we’re looking at you, Russell Harty). These interviews, and the small bits of autobiography Brett does choose to include, emphasise Bowie’s feelings of isolation. The film touches briefly on his idolisation of his half-brother Terry Burns, and Terry’s welldocumented mental health struggles with schizophrenia, as well as his tense relationship with his mother. In one interview sequence on the Russell Harty show, when being asked why his accent is the same (we told you the questions were idiotic), Bowie proclaims he doesn’t talk to anybody. How much of that is the tongue in

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cheek on Bowie’s part is hard to say. What is often at the forefront of Morgen’s film is the fans. The kids at the Hammersmith Odeon and Earl’s Court shows in particular are transformed into their very own version of Bowie and the public mood of the 70s is never far away, with one fan remarking, “You don’t have to be bent to wear makeup.” The public ‘working’ Bowie is the focus of the film. It portrays a solitary travelling artist, with no roots, following his creative instincts across continents. Morgen seems to suggest that Bowie’s best work was done in the 70s, but that the simple fact of him being Bowie maintained his relevance through the heady success of the 80s, his hit and miss big-screen appearances, and well on into the 90s and beyond. The film isn’t particularly revelatory in that sense, it’s more of a love letter, or eulogy, to the star man – and we’re very glad Morgen took the painstaking time to pore over the avalanche of archive to make it. Ash Birch

A Bunch of Amateurs Director: Kim Hopkins In the 1930s, everyone loved films. It was pretty much the only entertainment they had. The rise of the lavish picture palaces such as the Gaumont and the Odeon meant that watching films in cinemas became an affordable part of everyday life, but what has been forgotten is that there was a similar growth in local cine clubs – groups of people who loved to make their own films. Dozens of amateur film clubs once thrived throughout the north of England, but one by one they’ve gradually disappeared. However, head up the M1 to Bradford and you’ll find the world’s oldest amateur film club is still bravely soldiering on. At the start of the film, Harry proposes to the rest of the Bradford Movie Makers a remake of the musical Oklahoma – just the first five minutes, mind – but as Joe points out, they’re going to struggle to find grass growing as high as an elephant’s eye in Bradford. That seems to be a minor concern as it becomes clear that Harry, now in his 80s, has no idea how to ride a horse. Yet, in the true spirit of amateur enthusiasm, none of this will stop them. As the film shows the foregone glory days of the Bradford Movie Makers, it becomes clear that belonging to the club is just as important to the members as making the actual films. For many of them, it forms a support group in a world where some of them have very challenging lives. Kim Hopkin’s wonderful documentary is about the joys of a shared passion: a bunch of enthusiasts still clinging onto the dream of making their own movies, in a world where everyone can shoot their own videos, without ever needing to consider the art of filmmaking. There are challenges, namely funding and the fact that new members are hard to come by, and the forced isolation which arrives during the pandemic is the last thing they need. The end of the Bradford Movie Makers club looks an inevitability, but this is the world of film, isn’t it? Who knows what their own brand of cinematic magic will bring? If there was ever a film which was odds on to win the Audience Award at this year’s DocFest, this one had it in the can. I can predict it will be just the start of a slew of awards heading their way, and wider distribution should mean we can all enjoythis charming and heart-warming film.


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DOCFEST DIARIES: AWAY FROM THE BIG SCREEN PICTURE: PRATIBHA PARMAR

PICTURE: DAVID CHANG

By Mark Perkins

docfest

You’d be forgiven for thinking that going to a film festival was all about watching films.

festival, transforming it into one of the world’s leading cultural gettogethers.

I’d been going to DocFest for a couple of years before I myself discovered that some of the people who attended were ‘too busy to see any films’. The festival, which attracts creative talent from all over the globe, provides so much more than cutting-edge documentary films. Organisations such as the British Council and the BFI promote their work, while big media players such as Channel 4, Sky and the BBC interview some of the giants of the documentary world in front of a live audience. Alternatives to storytelling on film – sound recordings, VR headsets and immersive experiences – have become a flagship of the event, particularly with their growing Alternate Reality events. So, now that we’ve covered some of our big screen picks, I’ll detail some of the fringe events which make Sheffield DocFest more than just a film

On the opening day of the festival, to celebrate the UEFA Women’s Euro 2022, the Site Gallery had commissioned a football match between three teams, played on a hexagonal pitch with three sets of goal posts. I needed to see this. Under the title of Feminist Economics Football: A Cooperative Game for Sheffield, the players gathered in the amphitheatre, above the train station. Quite what the rules were – and, indeed, what the result was – I’m not too sure, but thankfully the whole event will be edited into a film to be shown at the Site Gallery throughout the games, four rounds of which will be played at Bramall Lane.

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This year almost 30 Alternate Realities installations were available, for free, across the city. They ranged from fully immersive VR headset experiences to merely sitting in some

that comfy chairs, playing a card game with complete strangers. They were in the Site Gallery and the Workstation, an empty shop on Fargate and the Performance Lab on Arundel Gate. Kubo Walks the City was staged in its own room above Kommune, and invited us to don a VR headset and explore an exquisite rendering of Seoul in the 1930s. One of the most moving was Rozsypne, where you could experience

PICTURE: CECILIA HOU

DIARIES


PICTURE: MINGTON CHN

PICTURE: CHIJIA HUA

PICTURE: DAVID CHANG

Our resident dochead Mark Perkins shifts his focus from films to all the other immersive delights on offer at this year’s festival…

what it was like to be in that Ukrainian village in 2014, when flight MH17 was shot down leading to debris and bodies raining down. The most impressive, and the one which won the festival award, was The Sound Voice Project – a three-part celebration of the human voice, questioning what a voice is, and movingly exploring what happens to people when their voice is gone.

Live on-stage interviews this year featured documentarian Brett Morgen, Paralympian Ellie Simmonds and journalist Clive Myrie. But my favourite was Will Young, interviewed by Rob Rinder. It was moving and illuminating, as Young talked about his recent Channel 4 documentary Losing My Twin Rupert. Rob Rinder was the perfect choice for this, as his charming and

supportive interview style, perfectly enabled Will to talk about a very personal and devastating event for him and his family. The war in Ukraine is never far from our thoughts these days, and the fact that a scheduled film festival there could clearly not take place led DocFest to step up and invite participants to Sheffield. It was a privilege to get to attend a reception hosted by The British Council, as they launched the Ukrainian Season of Culture – a joint project with the Ukrainian Institute. A delegation from Ukraine were there, clearly moved by the generosity shown by the UK toward them, as they marked the various Ukraine focused films and events over the festival. Perhaps it was the fact that the festival has been effectively absent since 2019, but from my perspective, DocFest 2022 exceeded all expectations to become the best I have yet attended. Put me down for 2023.

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FOOD & DRINK // DHABA

FUSION FOOD

Steel Yard Kelham has come on in leaps and bounds over the last few months and its latest addition, the family-run, Indian fusion restaurant Dhaba, is a very tasty addition to the bustling courtyard. The restaurant can be found on the upper level of the Neepsend shipping container development, and we popped in for a natter with owner Adam Mir, who you may recognise from men’s clothing shop Sa-kis (RIP), to have a go at some of the amazing dishes on the street food portion of the menu. Dhaba, which takes its name from the Indian word for a roadside food stall, focuses on Indian fusion food with a straightforward, casual menu of wraps, curries and loaded fries that have been passed down from Adam’s dad’s secret recipes. “My dad has got a massive passion for food,” says Adam. “As a kid he learned how to cook from his mum, and when he left home at 16 to travel the world, he picked up bits in each country he visited before settling here. “He met my mum who loves cooking English cuisine, and she taught him how to make English food and he taught her Indian food. Over the years that became its own fusion, which is what we’re doing here. “Growing up mixed heritage, a lot of my mates would

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come around to our house and say, ‘I’ve never tried a curry like this.’ That’s because it’s authentic home-cooked food and not like what you’d get in a restaurant. “When my dad retired, he was a bit bored, so I asked him if he’d like to help me set up a restaurant to pass on these recipes. We now have a chef who he’s taught these secret family recipes, too.” The homecooked ethos can be seen best in the naming of its dishes, where you’re simply presented with chicken curry or lamb curry, rather than madras or tikka masala, as that’s what you’d get if you went to someone’s home, Adam explains. The street food dishes are where the fusion element can be found, with dishes like the loaded fries with daal, which elevates the humble potato into another stratosphere! Growing up, Adam remembers Sunday Dinners with spicy gravy, which the ever-evolving menu will begin to incorporate as the restaurant becomes more established. “The next thing we’ll be adding to the menu is Yorkshire

puddings with curry – and that’s what we’re all about. It’s the blending of two cultures that both have a passion for cooking, and putting those skills together to create a fusion. “We use all the best cuts like we would at home. We don’t cut any corners and it’s all prepared fresh on the day. I don’t want these recipes to be lost. I don’t have a passion for cooking, but if we can give this to other people, it will give my dad a legacy and something to be proud of.” While Adam’s dad isn’t in the restaurant full-time, since it opened in April he’s enjoyed popping in to oversee his recipes. This family approach to hospitality is new to everyone with Adam’s background firmly grounded in retail. “It’s been really exciting but challenging at the same time,” says Adam. “I’ve never been a waiter, so it’s been a learning curve, right down to how to fold a napkin! “I love the Steel Yard as a space, and I can’t wait to see what the future holds for us.” @dhaba_indianstreetfood


Eat more Curreh.

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KELU 294, Shalesmoor, Sheffield S3 8UL @ k_e_l_u


FOOD & DRINK// NEWS

SMOKED TO PERFECTION Beer and BBQ food – a match made in heaven, right? Especially when you’ve got two much-loved Sheffield brands on the case! Earlier this month, award-winning Kelham-based craft brewers Heist Brew Co and city-centre restaurant Smoke BBQ launched their collab beer Smoke Red – a devilishly good 4.5% red ale. Nicely bridging the gap between porter and bitter, the gluten-free beer is a perfect pairing with smoked meats and can be purchased both at the Smoke restaurant and Heist’s taproom brewery. Adam France, co-owner of Heist, told Exposed: “We were approached by Smoke to produce their red ale and, as a favourite eating spot in the city, it was a no-brainer to partner up. They have literally been with us since the beginning of our journey, as they provided street food for one of our opening weekends, and we’ve been in contact ever since. It’s important in the current climate that businesses and communities stick together and support each other instead of the dog-eat-dog mentality; it’s key to business progression and survival in such times.” So, with BBQ season well and truly underway, what are you waiting for? @smokebbquk // @heistbrew

BAKE MY DAY...

An all-new Mediterranean bakery and patisserie is set to open on Church Street later this month and owners promise the gorgeouslooking site will offer residents the chance to sample unique savoury and sweet treats, many of which you won’t be able to find anywhere else in the city. Le Ble’s team will make the majority of its savoury snacks, including everything from the humble sausage roll to speciality Greek feta-filled delights, onsite in their purpose-built bakery each day, but in order to provide that extra level of authenticity, many of the desserts are being made fresh in Greece, blast frozen and shipped directly

COMING SOON...

to their Sheffield venue, as we’re told the ingredients and water can’t be replicated here in the UK. The patisserie’s beautiful, bespoke interior has been created by a Barcelona-based architect and is intended to give the vibe of a jewellery shop. The centrepiece is a huge blossom tree, and the walls and floors are awash with pastel pinks that would have Wes Anderson drooling (even before he sees the cakes!). The rotating menu means that not everything will be available each day, but customers can pre-order anything from the menu online and there will be vegan, gluten free and halal options across their entire range of products.Ahead of opening, Apostolos tells us: “It’s like waiting for my first child to be born! I can’t even be excited because we’re all super busy. Maybe ask me in a month!” @leble_uk WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 47


FOOD & DRINK // NEWS

PUTTING IN THE HARD YARDS Over the Yardarm, a new Abbeydale Road cocktail bar with European-style vibes, opened its doors and spacious terrace to the Sheffield public last month. The new venue, based in the former home of Starlight Kitchens, is the perfect summer addition boasting a 24-seater sun terrace and huge sliding doors inspired by metropolitan drinking spots in European cities. Alfie Chester, who opened the bar with his dad, Andrew, told Exposed: “I’ve always really loved drinking in places like Seville and Barcelona with that sort of on-street, off-street, indoor, outdoor vibe that you get with those tiny little places. Where everyone just spreads out into the street and drinks out there. It’s a really sociable, very European style of drinking.” The bar takes its name from the traditional nautical saying ‘sun is over the yardarm’, which indicates it’s time for a morning drink, but Alfie is quick to point out the bar will not be nautical-themed. “The name just means it’s time for a drink; it’s time for the first drink of the day, to start the weekend and time to come down and meet your friends. “I’ve always loved Abbeydale Road and always drank down here. It’s something we want to be part of, and we want to find our own niche within it. There are already great independents in the area, and we hope to add to that and find our own spot.” The new bar is split over two floors, offering a new vantage on Abbeydale Road from the top floor cocktail lounge area, while they also ffer eight craft beer lines, which will inevitably, being just a barrel roll away, include Abbeydale Brewery, alongside a range of popular breweries and modern wines. @overtheyardarmbar 48 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

HAVE AN INDIE-GO Owners of Indie-Go Kelham, based in Kelham Island’s Steel Yard shipping container development, are set to open their second venue, Indie-Go Resurrection, in the former home of the Devonshire Cat pub in Sheffield city centre. The new site hopes to be open to the public by the end of July and promises to be a bar and live music venue with an inclusive ethos that looks to nurture young, local music talent, as well as playing ‘banging indie tunes’ from 10am – 3am. Co-owner Andrew Hague told Exposed: “At the new site we want to give local bands the chance to play on our platform. Give them a go, you know? There’s a gap for that in Sheffield right now and there’s loads of talent out there.” “It’ll be a dedicated indie bar with a friendly atmosphere, where people can express themselves. We’re going to have a drop-in space, where you can bring your demo tapes or memory sticks so we can have a listen.” Bar manager Russ Thompson added: “It’s a lot bigger place than the first bar, so we’re amplifying

the offer. We’re aiming for everyone to know that on Friday and Saturday night we’ll have live music, then on a Sunday we’ll incorporate a jam night.” The bar comes from five Sheffield-based indie music-lovers who, back in the day, spent many a night falling out of the CASBAH and Limit. After Andrew built a log cabin home-bar in his garden with his daughter back in 2019, predominantly to serve his mates, the group of friends saw the potential and joined forces to create Indie-Go Kelham, looking to recreate the vibe of those long-lost Sheffield landmarks of their youth. Following the success of its first incarnation, they have now set upon creating the new site, which is more than double the size and offers more scope to offer a fully stocked bar featuring plenty of local breweries, ‘rocktails’, live sport, bottomless brunches, indie DJ sets and live music. @indiegoresurrection


SHEFFIELD’S FIRST JAPANESE CHARCOAL BBQ+BAR

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UPFRONT // GIVE IT A GO

SHEFFIELD PLATE @SHEFFIELDPLATE

THE PLACE

Situated in the city centre’s bustling Orchard Square courtyard, Sheffield Plate is a popular foodhall showcasing incredible street food from around the world. On the first floor you’ll find a spacious seating area in an industrial chic setting, flanked by six mouthwatering vendors specialising in everything from Thai curries to Peruvian delicacies. Downstairs you’ll find another social space served by two bars, The Orchard Tap and Liquor Lab, plus a large projector screen that’s perfect for sports fixtures.

THE VENDORS

Covering all your food and drink needs inside you’ll discover… Wingin’ It The highest quality wings in Sheff with a range of succulent, delicious flavours inspired by the world. Colombo Street Food Sumptuous Sri Lankan dishes made authentically from traditional family recipes. Taverna Street Food Portuguese classics and smashed burgers to die for. Try the Franchesinha – a famous sandwich from Porto – or the grilled steak in Madeira sweet potato bread. Taste Peru Authentic Peruvian dishes ranging from tasty empanadas and yuca fries to homemade chilli con carne and tallarin saltados. Thai Kitchen Thai street food specialists who’ve made a name for themselves through incredible curries, pad thai and fried rice dishes. 50 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Meat Up Meaty Balkan dishes covering gyros, burgers, mixed grills and salads. The Orchard Tap Beers and ciders on draught, plus chilled bottles and cans in the fridges. Throw in a solid selection of spirits and wines and you’re sorted! Liquour Lab A subterranean cocktail (and mocktail) den slinging out banging tipples – from the classics to innovative new concoctions.

WHAT’S ON As well as providing a top-notch food and drink venue, Sheffield Plate prides itself on being a social hub, hosting a wide range of activities from live entertainment (every Fri and Sat from 7pm) and open mics (fortnightly on Thurs, 7pm-9pm) to its hugely popular interactive ‘Smart Quiz’ (every Weds, 7pm-9pm) For some family entertainment this holiday, Sheffield Plate in the Square will be hosting various events across the summer. This will include Summer Themed Tea Parties every Wednesday in August, with tickets priced at £10 per person, as well as a Disney Drawing Session (Sat 6th August, 2pm-4pm), priced at £15pp. Keep an eye on their socials for further information and ticket announcements.

31-33 Orchard Square, Sheffield City Centre, Sheffield S1 2FB @sheffieldplate // facebook.com/ SheffieldPlate


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FOOD & DRINK // JONI

JONI AT THE

DOUBLE!

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PICTURE: ANDY BROWN

The team behind Joni oversaw the successful launch of Island Café and The Millowner’s Arms in Kelham Island Museum and are now set to take over the running of the Beauchief museum’s visitors centre café from August. The café spearheads the museum’s plans to increase its offering with longer opening hours and Joni will be open to both residents and museum visitors whenever the site is open. The vibe will be very similar to their neighbourhood café in Oughtibridge: slinging specialty coffee from Foundation Roasters, baking croissants fresh on site each day and serving up classic breakfast, brunch and lunch dishes like eggs benedict, alongside delicious croque monsieur, cakes and bakes. Liam, who co-owns Joni with business partner Nathan, told Exposed: “After the successful reinvention of Joni in Oughtibridge, we saw the importance of these district centres. Sheffield is a conglomerate of villages, and with more people working from home, people want somewhere to come and get a good coffee or some good food in their own neighbourhood. We want Joni 2 to be another community anchor point. “We’re very excited about it, as I think that that part of town is just lovely – what a backdrop. Just to sit there and have a coffee under that tree is beautiful and we want to give people even more reason to visit this beautiful piece of our city’s industrial history.” Nathan added: “It’s great to be a part of the museums plans to open additional days by helping to keep it free to visit through the revenue we generate. It also has the same character as Joni 1, with the stone buildings, and that’s something that is important to us. This is hopefully going to be the second of many Joni locations.” The chance to open a second Joni site on the museum grounds was brought to them by the museum’s trust themselves who, after the successful merge of Museums Sheffield and Sheffield Industrial Museums, recognised the opportunity to create a space for the local community to enjoy the beautiful surroundings by increasing its offer.

PICTURE: IAN SPOONER

Popular Oughtibridge café Joni is set to open its second site in the historic setting of Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet.

Following the successful collaboration at Kelham Island Museum, the museum needed to look no further than the team behind Joni. Kim Streets, Chief Executive at Sheffield Museums, told Exposed: ‘We’re very much looking forward to welcoming Joni to Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet. Joni has earned a loyal following over in Oughtibridge and we’ve no doubt they’ll do the same here. “A daytime café with such a fantastic offer will really place Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet at the heart of the community, providing the perfect place for both local residents and visitors to the Hamlet to

enjoy great coffee and great food.” Joni, which takes its name from Liam’s grandmother who recently celebrated her 90th birthday in the Oughtibridge café, have been in discussions with local residents about what they would want from the space and that has helped define some of what the new Joni will be about. Pop down this month to see how they’re getting on! Find out the latest opening times for Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet and it’s onsite café here: simt.co.uk/ abbeydale-industrial-hamlet.


BREAKFAST, BRUNCH, LUNCH & COCKTAILS

BOOK A TABLE NOW!

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 1 LANGSETT ROAD SOUTH, OUGHTIBRIDGE, S35 0GY @JONI_OUGHTIBRIDGE | MYJONI.CO.UK


FOOD AND DRINK

A NIGHT AT THE DOGS Reviewing Owlerton Stadium’s Panorama Restaurant For over 90 years now, Owlerton Stadium has been established as Sheffield’s premier destination for greyhound racing. You’d have to go back to 1932 for their opening night of races, an event which reportedly attracted 10,000 visitors, and if you fast forward to the subsequent century, the S6 destination remains a popular night out for groups seeking an exciting get-together. Naturally, over the years there have been a number of significant developments to both the stadium and overall experience. Today the culinary offering is just as important as the live entertainment and the modern glass-fronted Panorama Restaurant seats up to 300 people, promising a seasonal menu choice from highly experienced chefs. The restaurant package also includes a personal waiting service throughout four hours of racing as well as tote runners who work the tables to take bets. Basically, the idea is to ensure that you’re fully taken care of, and once settled into seats everything is in place for a comfortable but exhilarating evening of socialising. As our party of four were welcomed into the restaurant area, we quickly realised just how popular the place was. Friday night was in full swing and there didn’t appear to be a table spare amidst the sleek, bustling setting. Once seated, we ordered a bottle of merlot from the impressive global wine list and our host explained how things worked – handy as it was the first visit for two of our party. The races began as our starters arrived, and the convivial atmosphere picked up a notch or two. For our appetisers, we’d doubled up as couples on the smoked haddock and cheddar tart and the pressed gammon and mustard seed terrine. Creamy, cheesy and with a delicate smokiness from the fish, the fluffy pastry was complemented nicely by an accompanying tangy pickle sauce. The super savoury terrines provided a salty, hearty treat spread onto a toasted bloomer and mixed with sides of pickled veg supplying a welcome piquant kick. Now onto the mains, where three of our number were thoroughly won over by the chargrilled sirloin steaks (truth be told, a sly peek at the orders of the table behind us helped to influence this near-unanimous decision) while our remaining companion chose the welcome vegetarian option of pancake cannelloni. Once mains were ordered – again with timely, friendly service from the waiting staff – we could relax and turn our attention back to the conversation, our racecards and the perfect 360 views of the track, providing a clear eagle-eye angle to proceedings (though we also had handily placed tv screens displaying the action for when things got a bit close to call). The sumptuous steaks were cooked to medium-rare perfection, served in a velvety, rich red wine jus and topped with a beef bourguignon garnish of sauteed onions, 54 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK


PHOTO: VICTORIA GREENSMITH

mushrooms and velvety mash. Sides were ample and we could pile our plates further with honey-glazed carrots, roast potatoes, cabbage and red onion. My partner’s indulgent pancake cannelloni arrived in a sizeable dish capped with gooey mozzarella cheese, the pasta inside stuffed with sweet butternut squash and tangy sun blush tomatoes. The more than generous servings (there’s no question of value for money here!) had almost written us off, but we had enough in the tank to share a tempting cheeseboard with celery, chutney and biscuits, plus the pear and almond tart – a classic sweet pairing elevated with the decadent addition of honeycomb ice cream and Biscoff crumb. The whole evening seemed timed to perfection as we just finished off desserts in time for the final races. Alas, there were no victors at the table from the racing on show, but when it came to the food on offer and general night out satisfaction we felt like real winners. All of the Owlerton Stadium racing packages are available to view and book online at owlertonstadium.co.uk


the cribs

foundrysu.com

Tuesday 2 Aug ‘22, Doors 8pm

queenz: the show with balls!

the mission

Wednesday 25 Oct ‘22, Doors 7pm

Wednesday 3 Aug ‘22, Doors 7pm

mdou moctar Wednesday 17 Aug ‘22, Doors 7pm

TAYCE Wednesday 14 Sept ‘22, Doors 7pm

matt maltese Sunday 2 Oct ‘22, Doors 7pm

turin brakes Thursday 6 Oct ‘22, Doors 7pm

agmp presents: from the jam Friday 29 Nov ‘22, Doors 7pm

bruce juice Saturday 5 Nov ‘22, Doors 7pm

the bug club Monday 7 Nov ‘22, Doors 7:30pm

showhawk duo Saturday 19 Nov ‘22, Doors 7:30pm

disco wonderland: the abba disco

craig charles funk & soul club

Friday 7 Oct ‘22, Doors 10pm

Friday 29 Nov ‘22, Doors 9pm

beabadoobee

cloudbusting:

Friday 14 Oct ‘22, Doors 7pm

since september Saturday 15 Oct ‘22, Doors 7pm

porridge radio

the music of kate bush Saturday 3 Dec ‘22, Doors 7:30pm

daft funk

Saturday 25 Mar ‘23, Doors 7:30pm

Thursday 20 Oct ‘22 Doors 7:30pm

stray from the path Friday 21 Oct ‘22 Doors 7pm

scan for tickets


the ship inn

draught / rotating cask / premium spirits live bt sport / live music open 7 days a week

keep an eye on our socials for offers, upcoming events and more

@shipinnkelham

312 shalesmoor, sheffield, s3 8ul


NIGHLIFE

a night at the bingo Ahead of Bongo’s XL 80s-themed bingo rave extravaganza, Sheffield’s host for the evening Chris Mac explains what to expect from this adrenalinefueled mix of traditional bingo, dance-offs, rave intervals, special guests and countless magic moments. WORDS BY JOE FOOD

First of all, how did you get into this job? I’d been friends with one of the co-founders, Josh Burke, for a long time. I DJed at a big indie disco in Liverpool and we got to know each other through that. Bongo’s Bingo had been running for a couple of years and Josh messaged me out of the blue, asking if I’d consider being a host for the nights. It was really big in Liverpool by then, and I’d had plenty of stage experience through being in bands – although this is very different! – so I thought, f**k it, let’s give this a go. I’ve always enjoyed making people laugh and being on stages, so it seemed to fit. I’ve probably done about 200-plus shows now! Do you do anything to psyche yourself up before the shows? In the early days I would drink quite enthusiastically, but not so much now. We’ve got a really good team who’ve got it all nailed on now, so I don’t feel like I need the Dutch Courage now. I might do a few warm-ups beforehand to get my heart racing. Over the last three or four years, Bongo’s Bingo seems to have exploded. Why do you think the country has taken to it so well? I think people want an experience with their nights out these days; Bongo’s is certainly an experience. Fundamentally, it’s three hours of relatively cheap, high-octane legal fun. There’s a bit of escapism in there as well and I think that now, post-Covid lockdowns, people are really looking to let their hair down and escape. There’s a broad appeal; it’s almost impossible to not get swept up in the atmosphere. When it comes to the end of the night, you’ll find pretty much 58 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

everyone on their tables, hands in the air, with big smiles. It’s pretty special. You’re in Sheff next month with Bongo’s Bingo XL show, an 80s-themed special. What separates the XL shows from the regular BB events? It’s the same bingo show – but on steroids. The production levels are massive, we’ve got some surprise 80s guests coming along, we’ve got enormous cash prizes. The usual capacity in Sheffield is 700, but at this, it’s going to be 2,200 people. So you’re tripling the atmosphere. After 200-plus shows you must have a few wild stories to regale us with? Yes, but not many are suitable for print! One of the first shows I ever did was in Sheffield and I remember playing ‘Time of my Life’ and trying to do the iconic dive into the crowd from the stage. Sadly, the crowd wasn’t quite as big as I thought, and I ended up going straight through to the deck. That was a bit of a bruiser. If any of the Sheffielders I jumped on are reading this, I can only apologise! What would you say to people who still haven’t been won over by the Bongo’s craze? I’d say try it once. I guarantee you’ll find inner peace or love for the experience. It’s impossible not to feel the magic on the night. Bongo’s Bingo biggest Sheffield show to date will be held over two nights on 23rd and 24th September at Magna. Tickets priced from £24 and available from bongosbingo.co.uk.


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NIGHTLIFE // VILLAGE SCREEN Equipped with some cinematic classics – including a Steel City fave – Village Screen’s pop-up cinema and silent disco comes to Kenwood Hall this month.

GOING THE FULL MONTY! From Thursday 4th August – Sunday 7th August attendees can lounge on vintage striped deckchairs for screenings of classic musical Grease, 80’s favourite Dirty Dancing, Sheffield’s finest The Full Monty, and a ‘roar-some’ screening of Jurassic Park to round off the weekend! The Village Screen have been hosting cinema events in the grounds of Kenwood Hall since 2018 and this time around, pre-film cinemagoers can enjoy a silent disco in the grounds of Kenwood Hall before snuggling down as the sun sets to watch the film. The film sound will also be played through the headphones provided for the silent disco, really allowing you to immerse yourself in the film. Guests can choose to bring their own seating or book to lounge on the deckchairs, there are even VIP gazebos and giant deckchairs! For an added touch, you can write a message, to be shown on the big screen, for your loved ones or pals. As always with The Village Screen cinema experiences, there will be a choice of delicious and independent street food options, with the perfect match of drinks and snacks, including themed cocktails, Prosecco, freshly cooked popcorn and more. The Village Screen are a small, independent, event production team, who have been running experiential, cinematic events in Sheffield, Manchester and across the UK for the past seven years. Their wonderful team work tirelessly to ensure they deliver a truly amazing experience and are on hand at each event, to greet you with a smile and look after you throughout your chosen event. Expect awesome pre-show entertainment, fantastic décor and a cool, summer vibe! Tickets are available from thevillagescreen.com and priced at £16 for adults, £14 for concessions, £12 for children and family tickets at £48. Deckchair hire can be added for £5, VIP packages available. WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 61



MUSIC // TOP PICKS

LOOK LOCAL: SHEAFS BRING THE NOISE THE CRIBS

The Foundry // 2 August // £15 The Cribs are heading to The Foundry to celebrate the reissue of their first three albums. British indie rock band have been on the scene since 2001 with guest appearances from legends like ex-The Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr. The Jarman brothers will also be featuring new music from their latest album ‘Night Network’ released in 2020. foundrysu.com

SOOT SPRITE

Sidney and Matilda // 4 August // £8.14 Soot Sprite is a self-described sad-gaze band hailing from Exeter. Originally the solo project of Elise Cook, Soot Sprite has evolved into a three piece band for their first EP ‘Sharp Tongue’ in 2019. Additionally, their latest record ‘Poltergeists’ was released with Specialist Subject Records and was featured on NME. sidneyandmatilda.com

LAURA CORTESE & THE DANCE CARDS

The Greystones // 17 August // £15.40 Featuring a rotating cast of talent since its formation in 2014 with Cortese at it’s core, the indie-folk band released it’s latest album ‘BITTER BETTER’ in 2020, showcasing dance-worthy grooves, synths and loops. www.mygreystones.co.uk

WE ARE SCIENTISTS

The Leadmill // 25 August // £20 Following the release of their critically acclaimed album ‘Huffy’, American rock band will be heading to the Leadmill to showcase their much-loved shtick – a unique mix of indie rock and part postpunk revival with a touch of 80s synth pop. leadmill.co.uk

New tunes from an exciting local act! Last month, Sheffield band and former Exposed In Session stars SHEAFS released their debut album A Happy Medium. The post-punk five-piece consists of Chris (guitar), Lawrence (lead vocals), Charles (guitar), Charlie (drums) and Cal (bass), who all met at Sheffield Hallam University. For the past few years the band has been building a strong fanbase through their riotous performances, performing at festivals such as Leeds/Reading, Isle of Wight, Y Not and Tramlines. After releasing their debut EP, the band scored a ‘Next Wave’, on BBC Radio 1’s Indie show with Jack Saunders who described the band as “coming in hot!”. The album opens with a strong contender, ‘En Route Distress’, a pummelling 4 minutes of post-punk mastery. The album will also feature single ‘Millennial’, which continues the band’s relationship with two-time Grammy award-winning producer Adrian Bushby. Elsewhere over the ten tracks you’ll find more of the punchy, riff-laden tunes that have cemented SHEAFS as one of the region’s most exciting guitar acts. The release of the album has been followed up with a UK tour, which ended in a raucous Tramlines gig at the end of last month. Not discovered the band yet? You can listen to A Happy Medium across all major streaming platforms

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MUSIC // FESTIVAL REVIEW

OUTLOOK UK: OFF TO A FLYER Words: Aisling Bennett Pictures: Jake Davis

The first weekend of July saw the inaugural edition of Outlook UK grace the grounds of Cholmondeley Castle, Cheshire. Expectations were high, with the world’s biggest and best acts in bass-heavy music all in attendance. Exposed went along to see if they delivered… Outlook has been taking place in Croatia since 2008, in which time it has received widespread critical acclaim and built an army of dedicated fans. The decision to move the festival to the UK was bold and ambitious due to the difficulties of hosting large-scale bass events in this country. But it was clear from day one that the organisers, artists and crew were putting in every ounce of their blood, sweat and tears to give sound-system culture the celebration and respect it deserves. Each stage had a unique feel, with different label and sound system takeovers to keep things fresh across the four-day weekend. The Main Stage brought all the warm feels, with highlights including a fire show from DRS, a set of the best in rare reggae and roots records from Earl Gateshead and a stunning, soulful performance from singer Hollie Cook, who shone on stage as the sun appeared on Saturday afternoon. The Subdub Arena was an absolute joy to walk into, with four mighty rigs blasting out dub and reggae all day long. Being a small arena with hay bales acting as a sound-buffering wall, standing in the centre was like being wrapped in a fuzzy blanket of bass vibrations. Sound Systems Iration Steppas, Channel One and Mungo’s Hi-Fi were but a few of the stand-outs from across the weekend. At The Keep, we caught dubstep masterclasses from the 64 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

illusive Goth-trad and Manchester’s own Biome, as well as an exceptional set from Yung Singh, who is continuing to make tidal waves across the scene. Smuggler’s Cove packed a pint-sized punch throughout the weekend, with Dub Smugglers and Mina providing serious party/carnival vibes. A last-minute schedule change on Sunday meant legends Fabio & Grooverider, followed by fellow heavyweight Goldie, took the reins at the Cove late afternoon. Both billed for later sets on bigger stages, they showed their experience and wisdom by saving the drum n bass for nighttime and throwing down some house bangers. It’s only right we give a big shout to Sheffield’s Sinai Sound System, who were most heavily impacted by the noise restrictions, and to all the ravers that continued to pack into the Sinai Arena across the weekend, showing nothing but love and support. And last but not least, a special mention to Chloé Robinson and her Pretty Weird label takeover at the Tiltyard stage on Saturday, which was, without doubt, the highlight of the weekend. The stage showcased a masterfully curated line-up of artists who all delivered the highest quality sets. Standouts include Shy One, Thys, Chloé’s own b2b with DJ ADHD and of course LCY, who closed the stage with a whirlwind trip though UK bass, jungle, percs and even a bit of happy hardcore at the end. The tight noise restrictions caused a few unavoidable problems, but the love of music and community spirit won out, making the weekend a truly magical and unforgettable experience.


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MALAH PALINKA

12TH AUGUST £8 ADV Malah Palinka are back at Yellow Arch for the first time since their 2021 sold out show. Inspired by funk, hip-hop, jazz and pop, Malah Palinka are an 8piece pop-fusion band from Sheffield, UK. Their debut EP “How to Wake Up.” dropped in 2021 following a highly successful Kickstarter and since then they’ve been selling out shows across the north. Combining infectious funk grooves and swanky harmonies, Malah Palinka deliver energetic live performances designed to get people moving. Support from Casual Delights A brand spanking new funk & soul band. Playing a mixture of their own takes on interesting covers & some intricate groove based songs of their own, Casual Delights insight soul & pleasure the heart.

SOUL GLO

10TH SEPTEMBER £11 ADV We are delighted that Soul Glo join us in September, hot on the heels of their latest release 'Diaspora Problems'.

Late December 2020 found the Philadelphia, PA post-hardcore outfit holed away in an unfinished warehouse, beginning to find drum tones for their upcoming full length, Diaspora Problems. They had just begun to accept that they would be in talks with Epitaph Records, and that it was likely they were going to go with the label as they hadn’t even begun to reach a place where they could consider shopping it to other record labels. Working with Epitaph was far and away the best case scenario that the band could’ve hoped for, but they simultaneously wondered if the label had any understanding of what they were getting into. Not one to be missed!

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2022 05/08 06/08 07/08 12/08 18/08 02/09 03/09

IS THIS IT? FOR THE RECORD SLIM WILSON & THE SWAMP BROTHERS MALAH PALINKA YELLOW ARCH COMEDY CLUB IS THIS IT? FOR THE RECORD

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SOUL GLO YELLOW ARCH COMEDY CLUB PLANET ZOGG 22ND BIRTHDAY BLACKWATERS YA PRESENTS: AUTOSUGGESTION + RUBY LUGER + PETE JACKSON 23/09 NAGUALS

YELLOWARCH.COM/EVENTS 30-36 BURTON ROAD, SHEFFIELD, S3 8BX


MUSIC // LIVE REVIEWS

KRAR COLLECTIVE @ CROOKES SOCIAL CLUB WORDS: MARK PERKINS PHOTO: FIL MAZZARINO

THE CHATS @ THE LEADMILL WORDS: ASH BIRCH PHOTO: JAMES WOOLLEN

It’s the hottest day of the year so far and on this sweltering Sunday evening the Leadmill is heaving. For their first ever visit to Sheffield, Queensland’s finest The Chats have apparently brought the sunshine with them and the Leadmill is a slicked sweatbox – just like it should be. Advertised support The Chisel have pulled out at the eleventh hour, so it comes as a bit of surprise to some of the audience (us included) when in their place stride local punksters, Mouthparts. They walk onto stage led by the drummer who, like a budget Lucha Libre, sports his customary tinfoil helmet. After introducing themselves even more confusingly as ‘The Chisel from London’, they blast into their set at breakneck speed and a good majority of the sold-out crowd are immediately sold on them. Even if, when they do eventually tell us who they are, no one quite catches it, leading to a lot of post gig chatter in the Spar around the corner concerning who they actually were. Anyway, it’s Mouthparts, lads. remember the name (this time!).

With all that cleared up for the flaming galahs among us, we move onto our headliners, Ozzy punk powerhouse The Chats, and strewth (Sorry. Not sorry!), did they put on a show! This might sound like damning with faint praise, but The Chats are very good at what they do. It’s not rocket science. It’s not even all that clever half of the time. But it’s bloody good! There’s a real throwback feel to The Chats, not in a nostalgic, naval gazing, this has all been done before kind of way, but more in a you don’t see gigs like this anymore kinda vibe. If you’ve been paying attention since they formed in 2016, it doesn’t really come as a shock, but it’s still thrilling to witness songs coming at you with little room to breathe, one replacing the last relentlessly. The sweat soaked mob braving the front of stage were sweaty before they even got in here, so must be dangerously close to dehydration by the midpoint, but, undeterred, they pogo, mosh and crowd surf their way through a set which is peppered with bangers from the diminutive three-piece. Fan favourite tracks like Smoko, Identity Theft and 6L GTR lift the roof off and Bus Money’s hook ‘all I need is a buck or two.’ gets the crowd’s vocal cords loosened. Somehow, amidst all this frenetic energy, there’s still time for singer Eamon Sandwith to take a minute to stick the boot in to ‘the c***s tryna shut this place down.’ Quite Eamon, quite. There’s no messing about with an encore, and when the set plummets to an abrupt end, we scuttle out into the Sunday evening haze with Foreigner’s I Want to Know What Love Is ringing in our ears. It’s played at an ear bleeding volume that is somehow louder than the hour or so of high energy punk we’ve just been happily battered with. #WeCantLoseLeadmill 66 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

It’s becoming something of a habit now, to wander up to the Crookes Social on a Friday night to see some live African music. It’s not that long since Deli Sosimi and his Afrobeat Quintet played here, and tonight seemed to be the natural follow-up to that. This was another night for dancing; in fact, I don’t think anyone within my eye line stayed still at all during either of the Krar Collective’s two sets. The music of Ethiopia is not something I know much about, but I do now know that the traditional Ethiopian instrument they play on stage, something of a hybrid between an electric guitar and a harp, is called a krar. Their own handmade versions of the traditional acoustic instruments created a lush bass sound and rhythmic lead guitar sound in the skilful hands of the players, but all the time with the emphasis on creating music impossible not to dance to. They took to the stage as a three-piece, with kebero drums in the centre, for the opening tune. As the crowd were nicely grooving, they were joined by singer Genet Assefa, who added her vocals over the top of their groove. What followed was a modern take on traditional Ethiopian tunes. And talking of dancing, what about that ‘shoulder dancing’? At one point in the first half, a former member of the band joined them on stage and started to dance, principally just moving his shoulders, the likes of which I’d never seen before. The band played two sets, and while every song had its own identity, and distinctive refrains, all of them combined to form a dance groove that at once inspired and exhausted anyone who was there that night. Crookes Social has never seen a more colourful feast of mind-blowing Ethiopian grooves. More like this, please.



FILM WITH CAL REID

r e h c r o c s r e summ TOP GUN MAVERICK

It’s time, dear readers, to reveal my film pick of the summer... If there is one film which epitomises its decade more than any other, it is without a doubt Top Gun. Famous largely for the Kenny Loggins tracks and its Reagan Era posturing, over the years it has become the subject of affectionate ridicule despite being insanely enjoyable more than thirty years on. So macho is its dialogue and infamous beach volleyball scene, that the film frequently horseshoes unintentionally from rampaging masculinity to pure homoeroticism. For my money that only makes it more awesome. For these reasons amongst others, Top Gun is also one of the last films you could ever imagine needing a sequel, let alone one you’d expect to work. Not only is it a product of its time, but the discourse remains firmly entrenched in its decade. Still, that hasn’t stopped Hollywood before, and after numerous delays and endless repeats of the trailers, Top Gun: Maverick finally landed in cinemas, and by God, is it good! What makes a great sequel in my eyes is a film that shows respect for the original whilst existing totally in its own right, to the point where it can be viewed and appreciated independently. Plenty of great sequels work best as companion pieces. The Godfather Part

II, for example, succeeds largely thanks to what was established before with its characters. Top Gun: Maverick unquestionably surpasses the original, breaking free of its influence, but remaining conscious of what made the original work beyond its unadulterated 1980s-ness. The aerial training and combat sequences are executed with an insurmountable authentic splendour, but at the heart of it is Cruise’s Pete ‘Maverick’ Mitchell, finding himself being doggedly present in a world trying to force him out. Maverick is a man held back by guilt, despite his outwardly cavalier attitude to flying. Ironically, it’s a film about consequences, and the need to let go and forgive yourself for the benefit of those close to you. Surprisingly, this is rarely seen in blockbusters these days (I’m looking at you, Thor: Love and Thunder). A film with no political or social agenda – not that it’s necessarily a bad thing if done well – but Maverick’s lack of an agenda beyond its exploration of universal human emotions widens its accessibility to anyone. Maverick demonstrates the value of thematic simplicity with blockbuster cinema, and that films do not have to reinvent the wheel to be exceptional. Fans of the original still have plenty to fist pump at, with another shirtless beach sequence set to a banger of a tune by OneRepublic. The credits and opening minutes are straight from the first film, complete with Danger Zone playing over shots of F-18s and F-35s. The specifics of the mission pay homage to classic aerial war adventures, in particular 663 Squadron. Miles Teller, Jennifer Connelly and Val Kilmer all finely support God’s gift to action cinema, Tom Cruise. It’s exhilarating, touching and funny… it’s just brilliant! 5/5

COMING SOON... Nope Unsettling things are going on out at a family-run California ranch. The new horror-thriller from Get Out and Us director Jordan Peele promises more of his trademark style. Don’t Worry Darling Ever wonder what your husband really does at work? Don’t ask! Harry Styles, Florence Pugh, and Chris Pine star in this psychological thriller set against the backdrop of an idyllic 1950s American neighbourhood. Bullet Train Five assassins on the same journey to Kyoto discover that their respective missions may be closely linked with each other. Brad Pitt, Sandra Bullock, and Aaron TaylorJohnson star in this wild action-comedy.

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THE BOYS SEASON 3 With the conclusion of Prime’s The Boys’ latest season, it is now another agonising wait until we can revel in more diabolical carnage. From the first episode, The Boys set itself apart from other alternative superhero films and shows with its extreme mixture of violence, comedy, and razor-sharp socio-political satire. As an adaptation, it has benefitted greatly from the times, taking well-aimed shots at the superhero genre, Disney +, and more sensitive issues like the #MeToo movement. The third season continues to focus on the development of its characters whilst giving a delightful centrist middle finger to both the extreme right and extreme left. The dangers of exposing Homelander’s true self to the American public are brought to fruition, channelling the fallout from Trump’s election loss, whilst Vought’s amoral, yuppie-like exploitation of progressive attitudes reminds us that conglomerates like Disney really don’t understand or care about contemporary social issues beyond their financial potential. Whilst we saw snippets in the second season, the third really tests audiences with their moral allegiances. Very few characters are without some crippling fault, except maybe Annie, but even the most monstrous of superbeings like Soldier Boy and Homelander have sympathetic or even root-worthy moments throughout the episodes. The best shows provide what you love whilst making sure that by the end of each season or series the characters are not in the same internal positions they started in, and The Boys gets top marks for that. It remains a funny, shocking and intelligent show interested primarily in exploring the consequences of its core characters’ choices. 5/5 WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 69


CULTURE

THE BEAUTIFUL GAME Coinciding with the UEFA Women’s Euros and the upcoming FIFA World Cup, Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery will host an exhibition of painting, photography, film and collage celebrating football culture. The Football Art Prize receives submissions from across the globe, which have been whittled down to 50 shortlisted works from artists tapping into themes of glory, defeat, loyalty and passion – from wintery night matches and foggy fields to moving depictions of the personal connections made with the pitch and those who play on it. Entries were judged by a panel including writer, critic and broadcaster Sacha Craddock, former England player turned pundit David James MBE, former Chief Executive of the Professional Footballers’ Association Gordon Taylor OBE and Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger. The eventual winner was Toby Michael’s Roy Keane (pictured), a painting inspired by Will Carling’s infamous ‘Ice Cream Roy’ photograph. However, there are many more highlights to explore in the exhibition including a submission from Sheffield artist James Titterton, in which the famous ‘Greasy Chip Butty’ chant is interspersed with personal recollections and experiences. This touring exhibition arrives in the Steel City to coincide with it hosting a selection of games for the UEFA Women’s Euro 2022 tournament. Each work 70 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

TOBY MICHAEL’S ROY KEANE

is accompanied by a statement from the artist explaining their inspiration. Kirstie Hamilton, Director of Programmes at Sheffield Museums, said: “The quality of work entered for the Football Art Prize 2022 was astounding and it made our job as judges very challenging. It was great to see the passion and love for football coming through in so many different ways and also to see how well the artists had executed their ideas. Deciding on only one winner was no easy task and it took a lot of discussion as there was so much potential. It’s great to see all the shortlisted works go on display in Sheffield as we welcome the UEFA Women’s Euro 2022.” The Football Art Prize is available to view at Millennium Gallery, 21 July – 31 October 2022.


THE FOOTBALL ART PRIZE

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CULTURE // TOP PICKS

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST HOW A CITY CAN SAVE THE WORLD

Studio // 3-6 August // £21 Five strangers get into a lift in Sheffield, and when the doors open, they find themselves in 2116 in the very different city of Sheffuld. The eco-apocalypse has happened, division is rife, three-winged birds fly overhead and people seem to be getting high on cups of tea. But an impending disaster looms and it falls to our gang from 2022 to save the day… sheffieldtheatres.co.uk

KIERAN FLYNN: POLYCHROME

Gage Gallery // 6-14 August // Free The second solo show from Sheff-based abstract painter Kieran Flynn, working predominantly with spraypaint, stencils and a wallpaper scraper (and the odd paintbrush). His work crosses the boundaries of street art, abstract art, op art and design. Following a run in London last month, his latest exhibition will be available to view at Kelham Island’s Gage Gallery 10-6 on weekday, and 11-5 weekends. kiac-sheffield.org

SHEFFIELD BRICKTROPOLIS

City Centre // 6-21 August // Free Bricktropolis is back this summer with a new adventure: An Expedition of Extinction. Built and presented by BRICKLIVE, Brickosaurs is a unique collection of impressive brick dinosaurs, each of which can be located at a different venue in the city centre. Set out on the trail using the official map (available Explorer Central at Unit 1, Surrey Street) and have the opportunity to win either a two-night stay at Legoland or a £1,000 gift card. sheffieldbricktropolis.com

WAR OF THE WORLDS

Botanical Gardens // 11 August // £8.50-£14 The critically acclaimed Pantaloons invade the stage in this funny yet faithful open-air adaptation of H G Wells sci-fi classic as they use musical instruments, puppetry and, um, enthusiasm to recreate deadly heat rays, giant fighting machines, squidgy tentacled Martians and interplanetary warfare on an epic scale. The chances of success? A million to one… tickettailor.com 72 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Heeley People’s Park // 6 August // Pay as you feel Slapstick Picnic would like to cordially invite you to its summer tea party, where marvellous feats of performance and culinary capers await. Over tea and cucumber sandwiches, prepare to witness the impossible: the entirety of Oscar Wilde’s classic play of manners, affairs and handbags being performed by just two rather dashing entertainers. slapstickpicnic.com

news MAKING THE CASE

Sheffield Showcase, a collaborative festival between a multitude of arts and culture groups based in the city, will be taking place over the first weekend of September (2nd-4th) and featuring film screenings, music performances, art and family-friendly activities. The event will introduce audiences across a shared city-wide ‘showcase event’ to new cultural activity in Sheffield, while giving support to venues and independent organisations. The weekend programme for the festival will feature events from Art in the Gardens, ArtWorks, Chance to Dance, Classical Sheffield, Cupola Gallery, GLOAM Gallery, Greentop Circus, Karma Leon’s Kabaret, National Videogame Museum, Off The Shelf, Open Up Sheffield, Reel Steel, Regather, Sheffield Adventure Film Festival, Sheffield Jazz, Sheffield Libraries, Sheffield Museums, University of Sheffield Concerts, Yellow Arch Studios. For details of all the activities taking place, head to ourfaveplaces.co.uk/ sheffield-showcase.


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CULTURE

STARS ON THE STREET Words: Joe Food Mine’ project, which gives emerging creatives a platform on the street, showcases the work of Sheffield artist Patricia Bugembe (@pattybug) at various locations around the city centre: Broad Lane, Leadmill Road, Neepsend Lane, Sheaf Street, Fitzwilliam Street, Shoreham Street, Upper Allen Street, and Meadow Street. Ugandan by heritage, born and raised in Ethiopia and now based in Sheffield, Bugembe creates mixed media portraits to explore her roots and experiences, with a particular focus on journeying further into the history, the beauty and the power of the Black Woman. With strong musical influences and a selftaught style, the artist’s work also champions the therapeutic nature of creativity and its part to play in aiding mental health. Overall, there are nine artworks to be discovered, including a series entitled ‘House of the Rising Stars’ which focuses on her musical influences and features timeless images of four musicians (Nina

Simone, Gregory Isaacs, Miriam Makeba and Grace Jones). As well as a trio of powerful, dignified portraits from the series ‘In Her Nature’ in which lush green foliage encompasses the portraits, bringing the natural word onto the canvas. She said of the collaboration: “Partnering with Jack Arts has been a journey of working with super talented people, who not only supported me but also understood me as a person driven to draw. I couldn’t think of a more fitting outfit to collaborate with to showcase my work to the city of Sheffield. With this collaboration, Jack Arts and I celebrate arts and culture, musical legends, and the beauty in life.”

Photography: @dannimaibaum WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK | 75


CULTURE // ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

HILLVETICA We hear from Ben Neasmith, founder of the small creative outfit specialising in prints and other design paraphernalia celebrating Sheffield’s S6 postcode. Love the prints, Ben. Can you tell us about your background and how Hillvetica came about? I have been a designer for a long time now, and I’ve always been so busy that I never really thought about doing anything other than my day job. Like many people during the pandemic, it made me take stock a bit and recharge creatively; I started just putting stuff together for my own benefit, which was not something I had ever done before. The other aspect of lockdown – bloody awful though it was – was you were kind of forced to take a look at the things around you, appreciate and find some beauty in them. I was inspired in some ways by the kind of early to mid-century travel posters you’d get for places like Scarborough or Filey, and I liked the idea of trying to capture some of these places near me in the same way. I wondered what it would be like to treat some of these everyday places on our doorstep as something a bit more special, like if Owlerton Stadium had given their marketing budget to a 1950s ad agency. The work is obviously inspired by Sheffield and S6. What interests you about the northwest suburb? To me, Sheffield is a city of suburbs and S6 and Hillsborough in particular just feel like an archetypal suburb. All the streets and houses, all the lives of people living cheek by jowl, finding a way to get on. There’s a lot of history here, not always good, but there’s definitely a unique significance 76 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK


to the place. I remember the first time stumbling across Wardsend Cemetery or going down Beeley Woods and being taken aback that this was on my doorstep but there’s no fanfare or fuss about it. Trust me you wouldn’t see something like that in the Cotswolds. The prints are very stylised. What or who has influenced your style? I always thought I never really had a style, but over time it’s clear there are some things I tend to be drawn to (no pun intended). When I was growing up, I was always attracted to advertising, particularly things that had a really strong illustrative or typographical flavour to them. I can remember ads for things, or supermarket packaging from years ago, something about them really resonated, I guess. In the days before Photoshop and filters and all that stuff, you had to think really hard about what to draw and how to draw it and I always admired that ability to make something appealing, with all these restrictions. This was the kind of thing I learned when studying the Swiss Design school, which inspired the name Hillvetica. Has illustration and design always been your preferred medium, or do you dabble in other forms of creativity? It’s funny, I have been doing design and illustration for so long in my work life that it doesn’t always feel like creativity. I’ve always thought of myself as a bit of a hack, to be honest. That’s been one of the nice things about starting this, it’s made me rediscover the creative side of myself which maybe I had taken for granted. I think it’s very easy to judge ourselves creatively on the things we can’t do rather than the things we can. What’s the best bit of advice you’ve received as a designer/artist? Someone once told me that, as a designer, if you can make something a bit less shit then you’ve succeeded! There’s definitely a lot of truth in that so if anyone asks me for career advice that’s what I tend to say. The other thing I learned that always stuck with me is that it’s as much about what you don’t draw as what you do, and that’s a big part of the process: taking things out of a design as much as putting things in.

Hillvetica.com // @hillvetica_designs

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CULTURE // LIVE REVIEWS

CHICAGO @ LYCEUM THEATRE WORDS: LIZZY CAPPS PHOTOS: TRISTRAM KENTON Legs, laughs and liquor: a flawless portrayal of a saucy classic. Full of jazz and scandal, Chicago is my all-time favourite musical, so I took my seat with high expectations. I was definitely not disappointed. It was sexy, slick and at times had me laughing out loud and I couldn’t have asked for a better way to spend my evening. Faye Brookes and Djalenga Scott tell the story of Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly as they try to win over the city of Chicago, shimmying their way from Murderess Row to newspaper headlines with the help of the lawyer and renowned sweettalker Billy Flynn, played by Lee Mead. Each cast member, even down to the ‘six merry murderesses of the Cook County Jail’, put their own spin on their characters making it a refreshing take on the show. I was particularly impressed by Faye Brookes (Roxie) who owned the stage with her spectacular voice and energy. No element of the show took a back seat; your eyes were constantly drawn to something new on the stage. Rather than the band playing in the pit they were in full view on 78 | WWW.EXPOSEDMAGAZINE.CO.UK

tiers at the back of the stage, so each musician had their own platform. What’s more, the second act began with the band’s rendition of ‘All That Jazz’ in which each band member got to enjoy their moment in the sun. By the end of the number, every musician was on their feet and had the whole room clapping along. Using a hefty chunk of the original choreography, the dance numbers were tailored to the stage perfectly. From slow, contained Fosse moves to bouncy Charleston routines, it was a performance that would have made Bob Fosse himself proud. Although it was a clean and slick demonstration of music and dance, the directors added heaps of comedy often leaving the audience in stitches. From reporter Mary Sunshine’s shrill singing voice to Roxie’s childish and immature approach to winning her court case, there was plenty of opportunity for a good knee slap. It was an interpretation of the show, different enough to wonder whether they would even stick to the storyline. With a nod to the original and a twist that made me gasp out loud, I was thoroughly entertained from beginning to end.


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