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Table of Contents FOREWORD ............................................................................................................................................... 1 CARICOM AGREEMENT ........................................................................................................................ 1 SECTION 1.0: MARKET OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................. 1 1.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1

1.2

Population ............................................................................................................................... 1

1.3

Demographics ......................................................................................................................... 1

1.4

Climate ..................................................................................................................................... 1

1.5

Language ................................................................................................................................. 2

1.6

Hours of Business................................................................................................................... 2

1.7

Public Holidays - 2015 ........................................................................................................... 2

1.8

Travel & Transportation ........................................................................................................ 2

1.9

Time Zone ............................................................................................................................... 3

1.10

Currency .................................................................................................................................. 3

1.11

Communication ...................................................................................................................... 3

SECTION 2.0: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT ...................................................................... 4 2.1

Economic Performance .......................................................................................................... 4

2.2

Business ................................................................................................................................... 5

2.3

Labour Force ........................................................................................................................... 6

2.4

Political Structure ................................................................................................................... 6

SECTION 3.0: TRADE ENVIRONMENT ......................................................................................................... 7 3.1

Import Statistics ...................................................................................................................... 7

3.2

Jamaica’s Top 10 Imported Products................................................................................... 7

3.3

Bilateral Trade Between Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica ........................................... 7

3.4

Import Tariffs & Taxes........................................................................................................... 8

3.6

Trade Barriers ......................................................................................................................... 8

3.7

Prohibited and Restricted Imports ...................................................................................... 8

3.8

Trade Agreements .................................................................................................................. 9

SECTION 4.0: MARKET CHALLENGES ....................................................................................................... 10 4.1

Buy Brand Jamaica ............................................................................................................... 10


4.2

Brand Loyalty ....................................................................................................................... 10

SECTION 5.0: TOP MARKET OPPORTUNITIES & PROSPECTS ................................................................... 10 SECTION 6.0: MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES ............................................................................................. 11 6.1

Using a Distributor .............................................................................................................. 11

6.2

Exporting directly to a retail establishment ..................................................................... 11

6.3

Private Labelling, Branding or Co-Packaging.................................................................. 11

6.4

Consolidation with other Exporters .................................................................................. 11

6.5

Establishing an Office .......................................................................................................... 11

SECTION 7.0: SELLING, MARKETING AND PROMOTION ......................................................................... 12 7.1

Selling Factors/Techniques ................................................................................................. 12

7.2

Trade Promotion .................................................................................................................. 13

7.3

Advertising ........................................................................................................................... 13

7.4

Distribution and Sales Channels ........................................................................................ 13

7.5

Pricing .................................................................................................................................... 15

7.6

Shipping Information .......................................................................................................... 15

SECTION 8.0: REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS ....................................................................................... 16 8.1

Standards ............................................................................................................................... 16

8.2

Certificate of Origin ............................................................................................................. 17

8.3

Requirements and Documentation .................................................................................... 17

8.4

Packaging, Labelling and Marking Requirements .......................................................... 19

SECTION 9.0: FINANCING EXPORTS TO JAMAICA .................................................................................... 19 SECTION 10.0: TRADE EVENTS AND FAIRS .............................................................................................. 20 SECTION 11.0: CONTACT INFORMATION ................................................................................................. 21 Appendices ...................................................................................................................................................... Appendix I – Excerpt from “The Tourist Enhancement Act [2004]” pages 583 & 584 ............... Appendix II – Listing of Market Players in Jamaica ....................................................................... Appendix III – Published Survey of Grocery Items by Consumer Affairs Division .................. Appendix IV – Sample CARICOM Certificate of Origin ............................................................... Appendix V – Caribbean Community Standard For Requirements For Labelling .................... Appendix VI – Product Comparison.................................................................................................


FOREWORD This Market Guide is intended to give Trinidad & Tobago exporters relevant, accurate and valuable information for successfully exporting their goods to Jamaica. The information contained therein is based on exporTT’s visits to the market, in-market consultant information, and desk research. Feel free to contact us at 1.868.623.5507 to discuss your exporting needs. **********

CARICOM AGREEMENTi The Caribbean Community (CARICOM), originally the Caribbean Community and Common Market, was established by the Treaty of Chaguaramas which came into effect on 1 August 1973. CARICOM is an organization of 15 Caribbean nations: Antigua & Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. There are also five (5) Associate members and they are as follows:- Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, and Turks and Caicos Islands. CARICOM's main purposes are to promote economic integration and cooperation among its members, to ensure that the benefits of integration are equitably shared, and to coordinate foreign policy. Its major activities involve coordinating economic policies and development planning; devising and instituting special projects for the less-developed countries within its jurisdiction; operating as a regional single market for many of its members (CARICOM Single Market); and handling regional trade disputes. The Secretariat Headquarters is based in Georgetown, Guyana. Jamaica became a member of CARICOM on August 01, 1973 and is the founding nation of the CARICOM Community. Jamaica is also a member of the CARICOM Single Market and Economy, whose intent is to benefit the people of the region by providing and opportunities to produce and sell their goods and services and to attract investment. This will be achieved by the creation of one large market among the participating member states.ii

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SECTION 1.0: MARKET OVERVIEW 1.1 Introduction Jamaica, the first nation to gain independence from Great Britain on August 6th 1962, is also the largest English speaking CARICOM nation spanning 10,991km2. The country’s capital of Kingston is located on the South-Eastern Coast. The country has fourteen (14) parishes which are divided into three (3) counties of Cornwall, Middlesex and Surry. Cornwall has five (5) parishes – St. Elizabeth, Trelawny, St. James, Hanover and Westmorland. Middlesex has five (5) parishes – St. Catherine, St. Mary, Clarendon, St. Ann and Manchester. Surry has four (4) parishes – Kingston, St. Andrew, St. Thomas and Portland. 1.2

Population

Population

2,714,734 (2013 est.)

Population Growth

0.36% (2011 est.)

Median Age

Total: 27.5 years Male: 27 years Female: 28 (2011 est.) 73.28 years -5.43

Life Expectancy Migration Rates (per 1,000)

(Source: Statistical Institute of Jamaica 2015) iii

1.3

Demographics

Ethnic Groups Religions

Black 92.1%, Mixed 6.1%, East Indian 0.8%, Other 0.4%, Unspecified 0.7% (2011 est.) Protestant 64.8% (includes Seventh Day Adventist 12.0%, Pentecostal 11.0%, Other Church of God 9.2%, New Testament Church of God 7.2%, Baptist 6.7%, Church of God in Jamaica 4.8%, Church of God of Prophecy 4.5%, Anglican 2.8%, United Church 2.1%, Methodist 1.6%, Revived 1.4%, Brethren .9%, and Moravian .7%), Roman Catholic 2.2%, Jehovah's Witness 1.9%, Rastafarian 1.1%, other 6.5%, none 21.3%, unspecified 2.3% (2011 est.)

(Source: The World Factbook 2015) iv

1.4 Climate Jamaica’s climate can be generally described as tropical, with rainy and dry seasons that are much like that of Trinidad and Tobago. The months of December to February, are the chilliest. These conditions can vary based on location. Jamaica is hurricane-prone and hurricane season spans through the months of June to November. They have experienced landfall of some notable hurricanes in the past, namely Ivan in 2004 and Sandy in 2012 which contributed to loss of life and property. (Source: World Trade Guide 2014) v

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1.5 Language English is the official language of Jamaica in addition to a renowned local dialect called ‘Jamaican Patois’ which is spoken across the population. 1.6 Hours of Business  Commercial: Monday to Friday; 8:30 a.m.-4:30/5:00 p.m.  Bank hours: Mondays to Friday; 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. *Store hours may vary. Also some shops open on Saturdays until noon or later. 1.7

1.8

Public Holidays - 2015 Month January

Day 1

Observance New Year's Day

February

18

Ash Wednesday

April

3

Good Friday

6

Easter Monday

May

23 (25)

Labour Day

August

1

Emancipation Day

6

Independence Day

October

19

National Heroes’ Day

December

25

Christmas Day

26

Boxing Day

Travel & Transportation

1.8.1 Airline Travel Airline, Route & Duration The airlines, route and duration of flights from Trinidad and Tobago to Jamaica are as follows: Airline Caribbean Airlines COPA American Airlines

Route Direct Via Panama Via Miami

Duration 1 hr 45m+ 6h 20m+ 7h 40m+

Airport There are three (3) operational international airports in Jamaica: 1. Norman Manley International Airport in Kingston – The airport is adjacent to Kingston Harbour and is 20 minutes from the capital city of Kingston.

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2. Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay - The airport is approximately 174 kilometres or 3 hours (via the “A1” road) from the capital city of Kingston. 3. Ian Fleming International Airport in Ocho Rios/Boscobel – This airport is 15km from the tourist mecca Ocho Rios, and approximately 98 kilometres or 2 hours (via the “A3” road and Highway 2000) from the capital city of Kingston. Individual Entry Requirements 1. Valid Passport 2. Airline Ticket 3. Tourism Enhancement Fee (See Appendix I) Individual Exit Requirements 1. Valid Passport 2. Airline Ticket 3. Departure Tax – Approximately JD$1,800 and it is usually included in the ticket price. 1.9 Time Zone Time Zone: UTC 5 Time Difference: One (1) hour behind Trinidad and Tobago 1.10 Currency Jamaican Dollar (JMD) Current Exchange Rate: Jamaican dollars (JMD) per US dollar - 99.83 (2013 est.) 115.70 (2015, April est.) 1.11 Communication Calls from Trinidad and Tobago to Jamaica  Landline = 1-876-XXX-XXXX  Mobile = 011-1-876-XXX-XXXX Calls from Jamaica to Trinidad and Tobago  Landline = 1-868-XXX-XXXX  Mobile = 011-1-868-XXX-XXXX

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SECTION 2.0: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT 2.1

Economic Performance Indicator

Economic Performance

GDP (USD)

$14,362.26 million (2013 est.)

GDP per Capita (USD) Growth (% change)

$5,289.97 (2013 est.) 1.27% (2013 est.)

GDP by Sector (% of GDP)

Agriculture: 6.71% Manufacturing: 9.21% Industry: 20.82% Services: 72.45% (2012 est.) 15.05% (2013 est.)

Remittances (% of GDP) Inflation Rate Import Commodities (2012/2013) Import Partners (2012)

9.34% (2013 est.) Refined petroleum, crude petroleum, alcohol, cars, packages medicaments US (35%), Venezuela (14%), Trinidad and Tobago (10%), China (6.8%) and Brazil (3.9%)

(Source: World Bank 2015; Observatory of Economic Complexity 2013vi)

Jamaica is described by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as an ‘emerging economy’. The history of its economy is marred by numerous economic challenges that they continue to overcome. More recently, Jamaica returned to the IMF in 2013 for funding with the overall objective of controlling the country’s debt to GDP ratio, which stood at 141.6% in March 2014 (World Bank 2014). The most recent review of the economy published in December 2014 alluded to Jamaica being successful in meeting the objectives of the program thus far and positive signs through improvements in its economy. A few of the improvements include:    

Slow but improving economic growth; Improving business environment (See Section 2.2 Business); Positive and increasing growth in remittances and tourism receipts; and Stabilisation of interest rates vii

Aside from this economic performance as viewed by the IMF, Jamaica has experienced increasing prices for basic consumer items (The CPI can be used as a measure of inflation). Overall, the Budget Statement for 2015/16 announced that inflation at the end of 2014 decreased to 6.4%, down from 9.5% in the prior year (2013). See Graph below.

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JAMAICA CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (CPI) JUNE 2013- JUNE 2014 220

CPI

210 200 190 Jun-2013 Jul-2013 CPI

199.9

200.9

Aug2013

Sep2013

Oct2013

Nov2013

Dec2013

Jan-2014

Feb2014

Mar2014

Apr2014

MayJun-2014 2014

201.6

207.2

209

209.5

210.7

211.8

211.9

214.2

213.6

215.7

215.9

(Source: The Statistical Institute of Jamaica, 2014)

This inflation in prices is also accompanied by a devaluated exchange rate, which would not just impact on the cost of importing, but also on the value of remittances (See graph below). As seen above, remittances account for more than a tenth of the country’s GDP.

EXCHANGE RATE, 2014 VALUE TO USD 1 116 114

J$

112 110 108 106 104 102 USD 1 =

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

106.9 107.93 109.21 109.86 110.84 111.64 112.66 112.8 112.71 112.65 113.15 114.26

(Source: The Statistical Institute of Jamaica, 2014)

The budget for 2015/16, presented by His Excellency The Most Honourable Sir Patrick Allen during. February of this year announced plans for the upcoming fiscal year which begins in April. Further reading can be done at: http://jis.gov.jm/budget-watch/. 2.2 Business In the 2015 Ease of Doing Business Rankings, Jamaica ranked 58, up from 85 in 2014. Despite its low performance in the Trading across Borders indicator, cross border trade between Trinidad and Tobago is largely facilitated by the provisions of CARICOM, which has made easier.

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Indicator

Rank

Starting a Business Dealing with a Construction Permit

20 26

Getting Electricity Registering Property

111 126

Getting Credit

12

Protecting Minority Investors Paying Taxes

71 147

Trading Across Borders

115

Enforcing Contracts Resolving Insolvency

117 59

(Source: The World Bank 2015)viii

2.3

Labour Force

Labour Force:

1,305,500 (Jan. 2014 est)

Unemployment:

18.8 (2008 est.) Labour Force by Occupation, 2014 Professional Senior Officials and Technicians Clerks

20.10% 9.09%

Service Workers, Shop and Market Sales Workers

20.70%

Craft and Related Trades Workers Plant and Machine Operators and Assemblers Elementary Occupations Not Specified

15.78% 5.48% 13.41% 0.37%

(Source: The Statistical Institute of Jamaica, 2014)

2.4

Political Structure

Prime Minister

Mrs. Portia Simpson-Miller (2012 – Present)

Government Elections

People’s National Party Every 5 years

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SECTION 3.0: TRADE ENVIRONMENT 3.1

Import Statistics

The Top 10 sources of Jamaica’s imports, in 2014, are the following: 1. United States of America (USA) 2. Venezuela 3. Trinidad and Tobago 4. China 5. Mexico 6. Japan 7. Canada 8. Germany 9. United Kingdom 10. Brazil (Source: Statistical Institute of Jamaica, 2015)

3.2

Jamaica’s Top 10 Imported Products HS Chapter

3.3

Product Label

Value 2014

'84

Machinery, nuclear reactors, boilers, etc.

347025

'87

Vehicles other than railway, tramway

319417

'22

Beverages, spirits and vinegar

301546

'85

Electrical, electronic equipment

229673

'10

Cereals

213012

'39

Plastics and articles thereof

181269

'30

Pharmaceutical products

131919

'48

118694

'99

Paper and paperboard, articles of pulp, paper and board Commodities not elsewhere specified

'21

Miscellaneous edible preparations

104002

113631

Bilateral Trade between Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica Year Value

2011 127,482,000

2012 132,548,000

2013 130,488,000

2014 193,813,643.17

(Sources: ITC Trade Map, 2011-2013: SEW Data 2014)

Top imports from T&T were:  Beverages, spirits & vinegar;  Cereal, flour, starch, milk preparations and products;  Paper & Paperboard, articles of pulp, paper and board;

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      

Vegetable, fruit, nut etc. food preparations; Plastics and articles thereof; Tobacco and manufactured tobacco substitutes; Cocoa and cocoa preparations; Electrical, electronic equipment; Soaps, lubricants, waxes, candles, modelling pastes; and Milling products, malt, starches, inulin, and wheat gluten.

3.4 Import Tariffs & Taxes Jamaica is a member of CARICOM and uses the common external tariff, based on the Harmonized Tariff System (HTS). For specific tariffs rates please contact exporTT Limited. General Consumption Tax (GCT) Jamaicans pay a General Consumption Tax which is a value added tax of 16.5%. This tax is “applied on the value added to goods and services at each stage in the production and distribution chain. It is a tax on consumption and is included in the final price the consumer pays for goods and services whether imported or bought locally”1 The current rate of General Consumption Tax on Commercial items is 21.50%. 3.6

Trade Barriers

According to the Enabling Trade Index of 2014, Jamaica ranked, overall, 89, and (out of 138 countries) 58 in Market Access, 76 in Border Administration, and 92 in Operating Environment. The main problematic factors, that apply to Jamaica and/or its trade with Trinidad and Tobago: 1. Corruption at border 2. High cost or delays caused by international and domestic transportation; 3. Inappropriate telecommunications infrastructure (Source: World Economic Forum 2014)ix

Conventional trade barriers, such as tariffs or burdensome customs procedures are eased considerably by the CARICOM Single Market and Economy. Therefore, trade between these two (2) economies in the common market is easier than extra-regional trade. 3.7 Prohibited and Restricted Imports According to the Jamaica Customs Agency, the following items are prohibited from being imported into Jamaica:  Indecent and obscene prints

1

http://www.jamaicatax-online.gov.jm/tax_types/tax_types_detail_gct.html 26.11.13

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o

 

 

Indecent and obscene prints, paintings, photographs, cinematograph films, lithographs, engravings, books, cards or written communications or any indecent or obscene articles whether similar to the above or not and any parcels, packages or packets having thereon, or on the cover thereof, any words, marks or designs which are grossly offensive or of an indecent or obscene character. Coin-base or counterfeit coin of any country. The following and similar publications: 1. All publications of de Laurence Scott and Company of Chicago in the United States of America relating to divination, magic, cultism or supernatural arts. 2. All publications of the Red Star Publishing Company of Chicago in the United States of America relating to divination, magic, cultism or supernatural arts. Camouflage clothing (which are only used in the Jamaica Defence Force). Black Mosquito Destroyer and any other items that are not approved by Jamaica's health authorities”

(Sources: Jamaica Customs 2014x; Jamaica Observer 2014xi)

Items which are classified as “Restricted” imports need permits/licences from the relevant authorities in Jamaica, and these documents must be presented to the Jamaica Customs Agency before the relevant item can be imported into Jamaica. The following list contains some of Jamaica’s restricted import items:  Meat, animals, red peas, fruits, vegetables, plants/plant products, ground provisions, milk-based products which all require a Permit or Phyto Sanitary Certificate from the Ministry of Agriculture.  Pharmaceuticals, chemicals and herbal teas require a Pharmaceutical Services Division Certificate from the Ministry of Health.  All firearms and accessories, explosives, fireworks, firecrackers, toy guns, radar detectors, pepper spray, swords, spear guns, and tasers require permit and licence from the Ministry of National Security and the Trade Board.  All coconut derivatives, oil-producing seeds and edible oils require a permit from the Coconut Industry Board. Also, alcohol in bulk requires a Spirit Pool Permit from the Spirit Pool Association.  When importing human remains, the importer must obtain a permit from the Ministry of Health.  The importation of two-way radios requires approval and licence from the Spectrum Management Authority. 3.8 Trade Agreements Jamaica has signed Trade Agreements with the following countries:  Caribbean-Canada Trade Agreement (CARIBCAN) – Established in 1986 (ended 2011, presently being renegotiated)  CARIBBEAN COMMON MARKET (CARICOM) – Treaty of Chaguaramas 4th July 1973; Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas - 2001  CARICOM/VENEZUELA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT - 13th day of October, 1992

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 CARICOM/COLUMBIA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT - 24th day of July 1994  CARICOM/DOMINICAN REPUBLIC FREE TRADE AGREEMENT – 28th day of August 1998  CARIBBEAN BASIN INITIATIVE (CBI) (TO ENTER THE United States of America) – established in 1983 by Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA); it came into effect on January 1, 1984  EUROPEAN PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT – 15th October 2008  CARICOM/CUBA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT – 5th July 2000  CARICOM/COSTA RICA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT- 9th day of March 2004 (Source: OAS Foreign Trade Information System 2015)

SECTION 4.0: MARKET CHALLENGES 4.1 Buy Brand Jamaica There is a strong buy brand Jamaica campaign where consumers are encouraged to support their own local manufacturers, which is hoped to engender pride in producers and consumers and be good for their economy. This strong campaign may hinder the entry of products from Trinidad and Tobago into Jamaica. 4.2 Brand Loyalty Jamaican consumers are considered very brand conscious, therefore reputable brands will maintain its market share in spite of a price increase. Because of this, products from Trinidad and Tobago can find its place as a new product introduction or expanded product line of an existing (Jamaican) brand with a strong reputation. If not, a local exporter may have to do extensive marketing and promotions in order to obtain market acceptance for products that are not marketed under an existing brand. This does not mean that Jamaicans will not be open to other brands, however the willingness to try another brand will be driven by price and the perceived quality.

SECTION 5.0: TOP MARKET OPPORTUNITIES & PROSPECTS MegaMart currently imports directly from Trinidad and Tobago and also consolidates their shipments. This creates an opportunity for small manufacturers who are unable to ship a container. It is recommended that exporters explore the possibility of establishing a relationship with MegaMart for their products. See contact details for MegaMart in Appendix II.

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SECTION 6.0: MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES 6.1 Using a Distributor In selecting a distributor, an exporter should consider one that is already established in Jamaica with the necessary support systems in place. Other areas of consideration would include whether your target customers and the distributor’s target match and also if the products carried by the distributors are that of competitors or near competitive products. Additionally, if using a distributor, exporters should ensure that there is an agreement in place on how the product will be promoted. 6.2 Exporting directly to a retail establishment Several retailers in Jamaica choose to purchase items from distributors as well as directly from manufacturers/exporters. This enables the manufacturer to have more control in the selection of retailers for its product. Eliminating the middle man also makes the manufacturer more aware of who are the most likely consumers of their products and as well as affording them the opportunity to make a higher profit. Two drawbacks to this using method are as follows: i. The manufacturer/exporter will have to handle all of the logistics for the transaction. ii. You might not be able to respond to your customer as soon as a problem arises. 6.3 Private Labelling, Branding or Co-Packaging This is exporting indirectly through Private Label, Branding or Co-Packaging where the distribution is under an existing popular brand with a good reputation. The main disadvantage of this method is that it does not allow the exporter to develop a brand name in the Jamaican market. Exporters should note that Jamaican manufacturers see possible co-packing projects as an avenue to achieve more competitive costs by taking advantage of Trinidad and Tobago’s relatively cheaper energy costs. 6.4 Consolidation with other Exporters This method allows a small manufacturer who has less than a container load (LCL) to ship to Jamaica. They will have to be either shipping directly to a retailer such as MegaMart or to an existing distributor. 6.5 Establishing an Office Under the Caribbean Single Market Economy (Article 32.5 – Revised Treaty), CARICOM nationals can establish business operations in any of the Member States that are part of the arrangement such as Jamaica. Although such a strategy is very costly to implement, it can be advantageous to the exporter as they will have more control of the marketing and distribution of their product in Jamaica. Exporters seeking to establish an office in Jamaica should acquaint

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themselves with the established procedures for such an undertaking as well as seek the advice of a legal professional. General Guidelines  It is recommended that potential exporters conduct a cost-benefit analysis of each strategy to determine the return on their investment.  It is recommended that potential exporters speak to existing exporters to Jamaica to obtain suggestions on the best form of market entry.

SECTION 7.0: SELLING, MARKETING AND PROMOTION 7.1 Selling Factors/Techniques Selling factors and techniques are described in the following five steps to master the selling process. Steps

1. Greeting

2. Ask questions to understand the prospect 3. Present Benefits

4. Handle Objections

5. Close

Other Tips

Description You need to ‘arrest’ the buyer:  Pay attention to dress, hygiene, grooming, handshake, etc.  Treat the buyer’s business card with respect and present your business card in a professional manner.  Speak clearly, paying attention to voice, tone, eye contact, etc.  Use correct titles and surnames.  Have a positive body language. Don’t ask direct questions but ask leading questions in a conversation type manner to find out the buyer’s need and what he/she is looking for. Present the benefits of your product/(s) or service/(s) in a manner that aligns them to the need of the buyer. If the buyer is not interested in your product/(s) or product/(s) do not end the meeting in despair, remain calm. Instead, use the opportunity to find out more about the market and their needs so that you can possibly make adjustments to your product to suit their needs. It is very important to know and agree on the next steps which should include a thank you email that captures the essence of the conversation and the activities that would follow.  Be prepared  Know your business and your products  Be confident  Be a persuasive negotiator  Confirm appointments at least 24 hours in advance and be on time.

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 Prepare your marketing tools e.g. brochures, samples, PowerPoint presentations, etc. and make them come alive with images.  Take notes and bring a note taker if necessary.

7.2 Trade Promotion Locally, exporTT offers trade promotion programmes periodically, including trade missions, trade shows, trade fairs, matchmaking events, conferences, etc. These programmes are conducted with a pre-approved budget and with an element of co-financing with the exporter for some activities. 7.3 Advertising Many different methods are employed to advertise items in Jamaica. For example, many products are advertised on billboards strategically located throughout the island. With reference to food and beverage items, many supermarkets offer discounts for bulk purchase of items. Signs can be observed at several supermarkets displaying the cost saving of purchasing three of the same item instead of only one. Many retailers also offer in store promotions especially during peak hours as this allows the consumer to touch, feel, smell or taste samples of the products. The location of products on the shelf is also key to promotion, where you will find that distributors with a wider range of products will have more options for display than those who only have a few products in the supermarket. Outside of supermarket advertising, other forms of advertising can include radio and TV during the periods of high listening and viewing; newspapers, especially the Gleaner because of its wide distribution; and of course, social media can also be employed. 7.4 Distribution and Sales Channels Jamaica’s distribution systems includes several distributing companies which are subsidiaries of manufacturing companies and in some situations retail establishments. In order to effectively serve the needs of all of its customers who may be scattered throughout the country of 4,411 square miles and mountainous terrain, distributors may have warehouses located in several parts of the country. The main population centres are located in Kingston (South-Eastern end of the island), Montego (North Western side of the island), Mandeville (Central side of the island) and St. Ann (northern side of the island). The larger distributors usually have a fleet of vehicles and a sales team to find sales for the products they represent and feedback on market trends.

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There are in excess of three hundred (300) supermarkets, over four hundred (400) pharmacies as well as thousands of smaller shops. Some of the country’s manufacturers of household cleaners cater primarily for the lower end of the market and their products are not found in supermarkets. Instead, after the company manufactures the cleaners e.g. bleach, they deliver the finished product to the retailer’s storage tanks. The retailers sells the products to its customers (who bring their bottles) by the “litre” thereby allowing the consumer to purchase a little as or as much as they can afford. One manufacturer explained that the packaging usually accounts for the bulk of the cost, and by eliminating the packaging the final product is much more affordable to the customer. Some of the leading companies in the distribution channel are as follows: Company Grace Kennedy Wisynco T Geddes Grant Chas E Ramson Cari-Med Industrial Sales Island Products J. Wray & Nephew HD Hopwood MegaMart PriceSmart Progressive Group

Manufacturer

           

Distributor

           

Wholesaler

Retailer

           

           

(Source: A-Z Information Jamaica Limited – Market Survey to Jamaica – November 2013)xii

Grace Kennedy (Grace Foods) is one of the largest distributors in the Caribbean. They are Direct Sales Distributors controlling all aspects of the distribution channel. Grace Kennedy manufactures and distributes to wholesalers and retailers including their own retail supermarkets – The Hi-Lo Foods stores, which supplies middle and upper income brackets. Hi-Lo Food Stores is the second largest supermarket chain behind the Progressive Group.

Wisynco boasts the largest warehousing facility in the Caribbean.

MegaMart is a wholesale club and 3 has super stores throughout the country. They purchase directly from manufacturers in Trinidad and Tobago consolidating the shipments, and supplying only its own stores. Marketing and sales are integral activities of the distributors in Jamaica. Each distributor has a sales team whose job it is to find sales for the products they represent as well as provide valuable feedback on market trends.

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Jamaica

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The distributors have their own network of trucks and packers for getting the product on the supermarket shelves. A supplier with only one or very few products would therefore find it expensive to maintain this. For example Island has an opportunity to market Spotless from ANSA McAl but would have to sell it to a wholesaler as it would not be feasible for them to hire someone for only one product. The truck fleet have designated routes to the supermarkets located across the island. Along the way, they will stop at the larger shops. These truckers also provide valuable market intelligence and if a new shop appears along the route, they provide that feedback to have the shop added to the list of delivery stops. There are also sales trucks that service the smaller supermarkets and shops. The smaller shops purchase their goods from the wholesalers. To introduce a new product into the market, the distributors will place their own marketing staff in supermarkets to do promotions. The consumers prefer to be able to touch, feel and smell new products as part of the product acceptance. 7.5 Pricing A comparison of supermarket prices per item is published monthly by The Consumer Affairs Commission in the daily newspapers. The comparison is done for all of major supermarkets and shops/grocers in each town in the fourteen parishes in the country. The list shows the price comparison for the basic food and beverage commodities as well as household cleaners by brand and size of items. Consumers of the aforementioned items have access to the required information and can make informed decisions when they shop. A list can be found in Appendix III. Additionally, according to A-Z Information Jamaica Limited “Products need to be priced competitively particularly since the market has become more price sensitive. This is because consumers in Jamaica have had their real income eroded by the currency depreciation and the resulting price increase of goods and services. It would therefore be a good idea to reduce the size of the packaging/contents of some products (i.e. produce a smaller option). That will allow particularly the lower end of the market to purchase amounts based on their available cash. This practice is already done by local grocery stores where packages are broken open and sold as individual parts. Creative packaging can be employed for some products such as biscuits in small containers.” 7.6 Shipping Information The Port Authority of Jamaica “…is the principal maritime agency responsible for the regulation and development of Jamaica’s port and shipping industry.2.”

2

http://www.portjam.com/nmCMS.php?p=aboutus 5.12.13

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There are several ports in operation in the country. They are as follows:  The Kingston Container Terminal—one of the region’s leading container transhipment ports and consists of three terminals—the North, South and West Terminals with a rated capacity of 2.8 Million TEUs.  The Port of Montego Bay—the island’s second international port. Operations at this port include both cargo and cruise ship activities.  The Port of Ocho Rios—consist of two facilities. Operations at this port can include both cargo and cruise ship activities.  Falmouth—this port has been constructed primarily for cruise ship activities.  Port Antonio—has two separate facilities. One is dedicated to cruise ship passengers and the other handles cargo. In general, it is relatively easy to ship goods both via Sea and Air to Jamaica, with sea freight shipments being the most cost effective way. If items are transported via sea freight, they must be cleared through customs within 14 days of arrival in Jamaica. A Custom Broker must be used if/when clearing shipment with a value of more than US$5,000. On average, it takes twenty-two (22) days to comply with the procedure to import in Jamaica and costs on average US$1,420 per container, while exporters from Jamaica require twenty-one (21) days to comply with the procedures to export and this process cost US$1,750 per container on average. Vessels transporting products manufactured in Trinidad and Tobago would dock at The Kingston Container Terminal. Shipping Samples Samples with “no commercial value” are shipped free into the country, while samples with commercial value are charged the normal rates of duties.

SECTION 8.0: REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS 8.1 Standards Trinidad & Tobago enjoy duty free access into Jamaica because the country is a member of CARICOM. The import regulations and health requirements are generally harmonised across the CARICOM territories and this is maintained as a result of the on-going work of the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards & Quality (CROSQ). Additionally, before exporting to Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago exporters may need to use the services of officials in the following agencies:  The Trade Board Limited – To ascertain Import Licensing requirements

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 

The Jamaica Bureau of Standards – To ensure adherence to standards and quality for Imports The Jamaica Customs Agency – To ensure that Trinidad and Tobago products are eligible to be a part of the Common External Tariff (CET) and therefore no import duties are applicable to goods which are certified to be of CARICOM origin

8.2 Certificate of Origin exporTT’s Trade Facilitation Office is charged with the responsibility of certifying all products and determining their eligibility for preferential treatment into countries within which Trinidad & Tobago has a trade agreement. In this regard, exporters should complete the following steps to determine their eligibility for preferential access: • Completion of Factory Visit Form (Information Furnished in Support of Declaration of Origin • Payment ($400.00) • Visit by a Certification Officer • Inspection on process of production, raw materials utilized in production and relevant documentation Please see Appendix IV for a sample Certificate of Origin 8.3 Requirements and Documentation The following list of documents are required when exporting to Jamaica:  Commercial Invoice  Packing List  Transport Document  Certificate of Origin (as applicable)  Cargo Insurance (optional) 8.3.1 Commercial Invoice A Commercial Invoice is required for commercial shipments. At least six (6) original, signed copies should be forwarded to the consignee or the consignee’s agent. Another copy may be required for shipments requiring specific licenses. CARICOM countries typically require use of the CARICOM Invoice format, also known as the U.N. Layout Key form, which is available from commercial stationers. For airfreight shipments, documents in most cases should accompany cargo such as an Airway bill (AWB). For non-commercial shipments, prepare a Pro-forma Invoice. 8.3.2 Packing list

A packing list is recommended to facilitate customs clearance.

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In general, even when it is not the required regulation, it is recommended that a packing list be used with all shipments containing more than one shipping unit of packaged cargo. Most countries require a packing list be provided together with the commercial invoice. The required information must be consistent with all information shown on the commercial invoice. At least three (3) copies of the packing list should be included as part of the shipping documents sent to the consignee or the agent thereof. The exact contents of each package should be clearly identified. This should include each item's gross weight and net weight and each package's marks and numbers. 8.3.3 Transport document

A properly prepared transport document is required for transportation purposes and as a source document for customs clearance purposes. Vague descriptions of merchandise will not be accepted on the manifest, bill of lading or other transport document. Accurate description including quantity and weight of the items will be required. Descriptions such as "personal effects," etc. will no longer be accepted. For ocean cargo, an Ocean Bill of Lading is typically used. "To order" bills of lading are accepted, when there is an endorsement to the order of a local bank. For air cargo, three (3) copies of an airway bill (AWB) are typically used. 8.3.4 Certificate of Origin A Certificate of Origin is required when goods are eligible for duty free treatment. The Certificate of Origin is to be prepared in two (2) copies using the general Certificate of Origin form, certified by a recognized chamber of commerce. The Certificate of Origin can be applied for via TTBizLink and Single Electronic Window (SEW) which is a secure user-friendly online platform which gives real time approvals to more than twenty five different e-government business and trade related services. It allows individuals to complete application forms online and includes the upload of supporting documentation. Once submitted, these documents are automatically routed to various agencies responsible for processing and approvals. Notifications on the status of applications are sent to applicants via email and if requested via mobile text. Please visit the link below for TTBizlink Certificate of Origin Training Manual Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMLRApTwEL0 Please see below of the TTBizlink Process Map

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8.3.5 Cargo Insurance Shippers who wish to protect their interests in the cargo in the event of loss or damage prior to delivery to the ultimate consignee should obtain cargo insurance, depending on terms of delivery with either an FOB/FAS clause or, a CIF+10% value coverage. It is more advisable, however, to obtain Contingency Insurance Clause Coverage. Having obtained that insurance coverage for the shipment, a copy of the insurance certificate or the insurance policy should be included in the shipping documents sent to the consignee or the agent/transportation intermediary thereof. (Source: Jamaica: Import (general)) http://www.gistnet.com/cidb-sample/do-jm.import.html

8.4

Packaging, Labelling and Marking Requirements

Jamaica follows labelling requirements set out in the Caribbean Community Standard for Requirements for Labelling. This is indicated in Appendix V to this report.

SECTION 9.0: FINANCING EXPORTS TO JAMAICA exporTT Limited provides co-financing options (50% reimbursement) for the following market access activities: a. Product Registration b. Trademark Registration c. Product Testing d. Translation & Interpretation Services e. Legal representation for product, brand and trademark registration f. Booth rental at trade shows g. Business to business matchmaking services h. Shipping of samples

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i. In-store marketing and promotions j. Booth design at trade shows k. Ground transportation for exporTT led groups at trade missions and trade shows l. Brand registration m. Label modification n. Registration at international capacity building forum/workshop Please contact the following person or any other exporTT representative for more information on these services: Mr. Crisen Maharaj Manager- Capacity Building and Programme Financing exporTT Limited 151B Charlotte Street Port of Spain Tel.: (868) 623-5507 ext. 362 Fax: (868) 625-8126 Mobile: (868) 796-4276 Email: cmaharaj@exportt.co.tt Website: www.exportt.co.tt In addition to local banks, to obtain information on financing exports to St. Vincent and the Grenadines, please contact: Mr. Shaun Waldron Manager, Credit & Business Development Export Import Bank of Trinidad & Tobago Limited #30 Queen's Park West, Port of Spain Phone: 1-(868)-628-2762 ext. 288 Fax: 1-(868) -628-9370 Email: swaldron@eximbanktt.com Website: www.eximbanktt.com

SECTION 10.0: TRADE EVENTS AND FAIRS Expo Jamaica: April 14-17, 2016 This event is hosted by the Jamaica Manufacturers Association and the Jamaica Exporters Association. It features exhibitors who are manufacturers, producers, wholesalers and distributors of Jamaican goods and services. Further information can be found on http://www.expojamaica.com.jm/

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SECTION 11.0: CONTACT INFORMATION 11.1 Trinidad and Tobago Office

Contact Information Roann David Export Officer

exporTT Limited

Customs & Excise Division

Shipping Agencies

exporTT Limited 151 B Charlotte Street Port of Spain Trinidad W.I. Tel: 1.868.623.5507 Ext. 226 Mobile: 1-868-477-8031 Fax: 1.868.624.3919/625.8126 Email: rdavid@exportt.co.tt Website: www.exportt.co.tt Customs and Excise Division Ministry of Finance Custom House Nicholas Court Cor. Abercromby Street and Independence Square Port of Spain Phone: (868) 625-3311-9 Ext 335-8 Shipping Association of Trinidad & Tobago 15 Scott Bushe Street, Port of Spain Phone: (868) 625-2388, (868) 623-3355 Fax: (868) 623-8570 Email: om@shipping.co.tt Web: http://shipping.co.tt/member%20search.php?id=1&page=1

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11.2 Jamaica Office

JAMPRO  Jamaica Coalition of Services Industries  Jampro Knowledge Services Unit  Jampro Trade & Business Development Unit

Contact Information 18 Trafalgar Road/Braemar Avenue Kingston 10 Tel: 876 978-7755  Stephen Charoo – Consulting Officer, Knowledge Services, email: scharoo@jamprocorp.com  Vivion Scully – Manager Knowledge Services, email: vscully@jamprocorp.com  Robert Scott – VP Trade & Business Development, email: rscott@jamprocorp.com  Marjorie Straw – Manager Special Projects 4 St. Lucia Avenue Kingston 5 Tel: 876 968-7116

Ministry of Industry, Investment and Commerce

 Douglas Webster, Senior Dir., Policy, planning, projects and Research Division, dwebster@miic.gov.jm  Kelvin Kerr, Acting Dir., Prices & Supplies, Commerce Unit. kkerr@miic.gov.jm  Latoya Richards Franklin, Snr. Economist, Logistics Hub Secretariat, lrichards@miic.gov.jm  Vivian Brown, Acting PS, MIIC  Mrs. Andrene Collins, Trade Specialist 21 Dominica Drive Kingston 10 Tel: 876 926-4220

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade (MFAFT)

 Dr. Richard Brown – Deputy Director, Foreign Trade Department  Cheryl Gordon  Sheldon Barnes  Andrea Dubidad-Dixon 4 Winchester Road Kingston 10 Tel: 876 926-3140-5

Bureau of Standards Orine Henry-Blair – Director, Regulatory Division, Bureau of Standards Email: oblair@bsj.org.jm

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Office

Contact Information JAMPRO 18 Trafalgar Road/Braemar Avenue Kingston 10 Tel: 876 927-8056

Anti-Dumping and Subsidies Commission

Jamaica Customs

Andrea Marie Dawes Executive Director Tel: (876) 927-8665/978-1800 Cell: (876) 564-0910 Fax: (876) 978-1093 Email: abrown@jadsc.gov.jm Website: www.jadsc.gov.jm Marcus Garvey Drive Newport East Kingston Tel: 876 922-5140-8 Major Reese - richard.reese@jacustoms.gov.jm Marsha Daley, Erica Wheatle - International Trade Unit

Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN)

7 Cecelia Avenue Kingston 10 Tel: 876 926-5311 www.statinja.gov.jm www.statinja.com  Carol Coy, Director General, ccoy@statin.gov.jm  Sharon Willis, Senior Statistician/Unit Head, External Trade Email: swillis@atatinja.gov.jm Ardenne Road Kingston 10 927-6238

Private Sector Organization of Jamaica

Dennis Chung Chief Executive Officer Tel: (876) 927-6931 Cell: (876) 855-0891 Fax: (897) 927-5137 Email: dennisc@psoj.org Website: www.psoj.org

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Jamaica

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Office

Jamaica Exporters Association

Jamaica Chamber of Commerce

Jamaica Manufacturers Association

Contact Information 1 Winchester Road Kingston 10 Tel: 876 920-6702 Mr. Claude Fletcher General Manager Suite 13-15 Ocean Boulevard Kingston Tel: 876 922-0150-1 Trever Fearon CEO 85A Duke St Kingston Tel: 876 922-8880 Imega Breese-McNab Executive Director 191 Hagley park Road Kingston 11 Tel: 876 937-1623/7

Freight Forwarders Association

Trade Board

Antoinette Chambers President Cell: 876 322-9828 Email: jlbshipping.com Trade Board Limited 10th Floor, Air Jamaica Building 72 Harbour Street Kingston Tel: 876 967 0507 Fax: 876 948 5441/876 948 7486 Email: info@tradeboard.gov.jm

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Appendices


Appendix I – Excerpt from “The Tourist Enhancement Act [2004]” pages 583 & 584 Tourism Enhancement Fee 4.-(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act, there shall be paid by each traveller, a tourism enhancement fee of(a) US$10 or the Jamaican dollar equivalent, in respect of travel by air; (b) US$2 or the Jamaican dollar equivalent in respect of travel by sea. (2) The fees specified in subsection (1) may, from time to time, be varied by the Minister by order subject to affirmative resolution. (3) A tourism enhancement fee shall not be payable by travellers who(a) Are under the age of 2 years; (b) Enjoy diplomatic immunities or privileges; (c) Are travelling by air destined for some other place outside Jamaica and who are in transit in Jamaica for 24 hours or less; (d) Are crew members of a commercial airline or ship and who are on duty; or (e) Fall within a category of travellers prescribed by the Minister.


Appendix II – Listing of Market Players in Jamaica

Company

Type

Amalgamated Distributors

D

BOSS Furniture Company Limited

W,M

Carimed

Chas E. Ramson

Courts

Empire Supermarket

D

M,D

R

S (Low end)

Address 1 Spanish Town Rd Kingston 11 Jamaica Tel: 876 937 3012 Email: adl@cwjamaica.com Mr. Omar Azan Chief Executive Officer Cell: 876 999-2455112 Church Street Kingston Jamaica Tel: 876 922 1734/0263 Fax: 876 967 5777/1278 Email: oazan@bossfurniture.com 20 Lady Musgrave Rd Kingston Jamaica Tel: 876 927 7098 www.carimed.com Raymond Silvera General Manager 449 Spanish Town Road Kingston 11 Jamaica Tel: 876 923 5051-4 Web: www.chaseramson.com 29 Constant Spring Road Kingston 10 Tel: 876 960 7947 Web: www.courts.com.jm 1-3 Retirement Road Kingston 5 Tel: 876 960 1309-11 Email: info@empiresupermarkets.com


Company Empire Supermarket Wholesale & Retail Outlet

Fresh Approach

General Food Supermarket

Type W,R

S

S (Mid end)

Grace

M,D, W, R

HD Hopwood

D

Hi-Lo Food Stores

S

Industrial Sales Limited

D

Address 1--3 Retirement Rd Kingston 5 Jamaica Tel: 876 960 1309-11 Email: info@empiresupermarkets.com 112 ½ Constant Spring Road Kingston 8 Jamaica Tel: 876 969 7422 Liguanea Plaza 134 Old Hope Road Kingston 6 Tel: 876 977 9799 Email: liguanea@generalfoodsupermarket.com Email: ochorios@generalfoodssupermarket.com Address: 73 Harbour Street Kingston Jamaica Tel: 876 922 3440/9 Tel: 876 977 9799 Web: www.gracefoods.com 3 Carifta Avenue Kingston 11 Jamaica, W.I. Tel: 876 923 8481; 876 618 1434 Telefax: 876 923 6351 E-mail: info@hdhopwood.com 13 Old Hope Road Kingston 5 Kingston Jamaica Tel: 876 926 6172 Web: www.gracefoods.com Neville Ledgister General Manager 107 Marcus Garvey Drive Kingston Email: nledgister@seprod.com corporate@seprod.com Web: www.seprod.com


Company Island Products

Jamaica Packaging

John R. Wong Supermarket

Type W,M,D

M

S (Mid to Upper end)

Kirk Distributors

D

Lascelles/J. Wray & Nephew

M,D

Lasco

M,D

Address E. Barry Martin Managing Director 2B Ken Hill Drive Pembroke Hall, Kingston 20 Jamaica Tel: 876 765 6468 Tel: 876 934 0666/0839 Email: islandpro@cwjamaica.com Web: www.islandproductsja.com Mrs. Hope Harnett General Manager 16 Ashenheim Road Kingston 11 Tel: 876 923 7031-3 Tel: 876 937 2023, Ext. 230 Email: hharnett@jamaicapackaging.com sales@jamaicapackaging.com 1 Tobago Ave. Kingston 5 Tel: 876 926 4811-2; 876 926 5798 Email: jrwong.supermarket@gmail.com Email: johnrwong.supermarket@gmail.com Kirk Distributors Limited 216 Marcus Garvey Drive Kingston 11 Jamaica Tel: 876 923 7011-6 Web: www.kirkdistributors.com 23 Dominica Drive Kingston 5 Tel: 876 923 6141–9 Web: www.jwrayandnephew.com White Marl - PO Box 809 Spanish Town, St. Catherine Jamaica W.I. Tel: 876 749 5272 Web: www.lascodistributors.com


Company Lee's Food Fair

Loshusan Supermarket

Type S

S (Upper end)

Maxim Wholesale

Megamart

MegaMart Wholesale Club

Megamart/Bascho

W

W,S

SS

W,S

NMH Trading & Distribution (Jamaica) Limited formerly H.D. Hopwood & Company Limited.

D

Price Rite

S

Address 86 Red Hills Road Kingston 20 Jamaica Tel: 876 931 1560/0706 Barbican 29 East Kings House Road Kingston 6 Jamaica Tel: 876 946 1677/80 Fax: 876 978 0971 Email: loshusan.supermarket@gmail.com 37-39 Half Way Tree Road Kingston 5 Jamaica Tel: 876 926 2528 29 Upper Waterloo Road Kingston 10 Jamaica Tel: 876 969 3899/1533 Fax: 876 969 7755 29 Upper Waterloo Rd Kingston 10 Tel: 876 969 3899; 876 969 1533 Elias Azan CEO 29 Upper Waterloo road Kingston 10 Jamaica Tel: 876 969 3899/1533 Richard Barrow Chief Executive Officer 3 Carifta Avenue Kingston 11 Jamaica Direct Line: 876 675 4007 Tel: 876 923 8481 9 Chancery St Kingston 19 Kingston Jamaica Tel: 876 925 1530


Company

Type

PriceSmart (Ja) Ltd.

SS

Progressive Group

S

Public Supermarket

S

Rapid True Value

H

SAMPARS Cash and Carry

W,S

Seprod

M,D

Shoppers Fair Supermarkets

S

Address 111 Red Hills Road Kingston 19 Tel: 876 969 1242 Web: www.pricesmart.com Barbican 29 East Kings House Road Kingston 6 Jamaica Tel: 876 946 1677/80 Fax: 876 978 0971 Shop C11 195 Constant Spring Road Kingston 8 Jamaica Tel: 876 925 6409 Lane Plaza 26 C Constant Spring Road Kingston 11 Tel: 876 765 9967 Email: www.rapidtruevalue.com 233 Marcus Garvey Drive Kingston 11 Jamaica Tel: 876 923 7467 Email: sampars@cwjamaica.com Email: sales@samparja.com Web: www.shopsampars.com Fox Path Kingston Jamaica Tel: 876 922 1220 Email: corporate@seprod.com Email: stratcom@cwjamaica.com Web: www.seprod.com Shop 18-19 Duhaney Pk Plaza Kingston 20 Jamaica Tel: 876 933 3517


Company

Type

Address

Singer

R

Super Plus

S

21 C Constant Spring Road Kingston 10 Tel: 876 926 8395 Email: info@singer.com.jm Web: www.singer.com.jm Head Office Christiana Main St Tel: 876 964 2465 Novea Henry Marketing and Project Director 109 Marcus Garvey Kingston 11 Jamaica Telephone: 876 923 7311-9 Fax: 876 923 7137, 876 923-8356 E-mail: info@tgeddesgrant.com Web: www.geddys-ja.com Twickenham Park, Spanish Town, St Catherine, or 13 Old Hope Road, P.O. Box 69 Kingston 5 Jamaica Tel: 876 984 3081-4 Web: www.wisynco.com

T. Geddes Grant

M,D

Wisynco

M,D

KEY M D W R S SS

Manufacturer Distributor Wholesaler Retailer Supermarket Super Store


Appendix III – Published Survey of Grocery Items by Consumer Affairs Division

CONSUMER ALERT! SURVEY OF GROCERY ITEMS - DECEMBER 4-5, 2014

PORTLAND

CORPORATE AREA Items

CORNED BEEF (CANNED) [TX]

MACKEREL (CANNED) (In

Tomato Sauce) [NT]

Brand

Size

CONSTANT SPRING CARI HOME PUBLIC SUPERMARKET

SUPERMARKET

WATERLOO ROAD MEGA MART

HAVENDALE FAMILY PRIDE SUPER VALU

RED HILLS ROAD LEE'S FOOD FAIR

PORT ANTONIO KAMAL'S

KAMLYN'S

BUFF BAY SHOPPER'S PRIDE

ST. JAMES BAY CITY SUPERMARKET

MONTEGO BAY MEGA HI-LO MART BASIX

SHOPPER'S FAIR

GRACE

340 g

320.97

359.97

342.22

324.58

335.78

335.47

311.60

306.99

340.00

334.32

342.22

347.95

335.78

EVE LASCO

340 g 340 g

285.44

329.68 327.35

316.94

279.33 256.30

307.12

316.61

292.26

314.55

301.97

322.00 311.00

303.26 306.19

303.26

314.55

274.46 293.95

321.41

301.98

312.30

357.77 314.55

GRACE

155 g

82.13

80.99

77.15

77.00

74.76

71.96

70.70

70.00

77.08

67.76

77.15

80.14

74.76

EVE LASCO

155 g 155 g

66.67

68.99 70.76

57.77 68.55

64.47 68.55

65.79 65.41

63.17 65.81

63.16 65.81

67.00 69.00

63.70 69.50

72.58 70.76

68.54

64.47 68.55

SARDINES (CANNED, In Soya

BRUNSWICK

106 g

128.21

128.00

99.00

103.03

122.66

99.00

115.40

115.00

106.00

105.49

99.00

Oil) [NT]

EVE

106 g

86.02

91.99

89.63

77.77

87.50

84.00

84.00

90.00

87.50

89.63

DRIED SALTED FISH [TX]

BULK

1 kg

1522.24

1208.09

1419.79

1157.72

85.00 1215.95 (On Special)

1388.89

1056.00

1097.88

1188.00

1125.00

1419.84

1317.50

WHOLE CHICKEN (Grade A, Frozen) [NT]

BEST DRESSED

1 kg

474.51

440.99

440.60

450.79

429.32

426.40

414.46

414.46

462.00

374.00

440.62

450.78

CB

1 kg

468.99

435.99

443.90

446.67

422.50

443.89

445.54

80 g

142.04

154.93

142.81

140.56

151.51

142.04

142.04

148.00

125.00

142.81

140.56

80 g

124.80

132.99

137.16

135.00

138.24

150.90

151.00

154.00

157.28

137.16

135.00

NESTLE

392 g

271.74

265.61

258.83

244.55

244.57

254.75

244.56

237.00

258.82

211.14

258.83

247.32

BETTY

395 g

227.45

246.97

240.70

206.19

227.44

236.91

221.11

215.00

251.92

211.14

240.70

229.99

400 g

632.90

565.99

602.83

542.45

593.33

578.66

569.63

569.60

603.00

602.83

565.10

SKIMMED MILK POWDER [TX] POWDERED WHOLE MILK [NT] SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK [TX]

LASCO

INFANT FORMULA [NT]

147.96

455.40

122.66 87.50

85.00

SMA GOLD

400 g

1247.00

1422.16

1197.32

1428.06

1277.25

1360.57

1203.41

1321.07

1378.06

1422.16

MARGARINE [TX]

GOLD SEAL CHIFFON

227 g 227 g

140.95 238.81

163.10

133.49 229.09

142.39 244.36

142.35 244.30

128.17 207.62

128.00 206.00

135.62 237.44

125.60 229.00

163.10 233.58

167.07 243.74

COOKING OIL [NT]

CHEF

500 mL

226.16

200.99

215.42

192.71

192.71

192.71

212.04

203.56

202.00

215.42

192.71

LIDER

500 mL

187.25

194.99

181.78

179.35

176.15

187.25

179.76

179.76

190.24

185.09

176.14

TOMATO KETCHUP [TX]

GRACE

385 g

139.68

109.27

EVE

382 g

122.00

119.98

101.94

109.79

116.20

DARK SUGAR [NT] RICE [NT] CORNMEAL [NT]

BULK BULK BULK

1 kg 1 kg 1 kg

117.60 105.00 105.34

128.99 92.99 109.99

126.88 90.28 103.13

124.41 90.42 105.81

123.20 90.20 104.41

125.40 92.18 98.41

111.64 114.00 88.17 98.70

114.37

114.37

93.06 103.13

133.13 91.80 106.25

187.25

119.00

117.96 117.70 119.52

106.90

114.37

127.00 88.17 98.70

122.50 87.50 88.18


COUNTER FLOUR [NT]

BULK

HARDOUGH BREAD [NT]

NONE EXCELSIOR NATIONA L EXCELSIOR NATIONA L NESTLE-MILO (Protomalt)

WATER CRACKERS [NT]

CREAM CRACKERS

FOOD DRINK [TX]

1 kg 2 "lb" loaf 336 g

285.00 147.63

336 g 113 g

154.67 45.77

98.00

109.72

97.92

285.00 164.99

285.00 155.00

285.00 147.62

285.00 145.00

150.99 47.99

145.00 45.00

131.25 51.42

145.00 51.42

98.00

285.00 147.62

285.00 148.80

285.00 155.00

285.00 157.48

285.00 181.00

275.00 155.00

145.00 44.57

142.08 43.40

142.00 55.00

133.00

145.00

145.00 45.00

43.20

53.99

51.42

42.86

42.86

51.42

49.30

40.00

49.73

51.42

49.00

52.95

51.42

326.53

253.70

316.37

324.00

294.91

294.91

321.46

270.35

326.53

342.70

316.40

132.00

148.49 197.99 (On Special)

185.18

187.39

223.15

220.00

157.30

148.50

288.00

294.99

231.00

178.57

208.33

176.00

231.00

148.50

348.00

214.49

184.80

132.99

1 kg

263.99

198.99

148.50

165.00

1 kg

260.86

198.99

281.00

265.50

238.19

216.05

286.00

297.00

242.00

191.62

281.00

403.32

294.99

LOCAL

1 doz

375.22

364.63

438.41

388.34

412.42

400.76

348.00

348.00

370.00

315.00

438.41

390.00

385.91

BUG OFF

6 coils

63.57

59.40

69.90

56.76

56.76

58.12

51.60

69.90

52.20

57.90

VAPE

6 coils

62.91

59.40

57.52

55.05

56.16

60.41

57.00

57.52

62.55

400 g

233.61

189.63

208.58

218.60

221.55

183.56

225.53

193.84

ARIEL

375 g

223.82

208.52

178.78 (On

191.00

177.00

212.00

133.28

203.00

199.83

BOMBER

140 g

55.89

55.89

58.20

49.00

51.00

AJAX

475 mL

96.43

86.11

86.11

88.17

83.00

83.00

87.00

86.11

CHLORO-DO

475 mL

79.08

73.79

77.67

74.27

79.00

73.79

110 g

109.56

89.69

105.64

97.81

97.81

100.16

93.95

93.90

99.36

97.81

113 g

283.79

264.44

247.71

263.53

263.53

283.10

253.40

253.00

79 g

160.93

147.13

143.68

154.21

153.78

90 g

107.37

119.20

115.63

10 pk

261.44

233.44

233.44

JOHNSON'S BABY POWDER COLGATE (Cavity

58.12

199.83

216.92 180.81 Special)

53.00

BLEACH [TX] BATH SOAP [TX]

58.25

193.84

53.00

LAUNDRY SOAP BAR [TX]

TOOTHPASTE (Regular) [TX]

45.56

329.70

1 kg

POWDER [TX]

99.31

54.84

LOCAL

POWDERED LAUNDRY DETERGENT [TX]

95.77

321.23

LOCAL

IMPORTED

110.00

300 g

CABBAGE (Green) [NT]

EGGS [TX] MOSQUITO DESTROYER [TX]

104.50

112 g

TOMATOES (Plummy) [NT]

ONION [NT]

104.52

142.00

55.89

58.12

45.57 92.45

86.11 77.67

105.64

101.61

97.81

147.13

149.29

143.68

114.78

105.86

115.63

261.08 146.00

Protection) Protection ) STAYFREE MAXI

SANITARY NAPKINS [NT]

* *

114.44

107.00

117.42

(On Special)

233.44 233.99

Cells highlighted in green signify the lowest price for that particular item, in its respective parish Cells highlighted in red signify the highest price for that particular item, in its respective parish * NT - Not Taxable * TX - Taxable

Source: The Consumer Affairs Commission Jamaica- http://www.consumeraffairsjamaica.gov.jm/

243.75

225.00

224.10

234.38

236.30


Appendix IV – Sample CARICOM Certificate of Origin


Appendix V – Caribbean Community Standard For Requirements For Labelling (Labelling of pre-packaged goods) TABLE OF CONTENTS 0. FOREWORD 2 -3 1.0 SCOPE 3-4 2.0 DEFINITIONS 4 -8 3.0 REQUIREMENTS 8 -13 4.0 USE OF STANDARD MARKS 13 -14 5.0 ADVICE ON LABELS 14 6.0 CONFLICT 14 7.0 REGISTRATION OF LABELS PROGRAMME 15 0.

FOREWORD 0.1 This standard was prepared by the Caribbean Common Market Standards Council and approved by the Council of Ministers in December 1978 for use as a voluntary standard. 0.2

It is recommended that each Territory of the Caribbean community should adopt this standard as a compulsory standard to prevent fraud and deception arising from misleading labelling and to give adequate information to the consumer or user of prepackaged goods. 0.2.1

0.3

This standard was prepared at an early stage as the Caribbean Common Market Standards Council had indicated those standards for labelling would be given high priority.

As many goods for retail sale are commonly sold pre-packaged by the manufacturer, the packager, or the retailer, it was recognized that provisions for the information to be given on labels of pre-packaged goods would help the consumer or purchaser to assess the quality of goods and their relation to his or her needs and resources. 0.3.1 It is hoped that this standard will also assist manufacturers in meeting the requirements for labelling imposed on countries outside the Caribbean Community.

0.4

In drafting this standard, assistance was derived from the following: I. The Food and Drugs (Amendment) Regulations (1974) – Trinidad and Tobago; II. The Consumer Packaging and Labelling act (1971) and Regulations (1974) – Canada; and III. TTS 21 10 500 Part – 1976 – Labelling of Pre-packaged Goods. IV. JS 1 Part 20 Jamaican Standard Specification for Labelling of commodities Part: 20 Labelling of Pre-packaged products (Revised).


0.5

Labelling of pre-packaged goods is intended to: I. assist the purchaser or consumer towards an understanding of the nature, quality or use of the goods so that he may judge whether it is adequate for his needs and is of a quality or usefulness for which he judges the price to be acceptable; II. Enable the manufacturer or retailer to carry out his obligation to describe the goods at the point of sale in a truthful, informative and non-deceptive manner so that no cause for complaint may be found that the goods were wrongly described.

1.

For these reasons, and in order to minimize the confusion that exists in the labelling of different classes of articles so that some are customarily sold with much information, others with little, this standard has been prepared to lay down the basic requirements and basic information that labels should carry.

2. 1.1

SCOPE This standard sets out requirements for the information to be included on labels of goods pre-packaged for retail sale, the method of display of such information, and where necessary, the wording and units of measurements (metric) to be used. This standard does not apply to the following: I. Goods in packages not intended for retail sale; II. Goods or classes of goods where different or additional information is prescribed by any Caribbean Regional Standard or model regulations approved by the Caribbean Regional Organization for Standards and Quality (CROSQ); III. Goods intended for export only which comply with the requirements of standards or laws on labelling in force in the country to which they are being exported; Cases where any Caricom Regional Standard for any goods or classes of goods makes differing or supplementary provisions for labelling, the provisions of that standard shall prevail over the provisions of this standard; Gift-wrapped goods; and VI. Markings on shipping containers.

1.2

2.0

DEFINITIONS 2.1 For the purposes of this standard the following definitions shall apply: 2.1.1 Address means the identifiable address of the principal place of business or registered office of: I. The manufacturer or packager of the goods; or II. The person for whom the goods are manufactured or packaged. 2.1.2 Bulk Container or Multiple Containers means a package in which one or more similar articles of pre-packaged goods are placed and which may be sold together with them by retail as a unit or each pre-packaged article may be sold separately. 2.1.3 Combination package means a package intended for retail sale, which contains two or more individual packages or units of dissimilar commodities.


2.1.4 Common Name of any goods means the name by which those goods are commonly described in a member country of the Caribbean Community, or any name for those goods that is commonly used in any trade, art, craft, science, industry or occupation in countries using the English Language (whether or not the name is in English) and includes any name in a standard declared by CROSQ), or the Competent Authority, for those goods. 2.1.5 Competent Authority means a Minister, Ministry, department of government or statutory body in a Territory of the Caribbean Community administering any law regulating the labelling of goods. 2.1.6 Country of Origin means the country where the nature or quality of the goods was last changed to a significant extent, other than by packaging. 2.1.7 Date Mark means any date by which the age of any article may be determined if it is subject to deterioration in the course of distribution through trade. 2.1.8 Distribute means to deliver goods to another person in exchange for money, or other consideration. 2.1.9 Expiry Date means any date after which the manufacturer or packager does not guarantee any property of the goods by reason of the foreseeable deterioration due to age or normal handling before retail sale. 2.1.10 Instruction for Use means any information as to the method of storage, handling, use, installation, care, maintenance or repair that may reasonably assist a consumer, user or purchaser in using any goods, or which may be required to be given in conformity with a standard, warranty, or any law in force in a Territory of the Caribbean Community. 2.1.11 Label means any mark, symbol, device, and imprint, stamp, brand, ticket, or tag applied to, place on, accompanying, sold with, or referring to any goods or package containing goods. 2.1.12 Manufacturer means the person who manufactures, produces, processes, prepares, packages, or pre-packages any goods for retail sale. 2.1.13 Multiunit package means a package containing two or more individual packages of the same commodity in the same quantity, with individual packages intended to be sold as part of the multiunit package, but capable of being sold individually, in full compliance with all the requirements of this standard. 2.1.14 Net Contents means the quantity of goods contained in a package as measured in terms of a unit of measurement of length, volume, weight (or mass), or number, when the package and packing materials have been separated from the goods. 2.1.15 Ornamental container means a package in which the surfaces commonly displayed are used solely for decorative ornament and not for any advertising or promotional information other than the trade name and the common name of the goods. 2.1.16 Package means any container, wrapper, or confining band, in which any product is enclosed for use in the delivery or display of that product to the retail purchaser. 2.1.17 Pre-packaged goods means goods that are placed in advance of sale in the final package in which it is intended for retail sale, and in which it is intended for retail sale, and in which it may be sold, used or purchased without further repackaging.


2.1.18 Principal display panel means that part of the package which is most likely to be displayed, shown or examined under customary conditions of display for retail sale 2.1.19 Standard Mark means a registered certificate trade mark granted to commodities, processes and practices which consistently perform to national specifications. 2.1.20 Registered office means the company’s official place where all communications are to be sent. 2.1.21 Retail price means the price set or asked by a retailer for: I. One or a specified number of articles of the goods; or II. One or a specified number of units of measurement of the goods. 2.1.22 Sell includes: I. Offer of sale, expose for sale, have in possession for sale; and II. Display in such a manner as may reasonably be construed as to invite an offer to treat or to be for sale. 2.1.23 Shipping Container means any container intended to protect goods during transport that is not customarily used to store the goods when displayed for sale. 2.1.24 Unit of Measurement means any unit in the SI system of units or the Imperial System of units or any other unit prescribed by law for use in trade, or commonly used in trade, science, the arts, or other occupations to measure the properties of an article. 2.1.25 Warranty or Guarantee means an undertaking given by a vendor, manufacturer, distributor or supplier to a buyer or consumer with respect to any goods or part of goods, relating to any of the following matters: I. Safety; II. Quantity; III. Quality; IV. Composition; V. Performance; VI. Lifespan; VII. Durability; VIII. Repair and maintenance services; . Replacement of goods if found defective; . Compensation to the buyer or consumer for any defective goods supplied, or loss, harm, damage or under hardships resulting from use of any defective goods supplied; or XI. 3.0

Any other related matters not included under (I) to (X) above.

REQUIREMENTS 3.1 General – Each package of pre-packaged goods shall be labelled with the following information: I. The common or usual name of the commodity, a generic name, or appropriately descriptive term such as a statement of function or the name required by or specified in any applicable regulation together with any trade name or brand name controlled by the manufacturer;


II.

III.

The name of the manufacturer and his identifiable address, the principal place of business or registered office of the manufacturer, packer or importer and the name of the country of origin. It shall be preceded by the words “manufactured by ....”, “packed by......”, “distributed by....”, “imported by.....”, as applicable, and the words: “made in (name of territory)”; “produce of (name of territory)”; “packaged in (name of territory)”; as appropriate. A correct statement of the net contents of the package, subject to such tolerance as may be allowed, in metric units of measurement; . Major ingredients or contents shall be listed in decreasing order of predominance by weight or volume. Products which have ingredients shall state the ‘Active Ingredients’ in decreasing order of weight , or volume, or percentage, followed by the ‘Inert Ingredients’, in decreasing order of weight or percentages. For food products which contain a preservative the name of the preservative shall be stated followed by the word ‘preservative’ in parenthesis. . An expiry date or date marks where an indication of the age of the goods is likely to be useful to the consumer or purchaser.

3.2

Prevention of Deception – A label on package of pre-packaged goods may contain other information, designs, symbols or pictorial matter, provided that no words, illustration, symbols, or other matter are used to: I. Give an erroneous impression as to the net contents of the package; II. Give an erroneous impression as to any ingredient or component of the goods or that the goods contain an ingredient or component that is not in fact contained in it; III. Referring to the nature, origin, type, quality, performance, function, or method of manufacture or production of the goods that is likely to give an erroneous impression as to the matter described or depicted; IV. To give an erroneous impression as to the country of origin of the goods; V. To give an erroneous impression as to the price or unit price of the goods; VI. To give an erroneous impression as to ease of maintenance or repair of the goods, or as to the availability of spare parts for the goods. V11. To give an undertaking or warranty, expressed or implied, which cannot be satisfied by the product or the manufacturer.

3.3

Position of Information on Package or on the Goods 3.3.1 The information required by 3.1 shall be placed on the principal display panel of the package, that is, the part of the package that is displayed or visible to the purchaser or consumer at the point of sale, which may be: I. In the case of a box, the side or surface commonly displayed; II. In the case of a cylindrical container, an area covering an arc of 40 percent of the circumference of the cylindrical surface; III. In the case of a bag with equal sides, one of these sides; In the case of a


bag with sides of more than one size, the size with the largest area; . In the case of a wrapper or confining band that is much narrower than the goods contained therein, the total area of a ticket or tag attached to the container or to the goods; VI. In the case of an article attached to a display card with which it is sold, the area of the display card and of the package; and VII. In the case of an ornamental package, at the bottom of the package. 3.4

Exemptions for Certain Retail Sales – Goods which are repackaged by the retailer need not be labelled with the information required by 3.1, so long as they are sold or displayed or exposed for sale in close proximity to a notice, card, or statement in clearly discernible lettering containing the information required by 3.1

3.5 Language to be used on Labels of Pre-packaged Goods 3.5.1 All statements required by 4.1 shall be in the English Language, except where the common name, manufacturer’s name, or addresses are in other languages. 3.5.2 All statements required by 3.0 shall be printed or written in the English alphabet with or without accent signs. 3.5.3 All numbers relating to net contents stated on the label shall be given in Arabic numerals or in words. 3.5.4 Where the label contains information in English and in one or more other languages, the statements required by 3.1 shall be separate from the statements in other languages, and placed on the label or package as required by 3.3. 3.6

Information as to Retail Price or Unit Price 3.6.1 The label on a package may include a statement of the price of the goods in the package. 3.6.2 Where the price of a package of the goods is not marked on the label or on the package, the price shall be clearly displayed on a card or notice placed in the close proximity to the place where the goods are displayed or exposed for sale. 3.6.3 Where units of the same goods differ in quantity so that packages containing the goods are not uniform in net contents, the price of each package and net contents of each package shall be marked by the packager or retailer on the label, together with the price for a unit of measurement of the goods. 3.6.4 Where a claim is made: I. That the goods are sold at a new price which is less than a previous price; or II. That an amount has been taken off the price of the goods; III. Then the old and new prices shall be stated in figures of equal size and style.

3.7

Warranties or Guarantees – No reference shall be made on a label or on a package to any warranty or guarantee for any goods unless a copy of the warranty or guarantee


3.8

3.9

is given to the purchaser or consumer at the time he takes possession of the goods. Presentation of Information – All information required by this standard to be placed on a label or ticket shall be clearly presented and readily discernible under normal conditions of sale. 3.8.1 Where the statements of common name or manufacturer’s name or manufacturer’s address or of country of origin consist of more than one word, the statements thereof required by 3.1 shall be in letters of identical size and style of print. Date Markings and Expiry Dates 3.9.1 Where products are liable to deteriorate after the date of manufacture or packaging so that the quality, safety, hygiene or other desirable characteristics are not likely to be maintained, the expected shelf life shall be indicated with a date mark, a date of minimum durability or expiry date. 3.9.2 In addition to the date of minimum durability if there are any special conditions for storage of the product, it shall be declared on the label if the validity of the date depends on it.

3.10 Instructions for Use and Information on Source for Spare Parts 3.10.1 Instructions for use or care in handling shall be included on the label or accompanying document, as necessary to ensure correct utilization of the product. 3.10.2 Where any risk to the safety or health of a consumer or user, or where any significant deterioration of the quality, performance life, durability, or other property of the goods are not properly stored, handled, transported, used installed, cared for, maintained or repaired, any appropriate hazard symbol and instructions for use in English shall be provided either on the label, on the package, on the goods, or on a card or paper accompanying the goods or package. 3.10.3 Where components of an article are likely to become unserviceable before the end of the expected life of the article, and where such components are not commonly available, the instructions for use should indicate the name or appropriate specification of the component or spare part. 1 Where no instructions for use are given with the article or goods, the information on spare parts shall be supplied separately with the goods. 4.0 USE OF STANDARD MARKS 4.1 The law of that Territory shall govern the use of a Standard Mark issued by a standard organization of a Territory of the Caribbean Community. 4.2 The use of a Standard Mark issued by a standard organization outside the Caribbean Community shall be in accordance with the rules or laws governing that Standard Mark applied by the standard organization. 4.3 No manufacturer or packager shall use a standard mark on a label, on a package, or


on goods without written authorization in accordance with the laws or rules referred to in 4.1 and 4.2. Note: the following bodies in the Caribbean Community issue Standard Marks:

5.0 ADVICE ON LABELS 5.1 A manufacturer or packager should consult with a competent authority or a national standards organization in a Territory of the Caribbean Community, as to whether any label he uses or proposes to use on pre-packaged goods complies with the provisions of this or any other Caribbean Regional Standard, or of any model regulations approved by CROSQ referring to labelling. 5.2 Where a competent authority administers a law referring to this or other Caricom Standards Council standard that makes provision for labelling of goods, the Caribbean Regional Standards will refer the applicant to that authority for advice on labels. 6.0 CONFLICTS 6.1 In the event of conflict between the provisions of this standard and the labelling requirements of any Caribbean Regional Standard or model regulations approved by CROSQ the latter shall prevail. 6.2 In event of conflict between the provisions of this standard and any Caribbean Regional Standard for the labelling of classes of goods that are sold pre-packaged, the latter shall prevail. 7. REGISTRATION OF LABELS PROGRAMME Individual territories should have a Registration of Labels Programme in place. The labels should be registered with the standards organization or competent authority. 2004 05 12


Appendix VI – Product Comparison The Table below list a comparison of products based on the interviews done and the persons who were willing to provide the information. Product Type Water

Sodas

Packaging Material

Main Players

TT Brand

Food and Beverage Industry Wisynco - Wata Aqua Pure Catherine Peak

Comments

Wata has about 85% of the market. This is enhanced by their line of flavoured water e.g. Cran Wata The main competitor is Catherine’s Peak. There are about 27 brands on the market. Pepsi Cola Jamaica Busta Pepsi Cola has the biggest Wisynco – Coke, Bigga market share Printing, Packaging and Publishing  CorPak Jamaica  Jamaica  Jamaica Packaging  AMG Packaging originally Jamaican  Dynamic Packaging manufacturing company Products Limited but now gets their corrugated packaging material from their sister company in Trinidad after they moved their equipment there. Losing market share to local companies  Jamaica Packaging had 95% of market share up to 2005. Severely eroded by AMG and now CorPak  Dynamic Packaging is the market leader in noncorrugated packaging


Product Type Main Players Wood and Manufacturer Wood related  BOSS products  Therapedic Caribbean (Bedroom  Sealy Jamaica furniture, Retailer mattress  Courts support)  Singer Construction

 WIHCON  GEON

TT Brand Comments Manufacturer  In Bedding BOSS is the  Serta largest of the 5 players. Therapeutic & Sealy is about 20%. Sealy was the Retailer largest before BOSS entered  Courts and took over None

 Geon does high end housing construction. Doesn’t construct individual houses.  WHICON does mass housing construction targeted at lower income market as well as the high end residential side


WORKS CITED The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat. (2011). History of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Retrieved from http://www.caricom.org/jsp/community/history.jsp?menu=community i

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat. (2011).The CARICOM Single Market and Economy. Retrieved from http://www.caricom.org/jsp/single_market/single_market_index.jsp?menu=csme ii

Demographic Statistics. (2015). The Statistical Institute of Jamaica. Retrieved from http://statinja.gov.jm/Demo_SocialStats/newComponentsofIntercensalPopulation.aspx iii

Jamaica. (2015). The World Factbook. Retrieved https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/jm.html iv

from

Jamaica Weather, Climate and Geography. (2014) World Travel Guide. Retrieved from http://www.worldtravelguide.net/jamaica/weather-climate-geography v

Jamaica. (2013). Observatory of http://atlas.media.mit.edu/profile/country/jam/ vi

Economic

Complexity.

Retrieved

from

Jamaica. (2015). The International Monetary Fund. IMF Country Report No. 14/359. Retrieved from https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2014/cr14359.pdf vii

viii

Doing Business 2015: Going Beyond Efficiency. (2015). The World Bank Group. Retrieved

from http://www.doingbusiness.org/~/media/giawb/doing%20business/documents/profiles/country/J AM.pdf The Global Enabling Trade Report 2014. (2014). The World Economic Forum. Retrieved from http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalEnablingTrade_Report_2014.pdf ix

Prohibited. (2009). Jamaica Customs. Retrieved from http://www.jacustoms.gov.jm/home_template.php?page=prohibited&group_id=1%2011.8.14 x

Clearing Customs: Restricted and Prohibited Items. (2012). Retrieved http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/clearing-customs/Restricted-and-prohibiteditems_13109202 xi

xii

Source: A-Z Information Jamaica Limited – Market Survey to Jamaica – November 2013

from

JAMAICA Market Guide Apr 2015  
JAMAICA Market Guide Apr 2015  

exporTT has prepared this document to give you insight to the Jamaican Market and how to successfully conduct business there.

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