Page 1

           

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS    FOREWORD .....................................................................................................................................................  

ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT .......................................................................................................   SECTION 1.0: MARKET OVERVIEW .............................................................................................................. 1  1.1 

Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 

1.1.1 International Dialing Access ............................................................................................... 2  1.2 

Public Holidays .................................................................................................................... 3 

1.3

Travel & Transportation ...................................................................................................... 3 

1.3.1 Individual Entry Requirements for the Three Territories .............................................. 4  1.3.2  Yellow Fever Vaccination .................................................................................................... 4  1.3.3  Visa Requirements ............................................................................................................... 4  1.3.4  Individual Exit Requirements from Trinidad and Tobago ............................................ 4  1.3.5  Ground Transportation ....................................................................................................... 4  SECTION 2.0: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT ....................................................................... 5  2.1 

Economic Performance ........................................................................................................ 5 

2.2

Economic Outlook ................................................................................................................ 5 

2.2.1 Guadeloupe ........................................................................................................................... 5  2.2.2  Martinique ............................................................................................................................. 6  2.2.3  French Guiana ....................................................................................................................... 6  2.3 

Business ................................................................................................................................. 7 

2.4

Labour Force ......................................................................................................................... 7 

2.5

Political Structure ................................................................................................................. 8 

2.5.1 Caribbean Integration .......................................................................................................... 9  SECTION 3.0: TRADE ENVIRONMENT .......................................................................................................... 9  3.1 

Import Statistics .................................................................................................................. 11 

3.1.1 Guadeloupe ......................................................................................................................... 11  3.1.2  Martinique ........................................................................................................................... 13  3.1.3  French Guiana ..................................................................................................................... 14  3.2 

Import Tariffs & Taxes ....................................................................................................... 16 

3.2.1 General Customs Duty ...................................................................................................... 16     


3.2.2 The Value Added Tax ........................................................................................................ 16  3.2.3  Internal Taxes: The “Octroi de Mer” (O.M.) ................................................................... 17  3.2.4  The Quay Tax ...................................................................................................................... 18  3.3 

Trade Barriers ..................................................................................................................... 18 

3.4

Prohibited and Restricted Imports ................................................................................... 18 

3.5

Trade Agreements .............................................................................................................. 19 

SECTION 4.0: MARKET CHALLENGES ....................................................................................................... 20  4.1 

Culture ................................................................................................................................. 20 

4.2

Price ...................................................................................................................................... 21 

4.3

Brand Loyalty ..................................................................................................................... 21 

4.4

Competition ........................................................................................................................ 21 

4.5

Taste Preference .................................................................................................................. 21 

SECTION 5.0: TOP MARKET OPPORTUNITIES AND PROSPECTS ............................................................... 21  SECTION 6.0 MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES ............................................................................................... 22  6.1 

Using an Agent or Distributor .......................................................................................... 22 

6.2

Joint Ventures/Licensing ................................................................................................... 22 

SECTION 7.0 SELLING, MARKETING & PROMOTIONS .............................................................................. 23  7.1 

Selling Factors/Techniques ................................................................................................ 23 

7.2

Trade Promotion ................................................................................................................. 23 

7.3

Advertising .......................................................................................................................... 24 

7.4

Electronic Commerce ......................................................................................................... 25 

7.5

Distribution and Sales Channels ...................................................................................... 26 

7.6

Pricing .................................................................................................................................. 26 

7.7

Shipping Information ........................................................................................................ 26 

7.8

Due Diligence ...................................................................................................................... 29 

SECTION 8.0: REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS ........................................................................................ 29  8.1 

Import Regulations ............................................................................................................ 29 

8.2

Samples ................................................................................................................................ 30 

8.3

Packaging, Labelling and Marking Requirements ........................................................ 30 

8.4

Customs Regulations ......................................................................................................... 32 

SECTION 9.0: TRADE EVENTS AND FAIRS ................................................................................................. 32     


SECTION 10.0: FINANCING EXPORTS TO THE FRENCH CARIBBEAN ........................................................ 32  SECTION 11.0: USEFUL CONTACTS ........................................................................................................... 33  11.1  Trinidad and Tobago ......................................................................................................... 33  11.2  French Caribbean Outermost Regions ............................................................................ 34  11.3  Other .................................................................................................................................... 37  APPENDICES ..........................................................................................................................................................   Appendix I – Applicable Taxes to Products of Interest for CARIFORUM Exporters ........................   Appendix II – Pricing Information for Selected Goods in the FCOR ...................................................   Appendix III– Comparative Pricing Information for Selected Goods in the FCOR ...........................   Appendix IV ‐ Opportunities & Threats Related to Selected Sectors in the FCOR ............................   Appendix V – Recommendations on FCOR Market Entry for Selected Goods ..................................   Appendix VI– Buyers & Distributors ........................................................................................................   Appendix VII– Major Competitive Brands in the FCOR .......................................................................   Appendix VIII – Import Regulations for a Selected Group of Products ..............................................   Appendix IX – Public Translators ..............................................................................................................    

 


FOREWORD   This Market Guide was sponsored by UK Aid, facilitated by the Caribbean Development Bank and prepared  by exporTT Limited.    The Market Guide is intended to give Trinidad & Tobago exporters relevant and valuable information for  successfully exporting their goods to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions (Guadeloupe, Martinique,  and French Guiana).  The information contained therein is based on a compilation of exporTT’s visits to the  market, in‐market consultant information, and desk research which is cited accordingly. Feel free to contact  us at 1.868.623.5507 to discuss your exporting needs.    ***********      ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT  BETWEEN  THE CARIFORUM STATES  AND  THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY AND ITS MEMBERS STATES      Signed  in  2008,  between  the  European  Union  and  15  Caribbean  countries  (comprising  14  CARICOM  States  and  the  Dominican  Republic),  the  CARIFORUM  ‐  EU  Economic  Partnership  Agreement is in part a free trade agreement between the two regions which liberalises trade in  goods, selected services and investment.  The accord also facilitates financial support from the EU  to assist the Caribbean nations implement the agreement, increase exports to the EU and attract  foreign investment.    The objectives of the Agreement are:   

a) Contributing to  the  reduction  and  eventual  eradication  of  poverty  through  the  establishment  of  a  trade  partnership  consistent  with  the  objective  of  sustainable  development, the Millennium Development Goals and the Cotonou Agreement;  b) Promoting  regional  integration,  economic  cooperation  and  good  governance  thus  establishing  and  implementing  an  effective,  predictable  and  transparent  regulatory  framework for trade and investment between the Parties and in the CARIFORUM region;  c) Promoting the gradual integration of the CARIFORUM States into the world economy, in  accordance with their political choices and development priorities;  d) Improving the CARIFORUM Statesʹ capacity in trade policy and trade related issues; 


e) Supporting the  conditions  for  increasing  investment  and  private  sector  initiatives  and  enhancing supply capacity, competitiveness and economic growth in the CARIFORUM  region;  f) Strengthening  the  existing  relations  between  the  Parties  on  the  basis  of  solidarity  and  mutual  interest.  To this  end,  taking  into account  their  respective  levels  of  development  and  consistent  with  WTO  obligations,  the  Agreement  shall  enhance  commercial  and  economic relations, support a new trading dynamic between the Parties by means of the  progressive, asymmetrical liberalisation of trade between them and reinforce, broaden and  deepen cooperation in all areas relevant to trade and investment.    See http://eur‐lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2008:289:0003:1955:EN:PDF for  the full economic partnership agreement.i      


SECTION 1.0: MARKET OVERVIEW    1.1  Introduction  Guadeloupe  and  Martinique  are  two  small  Caribbean  islands  located  in  the  Lesser  Antilles.   Guadeloupe  is  located  north  of  Dominica  and  South  of  Antigua  &  Barbuda.  Alternatively,  Martinique is located north of Saint Lucia and south of Dominica. French Guiana is located on  the South‐American continent (east of Suriname; west and north of Brazil) and is the largest FCOR  in terms of land surface.    The  French  Caribbean  Outermost  Regions  of  Martinique,  Guadeloupe  and  French  Guiana  are  effectively a part of the overall EU market and a microcosm of the market regime that exists for  CARIFORUM and other exporters to the EU. The Least Developed parts of the EU are the seven  ultra‐peripheral  regions  of  the  European  Union,  including  the  French  Overseas  Departments.  They are governed by the same ever evolving rules and regulations that govern France and its  regions, in addition to those laws that govern the EU.  FCORs conduct most of their business with  mainland France due to longstanding colonial ties. There is a high preference for French culture  and French influence dominates their way of life.    This Guide concerns the French Caribbean Outermost Regions of Martinique, Guadeloupe and  French Guiana (FCORs).   Quick facts are provided below on the three territories.      Population  Growth rate  % under 20 years 

Language

Guadeloupe 405,739 +0.2%  ‐ 

Martinique 386,486 ‐0.4%  25% 

Official: French  Other spoken language is Creole Patois 

French Guiana 250,001  +3.1%  43%  Official: French  Other languages : French  Guianese Creole,  Bushinenge, Amerindian  and Hmong NJua 

Geography Area Population Density  Climate 

Average Temperature  Natural risks 

1,628 sq. km  1,128 sq. km.  249/sq. km  ‐  Tropical moderated by trade winds and maritime  influences,  Relatively high humidity,  Rainy season : June to October  27° C (87° F) at lower altitudes  23° C (73° F) at higher levels  Earthquakes, hurricanes and volcano 

Capital

Basse Terre 

Fort‐de‐France

Major towns 

Pointe‐à‐Pitre, Baie‐ Mahault, Les Abymes 

Le Lamentin, Le  Robert, Le François 

83 846 sq. km  3/sq km  Equatorial and damp  climate with low wind  Dry seasons : March and  August to November  Tropical  Landslide, flooding,  coastal erosion  Cayenne  Kourou, Matoury,St  Georges, Saul, Saint  Laurent du Maroni 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 1 of 37   


Business Shops 

Government agencies 

Public Holidays  (see holiday listing below) 

Opening Hours Monday – Friday 8/9  Monday – Friday 8/9  a.m. to 12/1 p.m.  a.m. to 12/1 p.m.  2:30/3 p.m. to 5/6 p.m.  2:30/3 p.m. to 5/6 p.m.      Monday, Tuesday,  Monday – Friday Thursday  7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and  2:00 to 5:30 p.m. 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.  (closing at 1:30 p.m. at  Wednesday & Friday  specific days of the  8 a.m. to 1 p.m.  week)  Conveniences

Monday – Friday 8/9 a.m.  to 12/1 p.m.  2:30/3 p.m. to 5/6 p.m.  9 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Monday – Friday  7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  3 p.m. to 6 p.m.  Hours are shorter on  Wednesday and  Thursday afternoons 

18 Days including religious, cultural and  historical celebrations 

17 Days including  religious, cultural and  historical celebrations 

Currency

Communication

Time Zone 

Euro

ISDN network with  international dialing,  local access to Internet  (ADSL and SL)  Cellphone coverage  99% of the population 

Eastern Caribbean Time (UTC–04:00) 

Working on the  improvement of good  internet reception in  other town than  Cayenne.  77% of the population  have access to 3G. The  objectives for 2014 was to  spread it to Maroni,  South centre and  Oyapock.  French Guiana Time  (UTC‐03:00). Time  Difference: 1 hour ahead  of Trinidad & Tobago 

(Source: INSEE, 2013) 

1.1.1  International Dialing Access  Guadeloupe  Calls from Trinidad and Tobago to Guadeloupe = 011 – 596 – 9 digit phone number  Calls from Guadeloupe to Trinidad and Tobago = 00 – 1 – 868 – 7 digit phone number    Martinique  Calls from Trinidad and Tobago to Martinique = 011 – 590 – 9 digit phone number  Calls from Martinique to Trinidad and Tobago = 00 – 1 – 868 – 7 digit phone number       

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 2 of 37   


French Guiana  Calls from Trinidad and Tobago to French Guiana = 011 – 594 – 9 digit phone number  Calls from French Guiana to Trinidad and Tobago = 00 – 1 – 868 – 7 digit phone number    1.2  Public Holidays  Day  Guadeloupe  Martinique  New Yearʹs Day  1 Jan  1 Jan  Epiphany  6 Jan  ‐  Carnival Monday*  16 Feb  Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday)*  17 Feb  17 Feb  Ash Wednesday*  18 Feb  18 Feb  Mi‐Carême (Mid‐Lent)  15 Mar  ‐  Good Friday*  ‐  3 Apr  Easter Monday*  6 Apr  6 Apr  Labour Day  1 May  1 May  Victory Day  8 May  8 May  Ascension Day  14 May  14 May  Whit Monday  25 May  25 May  Abolition Day  27 May  22 May  Bastille Day  14 Jul  14 Jul  Schoelcher Day  21 Jul  21 Jul  Assumption  15 Aug  15 Aug  Cayenne Festival  ‐  ‐  All Saintsʹ Day  1 Nov  1 Nov  Armistice Day  11 Nov  11 Nov  Christmas Day  25 Dec  25 Dec  *These dates vary depending on the date of Easter Sunday.    1.3  Travel & Transportation    Main Airport 

Guadeloupe Pointe‐à‐Pitre  International Airport  Distance to Capital City  Basse Terre  30.8 km  Driving Time  46 minutes 

Martinique Martinique Aimé  Césaire  Fort‐de‐France  9 km  11 minutes 

French Guiana  1 Jan  ‐  ‐  17 Feb  18 Feb  ‐  3 Apr  6 Apr  1 May  8 May  14 May  25 May  10 Jun  14 Jul  21 Jul  15 Aug  15 Oct  1 Nov  11 Nov  25 Dec 

French Guiana  Félix Eboué Airport  Cayenne  16.4 km  24 minutes 

There are two daily flights to Martinique as follows:  1) Liat ‐ Trinidad/Barbados/Martinique.  Connecting flights are available from Martinique  to Guadeloupe or French Guiana via Air Caraibes.  2) Caribbean Airlines – Trinidad/St Lucia.  Connecting flights are available from St Lucia to  Martinique.    Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 3 of 37   


1.3.1 Individual Entry Requirements for the Three Territories  (This information is purely indicative and subject to change according to regulations from the  Government of France)  1) Valid Passport (should not be expiring in 6 months)  2) Travel itinerary  3) Hotel booking (evidence of booking such as a hotel confirmation) or “French lodging  certificate”   4) Travel insurance  5) Financial means (debit/credit cards)    1.3.2  Yellow Fever Vaccination  Evidence of the yellow fever vaccination is only applicable to French Guiana.  Persons will not be  allowed entry into the territory without it.    1.3.3  Visa Requirements  It should be noted that a Visa is only applicable to French Guiana. Kindly note that individuals  must now travel to St Lucia to have the Visa issued for French Guiana. An application form to  apply  for  the  visa  and  other  pre‐requisite  documents  are  available  on  the  website  www.ambafrance‐lc.org. See full contact detail in Section 11.0.    A  non‐refundable  application  fee  is  accepted  only  in  Eastern  Caribbean  (EC)  dollars.  Please  contact  the  Embassy  for  the  exact  amount  since  it  may  vary  depending  on  the  date  of  your  application. Applicants are advised to schedule their appointment at least two (2) months before  the date of travel.    1.3.4  Individual Exit Requirements from Trinidad and Tobago  1. Valid Passport (visa for only French Guiana)  2. Airline Ticket  3. Departure Tax = US40 (it is either included in the ticket price and if not, it can be paid at  the airport)  (Source: The Embassy of France)ii  

1.3.5  Ground Transportation  Transportation in each market can be done via taxis.  There is limited public transport in the three  territories,  as  a  result,  taxis  are  very  expensive  in  Martinique  and  Guadeloupe,  however  less  expensive in French Guiana.  It may be more economical to rent a car when visiting the territories.   Where interpreter services are required, it is recommended that an interpreter be engaged who  can provide the service of both driver and interpreter.  The Chamber of Commerce in each market  may provide recommendations in this regard.          Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 4 of 37   


SECTION 2.0: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT    2.1  Economic Performance  2013  Gross Domestic Product (GDP)  GDP Growth  GDP/capita  Inflation rate  Breakdown of added value   Non market services*   Market services**   Construction  Agriculture 

Guadeloupe Economic performance 8.1 B€  0.5%  19,593 €  0%  2009 41%  44%  6%  3% 

Martinique

French Guiana

8.4 B€  0.2%  21,527 €  0.7%  2009 40%  44%  6%  3% 

3.9 B€  3.3%  15,416 €  1%  2007 34%  42%  9%  4% 

Source:

Annual IEDOM Report 2013 of Guadeloupe Annual IEDOM Report 2013 of Martinique  Annual IEDOM Report 2013 of French Guiana *A unit is considered to render non market services when it provides them free of charge or at prices which are not  economically significant. These services include: education, health, social work and administration (INSEE).  ** Activities such as wholesale, retail, trade, hotel, restaurant, transport, real estate.

2.2  Economic Outlook    2.2.1  Guadeloupe  The economy of Guadeloupe has been impacted by the financial crises which has affected the  wider EU. Thus, the economic performance has been described as lackluster. In 2011, the average  net  salary  in  the  local  civil  service  was  €1,823  per  employee  and  inflation  was  2.1.  By  2012,  unemployment grew by 8.2%. Women and young people have been most affected. Nonetheless,  the economy can be considered as lucrative. Since the first quarter of 2011, the average value of  merchandise imports has been measured at €657 million annually. The main industries are agro‐ products,  construction,  services  (trade,  tourism,  public  services)  and  main  exports  are  Agro‐ products (sugarcane, banana), light industrial products, and transhipments. The outlook for the  economy remains closely tied to measures for stimulating overseas economies to be implemented  by the European Commission. About 80,000 tourists visit the country annually.    Despite  the  recent  lackluster  performance,  Guadeloupe  is  listed  as  one  of  the  five  (5)  richest  islands  in  the  Caribbean.  An  estimated  70%  of  its  revenue  is  credited  to  services  and  15%  to  international  trade.    Although  the  construction  sector  is  relatively  small,  one  out  of  five  small  businesses is construction‐related. Agricultural production has been slowing over the last decade.    External trade is mostly geared towards France and imports are 30 times the volume of exports.  Energy  related  products  account  for  nearly  40%  of  imports,  intermediate  goods  20%;  and  car‐ related goods 10%.  Agriculture and food‐industry (banana, rum and sugar) account for about  40% of exports, equipment goods 22%; and intermediate goods 15%.    Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 5 of 37   


The major industrial plants are located in the industrial zone of Jarry. This area also has the Euro‐ Caribbean Centre which encompasses the international trade zone, the World Trade Center and  the port. Jarry industrial Zone has approximately 900 firms and is ranked among the top 3 major  industrial zones in France and account for 80% of jobs on the island. Guadeloupe also has the  largest international airport of the FCORs.    2.2.2  Martinique  The country’s economy is supported by household consumption and the export of services with  tourism as the leading foreign exchange earner. Agricultural products (bananas, sugarcane and  pineapples)  remain  important,  together  with  rum,  refined  petroleum  and  construction.  The  economy is made up of many small companies, many of which are in the services sector. The  population  is  augmented  by  about  490,000  tourists  annually.  However,  in  absolute  terms,  the  added value of all sectors is increasing, with the exception of the hotel and catering industry (‐ 2.7% a year on average).  The unemployment rate however has remained at a high level over the  past ten years, above 20%.  Trade and commercial services account for about 50% of business;  administrative services 33%, industrial activities 8% and construction 6%.    The Martinique Chamber of Commerce and Industry is in charge of the port, airport, industrial  zones and World Trade Center. The Center employs foreign trade specialists to inform business  people  on  market  regulations;  set  up  meetings  between  local  and  foreign  businesses.  It  also  employs interpreters to facilitate adequate communications at these meetings.  At the industrial  zones, factory space for rent and in‐bond facilities are among the special services provided. These  zones are Zone de Gros de La Jambette in Fort‐de‐France; Place d’Armes Industrial Zone and La  Lezarde Industrial Zone in Lamentin; Petite‐Cocotte Industrial Zone  in Ducos and  La Laugier  Industrial Zone in Riviere‐Salee.    2.2.3  French Guiana  French Guiana is located on the South‐American continent and is the largest FCOR in terms of  land  surface  (83,846  km2).  About  90%  of  the  country  is  covered  with  Amazonian  forest  and  approximately 58% of its inhabitants live on 6% of the country, mainly on the sea coast and rivers.   French Guiana is least developed of the 3 FCORs and accounts for the lowest GDP per capita.  In  addition, about 80,000 tourists visit the country annually.    Gold  mining,  fishing,  rice,  cattle,  lumber,  tourism  and  the  aerospace  industry  are  the  main  industries  in  French  Guiana.  The  GDP  growth  mainly  relies  on  public  administration,  consumption, construction and French Guiana space shuttle activities. Indeed the presence of the  Space  Centre  not  only  increases  the  country’s  exports  but  also  attracts  investment. With  1,685  employees and approximately 4,200 other jobs related to the Space Centre, it is the driving force  of the Guianese economy.  The other key sectors of development showed signs of decline in 2013.  The  construction  industry,  considered  as  the  second  pillar  of  this  economy,  was  in  decline  because of the cancellation of numerous contracts and a decrease in new construction projects  and permits granted. The gold industry ‐ one of the main local exports has been in decline, since 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 6 of 37   


the fall  of  gold  prices.  The  business  sentiment  indicator  reflected  a  consistent  decline  in  these  sectors throughout the year.    Ocean freight transport is costly, largely because of the shipping routes: between the European  continent–Caribbean‐French Guiana‐Brazil‐Europe; and back haul containers remain empty thus  attracting  return  freight.  Nonetheless,  the  similarities  to  Martinique  and  Guadeloupe  and  the  proximity to the Caribbean Region present good potential for trade.  French Guiana has also been  seeking closer integration with Suriname and Brazil, more specifically through the PO Amazonia.  This initiative entails easier cross‐border movement of goods and persons in South America.    2.3  Business  In the Ease of Doing Business Index, 2015iii, France improved its ranking from 33rd in 2014 to 31st  in 2015 out of 189 countries.  This index measures a country’s economic performance in relation  to it attaining its positive socio‐economic goals.  France improved its performance in starting a  business and in resolving insolvency among others.  However, decreased its performance in areas  such  as  getting  credit  and  registering  property.    There  was  no  movement  on  the  rating  for  enforcing contracts.    Other  business  nuances  should  be  noted  when  attempting  to  do  business  with  the  French  Caribbean. Findings from an EU Funded project in Doing Business in the French Caribbean found  the following could assist when attempting to do business in any of the three (3) countries:    1. Proficiency in French or a French‐native speaker, whether it be translator, interpreter or  member of staff;  2. An appreciation for the regulations, culture (discussed further in Chapter 4.1 – Culture)  and the bureaucracy linked to doing business;  3. Small‐size of the territories and interconnectedness of their business community;  4. Cost of transportation is high, therefore, longer terms of payment may be required.     (Source: A‐Z Information Jamaica 2013)iv 

2.4  Labour Force  Guadeloupe – There is a relatively high unemployment rate (27%).  The tertiary sector accounts for  86.1% of the labour force. The primary sector ‐ 1.5%; industry ‐ 7% and construction 5.4%.    Martinique ‐ The unemployment rate has remained at a high level over the past ten years, above  20% and was 22.8% in 2013. Age and the low level of training are the main factors attributing to  the unemployment level. Central Martinique accounts for almost two‐thirds of paid employment  in  the  territory.  Public  sector  employment  accounts  for  about  a  third  of  paid  employment  comprises three categories: the state civil service (39.5%), the territorial civil service (40.0%) and  the public hospital service (20.5%).   

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 7 of 37   


French Guiana ‐ The tertiary sector however is the one employing most of the labour force. Just  over  59,000  individuals  were  working  for  the  markets  sector  in  2013,  with  more  than  three  quarters of them working in the services sector.  The public sector however accounts for 30% of  the  workforce.    In  2011,  21,438  persons  were  working  in  public  services.    In  2013,  the  unemployment  rate  for  French  Guiana  was  21%  representing  a  total  of  16,045  persons.      In  addition,  INSEE  recorded  another  category  of  18,000  classified  as  “discouraged”.  These  individuals are unemployed who wants to work, but estimates that their chances of finding a job  is practically non‐existent, therefore they do not actively seek a job.     2.5  Political Structure   

Official Structure: Overseas Region and Department/European Union Outermost Regions   

Guadeloupe, Martinique  and  French  Guiana  have  been  Departments  of  France  since  the  Departmentalisation  Laws  of  19th  March  1946  and  Regions  since  31st  December  1982.  This  institutional framework is defined by the Constitutional Law of 28th March 2003 which created  the  denomination  of  “Overseas  Departments  and  Regions”  (ODRs).  Unlike  its  counterparts  in  mainland France, it is a single department territory with extended powers, particularly for local  public finances.  All French laws are directly applicable there but can be adapted to the specific  situation of the region (on the basis of Art 73 of the Constitution). Since the 1st of January 2015  the  ODRs  have  been  given  new  authority  to  manage  their  economic  development,  health,  education, culture and the social sector.   

They are also represented at both the National Assembly and Senate of France. They also have  representatives  at  the  Economic,  Social  and  Environmental  Council.  The  Prefect  is  the  local  representative  of  the  French  Government  on  the  territories.    As  Overseas  Departments,  Guadeloupe,  Martinique  and  French  Guiana  are  also  European  Union  Outermost  Regions  (OMR),  which  means  that  Community  Law  is  applicable  and  allows  them  to  benefit  from  structural funds.   

The French Constitution now gives ODRs the possibility of creating a single entity replacing the  Department and Region, subject to the consent of the electorate.  In the referendums on the 10th  and 24th of January 2010, voters in Martinique widely rejected its transformation into an Overseas  Territory,  governed  by  Article  74  of  the  Constitution,  and  decided  to  create  a  single,  entity  exercising  the  powers  conferred  on  the  Departments  and  Regions  under  Article  73  of  the  Constitution. The single entity of Martinique is expected to come into being in 2015.   

Following the referendum of January 2010 in French Guiana, it was decided that a new single  entity would replace the department and region and discharge the functions of both. A draft law  defining the organizational and operational arrangements (governance, voting method, number  of  councilors,  financial  resources)  for  the  territory  was  put  before  the  Council  of  Ministers  in  January  2011  and  voted  in  July  2011.  It  was  expected  to  be  introduced  in  2014  but  has  been  postponed to December 2015 simultaneously with the renewal of all regional councils. It will be  established as a unique council called a Collectivité Unique (with 51 members), and executive  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 8 of 37   


power represented  by  the  President  of  the  Council  and  standing  committees  (Commission  permanente).  Contrary to these, Guadeloupe has chosen not to modify its political organization.    2.5.1  Caribbean Integration  In  order  to  empower  the  French  overseas  territories  in  their  relationship  with  neighboring  countries, they are granted authorization to negotiate and sign cooperation agreements with their  neighbors.  Both Guadeloupe and Martinique have asked to join OECS and CARICOM and are  already associated members of the Association of Caribbean States (ACS) since February 2014.   Guadeloupe has also joined the CEPALC (ECLAC) since August 2012.      SECTION 3.0: TRADE ENVIRONMENT    Many  exporters  from  Trinidad  and  Tobago  and  other  CARICOM  countries  are  already  doing  business in the FCORs as illustrated in the tables below.  Trade data show that all CARICOM  countries export to, and import from the FCOR, where trade spans all categories of goods. The  export opportunities span a broad cross section of goods.    CARICOM Exports to the FCORs (USD) 2009‐2011    Country/Region  CARICOM         MDCs        Barbados        Guyana        Jamaica        Suriname        Trinidad & Tobago         LDCs        Belize            OECS           Antigua           Dominica           Grenada           Montserrat           St. Kitts/Nevis           St Lucia           St. Vincent   (Source: CARICOM Secretariat) 

2009 70,565,893

2010 182,656,243  

59,475,366 1,276,692  2,420,890  3,851,890  …  51,925,895 

176,274,332  1,242,340  2,923,421  5,177,951  …  166,930,620 

11,090,527  78,102 

170,884,630 1,496,766  1,931,471  5,846,997  …  161,609,396   

6,381,911 30,524   

11,012,424 629,649  5,532,113  787,997  31,697  184,884  3,827,860  18,224 

2011 176,203,443 

5,318,812 7,892   

6,351,387 469,183  3,631,920  803,528  …  216,146  1,211,262  19,348 

5,310,920 868,290  2,475,092  262,894  …  577,279  1,125,003  2,363 

 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 9 of 37   


Export of Goods from CARIFORUM to FCORs by Category in USD (2006‐2008)    CATEGORY 

2006

2007

2008

01‐05: Animal & Farm Products 

4,202,432

4,081,058

3,253,686

3,845,725

06‐15: Vegetable Products 

4,176,646

2,643,030

4,760,254

3,859,977

16‐24: Foodstuffs 

4,665,627

5,268,107

8,172,136

6,035,290

298,130,188

85,525,074

173,552,153

185,735,805

28‐38: Chemicals & Allied Industries 

4,466,250

6,851,266

8,806,572

6,708,029

39‐40: Plastics/Rubbers 

1,248,742

929,355

2,009,031

1,395,709

8,627

98

5,625

4,783

1,497,243

1,580,762

1,836,639

1,638,215

50‐63: Textiles 

194,754

55,613

466,219

238,862

64‐67: Footwear/Headgear 

229,225

268,841

302,459

266,842

80,269

99,273

408,559

196,034

19,088,364

23,324,991

33,349,087

25,254,147

489,962

72,176

111,145

224,428

86‐89: Transportation 

76,897

74,919

101,667

84,494

90‐97: Miscellaneous 

652,986

360,865

1,010,384

674,745

339,208,213

131,135,427

238,145,616

236,163,085

25‐27: Mineral Products 

41‐43: Raw Hides, Skins, Leather & Furs  44‐49: Wood & Wood Products 

68‐71: Stone/Glass  72‐83: Metals  84‐85: Machinery Electrical 

TOTAL

AVERAGE

(Source: CARICOM Secretariat) 

CARIFORUM exports  currently  account  for  a  fraction  of  the  total  imports  of  the  FCORs,  the  majority of which is sourced from France. The trade data for 2008, however indicated that the  total CARIFORUM exports to the FCORS was valued at US$ 238Mv.  The data on trade in goods  suggest  that  many  firms  in  CARIFORUM  States  have  been  taking  advantage  of  the  market  opportunities  available  in  the  outermost  regions.  Since  the  signature  of  the  CARIFORUM  EU  EPA, CARIFORUM States have collectively maintained a positive trade balance with the FCORs.  A look at CARICOM’s trade data between 2008 and 2011 suggests that while the trade balance  has  reduced  somewhat  from  USD  213M  to  USD  155M  over  the  period,  the  balance  has  been  consistently in favour of CARICOM’s exportsvi.    In terms of the overall value, CARIFORUM goods exports to all three FCORs is dominated by  mineral  based  products  (petroleum  and  gas),  metals  and  chemicals  that  are  exported  from  Trinidad  &  Tobago.  Minerals  exports  account  for  over  90%  of  the  value  of  all  CARIFORUM  exports to the FCORs. The data also shows that significant amounts of agro‐processed products  (fish  and  sea  food,  aerated  beverages,  vegetables  and  tubers)  labels,  steel  products,  sand  and  gravel/crushed stones are exported by CARIFORUM. Market intelligence suggests that there are  additional  opportunities  for  agro‐processed  products  (sauces,  spices,  condiments,  jams,  jellies,  etc.); food and beverages (food preparations, mineral waters, beers, aerated waters, etc.); paper  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 10 of 37   


and paperboard  products;  furniture;  cosmetics;  household  chemicals  and  other  products.  It  should  be  noted  that  the  FCORs  import  a  large  portion  of  the  vegetables  and  fruits  that  it  consumes.    The  interest  by  CARIFORUM  States  in  increasing  exports  to  the  FCORs  is  exemplified  by  Trinidad and Tobago which is seeking to expand exports from the non‐energy sector. The OECS  sub‐region has also been making efforts to increase trade in goods and services to the FCORS.      3.1  Import Statistics    3.1.1  Guadeloupe    Guadeloupe – Major Imports & Exports, 2014    Imports  Sector 

Exports

(million euros) 

% Change  2014 

(million euros) 

% Change  2014 

Agriculture, forestry & fishing 

52,7

2,2

39,0

2,8

Natural hydrocarbons , other mining and  quarrying products , electricity, waste 

29,5

‐14,9

12,5

‐9,3

Food, beverages and tobacco products 

424,4

2,0

59,7

‐3,3

Refined petroleum products and coke 

475,3

‐4,1

12,6

‐73,8

Mechanical equipment, electrical, electronic  and computer 

411,1

‐20,2

25,5

‐1,0

Transport equipment 

246,0

4,3

16,6

‐44,2

Automotive Industry etc 

203,2

2,1

5,6

‐9,5

Other industrial products  

932,5

‐2,8

54,0

‐13,0

Pharmacy etc 

161,5

3,0

0,9

‐40,2

Other

19,0

‐14,5

0,8

‐10,7

2 590,4 

‐5,1

220,8

‐21,2

Value

TOTAL

Value

(Source: INSEE, 2015)vii   

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 11 of 37   


Guadeloupe – Imports by Territory, 2009 – 2014     

(Source: INSEE, 2015) 

 

    In  2014,  imports  into  Guadeloupe  decreased  by  5%  despite  increases  in  import  of  food  and  beverage, transport equipment and industrial products.  While France and the EU are the main  suppliers to Guadeloupe, the USA is now the 3rd largest supplier due to petroleum products.  In  the Caribbean, the ACP countries are the only ones doing business with Guadeloupe.  Except for  energy products, Guadeloupe exports mainly bananas and melons to France, the EU (generally  to countries bordering France) and to Martinique.    Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 12 of 37   


3.1.2 Martinique    Martinique – Major Imports & Exports, 2014  Imports  Sector 

Exports

(million euros) 

% Change  2014 

(million euros) 

% Change  2014 

Agriculture, forestry & fishing 

48,0

‐9,4

92,0

19,3

Natural hydrocarbons , other mining and  quarrying products , electricity, waste 

384,5

24,1

14,6

1,2

Food, beverages and tobacco products 

406,2

‐1,7

58,2

1,9

Refined petroleum products and coke 

396,1

‐13,6

359,0

99,8

Mechanical equipment, electrical,  electronic and computer 

395,5

6,2

11,6

26,5

Transport equipment 

264,3

2,5

8,0

‐60,7

Automotive Industry etc 

243,7

2,4

4,1

121,9

Other industrial products 

857,7

1,8

36,5

‐15,2

Pharmacy etc 

146,9

2,6

4,0

35,7

Other

21,6

‐7,7

1,3

57,7

2 774,0 

1,6

581,1

Value

TOTAL

Value

(Source: INSEE, 2015)

 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 13 of 37   


Martinique ‐ Imports by Territory, 2009 – 2014   

(Source: INSEE, 2015) 

Energy accounts for a significant part of Martinique’s foreign trade, due to the fact that the oil  refinery company SARA (Société Anonyme de la Raffinerie des Antilles), which exports refined  fuel,  is  established  in  the  department.  This  explains  why  Guadeloupe  and  French  Guiana  are  important export partners for Martinique, while mainland France and the European Union are  its largest suppliers. Regional trade (excluding energy) is, for the most part, still in its infancy.  The  trade  balance  is  structurally  in  deficit  and  the  trade  deficit  has  grown  over  the  decade  (+46.6%).    3.1.3  French Guiana   

French Guiana – Major Imports & Exports, 2011 

Imports Sector 

Value (million euros) 

Agriculture, forestry & fishing 

Exports

% Change  2011 

Value (million euros) 

% Change  2011 

13,7

12,4

0,7

29,7

1,5

25,0

1,1

87,0

Food, beverages and tobacco products 

199,9

11,6

12,9

‐12,6

Refined petroleum products and coke 

184,5

‐5,7

0,0

24,3

Mechanical equipment, electrical, electronic  and computer 

329,5

27,1

41,3

‐27,9

Transport equipment 

156,7

7,7

38,9

25,3

Automotive Industry etc 

139,5

6,7

37,4

22

Other industrial products  

417,9

29,6

72,4

34,6

Pharmacy etc 

51,8

8

0,0

151

Other

11,5

8,5

0,2

132

1,315,3

16,8

167,5

6,0

Natural hydrocarbons , other mining and  quarrying products , electricity, waste 

TOTAL (Source: INSEE, 2015) 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 14 of 37   


French Guiana ‐ Imports by Territory, 2011    France métropolitaine Union européenne hors France 30%

34%

Caraïbe ACP Martinique Chine

11% 2% 3%

5% 3%

6%

Etats‐Unis

6% Guadeloupe

(Source: INSEE, 2015) 

 

  French Guiana has a few productive industries; consequently it has to import equipment, raw  materials  and  goods  for  consumption.  The  import  of  capital  goods  is  important  to  service  the  space shuttle and petroleum sectors.  In 2013 France (including the French West Indies) remained  the  main  suppliers  to  French  Guiana.  The  European  Union  remains  a  major  partner.    Imports  from  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  which  is  traditionally  an  important  supplier  of  energy  products,  decreased  between  2011  and  2013  since  Martinique  is  now  the  major  supplier  of  petroleum  products.    Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 15 of 37   


French Guiana’s exports are essentially in two main categories:  the re‐export of space related  goods  and  gold.  In  2013,  Guianese  exports  increased  by  31%  mainly  because  of  capital  goods  (55.7%)  and  transport  materials  such  as  empty  containers  (78.5%).  Despite  that  fact,  exports  remain insufficient to offset the rise in imports.    In  the  last  10  years,  the  structure  of  Guianese  exports  has  changed  remarkably.  Gold  exports  which formerly constituted 70.7% of French Guiana’s exports in 2003 has drastically decreased to  only 31.6% in 2013. The agro‐processing industries (especially the fisheries industry) fell by 7.6%.  In parallel the capital goods industry, exports linked to space activities and re‐export of transport  materials  increased  from  10.1%  to  53.2%.  These  products  are  not  locally  produced  so  consequently they have low added value for French Guiana.    In 2013 the structure of French Guiana’s foreign markets has also changed. France, which was  formerly the leading client has now moved to second place receiving 81.6 million euros (27.7%).  Trinidad took the first place with 40.7% of Guianese exports totaling, 119.2 million euros. This is  a remarkable progression since in 2012 French Guianese exports towards that destination were  around 20 million Euros. These exports are related to petroleum exploration off the coast of the  French region.    3.2  Import Tariffs & Taxes  The  Economic  Partnership  Agreement  signed  between  the  EU  and  15  Caribbean  territories  (comprising 14 CARICOM States and the Dominican Republic) is in part a free trade agreement  between  the  two  regions  which  liberalises  trade  in  goods  and  selected  services.    There  are  however specific import taxes which are unique to the FCOR and are discussed below.    3.2.1  General Customs Duty  Goods  coming  from  the  African  Caribbean  and  Pacific  (ACP)  countries  are  exempted  from  General Customs Tax because Trinidad and Tobago and the rest of CARICOM are fellow ACP  countries. Where the goods do not qualify for exemption, which may be the case of re‐exports or  on non‐origin issues, the import duties are calculated on an ad valorem basis, i.e. expressed as a  percentage of the value of imported goods. This dutiable value is the “transaction value” plus  freight,  insurance,  commissions,  and  all  other  charges  and expenses  incidental  to  the  sale and  delivery of goods to the point of entry into the EU customs territory including the FCORs. The  invoice price is used as the transaction value providing there is no relationship between the seller  and the buyer.    3.2.2  The Value Added Tax  The FCORs (other than French Guiana) apply VAT closely resembling the European Community  system  but  with  certain  adaptations  (reduced  rates).  The  current  rate  averages  8.5%  for  most  goods. The VAT is applied on the “tax excluded price”. VAT must be added to the price of all  goods and services sold. The VAT is reduced to 2.1% on food and medical products.   

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 16 of 37   


3.2.3 Internal Taxes: The “Octroi de Mer” (O.M.)  The Octroi de Mer is applied to imports from the EU and the rest of the world. It affects all goods  both locally produced and imported. The Octroi de Mer is also applicable to the local production  of goods whether from manufacturing operations, processing, and renovation of tangible assets  as well as agriculture and mining operations.    The  basis  for  the  calculation  of  the  tax  is  the  CIF  value  in  the  case  of  imports  and  for  local  production,  it  is  the  quarterly  statement  of  turnover.  The  tax  base  consists  of  the  following  elements:  a) For imported goods, the customs value for the purposes of Community law;  b) For  the  supply  of  locally  produced  goods,  the  price  excluding  value  added  tax  and  excise off.    The Octroi de Mer is locally set by the Regional Council and not at the EU level. It is specific to  the FCORs to cover costs related to Government Administration in the territory. Thus, imports of  Goods originating from France, other members of the European Union, third countries, Reunion  and French Guiana are liable to pay Octroi de Mer.    The  Octroi  de  Mer  has  two  components,  the  OM  and  the  OMR.  When  both  OM  &  OMR  are  combined,  the  average  is  17.5%.    It  is  applicable  to  all  imports  and  the  locally  manufactured  goods.     The OM has a variable rate and the OMR is fixed.   OM (financing the municipalities) – 0% to 70% (average 15%). Upper levels applicable  to products such as oil, tobacco, liquors e.g. 70% on tobacco     OMR (financing the Regional Council) – fixed rate of 2.5%   With regard to the application of the Octroi de Mer (OM & OMR) to the local production, the  quarterly statement of turnover is the basis of calculation. In the case of imports, the CIF value is  the basis for calculation.    Exceptions to the Octroi de Mer  Both the OM and the OMR are waived or reduced in the following four circumstances.  1. Local manufacturers are exempted of this tax if they are below the threshold turnover  of €550,000/year.  2. Some  local  manufacturers  whose  turnover  exceeds  €550,000/year  benefit  from  an  exemption  or  reduction.  This  applies  only  to  a  list  of  218  products  out  of  the  5088  products imported (2008) and as listed in appendices of EU Decision 2004/162/EC of  February  10,  2004  and  known  as  List  A,  List  B  and  List  C  (maximum  authorized  differential  of  max  differential  10,  20  and  30%  respectively).  Regarding  the  other  products locally manufactured the normal tariff applies.  3. Imports under franchises; 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 17 of 37   


4.

For some imported products such as raw or intermediate goods, which are used in the  local manufacturing, the Regional Council may authorise an exemption or reduction,  irrespective of their origin. 

(Source: A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd, 2012) 

  See Appendix I for the identification of the various taxes which may be applicable to products of  interest to CARIFORUM Exporters.    3.2.4  The Quay Tax  The Quay tax corresponds to a tax for the unloading of goods. Each port has a different charge  and the formula is calculated based on different variables such as weight; size of the ship, type of  goods and applies both when the ship arrives and departs etc. The average cost is €120 for a 40ft  container.    3.3  Trade Barriers  In  terms  of  performance  in  world  trade,  France  ranked  12th  in  the  EU  and  21st  in  the  world,  according to the World Economic Forum Enabling Trade Index.  The FCOR is officially part of  France, however, if they were ranked separately the score would be considerably lower due to  their  economic  dependence  on  a  few  products  which  are  exported.    The  specific  barriers  and  challenges however on entry into the FCORs are:   Challenges in meeting French/EU Standards and technical requirements;   Lack of knowledge of the French system (tax and market structure);   Unavailability of less than a container load (LCL) shipments to the market;   Lack of on the ground representation in the French Caribbean and CARIFORUM to  assist exporters to those markets;   Language differences;   Overall  lack  of  market  information  that  can  guide  taking  meaningful  decisions  on  opportunities in the outermost regions;   The French and hence FCORs invariably apply standards which are somewhat higher  than those of the EU;   Competition from large multinationals particularly from the EU.    Recent experiences have indicated that perhaps the greatest hurdle to increasing exports to the  EU  relate  to  product  standards  and  regulations.    It  is  anticipated  that  in  time,  some  of  these  challenges  can  be  reduced  through  better  representation  in  the  market  place  such  that  the  gathering  of  market  intelligence  and  the  interface  between  exporters,  importers  and  the  regulatory agencies can be facilitated and improved.    3.4  Prohibited and Restricted Imports  The import and export of the following goods are prohibited:   Counterfeit goods   Products  of  a  pedophilic  nature,  namely  “items  of  any  kind  containing  images  or  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 18 of 37   


representations of minors of a pornographic nature”;  Asbestos or products containing asbestos 

The import  of  the  skin  and  fur  of  cats  and  dogs  and  all  products  containing  these  are  also  prohibited.  Sources:  A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd, 2012    World Economic Forum, 2014viii    Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

3.5 

Trade Agreements  Europe  • Norway ‐ 01 July 1973   • Iceland ‐ 01 April 1973   • Switzerland ‐ 01 January 1973  • Faroe Islands ‐ 01 January 1997  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia ‐ Stabilisation and Association Agreement,  01 May 2004  • Albania ‐ Stabilisation and Association Agreement, 01 April 2009  • Montenegro ‐ Stabilisation and Association Agreement, 01 May 2010  • Bosnia and Herzegovina ‐ Interim Agreement on trade and trade related matters, 01 July  2008  • Serbia ‐ Interim Agreement on trade and trade related matters, 01 February 2010    Mediterranean  • Palestinian Authority ‐ Association Agreement, 01 July 1997  • Syria ‐ Co‐operation Agreement, 01 July 1977  • Tunisia ‐ Association Agreement, 01 March 1998  • Morocco ‐ Association Agreement, 01 March 2000  • Israel ‐ Association Agreement, 01 June 2000   • Jordan ‐ Association Agreement, 01 May 2002  • Lebanon ‐ Interim Agreement, 01 March 2003   • Egypt ‐ Association Agreement, 01 June 2004  • Algeria ‐ Association Agreement, 01 September 2005    Other Countries  • Mexico ‐ Economic Partnership, Political Coordination and Cooperation Agreement, 01  July 2000  • South Africa  ‐ Trade, Development and Co‐operation Agreement, 01 January 2000   • Economic Partnership Agreements ‐ European Union – CARIFORUM, 2008  • Chile ‐ Association Agreement and Additional Protocol, 01 February 2003 (trade)  / 01  March 2005 (full agreement)   • Madagascar, Mauritius, the Seychelles, and Zimbabwe  Interim Partnership Agreement  signed in August 2009  • Korea  ‐ New Generation Free Trade Agreement, signed 06 October 2010 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 19 of 37   


• Papua New  Guinea  and  Fiji  ‐  Interim  Partnership  Agreement  ratified  by  Papua  New  Guinea in May 2011  • EU‐Iraq  ‐ Partnership and Cooperation Agreement, signed on 11 May 2012  • Colombia and Peru ‐ Trade Agreement, signed 26 July 2012  • Central America ‐ Association Agreement with a strong trade component, signed 29 June  2012  • EU‐Ecuador text of the trade agreement published, not yet ratified, 17 February 2015    Custom Unions  • Andorra ‐ 01 July 1991  • San Marino ‐ 01 December 1992   • Turkey ‐ 31 December 1995    (Source: INSEE, 2015) 

  SECTION 4.0: MARKET CHALLENGES    4.1  Culture  The geography of the FCOR is similar to Trinidad and Tobago in terms of climate, features of  small island states, beaches and marine resources.  The population is relatively small, the heritage,  history and sport are similar.  The peoples are of African, European, Indian heritage; numbered  among  the  populations  are  world  famous  sports  persons  and  artistes.  There  is  also  the  same  vulnerability  to  natural  disasters;  a  limited  range  of  products  for  exports  and  high  import  dependence.  On the other hand, the per capita income, wage rates and technological expertise  are very high when compared with CARICOM. The culture music and cuisine of the FCORs also  reflect the French influence.      T&T’s exporters should never finalise an agreement before visiting the market and getting a good  understanding  of  the  market  and  how  business  is  normally  conducted.  Know  the  cultural  nuances.     The official language in the FCOR is French and thus, an interpreter may be needed to facilitate  the dialogue between trading partners.  The response to follow‐up calls or emails after a meeting  may not always be as forthcoming.   Patience and persistence is required to do business with this  market.    Also, because of the language difference between Trinidad & Tobago and the FCOR, this presents  opportunities for serious miscommunication and misunderstandings and sometimes with grave  consequences which you would want to avoid.  Therefore when entering into agreements with  FCOR  companies,  it  is  imperative  to  utilize  the  services  of  a  competent  bi‐lingual  attorney  to  avoid communication failures.   

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 20 of 37   


4.2 Price  An estimated 90% of products in the FCORs originate in France; however return freight cost is  added to imports given the lack of backhaul freight and this impacts on the retail price.  The price  of goods in the market are relatively expensive, however, the working class has the disposable  income  as  they  benefit  from  a  minimum  wage  of  €8.86/hour  which  is  over  four  times  that  of  Trinidad and Tobago’s.  It means that T&T’s main competitive edge in the market is the price of  its  goods.    See  Appendix  II  for  pricing  information  and  Appendix  III  for  comparative  pricing  information in the FCOR.  Also, quality and brand loyalty are important issues in the market.    4.3  Brand Loyalty  There is a strong affinity to French brands and buyers will not just abandon a traditional supplier  in lieu of a cheaper product.  Developing long‐standing relationships with potential buyers are  also critical.  However, with good relationships in times of economic downturns, buyers will be  willing to support your business if you had a healthy relationship.  Another challenge to be faced  by exporters is the economic domination of buyer groups who are represented across a range of  sectors and in all three of the markets.  It is therefore imperative that products be adapted to the  local context in terms of taste profile, design, packaging and labelling to meet the demands of the  market.  The exporters must prove the credibility of their company and provide quality products.   Covering the travel expenses for the buyer to visit your company’s operations to illustrate that  you can supply on par with the French competition will be a useful investment.    4.4  Competition  The FCORs conduct most of their business with mainland France and the wider EU markets due  to longstanding colonial ties.  Other key suppliers include North America and China and they  generally meet the EU quality standards to penetrate the market.  The key local productive sectors  include:  agri‐business,  food  and  beverage  and  construction  materials.    Martinique  has  a  competitive distribution sector, dominated by five large importers. The retail network includes a  few small and medium sized family‐owned firms with close links to the local wholesale and retail  trade. Business relations tend to be monopsonistic (one Buyer, multiple Sellers); while it is easier  to  make  large  market  penetration,  the  buyers  have  more  power.  Nonetheless,  Trinidad  and  Tobago is a lower cost producer and has the added advantage of proximity in terms of lower  freight costs and lead time to the market.    4.5  Taste Preference  There is a high preference for French culture as French influence dominates their way of life.  It  is  strongly  recommended  that  sampling  be  first  conducted  for  food  and  beverage  products  to  ensure that there is a market for it.  Product adaptations may be required to enter the market.      SECTION 5.0: TOP MARKET OPPORTUNITIES AND PROSPECTS    It is a level playing field to enter the FCOR as the import taxes such as the Octroi de Mer apply  to both imported and locally produced goods.  The added advantage for Trinidad and Tobago’s  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 21 of 37   


exporters are  the  close  proximity  to  the  market  and  the  preferential  treatment  under  the  EPA  Agreement. exporTT recently concluded a Market Survey to the territories and the products with  the  greatest  prospect  include:  Fashion;  Food  &  Beverage;  Industrial  and  Household  Cleaning  Chemicals; Personal Care Products; Printing, Packaging, Plastics & Tissue Products; Construction  Materials;  and  Wood  &  Wood  Based  Products.    The  quantities  however  demanded  in  each  territory is relatively small due to the size of the market. Interested persons may contact exporTT  for further information on these market opportunities.     Appendix IV also provides further information on opportunities and threats related to selected  sectors in the FCOR.      SECTION 6.0 MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES    6.1  Using an Agent or Distributor  The FCOR is considered a consumer market as there is limited domestic production within the  three  territories.    As  a  result,  there  are  many  Agents  and  Distributors  represented.    However,  some  large  retailers  such  as  hypermarkets  also  purchase  directly  from  foreign  suppliers.   Exporters  should  start  their  market  research  by  consulting  with  the  right  “authority”  in  the  market e.g. for building materials, it may be appropriate to consult the architects and contractors.   The Chambers of Commerce is also a useful source for obtaining a list of buyers in other targeted  sectors. It is also important to prepare part of the promotional kit for the education of users of the  products e.g. masons, processors, engineers, etc.    As a small market, the recommended business relationship is a single distributor in each of the  FCOR  territories  rather  than  a  situation  in  which  there  are  several  distributors  for  the  same  product.  In such situations, distributors are likely to request deals for exclusive distribution of  products.  Acceptance  of  this  will  depend  on  a  number  of  factors  including  the  breadth  of  the  market  covered,  distribution  margins,  plans  for  promotion  of  the  product  and  the  potential  profitability of the deal. The choice of distributor will, among other things, depend on how each  proposes to promote the product in the marketplace.    Ideally,  exporters  may  wish  to  ensure  that  there  is  a  provision  in  their  distribution  contracts  which allows them to go to another buyer if the distributor has not progressed adequately within  a  four  (4)  month  period.    In  other  words,  there  should  be  an  obligation  on  the  part  of  the  distributor to promote the sale of the product if an exclusive distribution arrangement is to be  mutually satisfactory.    6.2  Joint Ventures/Licensing  Private labelling arrangements are common in the FCOR where foreign suppliers are contracted  to produce under the brand name of FCOR companies.  This is also a natural entry point into the  market.    Through  the  development  of  joint  ventures,  companies  can  benefit  from  technology  transfer from France/FCORs. This may be an option in some cases and can foster the development  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 22 of 37   


of an exotic Caribbean brand. Future efforts in market penetration should include possibilities for  joint ventures with the production taking place in T&T ‐ where advantages in production costs  can be achieved over the FCORs.  Buyers in FCORs also have contacts in the rest of FCORs as  well as other Caribbean territories and the EU. Through investments and strategic alliances in the  FCORs, possible synergies may result for both TT and FCOR companies.    Appendix V provides further information on strategies for selected goods to enter the market.      SECTION 7.0 SELLING, MARKETING & PROMOTIONS    7.1  Selling Factors/Techniques  A good website, high quality brochure; videos on plant operations, online company profile all  help  to  establish  credibility.  Give  the  business  meaningful  impact  because  FCOR  buyers  will  research you on the internet. The Trinidad and Tobago exporter should be prepared to visit the  market.  The Chambers of Commerce can assist with setting up a schedule of appointments and  exporTT may also provide useful contacts in the market.  Good screening of potential buyers is  important. Business profiles are critical.     Prior to a market visit, it is important that an initial email contact with the buyer be written in  proper  French.    A  google  translation  will  not  be  acceptable  and  may  be  considered  as  spam.   Companies should engage the services of an indigenous French speaker to assist with the written  communication.    exporTT  may  provide  contacts  who  can  assist  with  translations.    A  call  may  serve as a follow‐up to the initial email to obtain feedback from the buyer.  It is possible to have  a three‐way call including an interpreter who can facilitate a meaningful exchange.    Business Schools in the FCORs may be able to provide research assistance including translation  services on market visits.  During a trade mission or market visit, the exporter should walk with  a suitably designed company profile showing the manufacturing plant, catalogue of the products  being offered with specifications and quality standards and having price information on spot are  critical. Buyers want to understand the capacity and capability of the industrial unit to ensure  that the delivery of quality products can be made on time and at competitive prices. Additional  useful  information  for  company  profiles  include  plant  layout,  size,  capacity,  designs  and  the  export  successes  of  the company  etc.  Videos  where  available  may  provide  better  content than  brochures/flyers.  Sampling and taste testing for food and beverage products are also critical in  the marketplace and feedback for product adaptations should be addressed. Buyers may indicate  an interest in the product line, however exporters should not be daunted if follow‐up emails are  ignored but should be persistent and exercise patience.  Whilst an initial order may be secured,  follow‐up visits to the market have proven to yield repeat orders from buyers.    7.2  Trade Promotion  exporTT is committed to providing support to exporters who are seeking to penetrate the FCOR  market.  exporTT provides a range of co‐financing services including the shipping of samples,  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 23 of 37   


translations, in‐market  product  registration,  participation  in  trade  fairs,  missions  and  buyer‐ exporter  meetings.    These  programmes  are  conducted  with  a  pre‐approved  budget  so  that  exporters are invited to contact exporTT prior to undertakings related to the market.    With respect to the FCOR market in particular, exporTT undertook a four (4) year programme  (2011‐2015)  entitled,  “Development  of  Sustainable  Exports  to  the  European  Union  under  the  Economic  Partnership  Agreement”  with  funding  from  UK  Aid,  under  the  CARTFUND  and  facilitated  by  the  Caribbean  Development  Bank  (CDB).    The  project  consisted  of  capacity  development of 20 exporters on entering the FCORs, in‐market research in the FCORs (goods and  services),  exporter  training,  trade  missions,  a  gender‐inclusive  export  development  project,  a  mentorship project, development of a look book of fashion designers and its promotion in the  FCORs  and  an  exporter  success  story  video.    Below  are  dedicated  links  to  access  the  training  materials and testimonials resulting from this intervention.    exporTT’s Resources on the FCORs  Link to exporTT’s Export Mentorship Programme Webpage.  It includes the EPA Agreement;  market  intelligence  reports;  seminar  presentations;  an  export  manual  and  case  studies  of  Trinidad  and  Tobago  companies  on  market  penetration.    The  case  studies  provide  useful  information on the FCOR business climate for selected products.  http://www.exportt.co.tt/node/485     CARTFUND Project YouTube Channel ‐ FCOR Seminars ‐ Video Presentations.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqK8a‐ysGDQ&list=PLMiA‐ 6LLB0pZgDZyNvliXVh6gx__upZUF&index=1     FCOR Exporter Success Story Video  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUjl‐SlxQlw&index=12&list=PLMiA‐ 6LLB0pZgDZyNvliXVh6gx__upZUF    7.3  Advertising  Normally if the products are being sold under a private label, the Distributor is responsible for  advertisements. Alternatively, the promotional cost for individual brands is the responsibility of  the exporter.  There is however, no hard and fast rule and in some private label arrangements,  the  cost  of  promotion  may  be  shared  between  the  distributor  and  the  supplier.  Due  to  cost  differentials  between  FCORs  and  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  it  is  advisable  to  prepare  an  advertisement  to  run  on  television  (in  French)  as  well  as  in  store  promotional  material.    The  following  media  are  used  in  French  advertising:    Billboards,  Flyers,  TV,  Print  and  Web  advertising.    The Billboard is a popular medium due to the road traffic situation and is significantly cheaper  than TV.  The Billboards are used mainly for special offers on products intended for both retail  and industrial use. Ads on the billboards are changed every two weeks and T&T’s exporters may 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 24 of 37   


consider launching an ad campaign with various printed ads running for example, over a three  month period as a means of creating awareness in the market.    Advertising in the FCOR is also common surrounding promotional events Christmas, Carnival,  Easter, Anniversaries.  Flyers are used mainly by SME’s and are distributed by hand or placed in  mailboxes.  They generally present special offers and where applicable reinforce the messages  displayed on Billboards.  Web advertising is less popular but it used to showcase special offers  such as large discounts (from 40% to 70%).  TV commercials are mainly used for brand awareness  promotion since this kind of advertising is much more expensive than the others. It is sometimes  combined with website banners for industrial products or for top brands.  Radio commercials are  more  focused  on  special  offers.    Consumers  are  generally  attracted  to  low  prices  and  product  specials.  Concerning advertising, press media is divided into two groups:     Content related press (free or not) mostly used for brand awareness   Flyers distributed in mailboxes with ads promoting price or special offers     The key advertising channels are outlined below:    Key Advertising Channels in the French Caribbean    Channel  Guadeloupe  Martinique  French Guiana  Martinique 1ière  Guadeloupe 1er  ATV  Guyane 1ière  TV – Local Media  Canal 10  KMT  Ktv Guyane  Alizée Guadeloupe  Zouk TV  Guyane 1er  RCI  RCI  Ouest fm Guyane  Radio – Main  Martinique 1ière  Guadeloupe 1ière  RDI  Players  Trace FM  MFM  Trace fm  NRJ  NRJ  SAMSAG  CLG  CLG  Tip top Media  Billboard  SAMSAG  SEDECA  Smartday  Companies  Nextone  PRESTO  Nextone  SmartDay  AVENTI ANTILLES  France‐Antilles  France‐Guyane  Print Media  ‐  Madin Mag  Saison en Guyane  Creola  Guyamang  (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

7.4  Electronic Commerce  Because of delivery issues, e‐commerce is not a key channel for local firms. When they do, they  organise meeting points for the customers to retrieve their goods.  Consumers will buy online if  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 25 of 37   


they have a way of being delivered at home. They are attracted to known products found at less  expensive prices, particularly fashion‐related products.  Within the last few years, firms acting as  forwarding agents for individuals have been established.    7.5  Distribution and Sales Channels  Cultural norms suggest that it may be better to work through a Commercial Agent. Very often,  Distributors  and  Commercial  Agents  will  negotiate  together.    The  main  reason  is  that  the  Commercial Agent usually has a warehouse and transportation to move the products to outlets  in the market place. The Distributor depending on the size and sophistication of his operation  may  only  be  able  to  place  orders  with  the  exporter  taking  responsibility  for  making  direct  shipments of the orders. Large Distributors such as Multigros‐Geant or Leader Price have their  warehousing  and  multiple  outlets  in  the  territories.    See  Appendix  VI  for  a  list  of  Buyers  and  Distributors in the FCOR market.    7.6  Pricing  The pricing in the FCOR is as follows:   CIF   Tax ‐ Octroi de Mer (Average 17.5%)   VAT (in Martinique and Guadeloupe only.  Average 8.5% on most goods and 2.1% on  food and medical supplies)   Quay Tax (Average 120euros for a 40ft container)   Agent/Distributor Mark‐up (negotiable)   Retailer Mark‐up (20‐30%)    The retailer mark‐up for fast moving consumer goods range between 20‐30%.  However, it ranges  between 25‐30% for sauces and condiments.  If an Agent is used, the Agent’s margin is negotiable.  The  Distributor  may  request  an  additional  percentage  of  the  annual  turnover  to  support  promotion of the product. The Distributor may also request a rebate, payable in cash at the rate  of 3‐6% on the gross sales of the product for the year.  See Appendix III for comparative product  prices and Appendix VII for major brands in the FCOR.     7.7  Shipping Information  The  FCORs  are  seeking  to  become  more  Caribbean  oriented.  Although  the  shipping  services  between Trinidad and Tobago and FCORs are well established, the available loads are minimal  at this time.  The tables below highlight the average cost of shipping a 20ft and 40ft container to  the French Caribbean.  Also hereunder are air freight rates to Martinique and Guadeloupe.         

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 26 of 37   


Sea Freight Rates to the French Caribbean (US$) – Gulf Shipping    20 ft 

40ft French 

Description

Guadeloupe

Martinique

Point Lisas 

Point Lisas 

Port of  Discharge 

French Guadeloupe 

Martinique

Port of  Spain 

Point Lisas 

Point Lisas 

Point Lisas 

Pointe a Pitre 

Fort de  France 

Degrad Des Cannes 

Pointe a  Pitre 

Fort de  France 

Degrad Des  Cannes 

Freight Rates  Inclusive of  Charges (US$) 

2667.88

2117.88

1917.88

3067.88

2617.88

2467.88

Sailing

Weekly

Weekly

Weekly

Weekly

Weekly

Weekly

Transit Time 

11 days 

13 days 

22 days 

11 days 

13 days 

22 days 

Port of  Loading in  T&T 

Guiana

Guiana

(Source: Gulf Shipping) 

  Sea Freight Rates to the French Caribbean (US$) – CMA/CGM    20 ft  Description 

Guadeloupe Martinique 

Port of Loading in  T&T 

Point Lisas 

Point Lisas 

Port of Discharge 

Pointe a  Pitre 

Fort de  France 

Transit Time  Charges: 

11‐12 days   

Ocean Freight  Terminal  Handling Charge  – Origin  Terminal  Handling Charge  – Destination  Chassis add  destination  Carrier Haula  Bunker Surcharge 

40ft French  Guiana 

Guadeloupe Martinique 

French Guiana 

Point Lisas 

Point Lisas 

Pointe a Pitre 

Fort de  France 

12 days   

Port of  Spain  Degrad  Des  Cannes  3‐4 days   

11‐12 days   

12 days   

Port of  Spain  Degrad  Des  Cannes  3‐4 days   

1200

1500

1500

1900

2150

2100

189

189

189

189

189

189

229

286

0

352

395

0

35

0

0

35

0

0

91

91

91

182

182

182

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 27 of 37   


Local Administration  Charge (LAC)  Export  Declaration  Surcharge  ISS01 – Ocean  Carrier‐Intl Ship  & Port  Total (US) 

43

43

43

43

43

43

25

25

25

25

25

25

12

12

12

12

12

12

1824

2146

1860

2738

2996

2551

(Source: CMA CGM Trinidad Ltd) 

  Airfreight Rates to Martinique & Guadeloupe  Liat Quikpak Rates ‐ Express Package Service  All rates are door to door ‐ Airport pickup is optional.  No price adjustment  Effective July 15, 2012    Tariffs subject to change without notice ‐ Charges exclude duties and taxes  Each additional pound after 50lbs = $3.00  Limits:  Maximum weight per individual package is 30kgs or 70 lbs    Maximum length per package is 60 inches 

Weight (lbs) 

US$

Weight (lbs) 

US$

Weight (lbs) 

US$

1

             23.10     

18

             88.55     

35

           154.00  

2

             26.95     

19

             92.40     

36

           157.85  

3

             30.80     

20

             96.25     

37

           161.70  

4

             34.65     

21

           100.10     

38

           165.55  

5

             38.50     

22

           103.95     

39

           169.40  

6

             42.35     

23

           107.80     

40

           173.25  

7

             46.20     

24

           111.65     

41

           177.10  

8

             50.05     

25

           115.50     

42

           180.95  

9

             53.90     

26

           119.35     

43

           184.80  

10

             57.75     

27

           123.20     

44

           188.65  

11

             61.60     

28

           127.05     

45

           192.50  

12

             65.45     

29

           130.90     

46

           196.35  

13

             69.30     

30

           134.75     

47

           200.20  

14

             73.15     

31

           138.60     

48

           204.05  

15

             77.00     

32

           142.45     

49

           207.90  

16

             80.85     

33

           146.30     

50

           211.75  

17

             84.70     

34

           150.15        

 

(Source: Liat Cargo & Quikpak Expressix) 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 28 of 37   


Liatʹs Cargo Rates    Fuel Surcharge of USD 0.25 per kilo and Security Fee of USD 0.03 apply    Destination 

Under 45 kgs  (US$) 

Over 45 kgs  (US$) 

Over 500 kgs  (US$) 

Minimum Charge (US$) 

Fort de France,  Martinique 

1.55

1.21

0.92

70.00

Point‐A‐Pitre, Guadeloupe 

1.94

1.55

1.02

70.00

(Source: Liat Cargo & Quikpak Express) 

7.8  Due Diligence  Trinidad and Tobago’s exporters should visit at least 2‐3 prospective customers in the market to  facilitate comparison.  The Chamber of Commerce will be in a position to provide information on  the  bona  fides  of  Buyers.    In  addition,  a  credit  check  is  recommended  to  evaluate  the  credit  worthiness  of  the  business.    The  potential  partner  should  also  be  requested  to  provide  trade  references.      SECTION 8.0: REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS 

8.1  Import Regulations  While the market prospects for the FCORs appear attractive to exporters, the greatest challenge  is expected to be that of meeting the regulatory standards. The Europa Export Helpdesk provides  information  on  the  EU  tariffs,  standard  requirements,  preferential  arrangements,  quotas  and  statistics.    The  Europa  TARIC  database  is  a  multilingual  database  in  which  are  integrated  all  measures  relating  to  EU  customs  tariff,  commercial  and  agricultural  legislation.  TARIC  gives  economic  operators  a  clear  view  of  all  measures  to  be  undertaken  when  importing  or  exporting  goods.  Below are links to the Europa website:    EU – Help Desk  http://exporthelp.europa.eu/thdapp/index.htmx     Sanitary & Phytosanitary Requirements  http://www.exporthelp.europa.eu/thdapp/display.htm?page=rt%2frt_SanitaryAndPhytosanitar yRequirements.html&docType=main&languageId=en      

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 29 of 37   


Import Restrictions  http://www.exporthelp.europa.eu/thdapp/display.htm?page=rt/rt_ImportRestrictions.html&doc Type=main&languageId=EN    Tariffs  http://exporthelp.europa.eu/thdapp/display.htm?page=it/it_Tariffs.html&docType=main&langu ageId=EN    TARIC Database ‐ Tariff of the European Union ‐ Integrating all measures relating to the EU  customs tariff, commercial and agricultural legislation  http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/customs/customs_duties/tariff_aspects/customs_tariff/ind ex_en.htm    The specific import requirements for a selected group of products are also presented in Appendix  VIII.    8.2  Samples  Samples and Carnets that carry no commercial value do not attract duties and taxes. Shipping  documents must specify that such samples are of “No commercial value” when they are being  imported into the FCORs.     If they are being sent via the parcel post, the types of samples must be clearly identified. Samples  of  commercial  value  can  also  enter  duty  and  tax  free,  however  a  bond  or  deposit  of  the  total  amount  of  duties  and  taxes  must  be  supplied.  This  money  is  refunded  if  the  samples  are  re‐ exported within a year. An ATA Carnet can be used instead of this deposit.    An ATA Carnet is an international customs document which simplifies and streamlines customs  entry procedures for merchandise imported to participating countries for a year. They may be  used  for  commercial  samples,  professional  equipment  and goods  destined  for  exhibitions  and  fairs. They are accepted as a guarantee that all customs duties and excise taxes will be paid if any  of the items covered by the carnet are not re‐exported within the time period allowed. Advertising  material attracts duties.    8.3  Packaging, Labelling and Marking Requirements  The label regulations in the FCORs must comply with those of the EU. The following are  generally required for all categories of products. 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 30 of 37   


Labelling and Marking Requirements  Origin: 

Language:

Designation: Brand  Names/Trademarks 

Cite the country of origin and the lot number   Labels must be written in French. This however, does not preclude having a  label  in  more  than  one  language.  In  such  a  case,  French  authorities  must  authorise any foreign words or abbreviations. The writing must be clear and  non‐promotional.   The identifying name of the product must be stated clearly on the label. For  example: ʺolive oil.ʺ   Any name, symbols and marks relating to the product must be found on the  exterior of the packaging, the product label, and the bottle‐top or lid, as the  case  applies.  A  manufacturer  can  only  use  registered  brand  names  and  trademarks.  

Composition:  

All ingredients or materials constituting the product must be listed, ranking  them starting with the one with the highest content.  

Qualifiers:  

For example: ʺmade by handʺ on leather goods.  

Usage Instructions:  

Explain how the product is to be used and stored.  

Specifications:  

Bar Code Price  Labelling (GENCOD): 

Quality and Ecological  Labels: 

Quality Labels 

Labels must  inform  the  consumer  of  any  particular  product  limitations  or  special sales conditions.   Stores are increasingly using this system to speed up the passage of clients at  cash  registers.  GENCOD  ‐‐  Franceʹs  bar  code  price  labelling  system,  is  generally used for products with a low per‐unit value and rapid turnover, as  well  as  for  food  and  non‐food  products  requiring  an  individual  price  marking because of their value, nature, or presentation.  More established quality seals and labels exist in France than in any other  European country.    Though desirable because they offer extra information to the customer, they  are not mandatory.  There are various types of French quality certificates: Public labels certify the  quality of a product that cannot be otherwise observable (credence goods)  and recognized as such by consumers, eg geographical indications used for  various  types  of  cheese.  The  ʺOrigine  France  Garantieʺ  label  is  used  to  promote  products  ʺMade  in  Franceʺ.  The  Quality  labels  tell  you  about  product performance, and environmental labels (ecolabels) tell you that the  product  has  lower  impact  on  nature  or  man  compared  to  other  products.  Where  certificates  are  issued  by  professional  associations,  they  must  be  contacted individually for more information.   All labels entering the EU require metric units   Quality  labelling  can  be  viewed  as  a  ‘silent  salesperson’  that  is,  it  can  prove to be critical in market penetration and participation. 

(Source: A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd, 2012) 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 31 of 37   


8.4 Customs Regulations  It is recommended that a customs broker with experience on the FCOR market be engaged to  facilitate the export documentation process. The following documents are required by French  law for all goods being exported into the FCORs:    Commercial Invoice    Certificate of Origin    Bill of Lading or Airway bill    Transit Document (T1 or T2) if the goods passed through a EU country    EUR 1 circulation certificate    Phytosanitary certificate where required.       SECTION 9.0: TRADE EVENTS AND FAIRS    The two major annual shows hosted in Martinique are:   Foire Expo (Trade Fair): Multisectoral trade fair aimed at showcasing a countries’ culture  and  art.    The  next  event  is  tentatively  carded  for  March,  2016.  Website:  http://www.foireexpo‐dillon.com/ 

 Salon de l’Habitat: Trade exhibition for housing and related products. The next scheduled fair is October 21-25, 2015. Website: www.salonhabitat-dillon.com   SECTION 10.0: FINANCING EXPORTS TO THE FRENCH CARIBBEAN    exporTT Limited provides co‐financing options (50% reimbursement) for the following market  access activities:  a. Product Registration  b. Trademark Registration  c. Product Testing  d. Translation & Interpretation Services  e. Legal representation for product, brand and trademark registration  f. Booth rental at trade shows  g. Business to business matchmaking services  h. Shipping of samples  i. In‐store marketing and promotions  j. Booth design at trade shows  k. Ground transportation for exporTT led groups at trade missions and trade shows  l. Brand registration  m. Label modification  n. Registration at international capacity building forum/workshop  o. Consultancies for international standards certification   

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 32 of 37   


Please contact the following person or any other exporTT representative for more information on  these services:  Mr. Crisen Maharaj  Manager‐ Capacity Building and Programme Financing  exporTT Limited  151B Charlotte Street   Port of Spain  Tel.: (868) 623‐5507 Ext. 362  Fax: (868) 625‐8126  Mobile: (868) 796‐4276  Email: cmaharaj@exportt.co.tt   Website: www.exportt.co.tt   

In addition to local banks, to obtain information on financing exports to French Caribbean, please  contact:   

Mr. Shaun Waldron  Manager, Credit & Business Development  Export Import Bank of Trinidad & Tobago Limited  #30 Queenʹs Park West,  Port of Spain  Phone: 1‐(868)‐628‐2762 Ext. 288  Fax: 1‐(868) ‐628‐9370   Email: swaldron@eximbanktt.com   Website: www.eximbanktt.com      SECTION 11.0: USEFUL CONTACTS    11.1  Trinidad and Tobago    Office  Contact Information  Natalie Paul‐Harry (Mrs.)  Senior Export Officer 

exporTT Limited 

151B Charlotte Street  Port of Spain  Tel: (868) 624‐3932 Ext. 364  Fax: (868) 625‐8126  Email: npaul‐harry@exportt.co.tt   Web: www.exportt.co.tt

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 33 of 37   


Office

French Embassy 

Customs & Excise  Division 

Shipping Agency 

Translation Services 

Contact Information  Embassy of France in Trinidad and Tobago  Tatil Building  #11 Maraval Road  Port of Spain  Phone: (868) 622‐7447  Fax: (868) 628‐2632    Head of Mission: His Excellency Hedi Picquart, Ambassador  Customs and Excise Division  Ministry of Finance  Custom House  Nicholas Court  Cor. Abercromby Street and Independence Square  Port of Spain  Phone: (868) 625‐3311‐9 Ext 335‐8  Shipping Association of Trinidad & Tobago  15 Scott Bushe Street, Port of Spain  Phone: (868)625‐2388, (868)623‐3355  Fax: (868)623‐8570  Email: om@shipping.co.tt  Web: http://shipping.co.tt/member%20search.php?id=1&page=1   A  list  of  official  translation  and  interpreting  agencies  approved  by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Trinidad and Tobago can be  found in Appendix IX. 

  11.2  French Caribbean Outermost Regions    Office  Contact Information  GUADELOUPE  Regional Council  (Région Guadeloupe)  Avenue Paul Lacave  97100 Basse‐Terre  Regional Council  Tel.(590)‐80.40.40  Fax.(590)‐80.40.35  Website: http://www.regionguadeloupe.fr/accueil/ 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 34 of 37   


Office

Customs Department 

Guadeloupe Chamber of  Commerce 

Regional Council 

Customs Department 

Martinique Chamber of  Commerce 

Contact Information  Customs Department  (Direction Regionale des Douanes)  Chemin stade Felix Eboue  97100 Basse‐Terre  Tel.(590)‐81.54.32  Fax.(590)‐81.18.22  Website: http://www.douane.gouv.fr/accueil   Guadeloupe Chamber of Commerce  (Chambre de commerce et industrie de la Guadeloupe)  Morne Mamiel Petit Pérou  97139 Abymes  Tel: (590) 21 11 00  Website: http://www.guadeloupe.cci.fr   MARTINIQUE  Regional Council  (Conseil Regional de la  Martinique)  Rne Gaston Deferre‐cluny  97262 Fort‐de‐France ‐BP 601  Tel: (596) 59 63 00  Fax: (596) 72 68 10  Website: www.cr‐martinque.fr  E‐mail: servicecooperation@crmartinque.fr Customs Department  (Direction Inter‐régionale des  Douanes)  Cluny Quartier Plateau Roy BP630  97200 Fort‐de‐France  Tel: (596) 63 04 82  Fax: (596) 63 61 80  Martinique Chamber of Commerce   (Chambre de Commerce et  d’industrie de la Martinique)  50 Rue Ernest Deproge BP. 478  97241 Fort‐de‐France  Tel. (596) 55 28 00  Fax. (596) 60 66 68  E‐mail: cai@martinique.cci.fr   Website: www.martinique.cci.fr  

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 35 of 37   


Office

Chamber of Trade and  Craft 

Regional Council 

Customs Department 

French Guiana Chamber  of Commerce 

Chamber for Trade and  Craft 

Contact Information  Chamber of Trade and Craft  (Chambre des Métiers de la Martinique)  2, Rue du Temple  Morne Tartenson BP 1194  97200 Fort‐de‐France  Tel: (596) 71 32 22  Fax: (596) 70 47 30  Website: www.cma‐martinique.com   FRENCH GUIANA  Regional Council  (La région Guyane )  Carrefour Suzini  4179 route de Montabo  BP 47025  97307 Cayenne  Tel: (594) 29 20 20  Fax: ( 594) 31 95 22  Website: www.cr‐guyane.fr  Customs Department  (Direction régionale des douanes)  8, rue Louis‐Blanc  BP 5026  97305 Cayenne   Tel: ( 594) 29 74 74  Fax: (594) 29 74 52  French Guiana Chamber of Commerce  (Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de la Guyane)  Place de l’Esplanade BP49  97321 Cayenne  Tel: (594) 29 96 00  Fax: (594) 29 96 34  Website: www.guyane.cci.fr   Chamber for Trade and Craft  (Chambre des métiers et de l’artisanat)  41 ZA Galmont  97300 Cayenne Cedex  Tel: (594) 2524 70  Fax: (594) 30 54 22  Website: www.cm‐guyane.fr  

  Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 36 of 37   


11.3 Other    Office 

French Embassy to the  O.E.C.S Member States 

Contact Information  Consular Affairs Section  French Embassy to the O.E.C.S Member States  Nelson Mandela Drive Vigie  Castries  Saint Lucia  Tel: 1 (758) 455 6081; 6060  Fax: 1 (758) 455 6056  Email: visas.frenchembslu@gmail.com   Website: www.ambafrance‐lc.org  Public office hours: 8.30a.m. to 1.00p.m  Appointments  by  e‐mail  or  by  phone  only  from  1.00p.m  to  3.00p.m 

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to the French Caribbean Outermost Regions                     Page 37 of 37   


Appendices                                    


Appendix I – Applicable Taxes to Products of Interest for CARIFORUM Exporters   

Import Taxes Applicable to Selected Trinidad & Tobago Products    Total  non  EPA 

COMPANY

PRODUCT

HS CODE 

EU TARIFF 

EPA (EUR 1) 

OM

Ansa Mc Al 

Bleach Thinset  Mortars 

281511

5,50%

0,00%

7,00%

2,50% 8,50%  23,50%  18,00% 

382440

6,50%

0,00%

7,00%

2,50% 8,50%  24,50%  18,00% 

Bowen Boats 

890110

1,70%

0,00%

7,00%

2,50% 8,50%  19,70%  18,00% 

Caribbean Safety 

Flame Retardant  Gloves 

621139 392620 

12,00% 6,50%

0,00% 10,00% 2,50% 8,50%  33,00% 21,00% 0,00%  15,00%  2,50%  8,50%  32,50%  26,00% 

Bonsal

OMR

VAT

TOTAL EPA 

Dyna Plas  Small Jars  321310  6,50%  0,00%  7,00%  2,50%  8,50%  24,50%  18,00%  Ltd  Global  Plastic Bags  392310  6,50%  0,00%  20,00%  2,50%  8,50%  37,50%  31,00%  Marketing  KC Candy  Confectionery  1704.90.00  13,40%  0,00%  10,00%  2,50%  8,50%  34,40%  21,00%  Electrical  Electrical  854470  0,00%  0,00%  7,00%  2,50% 8,50%  18,00% 18,00% Industries  Cables  900110  2,90%  0,00%  25,00%  2,50%  8,50%  38,90%  36,00%  Print‐a‐Pak  Packaging &  481920  0,00%  0,00%  20,00%  2,50%  8,50%  31,00%  31,00%  Limited  Printing  Rotoplastics  Water Tanks  3925.10.10  6,50%  0,00%  20,00%  2,50%  8,50%  37,50%  31,00%  Sacha  Cosmetics  330410  0,00%  0,00%  15,00%  2,50%  8,50%  26,00%  26,00%  Cosmetics  Stuart  Flavours  330290  0,00%  0,00%  20,00%  2,50%  8,50%  31,00%  31,00%  Brothers  Trinidad  Blocks  681011  1,70%  0,00%  20,00% 2,50% 8,50%  32,70% 31,00% Aggregate  Tiles  681019  1,70%  0,00%  20,00%  2,50%  8,50%  32,70%  31,00%  Products  Trinidad  Tissues,  480300  0,00%  0,00%  20,00%  2,50%  8,50%  31,00%  31,00%  Tissues  Towels  Wood  Furniture  940310  0,00%  0,00%  15,00%  2,50%  8,50%  26,00%  26,00%  Home F.  National  Hot Sauces  21039010  0,00%  0,00%  7,00%  2,50%  8,50%  18,00%  18,00%  Canners  Chemtrax  Detergents  340111  0,00%  0,00%  7,00%  2,50%  8,50%  18,00%  18,00%  MDCUM  Furniture  940310  0,00%  0,00%  15,00%  2,50%  8,50%  26,00%  26,00%  Hyline  Labels  482110  0,00%  0,00%  15,00%  2,50%  8,50%  26,00%  26,00%  Label    EPA (EUR1)  OM  OMR  VAT 

EPA Regime  Octroi de Mer  Octroi de Mer Régional  Value Added Tax 

(Source: A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd, 2012)xi 


Import Taxes Applicable to Selected Products    Guadeloupe Product Description 

Curry Chocolate confectionery  Other, spaghetti, macaroni,  noodles, shells  Other [Prepared corn  products incl cereals]  Sweet biscuits  Wafers & waffles  Other [Roti skins]  Prepared corn products   Prepared potato &  multigrain products  Other [Fried & Pepper ‐  Chick Peas or Split Peas]  Other orange juices   Other mixtures, fruit juices  Tomato ketchup   Other tomato sauces [BBQ  Sauce]  Pepper sauce   Mayonnaise   Amchar, kuchela and similar  preparations  Other sauces and  preparations [incl Green  liquid seasoning; powdered  seasoning]  Aerated waters   Aerated beverages   Other drinks   Dish washing liquids   Liquid bleaches for retail  Liquid detergents  Other detergents   Preparations for the  treatment of textile materials  or other materials [Fabric  softener]  Disinfectants 

O.M.R.

7% 7%

Regional O.M. 

Martinique O.M.R.

French Guiana

Regional O.M. 

Food and Beverage 2.5% 2.5%  0% 

O.M.R.

Regional O.M. 

1,5%

15% 7% 

2.5% 2.5%

7%

2.5%

0%

2,5%

7%

2.5%

7%

2.5%

7%

2.5%

7% 7%  7%  7% 

2.5% 2.5%  2.5%  2.5% 

0%     0% 

2,5%     1,5% 

7% 7%  7%  7% 

2.5% 2.5%  2.5%  2.5% 

7%

2.5%

0%

1,5%

7%

2.5%

7%

2.5%

7%

2.5%

7% 7%  7% 

2.5% 2.5%  2.5% 

0% 0%  0% 

2,5% 2,5%  1,5% 

7% 7%  7% 

2.5% 2.5%  2.5% 

7%

2.5%

0%

1,5%

7%

2.5%

7% 7% 

2.5% 2.5% 

0% 0% 

1,5% 1,5% 

7% 7% 

2.5% 2.5% 

7%

2.5%

0%

1,5%

15%

2.5%

7%

2.5%

0%

1,5%

20%

2.5%

2.5% 2.5%  2.5% 

7.5% 17.5%  17.5% 

2.5% 2.5%  2.5% 

1,5% 1,5%  1,5%  1,5% 

15% 15%  15%  15% 

2.5% 2.5%  2.5%  2.5% 

7% 2.5%  0%  7%  2.5%  0%  7%  2.5%  0%  Chemicals & Non‐Metallic Minerals 0% 7%  2.5%  0% 7%  2.5%  0% 7%  2.5%  0% 7%  2.5%  7% 

2.5%

0%

1,5%

15%

2.5%

7%

2.5%

0%

1,5%

15%

2.5%


Paper, Printing, Packaging and Publishing Plastic bottles [packaging  material]  Toilet paper  

7%

7%

2.5%

15%

2.5%

7% 0% 2.5% 1,5%  Articles of Base Metal [Construction Materials] Aluzinc roofing sheets, floor  7%  2.5%  7%  2.5%  decking  Aluminium profiles [to  produce doors, windows,  7%  2.5%  7%  2.5%  handrails, solar panels,  angles, flats etc]  Aluminium windows, doors,  7%  2.5%  7%  2.5%  louvres  Wood and Wood Related Products Mattress support  7%  2.5%  7%  2.5%  Mattresses: of cellular rubber  or plastics, whether or not  7%  2.5%  7%  2.5%  covered  Other articles of bedding,  furnishings such as pillows,  7%  2.5%  7%  2.5%  cushions, mattress covers etc.  (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)xii 

15%

2.5%

7.5%

2.5%

15%

2.5%

15%

2.5%

17.5%

2.5%

17.5%

2.5%

17.5%

2.5%

   

2.5%


Appendix II – Pricing Information for Selected Goods in the FCOR  Prices quoted in Euros    Product  MM Min price  Tomato Ketchup  MM Max price  (1 kg)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Mayonnaise  MM Max price  (250 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Pepper Sauce  MM Max price  (490 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Amchar,Kuchela  and Similar  MM Max price  preparations  Leader Price  MM Min price  Curry  MM Max price  (420 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Cereals  MM Max price  (375 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  PopCorn  MM Max price  (270 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Prepared Potato  MM Max price  (600 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Fried & Pepper  MM Max price  Leader Price  MM Min price  Chik peas  MM Max price  (500 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Split Peas  MM Max price  (265 g)  Leader Price 

Curry(Spice) (42 g) 

Spaghetti (500 g) 

Guadeloupe 1.02 3.18  1.14  1.50  3.98  1.78  1.99  2.95  1.29  3.02  5.66  Not Found  1.25  4.60  NF  2.68  4.85  Not Found  2.80  Not Found  Not Found  3.95  4.70  2.99  1.49  3.35  1.98  1.25  1.59  0.69  1.10  2.39  1.35 

Martinique 1.39  4.21  1.13  2.19  4.19  0.99  1.39  3.15  Not Found  Not Found  Not Found  Not Found  1.14  1.95  1.10  1.79  5.05  1.62  0.99  2.95  Not Found  1.08  6.43  1.39  Not Found  Not Found  Not Found  0.99  1.56  1.15  1.01  1.43  Not Found 

French Guiana 1.20  4.90  1.59  0.50  3.90  1.99  1.25  1.35  Not Found  2.17  2.50  Not Found  2.28  2.49  NF  2.65  5.79  3.95  1.45  3.10  Not Found  1.29  7.45  1.05  0.89  3.35  1.89  0.89  2.79  1.65  1.19  3.09  1.95 

MM Min price 

1.04

0.82

Not Found 

MM Max price 

1.99

1.92

Not Found 

Leader Price 

Not Found 

0.79

Not Found 

MM Min price  MM Max price 

1.95 2.05 

1.13 1.99 

0.95 2.69 

Leader Price 

1.45

1.45

1.69


Product MM Min price  Macaroni  MM Max price  (500 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Shells  MM Max price  (500 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Noodles  MM Max price  (500 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Sweet Biscuits  MM Max price  (200 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Chocolate  Confectionery  MM Max price  (100 g)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Wafer & Waffles  MM Max price  Leader Price  MM Min price  Orange Juice  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Mixtures, fruit  juice  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Aerated  Beverages  MM Max price  (1.5 l / 2 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Tea  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Flavored Water  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Aerated Water  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Bleach  MM Max price  (2 l)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Dish washing  MM Max price  (750 ml)  Leader Price  MM Min price  Detergents  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price 

Guadeloupe 0.98 2.77  1.69  1.09  1.87  Not Found  0.96  1.89  1.69  1.49  4.95  4.50  1.15  2.56  1.49  1.59  2.48  2.46  2.19  4.24  2.26  1.79  3.29  2.06  1.25  2.75  1.10  Not Found  Not Found  Not Found  1.63  2.55  Not Found  0.98  1.25  Not Found  3.01  6.25  2.44  1.54  5.15  1.59  Not Found  Not Found  Not Found 

Martinique 1.05  2.08  1.55  1.22  2.08  1.19  1.09  1.92  0.95  1.39  3.67  Not found  1.57  2.85  1.49  Not found  Not found  Not found  1.75  2.55  1.45  1.71  2.55  1.15  1.45  2.85  0.85  1.98  3.05  1.99  1.59  1.74  0.58  1.15  1.99  0.78  1.95  4.31  2.19  1.49  2.99  1.79  1.75  3.95  1.39 

French Guiana 0.95  2.69  1.99  0.95  2.95  3.10  1.49  2.89  1.25  0.45  5.10  2.95  2.10  7.35  4.90  Not found  Not found  3.59  1.25  3.25  3.25  1.75  3.79  3.20  0.95  3.50  1.20  1.65  2.89  2.29  1.69  2.29  1.39  1.30  1.30  Not Found  1.10  5.35  2.28  0.90  5.40    1.99  6.85  3.75 


Product MM Min price  Disinfectants  MM Max price  (1 l)  Leader Price  Treatment of  MM Min price  textiles, materials  MM Max price  or other materials  Leader Price  (1.8 l)  MM Min price  Toilet Paper  MM Max price  (12 rolls)  Leader Price  Mattress support  (140 cm x 190 cm)  Mattress  (140 cm x 190 cm)  Pillow  (60 cm x 60 cm)  Louvre  Window  Door 

Market  Min  price  Market Max price  Market Min price  Market Max price  Market Min price  Market Max price  Companies were  unable to provide  us with a price  since they using a  special software  for that purpose 

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)     

Guadeloupe 1.95 4.49  Not Found  4.49  12.48 

Martinique 2.13  7.89  2.19  3.39  7.21 

French Guiana 1.45  3.59  X  2.29  18.15 

6.18

3.99

9.95

1.68 3.90 

4.3 6.35 

2.20 7.99 

7.34

2.39

4.49

53

171

82.80

1 190  109  2 295  9.99  119  280  (80 cm x 80 cm)  560  (120 cm x 120 cm) 

894 193  1294  9.99  95 

488 99.99  758  5.99  89 

700 (90 cm x 220 cm) 

Companies were  unable to provide  us with a price  since they using a  special software for  that purpose 


Appendix III– Comparative Pricing Information for Selected Goods in the FCOR  Pricing Information (Guadeloupe) quoted in Euros   

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 


Pricing Information (Martinique) quoted in euros 

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

 


Pricing Information (French Guiana) quoted in euros 

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 


Appendix IV ‐ Opportunities & Threats Related to Selected Sectors in the FCOR      Sauces, Condiments & Prepared Foods       

Opportunities • Traditonnal or local  sauces are not much  represented • Indian sauces are not  really represented on the  market. • The market of split and  chick peas is not highly  competitive

Threats • Large offer for classic  products like ketchup or  mayonnaise • The consumption of  certain product, such as  popcorn, is not  entrenched in these  societies  

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

      •Taste approval  by local  population •European  standard  packaging with  locally adapted  texts

•Market entry  below market  price •Market price 

Product

Price

Proximity Promotion

Placement via  wholesalers

•Tasting events •Word of mouth

•Mass market  retailing •Convenience  store   (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

 


Pasta      

Opportunities

Threats

• Consummer ready to  pay more for quality • Few noodles products

• Large offer on classic  products in the whole  spectrum • Premium brands  setting the standards  for innovation  

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

      •Combined with sauces •European standard  packaging with locally  adapted texts

•Market entry below  market price •Market price for  equivalent quality 

Product

Price

Mass media  Promotion

Placement via  wholesalers

•Billboard & leaflets •Recipe leaflet for adults  and children

•Mass market retailing •Convenience store

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

 


Biscuits & Snacks       

Opportunities

Threats

• Large price range • Limited offer on  waffles

• Saturated market

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

      •Taste testing •European standard  packaging with locally  adapted texts

•Market entry below  market price •Market price for  equivalent quality 

Product

Price

Mass media  Promotion

Placement via  wholesalers

•Billboard &  broadcasting •Taste animations

•Mass market retailing •Convenience store

 

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)     


Non‐Alcoholic Beverages         

Opportunities

Threats

• Lack of a complete  • Strong brand loyalty to  product range on  the products of the  tropical juices local industry • Increase of demand for  • Strong competition  energy drinks between international  and local brands • Specific tastes     (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

      •Taste testing •Locally adapted and  evolutive packaging  with bright colors and  eventually a  differenciating bottle

•Higher perceived  quality at market price

Product

Price

Mass media  Promotion

Placement via  wholesalers

•Billboard, movie  theater advertising,  sport event sponsoring •Taste animations

•Mass market retailing •Convenience store

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)       


Bleach & Detergents       

Opportunities

Threats

• Consumers sensitive to  • Strong brand loyalty  product efficacy or at  when satisfied least value for money • French regulation • Market is essentially  occupied by French  Brands   (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

      •Locally adapted  packaging

•Market price for  equivalent quality

Product

Price

Mass media  Promotion

Placement via  wholesalers

•TV broadcast of  effeciency test

•Mass market retailing

  (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)     


Toilet Paper       

Opportunities • Products are not really  differenciated

Threats • Quasi monopolistic  position of one groupe

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)         

•Locally adapted  packaging eventually  differentiating

•Lower than market  price

Product

Price

Mass media  Promotion

Placement via  wholesalers

•Discount coupons •Referencing in leaflets

•Mass market retailing

  (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)       


Appendix V – Recommendations on FCOR Market Entry for Selected Goods     

Place

Price

Promotion

Food & beverages 

Mass market and  convenience stores via  wholesalers

Market penetration  strategy 

Billboards, mass media  Tasting event 

Rum

Wine shop 

Detergents

Mass market and  convenience stores via  wholesalers

Market penetration  strategy 

Plastic bottlers 

Distributors

Market penetration  strategy 

Construction materials  (raw materials)  Bedding products (raw  materials) 

Distributors Local manufacturers

To be negotiated 

Easy terms of payment 

Local manufacturer 

To be negotiated 

Easy terms of payment 

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015)     

Private events Luxury packaging  Community  management Efficacy demonstration  on local TV  Demonstrations on site


Appendix VI– Buyers & Distributors   

Guadeloupe  

Carrefour Destreland  Ccial Destrelland  97122 Baie‐Mahault  Tel: (590) 26 10 10  Fax: (590) 26 14 78  Website: http://www.carrefourguadeloupe.com/  Leader price  La Jaille  97122 Baie‐Mahault  Tel: (590) 41 09 65  Ecomax (head quarter)  Imm/Logistika  Voie verte   ZAC Houelbourg 3  97 122 Baie‐Mahault  Tel: (590) 41 94 60  Fax: (590) 41 94 78  LP Guadeloupe  Moudong Centre   97122 baie‐Mahaiult  Tel: (590) 32 28 08  Fax: (590) 32 23 03 

Géant Casino  Bas du fort  97190 Gosier  Tel: (590) 93 68 00 

Super U  72 rue Jean Jaurès  97110 Pointe‐à‐Pitre  Tel: 0590 83 05 77  SAFO group  Voie Verte  ZI Jarry  97 122 Baie‐Mahault  Tel: (590) 38 12 33  Fax: (590) 26 73 15  Website: www.groupesafo.com  Email: info@groupesafo.com   

 

Martinique  

Géant Casino ( groupe Ho Hio Hen)  Centre commercial   La Batelière  97233 Schoelcher  Tel: (596) 61 32 62  Website: www.geantcasinomartinique.fr  Chez Mireille Proxi  Rte des plages   Cap chevalier   972727 Sainte‐Anne  Tel: (596) 74 70 18  Fax: (596) 76 99 18  Website: http://www.chez‐mireille‐martinique.fr  GBH ( Bernard Hayot Group)  Acajou‐ BP 423  97292 Le Lamentin  Tel: (596) 50 37 56         (596) 50 81 76  Website : www.gbh.fr 

Hyper U  Centre Cial Galléria  97232 Le Lamentin  Tel: (596) 50 66 33  Website: http://www.coursesu.com/lelamentin  Carrefour   Centre cial Dilon   97200 Fort‐de‐france  Tel: (596) 75 20 21  Fax: (596) 75 07 19  Website: www.carrefour‐martinique.com    Groupe créO  Leader price (Martinique and French Guiana)  Zone de Manhity   97232 Le Lamentin  Tel: (596) 39 00 12  Website: http://www.leaderprice‐ martinique.com/fr   

Groupe Ho Hio Hen / H distribution  2 avenue Arawaks   97200 Fort‐de‐France  Tel: (596) 75 16 14  Website: www.groupehohiohen.com   

Groupe SAFO  ZI place d’Armes  972232 Le Lamentin  Tel: (596) 30 07 93  Fax: (596) 30 07 84  Email: info@groupesafo.com  Website: www.groupesafo.com 


French Guiana    Géant Cayenne  ZI Collery  5 Rocade Leblond  97300 Cayenne  Tel: (594) 29 81 00  Carrefour  Zone terca,   97351 Matoury  Tel: (594) 25 70 00  Website: http://www.carrefour‐matoury‐guyane.fr  Propadis   Zi Collery  97300 Cayenne  Tel: (594) 35 17 17  Fax: (594) 35 31 14     

Ecomax 9 k rte Rémire   97354 Montjoly  Tel : (594) 35 40 93  Ho Shiang Ming  8 ZI Collery Ouest   BP 116  97300 Cayenne  Tel: (594) 35 08 89   


Appendix VII– Major Competitive Brands in the FCOR     

Guadeloupe Amora, Heinz,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price  Amora, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  Baron, Bello, Hot  sauce Louisiana 

Benedicta, Carrefour, Lessueur 

French Guiana  Heinz, Amora,  Carrefour, leader  Price, Casino  Amora, Benedicta,  Carrefour, Casino,  Leader price  Carrefour, Benedicta,  Casino 

Sharwoods

Not found 

Ducros

Lesieur, Suzi wan  Kelloggʹs, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  MagicPop  Lay’s, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  Kellogg’s, Leader  Price 

Casino, Lessieur  Nestlé, Lion, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  price Magicpop, Riglopop  Leader price,findus  Mc Cain, Casino,  Carrefour 

Ducros Nestlé, Joe’s farm,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader price  Carrefour, Menguy’s 

NF

Ducros, Leader price 

Chick Peas 

Bonduelle,

Bina

Split Peas 

Vivien Paille 

Isis Celimen 

Tomato Ketchup 

Mayonnaise Pepper Sauce  Amchar,Kuchela and  Similar preparations  Curry  Cereals  PopCorn  Prepared Potato  Fried & Pepper 

Chocolate Confectionery  Sweet Biscuits 

Wafer & Waffles 

Orange Juice 

Mixtures, fruit Juice   

Aerated beverages 

Lindt, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  Lu, Pimps, Casino,  Carrefour , Leader  Price  Loacker, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  Joker, Réa, Banga,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price  Joker, Jaïgo, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  Guadeloupe  Coca‐Cola,  Orangina, Ordinaire,  Gwada Cola, Vaval  tropique, Amigo,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price 

Tea

Lipton

Flavored Water 

Volvic, Chanflor 

Martinique Lessieur, Amora,  Casino, Carrefour,  Heinz  Amora, Carrefour,  Lessueur, Casino 

Cote d’or, Lindt,  Nestlé 

Mousseline, Maggi 

Casino, Bonduelle, A.  legal, Leader price  Carrefour, Casino,  Bonduelle  Nestlé, Poulain,  Carrefour, Casino,  Leader Price 

Casino, Carrefour,  Lu, Leader Price 

Lu, Oréo, Carrefour,  Casino, Leader Price 

Not found 

Serebis

Casino Carrefour  Royal Jocker, Rea,  Leader price  Casino Carrefour  Royal Jocker, Rea,  Pamphil, Leader  price  Martinique 

Casino, Bravo, Joker,  Réa, Carrefour,  Leader Price 

Casino, Orangina  Royal soda, Zwel,  Coca Cola, Fanta  Carrefour, Casino,  Lipton, Chanflor,  Leader price  Chanflor Vittel,  Contrex ,Leader  price 

Sunland, Joker, Jaïgo,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  French Guiana 

Orangina, Casino,  amigo, Leader Price 

Lipton, Casino,  Carrefour,  Matouba, Chanflor, 


Aerated Water   

Capès, Didier, Saint  Pellegrino, Perrier,  Fine Ligne  Guadeloupe 

Bleach

Lacroix, BEC, Ajax,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price 

Dish washing 

Paic, Chlorex,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price 

Martinique Tropic force, Bref,  LaCroix, Leader  Price  Carrefour, Casino  Casino, Mir PAIC,  Carrefour  Casino , Carrefour  Saint marc,Lacroix,  Cillit Bang , Leader  Price  Casino,  Carrefour,Canard  Harpic , Leader  price 

Didier French Guiana  Tropic force, Bref,  Lacroix, Leader Price  Casino Maison Verte,  Kris, PAIC, Carrefour  Cilit bang, Vigor,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader price 

Detergents

Not Found 

Disinfectants

Sanytol, Casino 

Treatment of textiles,  materials or other  materials 

Ariel, Gama, Skip,  OMO, Le chat, X‐ TRA, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price 

Casino,  Carrefour  Doudou, Lenor,  Soupline, Leader  Price 

Dash, Mechat,  Carrefour, Casino,  Leader Price 

Bleach

Lacroix, BEC, Ajax,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price 

Tropic force, Bref,  LaCroix, Leader  Price  Carrefour, Casino 

Tropic force, Bref,  Lacroix, Leader Price 

Dish washing 

Paic, Chlorex,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader Price 

Casino, Mir PAIC,  Carrefour 

Casino Maison Verte,  Kris, PAIC, Carrefour 

Detergents

Not Found 

Disinfectants

Sanytol, Casino 

Guadeloupe Ariel, Gama, Skip,  OMO, Le chat, X‐ TRA, Casino,  Carrefour, Leader  Price  Dunlopillo, Matelas  Baptistide, Selina,  Diroy, Bultex, Sonjia,  Dremea  Sweet dreams, Dodo,  Diroy, Ergoform 

Treatment of textiles,  materials or other  materials 

Mattress

Pillows (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

Didier, Pellegrino,  Vichy 

Casino , Carrefour  Saint marc,Lacroix,  Cillit Bang , Leader  Price  Casino,  Carrefour,Canard  Harpic , Leader  price  Martinique  Casino,  Carrefour  Doudou, Lenor,  Soupline, Leader  Price  Dunlopillo, Body  impression, Ebac,  Kalmboe, Simmons,  Dremea, Epada  Tempur, Dreams,  meribel 

Casino, St‐Marc,  Dettol, Leader price 

Cilit bang, Vigor,  Casino, Carrefour,  Leader price  Casino, St‐Marc,  Dettol, Leader price  French Guiana  Dash, Mechat,  Carrefour, Casino,  Leader Price  Dreamea, Duniopillo,  Epeda, Simmons,  Treca  Dreams, Meribel 


Appendix VIII – Import Regulations for a Selected Group of Products      Specific Import Regulations – Selected Food & Beverage Products    Product Description  Curry  Chocolate confectionery  Other, spaghetti, macaroni, noodles, shells  Other [Prepared corn products incl cereals]  Sweet biscuits  Wafers & waffles  Other [Roti skins]  Prepared corn products  Prepared potato & multigrain products  Other [Fried & Pepper ‐ Chick Peas  or Split  Peas]  Other orange juices  Other mixtures, fruit juices  Tomato ketchup  Other tomato sauces [BBQ Sauce]  Pepper sauce  Mayonnaise  Amchar, kuchela and similar preparations  Other sauces and preparations [incl Green  liquid seasoning; powdered seasoning]  Aerated waters & beverage, Other drinks  (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

 

 

Control of  contaminants in  foodstuff 

Control of residues  of veterinary  medicines 

Control of pesticide  residues 

Health control of  foodstuffs of non‐ animal origin 

Traceability, compliance and  responsibility in  food and feed 

Labelling for  foodstuff 

Products from  organic production –  Voluntary  Regulations 

X   X  X  X  X  X    X 

          X    X 

X                

X X  X  X  X  X  X    X 

X X  X  X  X  X  X    X 

X X  X  X  X  X  X    X 

X X  X  X  X  X  X    X 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X  X  X  X  X  X 

           

           

X X  X  X  X  X  X 

X X  X  X  X  X  X 

X X  X  X  X  X  X 

X X  X  X  X  X  X 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


Specific Import Regulations – Selected Chemicals & Non‐Metallic Mineral Products   

Product Description 

Dishwashing liquids   Liquid bleaches for retail  Liquid detergents  Other detergents   Preparations for the  treatment of textile  materials or other  materials  Disinfectants 

Prohibition of products  containing  fluorinated  greenhouse  gases 

     

     

X X  X  X 

X

X

X

   

X

X

X

 

Marketing requirements  for detergents 

     

X X     

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

Control of  trade in  dangerous  chemicals 

Import requirements  for seal  products 

Ozone‐ depleting products 

Voluntary ‐ Eco Label… 

Marketing requirements  for dangerous  chemicals,  pesticides and  biocides 

Import requirements  for medicinal  active  substances 

…for lubricants 

...for all  purpose  cleaners  and  sanitary  cleaners 

...for  dishwashing  detergents 

...for hand  dishwashing  detergents 

…for laundry  detergents 

X X  X  X 

     

X X  X  X 

X X  X  X 

X X  X  X 

X X  X  X 

X

X

X


Specific Import Regulations – Selected Articles of Base Metal    Technical Specifications for Construction Products 

Technical standards for Motor Vehicles 

Prohibition of Products containing Fluorinated  Greenhouse Gases 

Aluzinc roofing sheets, floor decking 

X

X

Aluminum profiles  

X

X

Aluminium windows, doors, louvres 

X

Product Description 

(Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

  Specific Import Regulations – Selected Wood and Wood Related Products    Product Description  Mattress support  Mattresses: of cellular rubber or plastics,  whether or not covered  Other articles of bedding, furnishings such  as pillows, cushions, mattress covers etc.  (Source: Cayribe Sarl, 2015) 

 

 

General Product Safety 

Eco‐label for Bed Mattresses 

Restriction on the use of certain Chemical Substances  in Textile and Leather Products 

X

X

X

X

X

X


Appendix IX – Public Translators  (Approved by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Trinidad and Tobago)      1) 

2) 

Mr. Luis Arreaza  # 38 Carlos Street, Woodbrook                       French, Spanish  Tel: 764‐8683  Mr. Chantale Leonard‐St. Clair  Director (Ag.)  Translation & Interpreting Services Unit  French, Spanish, Portuguese, College of Science Technology and Applied Arts   Dutch, German    of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAAT)  Tel: (868) 625 5030 Ext. 5270  Fax: (868) 627 5714  E‐mail: cstclair@costaatt.edu.tt; pwilliams@costaatt.edu.tt  

3)  Mr. David Coutisson               Director  THE ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE                  French  # 17 Alcazar Street, Port of Spain  Tel: 622‐6119/6728    4)  Eric Maitrejean  CITB Coordinator  Caribbean Interpretation & Translation Bureau  University of the West Indies                                        French, Spanish, Arabic  St. Augustine Campus, St. Augustine  Tel: 662‐0758  Email: CITB@sta.uwi.edu      

 


WORKS CITED      i Official Journal of the European Union. (2008). Economic Partnership Agreement between the  CARIFORUM States and the European Community and its Member States. Retrieved from  http://eur‐lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2008:289:0003:1955:EN:PDF    ii Embassy of France in St Lucia (2015). Short Stay Visa. Ease of Doing Business Index – 2015.  Retrieved from http://www.ambafrance‐lc.org/Short‐Stay‐Visa    iii World Bank Group (2015) Ease of Doing Business in France. Retrieved from  http://www.doingbusiness.org/data/exploreeconomies/france/     iv A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd (2013). Insights into Export Potential and Opportunities in the  French Caribbean Outermost Regions (FCORs).  Study Commissioned by exporTT and the  European Union.   

A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd (2011). Final Report Consultancy on Opportunities for Doing  Business between CARIFORUM States and the French Caribbean Outermost Regions  (FCORs) – November 2010.  Study Commissioned by Caribbean Export Development Agency    vi Caribbean Export Development Agency (2011). CARIFORUM‐FCOR Trade Statistics    vii National Institute of Statistics & Economic Studies (INSEE) (2015). Foreign Trade. Retrieved  from http://www.insee.fr/fr/themes/document.asp?reg_id=26&ref_id=23039     viii World Economic Forum (2014). The Global Enabling Trade Report 2014. Retrieved from  http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalEnablingTrade_Report_2014.pdf     ix Liat Cargo & Quikpak Express (2015) Air Freight Rates to the French Caribbean. Cargo  Division, Corporate Headquarters, Sir George Walter Highway, Antigua, Tel: 268‐480‐5875    x European Commission (2015). Trade Export Helpdesk. Retrieved from  http://exporthelp.europa.eu/thdapp/index.htm     xi A‐Z Information Jamaica Ltd (2012), Manual – Exporting to the FCOR: Taking full  advantage of market opportunities. Study Commissioned by exporTT Ltd    xii Cayribe Sarl (2015) FCOR Market Survey Report.  Study Commissioned by exporTT Ltd    ‐000‐  v

 

FCOR Market Guide September 2015  
FCOR Market Guide September 2015  

exporTT has prepared this document to give you general insight to the market. This edition includes comparative pricing for selected product...

Advertisement