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Table of Contents FOREWORD ...................................................................................................................................................................... CARICOM/COSTA RICA TRADE AGREEMENT ............................................................................................................. SECTION 1.0: MARKET OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................................... 1 1.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................................................1

1.2

Population ................................................................................................................................................1

1.3

Demographics..........................................................................................................................................1

1.4

Climate .....................................................................................................................................................1

1.5

Language ..................................................................................................................................................1

1.6

Hours of Business ...................................................................................................................................2

1.7

Public Holidays .......................................................................................................................................2

1.8

Travel & Transportation .........................................................................................................................2

1.9

Time Zones...............................................................................................................................................3

1.10

Currency ...................................................................................................................................................3

1.11

Communication .......................................................................................................................................3

SECTION 2.0: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT .....................................................................................3 2.1

Economic Performance ...........................................................................................................................3

2.2

Business ....................................................................................................................................................4

2.3

Labour Force ............................................................................................................................................4

2.4

Political Stability and Structure .............................................................................................................4

SECTION 3.0: TRADE ENVIRONMENT ...........................................................................................................................5 3.1

Import Statistics.......................................................................................................................................5

3.2

Import Tariffs & Taxes ...........................................................................................................................7

3.3

Trade Barriers ..........................................................................................................................................8

3.4

Prohibited and Restricted Imports .......................................................................................................8

3.5

Trade Agreements ...................................................................................................................................8

SECTION 4.0: TOP MARKET OPPORTUNITIES & PROSPECTS ........................................................................................8 SECTION 5.0: MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES .................................................................................................................9 5.1

Using an Agent/Distributor ...................................................................................................................9

5.2

Joint Ventures/Licensing ...................................................................................................................... 11

5.3

Franchising............................................................................................................................................. 11

5.4

Selling to the Government ................................................................................................................... 11

5.5

Employing Staff in the Market ............................................................................................................ 11


SECTION 6.0: SELLING, MARKETING & PROMOTIONS ............................................................................................... 12 6.1

Selling Factors/Techniques .................................................................................................................. 12

6.2

Trade Promotion ................................................................................................................................... 13

6.3

Advertising ............................................................................................................................................ 13

6.4

Direct Marketing ................................................................................................................................... 13

6.5

Distribution and Sales Channels ......................................................................................................... 13

6.6

Pricing ..................................................................................................................................................... 15

6.7

Payment Terms...................................................................................................................................... 15

6.8

Shipping Information ........................................................................................................................... 15

6.9

Protecting Your Intellectual Property ................................................................................................ 16

6.10

Due Diligence ........................................................................................................................................ 17

SECTION 7.0: REGULATIONS & STANDARDS.............................................................................................................. 17 7.1

Sanitary Product Registration ............................................................................................................. 17

7.2

Certificate of Origin .............................................................................................................................. 18

7.3

Product Shipment/Samples ................................................................................................................. 18

7.4

Packaging, Labelling and Marking Requirements ........................................................................... 19

7.5

Temporary Entry ................................................................................................................................... 19

7.6

Customs Regulations ............................................................................................................................ 20

SECTION 8.0: TRADE EVENTS ..................................................................................................................................... 21 SECTION 9.0: FINANCING EXPORTS TO COSTA RICA................................................................................................. 22 SECTION 10.0: USEFUL CONTACTS ............................................................................................................................ 23 Appendices....................................................................................................................................................................... Appendix I – Buyers & Distributors................................................................................................................... Appendix II – Employing Staff in the Market................................................................................................... Appendix III – Public Translators ......................................................................................................................


FOREWORD This Market Guide is intended to give Trinidad & Tobago exporters relevant and valuable information for successfully exporting their goods to Costa Rica. The information contained therein is based on a compilation of exporTT’s visits to the market, in-market consultant information, and desk research which is cited accordingly. Feel free to contact us at 1.868.623.5507 to discuss your exporting needs.

**********

CARICOM/COSTA RICA TRADE AGREEMENTi Negotiations for the Free Trade Agreement were conducted between September 2002 to March 2004 and was signed by CARICOM on behalf of the governments of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago. It has been in effect with Trinidad & Tobago since November 15, 2005. The CARICOM/Costa Rica Free Trade Agreement will allow Trinidad and Tobago's exporters and CARICOM States a more transparent and predictable access to the Costa Rican market. The Agreement provides for free trade or preferential access for a wide range of goods. However, a limited number of sensitive products such as fish, chocolate, cigarettes and certain agricultural commodities will continue to attract duties. For several products, the duties were phased out over a four-year period to a zero rate. See https://www.ttbizlink.gov.tt/trade/tnt/cmn/pdf/CARICOM%20Costa%20Rica%20Free%20Trade%20Act-81.10.pdf for the full Trade Agreement.

-000-

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SECTION 1.0: MARKET OVERVIEW 1.1 Introduction This Central American country Costa Rica is officially the Republic of Costa Rica. To the North it is bordered by Nicaragua, to the South-east by Panama, to the West by the Pacific Ocean, to the East by the Caribbean Sea, and to the South of Cocos Island, Ecuador. Costa Rica has 7 provinces: Alajuela, Cartago, Guanacaste, Heredia, Limon, Puntarenas, and San José. These provinces are divided into 81 cantons. The country was founded on September 15, 1821 and the capital is San José. 1.2

Population

Population:

4,755,234 (July 2014 est.)

Population Growth Median Age

1.24% (2014 est.) Total: 30 years Male: 29.5 years Female: 30.5 years (2014 est.)

Life Expectancy

78.23 years

(Source: CIA World Factbook, 2014) ii

1.3

Demographics

Gentilic: Ethnic Groups:

Religions:

Costa Rican Tico (Informal) white or mestizo 83.6%, mulato 6.7%, indigenous 2.4%, black of African descent 1.1%, other 1.1%, none 2.9%, unspecified 2.2% (2011 est.) More than 75% of Costa Ricans are practicing Catholics and approximately 14% are evangelical Christians. Other religions include: Jehovah's Witnesses 1.3%, Protestant 0.7%, other 4.8%, and none 3.2%.

(Source: CIA World Factbook, 2014)

1.4 Climate The climate is temperate and there are two seasons. The Rainy/Green Season that runs from May – December and the Dry Season that runs from December – April. 1.5 Language Spanish is the official language but English is widely spoken in the business community.

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1.6 Hours of Business  Banks: Monday – Friday; 8:30 or 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.  Government Offices & Businesses: Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Lunch: 12:00 noon and 1 or 2 p.m. which includes the traditional Latin American siesta (rest), so your activities should be scheduled accordingly.  Retail Stores: Monday – Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 or 7:00 p.m. 1.7

Public Holidays Month

Day

January March

1 19

Observance Año Nuevo (New Year's Day) Dia de San José (St. Joséph's Day) Miercoles de Ceniza (Ash Wednesday)

April

11

June

25

Anexion de Guanacaste Commemorates Guanacaste's 1824 entrance into the Costa Rican union.

August

2

Dia de la Virgen de Los Angeles (Virgin of Los Angeles Day) honoring St. Mary, Patron Saint of Costa Rica.

September

15

Dia de la Independencia (Independence Day)

October

12

Dia de la Raza (Columbus Day) Celebrates Columbus' discovery of the Americas.

November

2

All Soul's Day

December 1.8

Semana Santa (Easter Week): Businesses will close the whole week before Easter weekend. Dia de Juan Santamaria (National Hero's Day)

Christmas Week

Travel & Transportation

1.8.1 Airline Travel Main Airport: Juan Santamaria International Airport, Alajuela (SJO) Distance from San José: 11 miles. Approximate driving time: 30 minutes, dependent on traffic and the time of day. Individual Entry Requirements 1. Valid Passport (should not be expiring in 6 months) 2. Airline Ticket  Copa Airline (Non-Stop): TT to Panama = 3 hours, 8 minutes; Panama to Costa Rica = 1 hour, 27 minutes  American Airline via Miami (Non-Stop): (US Visa required). TT to Miami = 3 hours, 55 minutes; Miami to Costa Rica = Minimum 9 hours and dependent on the number of stops

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Individual Exit Requirements 1. Valid Passport 2. Airline Ticket 3. Departure Tax = $US28 (can be paid at the airport or at participating hotels with an additional service charge) 1.8.2 Ground Transportation Taxi and public bus services are good and reliable in the capital of San José. The official taxis are red and are the recommended means of travel for business visitors. 1.9 Time Zones March – October: Mountain Standard Time November – March: Central Standard Time Time Difference: 2 hours behind Trinidad & Tobago 1.10 Currency National currency is the colon. The plural is colones Symbol: CRC or ₡ Current exchange rate is 1US$ = 528 colones Banknotes are available in 1,000; 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, 20,000, 50,000 Coins are available in 5; 10; 25; 50; 100; 500 1.11 Communication Calls from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica = 011 – 506 – 8 digit phone number Calls from Costa Rica to Trinidad and Tobago = 00 – 1 – 868 – 7 digit phone number

SECTION 2.0: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT 2.1

Economic Performance Indicator

GDP:

Economic Performance $61.43 billion (2013 est.)

GDP per Capita: Growth:

$12,900 (2013 est.) 3.5% (2013 est.)

GDP by Sector: Inflation Rate:

Agriculture: 6.2% Industry: 21.3% Services: 72.5% (2013 est.) 5.6% (2013 est.)

Import Commodities

Raw materials, consumer goods, capital equipment, petroleum, construction materials.

Import Partners (2012)

USA – 51.86%; China – 7.88%; Mexico – 4.4%

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Costa Rica's current and stable economic performance indicators have mainly dependent on tourism, real estate, agriculture, investment & business, commodity and electronics manufacturing and trading industries. Other major sectors in the economy that fluctuate more, but that have also contributed to Costa Rica’s economic growth include the service industries, large scale real estate developments, trade, whole and retail sales. Overall, Costa Rica has a relatively good transportation and well developed banking system. (Source: CIA World Factbook, 2014)

2.2 Business Costa Rica ranked 78th in the 2014 Ease of Doing Business report. They ranked 110th in 2013. The main areas of concern are protecting minority investors (180), paying taxes (129) and enforcing contracts (129). (Source World Bank Group 2014)iii

2.3

Labour Force

2.222 million Note: this official estimate excludes Nicaraguans living in Costa Rica (2013 est.) Agriculture: 14% Industry: 22% Services: 64% (2006 est.)

Labour Force:

Labour Force by occupation: (Source: CIA World Factbook, 2014)

2.4 Political Stability and Structure Three powers:  Executive: President and Ministers  Legislative: 57 elected representatives  Judiciary

President

Sr. Luis Guillermo Solis (April 2014 – Present)

Political Party

Citizens’ Action Party

Presidential elections

Held every 4 years

Traditional and stable democracy. Army abolished in 1949.

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SECTION 3.0: TRADE ENVIRONMENT 3.1

Import Statistics

Total Imports (US $ Billions) Imports of goods and services (% of GDP)

$18,355,992,791 38.75%

TRADE PARTNERS

#

Top Import Partners

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

United States (USA) China (CHN) Mexico (MEX) Japan (JPN) Panama (PAN) Brazil (BRA) Guatemala (GTM) Colombia (COL) Germany (DEU) Chile (CHL)

Import Volume (USD) 9,519,474,368 1,446,073,360 1,187,066,499 560,594,540 530,786,316 424,196,251 416,945,916 342,847,834 317,516,428 290,949,298

OTHER CHL DEU COL GTM BRA

USA

PAN JPN MEX CHN

TRADE COMMODITIES (at the 2 digit HS Code Level) HS Code (2 digit)

Top 10 Import Commodities

Import Volume (USD)

85

Electrical Machinery and Equipment and Parts Thereof; Sound Recorders and Reproducers, Television Image and Sound Recorders and Reproducers, and Parts and Accessories of Such Articles (Electrical Machinery)

$3,739,465,138

27

Mineral Fuels, Mineral Oils and Products of Their Distillation; Bituminous Substances; Mineral Waxes (Oil & Mineral Fuels)

$2,325,792,018

84

Nuclear Reactors, Boilers, Machinery and Mechanical Appliances; Parts Thereof (Industrial Machinery)

$1,358,674,760

87

Vehicles Other Than Railway or Tramway Rolling Stock, and Parts and Accessories Thereof (Motor Vehicles & Parts)

$1,046,062,468

39

Plastics and Articles Thereof (Plastics)

$1,009,217,318

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HS Code (2 digit)

Top 10 Import Commodities

Import Volume (USD)

Optical, Photographic, Cinematographic, Measuring, Checking, Precision, Medical or Surgical Instruments and Apparatus; Parts and Accessories Thereof (Precision Instruments)

$617,315,074

48

Paper and Paperboard; Articles of Paper Pulp, of Paper or of Paperboard (Paper)

$588,175,719

72

Iron and Steel (Iron & Steel)

$582,067,674

30

Pharmaceutical Products (Pharmaceuticals)

$546,414,609

73

Articles of Iron or Steel (Iron & Steel Articles)

$418,462,667

90

(85) OTHER

(27)

(73) (30)

(84) (72)

(48)

(90)

(39)

(87)

(Source: UN Comtrade (2012))

Foreign trade with Trinidad & Tobago, 2002-2013 (Millions USD) 2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013*

Exports

$6.9

$14.6

$16.4

$20.4

$27.3

$40.3

$46.3

$49.4

$54.7

$57.9

$62.0

$58.4

Imports

$12.9

$15.0

$18.7

$10.2

$51.2

$67.9

$51.7

$59.6 $162.4

$98.6 $101.2 $134.8

Balance

-$6.0

-$0.4

-$2.3

$10.2

-$23.9 -$27.6

-$5.4

-$10.2 -$107.7

Total Trade

$19.8

$29.6

$35.1

$30.6

$78.5

$98.0

$109.0 $217.1

$40.7 $156.

$108.2

-$39.2 -$76.4 $163.2 $193.2

5

(*Preliminary data. Source: PROCOMER & BCCR)

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3.2 Import Tariffs & Taxes Regarding tariffs and duties on foreign trade, ad valorem duties are levied on CIF value. Selective Consumer Tax is levied on the CIF value and the import duties but this has been reduced or eliminated for a majority of imported products. All imported products (except medications) face a fixed tax of 1% (called an emergency tax) and a domestic sales tax of 10%. Sales tax is paid by individuals as well as public and private companies that routinely sell goods or render services in addition to any person or company importing or entering goods into the country. Sales tax is determined based on net sales prices, which include the excise tax to which a 13% rate applies.  Import duty tariff (DAI): (applied at the border)  Raw Materials = 1%  Capital Goods = 2%  Intermediate Goods = 8-13%  Finished Goods = 18%  Poultry Meat Products = 19-262%  Sales tax (IVA) = 13% - applied to all products  Law #6946 = 1% - applied to all products on the customs value of imported goods.  Selective Consumption Tax (SC): rates are variable and selective, affecting only sumptuous goods.  Special Taxes (IDA, IFAM, etc): applied on certain products such as wine, liquor, cigarettes or woods. (Source: International Business Publications (n.d))

Example: For a product being imported into Costa Rica, assume a product has a CIF value of $1,000.00, an import duty of 18% and the consumption tax for the category is 15%. Based on these assumptions, the calculation would be as follows:

CIF % Import Duty (DAI)

Sample Calculation $1,000.00 18%

% Consumption Tax (S.C.) 15% % Law 6946 % Sales Tax (I.V.)

1% 13%

Import Duty (DAI) Consumption Tax (S.C.) Law 6946

($1,000.00 x 18%) = $180.00 ($1,000.00 + $180.00) = $1,180.00 x 15% = $177.00 $1,000.00 x 1% = $10.00 ($1,000.00 + $180.00 + $177.00 + $10.00) = $1,367.00 + 13% = $1,544.71 ($180.00 + $177.00 + $10.00 + $1,544.71) = $1,911.71

Sales Tax (I.V.) Total Taxes Due

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Tariff duties for exports from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica can be accessed here at ITC’s Market Access Map: http://www.macmap.org/Main.aspx or, exporters can contact exporTT’s Export Market Research Centre (EMRC) for this information. 3.3 Trade Barriers There are no significant trade barriers for products entering Costa Rica. Costa Rica continually unify and lower its tariffs in compliance with it commitments and obligations to the World Trade Organization. 3.4 Prohibited and Restricted Imports The importation of used tires without rims is prohibited because mosquitoes which carry diseases breed in water accumulated in rimless tires. Also the importation of weapons is closely regulated where only the government can import automatic firearms. (Source: Prohibited Imports. (n.d.). In Costa Rica Export-Import Trade and Business Directory (Vol. 1, p. 211). USA: International Business Publications.)iv

3.5

Trade Agreements  1963/Law 3150: Central America  1995/Law 7474: Costa Rica–Mexico  2002/Law 3150: Central America–Dominican Republic  2002/Law 8055: Central America–Chile  2002/Law 8300: Central America–Canada  2005/Law 8455: Costa Rica–CARCOM  2008/Law 8622: USA/Costa Rica/DR  2009/Law 8675: Costa Rica–Panama  2011/Law 8953: Costa Rica–China  2013/Law 9133: Costa Rica–Peru  2013/Entry into force: Costa Rica–Singapore  2013/Under Revision: Association Agreement Central America –European Union  2013/Signed not ratified: Costa Rica–Colombia  2013/Signed: Costa Rica–European Free Trade Association

SECTION 4.0: TOP MARKET OPPORTUNITIES & PROSPECTS 4.1 Paper & Paperboard Products Costa Rica is one of the largest paper and paperboard importers and consumers in Central America and the Caribbean. The high demand for this product is due to its use in agricultural exports and is an indication of how well developed the printing and graphic arts industries are in the country. The United States has traditionally been the largest supplier of paper and paperboard to Costa Rica.

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The most promising sub-sectors for paper and paperboard are:  Uncoated paper and paperboard for writing;  Newsprint paper;  Folding cartons;  Labels;  Bond paper used for computer printing, faxes and photocopies. 4.2 Plastic Products The manufacturing of plastic products such as tubing and ducts used in the construction industry, as well as in the water supply and sewage services sector, are integral to the development and growth presently taking place in Costa Rica. Since Costa Rica does not have a petrochemical industry, all types of resin are imported. All Costa Rican companies manufacturing plastic products import their resins, additives, pigments, stabilizers, plasticizers and lubricants. The biggest supplier of plastic materials and resins to Costa Rica is the United States. 4.3 Agricultural Chemicals The agricultural sector in Costa Rica is one of the most important of the country’s economy and the Government places great importance on this sector by facilitating banking credits and incentives to growers. The demand in Costa Rica for agricultural chemicals (fertilizers, fungicides, herbicides and pesticides) is high because the soils in general are very poor in nutrients such as phosphorus, potassium, sulphur, calcium and magnesium. Since Costa Rica does not produce fertilizers or agro-chemicals, the agricultural sector depends entirely on the importation of agricultural chemicals. In Costa Rica, there are three major blenders or mixers of fertilizers: FERTICA, ABOPAC, CAFESA. In addition, prospects are very good in the sectors of building products, hotel and restaurant equipment and medical and dental equipment. Other promising areas are auto parts and service equipment, drugs and pharmaceuticals, construction equipment, travel and tourism as well as telecommunications and insurance. (Source: International Business Publications, p. 198, 223, 225. 2004)v

SECTION 5.0: MARKET ENTRY STRATEGIES 5.1 Using an Agent/Distributor Costa Rican legislation establishes two principal means of representation: representative and distributor. The representative can also be considered an agent. It is possible for a person to occupy the post of both representative/agent and distributor. Distribution contracts are regulated by the Law for the Protection of the Representative of Foreign Companies. Article 360 of the Code of Commerce (Law No. 3284) states that the representative or distributor is understood as, “[…] any natural or legal person who continuously and autonomously, with or without Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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legal representation, carries out purchase or sale orders directly for local import or export companies on the basis of commission or a percentage, or who prepares, promotes, facilitates or finalises the sale of merchandise or services that another industrial businessperson sells or provides.” It further states the following requirements in order to be a representative/distributor:  The representative/distributor must be Costa Rican or have permanent residency in the country if not a Costa Rican national.  The representative/distributor must have sufficient knowledge of commercial matters and must be recognised as both solvent and honourable. Specifically, a distributor is defined as an individual or company that buys goods directly from a manufacturer with the intention of re-selling them. Generally, a distributor signs a distribution contract with a manufacturer and conducts an inventory valuation. A distribution agreement can be exclusive or non-exclusive. It is not rare to find a representative or distributor who represents various product lines or operates at a regional level in Central America. Distributor/Representative Law 6209 With respect to the Law for the Protection of the Representative of Foreign Companies (Law No. 6209), this applies to:  Distributors who independently and continuously place purchase or sale orders, prepare, promote, facilitate or finalise the sale of goods and services provided by Foreign Companies.  Contracts in which the supplier or manufacturer is foreign.  Local manufacturers who produce or package products in Costa Rica under the authority of a Foreign Company, using knowledge and techniques made available by said Foreign Company.  Agents, sales representatives, manufacturers and distributors who meet these criteria.  Infractions committed by the distributor or manufacturer against the Foreign Company.  The judicial declaration by the Supreme Court of Justice of Costa Rica of negligence or incompetence on the part of the distributor or manufacturer, causing sales to be ceased or substantially decreased for an extended period.  The unlawful release of confidential or critical information of the Foreign Company.  The serious breach of the legal obligations of the distributor or manufacturer for the Foreign Company, according to the stipulations of the Law and the distribution contract. Agreements between a manufacturer and distributor involve a host of factors, from the criteria for tangible goods to the sale of the product and the financial elements of benefits and investment profitability. It is therefore advisable that foreign companies wishing to do business in Costa Rica receive legal counsel from a lawyer specializing in this area, before signing any distribution contract. If special care is not taken and a contract is breached with a distributor, the foreign company must compensate the agent or distributor according to a formula based on the history of sales or the commission earned by the Costa Rican company. (Source: Benambourg, Eugenio Quirós. (2013, February 4))

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5.2 Joint Ventures/Licensing Licensing is not widespread in Costa Rica. Traditionally, foreign companies have exported to Costa Rica, or set up manufacturing assembly operations in the country, either independently or through joint venture arrangements. Foreigners may legally own a company in Costa Rica, or equity therein, and may invest in all areas not expressly reserved for state or semi-governmental companies. Foreign companies may be organized legally in several ways: as branches (including banks), joint ventures, wholly-owned subsidiaries or locally incorporated companies. Costa Rican government encourages bona fide investments. Foreigners must be residents of Costa Rica in order to work in Costa Rica or have a work permit. (Source: International Business Publications (p. 228, 2004). USA))

5.3 Franchising A key success factor in franchising in the Costa Rican market is the careful selection of the potential franchisee. The right franchisee will have the right financial resources to enter and develop the market as well as excellent local business contacts and an understanding of the intricacies of the local market. In Costa Rica business contacts greatly affect the success of a project. This can come into play, for example, in developing local sources of supply, expediting government approval and licensing, and in gaining access to prime locations for establishing a franchise site. Another reason for being highly selective is Distributor Law 6209 that protect distributors and agents. The local courts view this law as protecting franchisee rights as well. The law tends to favour the local franchisee and can make it very expensive for foreign franchiser to end a relationship with a local franchisee for reasons other than non-payment of royalties. (Source: International Business Publications (p. 238, 2004))

5.4 Selling to the Government Bidding for Public Tenders In some cases, the Code of Commerce offers foreign companies the possibility of participating directly in public tenders without a local representative in Costa Rica. The only requirement is that the employee representing the foreign company must have power of attorney certified by the Costa Rican Consulate in its country. However, the process of bidding for public tenders is usually tedious, so it is better to engage the services of a qualified representative in Costa Rica. (Source: Benambourg, Eugenio Quir贸s. (2013, February 4))

5.5 Employing Staff in the Market See Appendix II for a complete guide on positions, wages and salaries in Costa Rica.

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SECTION 6.0: SELLING, MARKETING & PROMOTIONS As with other Latin American countries, business in Costa Rica depends heavily on personal relationships. Therefore the business community in Costa Rican places high importance on personal contacts with foreign suppliers. Trinidad and Tobago exporters should be prepared to travel to Costa Rica periodically and follow up with customers regularly via telephone, Skype, email and fax. Exporters should be mindful that a patient sales approach is preferred over a “hard sell”. 6.1 Selling Factors/Techniques Selling factors and techniques are described in the following five steps to master the selling process. Steps

1. Greeting

2. Ask questions to understand the prospect 3. Present Benefits

4. Handle Objections

5. Close

Other Tips

Description You need to ‘arrest’ the buyer:  Pay attention to dress, hygiene, grooming, handshake, etc.  Treat the buyer’s business card with respect and present your business card in a professional manner.  Speak clearly, paying attention to voice, tone, eye contact, etc.  Use correct titles and surnames.  Have a positive body language. Don’t ask direct questions but ask leading questions in a conversation type manner to find out the buyer’s need and what he/she is looking for. Present the benefits of your product/s or service/s in a manner that aligns them to the need of the buyer. If the buyer is not interested in your product/s or service/s, don’t end the meeting in despair, remain calm. Instead, take the opportunity to find out more about the market and their needs so that you can possibly make adjustments to your product to suit their needs. It is very important to know and agree on the next steps which should include a thank you email which captures the essence of the conversation and the activities that would follow.  Be prepared  Know your business and your products  Be confident  Be a persuasive negotiator  Confirm appointments at least 24 hours in advance and be on time.  Prepare your marketing tools e.g. brochures, samples, PowerPoint presentations, etc. and make them come alive with images.

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 Take notes and bring a notetaker.  When using an interpreter, do not speak directly to the interpreter as if the buyer is absent, however keep the conversation focused on the buyer and allow the interpreter to interpret accordingly. 6.2 Trade Promotion Locally, exporTT offers trade promotion programmes periodically, including trade missions, trade shows, trade fairs, matchmaking events, conferences, etc. These programmes are conducted with a pre-approved budget and with an element of co-financing with the exporter for some activities. 6.3 Advertising Costa Rican newspapers are among the best ways to promote sales of products and services. Depending on the target market, advertising is also effective in magazines produced by organizations like the Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham), the Chamber of Commerce Costa Rica (CRECEX) and other specialized chambers/business associations. Sales catalogues and brochures should be translated into Spanish. It is important to note that Law N° 7472, the Law for the Promotion of the Competitiveness and Consumers Defense and its bylaws, allows the Ministry of Economy and Commerce to verify the compliance of the technical regulations, and receive complaints related to false advertisement. (Source: International Business Publications (p. 239, 2004))

6.4 Direct Marketing Direct marketing is a common business practice in Costa Rica and there is no law in Costa Rica that regulates direct marketing. Thus, direct marketing as a selling method is regulated by the general Costa Rican law that applies to publicity and advertising agencies as well as the commerce activity, consumer's defense, and other laws. If you are looking for a specific group of professionals to target, you can contact their respective associations and they may provide their member's business addresses and phone numbers for a fee or for free. For further information, consult a lawyer familiar with Costa Rican law. (Source: International Business Publications (p. 238, 2004))

6.5 Distribution and Sales Channels Due to the small size of the country and the high economic concentration in the Great Metropolitan Area1 (GAM), distribution channels in Costa Rica are relatively short. For this reason, most companies have the ability to easily get their products to the end consumer. The Directory of Institutional Units and Establishments 2012 of the National Institute for Statistics and Censuses (INEC) shows a significant concentration of the Costa Rican economy in the Great Metropolitan 1

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In Costa Rica’s distribution scenario, there are also cases where the importer is also the retail distributor. There are also very few specialist importers, since the small size of the market prevents them from specializing in the importation of one type of product. As in any unfamiliar market, Trinidad and Tobago companies are encouraged to have a local partner. While the distribution network is not complex, in most cases, the distribution companies located in Costa Rica have great power, as well as the number of competitors is not very high. For foreign companies, the distribution process entails detailed planning from the manufacturing of the products up to the distribution of products to the Costa Rican end consumers via intermediaries, i.e., wholesale or retail distributors. Additionally, foreign companies must conduct an analysis of the channels with the greatest profitability and scope for expansion, as well as identify the competition and its presence in a given distribution channel; they must also assess their product’s ability to satisfy the needs of the demand, and define the relationship they will have with their distributor, among other factors. With respect to the supermarket industry, this sector has become increasingly competitive, complex and changeable. Thanks to the increase in competition caused by the recent appearance of big supermarket chains, hypermarkets and warehouse stores, like PriceSmart and Walmart, there has been a rapid proliferation throughout the country of independent supermarket groups and smaller chains, as well as many varied businesses such as convenience stores and corner stores, among others. The success of these hypermarkets is based on the fact that they offer consumers the option to purchase products in greater quantity at a lower cost. Currently, the main supermarket chains include: Walmart (formerly the United Supermarkets Corporation), which is the main supermarket chain, with its hypermarkets (Walmart), supermarkets (Más x Menos and Maxi Palí) and its stores targeting the lower socio-economic bracket (Palí); Grupo Z (Megasuper Corporation) with its supermarkets (Megasuper) and discount stores (Mi Mercado); Auto Mercado with its supermarkets of the same name; Grupo GESSA with its supermarkets Perimercados; and PriceSmart with its warehouse layout. Alongside these, Costa Rica also has a significant number of franchises, department store chains, and small and medium businesses. In terms of the distribution channels of agricultural products and the food industry, these do not vary substantially. Technical knowledge is required for the handling of some products, such as fresh products and frozen foods, due to their perishable nature and need for refrigeration.

Area (GAM). According to INEC data for 2012, of the total 48,981 registered businesses, 41.9% (20,515) are based in San José, 20.9% (10,247) in Alajuela, 10.6% (5,194) in Cartago, 10% (4,921) in Heredia, 4.3% (2,088) in Guanacaste, 6.1% (2,983) in Puntarenas, 3.9% (1,901) in Limón, and 2.3% (1,132) of undetermined location. Source: www.inec.go.cr

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The distribution chain for food products to groceries, hypermarkets, supermarkets, and smalland medium-sized convenience stores is well developed. Some of the leading supermarket chains even import their goods directly. With respect to the big transnational and international companies for large-scale consumption, these pay special attention to the control of distribution channels with the main objective of maintaining their brands’ desired market position. In fact, these companies often even go to the extreme of acquiring the channels of distribution from their distribution partners to guarantee this control, via which they carry out all the distribution operations for their products themselves. Examples of such companies are Unilever, P&G and Coca Cola, among others. (Source: Benambourg, Eugenio Quirós (2013, February 4)

6.6 Pricing Prices of products imported into Costa Rica are typically based on:  The CIF value plus import taxes  Customs agent fees  In-country transportation costs  Other product-related costs Products must be price competitive. Costa Ricans are very price conscious and savvy shoppers. (Source: International Business Publications (p. 205, 2009))

6.7 Payment Terms Once the business transaction has been defined, both parties should determine the means and method of payment, opting to have a bank account with banks that have branches or relationships with other banks in Costa Rica. In terms of the payment currency, the United States dollar is the preferred currency for trade documents but other currencies are used when necessary. The usual terms of payment are letter of credit or other secured payments. It is not advised to use letter of credit when the transaction amount is lower than $5,000 USD, because usually banks have established high commission amounts to carry out this transactions. Even though this is a more secure method to buy and sell goods at an international level, it is mostly recommended for high volume transactions. Open account payment terms are generally reserved for well-known and well-established customers. 6.8

Shipping Information

Shipping Routes From Port of Spain to Puerto Limon, Costa Rica via Kingston, Jamaica = 9-10 days From Port of Spain to Moin, Costa Rica via Manzanillo, Panama = 13-14 days Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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From Port of Spain to Moin, Costa Rica via Cartagena, Colombia =19 days From Point Lisas to Moin, Costa Rica via Fort-de-France, Martinique = 14 days Shipping Documents 1. Bill of lading 2. Commercial invoice 3. Customs import declaration 4. Packing list 5. Terminal handling receipts. 6. Certificate of origin (where applicable) Average Times for Shipping Procedures  Documents preparation: 7 days  Customs clearance and technical control: 2 days  Ports and terminal handling: 3 days  Inland transportation and handling: 2 days Average Shipping Costs Several shipping companies in Trinidad and Tobago currently ship to Costa Rica. Prices for shipping via a 20-foot container range from US$900 – US$1,300 whereas a 40-foot container can range from US$1,300 - US$1,500. Inland transportation from Port Limon to San José starts at approximately US$300 for a 20-foot container. It should be noted that schedules are subject to change and the cost of shipping often fluctuates alongside the price of oil. (Source: Linescape.com & JOCSailings.com)

Note: If the exporter has an attractive price for the shipping freight, it is possible to negotiate under CIF incoterms, which will make the Costa Rican client feel more secure with the transaction. 6.9 Protecting Your Intellectual Property Registration Organization: The Ministry of Justice Cost: Customized Legal Fees In Costa Rica, the rights to intellectual property are guaranteed by the Constitution within article 47, which states that every author, inventor, producer or merchant shall temporarily enjoy exclusive ownership of his work, invention, trademark or trade name in accordance with the law. Trademarks, trade names and advertising signs are distinctive signs that are regulated by the Law on Trademarks and Other Distinctive Signs, Law No 7978 and its regulations. Additionally, Costa Rica is also part of many international agreements relating to the rights of intellectual property, such as TRIPS, the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, the Berne Convention, and the Convention establishing WIPO, among others. (Source: Ortiz, P., Gonzalez, L., & Calderon, A, 2013)vi Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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6.10 Due Diligence Before finalizing any contract whether for sale or representation, Trinidad & Tobago exporters should obtain information on the bona fides of the Costa Rican firms including reliable business and financial references. Also, the because of the language difference between Trinidad & Tobago and Costa Rica, this presents opportunities for serious miscommunication and misunderstandings and sometimes with grave consequences which you would want to avoid. Therefore when entering into business with Costa Rican companies, it is imperative to utilize the services of a competent bi-lingual attorney to avoid communication failures.

SECTION 7.0: REGULATIONS & STANDARDS 7.1 Sanitary Product Registration Registration Organization: Ministry of Health Cost: US$100.00 per product Sanitary Registrations or product registrations are required by law to produce and market consumer products. The products that require sanitary registrations are as follows:  Pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical preparation of natural products  Alcoholic beverages  Cosmetics  Cleaning and hygiene products  Processed foods  Medical products for surgical and dental purposes  Pesticides and dangerous chemical products require sanitary registration. The regulatory approval is granted for a period of five years, and may be extended indefinitely for successive periods of five years. Special requirements for Food and Beverage:  Health certificate of free sale and consumption of country of origin issued by the appropriate government entity authorized by the Consul of Costa Rica and endorsed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica.  Certificate of qualitative composition of ingredients and additives used, extended by the manufacturer or by the health authorities of the country of origin.  Two samples of the product.  Two sets of tags.  Labelling: The label (in Spanish) must contain the following mandatory information: a. Name of food b. Kind of product c. Net contents and drained weight Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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d. List of ingredients e. Country of origin f. Name and address of the manufacturer, packer, distributor, importer, exporter or vendor of the food g. Barcode h. Lot identification i. Date of expiry j. Instructions for use (Source: Costa Rica Ministry of Health Regulations)vii

7.2 Certificate of Origin exporTT’s Trade Facilitation Office is charged with the responsibility of certifying all products and determining their eligibility for preferential treatment into trade agreement countries. In this regard, exporters should complete the following steps to determine their eligibility for preferential access: • Completion of Factory Visit Form (Information Furnished in Support of Declaration of Origin • Payment ($400.00) • Visit by a Certification Officer • Inspection on process of production, raw material and relevant documentation 7.3 Product Shipment/Samples Sample introduction to Costa Rica is regulated under articles 120 and 121 of Law No 7557, and is also regulated by the Decree of Law No 25.270-H, and in articles 387 of the General Customs Law regulations, which establish specific conditions for their entry into Costa Rica. These documents may be consulted in Spanish at the link www.hacienda.go.cr . Additionally, the samples allowed to enter into Costa Rica, must not have any commercial value, or remain unused for the shipping, it is fundamental to state on the package that the samples do not have any commercial value. It is forbidden to introduce jewelry samples to Costa Rica. The maximum value to declare before customs is of USD$200. When the products reach customs, one must fill out a declaration to be presented before the customs authorities. The following documents are required for the customs clearance of samples: 1. Commercial invoice 2. Bill of landing (B/L) 3. Customs declaration from exporting country 4. Value declaration form 5. Import permits 6. Certificate of Origin (This can be obtained from the Trade Certification Unit of exporTT Limited and in accordance with the Free Trade Agreement) 7. Exemption notes (if applicable) * In the import process, a local customs agent is required. Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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Depending on the nature, the import of certain products requires the prior approval of various governmental institutions (Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Health, etc.) Violations of documentation laws carry heavy fines therefore great care must be taken to avoid errors and infractions. (Source: Ortiz, P., Gonzalez, L., & Calderon, A. (2013). General considerations regarding imports and business opportunities in Costa Rica. Trinidad and Tobago Market Opportunities in Costa Rica, Module 2, 33-34.)

7.4 Packaging, Labelling and Marking Requirements There are no general requirements in Costa Rica for marking the origin of goods or the labelling of general merchandise. However, special labelling requirements apply to shipments of food products, pharmaceuticals, fertilizers, pesticides, hormones, veterinary preparations, vaccines, poisonous substances and mouthwashes. Costa Rican food labelling laws require that all imported food products are labelled in Spanish with the following specifications:  Product Name  List of ingredients  Country of Origin  Nutritional information  Name and address of manufacturer  Name and address of importer  Expiration or best-if-used-by dates  Weight The Ministry of Economy, Industry and Commerce (MEIC) is in charge of regulating the information that must be included in product labelling, and has also established a series of bylaws regarding product quality. This can be revised in Spanish at the website www.reglatec.go.cr (Source: Ortiz, P., Gonzalez, L., & Calderon, A. (2013). General considerations regarding imports and business opportunities in Costa Rica. Trinidad and Tobago Market Opportunities in Costa Rica, Module 2, 34.)

7.5 Temporary Entry With regard to commercial samples and advertising films, the only conditions that apply to temporary duty-free admission are that:  They be imported solely for the solicitation of orders for goods or services;  They should not be sold, leased or put to any use other than exhibition or demonstration while in the other territory;  They should be capable of identification when exported;  They should be exported within a period that is reasonably related to the purpose of the temporary admission;  They should be imported in no greater quantity than is reasonable for its intended use. Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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If a good is temporarily admitted duty-free and does not fulfil all the required conditions, the Costa Rica may impose the following measures:  The customs duty and any other charge on the good that would be owed on entry or final importation of such good;  Any criminal, civil or administrative sanction that the circumstances determine. (Source: Trade Agreement: https://www.ttbizlink.gov.tt/trade/tnt/cmn/pdf/CARICOM%20Costa%20Rica%20Free%20Trade%20Act-81.10.pdf Page 20, Chap.81:10)

7.6 Customs Regulations The Customs and Excise Division of the Ministry of Finance and the Economy is responsible for approving all exports emanating from Trinidad and Tobago. To export commercial goods, the exporter is required to have a customs broker fill out the required documentation. Commercial and non-commercial exporters must also perform the following actions:  Fill out a Customs Declaration Form (C82 Form) in four copies, which is provided by your broker;  Submit the C82 Form along with other required documents (see below) to a customs officer at a Customs and Excise office for signature;  Take the signed C82 Form and the goods to be exported to the Import/Export station from which the goods are to be exported. The basic documents required for exporting are as follows:  Invoice showing the price paid locally  Export licence (where applicable)  Certificate of origin (where applicable) Please contact the Customs and Excise Division for further information. See Section 10.0. TTBizLink and Single Electronic Window (SEW) A Certificate of Origin can be obtained via the TTBizLink is a Single Electronic Window (SEW) which is a secure user-friendly online platform which gives real time approvals to more than twenty five different e-government business and trade related services. It allows individuals to complete application forms online and includes the upload of supporting documentation. Once submitted, these documents are automatically routed to various agencies responsible for processing and approvals. Notifications on the status of applications are sent to applicants via email and if requested via mobile text. Please see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMLRApTwEL0 for TTBizlink Certificate of Origin Training Manual Video

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The TTBizlink Process Map is as follows:

SECTION 8.0: TRADE EVENTS In Costa Rica, some of the annual trade events are as follows: Event Sintercafe Food & Beverage: Coffee www.sintercafe.com Expocomer 2015 Regional Trade Show in Central America www.expocomer.com

Location

Date

Real InterContinental November 12-15, 2014 Hotel & Club Tower

Exphore Central American Hotel Industry Trade Show www.exphore.com Expoferretera Building Construction 1. www.expoferretera.com

Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

Panama

March 11-14, 2015

Heredia

June 16-18, 2015

Heredia

May 29-31, 2015

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SECTION 9.0: FINANCING EXPORTS TO COSTA RICA exporTT Limited provides co-financing options (50% reimbursement) for the following market access activities: a. Product Registration b. Trademark Registration c. Product Testing d. Translation & Interpretation Services e. Legal representation for product, brand and trademark registration f. Booth rental at trade shows g. Business to business matchmaking services h. Shipping of samples i. In-store marketing and promotions j. Booth design at trade shows k. Ground transportation for exporTT led groups at trade missions and trade shows l. Brand registration m. Label modification n. Registration at international capacity building forum/workshop Please contact the following person or any other exporTT representative for more information on these services: Mr. Crisen Maharaj Manager- Capacity Building and Programme Financing exporTT Limited 151B Charlotte Street Port of Spain Tel.: (868) 623-5507 Ext. 362 Fax: (868) 625-8126 Mobile: (868) 796-4276 Email: cmaharaj@exportt.co.tt Website: www.exportt.co.tt In addition to local banks, to obtain information on financing exports to Costa Rica, please contact: Mr. Shaun Waldron Manager, Credit & Business Development Export Import Bank of Trinidad & Tobago Limited #30 Queen's Park West, Port of Spain Phone: 1-(868)-628-2762 Ext. 288 Fax: 1-(868) -628-9370 Email: swaldron@eximbanktt.com Website: www.eximbanktt.com Market Guide for Exporting Goods from Trinidad and Tobago to Costa Rica

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SECTION 10.0: USEFUL CONTACTS 10.1 Trinidad and Tobago Office

Contact Information Ms. Camille James Senior Export Officer

exporTT Limited

Procomer: Export Promotion Agency of Costa Rica (in Trinidad & Tobago)

Embassy of the Republic of Costa Rica

Customs & Excise Division

151B Charlotte Street Port of Spain Tel.: (868) 624-7171 Ext. 225 Fax: (868) 625-8126 Mobile: (868) 367-3165 Email: cjames@exportt.co.tt Website: www.exportt.co.tt Mrs. Sheri Joséph CARICOM Office

c/o Solus Business Centre, 29 Long Circular Road, St. James, Trinidad & Tobago, W.I. Tel: (868) 822-6085 Fax: (868) 822-6051 Email: sderry@procomer.com Website: www.procomer.com Embassy of the Republic of Costa Rica His Excellency Ambassador for the Republic of Costa Rica Edgar García Miranda #38 Carlos Street Woodbrook Phone: 628- 9601; 628-8775 Fax: 628-9203 Email: embrctt1@tstt.net.tt Customs and Excise Division Ministry of Finance Custom House Nicholas Court Cor. Abercromby Street and Independence Square Port of Spain Phone: (868) 625-3311-9 Ext 335-8

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Shipping Agencies

Translation Services

Shipping Association of Trinidad & Tobago 15 Scott Bushe Street, Port of Spain Phone: (868)625-2388, (868)623-3355 Fax: (868)623-8570 Email: om@shipping.co.tt Web: http://shipping.co.tt/member%20search.php?id=1&page=1 A list of official translation and interpreting agencies approved by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Trinidad and Tobago can be found in Appendix III.

10.2 Costa Rica Office

Contact Information

Crecex (Costa Rican Chamber of Importers)

Procomer: Export Promotion Agency of Costa Rica (in Costa Rica)

Embassy of Trinidad & Tobago in Costa Rica

Centro de Asesoría para el Comercio Exterior (CACEX) Address: Escazú, Teléfono: + (506) 800-PROCOMER/(800-7762-6637) /(506) 2505-4700 Fax: + (506) 2505-4971 Email: info@procomer.com Website: www.procomer.com Ms. Candice Shade Encargada de Negocios a.i. Embajada de la República de Trinidad y Tobago San José Costa Rica Tel: (506) 2231–0809 Fax: (506) 2231-1244

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Customs Agent

CINDE: Costa Rican Investment Promotion Agency

Costa Rican Chamber of Commerce

Attorney

Attorney

For sanitary product registration

For product labelling

Sr. Francisco Acosta Fresno Presidente Dos Mil D.C Asesores Aduaneros S.A. Apartado Postal 1400-1000, San José Telephone: 011–506–2223–2481 Mobile: 011–506–8383–5055 Email: francisco@dosmildc.com

CINDE San José Ph.: (506) 2201-2800 Fax: (506) 2201-2867 Email: invest@cinde.org Web: http://www.cinde.org/en/ Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce® Phone +506 2220-2200 +506 2220-2200 Fax +506 2220-2300 Email chamber@amcham.co.cr Website: http://www.amcham.co.cr/ Batalla Abogados Costa Rica T +506 2280 8880 F +506 2280 7543 www.batalla.cr Lupita Quintero Nassar Abogados (Unimark) Email: info@unimarkcr.com Tel: (506) 2257 2929 Cell: (506) 8911 3063 Ministry of Health Ministerio de Salud de Costa Rica http://www.ministeriodesalud.go.cr

Órgano de Reglamentación Técnica (ORT) http://www.reglatec.go.cr/

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For trade of animals and animal products

For Standards and conformity assessment

Ministry of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica

Costa Rica Export & Import Directory 2014

Servicio Nacional de Salud Animal (SENASA) Telephone: (506) 2587 1600, 2260 8300 Email: info@senasa.go.cr http://www.senasa.go.cr/ Instituto de Normas TĂŠcnicas de Costa Rica (INTECO) http://www.inteco.or.cr/

Address: EscazĂş Telephone: (506) 2505-4000 Website: www.comex.go.cr/ http://virtual.directorioscostarica.com/doc/directorios-costarica/directorio-de-exportadores-e-importadores-de-costa-rica2014/2013102201/1.html#0

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Appendices


Appendix I – Buyers & Distributors (This list represents only a sample of distribution companies operating in Costa Rica, and are associated with the Chamber of Commerce of Costa Rica.) Food and Beverage Company

Representative

Telephone

Alimentos Gourmet S.A.

Lyda Feoli Luconi

25242800

Casildo Camareno

22130000

1 km oeste y 100 norte del Hospital Psiquiatrico en Pavas

Alejandra Ramirez

22222090

Avenida 3,calles 18 y 20 San José

BAIT FISH

Kevin Castillo Lizano

26614186

Puntarenas, 200 E de la Terminal del Ferry en barrio del Carmen

Cadena de Detallistas

Karen Rodriguez Tenorio

22904774

San José, La Uruca 200 norte de la Capris

Calvo Distribuidora Alimentaria CR S.A.

María Rodriguez

22586161

Los Yoses,de la esq. SO de la Iglesia de Fatima,100E, 50S, 3era casa mano izquierda,Ladrillo

Sergio Vindas

24376785

Luis Gerardo Buitrago

22510390

Alimentos Heinz de Costa Rica S.A. Almacén Salvador Ramírez S.A.

Colombina Comproim S.A. Constenla S.A. Corporación Megadock S.A.

Address San José, San Pedro, Los Yoses, Avenida 10 calle 37 bis oficina Inteligente

Heredia, carretera Llorente de Flores del Lagar 200 N. 1ra entrada mano der. San José, San Rafael Arriba de Desamparados, atras de la Escuela M Pavas, Rincón Grande, 800 N° O 9 de DEMASA, antiguas instalaciones de

Rocio Azofeifa

22616918

Fabio Calderón

22645000

Uruca, frente a Recauchadora Gigante.

22910095

San José, Pavas, Condominio Industrial Pavas Local 10

Carlos Loo Fernandez


San José, Barrio México, de Torre Mercedes 300 N, 100 O y 75 N San José, De la sede central de la Cruz Roja 75 sur contiguo a TULE

DELCAM

Julio Flores

22481556

Detallistas Unidos S.A

Manuel Bogantes Madrigal

22227766

DIANA

Marco Vinicio Alvarez

22261211

Zapote, 100 sur, 300 este Autos Bohio

DISPAL

Mainor Lizano

22931224

Zona Franca Metropolitana, Barreal de Heredia,Edificio 2B

Distribuidora Panal S.A.

Luis Chacón

22408808

Cuatro Reinas de Tibas, de la Fabrica Metalco, 800 oeste

DSM Nutritional Products

Manuel Carrillo Phillips

22615502

Zona Franca Zeta, La Valencia de Heredia

Ileana Gamboa

22333344

FTZ Coca-Cola Service Company Ltda. Grupo Pampa S.A. IMDILUZA SRL

María Cecilia Carnevale Martinez Luis Arnoldo Elizondo Morún

22930101 22943662

Kraft Foods Costa Rica

Steven Sabo

22046000

LAICA

Sandra Vega Herrera

22846000

Mandarina Tropical Juice Bar Sigma Alimentos Costa Rica S.A.

Neisen Jaim Riascos Arango Carlos López Delgado

88965292 24422627

San José, Uruca, de la Plaza de Deportes de la Uruca, 200 metros Es Radial a Belen,del puenteSaenz sobre el río virilla, 100 N y 1K O, contiguo Milano San José, Ipís, Goicoechea, 25 S de la Iglesia los Ángeles frente a AY San José, Santa Ana, Parque Empresarial Forum 1, Edificio G, Piso 8 Barrio Tournón, detrás del Ministerio de Trabajo, Edificio Azul Heredia de la Burguer King 50N y 150 O Ed. Plaza Oficina 2do piso en el Roble 4 km oeste delModerna Aeropuerto Juan#9Santamaria, de Alajuela


Building Materials and Hardware Company

Representative

Telephone

Address

Abonos Agro S.A.

Maikol Lopez

22129300

Calle 16 y 18 Av 3, a 100 mts norte terminal de la coca cola. bodega 9

Compañía Exim Euroiberoamericana S.A.

Allan Cordero.

22358383

Moravia Los Colegios, del Colegio San Francis 125 sur frente al Cementerio de Moravia

Consorcio Ferretero de San José Armando Salazar Miranda S.A

22052525

San José, Pozos Santa Ana 200 E de la entrada principal de Hules Tecnicos San José, San Sebastián, 200 metros Norte de la Iglesia Catolica.

Depósito de Materiales de Construcción Irazú San Sebastián, S.A.

Alexander Barquero Sanchez

22864040

Ferretería Americana Latin América S.A

Guillermo Aguilar Jiménez

22402754

Moravia, 100 norte, 150 oeste BCR

Grupo Samboro G.S S.A.

Greivin Flores Vargas

22600606

100 oeste de la Antigua Fosforera, San Pablo de Heredia

Hidrotica S.A. Imacasa Costa Rica S.A.

Edith Jazmin Sibaja José Chacón Céspedes

22249778 22932780

La Casa del Fontanero S.A.

Luis Ulate Ulate

22470707

Guadalupe, 200 este de la Iglesia Catolica Barreal de Heredia 1 Km este de Cenada Multicomercial Bade Bodega 53 San José, La Florida De Tibas, Del Plantel Del Ice 250 Este

Reposa Distribuidora Superba S.A. El Guadalupano S.A.

Polly García Pérez Henry Castillo Joaquin Valverde

22724066 22551044 22242244

San José, Curridabat, 200 N del Servicentro la galera 200 oeste de Antigua Matra 100 norte de la Iglesia Catolica de Guadalupe

El Lagar S.A.

Victor Ortiz Martinez

22179400

Calle 16 y 18 Av 3, a 100 mts norte terminal de la coca cola

Espejos El Mundo S.A. Ferretería EPA S.A. Ferretería Reimers Torcasa

Julio Zúñiga Sergio Tirado Johel E. Morales Vega Ali Cantillo

22934961 25881122 22119553 22216363

300 mts norte del Cenada en Barreal de Heredia Carretera Santa Ana, 300 mts antes del Peaje La Uruca de la plaza de deportes 200 O San José avenida 10, calle 14 y 16


Torneca S.A.

Diego Garcia Ortiz

22077777

Valvulas y Conexiones Urrea S.A.

Oscar Coto

22522222

San José, Uruca, 400 mts Oeste de la plaza de deportes, Edificio color gris, contiguo al Banco BCR al Centro Comercial San José, Hatillo Centro, Frente Plaza América.

Supermarkets and Convenience Stores Company AM/PM Auto Mercado Corporación de Supermercados Unidos Sociedad Anónima GESSA

Representative Victor H. Rodríguez German Campos B. Alberto Ebrard Casaubon

Telephone 22582626 22615250

Address Calle 19, Av. 8, Casa 1912 San José, Calle 5 y 3, Avenida 3. Edificio Victoria 4to Piso

25825159

San José, Santa Ana Forum 2

Cristian Morales

22472300

De los Tribunales en Goicoechea 200 oeste, 100 norte y 25 este

Megasuper

Ricardo Visbal

22461534

Cartago, Paraíso, 3 Km, carretera a Paraíso

Supermercado Compre Bien

Juan Pablo González Rojas

24530019

Marcos Barrantes Carlos Vega Chaverri José Luis Zavala Roberto Cascante

22211539 22213131 24305824 22587630

Alejandro Pérez Durán

22031540

Abastecedor Kopper S.A. Almacén El Gallito Almacén Popular Color Concepts Costa Rica S.A. Inversiones Oleajes de Costa Rica Bodeg. Lindora,en radial entre San Antonio Belén y Sta Ana,de la E/S Texaco Lindora,100 S.A

Alajuela, Palmares Centro, Detras del Mercado Municipal Cs.8 y 10, Av. 1, Costado Noroeste del mercado central, localBCR, esquinero rotulo Elcalles Rapido Frente Av 2da, entre 4y6 Diagonal Esquina noroeste del Mercado de Alajuela De Torre Mercedes 300 norte y 125 oeste antiguas Bodegas colgate#18

N,bodega #23


Electrical Appliances or Household Furniture, Lighting Equipment and Other Company

Representative

Telephone

Address

Agencias Básicas Mercantiles

Jampoll Van Der Laat

22219972

De Pizza Hut Paseo Colón, 100 N y 75 E

Alfredo Sasso R. Hijos S.A.

David Vilchez

22353611

San José, de Antojitos Tibas, 75 N, edificio Alfredo Sasso

Casa Blanca Comercializadora Grupo GEA S.A.

Philip Waugh

22428700

Gabriel Jaime Cardona.

22151953

ELMEC

Jorge Chaverry Ramirez

22511515

San José, La Uruca, 300 N de la Pozuelo, carretera a Guachipelin de Escazú,Heredia Bodegas Gualanday, 200 N del paso a desnivel frente a Multiplaza Desamparados, San Antonio, del Banco de Costa Rica 150 N., local a mano izquierda.

Euromobilia S.A.

Melvin Leiva

22963050

GRUPO SPC Hogar Feliz Juan Bansbach Instrumentos Musicales S.A. La Artistica Línea Estrella Internacional MICROTRONICS S.A.

Angela Salazar Salomon Akoka José A. Pérez Ericka Anderson Francisco Mack Durin Christian Padilla Sánchez

22153232 22890580 25227601 22235544 22222202 22408181

PANASONIC

Urbano Ayala

25092400

Teltron

Danny Fernandez

22330255

Tienda Lyra S.A.

Cecilia Quiros Jimenez.

22931798

UNICOMER S.A.

Hector Garcia Gomez

24403282

600 O. de Canal 7, Carretera Principal a Pavas frente a tanque SNA, edificio blanco Parque Industrial de Guachipelin, 200 norte y 100 este Avenida Central, Frente a Mainieri Aronne San José, 50 este ,100 norte del Cine Capri Avenida Segunda, 50 este de la CCSS Av. 10, entre Calle 1 y 3 Edificio Starline. Sn Miguel de Sto.Domingo de Heredia, Fte. a la entrada dePlaza Riteve, a Guápiles 2 km oeste de de carret. los Deportes, San Antonio de Belén San José, 50 sur del Banco Popular en Avenidas 4 y 6, calle 1 100 oeste de la Escuela de Barreal de Heredia, Multicomercial Baden Bodega # 46 Heredia, 250 Sur de la UNA, Ofic Centrales Curacao


Motor Vehicles Company Agencia Datsun S.A. Auto Fácil de Costa Rica S.A. Auto Sasa S.A. Autos Xiri Peugeot

Representative William Arguedas Mario Arana García German Salazar Randy Xirinachs

Subarú VEINSA

Mario Fernández Gurdían Alvaro Ramirez

Telephone 22900505 22275597 22571455 22603939 22216116 22020100

Address Sábana Norte, San José, Frente a Grupo Taca Centro Comercial del Sur, 3er piso, locales 12 y 13 Costado oeste de la Torre Mercedes, Paseo Colón 200m norte de Jardines del Recuerdo, Carretera a Barreal San José, La Uruca,de 200Heredia E de la Plaza de Deportes Carretera Curridabat, Diagonal al Indor Club

Parts and Accessories for Motor Vehicles Company Alpine Properties S.A Autocamiones de Costa Rica Auto Cori S.A.

Representative

Telephone

Address

Oscar Villalobos Orozco

22401949

300m oeste y 10 sur de Pizza Hut, Tibas, San José

Alexander Selva

22348444 22215523

150 oeste, 75 sur de La Iglesia Católica de Sabanilla, Calle La Españolita La Ribera de Belén, 13 km, sobre la autopista General Cañas San José, Calle Blancos 200 O del Banco Nacional La Ribera de Belén, 13 km, sobre la autopista General Cañas CC plaza del oeste, frente la Embajada Américana, frente al Banco Nacional

BEA-Z5 Internacional S.A. Bridgestone Firestone de Costa Luis Rodríguez Meléndez Alejandro Cortes Rica Bridgestone Firestone de Costa Rosita Zumbado Rica Distribuidora S.A de Repuestos del Geovanny Lobo Oeste S.A. Europartes Vega S.A. J. Llinas B. Sucesores Ltda

Diana Chacon Vieto Joaquin Llinas Ruiz

22097300 22097372 22968362 22237733

Barrio Lujan. 100 E del costado norte de las Oficinas Centrales del PANI

22216474

San José, del Mercado Borbón, 100 norte y 75 este frete a un parqueo


La Casa de las Baterías en Costa Rica S.A. Lazaro Feinzilber Sucesores S.A.

Jessica Vilanova

Ricardo Viquez

22581090

22570220

San José, Costado Oeste del Parque Cañas frente a la estación del Ferrocarril al Pacifico De la Bomba la Castellana, 150 Oeste frente a bodegas de la Universal

LO JACK Mayorista de Llantas S.A.

Alberto Rojas Hugo Lopez Barrientos

22274227 22353331

San José, Pavas, Rohrmoser, 450 N de la Embajada San José, Tibás,Americana de Metalco, 200 S y 150 O

Navemar S.A.

Carlos Valverde Avalos

22832430

De la Iglesia de Montes de Oca, 600 sur y 75 oeste, Edificio Colina, 2do Piso.

Rafael Pinto y Compañia S.A.

Raúl Méndez Molina

22102660

La Uruca del Almacén Font, 200 norte, Edificio Castrol

Repuestos Conejo S.A.

Ronald Mora Sanabria

22573339

Av. 10, Calle 8 y 10, Frente Bomba La Castellana

Super Baterias

Ándres Cepedes S

22195454

San José, San Antonio de Desamparados, de la Cruz Roja 100 N

Motorcycle Parts and Accessories Company Joaquin R. Trejos M. LTDA Moto World CR Corporation S.A. YAMAHA Deportes de la Uruca

Representative Maria Alexandra Trejos Brenes Luis Biord Castillo Fernandez

Telephone

Seidy Rodriguez

22115900

22280031 22822989

Address Centro Comercial Trejos Montealegre, San Rafael de Escazú diagonal a Banco HSBC San José, Santa Ana, 800 Este de Forum contiguo a Expoceramica autopista Prospero 300 este de la Plaza de los


Textiles, Clothing and Footwear Company

Representative

Telephone

Address

Comercial S & S S.A.

Jaime Sabah

22233636

San José, 50 oeste de la esquina suroeste Mercado Central, en la tienda Telas y Colores

Flexi

Geovanny Alfaro H

22153405

Rotonda Multiplaza Escazú, 1.4 Km, frente a colegio Bluevalley, Bodega número 9

22967215

Aldonero Almacén Antonio Gazel S.A. Almacenes Simán S.A.

Ervin Rojas Marvin Bermúdez Mesén Elias Manuel Gazel Jop Magaly Castillo

Alvaro Rosabal S.A.

Alvaro Rosabal Oller

22374617

Armi Pronto Bkul

John Cardenas Mora

22616118

Eugenia Perez Briceño

22237857

Adoc de Costa Rica S.A.

Boutique Garper

22820517 22223000 25053300

Frente a las instalaciones de Repretel en la Uruca Santa Ana de la Estación de Servicio Total, 50 norte primer piso La Favorita Del Mercadoedificio CentralMilan 50 Oeste, Edificio San José, Escazu, Centro Comercial Multiplaza Escazú, 5ta Etapa. Heredia, Diagonal Esquina noroeste del Mercado Municipal, calle 2 Av 6 Lagunilla Heredia 400 O, 250N De Jardines Del Recuerdo.Bodegas Inmobilidaria Emanuel #11 Y 12 San José, Avenida Primera, Calle 0 y 2, diagonal al Banco HSBC en Boutique Garper

CEMACO

Andrea Meltzer

22963711

350 oeste de canal 7, Sabana

Eurotrends Costa Rica S.A.

Octavio Sotela

22015678

Guachipelin de Escazú, de la 1er antigua rot. de Multiplaza 800 Nor.o ofib. Capri Bod#15

Francisco Llobet E Hijos S.A.

Mario José Crespo

24422200

Frente Banco de Costa Rica Alajuela

Happy Hill of Costa Rica S.A.

Natalia Llobet Montelagre

22311254

San José, Uruca, 300 O de Repretel contiguo a las Bodegas de SU PAPEL

Importadora Ditaires S.A.

Sandra Poveda

22562211

San José, 75 O del Antiguo Cine California, edificio Sasso tercer piso


Inversiones I.C.M. Cosiri

Israel Cruz Martin

22912149

Uruca, de la Pozuelo 300 N., 100 E., Bodegas San Marino Local 2

Mainieri Aronne y Cía S.A.

Diana Mainieri Salazar

22221041

Avenida Central, Frente a la Universal

Pasoca S.A.

Uriel Villalta Mora

22722714

Villas de Ayarco, 1 Km antes del peaje a cartago

Pequeño Mundo

Joséph Joséph Saidy

22801200

Curridabat, frente al Supermercado AMPM

Sastrería Scaglietti S.A. Tienda La Gloria Tiendas Carrión S.A.

Hugo Fernando Blanca Corrales Scaglietti Lines Fausto Portillo

22552866 22222224 22395261

San José, Costado este del Banco Central San José Centro, frente al Banco Costa Rica Heredia, Dentro del Mall Real Cariari

Tiendas Simán

Ana Laura Madrigal

25053300

Multiplaza Escazú, 5ta. Etapa, oficinas Siman

Yamuni

Agustin Carvajal

22272222

200 norte de la Iglesia de San Sebastian

Machinery and Equipment Company

Telephone

CICADEX

Representative Gustavo Fernández Mauro José Miranda

Flotec S.A.

Mauricio Moreira

22215559

FONT

Hugo Arroyo

22969010

1km norte de L&S en la URUCA, y 75 norte del Ebais León XIII. 100 este de la Pozuelo la Uruca

Fursys de Costa Rica

Catalina Triana Bernal

22569595

San José, La Uruca, de Faco 100 O frente a la Bomba Shell

MAFISA

Debra Ureña

22535320

150 oeste de los Tribunales de Justicia, Guadalupe

Medica Yin de Costa Rica S.A.

Clara María Ruin Yin

22181826

PBS CR

Jorge Aguilar Arias

25063131

Almacén Mauro S.A.

25496000 22403600

Address Centro Comercial Sabana Sur, detrás de oficentro la Sabana 325 este de la Municipalidad de Tibas

San Fco. de Dos Ríos, del Motel La Fuente 150 S. y 25 E. tiene rotulo. Escazú, Autopista Prospero Fernandez del primer peaje 600 O calle paralela


Rem S.A.

José Valverde Retana.

22202324

Suplidora de Belleza Kanddy

Gaston Guardia Zuñiga

22484458

Del Hospital México, 350 oeste contiguo al taller 3R la Uruca San José, del Hospital Nacional de Niños 100 O y 150 S a mano derecha

Stationery Company

Representative Fernando Herrera Stevanovich Marcos A. Vásquez Muñoz

Telephone

Libreria Internacional

Mario Negrini

22203015

Productos Ampo S.A. Promocionar

Yalile Arce Soto Hermes Torres Suencun

22346868 25201012

H Y H Distribuciones S.A. Jiménez y Tanzi S.A.

22449179 22161023

Address Heredia, Santa Rosa de Santo Domingo, de la Guardia Rural 700 Noroeste Guadalupe, del cruce de Ipis, 2.8 K al Este, edificio color crema Rohmoser Frente a 2da etapa de Plaza Mayor,, contiguo al Fogoncito. Detrás del Pali de Lourdes de Montes de Oca San José, Sabana Norte del Chicote 100 N y 10 O

Pharmaceutical, Medical and Personal Care Products Company

Representative

Telephone

AVON

Paola Chaverri Picado

22894949

Botica San José

Liliana Peña Ovares

22221270

Corporación Cefa S.A Dirbel Inversiones S.A. Distribuidora Ancla S.A.

Jorge Julio Araya Maria Elena Mikly Flores Juventino Rodríguez Corrella

25190000 22019600 22342248

Address De la parte trasera de la Iglesia Católica de San Antonio de Escazú, 200 norte San José, 50 noroeste del costado norte del mercado central Calle 6, Av 1ª y 3ª De la Embajada de Estados Unidos, Pavas 200 sur 75 este San José, Escazú, Plaza Roble, Edificio las Terrazas 3er Piso Curridabat de Montesacro 150 este, frenta a sauter o la par de subway


Farmacia Chavarría S.A. FARMED

Cindy Rodriguez VíctorRamirez Ruiz Pacheco

22085500 22725959

San José, Pavas, contiguo al AyA, Frente a Gollo Zapote, de la Toyota 150 E, portones de color gris mano izquierda en frente a Iglesia China Zona Industrial Pavas, 175 sur de la Iglesia Maria Reina

IGT Latinoamerica S.A.

Ana Ruth Cordero Vargas

25200898

Importaciones Clio S.A.

Ofelia De León Chinchilla

22978080

Moravia 25 oeste del BAC San José, Frente a Pequeño Mundo

Inversiones Farmacéuticas Santa Lucía S.A.

Alonso Saborio Rodríguez

24400404

Alajuela Centro, 50 S. de la Cúpula de la Catedral

Ingrid Thompson

25270727

San Pedro, de la Escuela Franklin Roosvelt, 100 este

Luis Contreras

26660100

Guanacaste, Liberia, 4km S del Banco CITI

Jorge Robledo.

25209005

San José, La Uruca 50 S del Puente J.Pablo Segundo

Wilbert Rosales Gomez

22577557

San José, Paseo Colón, de la Toyota, 300 Sur, 50 Oeste, Edificio Oriflame

Multiservicios Electromédicos S.A. Natural Aloe de Costa Rica S.A. Omnilife de Costa Rica S.A. ORIFLAME Perfumes Fraiche ZERMAT

Cindy Brenes Guiselle del Río Padilla

22489796 25274404

Tram. Contiguo Alm. Salvador Ramirez, Cobro, 200 S de la Junta de Prot. Social San José, Zapote, 125 E de la Iglesia Católica


Appendix II – Employing Staff in the Market HUMAN RESOURCES I. Minimum Monthly Wages Minimum Wage in US$ Job Position

Non-qualified worker Semi-qualified worker Qualified worker High School level technicians Specialized worker College Technicians Associate Degree Bachelor Degree (University) "Licenciatura" Degree

Minimum Wage in Colones a/

257,220 277,074 291,516 310,413 332,647 382,550 413,168 468,630 562,376

Minimum Wage

Plus Mandatory Benefits b/

Per Hour Estimation c/

Per Hour Estimation, plus Mandatory Benefits

509.9 549.2 577.9 615.3 659.4 758.3 819.0 929.0 1114.8

703.4 757.7 797.2 848.9 909.7 1046.1 1129.9 1281.5 1537.9

2.44 2.63 2.77 2.95 3.16 3.64 3.93 4.45 5.34

3.37 3.63 3.82 4.07 4.36 5.02 5.42 6.14 7.37

Exchange rate: US$ 1 = 504.46 colones Source: Ministry of Labor and Social Security, October 2013 Notes a/: The legal minimum wage is the minimum that the employer must pay the employee for his work. It is fixed by the Minimum Wages Act, which automatically adjusts previous wages that were lower than the new stipulated minimum. b/: Includes social/medical/fringe benefits, workers compensation insurance and Mandatory Christmas Bonus: 37.95%. Does not includes accounting provision of severance pay for Employersponsored workers Association. c/: Estimated salary per worked hour, with 8 hour workdays and 6-day weeks.

II. Minimum Daily Wages Minimum Wage in US$ Job Position

Non - qualified worker Semi - qualified worker Qualified worker

Minimum Wage in Colones a/

8,619 9,384 9,565

Minimum Wage

Plus Mandatory Benefits b/

Per Hour Estimation c/

Per Hour Estimation, plus Mandatory Benefits

17.1 18.6 19.0

23.6 25.7 26.2

2.1 2.3 2.4

2.9 3.2 3.3


Specialized worker

11,464

22.7

31.3

2.8

3.9

Exchange rate: US$ 1 = 504.46 colones Source: Ministry of Labor and Social Security, Second Semester 2013 Notes a/: Minimum Daily wages are considered possible for the following sectors: Agriculture, Mining, Manufacturing, Industry, Construction, Electricity, Commerce, Tourism, General Services, Transportation, and Storage. b/: Includes social/medical/fringe benefits, workers compensation insurance and Mandatory Christmas Bonus: 34.5%. Does not includes accounting provision of severance pay for Employersponsored workers Association. c/: Estimated salary per worked hour, with 8 hour workdays.

III. Average Salaries in the Manufacturing Sector

Job Position

Production Manager SR Maintenance Manager Quality Control/Product Develop. Mgr Production Manager Operations Manager Purchasing Manager Plant Manager Head of Technical Department Head of Systems Support Systems Engineer Plant and Process Engineer SR Head of Purchasing Department Quality Engineer SR Technical Engineer Head of Operations/Logistics Maintenance Engineer SR Head of Maintenance Plant and Process Engineer Programming Analyst Quality Engineer Process Quality Supervisor Import/Export Coordinator

Monthly Average (US$)

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a)

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b)

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c)

8,011.9 6,010.5 5,914.1 5,572.1 5,502.8 5,440.3 5,056.7 3,473.1 3,201.3 3,117.3 2,892.8 2,828.8 2,821.8 2,497.2 2,305.1 2,287.5 2,257.4 2,072.2 2,026.9 1,866.4 1,859.7 1,858.0

7,415.8 4,626.3 4,515.5 4,353.6 4,065.2 4,301.1 4,398.9 3,062.5 2,656.1 2,544.4 2,545.9 2,210.7 2,340.1 1,902.1 1,340.8 1,970.1 1,846.3 1,778.6 1,596.7 1,531.6 1,633.7 1,411.2

8,427.5 6,822.7 6,832.8 6,779.4 6,395.5 6,279.7 5,532.8 3,628.9 3,648.5 3,508.6 3,194.1 3,347.7 3,112.5 3,112.5 2,891.5 2,672.2 2,615.1 2,322.9 2,306.2 2,094.2 2,104.4 2,190.2

135.5 101.7 100.0 94.2 93.1 92.0 85.5 58.7 54.1 52.7 48.9 47.8 47.7 42.2 39.0 38.7 38.2 35.0 34.3 31.6 31.5 31.4


Plant and Process Engineer JR Material Supervisor Head of Production Control Quality Engineer JR Electromechanic Mechanic / Electrician Electrician Quality Control Assistant Milling Machine/Lathe Operator Equipment Operator/Technician Head of Production Process Specialized Technician Boiler Operator Specialized Plant Operator Basic Machine Operator Non-Specialized Plant Operator

1,548.3 1,252.9 1,177.3 1,161.1 1,058.6 1,033.3 991.0 985.4 981.6 968.6 946.0 885.1 786.1 684.0 583.8 548.6

1,324.1 936.0 977.0 843.1 968.8 931.2 837.7 800.3 723.4 827.4 805.0 654.8 715.6 620.5 519.0 507.6

1,744.4 1,420.0 1,409.2 1,457.0 1,201.0 1,110.0 1,199.1 1,145.7 1,177.4 1,062.2 1,061.0 1,050.9 856.5 710.5 595.1 551.5

26.2 21.2 19.9 19.6 17.9 17.5 16.8 16.7 16.6 16.4 16.0 15.0 13.3 11.6 9.9 9.3

Source: PriceWaterhouseCoopers Costa Rica. Survey for the Second Semester 2013 Data for Multinational Companies Exchange rate for calculations: US$1 = 506.02 colones Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + nonmandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary

IV. Average Salaries in the Services Sector A. Average Wages for Contact Centers

Job Position

Monthly Average (US$)

Information Systems Manager Contact Center Operations Mgr Contact Center Quality Mgr. Area Services Manager

6,168.1 4,883.3 3,581.0 3,361.2

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a) 4,899.6 3,856.1 3,160.9 2,930.6

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b) 7,223.0 5,532.3 4,078.6 3,674.3

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c) 104.3 82.6 60.6 56.9


Technical Support Contact Center Agent SR - English Workforce Coordinator Trilingual Agent SR Training Coordinator Contact Center Quality Coordinator Contact Center Team Leader SR Agent Bilingual - English Technical Support Contact Center Agent - English Trainer Contact Center Quality Inspector Technical Support Contact Center Agent JR Spanish Agent SR Intermediate Agent Bilingual English JR Agent Bilingual - English

2,230.0

1,764.7

2,446.8

37.7

1,919.4 1,857.9 1,856.9

1,736.4 1,808.9 1,649.4

2,100.1 1,907.9 2,134.9

32.5 31.4 31.4

1,731.6

1,484.4

1,942.0

29.3

1,551.7 1,425.9

1,346.3 1,250.3

1,682.7 1,535.6

26.2 24.1

1,397.4

1,349.6

1,510.3

23.6

1,360.8

1,171.8

1,457.6

23.0

1,331.5

1,185.7

1,414.0

22.5

1,045.2

920.4

1,123.9

17.7

1,042.5

975.5

1,137.5

17.6

1,040.5

972.7

1,083.3

17.6

905.3

838.6

924.8

15.3

Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + nonmandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary

B. Average Wages for Shared Services/ Back Office

Job Position Shared Services Manager Human Resources Manager Area Services Manager Data Base Administrator Shared Services Supervisor Shared Services Team Leader

Monthly Average (US$) 8,574.5 5,725.1 3,361.2 2,951.4 2,809.8 2,386.2

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a) 7,481.8 4,483.3 2,930.6 2,336.5 2,437.0 2,073.8

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b) 9,239.8 6,831.4 3,674.3 3,480.7 3,175.8 2,720.6

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c) 145.0 96.8 56.9 49.9 47.5 40.4


SR Finance Analyst SR Human Resources Analyst Shared Service Analyst SR SR Technology Analyst JR Purchasing Clerk Statistician JR Technology Analyst Shared Services Assistant JR Finance Analyst JR Human Resources Analyst Shared Service Analyst JR

1,805.4 1,787.8 1,721.4 1,714.4 1,627.1 1,467.8 1,183.7 1,152.3 1,148.6 1,111.4 1,086.5

1,507.8 1,563.7 1,463.8 1,437.7 1,163.8 1,428.9 1,068.6 1,037.5 1,004.8 1,025.6 948.6

2,060.4 1,930.9 1,891.5 1,884.0 1,801.2 1,599.4 1,275.5 1,225.9 1,284.5 1,174.6 1,166.8

30.5 30.2 29.1 29.0 27.5 24.8 20.0 19.5 19.4 18.8 18.4

Source: PriceWaterhouseCoopers Costa Rica. Survey for the Second Semester 2013 Data for Multinational Companies Exchange rate for calculations: US$1 = 506.02 colones Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + non-mandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary C. Average Wages for IT Sector

Job Position Head of Software Development SR Business Consultant Head of Systems Support SR Architect Head of Projects / Analysis SR Software Developer Data Base Administrator Senior Financial Analyst SR Systems and Quality Control Engineer SR Technical Support Engineer JR Architect Software Developer Programming Analyst

3,785.5 3,556.0 3,201.3 3,123.1 3,008.2 2,989.9 2,951.4 2,929.3 2,712.0

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a) 3,335.1 3,054.9 2,656.1 2,667.9 2,476.9 2,619.0 2,336.5 2,358.9 2,290.1

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b) 4,206.0 4,549.4 3,648.5 3,600.4 3,557.2 3,239.0 3,480.7 3,425.5 2,985.0

2,467.4 2,323.3 2,231.1 2,026.9

2,051.4 2,213.4 1,894.4 1,596.7

2,844.6 2,390.7 2,580.8 2,306.2

Monthly Average (US$)

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c) 64.0 60.1 54.1 52.8 50.9 50.6 49.9 49.5 45.9 41.7 39.3 37.7 34.3


JR Business Consultant JR Software Developer Technical Support Engineer JR Systems and Quality Control Engineer JR Systems Analyst Statistician Support Technician JR Finance Analyst

1,925.9 1,738.4 1,646.7 1,639.1

1,692.6 1,325.0 1,387.3 1,391.4

2,123.8 1,920.9 1,867.5 1,875.6

32.6 29.4 27.9 27.7

1,634.1 1,467.8 1,209.2 1,148.6

1,387.3 1,428.9 1,024.7 1,004.8

1,819.8 1,599.4 1,351.5 1,284.5

27.6 24.8 20.5 19.4

Source: PriceWaterhouseCoopers Costa Rica. Survey for the Second Semester 2013 Data for Multinational Companies Exchange rate for calculations: US$1 = 506.02 colones Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + non-mandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary

D. Average Wages for Entertainment & Media Sector

Job Position Marketing Manager Head Marketing Supervisor SR Systems and Quality Control Engineer Public Relations Officer Software Developer Market Researcher Programming Analyst JR Software Developer JR Systems and Quality Control Engineer Programmer Technical Writer Graphics Designer Marketing Assistant

6,203.0 2,839.8 2,712.0

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a) 5,299.4 2,277.9 2,290.1

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b) 6,867.3 3,290.0 2,985.0

2,446.4 2,231.1 2,205.9 2,026.9 1,738.4 1,639.1

1,557.5 1,894.4 1,629.1 1,596.7 1,325.0 1,391.4

3,084.0 2,580.8 2,737.0 2,306.2 1,920.9 1,875.6

41.4 37.7 37.3 34.3 29.4 27.7

1,605.1 1,539.9 1,365.3 1,142.4

1,143.7 1,292.4 1,136.1 909.3

2,090.0 1,780.1 1,551.1 1,381.7

27.1 26.0 23.1 19.3

Monthly Average (US$)

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c) 104.9 48.0 45.9


Source: PriceWaterhouseCoopers, 2013viii Data for Multinational Companies Exchange rate for calculations: US$1 = 506.02 colones Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + non-mandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary

V. Average Salaries in Life Sciences Sector

Job Position Quality Control/Product Development Manager Production Manager Plant Manager Calibration Supervisor Microbiologist Laboratory Supervisor Purchasing Agent SR Plant and Process Engineer Quality Engineer Process Quality Supervisor Metrologist Customs Agent Calibration Technician Draftsman Technical Microbiologist Electronic Technician Electrician Milling Machine/Lathe Operator Specialized Technician Laboratory Assistant Specialized Plant Operator Basic Machine Operator

Monthly Average (US$)

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a)

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b)

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c)

5,914.1

4,515.5

6,832.8

100.0

5,572.1 5,056.7 2,878.1 2,343.9 2,147.7 2,128.5 2,072.2 1,866.4 1,859.7 1,546.0 1,201.2 1,185.0 1,045.2 1,032.2 1,007.5 991.0

4,353.6 4,398.9 2,379.3 1,857.1 1,688.1 1,780.6 1,778.6 1,531.6 1,633.7 1,412.4 1,031.6 998.6 883.1 927.0 850.1 837.7

6,779.4 5,532.8 3,349.7 2,579.6 2,524.2 2,464.8 2,322.9 2,094.2 2,104.4 1,749.1 1,416.0 1,344.3 1,257.8 1,100.2 1,102.9 1,199.1

94.2 85.5 48.7 39.6 36.3 36.0 35.0 31.6 31.5 26.1 20.3 20.0 17.7 17.5 17.0 16.8

981.6

723.4

1,177.4

16.6

885.1 793.6 684.0 583.8

654.8 654.8 620.5 519.0

1,050.9 949.4 710.5 595.1

15.0 13.4 11.6 9.9


Non-Specialized Plant Operator

548.6

507.6

551.5

9.3

Source: PriceWaterhouseCoopers Costa Rica. Survey for the Second Semester 2013 Data for Multinational Companies Exchange rate for calculations: US$1 = 506.02 colones Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + non-mandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary

Other Average Salaries

Job Position General Manager Administrative and Finance Manager Business Manager Marketing Manager Finance Manager Information Systems Manager Quality Control/Product Develop. Manager Human Resources Manager Accounting Manager Business Unit Manager Project Manager Head of Information Systems SR Business Consultant Senior Credit Officer Administrator Trade Marketing Analyst Accountant Bilingual Secretary Research Assistant Administrative Assistant

14,746

Monthly 25th percentile (US$) (a) 9,636

Monthly 75th percentile (US$) (b) 17,420

6,407

6,027

6,521

108

6,212 6,203 6,183 6,168

6,200 5,299 4,941 4,900

7,282 6,867 7,143 7,223

105 105 105 104

5,914

4,516

6,833

100

5,725 4,758 4,391 4,336 3,649 3,556 2,196 1,829 1,825 1,311 1,185 1,033 1,022

4,483 3,976 2,569 3,268 2,783 3,055 1,062 1,525 1,519 1,150 1,063 843 765

6,831 5,436 6,115 5,353 3,935 4,549 3,664 2,081 2,008 1,494 1,273 953 1,150

97 80 74 73 62 60 37 31 31 22 20 17 17

Monthly Average (US$)

Total Annual Cost (US$'000) (c) 249


Bilingual Receptionist Janitor

786 567

692 514

833 587

13 10

Source: PriceWaterhouseCoopers Costa Rica. Survey for the First Semester 2013 Data for Multinational Companies Exchange rate for calculations: US$1 = 504.46 colones Notes a/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the first quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are under this value. b/: Monthly unloaded salaries corresponding to the third quartile; i.e. 25% of the wages are over this value. c/: Total labor annual cost = unloaded salary + mandatory cost (0.3795 x unloaded salary) + nonmandatory cost (0.0300 x unloaded salary) = 1.4095 x unloaded salary


Appendix III – Public Translators (Approved by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Trinidad and Tobago) 1)

Mr. Kelvin Hoskins #3 O’Connor Street, off Dickson Avenue, Diego Martin Tel: 352-2238/632-8286

2)

Ms. Doris Millan #42 Saddle Road, Maraval Tel: 753-0643/628-8414

Spanish

3)

Mr. Jaime Graells #28 Old Paddock Road, Blue Range, Diego Martin Tel: 759-5218/637-7140

4)

Mr. Luis Arreaza # 38 Carlos Street, Woodbrook Tel: 764-8683

Spanish, French

5)

Mr. Chantale Leonard-St. Clair Director (Ag.) Translation & Interpreting Services Unit Spanish, French, Portuguese, College of Science Technology and Applied Arts Dutch, German of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAAT) Tel: (868) 625 5030 Ext. 5270 Fax: (868) 627 5714 E-mail: cstclair@costaatt.edu.tt; pwilliams@costaatt.edu.tt

6)

Mr. David Coutisson Director THE ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE # 17 Alcazar Street, Port of Spain Tel: 622-6119/6728

7)

French

Eric Maitrejean CITB Coordinator Caribbean Interpretation & Translation Bureau University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus, St. Augustine Tel: 662-0758 Email: CITB@sta.uwi.edu

Spanish, French, Arabic


WORKS CITED Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Costa Rica Free Trade Act. Chapter 81:10. Trinidad and Tobago Business Link (ttbizlink.gov.tt): https://www.ttbizlink.gov.tt/trade/tnt/cmn/pdf/CARICOM%20Costa%20Rica%20Free%20Trade %20Act-81.10.pdf i

The World FactBook: Cost Rica https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/cs.html

T

World Bank Group. Ease of Doing Business in Costa Rica http://www.doingbusiness.org/data/exploreeconomies/costa-rica iii

International Business Publication (n.d). Costa Rica Export-Import Trade and Business Directory (Vol. 1, p. 205). USA: International Business Publications. iv

International Business Publications (2004). Costa Rica: Business Law Handbook Volume 1: Strategic and Practical Information. USA: International Business Publications, USA. v

Ortiz, P., Gonzalez, L., & Calderon, A. (2013). Trademark Registration and Product Registration: Trademark Registration and Product Registration. Trinidad and Tobago Market Opportunities in Costa Rica, Module 1, 3-3. vi

Minsterio de Salud (2014). Registro de Productors de InterĂŠs Sanitario. http://www.ministeriodesalud.go.cr/index.php/tramites/registro-de-productos-de-interessanitario vii

PriceWaterhouseCoopers Costa Rica (2014) Survey for the Second Semester 2013. Costa Rica Human Capital Cost (CINDE): www.cinde.org/en/download/216 viii

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Costa Rica Market Guide - October 2014  
Costa Rica Market Guide - October 2014  

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