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experiment in self reliance annual report 2017 — 2018


table of contents 2. Letter from our Directors 3. Self-Sufficiency 5. Housing Services 7. Forsyth Free Tax 9. New Century IDA 11. Road to Empowerment 12. Priority Schools Initiative 13. Place Matters 14. Outdoor Movie Series 15. Day of Service 16. Golf Tournament 17. Giving Stewsday 18. Winter Wonderland 19. Facts 20. Budget 21. Board of Directors 22. Advisory Board 23. Staff 24. Volunteers & Interns 25. History 26. Louise G. Wilson Legacy Society 27. Donors

our mission empower social and

economic self-reliance

for the working low

income and homeless


Dear Community As Experiment in Self Reliance (ESR) enters our 54 th year as a Community Action Agency in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County area, we want to take time to reflect on all that we have accomplished and our hopes for the future. Over the years, ESR has empowered so many by providing them with the necessary tools and services to realize their potential, rise above poverty, and become self-sufficient. Through our four core programs — Self Sufficiency, Housing, New Century IDA, and Forsyth Free Tax — as well as agency initiatives — Road to Empowerment, Priority Schools, and Place Matters — ESR has helped those in need overcome obstacles to potentially end their cycle of poverty.

Adam Neiberg, Board Chair

Twana W. Roebuck, Executive Director

We would like to extend our deepest thanks to our clients, donors, and partners for their continued support and dedication. Each year, our programs yield incredible success stories as our clients achieve their goals and improve their lives. It is our belief that by uplifting individuals, we uplift the entire community. In addition to generating positive results, each year we are able to reflect and improve so that we can better serve those in need. The end of this fiscal year marked the conclusion of the pilot year of our Priority Schools Initiative. In collaboration with our community partners, we will be continuing this holistic program that targets the cycle of generational poverty, hoping to improve the lives of the younger generation that will be our future leaders. Every year brings challenges and change, but we remain steadfastly committed to our mission of empowerment for the working low-income and homeless members of our community. ESR continues to offer comprehensive and successful programs that provide the necessary resources to those in need so that they can achieve self-reliance and continue to succeed in life. As we enter into our 54th year, we anticipate continued success through the combined effort of our incredible staff, volunteers, donors, board members, city council, county commissioners, and state and federal senators and representatives. It is a privilege to work with such dedicated individuals in our mission to empower social and economic self-reliance for the working low income and homeless. Sincerely –

Adam Neiberg

Twana W. Roebuck

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LETTER FROM OUR DIRECTORS


The Self-Sufficiency Program allows individuals to customize a plan based on ROMA/ Life Domains to meet their goals to become self-sufficient. Success Coaches work one-on-one with clients, and through careful planning, support, accountability measures, and independence, clients realize their potential and are able to elevate themselves above the poverty level and achieve self-reliance.

92% OF ALL PARTICIPANTS

COMPLETED EDUCATION/

TRAINING

The two-year program is intended for individuals below 125% poverty, as defined by the Department of Health and Human Services Poverty Income Guidelines by Household Size. While government metrics for poverty serve as a qualifier for this program, United Way provides a free service to determine individual qualification for various local agencies’ programs, which can be reached by dialing 2-1-1.

The Self-Sufficiency Program can entail vocational training, housing assistance, transportation, educational advancement, financial counseling, employment preparation, and social and economic literacy training. Additionally, participants can qualify for tuition assistance, childcare funding, housing, and transportation services based on the plan that is established between the client and Success Coach.

AVERAGE ANNUAL INCOME

AT ENROLLMENT: $11,456

AVERAGE ANNUAL INCOME AT THE END OF THE PROGRAM:

$20,072

SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM


“WHEN YOU BETTER YOURSELF AND YOU’RE ABLE TO DO THINGS YOU WANT TO DO THAT YOU COULDN’T, YOUR WHOLE LIFE CHANGES.”

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Before coming to ESR, Robert was working delivering pizzas and living payc heck -to paycheck. He knew he had the potential and ability to do more, so he made the decision to come to ESR. Through the Self-Sufficiency Program and his work with his Success Coach Susan, Robert returned to school to become a truck driver,

graduating at the top of his class with a 3.86 GPA. Robert now works for a trucking company that drives to California weekly and makes weekly what he used to make monthly. Through the Self-Sufficiency Program, Robert found a career he is proud of and was able to make a sincere difference in his life.


“I JUST TELL PEOPLE JUST GO TO SCHOOL AND GET YOUR EDUCATION… IT’S NOT WHAT HAPPENS AT THE TIME BUT WHERE YOU ARE GOING.” ESR’s Housing Program aids participants in securing affordable permanent housing to take the first step to escape poverty and become selfsufficient. By implementing a “housing-first” philosophy, ESR is able to serve over 200 households annually. The “housing-first” approach moves away from a focus on transitional

HOUSING SEVICES

housing towards permanent housing under the premise that once stable housing is obtained, other needs can begin to be addressed. The barriers that often cause difficulty in securing housing are criminal, rental, or credit histories, lack of financial resources, and lack of access to affordable housing. This program takes a holistic approach by


Nancy was “hanging on by a thread� and working part-time in homecare. Unable to make ends meet, Nancy and her daughter were evicted from their home and were now homeless. She knew about shelters but had never experienced one for herself. It was important for her to be in Winston-Salem in a private shelter for her daughter. After being referred to ESR, Nancy was able to locate full-time employment and stable housing. She improved her credit score and learned about financial wellbeing.

linking educational, vocational, health and child care components that we believe contribute to housing stabilization. Success Coaches work one-on-one with clients in order to create a customized plan to maximize success. ESR manages four different housing sites throughout Forsyth County: 5th Street I, 5th Street

AVERAGE ANNUAL

INCOME AT ENROLLMENT: $8,902

AVERAGE ANNUAL

INCOME AT PROGRAM COMPLETION:

95% OF ALL PARTICIPANTS

OBTAINED STANDARD housing

$29,655

II, Burton Street, and Spring Street. At these four locations, ESR provides refuge for those in need while working to create long-term solutions to homelessness and poverty. The Housing Program continues to help low-income residents of Forsyth County obtain affordable housing. Residents are able to afford permanent housing, over-

come barriers to self-sufficiency, and improve their standard of living through housing, employment and education.

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“[ESR’S TAX SERVICES HAVE] REALLY HELPED DEMISTIFY MY EXPERIENCES WITH TAXES OVERALL. THEY KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING HERE AND THAT HELPS EASE THE BURDEN FOR PEOPLE LIKE ME.” The Forsyth Free Tax initiative provides free tax preparation and filing for low to moderate income individuals and families in Forsyth C ount y. T his pr o gr a m is specifically salient in helping individuals and families take full advantage of the credits for which they qualify. For example, many households qualify for the Earned

credit, which often goes unclaimed, can average around $1,700 per refund, making a significant impact on the lives of individuals and families. Each client saves approximately an additional $250 by filing with Forsyth Free Tax, and nearly $6 million in refunds have been realized by clients this past tax season by using this service.

FORSYTH FREE TAX

Over 4,500 individuals are served through ESR’s collaboration with partners and funders. This collaboration is known as the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Engagement Committee. By offering 10 sites for free tax preparation, Forsyth Free Tax works to overcome transportation barriers to optimize accessibility. Volunteers come from


Shannon is fairly new to the Winston-Salem area and did not know who she could trust to help file her taxes. Then she met Delores McCullough, our Tax Program Assistant, who told her about the Forsyth Free Tax program. Shannon learned about our tax program after years of experiencing tax anxiety that resulted from a commercial tax service giving her an inaccurate tax return, causing her to owe thousands to the IRS. After having her taxes filed with Forsyth Free Tax, Shannon was able to use her return to supplement spending on housing and books for school.

$2.1 MILLION IN EITC

86 VOLUNTEERS

4500 LIVES CHANGED

services, the community sites offer Asset Building Counseling and linkages to other asset-building programs available in the community, such as ESR’s New Century IDA program, Financial Literacy Counseling, and more.

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all parts of the community, including Wells Fargo, BB&T, Forsyth Technical Community College, Winston-Salem State University, Wake Forest University, Salem College, and many other entities. Volunteers are IRS-certified and trained to use IRS-approved software to prepare and file income tax returns. In addition to tax preparation

$5.9 MILLION IN TOTAL REFUNDS


“AFTER I STARTED MY COMPANY, I KNEW I WAS GOING TO NEED LOANS… THOSE LOANS… I WON’T BE ABLE TO GET THEM IF I HAVE BAD CREDIT. SO, IT WAS TIME TO MAKE A U-TURN AND THINK ABOUT REALLY BEING SAVVY WITH MY MONEY AND GET READY TO MANAGE MY BUSINESS AND TRY TO GET A HOUSE.” New Century IDA (Individual Development Account) is an asset building program that focuses primarily on promoting homeownership, obtaining higher education, and opening a small business. The IDA program works to eliminate generational poverty by encouraging lowincome families and individuals to accrue assets. In connection with Crosby Scholars, New Century

NEW CENTURY IDA

IDA participants with at least $300 in an IDA savings account who are seeking to invest in higher education can receive $2,400 in grant funds to be used towards tuition. Clients pursuing the education-track take online financial literacy courses through the FDIC’s Money Smart Program so as not to overwhelm their schedules, and homeownership and micro-enterprise clients


Djibril had decided enough was enough. After declaring bankruptcy nearly a decade ago, he learned as much as he could on his own about personal finances. A friend told him about New Century IDA where he could further his understanding and take the steps towards establishing his business and becoming a homeowner. He is now a participant in Wave 40 and is looking forward to purchasing a home for himself and his family in the coming year.

$1500 SAVED 1 GRADUATION 1 ASSET PURCHASED countless

DREAMS BECOME reality

One of the key components of the New Century IDA program is assistance in raising client’s credit scores in order to qualify for homeownership; poor credit due to lack of financial literacy is a common barrier to homeownership for many. ESR also assists participants in lowering the debt-to-income ratio through teaching budgeting and saving strategies.

Success Coaches work with individuals to create a plan that involves financial literacy classes along with a strategy to learn to budget, improve their credit score, pay down their debt, and learn how to maintain their asset.

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attend financial literacy courses at ESR. In addition, the Working Group meets monthly to implement programs and provide wrap-around services for clients. A new addition to the New Century IDA Program is the implementation of the microenterprise initiative in starting their own small businesses can receive an 8:1 match on their savings.

11 FINANCIAL LITERACY CLASSES 24 SUCCESS COACH MEETINGS


ROAD TO EMPOWERMENT The Road to Empowerment Initiative is a financial literacy series that seeks to empower individuals to reach their financial goals through education in asset building and career advancement. This free service provided by ESR offers opportunities to community members to learn more about topics including financial security, job preparation, banking services and credit, renter’s rights, and other

subjects of community interest. These courses are taught by ESR staff and experts from the community. As part of the series, attendees can receive giveaways including gift cards, bus passes, and more, as well as complimentary refreshments. This program allows individuals to feel more empowered, confident, and prepared to enter or excel in the workforce and to overcome barriers keeping them from success.

“WE HAD DIFFERENT PEOPLE COME AND TALK TO US ABOUT BUDGETING, COUPONING. THE COUPONING… OH MY GOD. YOU SAVE SO MUCH MONEY COUPONING.”

Through the classes offered in the Road to Empowerment Series, Belinda was able to learn ways to save and manage her money. She also learned ways to relax using art. “It is very stress relieving,” says Belinda. “You got your mind on your art and you aren’t thinking about nothing else and it is just like you in a total other world. Just happiness.”


Tia entered the Priority Schools Program while living with her mother and struggling to make ends meet. Through her plan she generated with her Success Coach, Tia has found stable housing for her and her children and has completed two courses at Forsyth Tech. As she looks towards the future, Tia’s goals are to buy a car and a house in order to further improve her family’s livelihood.

“SINCE I HAVE JOINED, THIS PROGRAM HAS HELPED ME TO FIND STABLE HOUSING FOR MY FAMILY.”

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The Priority Schools Initiative seeks to strengthen the parent or guardian relationship with the child and the child’s school, and in doing so, increase the economic and social self-sufficiency of the parents and i mpr ove the foundation for the child. This initiative works to overcome generational poverty and increases family stability on social, economic, and psychological levels, leading to positive increases child’s academic interests and performance.

ESR connects directly with the fa mi lie s o f four pr ior i ty elementary schools: Ashley, Easton, Forest Park, and Petree. By focusing on early intervention in students’ academic careers, ESR makes a difference in the lives of the underserved children of Winston-Salem. Through a partnership with the Reynolds American Founda tion and Winston-Salem Foundation, ESR is working to uplift all members of the younger generation that will one day lead Forsyth County to further success.

PRIORITY SCHOOLS INITIATIVE


Place Matters is an initiative started by United Way that recognizes and proactively works to combat one-size-fits-all s o l u t i o n s f o r c om m u n i t y development and advancement. Place Matters is facilitated in conjunction with United Way partners with the LaDeara Crest neighborhood, Liberty East Restoration, Habitat for Humanity of Forsyth County,

Ashley Elementary, and the Salvation Army. ESR works with these partners and r e p r e s e n t a ti ve s fr o m t h e community to determine which courses and programs would serve most beneficial. This initiative allows the community to reflect on its own goals and work with ESR and other nonprofit partners to strategize how to best achieve these goals.

PLACE MATTERS


OUTDOOR MOVIE SERIES During the summer months, ESR hosts the annual Family Film Fest: Outdoor Movie Series in collaboration with the Forsyth County Public Libraries and Great Commission Community Church. The free event allows the families and youth of WinstonSalem to gather and enjoy educational activities, free popcorn, community outreach, and a movie. In addition to fun

activities, information is provided about early childhood and elementary education enrollment, immunization requirements and locations, and other community resources. The movies are exciting, kid-friendly films provided by the Forsyth County Public Library, and Spanish subtitles are provided to offer an inclusive experience.

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On November 28th, 2018, ESR celebrated Giving Tuesday— with a twist! Giving Tuesday is a national campaign that encourages individuals to give to nonprofits on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving. ESR took part in this campaign by creating Giving STEWSday, in which participants would donate $10 for lunch and were able to sample and vote in a stew cook-off. Board members, staff, and others from the community

donated, enjoyed some delicious stew, and challenged others to do so as well! Over 15 stews entered the competition for Best Tasting, Most Creative, Best Aroma, Best Vegetarian Stew, and Most Entries. There was a three-way tie for best tasting shared by Lisa Clayton, Lisa Williams, and Adam and Rebecca Neiberg. Great Commission Community Church won for Most Entries.

GIVING STEWSDAY


WINTER WONDERLAND at the Innovation Quarter In February of 2018, ESR celebrated our Winter Wonderland fundraiser at the Innovation Quarter in downtown Winston-Salem. This event recognizes and celebrates donors and volunteers as well as raises funds for ESR’s key community development programs. Throughout the evening, success stories were shar ed and volunteers and donors were recognized for their contributions to ESR’s success. Specifically, new and returning members of the Louise G. Wilson Legacy

Society were recognized. Members of the Legacy Society are generous and impactful donors who give $1,000 or more annually. The fun evening also included a silent auction, entertainment provided by Envision, door prizes, food, and a wonderful opportunity for passionate community members to connect. A special thanks to table sponsors, local corporate partners, volunteers, and event co-chairs Emma Allen and Helen Monroe for making the event a success.

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Day of Service

On September 27th, 2017, ESR celebrated our 53rd anniversary by giving back to the community. The annual Day of Service allows ESR staff and other community members to serve the community by partnering with local nonprofits and organizations for a day of volunteering and engagement. As a Community Action Agency, ESR strongly values service, and

this event allows staff and volunteers to connect with other aspects of the community and learn more about other local organizations. Our staff and volunteers performed service at the SECU Family House, Habitat for Humanity of Forsyth County, SECCA, the Forsyth Humane Society, Habitat ReStore, Senior Services, Samaritan Ministries and ESR.

DAY OF SERVICE


On October 20, 2017, ESR hosted our Golf Tournament Fundraiser at Winston Lake Golf Course. This annual event seeks to raise awareness about poverty in Forsyth County and raise funds to support the programs and services ESR provides. Staff, community partners, and community members enjoyed a wonderful event and winners of first, second, and third place were

recognized, along with last place, closest to the pin, and longest drive for men and women. This event was able to raise $13,000 from generous donors that was used in its entirety to fund ESR’s programs and services. A special thanks to our hole sponsors, beverage cart sponsors, corporate sponsors and partners, golfers, and volunteers for making the fundraiser a success.

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FACTS FORSYTH FREE TAX SAVED PARTICIPANTS APPROXIMATELY

1 IN 5 WINSTON-SALEM RESIDENTS LIVE IN POVERTY

$1,131,750 IN TAX PREPARATION FEES

AVERAGE ANNUAL INCOME

AT ENROLLMENT FOR

HOUSING CLIENTS

AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE AT END OF THE SELFSUFFICIENCY PROGRAM

IDA PARTICIPANTS RECEIVED POST SECONDARY EDUCATION ASSETS

NUMBER OF CLIENTS

$8,095 AFTER THE PROGRAM: $14,899

$12.99

26 ENROLLED IN HOMEOWNERSHIP IDA: 18

NUMBER OF CLIENTS ENROLLED IN SMALL

BUSINESS IDA: 2

16 NUMBER OF CLIENTS WHO BECAME FIRSTTIME HOMEBUYERS


CSBG Reynolds American Foundation United Way Forsyth County City of Winston-Salem City of Winston-Salem—HUD City of Winston-Salem—CDBG Rental Income City of Winston-Salem—ESG Federal Emergency Management Agency Foundations, Corporations, Individuals, Faith-based

$1,109,642 $129,600 $273,854 $76,195 $120,830 $137,929 $89,250 $112,000 $26,151 $20,569 $256,958

Total

$2,352,978

11% 1%

1%

C SBG Reynolds American

5%

UnitedWay

4%

47%

Forsyth County C ity of Winston-Salem

6%

C ity of Winston-Salem HUD C ity of Winston-Salem C DBG Rental Income

5%

12%

5%

BUDGET

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C ity of Winston-Salem E SG FEMA

3%


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Back row, from left to right: Diane Fitzhugh, Brian Burley, Jose Perez, Marsha Davis Front row, from left to right: David Rose, Naomi Blackmon, Eva Gray-Allen, Minnie Ervin, Pastor Gloria Samuels (Secretary), Rebecca Bender (Vice Board Chair), Adam Neiberg (Board Chair), Chester David (Program Committee Chair), Tonya Bellanger (Treasurer), Amatullah Saleem (Assistant Secretary), Phillip Carter, Robert Hinshaw Not pictured: Rev. Michael W. Robinson, Katie Lefelar, LaShun Huntley, David Myers, LaMonica Sloan Wilhelmi, David Clayton


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Emma S. Allen Doug Atkinson, Chair Tamika Scales Bowers Kurt Gehsmann Kyle Gordon Tommy Hickman Dr. Francis James, III Andrea Jenkins Sharon Jeffries-Jones Laura McFadden Alisa T. Quick Dr. Karen Roseboro Dr. Brenda Sadler Dr. Eric J. Sadler, DDS Kent Wallace-Meggs Win Welch Mary Williams

ADVISORY BOARD


STAFF

Back row, from left to right: Sharon Cunningham, Josefina Cazares, Karen Spaugh, Teresa Simmons, Kena Gentry, Karen Forrest, Clarence Johnson, Megan Reynolds, Luna Williams, Bryon Harrison, Kimberly Simms Patricia Casey, Norma Lucas, Susan Claire Bowen, Jasmin Frazier, James Cherry, Delores McCullough Front row, from left to right: Keith Ferger, Deborah Austin-Thomas, Willa Hines, Victoria von Dohlen, Debra Perkins, Manya Stewart, Twana W. Roebuck, Fred Bazemore, Sherri Paysour, Pam Ingram, Eric Glenn, Hilda Moore, Janet McDowell Not pictured: Shirley Abdullah, Shadowe Magaraci


clients and donors participate in volunteer opportunities. These oppor tunities ra nge from assisting in tax preparation and filing, asset-building programs through AmeriCorps, feasibility studies through Dash Corps, planning and coordinating fundraisers and outreach events, teaching classes, and more. Internships can allow individuals to learn more about the nonprofit sector through collaboration with our development team, program

managers, directors, and success coaches. Learning about community based work can open new opportunities and lead to an exciting career.

VOLUNTEERS AND INTERNS

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ESR is proud to offer many volun te e r a nd in te r ns hip opportunities for those who are looking to become more involved in working with the low-income community. There are many opportunities and ESR is happy to accommodate those who also are passionate about our mission and values. Volunteers come to ESR from many local corporations, faithbased groups, schools, and more. We also enjoy having former


1964

1985

ESR is founded in 1964 after President Lyndon B. Johnson declares a “War on Poverty.� ESR is one of the first Community Action Agencies and received funding through the Equal Opportunity Act of 1964.

Louise G. Wilson retired from the position of Executive Director at ESR after 17 years of service to the community. Robert Law assumes the position of Executive Director.

1965

1993

ESR initiates their first program, the Neighborhood Youth Corps (NYC) to provide youth employment skills and encourage them to complete their high school education.

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HISTORY

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78

ESR purchased and renovated the Spring Street Apartments.

19 1978

85

Title X Programs begin, including Transportation, Meal Delivery, and Home M a i n t e n a n c e . Additional projects included Project SOY (Save our Youth), Junior Arts Program, and National Youth Sports Program.

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93 1990

The transitional Housing Program begins with the support of the United Way and City Council for Services. At the outset of the program, 100 homeless individuals and families were housed.


2015 1997 Robert Law retires. Twana Wellman-Roebuck becomes Executive Director of ESR.

The Louise G. Wilson Legacy Society (LWLS) was created to commemorate ESR’s longtime former Executive Director, Louise G. Wilson. Ms. Wilson worked as the Assistant Director of ESR in 1964, its founding year, before serving as Executive Director from 1968-1985. Ms. Wilson worked tirelessly to advocate for the low-income residents of Forsyth County. Her lasting effect on ESR can be seen in elements of the

Housing and Self-Sufficiency Program, and her impact on the community is still felt today. In her honor, the LWLS was created to recognize those who donate $1,000 or more throughout the year to ESR. The gifts from members of the LWLS provide crucial funding for the services ESR provides, bridging the gap between expenses and services and allowing ESR to serve more community members.

2017-2018 Louise G. Wilson Legacy Society Members Henry and Margery Brown, Chuck and Bobbie Chambers, Tommy and Patricia Hickman, The Lacy Foundation, Helen Monroe, Twana W. Roebuck, Dr. Eric Sadler, Starbuck Advised Fund, Claudette Weston, Harden “Butch” and Janet Wheeler, and John C. Whitaker, Jr.

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97

09

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2017

ESR launches a Capital Campaign to raise funds to build a new facility.

2013 ESR begins construction for its new building.

2014

2009

ESR celebrates 50 years of service to the community and moves into its new facility.

ESR launches the Priority Schools Initiative to strengthen the relationship between the parent, child, and school.

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EXPERIMENT IN SELF RELIANCE HELPS OVER 5000 FORSYTH COUNTY RESIDE HELPS RESIDENTS LOCATE AFFORDABLE HOUSING, RISE ABOVE THE POVERT Leonard & Shirley Abdullah ACEY Group Action Pathways D. Agmen Aixa Maria's Gift Baskets Dr. Betty Alexander Allegacy Federal Credit Union Emma Allen/Emma Allen State Farm Angela Alvarez Sharon Anderson Anne & Borden Hanes Jr. Fund Ola Ashford Augsburg Lutheran Church Deborah Austin-Thomas Ayari Andrea Bacon Veron Bailey David Barksdale Chasidy Barr Fred & Emily Bazemore BB&T Tonya Bellanger Cheryle Belo Rebecca Bender Benson Technology Group Isiah & Veronica Black Jermesia Boss Susan Claire Bowen Pitney Bower

Christa Boyd Gregory Bradsher Henry & Margery Brown Tina Brown Amy Bruner Brian Burley Leonard Ryden Burr Cahill & Swain Alan & Lisa Caldwell Karla Canas Capital Bank Tina Carson Alice Carter Lanicia Carter Phillip Carter James Cherry Chick-fil-a Chuck & Bobbie Chambers Fund City of Winston-Salem Kay Clark Clark S. Brown & Sons David Clayton Lavonda Coad Fonda Cole Tiffany Conley FC Cooperative Extension Crosby Scholars Sharon Cunningham

Donna Daniel Chester David Arlander & Tonya Davidson Marsha Davis Roosevelt Davis Shundra Davis Department of Social Services DG Marketing Dorsett Technologies Keeci Dorsette Crista Douthit Darlie Dudley East 5th Street Apartments Eastern Alliance Insurance Group Emergency Assistance Fund Jakay & Minnie Ervin ESR Housing Rental Program Gloria Evans Event Experts Ashley Farmer Elizabeth Fenwick Keith Ferger Keith Feuz Gena Fisher Flow Mini Karen Forrest Forsyth County Public Library Forsyth Technical College David Francis


ENTS EACH YEAR ACHIEVE FINANCIAL STABILITY. WITH YOUR SUPPORT, ESR

TY LEVEL, AND BUILD ASSETS SUCH AS EDUCATION AND HOMEOWNDERSHIP. Pearline D. Howard Larry Hungerford Iris Hutchins IL Long Construction Company Imprints Cares In Town's Pam Ingram Thomas Ingram Annie Wade Irving Monica Jackson Rachel Jackson Dr. & Mrs. Frank James Andrea Jenkins Peter & Jan Jennings John Jessup Jimmy Johns John C. Whitaker, Jr. Fund Mayor Allen Joines Carolyn Jones Ray Jones Pam Kahl Kaplan Henry J. Keating Mary King/Keona's Boutique Dan Kornelis Carmella Kovach Krispy Kreme Lacy Foundation Autumn Lash

The Leon Levine Foundation Liberty National Linda Little Travis Logan Daniel & Mona Lovett Norma Lucas Mickey Lyons M&F Bank Debra MacBeth Adrian Mack Violet Rymelle Macon Sam & Shadowe Magaraci Manisha Manning Marty & Holly Marion Marsh & McLennan Agency Dr. Harold & Atty. Davida Martin MASCO Million Differences Billie Matthews Reginald McCaskill Mr. & Mrs. McDara Folan III Fund Tim McNamara Carl J. Miller Mr. & Mrs. Ward Miller Lynne Mitchell Helen Monroe Mt. Sinai Full Gospel Deliverance MyFain NC Department of Revenue NCCAA

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Danny & Deborah Freeman Friday Night Crew FTCC James & Alinda Gadson Bob Gammon Kurt Gehsmann Naomi Gibson Latifa Gilmore Gilmore's Funeral Home Great Commission Community Church, Inc. GrimeGuru Janice Hairson Arriane Haith Latura Hall Brigitte Hampton Hanesbrands N.S. Harding Harris Teeter Beatrice Harry William Hawkins Barbara Hayes Miriam Heath Doug & Sue Henderson Jamilla Hester Tommy & Pat Hickman Willa Hines Murial Beth Hopkins HAWS


WE THANK YOU FOR MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN TH Adam & Rebecca Neiberg Ken Nelson Anatalie Nicholson Northside Glass Novant Health Foundation Wilbert Octetree Cecile Riter Pain Gwen Parker Latonya Parks Bernard Pate Pat's Body Shop Paul Smith Inc. Sherri Paysour DeValeum Penn Debra Perkins Perry Peterson Peterson/Gordon Architect Pine Needles Xpress Play it Again Sports PNC Foundation Leon & Mary Porter Providence Restaurant Quality Education Academy Quander & Rubain RAI Services Lavender Rain Andrea Raynor Glenda Read Reinvestment Partners

Megan Reynolds Reynolds American Foundation Ralph Ricciardi Nicole Rickard Rise N Fly Bid Whist Club Dr. Mae Rodney Bobby & Twana Roebuck Donna Rogers Laura Roland Jerry Romans Michael & Kathryn Rominger Curtis Roseboro David Roseboro Dr. Karen Roseboro Russell Funeral Home Dr. Brenda Sadler Dr. Eric Sadler Samaritan Ministries Minister Gloria Samuels Jre D. Scott Shot to the Head Photography Teresa Simmons Kimberly Simms Gordon Simpson SMSi Marketing St. Leo's Catholic Church Starbuck Advise Fund Starbucks Coffee Wanda Starke

David Starkey State Farm Foundation State of North Carolina Jane Stephens John & Gwendolyn Stewart Manya Stewart Straight Source LLC Michael Suggs Linda Sullivan Sunshine Energy Chris Terrell Evelyn Terry Terry's Barbeque Jamal Thompson Lydell Thompson Clarence Thorpe Triad Retirement Group Tom Trollinger Joyce Truitt Randall Tuttle TW Garner United Way of Forsyth County Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Wake Forest Innovation Quarter Wake Forest University Wake Forest University Athletics Beverly Wallace Wal-Mart Anne Walter

ESR would like to apologize if we accidentally left you off this list. We appreciate you and couldn’t do what we do without your support!


HE LIVES OF OUR FELLOW COMMUNITY MEMBERS! Joe Watson Sonia Watson Wells Fargo Wells Fargo Community Support Janet & Harden Wheeler Maria Wilds James & LaMonica Wilhelmi Gwendolyn Williams Luna Williams Kiyunta Wilson Winston-Salem Foundation Bill & Erna Womble Mildred Wood WSSU WSSU Division of Student Affairs Karl Yena Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Zael's

GIFTS TO THE ANNUAL FUND HELP

BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN EXPENSES AND OPERATIONS, KEEPING SERVICES ACCESSIBLE TO MORE FAMILIES AND

INDIVIDUALS. YOUR DONATIONS HELP RESIDENTS IN OUR COMMUNITY CONTINUE TO CREATE A BRIGHTER, MORE MORE STABLE FUTURE FOR THEMSELVES AND THEIR FAMILIES.


experiment in self-reliance 3480 dominion street winston-salem, nc 27105 (336) 722-9400 www.eisr.org

Profile for Experiment in Self-Reliance

2017-2018 Annual Report  

2017-2018 Annual Report  

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