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SUMMER EVALUATION REPORT

www.experienceBELL.org


3,128 Scholars

SUMMER 2009 Report Card

K-8 Grades Served

80% Average Daily Attendance

6.4 MONTHS Grade-Equivalent Gain, Reading

5.8 MONTHS Grade-Equivalent Gain, Math

33rd à 44th Percentile Rank Increase, Reading

35th à 43rd Percentile Rank Increase, Math

87% Parents reporting that they are more engaged with their child’s education because of BELL

96% Parents expressing satisfaction with BELL’s services

experienceBELL.org


SUMMER 2009 Evaluation Report

BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) exists to transform the academic achievements, self-confidence, and life trajectories of children living in under-resourced, urban communities. In the BELL Summer program, scholars in grades K-8 engage in day-long literacy and math instruction and hands-on enrichment courses. The program also engages parents and positive adult role models from the community. BELL partners with schools to expand learning time and reach the scholars who need it most. In 2009, 3,128 scholars participated in BELL Summer at 57 schools in Baltimore, MD; Boston and Springfield, MA; Detroit, MI; Charlotte, NC; Newark, NJ; and New York City, NY. BELL measures program outcomes against three major goals for scholars: improved academic performance, enhanced self-concept and self-efficacy, and increased social skills. Additionally, evaluation activities seek to assess parent engagement and satisfaction with the program.

GRADE-EQUIVALENT GAINS (Figure A)

Elementary School Scholars •  Grade-Equivalent Gains, Literacy: 8.4 months

7 6 5

Grade-level Skills

In BELL Summer, scholars made significant gradeequivalent gains in reading and math and avoided summer learning loss. Grade-equivalent gains are an important indicator of student success in the summer because they provide an absolute measure of growth about how much a student has progressed up the proficiency ladder at a time when most children are not engaged in structured learning activities. Average gains were greater for middle school students who entered BELL performing further below grade level.

Figure A: Reading and Math Grade-equivalent Scores

•  Grade-Equivalent Gains, Math: 3.5 months

4 3 2 1 0 Grade 3

Middle School Scholars •  Grade-Equivalent Gains, Literacy: 14.2 months

Reading Pre-Test Math Pre-Test

•  Grade-Equivalent Gains, Math: 7.4 months

PERCENTILE RANK SCORES (Figure B)

Reading Post-Test Math Post-Test

Figure B: Percentile Rank Increase by Subject 50 40 Reading

30

Percentile Rank

In BELL Summer, scholars increased their percentile rank scores. Percentile rank scores range from a low of 1 to a high of 99, with 50 representing the middle score and denoting average performance. They provide a relative measure that compares BELL scholar performance to national norms. When enrolling in BELL Summer, scholars were underperforming: they entered at the 33rd percentile in reading and the 35th in math. In BELL Summer, scholars increased their percentile rank scores to the 44th and 43rd percentiles in reading and math, significantly reducing their deviation from the norm.

Grade 8

Math

20 10 0

July

August


PARENT & TEACHER SURVEY DATA Parent & Teacher Observations of Scholars' Academic Performance 83%

Teachers reporting that BELL improved scholars' reading skills"

84%

Teachers reporting that BELL improved scholars' math skills"

86%

Parents reporting that BELL improved scholars' reading skills"

83%

Parents reporting that BELL improved scholars' math skills"

Parent & Teacher Observations of Self-Efficacy Skills 92%

Teachers reporting that BELL improved scholars' self-confidence."

84%

Teachers reporting that BELL improved scholars' ability to ask for help"

83%

Teachers reporting that BELL improved scholars ability to express their ideas."

89%

Parents reporting that BELL improved their child's self-confidence."

87%

Parents reporting that BELL helped their child be more interested in reading. "

83%

Parents reporting that BELL helped their child be more interested in math. "

91%

Parents reporting that BELL improved their child's attitude toward learning. "

88%

Parents reporting that BELL improved their child's attitude toward school."

90%

Parents reporting that BELL improved their child's ability to express their ideas."

Parent & Teacher Observations of Community Skills 91%

Teachers reporting that scholars were better at group activities."

79%

Teachers reporting that scholars were better with peer relations."

74%

Teachers reporting that scholars were better at self-control."

91%

Parents reporting that scholars are better at group actvities."

84%

Parents reporting that scholars cooperate more with other children."

Parent Engagement & Satisfaction 87%

Parents reporting that they felt more engaged in their child's education." Parents reporting that their child enjoyed BELL."

96%

Parents expressing satisfaction with BELL's services."

96% 94%

Parents reporting that they would enroll their child in BELL again. "

97%

Parents reporting that they would recommend BELL to other parents."

0%

25%

50%

75%

100%


EVALUATION ADVISORY BOARD BELL is nationally recognized for its rigorous approach to program evaluation. Its evaluation activities are guided, advised, and endorsed by an external, interdisciplinary group, BELL's national Evaluation Advisory Board. The responsibility of the Evaluation Advisory Board is to oversee the application of principles and standards established in the evaluation and assessment fields.

Dr. Duncan Chaplin, Senior Researcher Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Dr. Leslie Goodyear, Senior Research Associate Educational Development Center, Inc. Dr. Denise Huang, Project Director & Senior Researcher National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST) Ms. Priscilla Little, Research & Evaluation Consultant Evaluation Consultant Dr. Beth Miller, Director of Research & Evaluation Nellie Mae Education Foundation

METHODOLOGY TEST DATA: The following standardized, validated instruments were administered pre- and post-program and used to measure program outcomes: the fourth edition of the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test (SDRT-IV) (Harcourt Educational Measurement, 1996), a diagnostic assessment of grade-level literacy skills, was administered to all scholars; and the fourth edition of the Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test (SDMT-IV) (Harcourt Educational Measurement, 1996), a diagnostic assessment of grade-level mathematics skills, was administered to scholars in grades 2 and higher.

SELF-EFFICACY DATA: BELL uses the Youth Outcome Toolkit, a validated, youth-respondent instrument, to measure changes in scholars’ academic behaviors, sense of self, positive core values, and life skills. These attitudes, skills, and behaviors are highly predictive of future school persistence and success. In addition, at the beginning and end of BELL programs, scholars in grades 3 and higher complete a brief survey designed by BELL to assess their academic aspirations.

TEACHER SURVEYS: BELL developed a teacher and tutor survey instrument to assess program implementation and efficacy from the perspective of instructional staff. Teachers and tutors complete the anonymous survey at the end of the program, which includes questions regarding scholars’ progress, training, curricula, BELL staff and service, and parent engagement.

PARENT SURVEYS: BELL developed a parent survey instrument to assess parent observations of scholar improvement, program quality, and parent satisfaction. Parents complete the anonymous survey on-site during the final week of the program.

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BELL Summer 2009 Evaluation Report  

BELL's 2009 Summer Evaluation Report