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Finding the Future I&D Workforce

P. 44

MAY 2016 • VOL. 22 • ISSUE 3

[ ALSO IN THIS ISSUE ]

Riverview’s “Rock Concert” Experience P. 38

US $6 CAN $8

Global Exhibitions Day P. 56

FCC Cracks Down on Industry P. 50

Trends in Tradeshow Booth Design P. 25

EXHIBITCITYNEWS.COM


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beEXCEPTIONAL 4

All of us at beMatrix速 USA congratulate those Partners recognized for their exceptional 2015 exhibit design work at ExhibtorLive. Awards were presented at both Exhibitor Portable Modular Awards and The beMatrix速2015 Best of the Best events. We are proud to have such creative Partners and grateful for the trust you have in our people and product. The beMatrix速 Team looks forward to seeing more amazing projects in 2016. 5

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6 1 - Best Island > 1,000 Ft2 Dealer: Exhibit Concepts Inc. Client: LexisNexis 2 - Best Island 600-1,000 Ft2 Dealer: Access TCA Inc. Client: Boston Biomedical Inc. 3 - Best Use of Graphics Dealer: e4 Design Client: Sun Chemical Corp. 4 - Best Overall Exhibit Design Dealer: Hamilton Exhibits Client: Taurus

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5 - Best Overall Event Dealer: ASTOUND Group Client: Coca Cola 6 - Best Design > 600 Ft2 Dealer: Access TCA Client: Novartis 7 - Best Design < 600 Ft2 Dealer: Steelhead Productions Client: EyeMed 8 - Best Hybrid Design Dealer: e4 Design Client: Trade Show Stop - Xtime 9 - Most Unique Surface Treatment Dealer: Steelhead Productions Client: Steelhead

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

18

Features 18

Design, Technology and the Human Connection The human touch is still vital

25

Interesting Trends in Booth Design What’s hot in materials and booth décor

Cover Story

38

Riverview Systems Group’s Massive Exhibit for Zimmer Biomet

30-35

Canada Is on Sale A Favorable Exchange Rate Brings Bargains in the Great White North

An arena rock concert-style experience

Columns

The Future I&D Workforce

44 As Boomers retire, will Millennials step in?

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50

As the Saw Turns

Status of Exclusive Internet Providers in Question

Cow Bellies and Corn Fields

The FCC cracks down on venues illegally blocking personal Wi-Fi hotspots

Urban Vert The Ace Hotel in Los Angeles

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Employment Strategy Corner Could Bad Credit Mean “Bad Employee?”

In this issue 10 72 74 78 81 88 94

The Snapshot People on the Move Las Vegas DEAL Exhibit City Puzzler Regional Show Calendar Classified Ads Service Guide

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54

Virtual Reality Making waves at conventions and shows

56 Global Exhibitions Day Set to Increase Bonds and Awareness Debut to take place June 8, 2016

Contributing Writers 60

Intl. Trade Shows in the U.S.: Uniting for a Common Goal By Larry Kulchawik

Corporate Profile 66

Concept Communications’ Michael Tay Builds Relationships Around the Globe 6 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

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8 Trends in European Trade Shows and Events By Han Leenhouts

68

Taking a Stand on Terrorism By Rod Cameron

San Diego Convention Center photo courtesy San Deigo Convention Center

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PUBLISHER’S WORDS MASTHEAD PUBLISHER Donald V. Svehla Jr. 702-309-8023 ext.102 DonS@exhibitcitynews.com

Greetings to readers everywhere!

I

t’s May already, and spring is in full bloom across the nation. There are only a couple more months of show-upon-show and event-upon-event before schools let out for vacation and the industry slows down! Our editorial staff has put some excellent, must-read, content together that you surely do not want to miss. This issue has something for everyone. First off, for anyone looking for a deal, as our cover indicates, Canada is on sale. Our U.S. dollar earns roughly thirty percent more in comparison to the Canadian dollar, which is referred to as the “loonie.” According to Cam Stevens, owner of Ontario, Canada-based exhibit building company Stevens E3, besides real cost savings for producing booth components, “with the Canadian dollar being low, it’s less expensive for venues, less expensive for hotels and meals, and less expensive for event services.” See more about potential savings starting on P. 30. Interesting Trends in Tradeshow Booth Design: Brand spend on mobile exhib­its and booth design is significant, ranging from a few thousand dollars to hundreds of thousands. Regardless of the investment amount, the goal re­

Don Svehla | Publisher

CSAL

CONVENTION SERVICES ASSOCIATION

AS VEGAS

8 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Editorial

mains the same: the creation of some­ thing that will elevate the brand and draw potential customers and passersby to the booth. See Andrea Flint’s piece starting on P. 25. Finding the Future I&D Workforce: As Baby Boomers are retiring from the workforce, job openings are becoming available for Millennials. But the inconsistent schedules that go along with work in the trade show industry make it difficult for unions to maintain suffi­ cient staffing. See what Local 510 Sign & Display Union in San Francisco is doing to plan for the future on P. 44. Global Exhibitions Day Set to Increase Bonds and Awareness: To draw attention to the importance of the exhibition industry in the world marketplace, leaders from around the globe are banding together to create the first Global Exhibitions Day on June 8, 2016. Find out how you can help reach out to government officials on all levels on P. 56. Besides the four timely pieces mentioned above, we have our columnists, international coverage and, as always, our features on industry people. Until next print issue. I’ll see you on the digital side!

MANAGING EDITOR Liz Martínez 702-309-8023 ext.111 LizM@exhibitcitynews.com ART DIRECTOR Thomas Speak ThomasS@exhibitcitynews.com COLUMNISTS Gail Beckman Haley Freeman Phillip H. Kemper Jim Obermeyer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jessica Ablamsky Kathy Anaya Stephanie Annis Rod Cameron Andrea Flint Amber Johnson Larry Kulchawik Han Leenhouts Lesley Martin

Sales DIRECTOR OF SALES Kathy Anaya 702-309-8023 ext. 105 KathyA@exhibitcitynews.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Shane Levin 702-309-8023 ext. 1010 ShaneL@exhibitcitynews.com CIRCULATION Nancy Castino 702-309-8023 ext. 100 subscribe@exhibitcitynews.com


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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 11


COLUMN As the Saw Turns

Cow Bellies and Corn Fields

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ne of the things I have took place on a 1,200-acre, always liked about fully functional dairy rethis industry is the search farm. great opportunity we have to We were invited to spend learn about other industries a day with this group as they and other companies. Part heard presentations on evof the process of helping erything from improving our clients achieve heifer performance to positive results at large animal metabotheir trade shows lism to herd health to and business events composting technoloinvolves learning as gy. And then we were much as we can about By Jim Obermeyer given an in-depth tour what they do and how they of the farm and all of the redo it. Most of the time, this search facilities, including the learning takes place in a concalving operation, metabolism ference room, or occasionally labs, feed barns and compost on a plant tour. processing areas. I saw—and Or on a working dairy reheld—parts of a cow that I search farm…. never thought I would be near. I was once asked to offer After a full day immersed recommendations to an in how a dairy farm operates existing client on how they and how a dairy farmer works could improve their VIP to improve the milk-producclient tours. We jumped at ing performance of the herd, I the opportunity. Then we gained a new appreciation for learned that the VIPs were their business. And a better dairy farmers and the tours understanding of what it

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS DINING ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT SHOPPING SPORTING EVENTS

12 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

would take to help our client with their program for these guys. The bottom line is that I was grateful that our client allowed us to participate in this program. It really did help us help them. As much as we all try to learn everything we can about our clients, either through Internet research, meetings with our clients and other industry-specific contacts or attending shows and events in their industry, sometimes it takes an immersive experience such as this to really understand the issues our clients are dealing with. I had another client in the agricultural industry, a fertilizer company I had worked with for about five years. I really enjoyed working with this client and spent a good bit of time reading about and studying their field. I had toured several related businesses and talked with numerous companies in the industry. But it wasn’t until I spent a full day on a 1,000-acre farm, riding in the combine during corn harvest and listening to the grower talk about the details of applying fertilizer and additives in varying quantities based on soil moisture content that I began to appreciate the complexity of the process and the delicate balance between a bad year and a bumper crop. We must apply all we know about our business to the issues and challenges our clients are facing. That’s where our expertise comes in. The more we know about what

works and what doesn’t in our business, the easier it is for us to apply those solutions to the challenges we find in our clients’ programs. What this all comes down to is improving our own knowledge of our industry. It doesn’t help for us to spend a day on a dairy farm learning about a client’s business if we can’t bring a level of experience and expertise in our business to the table. That means we’ve got to stay sharp. And that means getting involved in this industry as well…attending our industry events, listening to the experts, talking to our peers, being a part of the industry associations and staying fresh. After 22 years of attending Exhibitor Show and 35 years in the industry, I feel like I still learn every time I attend an industry event. I attend sessions, walk the exhibit floor and talk to lots and lots of people. And I always come away feeling the time was well worth it. I learn things I know that I will be able to apply to our clients’ challenges. At least at these events, though, I don’t get to hold in my hands the insides of a cow. That was a very special moment.… See you on the show floor. Jim Obermeyer has been in the tradeshow industry 35 years, both as a corporate trade show manager and exhibit house owner. He is currently a vice president at Hamilton Exhibits and can be reached at jobermeyer@ hamilton-exhibits.com.


The Green Piece COLUMN

Urban Vert

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osh. Eclectic. styles are on offer to accomRadically distinctive. modate all types of gatherWhen you visit an Ace ings, from board meetings Hotel location anywhere in and private dinners to conferthe world, you will encounter ences and concerts. something extraordinary. And The crowing jewel is The inventively green. Theater at Ace Hotel, forI recently became lost to the merly the United Artists mythic vibe and grand proTheater and brainchild of portions of Ace’s digs in United Artists founders downtown Los Angeles. Mary Pickford, DougFormerly the United las Fairbanks, D.W. Artists building and Griffith and Charlie theater, this urban Chaplin. Inspired by gothic masterpiece Pickford’s passion was built in 1927 and for Spanish castles By Haley Freeman has been beautifully and cathedrals, restored for fans of a new the spectacular, three-stoera. She keeps fine company ry grand lobby will dizzy with her silver-screen cohorts and dazzle. The 1,600-seat in the historic Broadway The- theater has been “retrofitater District, where 12 movie ted with a state-of-the-art palaces built between 1910 digital projection system and and 1932 remain in varying cinema sound, an indepenstages of splendor and dishadent, ultramodern live sound bille. The city’s sizzle invigosystem, plus an elaborate rates on a Friday night, when contemporary stage lighting hipsters and locals blend in system.” Inside this ornate a delightfully seedy mix of space, where intricate plaspomp and happenstance. terwork hangs like stalactites Like Norma Desmond in from walls and ceilings, and Sunset Boulevard, the provoc- a highly wrought oculus ative Ace lures you inside presides, every event is a and threatens to keep you religious experience. both captive and captivated. More intimate indoor Venues of varying sizes and spaces loaded with Hollywood

glamour are available for smaller gatherings and events. Outdoors is Upstairs, a rooftop bar with stunning views of downtown Los Angeles, along with a rooftop pool for less formal events. Guests can stay in one of the hotel’s chic, modern chambers, with offerings ranging from rooms with private terraces to lofts and suites. Ace is a boutique hotel chain known for its innovative efforts toward sustainability. It uses Ecovim food waste reduction systems to recycle food waste by dehydrating it, thus reducing it by up to 90 percent into “a highly concentrated organic soil amendment which can be used as fertilizer, bio-fuel and animal feed. It will also generate water that can be reused to water plants.” Ace’s flagship hotel in Seattle is furnished with vintage and repurposed furniture. For its London hotel, Ace commissioned sustainable, locally crafted furnishings from Benchmark Furniture. Ace is also known for preserving historic landmarks and turning them into vibrant,

The Los Angeles Ace Hotel keeps fine company with her silver-screen cohorts in the historic Broadway Theater District. relevant centers for society and culture. Each location offers unique amenities and a variety of meeting spaces for events large and small. For event planners seeking to entice participation and dazzle guests with something truly novel and uniquely green, an Ace destination is a guaranteed win. Visit www. acehotel.com and view their varied and astonishing assortment of venues.

Green Quote: Although Charlie Chaplin is best known for his roles in silent film, he was a pioneer of the arts and a controversial voice for social issues. He said, “We think too much and feel too

little. More than machinery, we need humanity; more than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost.” ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 13


COLUMN Employment Strategy Corner

Could Bad Credit Mean “Bad Employee?”

T

oday, more and more Here are a few thoughts companies require that can help you determine compulsory credit how to proceed: checks on all candidates for employment. And a lot of Don’t Be Quick To Judge good prospects are triggerIt sounds simple, but you’d ing bad credit checks. The be surprised how easy it is to same is true with employees make a hasty judgment. Sit whose bad credit is often down with the employee and discovered by employers. ask whether s/he thinks the Poor credit on the part credit report is accurate. If it of either candidate or is, try to determine the employee presents a reason for the report serious problem— and the denial of and requires careful credit. consideration. Remember that Almost everyone I By Philip H. Kemper sometimes circumknow has put themstances beyond selves into more debt than the employee’s control have they would like at one time or caused a mediocre or bad another—maybe overextendrating. (I had a friend who was ing themselves to move into a the victim of identity theft a bigger home, get a glitzy, fastfew years ago, and I can vouch er car, take a dream vacation, for how painful and difficult it or just send those kids off to was for him to clear that up.) college! Let’s face it: Credit is easily available, and living the Put It Into Proper American dream is increasing- Perspective ly more expensive. And that’s While you should not ignore a deadly combination. the fact that the credit score But what happens when might be lower than you would you find out that a candidate like, remember that having a you are interviewing, or an less-than-perfect credit rating employee you have hired, has is not the end of the world—nor gotten himself into so much do you have Public Enemy #1 debt that it has affected his in your midst. For most jobs in credit rating and, hence, his your organization, this credit ability to get a company credit indicator will have absolutely card? And what if the comno bearing on how your empany needs that employee to ployees actually do their jobs. travel and incur legitimate expenses to do the job? Credit Decide For Yourself cards are basic equipment in There are no pat answers many employees’ pockets. in a situation like this. This 14 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

is where you rely on your gut and your skills as a manager. Some companies issue a cash advance for all travel and purchase airline tickets directly, while some managers I have spoken with have the company guarantee the credit card up to a certain dollar amount. As a matter of fact, I recommend this option as the easiest and the best for “saving face.” Your employee will feel trusted, and I’m a firm believer in trusting people until they

prove you wrong. Having faith in your employee will go a long way toward earning the loyalty that you want. And, in the best of cases, you’ll help that successful employee make a better future with a better credit rating! Philip Kemper is Founder/President of KemperAssociates, a 39-year-old Chicago-based national executive search firm. Phil can be contacted online at kemperassociates.org or kemperassoc@hotmail.com.


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DESIGN

Group Delphi at Exhibitor Live 2016

18 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


Design, Technology and the Human Connection AS TECHNOLOGY EVOLVES, EXHIBIT DESIGNERS AGREE THAT THE HUMAN TOUCH IS STILL VITAL FOR MAKING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN A CLIENT AND EXHIBIT USERS BY JESSICA ABLAMSKY

HGTV addicts may recognize Melissa Torres from Season 2 of Ellenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Design Challenge, a popular reality TV show that features six designers who compete to build furniture while avoiding elimination. Hosted by Ellen DeGeneres, the top-rated show saw Torres create a sleek and modern master bed upholstered in white leather, a whimsical tire swing, a bone-China-inspired dining table, and a vanity decked out in black, Continued on p. 20 @ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 19


DESIGN

Melissa Torres of Group Delphi is an environmental designer and veteran of reality TV show Ellen’s Design Challenge.

Continued from p. 19 white and pink. Now Torres has a new gig as an environmental designer with Group Delphi, a California-based company that specializes in exhibit design for trade shows and museums. As a newbie in the exhibit design industry, Torres says she has a lot to learn, particularly about the intersection of technology and exhibits. “Where things are going with design 20 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

right now: technology is where things are going,” Torres said. “I am so lucky I’m getting to do all this. There’s so much out there that keeps changing.” The multi-billion dollar conference and events industry has changed dramatically since the advent of the Internet and the rise of social media that allow companies to personalize their marketing for different user groups. Thanks to new technology and new uses for older technology like holograms and virtual reality, the

forward-thinking exhibit industry is making the most of the Internet age. Exhibit designers agree that technology provides more tools for them to incorporate into their designs, but the latest technology is not always the best solution. It is critical not to lose sight of the most important aspect of any exhibit: the human touch. “Augmented reality and other things I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to learn about if I weren’t doing this right


Dean Pappas is the founder of YOR Design Group of Burbank, Ill.

now,” Torres said. “It’s mind-blowing and exciting. But at the same time, it’s so important to keep balancing that human aspect. How you do that is really interesting and important.” Branding and technology Industry veteran Dean Pappas started YOR Design Group 10 years ago. A design company based in Burbank, Ill., YOR Design Group consults with exhibit houses that need additional design services. @ExhibitCityNews

Pappas has specialized in exhibit design for 23 years, after discovering the industry while working on his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Industrial Design at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “It’s definitely a unique industry because we are designing something that is very portable,” Pappas said. “You set up and tear down, and that may happen one time a year, or it may happen eight times a year.” The nuts and bolts—what you need and in what dimensions—are merely a checklist. The branding aspect: what is your marketing message? What statement are you trying to make for this show? That’s where design comes into play, according to Pappas. “At a trade show, they are there to sell something, whether it is themselves or a product,” he said. “There is a lot of psy-

chology behind it. What emotion are we trying to convey? Are we trying to present them as an industry leader? Which materials will go with that image?” Technology is great, but it has to be appropriate to the company, and to be a true success, the technology must help users remember the client. “Augmented reality is great,” he said. “But for Crayola, having crayons there and a wall that people can draw on may be better than augmented reality. Or it may be a combination. Take a crayon, draw something on this wall, then use your phone, and it becomes 3-D animation.” A client is not doomed to failure if it cannot afford the latest technology, Pappas pointed out. People still want human interaction, and technology can Continued on p. 22 ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 21


DESIGN

Tom Yurkin joined Freeman after graduation 30 years ago and has ascended to creative director.

Continued from p. 21 only do so much. “What we’re doing is helping somebody else portray their corporate image as a space,” Pappas said. “It is a space, and area, for them to be themselves, whatever that self may be.” It’s all about connection Tom Yurkin, a 30-year veteran of the exhibit design industry, is creative director at Freeman, a North American company that specializes in convention and trade show management. Yurkin was hired by Freeman right out of school and has evolved with the company. Although 30 years sounds like a long period, time has passed quickly for Yurkin, who said it feels like only a few years. “I always tell people, ‘Don’t miss a holiday party because it’ll be a long year,’” he said. “It’s just one project after another. Once you get on that cycle of setting one up and working on another one, and pitching another one and putting another 22 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

one into production, it just keeps going.” Yurkin’s job is to find the best solution for the client’s needs. In the past, he said, all you had to do was create a cool exhibit, and the company that made the biggest impact was the company with the coolest exhibit. “It’s not that way anymore,” he said. “Now it’s more about creating an experience.” Every trade show or convention is an opportunity. His job is not only to make an impact on exhibit users, but to make a connection between the client and exhibit users. Between the pre-show, post-show and social media, there are so many ways to make that connection. “If you have ten dollars, what is the best way to make an impact with that ten dollars?” he asked. “It might not be building something.” Good research is vital, Yurkin said. It is necessary to have a solid understanding of the client, its audience, and the situation: You can do things in the fashion

industry that you would never do in oil and gas. That is the beauty of exhibit design: connecting people to the client and sometimes even helping the client find their voice, Torres added. Based in the San Francisco Bay Area near Silicon Valley, Group Delphi works with many technology companies. Some of them offer great products and services but do not have much of an identity. Though exhibit design, Torres can help them find and showcase their identity, which helps create connections between the company and exhibit users. To make those vital connections between the client and exhibit users, Torres tries to maintain an element of play in her designs. “Being able to touch something or feel it is different from just pushing a button,” she said. “It’s like texting somebody versus having a conversation. People like play. You don’t want to lose that.”


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24 MAY 2015 Exhibit City News


DESIGN

Rediscovered Oak (lower cabinets) and Rediscovered Oak Planked (wall) from the WilsonartÂŽ Virtual Design Library was featured in a laundry room setting at the Kitchen and Bath Industry Show 2016.

Interesting Trends in Tradeshow Booth Design Brand spend on mobile exhibits and booth design is significant, ranging from a few thousand dollars to hundreds of thousands. Regardless of the investment amount, the goal remains the same: the creation of something that will elevate the brand and draw potential customers and passersby to the booth. As designer Kevin Alter of Arlington, Texas-based exhibit design company Skyline Sector 5 underscores, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the colors and finishes in an exhibit, at a trade show, briefing center, road show, interior or any other branded environ-

Photo by Tori Aston

Photo by

BY ANDREA FLINT

Continued on p. 26 @ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 25


DESIGN

Wilsonart® RE-COVER™ Laminate room makeover at the Kitchen and Bath Industry Show 2014.

Continued from p. 25 ment should set the stage for a brand to shine.” Recent attendance at trade shows in the United States and abroad reveals some interesting trends in materials use and booth décor: 26 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Contemporary European influences such as clean lines inspired by mid-century modern aesthetics transcend globally. Color-blocking (neutrals, colors), book-matching and mixing metals are prominent design features. Warm woods with straight grain, as well as

heavy character features, provide a strong, modern appearance. Industrial The industrial look remains strong. Woods are still aged and distressed with texture, but not as extreme as we’ve seen in the past. Concrete is still


metal chairs are perfectly paired to create a unique look by combining different trends. THE IMPORTANCE OF DESIGN ACCENTS Color The full prism of colors seen in booth design from bright and bold to soft pastels and in between are an important trend in trade shows. Gradations of color and color blocks in intended placements grab the eye. Lighting The use of light fixtures more for decorative accents than to actually provide lighting is in play. Hanging chandeliers create unexpected elegance and raise the level of the booth’s sophistication. The inclusion of neon and pendants as art adds appeal. Nature Inside Seasoned trade show attendees are delighted by and drawn to elements that bring the outside in. Oversized natureinspired graphics and the use of live plants such as succulents emulate a patio or outdoor feel.

important. However, it is being seen not only as countertops and floors, but now as walls. Metals are warming up with gold and matte black, making quite an appearance. Personal curation and storytelling continue to dominate. Mid-century modern clean tables with distressed @ExhibitCityNews

Pergolas To add visual interest, the inclusion of pergolas in booth design is growing. Pergolas encourage booth visitors to look up—a space that is often overlooked. Using slated metal, color-blocked designs and woodgrains to create a ceiling effect are evident. Wilsonart® RE-COVER™ Laminate allows pergolas, and exhibits in general, to be easily refreshed or repaired with new laminate surfacing over existing HPL, melamine surfaces, traditional substrates and painted and stained surfaces. Catching the eye of potential customers through unique booth designs is increasingly challenging and can get very expensive. Repairing and renewing with RE-COVER is simple and inexpensive and can help create a whole new look and extend booth longevity.

Photos Photography in booth spaces is popular. From poster-size to wall-size, graphic photos go beyond adding decorative accents. Photos are intentional and dramatic and meant to draw people in through colors, extreme close-ups and graphics. Wall Coverings Brick walls create an industrial look and atmosphere. They add dramatic effect to the booth space. The versatility of metals is showcased in sleek-and-contemporary or aged-and-rusted design in standalone or mixed fashion. Walls of green turf capture a sense of nature. There is “increased use of color and unique finishes such as wood and quartz,” adds Skyline Sector 5’s Alter. The use of planked and non-planked woods are translated through tone-ontone or monochromatic color. To help keep booths fresh, designers turn to resources such as Wilsonart’s innova-

The colors and finishes should set the stage for a brand to shine. tive Virtual Design Library, an evolving, curated collection of laminates available within two to three weeks of ordering. Exhibit design elements are continually evolving and must be intentional, careful and on-trend to attract the wandering eye of potential customers and passersby. Attracting foot-traffic is competitive, and resources like Wilsonart can help to draw in crowds. Andrea Flint is a product designer at Wilsonart. Information about RE-COVER™ Laminate, the Virtual Design Library and the company can be found at http://www.wilsonart.com ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 27


Norm Friedrich, President/CEO OCTANORM USA, Inc.

The EDPA Foundation is unparalleled in its financial support of exhibit industry people who are in need, and we as an organization were both proud and honored to be able to give something back to our industry as a Founding EDPAF Grantor. I have had the privilege of knowing many people who have benefited from the good works of the EDPAF including several Exhibition Design students from FIT and BSU, as well as recipients from the Randy Smith Memorial Golf Classic. We also had a family member of an OCTANORM employee receive a scholarship from EDPAF last year. We would like to believe that our involvement in the EDPAF has helped to create greater awareness of our industry to many young people who would otherwise be oblivious to the exciting career opportunities available to them. Getting to know these young minds and experiencing their energy gives me great confidence in the future of face to face marketing.

28 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


CANADIAN ECONOMY UNIQUELY AFFECTS THE TRADE SHOW INDUSTRY BY STEPHANIE ANNIS

Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy has hit a slump. The commodities market, particularly the oil and mining industries, is a large part of the Canadian economy, but because the global demand for commodities is down, Canada is experiencing a recession. The low price of oil has resulted in a depression in the Continued on p. 32 ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 31


CANADIAN ECONOMY UNIQUELY AFFECTS THE TRADE SHOW INDUSTRY

Stevens E3 of Ontario, Canada, built this General Dynamics Land Systems 40 x 40 custom exhibit.

32 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


Continued from p. 31 value of the Canadian dollar, known as the “loonie.” Provinces such as Saskatchewan and Alberta, whose economies depend heavily on commodities, are being hit particularly hard. Ontario and Quebec, which rely more on manufacturing, have not been affected so deeply. The Canadian economic downturn follows a period of growth that occurred while the United States was in a recession. This see-sawing of the two economies has created interesting opportunities in the trade show industry. While Canada is seeing economic growth in 2016 following a negative GDP in 2015, the value of the Canadian dollar is down, which makes doing business in Canada very attractive right now. And people are taking advantage of this climate. As Canadian manufacturing exports are growing, the Eastern provinces are experiencing a better

THE LOONIE The Canadian dollar is referred to as the “loonie.” This unusual term refers to the image of a bird— specifically, a loon, which is common in Canada—that appears on one side of the gold one-dollar coin. @ExhibitCityNews

Exhibit Installation Services Inc. (EIS) of Alberta, Canada, shows a standard Octanorm rental that CiDRA uses at a number of shows in Canada. Large curves and black laminate panels make the simple rental stand out at CiDRA’s shows. Because the booth works so well for the client, ESI also brings the booth down to the United States for a couple of shows. The booth is also easily reconfigured to a 10’ x 10’ space, thanks to the flexibility of the Octanorm system.

economic climate. Cam Stevens, owner of Ontario, Canada-based exhibit building company Stevens E3, pointed out that “the lower currency has triggered a resurgence in the manufacturing sector.” He also predicts that the provinces whose livelihoods are reliant on oil will experience relief soon. “As oil rebounds, the dollar will climb,” he said. In the meantime, the exchange rate is favorable to those with American money. “The lower our Canadian dollar is, the more incentive there is for U.S. visitors to come and vacation and buy Canadian goods,” Stevens said. Likewise, the depressed loonie means that American conventioneers exhibiting in Canada hire Canadian firms to build their booths because it has become less expensive than shipping the booth across the border. “Because the Canadian dollar is around

30-percent depressed compared to the U.S. dollar, our shop rate is 30 percent lower than a U.S. company that has the same shop rate,” Stevens said. “Canada is on sale.” Brad Henderson of Exhibit Installation Services Inc. (EIS) in Alberta, Canada, agreed. “Dollar for dollar, our rates are the same. So if you have a shop labor rate of $75 in the States, it’s $75 in Canada, but because of the exchange rate, there’s about a $30 difference right now.” EIS is able to provide the same product for 30 percent less than it would cost in the United States, yet, at the same time, the company is able to continue producing quality work. “If someone is looking to buy a Canadian company, it’s cheaper to buy it now that it would be at a par dollar,” he added. “If I buy something for ten dollars Canadian, it will Continued on p. 34 ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 33


CANADIAN ECONOMY UNIQUELY AFFECTS THE TRADE SHOW INDUSTRY

Continued from p. 33 cost me only around seven dollars American. There’s a depreciated Canadian dollar, and as a result, there’s cost saving to be had.” Because Canada is resource-rich in materials used in building exhibits, such as plywood, it is not necessary to import a lot of materials. This ready access to supplies translates into another cost savings for U.S. businesses that use companies such as Stevens E3 to build their exhibits in Canada rather than shipping the exhibit from the United States. However, Stevens acknowledged that there are materials he purchases from the United States: “One of the biggest things is carpet. Atlanta, Georgia, is a global carpet capital, and regardless of where you buy it, Atlanta’s making the carpet.” According to Henderson, the current state of the Canadian economy has changed the way he does business. “The depreciation of the Canadian dollar has really affected a lot of companies in Canada,” he stated. “For

The favorable exchange rate allows Canadian firms to attract new foreign investment from the United States, Europe and elsewhere. many companies, revenues are down, which has forced Canadian trade shows and exhibit-building companies to look for customers outside Canada.” Canadian businesses are expanding their global search for clients. The favorable exchange rate allows Canadian firms to attract new foreign investment not only from the United States, but from Europe and elsewhere.

WHAT IS NAFTA? The U.S. Customs and Border Protection outlines the basics of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which was established in 1992 as a way to expand free trade among the United States, Canada and Mexico. NAFTA’s purpose was to lift tariffs and other barriers that inhibited trade among the neighboring countries of North America. As businesses become ever more global, borders and

34 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Exhibit Installation Services Inc. (EIS) of Alberta, Canada, put together the office area of a large rental exhibit assembled for PDVSA at a show in Edmonton, Alberta. The office complemented massive towers and showcases in the booth and made space for a nice hub where people could sit. Interesting angles and stand-off graphics dressed up the frame and made an interesting central area.

EIS has been “quite active in the States,” Henderson said. “We are doing shows for both American customers exhibit-

ing in the States as well as in Canada.” And a good portion of the company’s production is for Canadian customers

free trade become important issues. The Office of the United States Trade Representative shows 20 countries that have free trade agreements with the United States. According to NAFTAnow.org, “One in five jobs in Canada is in part linked to international trade.” The ability for companies to do business freely with their neighbors has been a great benefit to many companies. Further, the site states, “Canada is using this continental platform as a way to help Canadian businesses embrace


Exhibit Installation Services Inc. (EIS) of Alberta, Canada, reconfigured Solar Turbines’ booth to a smaller, 10’ x 20’ exhibit at an event in Calgary, Alberta. Simple under-lighting and using powder-coated Octanorm help the booth pop. Stand-off letters and bold graphics also help the simple rental look a little bolder.

traveling to American shows. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has also created benefits for Canadian manufacturers. Not only is the manufacturing cost lower for Americans because

of the devalued loonie, but the provisions of NAFTA allow Canadian companies to export goods into the United States without being taxed. Stevens credits NAFTA for increased business. “Because of the exchange rate and NAFTA, the proportion of our U.S. sales has increased considerably,” he said. European clients also benefit financially from having exhibits manufactured in Canada and shipped to the United States, Stevens added. The lopsided exchange rate has also resulted in more international trade shows be-

commercial opportunities around the world.” The Agreement requires that goods crossing borders under NAFTA must bear country-of-origin markings. It also outlines how disputes are handled through negotiations, arbitration and the possibility of a tribunal, should an issue arise between participating parties. Now that NAFTA has reached the 20-year mark, it is being evaluated as the standard by which a new free trade agreement is being evaluated: the Trans Pacific Partnership, which involves 12 countries in the Pacific Rim.

@ExhibitCityNews

ing held in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and Montreal. According to Stevens, “With

the Canadian dollar being low, it’s less expensive for venues, less expensive for hotels and meals, and less expensive for event services.” While the Canadian recession has provided opportunities for the trade show industry in that country, there are still some sacrifices required. As Stevens noted, “It is more expensive for us snowbirds to go to Florida for the winter.”

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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 35


DESIGN

caption info TK

Riverview Systems Group Produces Massive Exhibit for Zimmer Biomet LIVE EVENT DESIGNER DELIVERS “ARENA ROCK CONCERT”-STYLE EXPERIENCE FOR WORLD LEADER IN ORTHOPEDIC HEALTH SOLUTIONS BY EXHIBIT CITY NEWS

38 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


PROJECT CREDITS Zimmer Biomet Convention Services Team: George Schwenk, Jessica Barger, Ricardo Case, Lee Walker Production Design & Execution: Riverview Systems Group Exhibit Design and Construction: Catalyst Exhibits Exhibit Installation and Dismantle: Tru Service Group Media: Varipix Automation Engineering: TAIT Rigging: Stage Rigging, Inc.

In March, Riverview Systems Group marked its eighteenth collaboration with Zimmer Biomet at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2016 Annual Meeting (AAOS) at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. Riverview Systems Group, an award-winning, full-service provider of engaging @ExhibitCityNews

and innovative live events, partnered with Zimmer Biomet, a global leader in musculoskeletal healthcare, to provide extensive production design services in support of its exhibit presence. The AAOS is the most important industry event, attended by over 15,000 orthopedic surgeons and allied health professionals.

However, calling what Riverview produced merely “an exhibit presence” is a bit of an understatement. In reality, the nearly 20,000-squarefoot, two-floor exhibit booth (complete with conference rooms and demonstration labs), featured a 16x48-foot, six-section automated LED wall that would move together and break apart depending on

specific content, as well as an immense lighting rig. “The technology advances and automated elements we incorporated into our approach for the Zimmer Biomet booth this year is more typical of a state-of-the-art rock concert than what is normally seen on a trade show floor,” Continued on p. 40 ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 39


DESIGN

Continued from p. 39 Riverview Systems Group CEO Evan Williams noted. “This was a multi-faceted custom booth environment that allowed for a seamless and cohesive presentation of brand messages throughout,” Williams added. “Because of the enormity of the project, and to realize a heightened level of automation, we partnered with TAIT, a market 40 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

leader in developing live event engineering systems for dozens of top rock tours, including U2, the Rolling Stones, Taylor Swift and Madonna.” TAIT is a world-market leader in staging, scenic design, kinetic architecture, LED integration, show control and automated rigging The Zimmer project called on Riverview’s comprehensive array of technical and creative services, as well as its exten-

sive inventory of state-ofthe-art equipment to provide all lighting, audio and video equipment; onsite technical support for any AV-related needs; and management of the delivery of all content to LED walls and displays throughout the exhibit. The veteran live-event design and production experts actually began work on the AAOS campaign nearly a year in advance with a comprehen-

sive rigging and engineering analysis. From there, they designed the support for all hanging elements, ranging from lighting, LED and audio systems to exhibit signage and headers weighing in excess of 10,000 lbs. “Internally, some of our team called it ‘Planet Zimmer,’ given the sheer size and scope of it—the overContinued on p. 42


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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 41


DESIGN

Continued from p. 40

ZIMMER BIOMET BY THE NUMBERS

170’ X 110’ 2 FLOORS FOOTPRINT

28,000 FT2 USABLE FLOOR SPACE

ACCOMMODATING CONFERENCE ROOMS, PRODUCT DISPLAYS AND DEMONSTRATION LABS.

46 TONS 46 2,350 FT. OF TRUSS

200

LED TILES

16’ H X 48’ W 700 LED DISPLAY WALL

90

1-TON MOTORS

42 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

OF TRUSS, HOISTS AND WEIGHTS

LIGHTING FIXTURES

all system, including truss and hoists, weighs over 46 tons,” Williams said. “This year really embodied that feeling, not only in size, but the design itself, which was very solar-system-like. Large, sweeping headers throughout the space created a central core of activity,” he added. “This area was led by the automated video system delivering the content about Zimmer Biomet Products. The booth really was a planet of its own.” Looking ahead, Williams said he foresees a future in which these types of massive booth displays become even more prevalent because, he noted, “It’s not really about

thinking ‘outside the box,’ but rather, making the box really big. “You hear it all the time: ‘content is king.’ But this year, more than ever before, content is driving production design, rather than the other way around,” he added. “Clients demand wide aspect ratios and display technologies to fit with their content desires and formats, and we as solutions providers have to muster the design acumen and technologies to make it happen. The LED automation on the Zimmer Biomet project exemplifies this trend.” It’s a trend that will continue for at least another year, as Riverview is already at work on the Zimmer Biomet booth for the 2017 AAOS show.


A Q&A WITH EVAN WILLIAMS Riverview Systems Group’s Evan Williams spoke with us about its recent project for Zimmer Biomet’s 20,000 square foot booth presence at the recent AAOS 2016 annual meeting, as well as trends and challenges facing today’s live event designers.

Q

For the past 18 years, Riverview has supported Zimmer Biomet’s exhibitor presence at the AAOS. That’s a long time. Can you comment on the nature of your collaborative relationship with Zimmer Biomet, and how Riverview continues to step up creatively year after year?

A

It’s not really about thinking “outside the box,” but rather making the box really big. This exhibit has been enormous for 18 years, and Riverview and the technology available have evolved a lot over that time. I think, in a nutshell, that it is simply our passion for the new and interesting that’s been the difference-maker. Our internal ecosystem is set up to support our vision and carry it through to completion, whether it’s a simple show or a complex one like Zimmer Biomet.

Q

Tell us about some of the creative and technical challenges you faced this time around supporting Zimmer Biomet’s exhibitor presence at the AAOS.

A

Given the design, we needed to hang anywhere from 40 to 50 tons of equipment and scenic elements above the booth space, so rigging is always the principal technical challenge. Because of this, every design is built from the rigging down. All hanging elements of the booth, including lighting, audio, video and exhibit pieces are taken into account as we build the system, which gave us the control to balance out every aspect visually and accentuate all of the elements that make it work as a unified design. Because of the enormity of the project, design and budgeting work begins on the next year’s exhibit almost immediately after the current show is over. After we can figure out how to out-do the previous year’s impact, we then discuss the needs and targets with our client to determine how to best approach a given campaign, support new initiatives, etc.  From there, we begin to work with the content, exhibit provider, and marketing partners to develop what we end up with.

Q

Speaking more broadly about production design, you recently remarked that “content is king.” How does that relate to Riverview?

@ExhibitCityNews

A

This should not come as a big surprise, but more often this year than ever before, content is driving production design, rather than the other way around. Clients demand wide aspect ratios and display technologies to fit with their content desires and formats, and we as content providers and delivery facilitators have to muster the design acumen and technologies to make it happen.

Q

The Zimmer Biomet project required Riverview to provide an extensive inventory of equipment and manage the delivery of all content to LED walls and displays throughout the exhibit. Tell us about the LED experience at this event and how the technology is affecting Riverview’s overall approach to projects and its benefits to clients.

A

Through our collaborative effort with Zimmer Biomet and other third-party vendors, we were able to rely on advances in technology and automation in our approach to the booth this year that is generally more typical of a stateof-the-art arena-like rock show than what is normally seen on a trade show floor. There were six large moving LED panels—each measuring 7’ wide by 14’ tall—that together with automation that synchronized the content to the LED movement, allowed us to take this year’s initiative to a level well beyond what has been done previously. As LED light sources get brighter and more consistent, it won’t be long before our lighting inventory, both automated and conventional, will all be LED-based. ETC [RE1] just released its retrofit LED engine for the Source 4 Ellipsoidal spotlight—the industry standard in conventional profile fixtures—and while it’s not yet as bright as we would all like it to be, it’s a welcome solution to convert our vast inventory of Source 4’s to LED technology sooner than later. I expect that by sometime in 2018, our entire lighting inventory, numbering some 800 units, will all be LED driven. While the price of admission to upgrade the inventory to all-LED is still quite expensive, there is a tremendous economy for the exhibitor when using these sources. They draw significantly less power than traditional incandescent sources, on the order of a 60- to 80-percent decrease. This translates to far less costly electrical bills on the trade show floor, and the lamp life is in excess of 10 times that of the older sources, so our maintenance costs are greatly reduced as well. This keeps the overall cost down for everyone.

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 43


LABOR

Team building exercise.

FINDING THE FUTURE I&D WORKFORCE FOR LOCAL 510 BY LESLEY MARTIN

As Baby Boomers are retiring from the workforce, job openings are becoming available for Millennials. But the inconsistent schedules that go along with work in the trade show industry make it difficult for unions to maintain sufficient staffing. A decade without newcomers The events that took place on September 11, 2001, shook the world and nearly destroyed the trade show industry. As trade shows across the United States were canceled, thousands of people were suddenly out of work, and installation and dismantle crews were some of the hardest hit. During the next decade, work was extremely competitive, and those who landed jobs held their ground, especially against newcomers without experience or connections. This was especially true in the unions where work is 44 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

assigned to senior members first. With barely enough to keep the veterans busy, apprentices were not given the opportunity to gain experience and rise in seniority. Fast-forward 15 years, and the tradeshow industry is in the midst of an upswing. Meanwhile, the majority of I&D crews are comprised of Baby Boomers approaching retirement without a younger workforce to replace them. Forecasting demand San Francisco, Calif., is a city booming with innovaContinued on p. 46


@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 45


LABOR

Continued from p. 44 tion. Moscone Center is a hot spot for tradeshows, currently operating at capacity and undergoing a $500 million improvement and expansion project. “The [renovated] convention center is opening in 2018, which will bring more shows to the city and the surrounding area,” said Joe Toback, President of Local 510 Sign & Display Union, which provides I&D labor for San Francisco, Oakland, San José, and all the way to Monterey. For Local 510, which has a workforce with a median age of 53, a shortage of labor is a real possibility. Toback said, “If it continues the way it’s going, I see the need for workforce doubling. We have to recruit now.” Recruits of all backgrounds The hard requirements to apply for the union are minimal: Applicants must be at least 18 years of age or older, have at least a GED and possess a California driver’s license. Candidates are interviewed and drug tested before being accepted into the training program, which requires that they complete 3,600 hours of training, or 40 hours per quarter over the course of three years. The union recruits at high schools, pre-apprenticeship schools and community colleges, but most of the applicants are referred by word of mouth and are already familiar with tradeshows from friends and family. With Continued on p. 48 46 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Above, Local 510 JATC holds its Ground School For Riggers in three days of classes to teach the rigging arts. The classes are geared towards groundpersons, but students are given hands-on experience in every aspect of the craft from boom lift driving to sign hanging. Below, the 2016 apprentice class.


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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 47


LABOR

Continued from p. 46 a short checklist, Local 510 receives applicants of all ages, education levels and backgrounds. Toback explained that “a union is a collection of people from all walks of life who have gathered together to agree on working conditions and negotiate for benefits and wages that help them all.” People looking to join the union are drawn to its lowcost benefits and security. During a time when universities drive students into debt and send graduates into a competitive job market that values experience over degrees, the union’s free, experience-based training that secures jobs upon graduation is an attractive alternative. Some union members are highly educated and have worked in the corporate world in stressful careers—like investments— but chose to leave the rat race for the union’s steadier, less competitive profession. Also, the union’s model of allowing members to choose when to work offers the flexibility to care for families or to work multiple jobs. Then there are those of retirement age who continue working to receive the union’s healthcare benefits. Retaining top talent Local 510 looks for people who possess a strong work ethic, problem-solving capabilities and customer-facing people skills. If the worker is talented and driven, there is an opportunity for creating a fulfilling career in the union. 48 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

However, the tradeshow industry’s inconsistent workflow drives ambitious workers to look for other opportunities during slow times. Local 510 has difficulty competing with similar trades, such as electrical, carpentry or construction, which provide steady work and predictable hours. Future leaders Retaining employees is an issue for all companies today. The Internet allows anyone to browse and apply for jobs, and recruiters search LinkedIn to poach top talent. Unlike Baby Boomers, who spent their entire careers at one company, the next generations are mobile and opportunistic. On average, Millennials spend two to five years at a company before switching to another. While today’s career landscape encourages employees to jump quickly into new and exciting ventures, the union model depends on a total commitment from its members. Unions were born at a time when corporations exploited unskilled workers. Union members stood together to fight for equality among all members, even the older and less skilled. As Toback himself reaches retirement age, he admits that there isn’t a group that has shown the dedication and willingness to commit to becoming the next generation of leaders for Local 510. For hard workers with ambition, Local 510 opens huge opportunities for advancement. To learn more or to apply for training, visit Local 510’s Web site: http:// www.local510.org/index.html

Team building exercise.

Mike Shaffer underlines a point while teaching a show site graphics class.


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The FCC fined Marriott International Inc. $600,000 for intentionally interfering with guestsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; personal Wi-Fi hotspots at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn.


TECHONOLOGY

Status of Exclusive Internet Providers in Question BY AMBER JOHNSON

In the wake of a series of crackdowns on venues found to be blocking personal Wi-Fi hotspots, the meetings and conventions industry is still grappling with the implications of the Federal Communications Commission’s position that no entity can interfere with the personal wireless access point of another. But even though millions of dollars in fines have been levied so far, a glance through randomly selected venue and show materials offers little indication that a sweeping change in policies and attitudes has taken place. Numerous venues still flout the FCC’s position by claiming to require the use of an exclusive Internet provider while on the premises or by warning that the use of personal hotspots is prohibited, despite the FCC’s advisories on the matter. For a variety of reasons debated by advocates and foes, it has been common practice in convention and conference centers for in-house Internet providers to block visitors from connecting to their own personal hotspots. While network administrators say the reason is to preserve the security and quality of the building’s own Wi-Fi structure, critics say it is to force exhibitors and attendees to use the sometimes exorbitantly priced inhouse provider. Regardless, the FCC says it’s illegal, and its enforcement division @ExhibitCityNews

has spent the past 18 months handing out penalties to companies it found engaging in the practice. The controversy over the right to connectivity came to the forefront in October 2014, when the FCC announced FCC REGULATIONS Section 333 of the Communications Act provides that “No person shall willfully or maliciously interfere with or cause interference to any radio communications of any station licensed or authorized by or under this Act or operated by the United States Government.” Regarding equipment designed to interfere with signals, the Act states, “Federal law prohibits the operation, marketing, or sale of any type of jamming equipment, including devices that interfere with cellular and Personal Communication Services (PCS), police radar, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and wireless networking services (Wi-Fi).” it had fined Marriott International Inc. $600,000 for intentionally interfering with guests’ personal Wi-Fi hotspots at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn. More fines followed, with convention center

technology providers including Smart City Networks and M.C. Dean each being slapped with fines exceeding $700,000. The Hilton hotel brand was also fined $25,000 for not cooperating sufficiently with an FCC investigation into its Wi-Fi practices, and FCC officials say they are just getting warmed up. Giants like Google and Microsoft lined up across the battle line from the Hospitality and Lodging Association, each leveraging a significant following to apply pressure on the FCC to redouble or rescind its position. Citing open airwaves legislation first drafted in 1934, the FCC has been unwavering. “In the 21st Century, Wi-Fi represents an essential on-ramp to the Internet,” FCC officials said in a statement. “Personal Wi-Fi networks, or ‘hot spots,’ are an important way that consumers connect to the Internet. Willful or malicious interference with Wi-Fi hot spots is illegal. The Enforcement Bureau has seen a disturbing trend in which hotels and other commercial establishments block wireless consumers from using their own personal Wi-Fi hot spots on the commercial establishment’s premises. As a result, the bureau is protecting consumers by aggressively investigating Continued on p. 52 ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 51


TECHONOLOGY

Continued from p. 51 and acting against such unlawful intentional interference.” According to Ian Framson, CEO and founder of Trade Show Internet, blocking access to hotspots has always been illegal, and his company has filed many complaints about such interference with the FCC, including the one that resulted in the $750,000 fine last year against Smart City. In years past, complaints like his garnered little attention from FCC officials, but a change in leadership in 2014 prompted the agency to begin taking a strong stance against the practice. Intentional Signal Blocking As a provider of Internet services for exhibitors, Trade Show Internet and companies like it use a variety of technologies to create independent connectivity in venues, from kits that use cellular signals to those that rely on satellite. For those accessing hotspots using cellular signals, venues can block access by intercepting a device’s attempts to connect

to the network. Equipment in the venue bounces the device’s signal back to it, creating something called a deauthentication packet. It also creates an endless loop in which the device is trying to connect but cannot. To detect such jamming efforts, Framson’s company uses routers that log deauthentication packets received, and it has routinely reported venues to the FCC for years, he said. Companies punished by the FCC have defended the legality of their actions, citing the need to protect building visitors from hackers and their responsibility to provide a network that is not crowded, and as such degenerated, by multiple concurrent signals. Even so, they have agreed to acquiesce to the demands of the FCC, though numerous venue Web sites still refer to Internet suppliers as “exclusive providers.” Smart City, for example, which serves 35 venues around the country, is still listed by most of them as the only firm able to provide Internet connectivity at events. The I-X Center in Cleveland and the Baltimore Convention Center have published material stating that the use

THE MISSION OF THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulates interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. An independent U.S. government agency overseen by Congress, the FCC is the United States’ primary authority for communications laws, regulation and technological innovation. In its work facing economic opportunities and challenges associated with rapidly evolving advances in global communications, the agency capitalizes on its competencies in promoting competition, innovation and investment in broadband services and facilities supporting the nation’s economy by ensuring an appropriate competitive framework for the unfolding of the communications revolution, encouraging the highest and best use of spectrum domestically and internationally, revising media regulations so that new technologies flourish alongside diversity and localism, and providing leadership in strengthening the defense of the nation’s communications infrastructure. The commission is organized into bureaus and offices based on function. The Enforcement Bureau (EB) is the primary FCC unit responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Communications Act, the Commission’s rules, orders and various licensing terms and conditions. EB’s mission is to investigate and respond quickly to potential unlawful conduct to ensure (1) consumer protection in an era of complex communications; (2) a level playing field to promote robust competition; (3) efficient and responsible use of the public airwaves; and (4) strict compliance with public safety-related rules. 52 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

WHAT TO DO IF YOU SUSPECT WI-FI BLOCKING If you have reason to believe your personal Wi-Fi hot spot has been blocked, you can file a complaint with the FCC. To do so, visit www.fcc.gov/complaints, or call 1-888-CALL-FCC. When contacting the FCC, you are encouraged to provide as much detail as possible regarding the potential Wi-Fi blocking, including the date, time, location and possible source. of personal hotspots or outside Internet services is prohibited in the facilities or against the license agreement for the space, despite the FCC’s position that they cannot prevent building visitors from using them. Some exhibitors have intensive technology needs that require the kind of robust network that in-house providers can supply, and venues often offer exclusivity in exchange for equipment and infrastructure upgrades by providers to the building’s technology offerings. But Framson thinks the telecommunications business is destined for a fair amount of upheaval when 5G service becomes commonplace, as he believes it will be hardy enough to handle most exhibiting requirements. All Internet vendors, inhouse and otherwise, will need to price their services competitively, he said, if they want to stay in business. Some venues, such as the San Jose McEnery Convention Center, are jumping out ahead of the curve with free Wi-Fi on state-ofthe-art networks, an offering that ups the ante in an industry where organizers and exhibitors can pay six figures for service. The playing field for Internet service might be leveled by the FCC’s new attention toward jamming activities, but there are other, less publicized, ways that venues can manipulate the cellular services exhibitors need for hotspots. Framson said indirect interference can happen through the venues’ contracts for its distributed antenna systems (DAS), which


can take cell service for one provider or all providers off-line easily. Simply put, many event facilities in the country have what is essentially an internal cellular tower that boosts signals for people inside the building. Individual cell companies must negotiate with each venue to have the signal boosted for its customers, and there is no industry standard for what those costs are. Built of concrete and rebar, many convention centers rely on DAS technology for reliable cellular signals. If a cellular service provider will not pay the stated price to access the system, then their service for customers is likely to stop at the door of the venue. For example, in a long-running conflict with Verizon, Framson said, the Jacob K. Javits Center in New York City would not add Verizon to its DAS network. The cellular company has positioned towers across the street

from the venue and pointed them in its direction, but Verizon users are likely to pick up a cell signal in only a few areas on the venue’s main level. As such, anyone counting on a Verizon hotspot would likely have difficulty connecting as long as the stalemate over the DAS network is in place. Those DAS networks can be incorporated facility-wide or in specific areas, such as ballrooms, lobbies or meeting areas. For that reason, Framson advises exhibitors planning to use cellular hotspots to contact the venue and ask where the DAS network is deployed and for which cellular providers. “If the Wi-Fi provider also handles the DAS, you have a potential conflict of interest,” Framson said, “because if you see hotspots and know they are coming through the DAS, you could take the service offline and confine exhibitors to the in-house provider.”

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Little has been said publicly about Wi-Fi jamming and FCC enforcement since M.C. Dean was fined $718,000 in November 2015 for blocking Wi-Fi in the Baltimore Convention Center. Will Wiquist, deputy press secretary for the FCC, could not comment on the existence of additional complaints or the status of any ongoing investigations, though he confirmed that M.C. Dean received the last fine levied and that any future actions would be revealed via press release. For his part, Framson continues to speak out about the unfair monopolization that signal interference creates. “Consumers have always had the right to deploy their own cellular hotspots and have their own networks operating on the unlicensed spectrum,” he said. “Anyone saying they can’t is being intentionally deceptive and trying to instill fear and uncertainty to get business. nd that’s a business model that is dying.”

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TECHNOLOGY

Virtual Reality: Not Just for Video Games Anymore VR MAKES WAVES AT CONVENTIONS AND TRADE SHOWS AROUND THE WORLD BY JESSICA ABLAMSKY

What if you could explore the site of your next convention without booking a plane ticket or offer virtual attendance to general sessions and exhibits? Fortunately for the tradeshow and convention industry, that day has nearly arrived. Technical advances in virtual reality have finally made possible a long awaited promise—full immersion in a digital world. VR is not just for video games. Although the VR industry is still in its infancy, the technology is already being applied to a wide range of businesses and making a splash at conventions in the U.S. and around the world.

What is VR? Virtual reality uses computers to simulate a three-dimensional world that can be interacted with in a realistic way. It tricks the brain into thinking an experience is actually happening, a concept known as “presence.” “The mind will think it’s real when there is a proper mix of audio, video and various other sensory information,” said Prithvi Kandanda, CEO and co-founder of Ease VR, a startup that offers analytics for virtual reality. “If there is any mismatch, the mind will immediately know that this is not real.” Full immersion in a digital world is the real promise of VR,

and it has been achieved by pricey systems like Oculus Rift. But immersion comes at a cost. Like other VR systems, users may experience dizziness, disorientation and other symptoms and are warned to ease into VR by starting out with a few minutes at a time and gradually increasing. The Hype Virtual reality sales will reach $2.86 billion this year and $40.26 billion by 2020, according to SuperData Research Inc., a market research firm. Virtual Reality has evolved, making the technology more immersive at a lower price point than ever before, according to Danfung Dennis, the CEO and founder of ConditionOne, a company that develops VR films. “Advances in high-resolution mobile screens, low latency tracking, and optics and huge increases in computing power make VR a technology that creates a strong sense of presence—a feeling that you are actually there— possible outside of university research labs and high-end training simulations,” Dennis

said. “We now all have the key ingredients for VR in our pocket—the Smartphone.” Options for experiencing VR content include low-end viewers like the popular Google Cardboard, which retails for about $20, and higher-end headsets like Samsung Gear VR for $99.99 and Sony Playstation VR for $399.99. VR megastar Oculus Rift requires powerful computers with packages that start at approximately $1,500. VR on the Convention Circuit Virtual reality is a natural fit for the tourism industry, which is using the technology to promote destinations to business clientele and tourists. The Utah Office of Tourism recently partnered with ConditionOne to create VR content for travel sector industry events, according to Jay Kinghorn, director of communications and digital strategy for the Utah Office of Tourism. The videos show off rock spires in Bryce Canyon National Park, Navajo traditional dancers at Monument Valley and other attractions using Samsung Gear headsets. The

THE HISTORY OF VIRTUAL REALITY Anyone who played video games in the ’90s knows that virtual reality is not new. The technology stretches back to at least 1929, according to the Virtual Reality Society, with the first commercial flight simulator, a machine that helped train pilots by mimicking the experience of actual flight. Like many fantasies made real, modern VR and its hightech headsets were perhaps first imagined in science fiction. Published in 1935, Pygmalion’s Spectacles by Stanley G. Weinbaum features goggles that allow the wearer to experience a fictional world through sight, sound, taste and smell. A similar concept was used to create the Sensorama, 54 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

an arcade-style cabinet developed in the mid-1950s by cinematographer Morton Heilig. The Sonsorama used a 3-D display, stereo speakers, fans, smell generators and a vibrating chair to immerse people in his films. The first VR mounted display was patented in 1960, with more advanced headsets developed throughout the 1960s. But the name “virtual reality” was not coined until 1987. A series of virtual reality products were released in the 1990s, including video arcade games and 1995’s Nintendo Virtual Boy, a 3-D gaming console that was a commercial failure. In 1993, video game giant Sega announced a VR headset for Sega Genesis that it never released due to technical difficulties.


Virtual reality uses computers to simulate a three-dimensional world.

bison appeared so real that many people reached out to touch them, Kinghorn said. Utah’s virtual content was intended as an enhancement to one-on-one conversations between marketers and potential leads, but it also attracted additional visitors “just to see what the buzz was all about,” he added. The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, which operates the Las Vegas Convention Center and Cashman Center, recently released a user-friendly VR app known as Vegas VR. Vegas VR shows off major attractions in the City of Lights, and content

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was created in-house using a 360-degree camera. The app, which was debuted at ITB Berlin, a travel trade show, can be viewed with a Smartphone, Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift and other virtual reality viewers. “The smiles that you see on people’s faces are really entertaining,” said Courtney Fitzgerald, brand public relations manager for LVCVA. “We were at a conference in Brazil. There was a line all the way across the floor waiting to test the virtual reality.” The content was originally intended for tourists, but the response from business clientele,

including meeting and convention planners, has been overwhelmingly positive, Fitzgerald said. The app allowed them to be instantly transported from the convention floor to the city’s most exciting attractions and helped give them the information they need when planning business destinations. Exhibit houses are also excited about the potential for virtual reality. Catalyst Exhibits, a full-service exhibit house in Chicago, is creating a virtual lab for a company that sells medical equipment, and it also created a virtual reality game to market an Internet security product from RSA, said Jordan Stocker, digital marketing manager for Catalyst Exhibits. “RSA had a line for that game throughout the entire show,” Stocker said. “They had great feedback in getting their message across.” A virtual reality game can take one to two months to create, but the right team can get it done in two weeks, Stocker added.

Virtual reality was also showcased at an event presented by AASA, the School Superintendents Association, to demonstrate how the technology could be used to help teach children who are not in the classroom, said Dave Weil, vice president of event services for SmithBucklin, an association management and services company in Chicago. If virtual reality catches on, he foresees a future where events can be planned in VR and event attendance can be expanded through physical and virtual attendance. The technology could be a powerful tool for sales, because instead of handing out brochures, sales teams could walk potential sponsors through available space to demonstrate the value the coffee break room and other costly locations. “It’s something that we’re educating ourselves about, but we can envision the possibilities,” Weil said. “It’s something that we’re going to be watching pretty closely.”

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 55


INDUSTRY AWARENESS

Global Exhibitions Day Set to Increase Bonds and Awareness BY AMBER JOHNSON

56 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

and the importance of international trade on the business community, both in terms of innovation and competition. The campaign will also emphasize the value of exhibiting for individual companies, encouraging them to grow their programs and rally for support with policymakers in their circles. And the drive is intended to celebrate the array of professions involved in the exhibit industry and the

individuals who serve critical roles in sustaining and growing exhibiting programs. Dedicated social media accounts, a Web site, a logo, a hashtag and public relations outreach are broadcasting a cohesive voice calling on individuals and organizations to join the cause, emphasizing that the development of international trade hinges on the success of the tradeshow industry. Organizations around

LIST OF ASSOCIATIONS CURRENTLY MEMBERS OF THE TASK FORCE: UFI (Global), AAXO and EXSA (South Africa), AEFI and CFI (Italy), AEO (UK), AFE (Spain), AUMA and FAMAB (Germany), CEFA and CENTREX (Central Europe), EEIA (EU), IAEE and SISO (USA), IECA (Indonesia), IEIA (India), LECA (Lebanon), PCEI (Poland), RUEF (Russia) and UNIMEV (France).

Photos courtesy of UFI

To draw attention to the importance of the exhibition industry in the world marketplace, leaders from around the globe are banding together to create the first Global Exhibitions Day on June 8, 2016. The initiative was formed through the partnership of The Global Association of the Exhibition Industry (UFI) and the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE), two associations that serve the international exhibition community, though many more organizations have since come to the table to collaborate with them on the effort. Together, partners have devised a campaign that will spotlight the far-reaching impact of exhibitions on the economy


Photos courtesy of UFI

Task force session

the world are working independently on furthering the success of the trade show industry, but the real power is in joining forces, organizers say. “There are many great national and regional initiatives addressing exhibitors, visitors, policymakers, and other stakeholders,” said IAEE chairperson Julie Smith and UFI president Sergey Alexeev in a jointly released statement. “Uniting these achievements under one common umbrella will strengthen the message and multiply the reach.” The campaign is modeled after an American Exhibitions Day, which celebrates its third anniversary on June 7-8, 2016. The U.S event focuses on raising awareness through lobbying, with the @ExhibitCityNews

in Paris.

industry’s most influential leaders from around the country converging in Washington, D.C., to meet with lawmakers and media people. The initiative has been effective in opening a dialogue with government officials about U.S. regulations that stymie the exhibition industry, particularly when it comes to international attendees and exhibitors. The effort has been enormously successful in raising the profile of the industry in the eyes of lawmakers and the general public, with an estimated 4 million impressions in 2015 alone. IAEE and UFI have garnered the support of industry associations representing Continued on p. 58 ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 57


INDUSTRY AWARENESS

MOST IMPORTANT ISSUES: DETAIL BY REGION AND TYPE OF ACTIVITY FOR THE FIVE TOP ISSUES IDENTIFIED GLOBALLY

South Africa, Italy, the United Kingdom, Spain, Germany, Central Europe, the European Union, the United States, Indonesia, India, Lebanon, Asia, Mexico, Poland, Central and South America, Hong Kong, Canada, Australasia, Russia and France. According to Kai Hattendorf, UFI managing director, more than 30 associations in all, plus dozens of organizers, venues and service providers and hundreds of individuals have pledged support and will be taking part in Global Exhibitions Day activities. Aside from being encouraged to use the #GED16 hashtag and logo in communications, industry people are being urged to form networking events, create informational videos and share professional stories of success to foster understanding about the world of exhibitions. According to Hattendorf, events are springing 58 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

up around the globe, including a gala in Hong Kong, a conference in Moscow, open houses in Germany and special events in Australia. The Global Exhibitions Day Web site has a growing list of â&#x20AC;&#x153;selfiesâ&#x20AC;? submitted by companies and individuals supporting the initiative. The rise in advocacy, both in the United States and around the world, correlates to positive growth and buoyant attitudes in the tradeshow industry. According to UFI research released in early 2016, markets around the world reported an uptick in revenue and an optimism that the trend would continue, which marked a sharp contrast to the state of the industry during previous Recession studies. The 2016 UFI Global Exhibition Barometer, which polled 240 industry professionals in 58 countries, found that in every region of the globe, about

two-thirds of the respondents expect an increase in profits during the coming year. An average of one-third of respondents, who largely represent venues, suppliers and show organizers, said they experienced increases of greater than 10 percent in their 2015 operating profits, though actual figures varied dramatically by region. In the United States and the Middle East, more than 50 percent said their increases were greater than 10 percent, while in Russia, just 8 percent experienced the same. Brazil also lagged behind the world average with just 25 percent of those responding saying profits had grown by more than 10 percent during the preceding year. UFI divides the world into 12 regions and eight major markets for the Global Exhibition Barometer, and in every market respondents indicated they have plans

Graphic courtesy of UFI

Continued from p. 57


Graphic courtesy of UFI

to increase the type and number of exhibition and event activities they participate in. However, just 20 percent on average said they intend to expand their activities into new countries. There were sharp divisions in this area of responses as well, with plans to expand to new regions having little correlation to a marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s increase in profits. For example, while 53 percent of respondents in the United States saw profits rise by more than 10 percent last year, just 13 percent said they intend to extend activities into new regions. Though the region had a similar increase in profitability to the United States, Middle East respondents are far more likely to grow geographically, with 45 percent saying they planned to do so. In contrast, Brazilian firms reported half as much profitability and twice the intention to extend operations into new global markets. But even in markets where a high proportion of respondents said they do

The trade show industry is one of the most powerful economic drivers in the world marketplace. not plan to expand globally, the state of the global exhibition economy is of high concern, even surpassing concerns about local competition and the local economy. That global concern has served as a catalyst for movements such as Global Exhibitions Day, which is forging bonds between countries and regions that had

little formal interaction in the trade show arena previously. While the purpose of Exhibitions Day in the United States is to influence lawmakers and media representatives, the aspiration of Global Exhibitions Day is to strengthen the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s network of industry associations, professionals and suppliers and to build understanding about the importance of face-to-face meetings on economies in the international marketplace. In the United States alone, the economic impact of the exhibition industry is estimated to be a $71.3 billion contribution to the U.S. gross domestic product, according to IAEE numbers. Similar figures are reflected in economies around the globe, making the tradeshow industry one of the most powerful economic drivers in the world marketplace. For more about Global Exhibitions Day, visit www.ufi.org.

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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 59


INTERNATIONAL COLUMN

International Trade Shows in the United States: Uniting for a Common Goal by Larry Kulchawik

A

s the world grows smaller, international trade shows grow taller, attracting attendees from around the world. Although many trade shows have a regional focus, every industry holds a world-class trade show somewhere on the planet that attracts a global market. CES, IMTS, Detroit Auto Show, RSNA, Pack Expo, Minexpo and Conexpo are American trade shows that market to the world, with exhibitors and attendees arriving from every inhabited continent. One such U.S. event is the Coverings Show, most recently held April 18-21, 2016, at Chicago’s McCormick Place. While international exhibitors at American events might normally represent 30 to 35 percent of attendees, for the Coverings Show, 78 percent of the total exhibitors came from abroad. The show, which is promoted as the Global Tile and Stone Experience, is the premier international trade fair and expo dedicated exclusively to showcasing the newest in ceramic tile and natural stone and introducing some of the most innovative products in that category in the world. The exposition also serves as a valuable resource for continuing education for all 60 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

categories of attendees, with accredited seminars and live demonstration sessions conducted throughout the event. It has grown to be the largest and most important show of its kind, featuring exhibitors from more than 40 countries and attracting thousands of distributors, retailers, fabricators and architectural and design professionals representing this dynamic industry. What is unique about this show is that the majority of exhibits are designed and built in Europe and shipped over with carpenters and stone masons. They follow a European approach to exhibit design, with raised floors and high walls, most of which are covered in stone. Almost all exhibitors partner with a U.S. exhibit builder or installation company. When in Rome American show site regulations, methods and labor requirements are often misunderstood or misinterpreted by the international exhibit suppliers who ship and install

their exhibits. Service items, such as material handling (the dirty word “drayage”), electrical, cleaning and catering, cannot be executed by the international work crew, as is done in Europe. At American shows, exhibitors must work with the show contractor to obtain these services. The exhibitors who have the fewest problems Alfredo are those Montanari, who have owner, A&M Production previously worked in the United States and recognize the virtue of “when in Rome, do as the Romans do.” I subscribe to the theory that there is no right way; there is no wrong way; there is only a different way. If you know and respect what is different, you are on your way to success in any region of the world. One of the major points of confusion at Coverings is the labor regulations. International exhibitors and suppliers who did the Coverings Show last year in Orlando, Fla., were allowed to do much of the install labor themselves. This labor regulation does

not apply in Chicago. Florida is a “right-to-work” state, and Illinois is not. Chicago requires that the labor team consist of a certain percentage of union labor to international workers. The installation labor is monitored by McCormick Place staff and is firmly enforced. Those international companies who prepared in advance and partnered with a U.S. labor company were then guided well and had few problems during set-up. European exhibit design and fabrication methods are different from American ones. Almost all international exhibits at Coverings had a raised floor and a bar area, and much of each exhibit was fitted, painted and stone-covered on site. This is not a common practice in the United States, but because it was the Coverings Show, the product in many cases was a design component of the exhibit. Stone dust and the smell of mortar were everywhere during set-up! The International Experience A majority of international exhibitors and exhibit design companies were represented at this year’s Covering Show. Continued on p. 62


“BEST EXHIBITORLIVE SHOW TO DATE.”

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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 61


INTERNATIONAL COLUMN

Continued from p. 60 Companies from Italy, Brazil, China, Spain, Portugal, Turkey and North America all had a presence. Exhibit company A&M Production of Reggio Emilia, Italy, represented 26 exhibits at the Coverings Show, and one of its exhibitors won Best of Show. All the A&M exhibits were shipped in from Italy, along with 30 of its staff to supervise and lay stone work. Company owner Alfredo Montanari started as a tile and stone designer and then was asked to design an exhibit for one of his customers. After successfully doing so, he realized that his newfound skill in designing exhibits to complement the tiles was both fun and profitable. One customer led to another, and over the last 30 years, Montanari has become the premier expert for companies displaying their products at stone and tile tradeshows worldwide. The company has expanded and now does work globally for retail and architectural interiors, as well.

A&M did its first exhibit at Kitchen and Bath in 1985 in Philadelphia. “Doing business there was quite an eye-opening experience compared to Europe,” Montanari said. “We learned the ways of a U.S.

Ceramics Exhibition in Valencia, Spain; and Batimat, the International Construction and Interior Exhibition in Moscow, Russia. The majority of the exhibits are covered with stone, much

“We … work with a trusted local partner to avoid getting our fingers burned.” – Alfredo Montanari, owner, A&M Production of Reggio Emilia, Italy

trade show by putting our fingers in the fire. We have since learned to work with a trusted local partner to avoid getting our fingers burned,” he added. A&M has a strong presence at each of the four major stone and tile shows in the world: Cersaie, the International Exhibition of Ceramic Tile and Bathroom Furnishings in Bologna, Italy; Coverings, the Global Tile and Stone Experience in the United States; Cevisama, the International

of which is scrapped at the end of the event. The frames, counters and specialty items are stored in a local warehouse. Because A&M maintains facilities in Italy, Russia and the United States, shipping charges for the re-use of components are kept to a minimum. The company produced the Italian Association of Ceramics’ exhibit, Ceramics of Italy, at Coverings. Exhibit designer Eva Perez de Vega, co-founder of e+i studio in New York

LESSONS LEARNED ABOUT INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATIONS International exhibitors in the United States need to recalculate when thinking about preparing for the show. When working internationally, it is best to partner with a local company for guidance through the requirements of any trade show. For the installation: Trying to work around the system will only create trouble and slow down the installation. International exhibitors need to be aware that the land of the free is not so free when it comes to working U.S. trade shows. Drayage, freight regulations and labor regulations are handled much differently than

62 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

anywhere else in the world. You don’t have to like it, but you sure need to understand and respect it. For the exhibitor: The art of engagement that leads to business discussions at U.S. trade shows is different than when greeting guests at shows in Europe and Asia. For the international visitor, slow down on your sales pitch, offer a cup of coffee or a water and sit down and engage in small talk before pitching your product. Adjust your sales approach to suit the variety of guests who visit your stand.

City, developed a unique design that incorporated all the flair expected in an Italian exhibit. A&M built the impressive display to capture the made-in-Italy look. A&M contracted with Sausalito, Calif.-based Coastal International Exhibit Services to provide the labor and organize the installation. A&M brought 29 people from Italy and contracted for 76 more from Coastal to prepare 26 exhibits at Coverings. “After 10 years of doing this show, our labor experience was a success with minimal stress,” said Mike Boone, Coastal’s director of international business. “The exhibit install was completed ahead of time, and we saved on the labor hours normally needed on Sunday. Pre-planning a year in advance, with frequent discussions, was a key to our partnership success,” he added. Another successful exhibit collaboration at Coverings was between SEM Design of Istanbul, Turkey, and Miller Tradeshow Services of Orlando, Fla., for the large Turkish Pavilion. Designer and builder Serdar Dursun and his wife Louise Dursun shipped components from Turkey but did not send labor. Instead, they collaborated with Miller’s president, Keith Miller, for a seamless install. The magic formula for success between international partners is pre-planning and a clear understanding about what needs to be done and who is permitted do it. When expectations among partners are on the same page, all parties are happy.


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INTERNATIONAL COLUMN

8 Small and Big Trends in Trade Shows and Events in Europe

by Han Leenhouts

Trend 1: Let’s get social In a world where we saw the Internet quickly gain momentum, the tradeshow industry held its breath because we thought that the end of the world had come. The Internet would become the next marketplace and we in the exhibition industry would be out of a job. Instead, the Internet became a big help to visitors who wanted to plan their visits, as well as a way for exhibitors to communicate with them in advance. But in the end, visitors want to see you, feel you and even smell you before doing business. So the Internet is no threat at all. Because visitors have access to information ahead of time, they are even better prepared when they come to the show. But WiFi, 3G and 4G have brought a whole new danger. We text message, WhatsApp, Skype, LinkedIn, and Facebook all the time. The way we communicate with each other has changed dramatically. We want peer-to-peer contact; we want one-on-one contact and a response within one minute. In fact, e-mail is going the way of the fax machine—soon to be outdated. There is a great contradiction here because this endless need for info and contact might lead to more real personal contact—yet that seems not to be the case. The younger generation stays glued to its machines and rarely comes up for air or real-life contact. Go into a bar, and you will see 90 percent of the people touching their Smartphones every two minutes. I have seen guys asking a girl to dance in a club through Facebook and Twitter. This allows them to avoid rejection when the lady is not up for it. Trend 2: No Goals, no glory When I entered the tradeshow and 64 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

events market in the early ’90s and my old boss was explaining how things worked, I was already struck by the fact that hardly anyone was engaging with visitors at tradeshows. Big booths, small booths, big budgets, small budgets— with few exceptions, no real interaction was occurring. He told me that all the people who go to events and tradeshows have a certain goal—which most of the time is to increase sales. They might say otherwise and come up with stories like we’re there to increase our name recognition, sustain relationships or just have a presence—but they’re not true. Then companies began pulling out of tradeshows. The claimed the costs were too high and there were no real benefits. Or they claimed they could not measure the value they were getting for exhibiting. This way of thinking is faulty because a presence at tradeshows is one of the most transparent ways of communicating. Exhibitors can do two things to improve the way they assess the value of exhibiting. First, define simple goals: the number of new contacts made, the number of customers seen at the show, the number of demos given, the number of free publicity articles written, the number of people who react positively to your proposition. Second, document all your on-site actions. After the show, look at what you have accomplished in relation to the goals you set beforehand, and evaluate the show on that basis. Trend 3: Shorter stays at shows In Europe, people do not take the old-fashioned two days to visit a tradeshow. Their time is limited, they are in a hurry or their bosses let them go for just one day. This means that the day must be worthwhile. They must be able to tell a

story about their experiences when they arrive back at the office. The best way to maximize your value and their experience is by enabling them to pre-inform themselves and by setting real appointments at the show. Don’t lean back and expect people to just drop in on your exhibit. Trend 4: More specialized events In line with the peer-to-peer communication development, there has been an increase in specialized events. Visitors do not want to search for that one solution within a big event; they want to be sure they will find what they need fast. So organizers are creating small events for a very dedicated group of attendees. This trend is very efficient for both visitors and exhibitors. Trend 5: Visitors get older The aging of attendees is becoming a real threat for our industry. In Europe alone, the average age of the visitors is annually increasing by a year. People under 40 are less interested in events and tradeshows as a way to gather information. They seek other ways to do that. The big reason is that, in their eyes, we are maintaining an old-fashioned and inefficient vehicle here. And we have not found the proper response yet, although it is clear that we need to focus on Trend 6 to give people more thrills and a better experience. Trend 6: Less info, more experience When I visited a theme park for the first time, I remained thrilled and excited for days. Now my children get bored in Disneyland Paris after half a day: been there, done that. We get so many kicks in everyday life that a special experience is necessary in order to attract people. This also goes for events and trade-


shows. Having a “normal” booth is just not enough anymore. When I walk international fairs, I see a large gap between the real needs of the visitors and what exhibitors think is an appropriate display. Every contact moment should amaze, thrill and connect to the heart and soul of visitors. They must be placed in a state where they become receptive to your information. Trend 7: Branding is a rising star What kind of feeling do you get when you see a well-known brand, such as Nike, Apple or Starbucks? What do these brands stand for? How do you feel about them? Loads of money is spent not just on marketing, but also on training people. People are the brand, and their behavior is crucial. How do they apply the brand values—the “internal branding”? The brand values lead all the actions a company takes. So when it comes to tradeshows and events, it is the same thing. We must recognize the brand in everything: the look, the feel and the way visitors are treated at the booth. Trend 8: Personal contact is still the best way to earn trust Having said all this, we as individuals

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still have amazing power that trumps all other ways of communicating. We offer the personal hand, the feel and even the smell. The best way to earn trust is by providing the visitor the opportunity to look right into our eyes. By employing a personal touch, we can build—or destroy—trust, but it is still the purest form of communication. Every day, I feel

lucky and thankful to be working in this industry. Han Leenhouts of the Netherlands-based exhibition sales, training and coaching company Sales and Pepper is the author of Pepper Talk 2.0, a book designed to help exhibitors reach their goals at tradeshows. He can be reached via http://www.salesandpepper.nl

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 65


INTERNATIONAL COLUMN

From left to right: UK’s Stonehenge; China’s Great Wall; Egypt’s Giza/ Pyramids; Peru’s Machu Picchu

World Traveler and Industry Expert Michael Tay Talks to Exhibit City News by Exhibit City News

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orld traveler Michael Tay is a founder of the Singapore-based production and project management company Concept Communications Pte. Ltd., known as conceptcoms. He recently sat down with Exhibit City News and talked about his last quarter century in the industry and his goals for the future. Tell us about your background and how you got into the industry. In 1988, I graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts and Social Sciences from the National University of Singapore, with majors in geography and sociology. I started to work first in a local creative agency as a writer before progressing to doing project work. Then in early 1992, some colleagues and I started our own production and project management company, Concept Commu-

66 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

nications Pte. Ltd., assisting clients and agencies from around the world in their project executions of exhibitions, events and environments. I have traveled close to half the world and networked with local sources, which helped conceptcoms be able to help bid and execute projects for our clients, even in less-developed locations. What have the last twoand-a-half decades been like in overseas markets? In 2017, the company will celebrate its 25th year in business. Looking back over the years, the standards and quality of work have improved drastically. This has to do with the opening up of markets and the proliferation of projects, which has led to more regular employment for workers and hence increased levels of quality and productivity. Where previously the perception was that well-executed projects

were on the same level as projects that the workers were accustomed to seeing in their home countries, in their own environments, we have raised the level of their expectations. Trained project managers have led the workforce to accept and understand that standards and quality are just minimum expectations, and the employees need to meet them if they are to continue working. Providing anything less than the best would mean the workers would end up not being hired back. What do you look for when deciding whom to work with? Trust is the main criterion for any selection of a partner, anywhere in the world! Of course, before trust can be given, there may be a host of questions, credentials to be provided, requests for quotations, tests of responses, and so forth. But nothing beats a

face-to-face meeting, a handshake with eye-to-eye contact and even some chatting about non-business related things. And even afterward, there are follow-ups, progressive reporting on matters, etc., at least on the initial rounds. Basically, if you are working on projects out of your comfort zone, after you have decided that the person/company you picked fits your work culture best, trust is your best guide to having a restful night. Is your business strategy to penetrate every world market? We did not grow with the goal of ensuring that we are in every market. Rather, we have developed strategic placements within Asia, Central Asia and the Middle East to assist with planning, sourcing and execution. In each of the countries I have visited, no matter whether there are no projects there or few


projects that have been heard of, I try to find local sources at exhibitions or events way before any potential projects may come up. Even if I cannot find a relevant contact providing the right services, I will always try to find a friend who may be eager to learn and listen to what I have done. I have been doing this for the last 25 years, so you could say that it has taken me 25 years to develop a network of at least 100 countries where we are able to execute projects. How has the Internet impacted your business? The Internet is a fast gateway to the world—and only if you have a presence on it will you be found. However, in some countries, our kind of business is not always listed in English, and people may have to search a lot harder. Most of the companies that are listed are the ones that have most likely paid for search engine optimization so they can be listed at the top. So it is less likely that hidden sources or less marketing-savvy businesses will be found. Even then, information about the suppliers listed on Web sites cannot be easily verified, even if you send questions by e-mail. When it comes to project work, credibility and trust cannot be given just by virtue of seeing a glossy picture of the company on the Internet. It would be a great disservice to a client who wants to do a small project in an uncharted venue to just pick a local supplier off the Net and send them to work on your client’s projects. You might get lucky and the project turns out to be successful, but that is something we ourselves would never try. The time-consuming and @ExhibitCityNews

costlier method of face-to-face meetings and a handshake beats the Internet hands down in getting a real vibe of a company, its owners and its working styles. Luckily, I am an avid traveler, which goes hand-in-hand with my approach to work. Do you work with outside creative agencies? Generally, we work with creative agencies to help with their project execution around the world. With my network of global contacts, I was able to assist them in their global bids where they may not have partners in less developed cities. To date, we have probably worked with some 100 agencies from all continents and on all continents. Our work style is scalable, and taking on multiple, larger and more difficult projects is part and parcel of what we have done over the last 25 years. We have not compromised on our quality of service, and we never will. We have built up 25 years of trust. What is the global economic climate like right now? We keep an eye on the global economy. In times of limited growth, the issue becomes how much clients are able to spend on their projects. This will be something to watch in Asia for the next 12 to 24 months. Generally, if the market is on the downturn, the watchword will be “savings.” Hence, companies will ask their creatives to start coming up with less expensive ideas while still effectively pulling off the marketing reach. This calls on the ingenuity of the creative agencies and the producers—production companies like ourselves—to

find solutions or come up with new ideas to save costs. In the exhibition industry, one of the biggest trends is to reuse. So signing a long-term

An avid traveler, Mike Tay’s aim is to visit all 193 U.N. countries and have a business partner and/ or friend in each of these countries. contract to reuse an exhibit makes sense. However, for many Asian clients, reusing the concept is a no-no. Companies therefore need to improve their productivity, perhaps cutting costs by reusing common materials while still maintaining their quality. How did you get into the exhibition industry? What do you recommend for others who are interested in working in this industry? I joined the exhibition industry by accident, at first by writing for in-house projects. Gradually I was phased into project work, and I have never looked back. Good mentors are more valuable than any literature. They can accelerate your learning by imparting their experience and know-how so that mistakes can

be lessened. However, if you are given an opportunity to work on projects even without proper mentors, you should jump on it, as it probably means that the person giving you that opportunity has some faith and trusts you to deliver, even while keeping a watchful eye on you. If you have never worked on events or exhibitions but have heard about or have an interest in joining our industry, your best bet is to read up, make a friend who can introduce you to someone in the industry, understand the realities of the industry and get your contact to make a connection for you.  If all else fails, write to me, and I will try to point you to the right people in the industry. You are very widely traveled. Do you have a goal to get to so many countries in a certain time frame? I do not travel to be in competition with anyone. However, I do keep track of where I have been by registering on the MostTraveledPeople.com Web site and the Travelers’ Century Club, which is an organization made up of people who have visited 100 or more countries and territories around the globe. Having flown around the world twice without backtracking, I also qualify for membership in the Circumnavigators Club. Visiting new places, learning new things, making friends and networking for my trade helped me very naturally in my business. I have been to 86 United Nations countries numerous times now. However, I hope that by June I will reach 90 and get to 100 by year-end. Michael Tay can be reached at mike@ conceptcoms.com ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 67


INTERNATIONAL COLUMN

Taking a Stand on Terrorism

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eading the news from various cities impacted by terrorist actions around the world these days is almost enough to make you want to go back to bed and pull the covers over your head. But for most of us—particularly in the meetings industry—that simply isn’t an option. Life goes on, and that life necessarily involves travel to places that include those unfortunate enough to have been targeted. But the fact is that there are huge implications to all this that extend far beyond our own immediate reactions. What is at stake is no less than the future of our industry—not just because of the fear factor and the event cancellations and relocations that may result but also because of the likelihood they will provoke greater security measures and potentially even a weakening of cross-border agreements that have facilitated travel in recent years. Together, these could conspire to reduce travel inclinations at a time when industry recovery was only just beginning to gain traction in many parts of the world. So this is clearly not a situation where we have the luxury of passively sitting back and watching events unfold. These incidents appear to have become part of a new reality, and the key question is: What can and should we do in response? I’d suggest there are three things we need to consider. The first is perspective—maybe the toughest of all in the face of recent coverage—and here there are several aspects. First, the approaches now being taken by terrorists mean that no major destination is truly immune—we can’t operate on the assumption that there are “safe” and “unsafe” options when recent events have made it clear that such incidents can and have taken place anywhere in the world and even in the air between. At the same time, media hype notwithstanding, most incidents have been relatively contained—frightening in their viciousness and seeming randomness but in reality 68 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

By Rod Cameron, Executive Director, JMIC

affecting only a tiny proportion of the population, even in the most dramatically affected areas. It remains the case that visitors are far more likely to be impacted by any number of other events than the actions of terrorists. The second factor is vigilance—and again, there are again several dimensions to consider. Most importantly, we need to

What is at stake is no less than the future of our industry—not just because of the fear factor and the event cancellations and relocations that may result. accept that we all have a responsibility to our members, clients and delegates to take and support every reasonable measure to manage and minimize the direct threat in any way we can. This is particularly true for suppliers whose decisions and actions shape the conditions that would form the backdrop for any incident that might occur. Organizers, facilities and suppliers all have a major obligation not just to secure their own operations but to coordinate with other agencies that would potentially be involved should an incident occur. In fact, a better coordination of efforts seems to be one of the top recommendations arising from those incidents that have already taken place. However, this responsibility also extends to counseling against the kind of overreaction that would place draconian

measures on travel overall, as this only serves to create a downward spiral that would in the end cause even more damage than the incidents themselves. And that brings us to the third most necessary and at the same time challenging action—a measure of defiance in the face of what is clearly an effort to disrupt not only the benefits but even the values that bring people together in joint efforts to improve the quality of our global understanding, cooperation and interactions on so many fronts. To the extent that we react out of fear and resort to isolation (or, at a minimum, the isolation of selected destinations), we become accomplices, delivering exactly what those responsible for the atrocities are looking to achieve. Our industry has a proud history in this regard. In previous global disruptions, including both terrorism and any number of recent economic or financial crises, it was typically the case that the business travel sector—including meetings, convention and exhibition attendance—was a leader in recovery. So far, it appears that this remains the situation today; in most terrorist-impacted cities, early reports are that tourism has been hit much faster and harder than scheduled business events. The clear message is that we have a key role to play in defying the disruptive purposes of terrorist acts by refusing to respond as they would like us to. And that means showing leadership in maintaining our event schedules and our rotations in ways that demonstrate our collective commitment to global engagement and participation. None of this will be easy—fear is a powerful motivator, as those responsible for these incidents know only too well—but then, it’s not as though there are any easier choices available. What we risk is becoming part of a reaction that produces the kind of success the terrorists are looking to achieve—and for the sake of our industry’s future, we must lead the resistance.


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CONVENTION CENTER SPOTLIGHT

EAT Exhibitors and attendees have a plethora of choices when it comes to dining in San Diego. A culinary treasure, the city boasts some of the finest restaurants in all of Southern California. Fortunately, many diverse dining experiences are a stone’s throw from the Convention Center. Enjoy modern American cuisine at Mister A’s or a juicy steak at Donovan’s Steak & Chop House. For something less formal, visit MJ’S Street Tacos, which offers authentic food that is out of this world. Also, it is worth considering drinks and appetizers at Hornblower Cruises and Events.

SLEEP

By Kathy Anaya

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he San Diego Convention Center in that beautiful California city is a must-see. The mission of the San Diego Convention Center Corporation is to generate significant economic benefits for the greater San Diego region by hosting international and national conventions and tradeshows in its world-class facility. Since opening in 1989, San Diego Convention Center’s priority has been providing meeting planners with quality five-star services. This award-winning facility is located on the waterfront and is the perfect backdrop for your next event. The 525,701-square-foot exhibit hall provides a contiguous exhibit area on the ground level, along with 90,000 square feet of column-free space in the 70 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Sails Pavilion on the upper level. This luxurious building is also equipped with two full-service kitchens and eight concession stands within the exhibit halls. Eight elevators, hi-tech telephone service, WiFi and electrical capabilities provide the very best event experience. Underground parking and adjacent parking structures offer 3,950 parking spaces for convention guests. The 50 loading docks are equipped with eight direct drive-in accesses to exhibit halls, which makes unloading and loading your exhibit booths a snap. And after enjoying exhibiting and meetings in this breathtaking facility, stroll the beaches of beautiful San Diego and dine under the stars of this gorgeous city.

PLAY The city offers so much to do that you will never be bored. See an array of exotic animals at the San Diego Zoo, which is also a winner of the Travelers’ Choice Awards. If you enjoy walking, you must visit Balboa Park, the largest urban cultural park of the nation. Driving over the Coronado Bridge is also a must-do: the view is breathtaking. Don’t pass up Sea World, where you can interact with some of the mammals. And no one should miss the opportunity to channel the Beach Boys by learning to surf at the San Diego Surf School in Pacific Beach. Create some fantastic memories of your stay in this great city.

Photo courtesy San Diego Convention Center

San Diego Convention Center

There are more than 55,000 hotel rooms in the San Diego area, so finding the right price range and location is a breeze. If you plan on coming before or staying after your event for a vacation, take advantage of the abundance of hotel options. From the Hilton San Diego Resort and Spa to La Jolla Cove Suites, several locations are there to spoil you. Fairmont Grand Del offers you an ocean view with all the amenities you need for a perfect stay. This beautiful resort was named 2015 Travelers’ Choice. The Pantai Inn located on the San Diego beach provides you the best value while offering world class art and design.


PEOPLE ON THE MOVE

People on the Move

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tevens E3 welcomes two new account executives to the team! Andrew Gariepy will be located in the London office, and Jack Slattery (right) will join the team in Chicago. Andrew’s early career began in the 1980s in the trade show and exhibits industry as an installations supervisor. He later embarked in a successful career as a Realtor as well as co-founding a national dental supply company. With this diverse background in sales and a dynamic blend of business acumen, Andrew will be a wonderful asset working on exhibit sales and rentals and new business. As a 12-plus-year exhibit sales veteran, Jack will be selling custom and exhibit rental properties nationwide. He has extensive experience in the sales, design and building of custom exhibits and previous experience as an advertising art director in New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. Jack will concentrate mainly on U.S.based trade events for exhibit sales and rentals from the office in Chicago, Ill. Now in its fifth year, The Expo Group Exhibit Marketer of the Year Award will be presented at the E2MA Red Diamond Congress Awards ceremony to Keith Tomaszewski of Johnson Controls. Keith has worked at Johnson Control for nearly 21 years and

By Exhibit City News

has and has been involved with the creation and development of many exhibit advisory teams. MG is pleased to announce a new addition to the Las Vegas team. Cassie Clery (right) will be the new global account manager, reporting to Jessie McNeil, MG’s director of client services. She will be handling the client’s overseas exhibit program needs, which include planning, logistics, ordering services and billing. Having been in the trade show industry for five years working as both a project and account manager, Cassie’s diverse experience will be beneficial in understanding clients’ needs better in order to execute exhibit programs across the world. Employco USA Inc. recently hired Michael O’Meara (left) as vice president to lead organic growth strategies, strategic business acquisitions and business development for its group of affiliated firms, which include Employco USA Inc., Corporate Risk Management Inc., and Staffworks LLC. Previously, Michael was executive vice president for strategic acquisitions and organic growth strategies at Axion RMS Ltd., a risk management and insurance firm that specialized in

OBITUARY Walter Tal Walker, former GM at Giltspur in Phoenix, Ariz., died on March 18, 2016, at the age of 79. Born on May 27, 1936, in Scranton, Penn., Tal built Giltspur Phoenix into a $20 million business before retiring in 1996 and relocating to Prescott, Ariz. Pictured are MarketCraft Studios’ Jim Croneberger and his mentor, Tal Walker. 72 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

employee benefits. As an insurance and risk management expert with 25 years of experience and a proven track record, he will be a fantastic addition to the team. Johnathan V. Regnier, senior creative manager at Riverview Systems Group, was honored at the 2016 NAB Show as a StudioDaily 50 award recipient. The new award, sponsored by industry news site StudioDaily, celebrates a cross-section of influential creatives and technologists whose leadership exemplifies innovative and creative thinking. Regnier began his career as a project and event manager for Apple, nearly a decade later joining Riverview Systems Group as a technical director and account manager for live events. Group Delphi announces two new senior vice presidents. As the most recent addition to Group Delphi’s executive team, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Culture Sara Ost has expanded her role to take responsibility over both the company’s marketing and culture teams, where she has initiated an innovative cross-functional group. Hailing from outside the experiential marketing industry, her technology and media background equips Ost to drive an ethos of healthy disruption and nimbleness across the organization. Tony Erpelding, the company’s co-founder, was recently promoted to Senior Vice President of Creative Services. Over his nearly two decades with Group Delphi, Tony has passionately built a culture of creativity across all teams at the company. He has also led critical creative work on a global scale on behalf of clients such as Medtronic and Virgin Galactic. Most recently, he became the inaugural recipient of the prestigious EDPA Michael R. Westcott Designer of the Year Award, recognizing his innovation in design, strategy and compelling storytelling.


DEAL Dining, Entertainment, Attractions & Lodging

ENTERTAINMENT The Enclave: A Las Vegas Event Center The Enclave, located in Henderson, Nevada, is conveniently located four miles from the Las Vegas Strip and just one mile from McCarran International Airport. This 75,000-square-foot facility rents a variety of event spaces; whether you’re a blushing bride-to-be planning a wedding or reception or a vice president of a company seeking space for a corporate meeting, the Enclave can accommodate you. The facility features multiple event spaces for trade shows, training facilities, broadcasting events or live entertainment, as well as a host of various events. Also included is free Wi-fi and parking. Each event space is uniquely designed for your every need. Starting with the Enclave, this 9,000-square-foot column-free space is acoustically designed to function as both a ballroom and a studio. Enter through the elegant glass elephant door by way of the valet plaza. A lovely private dressing room and green room adjoin the space. Bathed in sunlight, the “Prelude” Concourse Lounge welcomes all guests with its warmth and charm. This coffee/ cocktail bar and nourishment center is 4,800 square feet, with a video pro74 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

duction room and an additional 2,400 square feet for professional catering. The Outdoor Plaza is wonderful for any outdoor event. This 9,000-square-foot space can extend seamlessly from the Enclave and/or the Concourse, creating a private space for your special event. Other luxurious spaces include the “Madrigal” Ballrooms, “Sonata & Toccata” Pre-function Rooms, “Libretto” Board Room and Living Room, the “Vivace” Rooftop Deck, three conference rooms, and 16,000 square feet of rentable office space. The soft opening for the Enclave is scheduled for January 2017. www.EnclaveLV.com Italian American Club The Italian American Club of Southern Nevada is located in Las Vegas. It is a delightful social club that includes a rental events center, banquet facility and live nightly entertainment. For over 50 years, IAC has been a vital link to the Las Vegas Italian-American community, featuring old-world charm of days gone by. Plan your next special occasion with IAC today! Corporate meetings, special events, weddings, parties, receptions or an intimate dining experience can be transformed

into a unique lasting memory. For large groups attending an event, inquire about the Italian-American club’s coach limo bus to ensure that your guests travel safely and arrive timely in luxury and style. Visit the remodeled bar and restaurant with three dining rooms. Indulge in the delicious, new Ristorante menu prepared by award-winning chefs while enjoying a glass of wine from the extensive wine list. Make your reservations today! www.iacvegas.com Dream Racing at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway Imagine driving a real racing Lamborghini, Ferrari or Porsche Racecar. For many people, getting behind the wheel of one of these vehicles will always remain a dream. But dreams can come true at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway with its Dream Racing five-star driving experience, which features the world’s largest selection of supercars that you can actually drive! This once-in-a-lifetime exotic car racing experience offers a choice of driving between five and 22 laps in one special car—or choose to get behind the wheel of up to four high-powered vehicles. Safety is paramount, so everyone gets training in a classroom and then on a simulator before heading for the track. An instructor accompanies each driver in exploring the capabilities of each amazing car as it traverses the 1.2-mile road course in the infield of the Las Vegas Motor Speedway. This unique, only-in-Las Vegas experience is not to be missed. www.dreamracing.com Continued on p. 76 Lamborghini Aventador Superveloce

Lamborghini photo courtesy of Dream Racing Las Vegas

Rendering of The Enclave


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DEAL Dining, Entertainment, Attractions & Lodging

Continued from p. 75 DINING

View from inside cabin on the 550-foot-tall High Roller.

ATTRACTIONS The High Roller: The World’s Tallest Observation Wheel Shining bright on the Las Vegas Strip, the 550-foot-tall High Roller is a true standout at The LINQ Hotel and Casino’s outdoor shopping, dining and entertainment promenade.

76 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment

dining rooms for group entertaining for locals and traveling conventioneers, and convenient on-site parking. You can reserve a big table, a private dining room, a patio or the entire restaurant and add on a brewery tour or beer tasting and make your experience unique and memorable. www.gordonbiersch.com

Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment

Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurants What began over 20 years ago as a dream of bringing together fresh, handcrafted beer and made-from-scratch, world class cuisine is today a reality at Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurants. The Las Vegas location is true to the Gordon Biersch heritage of superior beer, great food and good times—all served up fresh daily. Inspired by the Reinheitsgebot of 1516, the Gordon Biersch experience rests upon the foundations of purity, simplicity and precision. This philosophy is most recognizable in the selection of authentic German lagers, each crafted on-site using only malted barley, hops, yeast and pure, filtered water. This same dedication extends to the kitchen, where our chefs create fresh dishes that perfectly balance comfort and excitement. Gordon Biersch Las Vegas is located in the city’s “Restaurant Row,” minutes from the Strip and the Las Vegas Convention Center. The airy, bright building is reminiscent of a converted San Francisco warehouse. Known as one of the area’s premier locals’ destinations, it features a Bier Garden, two private


Measuring 520 feet in diameter, the High Roller eclipses both the London Eye and Singapore Flyer. Facing north and south (parallel to Las Vegas Boulevard), the wheel takes 30 minutes to complete one full revolution and features 28 glass-enclosed cabins with broad views of the famous resort city. Each spherical cabin can hold up to 40 people. There are benches on either side of the cabin, with plenty of floor space in between—but we imagine you’ll want to stand against the window and admire the view. You can fly solo or rent out an entire cabin for the ultimate bachelor, bachelorette or wedding party. Or reserve bigger events at the High Roller’s wheelhouse. The gift shop at the base of the wheel offers fun souvenirs. www.caesars.com/linq/high-roller

LODGING

Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment

Photo courtesy of Caesars Entertainment

The Cromwell The Cromwell is the Las Vegas Strip’s first boutique hotel. Each of its 188 rooms features luxurious accommodations in an intimate, Parisian-inspired

atmosphere. Whether it’s the hardwood floors, plush furnishings or dim and romantic lighting, each room gives guests a glamorous, VIP experience. The hotel’s blend of modern and vintage design is another unique element. Exclusive amenities include coffee and tea service on the first floor, rain showers and Muk bath products. The Cromwell’s Deluxe King room measures 360 square feet and includes a pillow-top king bed. Reminiscent of a Parisian-style apartment, this Las Vegas hotel room’s hardwood floors, plush seating and antique trunk-style furnishings give it both a modern and a vintage flair. The neutral tones and berry accents provide a relaxing, glamorous vibe. The bathroom offers a window and rain-shower experience. The room also has a 55-inch flat-screen, high-end bath products and elevator lobby coffee service. Complimentary access to Drai’s Beach Club is included, although some exclusions do apply. Bold. Sophisticated. Enticing. Welcome to The Cromwell. www.caesars.com/cromwell

The Cromwell is the Las Vegas Strip’s first boutique hotel.

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ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 77


EXHIBIT CITY PUZZLER A Custom Crossword by Gail Beckman CustomCrosswords.com 1

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1. Lamp that provides a defined circle of illumination 7. May require extra services: _____ Handling 13. Short for purchase order 14. Apiece (abbr0 15. Used to sign the contract 16. Nevertheless 17. Referring to the exhibit location (hyph) 19. Visitor to the event 21. Purchase qty. 22. Food and Drug Administration, shortened 23. Didymium symbol 24. Surrounded by 25. How tall (abbr) 26. Precedes IOU 28. Negative votes 30. Takes apart; _____ down 33. Level 34. Poetic contraction 35. Service Kit, for example 36. Half a laugh 37. VII minus IV 38. The Good ‘___ Days 40. Short for Department of Transportation 41. Fire Hose Cabinets notation 42. Taxi 44. Time past 45. Between re and fa 46. Ques. result, hopefully 48. Space for exhibitors to lock up materials: ________ Cages 50. Paid notice 51. You might need a dolly or hand _____ 53. Certain dir. 54. Regarding 55. Europium symbol 56. Major CA city 58. Night light? 59. NE opposite 78 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

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60. Short for Owner’s Risk 62. Paid, shortened 64. Type of freight 66. Badge feature 68. At the ___ of the day ... 69. Calendar segments (abbr) 71. Time period 72. ____ for Business 75. Illuminates translucent material from behind (hyph) 77. Insulated rubber tubing used tochannel electrical wires 78. Frankfort state (abbr) 79. Follows display or shipping

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1. Another name for electrician 2. Plant holder 3. (with 65 down) Type of electrical plug 4. The rocks 5. Sign across the top of an exhibit 6. Bye-bye 7. Went in a hurry 8. Exhibit with aisles on three sides: _________ Display 9. Finish 10. Line ____ 11. I see ... 12. Where freight is received (2 wds) 18. Certain diagram 20. White board stand 22. Construction of an exhibit 27. Particular car club (abbr) 29. One in charge of supervising and coordinating workers (2 wds) 31. Gives off

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DOWN

32

49

74

24 28

31

46

57

12

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73

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72

9

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48

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78

79

32. Exhibit with components that must be assembled on-site 36. Website page 39. What a shipment might be worth: Declared _____ 43. Crucial factor; ______ line 47. Albany state (abbr) 48. Short version of Straight Time work 49. The two of ___ S P O T 50. Stomach musP O W A T S I cles, for short R C S 52. Where can I K H T get a good ___ of Y E coffee? M 57. Artificial intelliH A gence, shortened D O T 61. About (abbr) M I S E C U 63. Covered rails: T S Pipe & _____ L A 65. (see 3 down) A I R 67. Dismounted B E 68. Opposite WSW O P E N 69. Boston state R A C E (abbr) 1

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70. It’s the limit 71. When you’re due to show (init) 73. Public address 74. Electrical conductivity, shortened 75. Next to 76. Heavy Cargo, for short

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March 2016 Answer Key


QA Question: Where can you find industry features, maps, insider information, shop talk and free stuff?

Answer: Exhibit City News, of course!

Sign up for six stunning, full-color issues of ECN and get our very special 20th anniversary edition, 52 weekly digital updates and free stuff to wear proudly!

Go to ExhibitCityNews.com/subscribe or Call 702.309.8023


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80 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


Trade Show Calendar US CENTRAL

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

Show IEEE/PES Transmission & Distribution Conference Offshore Technology Conference - OTC Texas Dental Association - The Texas Meeting Southwest Fuel & Convenience Expo American Pain Society - APS American Academy of Physician Assistants - AAPA American Association of Airport Executives - AAAE Ambulatory Surgery Center Association - ASCs National Association of Educational Procurement - NAEP American Jail Association Annual Conf. & Jail Expo - AJA American for Talent Development - ATD DUG The Original - Developing Unconventional Gas Independent Liquid Terminals Association - ILTA American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Annual - AAPD ASTRA Marketplace & Academy Design Automation Conference - DAC Dairy-Deli-Bake Seminar & Expo - IDDBA Electronic Security Expo - ESX - NBFAA World Pork Expo American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine - ACVIM International New Age Trade Show - West - INATS Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nurses - AWHONN Associated Professional Sleep Societies - APSS Insurance Accounting & Systems Association - IASA American Association of Nurse Practitioners - AANP American Made Show - Buyers Market of American Craft - Summer Texas Restaurant Association - TRA Marketplace ISTE - Intl. Society for Technology in Education - NECC Conference for the Advancement of Math Teaching - CAMT

Start 5/2 5/2 5/5 5/9 5/11 5/14 5/15 5/19 5/22 5/22 5/22 5/23 5/23 5/26 6/5 6/5 6/5 6/8 6/8 6/8 6/10 6/11 6/11 6/12 6/21 6/23 6/26 6/26 6/29

View Complete Calendar Online

End 5/5 5/5 5/7 5/11 5/14 5/18 5/18 5/22 5/25 5/25 5/25 5/25 5/25 5/29 6/8 6/9 6/7 6/10 6/10 6/11 6/12 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/26 6/26 6/27 6/29 7/1

All Information Is Subject to Change*

Venue Kay Bailey Hutchison CC NRG Park Henry B. Gonzalez CC Austin CC Austin CC Henry B. Gonzalez CC George R. Brown CC Gaylord Texan San Antonio Grand Hyatt Austin CC Colorado CC Ft. Worth CC George R. Brown CC Henry B. Gonzalez CC Colorado CC Austin CC George R. Brown CC Ft. Worth CC Iowa State Fairgrounds Colorado CC Crown Plaza Hotel & CC Gaylord Texan Colorado CC

City Dallas Houston San Antonio Austin Austin San Antonio Houston Grapevine San Antonio Austin Denver Ft. Worth Houston San Antonio Denver Austin Houston Ft. Worth Des Moines Denver Denver Grapevine Denver San Antonio Henry B. Gonzalez CC San Antonio World Trade Center Dallas George R. Brown CC Houston Colorado CC Denver San Antonio

St TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX CO TX TX TX CO TX TX TX IA CO CO TX CO TX TX TX TX CO TX

Att 12.3K 119K 12K 2000 1800 8500 2500 2800 500 2200 10.5K 2482 4800 1315 6519 7000 2206 20K 2800 1500 3000 5000 2600 3000 5000 17.7K 16K 6900

Exh 772 2.5K 370 263 100 250 250 115 150 275 375 191 223 130 246 193 600 169 390 117 250 110 194 200 700 655 485 187

Nsf 224K 641K 50K 30K 20K 50K

Industry Electrical & Electronics Energy Dental Food & Beverage Medical & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Aerospace & Aviation 12.7K Medical & Healthcare 17K Education 30K Government 65K Associations 24.6K Petroleum 30K Petroleum 14.6K Dental 27K Education 85.3K Electrical & Electronics 150K Food & Beverage 28.8K Security 310K Agriculture & Farming Veterinary 35K Gifts Medical & Healthcare 80K Medical & Healthcare 34K Accounting 50K Nursing 81K Gifts 100KCityFood Beverage Exhibit News’ & best-read section! 132K Education 46.7K Education

SEE YOUR AD HERE! Sponsor your region in the Trade Show Calendar.

ExhibitCityNews.com/Tradeshow-Calendar Exhibit City News’ best-read section! @ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 81


Trade Show Calendar US MIDWEST

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

Show Ohio Health Care Association Annual Conv. & Expo - OHA International Powder Bulk Solids International Telecoms Week - ITW Food Safety Summit and Expo Design-2-Part Show - Schaumburg, IL Electrical Manufacturing & Coil Winding Expo - EMCW National Electrical Wire Processing Technology Expo BookExpo America - BEA American Telemedicine Association - ATA International Supply Management Conference & Expo - ISM World Conference on Quality and Improvement - ASQ Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meeting - COSM National Restaurant Association - NRA Show North American Association of Uniform Manufacturers & Distributors - NAUMD Sweets & Snacks Expo THE NBM B.I.G. SHOW American Society of Clinical Oncology - ASCO Internet Retailer Conference & Exhibition - IRCE Neocon & Buildex Chicago National Lawn & Garden Show American Water Works Association - ACE - AWWA International Floricluture Expo United Fresh Marketplace Fuel Ethanol Workshop & Expo - FEW FMI Connect America’s Claim Event - ACE Abilities Expo - Chicago National Sheriffs’ Association Annual Conference - NSA International Christian Retail Show - CBA

Start 5/2 5/3 5/8 5/10 5/11 5/11 5/11 5/11 5/14 5/15 5/16 5/18 5/21 5/22 5/24 6/2 6/3 6/7 6/13 6/14 6/19 6/20 6/20 6/20 6/20 6/22 6/24 6/24 6/26

End 5/5 5/5 5/11 5/12 5/12 5/11 5/12 5/13 5/17 5/18 5/18 5/22 5/24 5/24 5/26 6/4 6/7 6/10 6/15 6/15 6/22 6/22 6/23 6/23 6/23 6/24 6/26 6/29 6/29

Venue Greater Columbus CC Donald E. Stephans CC Hyatt Regency Donald E. Stephans CC Schaumburg CC Wisconsin Center Wisconsin Center McCormick Place Minneapolis CC Indiana CC Wisconsin Center Hyatt Regency Chicago McCormick Place Horseshoe Southern Indiana McCormick Place Indiana CC McCormick Place McCormick Place The Merchandise Mart Hilton Indian Lakes Resort McCormick Place McCormick Place McCormick Place Wisconsin Center McCormick Place Hilton Minneapolis Renaissance Schaumburg Duke Energy Center

All Information Is Subject to Change*

City Columbus Rosemont Chicago Rosemont Schaumburg Milwaukee Milwaukee Chicago Minneapolis Indianapolis Milwaukee Chicago Chicago Elizabeth Chicago Indianapolis Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Milwaukee Chicago Minneapolis Schaumburg Minneapolis Cincinnati

St OH IL IL IL IL WI WI IL MN IN WI IL IL IN IL IN IL IL IL IL IL IL IL WI IL MN IL MN OH

Att 3200 6771 5371 1400 2000 2800 2900 19.7K 6000 2500 2500 2500 61.5K 600 16K 6700 31.2K 8299 41K 180 9837 1752 4500 2000 20K 450 5000 4000 4918

Exh 300 387 93 152 200 140 118 939 188 150 100 90 1.9K 150 750 175 500 563 700 65 470 192 325 300

Nsf Industry 118K Medical & Healthcare 98440 Manufacturing Telecommunications 21000 Food & Beverage 20000 Manufacturing 24500 Wire 24800 Electrical & Electronics 155K Publishing 56700 Medical & Healthcare Manufacturing 30000 Education Medical & Healthcare 543K Food & Beverage Associations 165K Food & Beverage 39000 Printing 217K Medical & Healthcare 80100 Computers 152K Home Furnishings 25000 Garden Supplies 112K Water 60250 Garden Supplies 72000 Food & Beverage Renewable Energy Food & Beverage 83 10000 Insurance 100 25000 Medical & Healthcare 347 155K Police 322 65000 Religious

PORTABLE/POP-UPS | MODULAR/INLINE | CUSTOM ISLANDS | PURCHASE/RENTAL | ASSET MANAGEMENT

Need a Booth? Call TradeTec. NO POST SHOW BILLING. GUARANTEED. 82 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

TTChicago.com


See complete listing of shows online at ExhibitCityNews.com/tradeshow-calendar

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

US NORTHEAST Show Mfg4 - Manufacturing 4 The Future Craft Brewers & BrewExpo America Association of Progressive Rental Organizations - APRO International Contemporary Furniture Fair - ICFF Surtex - Selling & Licencing Original Art & Design National Stationary Show & The Supply Side Association for Iron & Steel Technology - AISTech INTX - The Internet & Television Expo AIA Convention - American Institute of Architects National Rifle Association - NRA American Industrial Hygiene Association - AIHce North American Snow Conference - APWA Oil & Energy Service Professionals - OESP American College of Sports Medicine - ACSM PowderMet - MPIF American Dental Hygienists’ Association - ADHA Meeting Professionals International - MPI - WEC NFR PROTECT - National Retail Federation - NFR Loss Prevention Conference HBA Global Expo - Health & Beauty Medical Design & Manufacturing - MD&M East International Hazardous Materials Response Teams - IAFC American Society for Microbiology - ASM Microbe SkillsUSA DUG East - Developing Unconventional Gas Metropolitan New York Shoe Market National Athletic Trainers Association - NATA Summer Fancy Food Show - NASFT Police & Security Expo Optometry’s Meeting - AOA

All Information Is Subject to Change*

Start 5/3 5/3 5/10 5/14 5/15 5/15 5/16 5/16 5/19 5/19 5/21 5/22 5/22 5/31 6/5 6/8 6/11 6/14 6/14 6/14 6/16 6/16 6/20 6/21 6/21 6/22 6/26 6/28 6/29

End 5/5 5/6 5/12 5/17 5/17 5/18 5/19 5/18 5/21 5/22 5/26 5/25 5/26 6/4 6/8 6/14 6/14 6/16 6/16 6/16 6/19 6/20 6/24 6/23 6/22 6/25 6/28 6/29 7/3

Venue Connecticut CC Pennsylvania CC Northern Kentucky Convention Javits Center Javits Center Javits Center David L. Lawrence CC Boston Conv. & Exhibition Center Pennsylvania CC Kentucky Expo Center Baltimore CC Connecticut CC Foxwoods Resort & Casino Hynes CC Sheraton Boston David L. Lawrence CC Atlantic City Waterfront Conf. Pennsylvania CC Javits Center Javits Center Hilton Baltimore Boston Conv. & Exhibition Center Kentucky Exposition Center David L. Lawrence CC Raritan Center Baltimore CC Javits Center Atlantic City CC

City Hartford Philadelphia Covington New York New York New York Pittsburgh Boston Philadelphia Louisville Baltimore Hartford Mashantucket Boston Boston Pittsburgh Atlantic City Philadelphia New York New York Baltimore Boston Louisville Pittsburgh Edison Baltimore New York Atlantic City Boston

St CT PA KY NY NY NY PA MA PA KY MD CT CT MA MA PA NJ PA NY NY MD MA KY PA NJ MD NY NJ MA

Att 5173 6400 650 31.4K 7150 18.6K 8000 10.2K 18K 75.2K 5000 1500 4000 5600 1000 2000 4000 2427 16.4K 33K 650 10K 16K 2800 8000 9929 25.8K 7500 3965

Exh 280 440 79 629 274 804 413 286 800 600 300 120 200 135 100 120

Nsf 56K

Industry Manufacturing Food & Beverage Building & Construction 25K 165K Home Furnishings Art, Music, Culture 28K 119K Paper 63K Metalworking 120K Radio, TV & Cable 170K Building & Construction 177K Sporting Goods & Rec. 77.5K Manufacturing 28K Government 30K Petroleum 24.8K Medical & Healthcare 45K Manufacturing 10K Dental 77.3K Exhibition Industry 227 38.7K Stores & Store Fittings Beauty & Healthcare 600 75K 1.1K 201K Medical & Healthcare 100 8000 Fire & Fire Protection Medical & Healthcare 275 50K 148 76K 315 45.8K Petroleum 380 75K Apparel Sporting Goods & Rec. 350 53K 2.3K 307K Food & Beverage 700 Police Vision 208 38K

Where Can You Find Industry Features, Maps, Insider Information, Shop Talk And Free Stuff?

Exhibit City News, of Course!

Sign up for six stunning, full-color issues of ECN and get our very special 20th anniversary edition, 52 weekly digital updates and free stuff to wear proudly! GO TO EXHIBITCITYNEWS.COM/SUBSCRIBE OR CALL 702.309.8023

@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 83


Trade Show Calendar US NORTHWEST

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

Show Association For Research In Vision & Ophthalmology - ARVO Association of California Water Agencies Heart Rhythm American Thoracic Society - ATS International Accounts Payable Professionals - IAPP FUSION Craft Beverage Expo - CBExpo International Anesthesia Research Society - IARS Society for Information Display - SID Display Week IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium - IMS Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Assoc - SGNA AeroMat Conference & Exposition Connections: The Digital Living Conference & Showcase West Coast Energy Management Congress - EMC American College Health Association - ACHA Bio International Convention CLEO: Expo - Laser Science to Photonic Applications Design-2-Part Show - Santa Clara, CA American Society of Echocardiography - ASE American Society for Artificial Interal Organs - ASAIO National Apartment Association - NAA Education Conference Pacific Northwest Dental Conference - WSDA NCIA Cannabis Business Summit Clean Pacific Conference & Exhibition Sensors Expo American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences Pacific Coast Builders Conference - PCBC SMX - Search Marketing Expo Advanced PacVet - Pacific Veterinary Conference California Applicantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Attorneys Association - CAAA Summer Convention

Start 5/1 5/3 5/4 5/13 5/17 5/18 5/21 5/22 5/22 5/22 5/23 5/24 5/25 5/31 6/6 6/7 6/8 6/10 6/15 6/15 6/16 6/20 6/21 6/21 6/22 6/22 6/22 6/23 6/30

End 5/5 5/6 5/7 5/18 5/20 5/20 5/24 5/27 5/27 5/24 5/26 5/26 5/26 6/4 6/9 6/9 6/9 6/14 6/18 6/18 6/18 6/22 6/23 6/23 6/25 6/23 6/23 6/26 7/3

Venue Washington State CC Monterey Portola Moscone Center Moscone Center Grand Sierra Resort & Casino Oakland CC Hilton SF Union Square Moscone Center Moscone Center Sheraton Seattle Meydenbauer Center Hyatt Regency SF Airport Washington State CC Marriott Marquis Moscone Center San Jose CC Santa Clara CC Washington State CC Hyatt Regency Moscone Center The Meydenbauer Center Oakland Marriott City Center Washington Hilton McEnery CC Hyatt Regency Bellevue Moscone Center Bell Harbor Intl. Conf. Center Hilton SF Union Square Marriott Marquis

All Information Is Subject to Change*

City Seattle Monterey San Francisco San Francisco Reno Oakland San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco Seattle Bellevue San Francisco Seattle San Francisco San Francisco San Jose Santa Clara Seattle San Francisco San Francisco Bellevue Oakland Seattle San Jose Seattle San Francisco Seattle San Francisco San Francisco

St WA CA CA CA NV CA CA CA CA WA WA CA WA CA CA CA CA WA CA CA WA CA WA CA WA CA WA CA CA

Att 12K

Exh

Nsf 8500

12K 15K 1200 1300 1000 7600 12K 2000 2000 850 2000 2000 16.5K 6000 2000 3000 600 5500 9000 2000 1000 4459 750 20K 900

130 175 52000 96 160 28 2800 43000 600 100K 70 60 150 100 2K 300 200 50

1100 25000 181K 59.5K 20K

2400 350 70K 150 80K 100 75 10K 185 21.6K 30 12.3K 690 195K 120 69

Industry Medical & Healthcare Water Medical & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Accounting Food & Beverage Medical & Healthcare Electrical & Electronics Science Nursing Aerospace & Aviation Electrical & Electronics Energy Medical & Healthcare Science Electrical & Electronics Manufacturing Medical & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Housing Dental Pollution Control Manufacturing Science Building & Construction Computers Veterinary Financial & Legal

PUT YOUR BUSINESS ON THE MAP! Showcase your regional services with a calendar sponsorship. Contact Sales@ExhibitCityNews.com For Rates and Details. (Design Services Available) 84 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


See complete listing of shows online at ExhibitCityNews.com/tradeshow-calendar

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

US SOUTHEAST Show Door & Hardware Institute - DHI CoNEXTions Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hurricane Conference Regional Airline Association - RAA Automotive Oil Change Association - iFlex - International Fast Lube Expo The Car Wash Show American Payroll Association International Jewelry Fair/General Merchandise Show Florida School Nutrition Assn Food & Equip Expo - FSNA American College of OB & GYN Annual Meeting - ACOG American Psychiatric Association - APA American Association of Critical Care Nurses - NTI Sapphire & ASUG Annual Conference - SAP WINDPOWER MuseumExpo - AAM Premiere Orlando - Beauty Show IAUG Converge - International Avaya Users Group American Physical Therapy Association - APTA NEXT Conference & Exhibition American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions - ADA Fiber to the Home Conference - FTTH League of Southeastern Credit Unions LSCU Annual Conv. Florida Roofing, Sheet Metal & Air Cond. Contractors - FRSA Florida National Dental Convention - FNDC IPW - U.S. Travel Association Society for Human Resource Management - SHRM Hospitality Financial & Technology Professionals - HITEC NAMM Summer Session American Library Association Annual Conference - ALA Building Owners & Managers Association - BOMA American Society of Safety Engineers - ASSE

All Information Is Subject to Change*

Start 5/4 5/8 5/9 5/9 5/9 5/10 5/12 5/12 5/14 5/14 5/16 5/17 5/23 5/26 6/4 6/5 6/8 6/10 6/13 6/15 6/16 6/16 6/18 6/19 6/20 6/23 6/23 6/25 6/26

End 5/6 5/13 5/12 5/11 5/11 5/14 5/15 5/14 5/17 5/18 5/19 5/19 5/26 5/29 6/6 6/9 6/11 6/14 6/15 6/17 6/18 6/18 6/22 6/22 6/23 6/25 6/28 6/28 6/29

Venue Orlando World Center Marriott Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel Charlotte CC Music City Center Music City Center Gaylord Opryland Morial CC Ocean Center Walter E. Washington CC Georgia International CC Morial CC Orange County CC Morial CC Walter E. Washington CC Orange County CC Disney Swan & Dolphin Resort Gaylord Opryland Morial CC Gaylord Opryland Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes Orange County CC Gaylord Palms Morial CC Walter E. Washington CC Morial CC Music City Center Orange County CC Gaylord National Georgia World Congress Center

City Orlando Orlando Charlotte Nashville Nashville Nashville New Orleans Daytona Beach Washington Atlanta New Orleans Orlando New Orleans Washington Orlando Orlando Nashville New Orleans Nashville Orlando Orlando Orlando New Orleans Washington New Orleans Nashville Orlando Washington Atlanta

St FL FL NC TN TN TN LA FL DC GA LA FL LA DC FL FL TN LA TN FL FL FL LA DC LA TN FL DC GA

Att

Exh Nsf 107 110K 4100 32.4K 1400 175 32K 2300 90 92K 5714 308 116K 2500 150 50K 5280 272 59.4K 1800 205 60K 13K 325 200K 11K 250 750K 9938 1K 105K 12K 220 70K 11K 920 275K 5000 300 70K 66K 785 289K 3000 142 28.4K 2376 221 31K 17.7K 171 87.4K 2500 102 31K 1100 130 28K 2500 209 31.2K 5967 300 50K 6423 881 145K 12.5K 800 4500 300 65K 10.8K 372 47.2K 20K 690 119K 2300 300 47.5K 8545 472 75.6K

Industry Building & Construction Government Aerospace & Aviation Automotive & Trucking Automotive & Trucking Business Jewelry Food & Beverage Medical & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Nursing Computers Renewable Energy Government Beauty & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Communications Banking Building & Construction Dental Travel Industry Business Hotels & Resorts Art, Music, Culture Libraries Real Estate Engineering

KEEP CALM Question: Where Can You Find Industry Features, Maps, Insider Information, Shop Talk And Free Stuff? Answer: Exhibit City News, of course!

Sign up for six stunning, full-color issues of ECN and get our very special 20th anniversary edition, 52 weekly digital updates and free stuff to wear proudly! GO TO EXHIBITCITYNEWS.COM/SUBSCRIBE OR CALL 702.309.8023

@ExhibitCityNews

AND

TWEET ON Join the conversation

@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 85


Trade Show Calendar US SOUTHWEST

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

Show Interop Las Vegas American Burn Association - Annual Meeting - ABA National Congress for Manufactured & Modular Housing Hospitality Design - HD National Hardware Show American Urological Association - AUA ICMI Contact Center Expo & Conference Electronic Distribution Show - EDS California Dental Association - Spring - CDA American Geriatrics Society - AGS Digestive Disease Week - DDW Association of Legal Administrators - ALA RECon - ICSC Leasing Mall & Trade Expo California Accounting & Business Show & Conference JCK Las Vegas InfoComm Sur/Fin - NASF HP Discover Technology Showcase WasteExpo National Independent Auto Dealers Association - NIADA Used Car Industry Expo World Tea Expo & Healthy Beverage Expo Hawaii Lodging, Hospitality & Foodservice Expo NFPA - National Fire Protection Association Conf. & Expo E3 - Electronic Entertainment Expo Licensing International Expo Western Foot & Ankle Conference International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators - IACLEA United States Bowling Congress - USBC & BowlExpo Environmental Systems Research Institute - ESRI

Start 5/2 5/3 5/3 5/4 5/4 5/6 5/10 5/10 5/12 5/19 5/21 5/22 5/22 6/1 6/3 6/4 6/6 6/7 6/7 6/13 6/13 6/13 6/13 6/14 6/21 6/23 6/24 6/26 6/27

End 5/6 5/6 5/5 5/6 5/6 5/10 5/13 5/13 5/14 5/21 5/24 5/25 5/25 6/2 6/6 6/10 6/8 6/9 6/9 6/16 6/17 6/14 6/16 6/16 6/23 6/26 6/27 6/30 7/1

Venue Mandalay Bay Caesars Palace Caesars Palace Mandalay Bay Las Vegas CC San Diego CC Long Beach CC Mirage Hotel & Casino Anaheim CC Long Beach CC San Diego CC Los Angeles CC Las Vegas CC LAX Hilton Hotel Mandalay Bay Las Vegas CC South Point Hotel The Venetian Las Vegas CC The Mirage Las Vegas CC Neal Blaisdell Center Mandalay Bay Los Angeles CC Mandalay Bay Disneyland Hotel & CC Sheraton Grand Phoenix Mandalay Bay San Diego CC

All Information Is Subject to Change*

City Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas San Diego Long Beach Las Vegas Anaheim Long Beach San Diego Los Angeles Las Vegas Los Angeles Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Las Vegas Honolulu Las Vegas Los Angeles Las Vegas Anaheim Phoenix Las Vegas San Diego

St NV NV NV NV NV CA CA NV CA CA CA CA NV CA NV NV NV NV NV NV NV HI NV CA NV CA AZ NV CA

Att 12.3K 2000 800 13K 19K 14.7K 1500 2700 29K 2700 19.8K 2000 33.5K 1700 36.6K 34.2K 1200 6300 12K 1259 5838 6233 7531 45.7K 19K 1000 300 5000 13.1K

Exh 330 80 120 765 2.6K 339 100 255 578 83 263 225 1.1K 120 2.5K 911 158 150 556 129 275 326 293 203 420 140 104 300 250

Fife

Nsf 92K 11.5K 40K 272K 559K 130K 11K 180K 130K 18K 93.5K 30K 900K 20K 498K 487K 17K 22K 237K 12K 48K 53K 64.2K 401K 205K 13.3K 10.4K 150K 30.7K

Industry Computers Medical & Healthcare Building & Construction Home Furnishings Building & Construction Medical & Healthcare Telecommunications Electrical & Electronics Dental Medical & Healthcare Medical & Healthcare Financial & Legal Real Estate Accounting Jewelry Audio Visual Building & Construction Computers Waste Management Automotive & Trucking Food & Beverage Hotels & Resorts Fire & Fire Protection Entertainment Business Medical & Healthcare Police Sporting Goods & Rec. Science

Williston

NEW YORK Bronx Carlin

Trenton Chicago

ILLINOIS

San Francisco

Richmond San Jose

Hobbs

Lake Charles

86 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


See complete listing of shows online at ExhibitCityNews.com/tradeshow-calendar

Att = Attendance | CC=Convention Center | Exh = Exhibitors | Nsf = Net Square Feet

CANADA Show Western Pet Expo - PIJAC Bakery Congress Canadian Institute of Mining - CIM Pri-Med Canada Ontario Dental Association - Annual Spring Meeting Project World & Business Analyst World Medical Library Association - MLA Montreal Manufacturing Technology Show - MMTS CANSEC Canadian Physiotherapy Association Congress JDIQ - Journees Dentaires Internationales du Quebec The Canadian Home Furnishings Market - TCHFM Society for Scholarly Publishing Annual Meeting - SSP Canadian Chemistry Conference & Exhibition - CSC World Conference on Disaster Management - WCDM Global Petroleum Show Million Dollar Round Table Annual Meeting - MDRT Electrical Apparatus Service Association - EASA Canadian Gaming Summit National Association of Federal Credit Unions - NAFCU Western Canada Farm Progress Show - WCFPS Security Canada West - CANASA Canadian Society for Medical Lab Science - LABCON - CSLMS EVS - Electric Drive Transportation Association - EDTA AAPG - American Association of Petroleum Geologists Annual

All Information Is Subject to Change*

Start 5/1 5/1 5/1 5/4 5/5 5/9 5/13 5/16 5/25 5/26 5/27 5/28 6/1 6/5 6/7 6/7 6/12 6/12 6/13 6/14 6/15 6/15 6/17 6/19 6/19

End 5/2 5/3 5/4 5/7 5/7 5/12 5/18 5/18 5/26 5/28 5/31 5/30 6/3 6/9 6/8 6/9 6/15 6/14 6/15 6/17 6/17 6/15 6/19 6/22 6/22

Venue Richmond Curling Club International Centre Vancouver CC International Centre Metro Toronto CC Metro Toronto Congress Centre Metro Toronto CC  Place Bonaventure Ernst & Young Centre Victoria Conference Centre Palais des Congres The International Centre Westin Bayshore World Trade & CC International Centre Stampede Park Vancouver CC Metro Toronto CC Shaw Centre Music City Center Evraz Place River Rock Casino Resort Prince Edward Island CC Palais des Congres BMO Centre

City Richmond Toronto Vancouver Toronto Toronto Toronto Toronto Montreal Ottawa Victoria Montreal Toronto Vancouver Halifax Toronto Calgary Vancouver Toronto Ottawa Nashville Regina Richmond Charlottetown Montreal Calgary

St BC ON BC ON ON ON ON QC ON BC QC ON BC NS ON AB BC ON ON TN SK BC PEI QC AB

Att 300 4250 7000 1800 10K 3500

Exh 72

Nsf 8000 40K

Industry Veterinary Food & Beverage Building & Construction 70 Medical & Healthcare 170 22K 300 58K Dental 70 Business Medical & Healthcare 130 4500 400 Manufacturing 11K 331 70K Military Medical & Healthcare 500 12K Dental Home Furnishings 7000 245 900 2600 Publishing 1800 Chemical 2300 120 18K Government 63.3K 2K 568K Petroleum 6000 100 12.5K Financial & Legal Electrical & Electronics 2000 203 35K 2000 130 18K Gaming 2000 180 18K Banking 45K 715 1.8M Agriculture & Farming 500 70 Security 63 13.2K Medical & Healthcare Automotive & Trucking 900 100 25K 8446 217 71.2K Petroleum

*DISCLAIMER: Please note that tradeshow information is provided as a resource only. All show information is subject to change. Please check show dates and venues with official show organizers and producers. For updated show and event listings, visit www.exhibitcitynews.com/tradeshow-calendar.

Making YOU Stand Out exposystems.com

1.800.263.3976

E x poS y s tem s is a L eading Modular S y s tem s Manuf ac tur er

Continued on p.98

@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 87

Atlan Cana Assoc Onta


Classifieds

Outside Sales Account Representative Orbus, a leading and highly successful manufacturer and trade distributor of products and services to the tradeshow and display industries selling Business to Business headquartered in Illinois, is seeking an Outside Sales Account Representative. We are looking for a “hunter” that is driven, self-motivated, goal-oriented, and willing to receive guidance and direction, as you will be the primary link to our current and prospective clients on the west coast. You will be responsible for maintaining, prospecting and calling on businesses within your territory. You will be in the business of meeting owners and decision makers and introducing them to our tradeshow/display products and services. You will be part of a Team Environment and play a part in the Sales Team Success. Your main focus will be selling our services/products to tradeshow/display businesses and assist them in identifying product strengths and weaknesses and then recommend ways to eliminate those problems by offering our services and products to increase sales growth. Our sales professionals are responsible for helping our clients increase their exhibit/display presence in the tradeshow industry. If you are a hungry, resilient, organized, sales quota buster and a risk-taker who has the ability and desire to be a successful sales person, then we want to hear from you. We are looking for

self starters with a high energy personality. This is a tremendous opportunity for the right candidate who is willing to work hard and put in the effort. Travel is over 50%

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: • 3+yrs outside sales experience, intangible product sale success a plus • Positive, high energy sales-oriented personality • Must have experience in prospecting, cold calling, then qualify prospects and motivating them to purchase from you • Highest degree of honesty, integrity and professionalism • Ability to accomplish monthly, quarterly sales targets and goals independently • Excellent presentation, communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to manage multiple projects with tight deadlines • Consistent attention to detail and strong organizational skills • Keen desire to learn, improve and succeed • Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience We have been on an aggressive growth path and are continuing to look to expand our Field Sales coverage throughout the US market. Compensation will be commensurate with experience, plus a comprehensive health and benefits package. Please include salary requirements when applying online or mail your resume to Orbus Inc. 9033 Murphy Rd., Woodridge, IL 60517

Trade Show Shipping / Account Executive WORK FROM ANYWHERE! National Exhibit Transportation company is seeking high energy individuals to generate new business. We have been in business for over 25 years. Our core competency is in trade show shipping services. We are interested in hiring experienced sales reps with a background in trade show shipping sales. Work from home office fully connected to our corporate office. Strong telemarketing skills needed. Competitive salary and commission program. Please send resume in confidence to jimh@elitexpo.com

88 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Sho-Link, a premier national I&D company, is seeking a Las Vegas City Manager. For more information about our unique company built on strong ethics, employee recognition and core values, please visit www.sho-link.com. We are looking for someone with a minimum of 3 years management experience, and with an understanding of the extremely fastpaced tradeshow and convention industry. The ideal candidate leads with moxie and by example, and will foster a positive environment.

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: • Management oversight. • Communication with all levels. • Exhibit floor management. • Payroll and invoice approval. • Planning.

NECESSARY SKILLS INCLUDE: • Leadership • Communication • Resourcefulness • Adaptability. Our existing Las Vegas team is equipped with an amazing and experienced support staff as well as strongly established show floor crews. For consideration, please submit your resume to hr@sho-link.com.

To place a classified ad, contact Kathy Anaya:

Call (702) 309-8023 or Email KathyA@ExhibitCityNews.com


Classifieds

Senior Project/Operations Manager – Las Vegas We are looking for a high energy individual that wants an exciting opportunity to grow with us! We are a Las Vegas based exhibit company with 17 years in the industry and we are seeking a quality individual who can run our Las Vegas operation. Are you a Lieutenant now • Exceptional Communicaand want to be Captain? If tion skills. so, then this opportunity • Expertise in taking is for you! Your expertise concept renderings and ideas are valued and and fleshing out details welcome! with CAD and graphics departments and strateTHE IDEAL CANDIDATE … gize a production plan. • Is extremely organized • Is an expert in processPROJECT/OPERATIONS MANAGER DUTIES & REes, procedures, and SPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE infrastructure BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO: • Is self-motivated • Enjoys taking on new responsibilities and Responsible for full comchallenges. pletion and fulfillment of • Embraces a fast each project, which would paced ever changing include: environment. • Loves to build genuine • Managing all service derelationships. partment and shop labor • Is willing to do whatever daily schedules it takes to get it done. to ensure timely completion based on timelines SKILLS/QUALIFICATIONS: given • Extensive project and • Oversee completed exproduction management hibits for approval before of Trade Show exhibit shipping builds. • Maintain project sched• experience is REQUIRED. ules (minimum 6 years) • Estimation of custom • Expertise in estimation exhibit projects of custom millwork, • Project management and metal work, acrylics, coordination fabrics, graphics, lighting • Maintaining a well-orgatechniques, packaging nized warehouse with a and extensive vendor full inventory system knowledge base. • Facility oversight • Fluency in Microsoft Office. (Excel, Word, Send resume to Outlook, PowerPoint) skyler4982@gmail.com

@ExhibitCityNews

Sales Manager West Coast ALUVISION Inc. develops and manufactures a modular aluminum system for the international exhibition and event industry, as well as for store and showroom fittings. Our high-end frame system allows a quick, efficient and ecological installation of every project. We are searching for a SALES MANAGER WEST COAST.

RESPONSIBILITIES: • Preserve and foster relations with existing clients. • Prospecting and adequate follow-up to develop new business. • Travel to visit trade shows. • Prepare and give product presentations and trainings to potential and existing customers. • Cold calling and face-to-face visits. • Achieve established targets. • Report directly to upper management.

REQUIREMENTS: • Outstanding written and oral communications skills. • Strong people interaction skills. • Effective time management skills with strong organization abilities. • Ability to travel on a regular basis. • A positive, can-do attitude to continually improve performance. • Trade show or event industry experience preferred. Visit us at www.aluvision.com. To apply, email your resume to annelies@aluvision.com.

DERSE is excited to announce that it’s expanding its presence in Southern California. We are changing the face-to-face marketing industry and we are looking for innovative sales and creative talent in the Southern California market to help drive our vision. Interested? Contact Sheri Thomka, Vice President of Human Resources, at sthomka@derse.com or cell at 414.795.3792. ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 89


Classifieds

Project Management Manager Orbus, a leading Custom Modular Exhibit Manufacturing and Tradeshow Supply company, located in the Midwest, seeks a full-time PM Manager to lead and manage our front end operations. This individual would be responsible for managing the project management and detailing teams that are responsible for producing details required for our production teams to manufacture custom modular exhibits, as well as managing our teams that provide instructions for our clients for on-site installation. This individual should have a minimum of 5 successful years of experience managing project management teams of 10+ people.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES • Must have the ability to hire, train, mentor and motivate current and future team members • Manage the scheduling of workload through teams • Ensure all team deadlines are met • Work with other departments such as sales and production to facilitate smooth project fulfillment • Work with other department heads to facilitate cross-departmental training • Develop and implement departmental processes and procedures • Develop and implement departmental metrics for overall evaluation on a per individual and per project basis • Improve overall quality and accuracy of team output, based upon those quantifiable metrics

REQUIREMENTS (SKILLS & EXPERIENCE) * Must have a minimum of 5 successful years of experience managing project management teams of 10+ people • Must be an excellent team player that works well within their department and others • Must be enthusiastic and an excellent communicator and motivator • Must be proficient with the Microsoft suite of products • Must have a proficient understanding of a company’s P & L and how their team’s contribution affects that • Must be a detail oriented individual with exceptional organizational skills • CAD experience not a requirement, but would be beneficial • Tradeshow / Exhibit manufacturing not a requirement, but would be beneficial • Must be willing to relocate to work out of our Midwest facility This is an opportunity to join a high-performing team in a dynamic and exponentially growing company. Please send resumes to: hr@orbus.com

90 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

MAXIMA 80X80 I have about 50 PCs of various sizes I used once to build a smaller pavilion in 2012. Since that day sitting in warehouse. Locks, bases, very great shape. Cost $14,000 Sell for $4,500

OCTANORM 300+ meter bars, 250+ 1/2 m bars, 40 8’ uprights. Numerous 2 meter and 3 meter bars as well as curves and other sizes bars. 1000 and 750 uprights with feet. Bucket of locks. Full size doors. Cabinet doors slides. Bullets. Z Clips. Tools. Includes 100+ counter tops, panels, and other bits and pieces. Over $60,000 value. Rental company in a box. $15,000 for all. Email: Bobrabcexpo@ gmail.com

We Buy Tradeshow Companies FGI has clients interested in buying tradshow companies in all specialties, sizes and geographic locations. Additionally, we offer free assessments of your tradeshow company with no obligation. Find out what your company is worth.

Exhibitrac is Hiring Exhibitrac needs new show guides for its database, and will pay $10 - $20 per accepted guide. If you are an industry supplier, exhibitor, union or other employee who regularly attends or works at shows in major convention cities such as Las Vegas, Chicago, Boston, Orlando, etc.

For Sale

Please contact us for details: klandrum@exhibitrac.com or call 702-824-9651 ext. 700

Please contact Carol Fountain, 216 952 0745, cfountain@ fountaingroupintl.com.


Classifieds

Established And Growing I&D Company Is Looking For A City Manager To Join Our Team In Las Vegas, Nevada. SUMMARY: The city manager is required to manage the daily operations for tradeshow labor in the regions many different venues, working with the Regional Manager on planning and executing large labor calls across the area. These daily operations include; calling and communicating with both customers and internal personnel, show planning, the hiring and training of the labor force, coordinating labor, completion of the daily time tickets, show reports, and payroll reporting, administrative duties and participating in any and all show floor activity as necessary.

REQUIREMENTS: • Previous city manager experience preferred with 10 years related tradeshow experience. • Strong attention to detail and excellent organizational and communication skills. • Ability to effectively work with a variety of people including, customers, laborers, and unions. • Willing to work very long hours when needed both through the week and over weekends. • Ability to use common electronics such as laptop and smartphones. • Must be able to maintain a positive attitude in a fast paced often chaotic environment.

Post Your Classified Here! Talent seekers have come to the right source. Place your classified ad with ECN in print and online today! Our six print issues a year complement our online website, giving your classified ad maximum exposure. Grab the attention of the most sought-after, seasoned event professionals who regularly read ECN. Ask about our Guaranteed Results Program for all your staffing needs. To place a classified ad, contact Kathy Anaya: Call (702) 309-8023 or Email KathyA@ExhibitCityNews.com

Please submit resumes to: blindbox@exhibitcitynews.com

@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 91


Classifieds

3D Graphics Designer As an Experience Designer with IMI Exhibits will include designing graphic and structural elements for tradeshow environments and exhibits. You will generate solutions to the creative challenges that our internal and external customers face in the fastest-paced, highest volume market in the country.

OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: • Creative and enthusiastic about design. • Well-versed in exhibit concepts. • Able to articulate design concepts to clients, account executives, design team, and all other relevant branch departments. • Organized and able to manage multiple assignments at once. • A team player ‘ willing to lead or follow as the project demands. • Customer service oriented. • Create 3D designs and exhibits. • Prepare presentation renderings, digital presentations or sample boards. • Meet with and present to clients and account executives. • Develop original concepts from client notes and requirements. • Keep current with design trends and research. • Maintain familiarity with modular systems and custom fabrication techniques.

REQUIREMENTS: • At least four (4) years’ experience in the tradeshow industry, designing exhibits, tradeshow environments, and/or corporate events. • Possess solid skills in Adobe CS applications, AutoCAD, 3DS MAX.

EDUCATION: • High School Diploma/GED Required. • Bachelor’s Degree in exhibit design, environmental design, set design, or related field preferred. Salary-Depending on experience with benefits. Please send resumes to:hr@imi-usa.com

92 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Eagle Management Group Is Looking For A City Manager To Join Our Team In San Francisco, Ca. SUMMARY: The City manager is required to manage the daily operations for tradeshow labor in the San Francisco Bay region. These daily operations include; the hiring and training of the workforce, coordinating labor, administrative duties, completion of the time tickets and billing reports, participating in all union activity and all show floor activity.

REQUIREMENTS: 10 years related tradeshow experience Strong attention to detail and excellent organizational skills Excellent communication and leadership, abilities. The ability to effectively work with a variety of clientele, people and unions. Ability to multi-task and maintain a positive attitude in a full-paced environment. Flexible and willing to work long hours when needed. Familiar with desktop/ lab top computers, internet, email, tablet, fax and smart phone use. Please send resumes to: info@eaglemg.com

Post Your Classified Here! Talent seekers have come to the right source. Place your classified ad with ECN in print and online today! Our six print issues a year complement our online website, giving your classified ad maximum exposure. Grab the attention of the most sought-after, seasoned event professionals who regularly read ECN. Ask about our Guaranteed Results Program for all your staffing needs. To place a classified ad, contact Kathy Anaya:

Call (702) 309-8023 or Email KathyA@ExhibitCityNews.com


We Build Statements. • GRAPHICS • MILLWORK • SCULPTING • CNC CUTTING • HARD COATING • FAST TURNAROUND • METAL FABRICATION • OUTSOURCE SPECIALISTS

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93 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


Industry Service Guide

Photographika

Photographika, Inc. is a Las Vegas based Corporate Event Photography & Video Production Company. Established by a 15 year Corporate Event Photographer Sammy Vassilev and Iva Vassilev with experience in wide range of corporate event photography and video production in Europe and USA, Photographika, Inc. specializes in Corporate Event Photography and Video. Photographika, Inc. provides general event coverage, awards, green screen, on-site printing, booth photography, general sessions, keynote speakers, red carpets, step & repeat, expo, convention, sales meetings, private corporate events photography and video. Our video production services range from general event coverage & video production to LIVE event LIVE web or TV broadcasts.

Consulting

Exhibits

Trade Shows from One Country to the Next A new book written by past IFES & EDPA PresidentLarry Kulchawik Trade Shows from One Country to the Next... A guide to recalculating your thinking when marketing in multiple countries â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trade Shows from One Country to the Nextâ&#x20AC;? delves into international marketing, with a focus specifically on global trade show differences and distinctions. Rather than concentrate on details about marketing per se, this book focuses on the needed adjustments-mental, physically and otherwise-when marketing a product/service through tradeshows from one country to the next. Although dedicated to trade show exhibit architecture and behavior, much of the information contained in this book also speaks to effective communication skills required when spending a week or less marketing a product in a foreign country. After forty-three years in the international trade show arena, the author shares his thoughts and the comments obtained from world-wide experts in the countries outlined. No one person or company is the expert everywhere in the world. There is no right way or wrong way-there is only a different way. This book will appeal to not only exhibit managers, show organizers, venues, and exhibit suppliers, but to those who market anything on a global scale. Effective communication is key! $17.95

International trade show marketing requires a recalculation of thinking when exhibiting globally. This book points out the country differences for exhibiting abroad. A review of the venues, rules, regulations, exhibit styles, labor issues, and cultural differences for exhibiting in 45 countries. Whether you are organizing an international trade show or working it, your awareness of cultural differences can make or break your success at global trade shows.

There is no right way, there is no wrong way, there is only a different way. Respect and understand what is different to avoid surprises and ensure exhibit success. Available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or direct through Exhibit City News. www.larrykulchawik.com

Exhibits

94 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

Exhibits


Industry Service Guide Freelance Design Services • Design Consultants on-site design service available

YOR Design Group Our Mission: to create trade show exhibits and environments that convey your brands cohesive image. Freelance Design, Design Consultations, On-Site Services, Over 20 years experience in local and national markets. ‘Got Design? We Got YORS!’ www.YorDesignGroup.com

10 YEARS STRONG established 2005

Contact Dean Pappas 20+ Years Exhibit Design Experience

1-708-598-8100 www.yordesigngroup.com

YOR Design Group World Headquarters • Burbank, IL

Exhibits & Events

Exhibit Production

Upstate NY

Montpelier, VT

Concord, NH

Boston, MA Worcester, MA Springfield, MA

Hartford, CT

Exhibit Software

Providence, RI

(508) 366-8594 info@corp-eventsne.com

Event Management

Exhibit / Trade Show Displays | Event Planning | Sporting Event Décor

@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 95


Industry Service Guide

Corey Johnson Photography

Corey Johnson Photography is a Las Vegas based company that specializes in a wide variety of event coverage. This includes photojournalistic event, corporate event, head shots, group/team photos, keynote speakers, awards, trade show, exposition, convention, booth, architectural, publication photography, and so much more. Corey Johnson Photography stands out from the competition by not only capturing your vision, but providing creative solutions and developing the comprehensive experience that your event needs.

exhibit and event experience photography

10% OFF

www.cjphotog.com

ECN10

Las Vegas, Nevada 218 - 209 - 1466 corey@cjphotog.com

PROMO CODE

For booking information, call 218-209-1466, or visit www.CJPhotoG.com

Furniture

Graphics

Logistics

Nail Salon

Champion Logistics Group has a transportation division specializing in the coordination of trade shows and special events. Champion provides the most reliable and flexible trade show transportation in the industry.

Chicago | Atlanta | Boston | Dallas | Las Vegas | Los Angeles | New Jersey

800.323.5401 | info@champlog.com | www.champlog.com

96 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News


Industry Service Guide

Main Place Lighting Main Place Lighting offers diverse lighting solutions, distributing for major Lighting Manufacturers. We specialize in L.E.D. lighting, including but not limited to, under counter, over head, arm lights and custom lighting solutions. We are also proud to be the West Coast Distributor of ShowBatteryâ&#x201E;˘. Bringing an Industry first: Fully contained, Rechargeable Battery Units for LED Lighting.

Security

Tradeshow List

Tree Removal

Your Category Here

BOOK BUSINESS WITH YOUR AD HERE Contact sales for details: 702-309-8023 ext. 105 Sales@exhibitcitynews.com

@ExhibitCityNews

ExhibitCityNews.com MAY 2016 97


ADVERTISER INDEX

Advertiser Index A-Z 253 Inc.

71

Exposystems

87

RES

12

4 Productions

73

Flooring Exhibits

36

Sho-Aids

61

A & P Flooring

63

Fresh Wata

37

SRS Fabrication

28

Ahern Rentals

86

Gist Specialties

93

Step 1 Dezigns

80

100

Group Delphi

29

Stevens E3

80

Grupo Omega

65

Storage West

93

Highmark TechSystems

23

Super Bright LED

77

Aluvision Angles on Design

7

beMatrix

2

Brumark

23

Hill & Partners

61

Sunset Transportation

Champion Logistics

16

IFES

24

Tectonics

99

Charlie Palmer

75

Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NY Pizza

76

Tradeshow Dogs

41

Cobo Center

55

Larry Kulchawik Consulting

61

Tradetec

82

Corp-Events

69

Momentum Management

3

Willwork Inc.

49

Corporate Communications

59

New Gen Business Solutions 41

CORT

15

Nolan Advisory

47

D.E. McNabb

4

Octanorm USA

16

Dolomite

53

OnSite Exhibitor Service

69

EDPAF

28

Orbus

Employco

35

Prism Lighting

9 17

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES Contact sales: 702-309-8023 ext. 105 sales@exhibitcitynews.com 98 MAY 2016 Exhibit City News

5


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WE BUILD IT. Tectonics supports exhibit companies by creating eye-popping, jawdropping, thought-provoking exhibit solutions using tension fabric and our proprietary aluminum extrusion system for the world's largest and most image-critical companies.

When it comes to amazement, we deliver. › Tension Fabric Displays

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Omni-55

hole in one Aluvision Inc. > 1620 Satellite Boulevard, Suite C

> Duluth > GA 30097 > T: (470) 252 3500 > info@aluvision.com > www.aluvision.com

Exhibit City News - May 2016  
Exhibit City News - May 2016