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The

Exonian

The Exeter School Magazine

2019


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s another year at Exeter School goes by, an impressive range of challenges and activities are undertaken by our pupils. All of this, we have tried to fit into 100 or so pages. It is not without challenge that pupils, teachers, and the editorial team tries to translate the bustling, exhilarating atmosphere of the school onto paper in this magazine; we can only hope that it is equally as engaging and inspiring as the community fostered in Exeter School each year. ALLEGRA LETTS Pupil Editor

THE EXONIAN 2019

CONTENTS

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006 016 024 038 045 048 054 057 062 069 070 077 081 084 088 090 092 096 102 110 118

iving off the coast of the exquisite islands of Pulau Gaya and Pulau Sapi near the coast of Borneo; performing on the banks of the sun-kissed Italian Rivieria in the district of Liguria; swimming in the natural pools overlooking the worldfamous Matterhorn; presenting the prestigious Greenaway Award to famous authors‌ The list of stunning achievements and experiences enjoyed by Exeter School pupils this year is quite unbelievable. It has been a pleasure working with the sparky The Exonian Editorial Team (although I apologise for some of these headlines‌ ) to compile for you here highlights of yet another year of hard work from the inspirational community at our wonderful school. MR SEATON-BURN Editor

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his edition of The Exonian, as ever, would not be possible without the hard work of a wide range of staff. An enormous thank you must go to Mrs Brookes-Ferrari, the team at Brightsea, and all contributors - staff and pupils alike.

4 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

New and Leaving Staff Features Trips and Tours Outdoor Pursuits Charity and Community Service Sixth Form Alumni Links Commemorative Days Art Design Technology Drama English Geography History Library Maths Modern Foreign Languages Music Psychology and Science Beyond the Classroom Sport


WELCOME

This past year in Exeter School, I have thoroughly enjoyed taking on the role of pupil Editor-In-Chief of The Exonian, along with participating in the Haileybury MUN Conference, and an abundance of the activities and societies that Exeter School has offered to me. Next year, I am looking forward to moving onto university, studying Politics and International Relations.

ALLEGRA LETTS

LILY ALFORD I’ve found this year at Exeter School really rewarding in terms of taking part in both hockey and netball and a variety of choirs and musical ensembles, while studying History, Maths, English Literature and Spanish. Writing for The Exonian has also been good experience for working in journalism.

This was my second year in The Exonian team and I have enjoyed every moment, from the opportunity to conduct a phone interview with Miranda Krestovnikoff to spending a day investigating sustainability in the city centre. I look forward to another year on the team.

Having been at Exeter School for eight years, I have enjoyed my time getting involved in both music and sport. Although I will miss school life, I am excited to take a gap year next year and am looking forward to studying Economics at university.

EMILY MOUDIOTIS

This year has been my first at Exeter School where I chose to study Chemistry, Biology, Maths and Politics. I decided to join The Exonian as the subjects I am doing are very science based and I wanted to mix things up and improve my writing skills. But I will never reach the standard that Daisy Brett sets for us.

MOLLY OLDRIDGE

ROSIE CROMWELL

DAISY BRETT

MADDY KING GEORGIA LING I have loved my time here at Exeter School, which has been a great place to grow up, but now look forward to the next step in my academic life.

I’ve found my first year at Exeter School very enjoyable, studying English Literature, Economics, Maths and RS, each endowed with the fruitful gift of knowledge. English Literature has given me the ability to articulate myself in the least pompous manner truly possible; an inimitable gift. Perhaps I have not quite mastered that but the nature of life is not to exceed man’s own ability in order to conform to the strict structure that society bestows but to do one’s best.

I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in the Sixth Form at Exeter School, particularly becoming involved in hockey and the Senior School productions. However, I am looking forward to next year, where I hope to study English Literature at UCL.

DAISY BISHOP This year I have really enjoyed my time at Exeter School. I have chosen to study Maths, Economics, Business and Politics. These are mainly new subjects so I have found them very interesting. My highlights of the year were getting involved in netball and House competitions and I have loved having singing lessons again.

JAMES BRODERICK ‘Frowning towards the amorphous mass Of heavy bellowing breaths: Concentrated, dark, a swaddling mess of Balwen bark. One can only guess where its borders lie above the estuary! At heart it longs to dribble out its drivel, To cry out its hest, to order its guests inside the monastery.’

EXETERSCHOOL.ORG.UK 5


THE EXONIAN 2019

NICE TO MEET YOU EXETER S C H O O L’ S NEW STAFF FOR 2019

Adam Gale

Agathe Lafragette

Ali Dunning

GROUNDSMAN/GARDENER

FRENCH LANGUAGE ASSISTANT

DEPUTY HEAD (PASTORAL) AND MODERN LANGUAGES TEACHER

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

I was working at Blundell’s School. WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Imagine Dragons and Eminem. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

In my spare time I like to play cricket and football. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Lasagne. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Arrogant people. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

My highlight would be preparing a cricket wicket and seeing it get played on, it takes a lot of preparation so it’s a shame when it gets called off due to rain. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

I would probably go to Australia as I have got some family over there. I went there a few years ago and loved it!

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

I was getting ready to start a new exciting job as a French teaching assistant at Exeter School. WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Georges Brassens! Boris Vian! Nina Simone! Jazz, blues, rock, folk, especially the Irish fiddle... WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Reading a good book with a lovely cup of tea. I also enjoy going for walks in the woods or on the beach, collecting little treasures such as pretty leaves, feathers or seashells. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Sadly I am not such a great cook. I would simply have a mixed salad with bits of apples, walnuts and raisins, a selection of the best French cheeses... and proper French bread of course. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

I was living in and teaching in Hertfordshire, thinking that I might like to find a nice school by the coast… WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

I love all kinds of music and I’ll listen to almost anything. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

I enjoy playing badminton, being outdoors and visiting new places. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

My mum’s minced beef rolypoly. It tastes better than it sounds. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Lazy grammar, undone top buttons and vanilla ice cream (it’s not a real flavour). WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

The last week of term before Christmas.

I enjoy attending the pupils’ concerts and theatrical plays. So much talent in this school!

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Southern France: home, sweet home! Or else maybe Italy or Spain. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Probably 1950’s SaintGermain-des-Prés, when jazz was all the rage in Paris.

6 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

New Zealand.

I’d go back to medieval times as I find that period of time fascinating. But I don’t think I’d want to stay there for very long…


NEW STAFF

Danny Otley-Howard

Hetty Hayden

Ian Wilkins

Jasmine Elmer

SENIOR IT SUPPORT SPECIALIST

PE TEACHER

ART TEACHER

CLASSICS AND GEOGRAPHY TEACHER

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

This time last year I was working for the largest Apple Premium reseller in the UK supporting the IT investiture of 26 stores across the country. WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

I am into dance and drum and bass although I love any outdoor live music. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

I was enjoying maternity leave with my 4-month-old daughter, Arabella.

I was a teacher of Art and Photography at Marlborough College in Wiltshire.

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

I love the Apple music playlists - so much to listen to. At the moment, I like the relaxed vibes of Nick Mulvey.

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

I collect vinyl records and enjoy a wide range of music. As I play guitar I tend to enjoy rhythm and blues from the 60s and 70s.

Anything soulful - R&B, jazz and soul (obviously!). Tentatively, I will admit to being partial to house music, especially tropical house, which always makes me feel like I’m abroad.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

I’m pretty active and enjoy the outdoors with friends or family. I enjoy running, water sports and playing hockey.

I enjoy playing football, cycling and water sports but YOUR SIGNATURE DISH? also like to binge watch series That’s a tough one. I do enjoy on Netflix. cooking chicken jambalaya. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

My chilli con carne is legendary even if I do say so myself! WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

People eating with their mouth open. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

I’d love to live on the Isle of Scilly, the pace of life and the stunning beauty of the islands is amazing. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

I’d like to go 30 years into the future to see how technology has progressed and what new gadgets have been invented.

WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Dishonesty – it makes me totally lose trust in them. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

I love sporting events, fixtures and sports day. Seeing pupils work hard to be the best they physically can be is always real highlight. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

We have just moved from Guildford to Devon, so I will say Devon! IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

I would love to travel back to the first Olympics, either to Olympia, Greece (776 BC) or perhaps the modern Games in Athens in 1896. It would be amazing to see the different facilities and events, the different clothing and physical fitness but what I’d most like to witness would be the atmosphere surrounding those original athletes.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

Starting my first year as a PhD student!

Spending time with my fiancée, making and looking at art, home improvements, walking on Dartmoor, listening to music, watching films, visiting historical places, charity shops and tea rooms.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Tartiflette. Commonly consumed as a refuel aprèsski, but used as comfort food in the Elmer household on a cold winter’s day.

Prawn linguine or chicken curry. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

I live on Dartmoor and therefore feel very lucky to live in such a beautiful location. Though if I was given the option of a ‘piedà-terre’, I would go for Sicily or somewhere on the Amalfi Coast. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Probably the Renaissance period.

I love the outdoors, walking on the beach or in a forest. If I’m not travelling, I’m planning the next trip for me and my family. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

My pet hate is questions about what your pet hate is... ! WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

As I was born on Christmas Day, I love the festivities of the late autumn term. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Bora Bora. I used to live in New Zealand and frequently visited the South Pacific. It is utter bliss! IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Unsurprisingly, I would hot foot it back to the GrecoRoman period. I cannot narrow this down, as I would like to see it all!

EXETERSCHOOL.ORG.UK 7


THE EXONIAN 2019

Jess Pearson

Lisa Barlass

Lisa Paget

Liz Corten

REPROGRAPHICS AND DESIGN ASSISTANT

SCHOOL NURSE

PA TO THE JUNIOR SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS

JUNIOR SCHOOL ASSISTANT SECRETARY

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

Working as the school nurse I was freelancing as a graphic at EF International Academy Torquay. designer for clients such as the Donkey Sanctuary and WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY local businesses. I am also LISTENING TO? part of the Exeter Etsy team I like listening to all kinds of so I was working on the build music. up to the Christmas market we had at Exeter Phoenix. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

I tend to listen to Spotify or the radio while working. Alt-J, London Grammar, Japanese Wallpaper and Maggie Rogers are all current favourites.

YOUR SPARE TIME?

Spending time at home in my garden, eating out with family and friends, being outdoors, walking. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

Commencing my new role at Exeter School.

Working for the NHS.

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

House music and 90’s hits, and some classical. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Playing cricket, watching my boys play rugby and cricket. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Homemade lasagne.

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Anything but classical. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Spending time with my granddaughter, gardening and travelling. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Spaghetti bolognese. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Rudeness.

Lateness.

Incorrect spelling in correspondence i.e. letters and emails.

WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

I love spending time with friends and seeing my niece and nephew. Living in Exmouth, I often head down to the beach for a walk or paddle. I also often have a print or portrait commission on the go.

WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

I have not been here a whole year yet but I liked the spring/ summer term – enjoyed seeing everyone enjoying the outdoor spaces and all the sporting fixtures.

Taking on the Junior School Personal Assistant to the Headmistress role.

YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

I’m apparently good at roast potatoes so will get roped into doing them at a family roast dinner! WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Plastic! I’m trying my best to reduce my usage. I haven’t used a carrier bag for a few years and I do feel physically sick if I see people using them for their shopping!

Spaghetti bolognese. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Australia. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Edwardian era (upper class!) because of the fashion and architecture.

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Within walking distance of Watergate Bay in Cornwall. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

I would go back to the 60s and 70s to see my parents when they were teenagers. Plus I would love the clothes! 8 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

I don’t know yet! WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Hawaii.

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Australia.

1970 to see my dad again.

IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

2000-2009, when I lived and worked in the Far East, my children were born and I got married.


NEW STAFF

Matthew Commin

Natalie Cushion

Rachael Magee

Rob Stoyle

PHYSICS TEACHER

MODERN LANGUAGES TEACHER

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI RELATIONS

JUNIOR SCHOOL GAP YEAR ASSISTANT

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

Teaching Physics at The Perse School in Cambridge, but being involved with a lot of other aspect of the school like rugby, cricket and outdoor pursuits. WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Very mixed: country, classical, rock, jazz, etc (just not rap)! WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Being active. Kayaking, playing sport, spending time walking or climbing in mountains and generally just being outside and by the sea. I am also rarely happier than when I am able to do some woodworking or being busy in the garden while listening to the cricket on the radio. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Mexican style chilli or a roast dinner. However I am really keen on using fresh local ingredients and enjoying whatever is in season. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Wheelie suitcases when they are really not needed. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

Anything where I get the chance to be outdoors, but I also get worryingly hyperactive with my favourite Physics demonstrations. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Triassic – who doesn’t want to see dinosaurs? Especially as I studied Geology at some point in my past.

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

I was in Japan with my husband. We arrived in Tokyo and spent five days exploring what has to be one of the maddest cities I have ever visited! We also went to Kyoto to explore temples. It was a fascinating experience! WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

I enjoy a variety of music but I particularly like bossa nova and Elvis. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

I very much enjoy travelling and discovering new places, people and food. I also like being outdoors, gardening and cycling. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

The Hairy Bikers’ Spanishstyle chicken bake. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

The idea of eating more than one Brussel sprout per year. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

In my last school, it was when the Spanish exchange students arrived. Students and staff alike would always get excited - it was a very special moment. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

I was actually preparing to start work at Exeter School. I was probably busy trying to get my head around the timetable (I still struggle to remember what time period 4 is!) and getting ready for a few alumni events we had coming up. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Lots of the usual things like reading, running, and films. But I do really love food and cooking: I’m always planning my next meal, usually before I’ve finished the last one, and I love to travel to try new foods and cultures. I took some time off a few years ago to travel purely so I could eat my way around the world! YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

I think I make a pretty good Shakshuka – it’s a delicious middle eastern dish with vegetables, tomato sauce and eggs baked in the sauce. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Negativity and ignorance – the two together are a real combo! Another one is people wearing socks with sandals... WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

Somewhere in South America, I am yet to decide the precise country!

Christmas! I love carols and Christmas music so I really am in my element at that time of year.

IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

I would travel to 1928, the year the U.K. government passed the Representation of the People act, which gave the vote to all women and men over the age of 21.

Wellington in New Zealand: it’s a stunning, interesting, laid back city in a very beautiful country, with the only drawback being it really is on the other side of the planet from all my family and friends.

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

I was just starting my second year of A Levels in the Senior School, studying Biology, Chemistry and Geography and of course playing for the mighty Exeter School FC. WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Anything really, just as long as it isn’t too slow or sad! WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Playing and watching sport, particularly cricket and football and spending time with friends and family, whether going on holiday or going out over the weekend. YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Cooking is not a strong point, but I made a good banana cake for my Geography class once! WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

People eating loudly. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

Definitely the summer term when the weather’s good, everyone is outdoors and the cricket season begins. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Probably New Zealand - they have everything you could want: skiing, beaches and fewer snakes than Australia! IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

I would like to go forward about 1,000 years and see what has changed. Will the Arctic still exist? Will humans still drive cars and fly planes?

EXETERSCHOOL.ORG.UK 9


THE EXONIAN 2019

Samuel Gaskill

Saskia van Schalkwyk

Stephen Hill

JUNIOR SCHOOL TEACHING ASSISTANT

JUNIOR SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS

MAINTENANCE TEAM WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

WHAT WERE YOU DOING THIS TIME LAST YEAR?

Starting a new role as Lunchtime Supervisor at the Senior School, having spent the previous seven years as a stay-at-home father to three children while my wife continued her legal career.

Working at The Granville School in Kent, helping the Year 6 girls prepare for their entrance exams into Secondary School.

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Coldplay and Ed Sheeran.

Kayaking.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

All genres – anything soulful, happy and uplifting. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Spending time with my family, running and reading.

Swimming in the sea, reading books and chimping around with my kids.

YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

YOUR SIGNATURE DISH?

Lateness.

Deliveroo. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Littering. WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

The entire rugby season. WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Cape Town. I toured South Africa with my own school’s 1st 1X in 2000 and loved the beaches and energy of the place and people. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

Having just finished Peter Ackroyd’s translation of The Canterbury Tales I would love to travel back to 13th Century England and give Geoffrey Chaucer a massive high-five for creating such a masterpiece.

Working for myself as a locksmith. WHAT MUSIC DO YOU ENJOY LISTENING TO?

Mike Oldfield. WHAT DO YOU ENJOY DOING IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

Seafood. WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Leaving shoes lying around.

Chilli con carne.

WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

WHAT IS YOUR PET HATE?

Finishing a project.

WHAT IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FOR YOU?

Too many to name just one, as every day brings new and interesting things. I love sports day, especially if the sun is shining, being part of the residential trips, Christmas and the carol concerts… the list is endless! WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Australia: I spent a gap year in Sydney and always told myself I would go back. I haven’t made it yet but there is still time, it is a beautiful country. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

The Roaring 20s: a decade of empowerment for women, jazz clubs and a lot of dancing… I love the flapper dress.

10 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

WHERE IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO LIVE?

Tenerife. IF YOU HAD A TIME MACHINE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO AND WHY?

1998, I would get married again.

WELCOME TO ALL THE NEW S TA F F JOINING US THIS YEAR!


LEAVING STAFF

GOODBYE AND GOOD LUCK We bid a fond farewell to several members of staff this year

Sue Marks JUN IO R S C H OOL HEA D MI ST RESS 2015-2019

W

e welcomed Mrs Sue Marks as Head of Exeter Junior School in September 2015. She had been Head of St Joseph’s Junior School, Launceston for four years and before that Head of Early Years for another four. She had previously worked in numerous schools in both sectors, building a first-class skill set, which equipped her admirably for her role here. One always feels with Sue one is in the company of an experienced and compassionate professional, who has an astute understanding of her children, colleagues and parents: her warm interpersonal style brings the best out of all those constituencies. Sue’s academic grounding in Science has served her well throughout her career and she won the Astra Zeneca

Primary Science Teacher of the Year award in 2012. She has worked as a Fellow of the Primary Science Teaching Trust throughout her time with us, speaking at its conferences and guiding the trust’s work in the SW region. With her encouragement, the Junior School gained the Primary Science Silver award in 2017. Sue led the thinking behind the STEM (or STEAM) facility on the upper floor of the Junior School, which has turned on a light in the minds of so many of our younger pupils. She worked with Richard Hawkins and Craig Stewart to shape the use and deployment of the rooms, adapting the original plan to include Art, DT, cookery and Science. Sue led the school through a

potentially uncomfortable autumn term of re-rooming, always seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. She also presided over muchneeded additional changing facilities. Sue championed the establishment of the outdoor classroom, to bring variety to the children’s experience. Her vision for enhanced computing provision and the teaching of coding in the Junior School has come to fruition, and the results are impressive. With her inspiration, drama, music and sport have all thrived at the Junior School. Sue has enjoyed planning and leading thoughtprovoking assemblies which reflect and endorse the school’s core values. She has joined in leading weekly worship with Reverend Tom. She achieves an enviable mix of gravitas and lightness of touch in public events, leavening her messages with kindness and great good humour. Her work with the school council and her embracing of the SEAL and THRIVE schemes have

shaped pastoral care very effectively. Setting a fantastic example to her pupils and staff, Sue impressively combines charitable and athletic pursuits: she was a central spoke in the wheels of the epic LEJOG and JOGLE bike rides; she has completed several marathons in her time as Head, somehow finding time to train, and always look fresh as a daisy on her return to school. In her whole-school management role, Sue has been a thoughtful and positive team player, always considering the welfare of individuals. Children love her, parents value her expertise and colleagues respect her fairness and good judgement. We will miss Sue enormously when she begins the next stage of her career at Grundisburgh Primary School in Suffolk. She has given excellent service to Exeter School in her four years as Headmistress and we wish her every success and happiness in the coming years. BY MR GRIFFIN

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 11


THE EXONIAN 2019

Ruth Sherrell

Nick Keyes

PA TO TH E JUN I OR SCHOOL HE ADM IS TR E SS

CL A SSI CS TEACHER 2000-2019

2000-2019

N

R

uth Sherrell has been an important presence in our school now for nearly two decades, for the majority of which she served as the Junior School’s most capable secretary. Her informed, calm and caring approach, coupled with a wealth of experience, has resulted in her becoming

affectionately known in the school as ‘The Oracle’. Her advice and judgement was well respected by all and her support and guidance, always offered with a large dose of humour, has helped many over the years. We will all miss Ruth, very much indeed, but hope that this is au revoir, rather than goodbye, and we look forward to enjoying her company in the future when we persuade her to come in to visit, join us on school trips or just meet for a coffee. We wish her good health and much happiness as she embarks on her new retirement adventure. BY MRS MARKS

ick Keyes retired from the staff in July after 19 years at Exeter School. A former British Army officer, he was a dedicated schoolmaster who willingly undertook various academic and extra-curricular roles, as a teacher of English and Classics, Head of Classics, Deputy Head of Sixth Form, rugby and cricket coach and Head of the Army CCF Section. He led many trips, notably contributing his immense knowledge of WW1 to the Lower Fifth Battlefields visit, as well as conceiving and running the Hadrian’s Wall challenge. His knowledge of military matters was always valuable when he accompanied CCF cadets to summer camps.

Nick regularly assisted the Drama department and directed school plays, including a memorable environmental piece called Going Underground, which he wrote. We will be glad to have him with us on future Battlefields trips and we wish him a long and happy retirement. BY MR GRIFFIN

Nicky Fairweather DE P U T Y H E A D ( PA STOR A L ) A N D GEOGR A PHY TEACHER 2016-2019

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icky Fairweather joined Exeter School as Deputy Head (Pastoral) three years ago. She leaves us to take up the post of Senior Deputy Head at Norwich School.  Whilst Nicky has been with us a relatively short time, she has had a huge impact on the school and brought about significant change. Structurally, Nicky has reformed the pastoral system at Exeter Senior School, leading the integration of the form structure into the longstanding House system of pastoral care for the first time whilst introducing a new tenth House, Dowrich. After just a single year in full operation, this has been such a smooth and successful transition that it has already

become the new normal. But it would be very wrong to portray Nicky as a purely managerial organiser of school structures. From the very first day, Nicky has been in and amongst pupils, walking corridors, in forms rooms, working with her Lower Corridor office door propped open and always available for a chat.  Pupils quickly realised that she was a source of knowledge, advice and comfort and was always willing to listen and to empathise with those who might be upset or frustrated. These informal chats led Nicky to develop her team of Wellbeing Ambassadors and Sixth Form Mentors and from here the ‘Wellbeing’ messages have permeated all aspects of the school. We now

12 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

have both in house popup wellbeing events run by pupils and visits from highprofile speakers and the school is the better for it. Nicky has, in a short time, brought positive change, led by her passionate desire to both help pupils to thrive and enjoy their school days but also to prepare themselves with the necessary skills

and resilience to cope with the ups and downs of life. She has done all this with enthusiasm, drive and an ever-present smile. BY MR HUGHES


LEAVING STAFF

Renata Alborough FRENC H AN D SPA N I SH T EAC HER 2015-2019

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t is with the heaviest of hearts that we bid Renata Alborough farewell after four incomparable years in the Modern Languages department. She took up a place at Exeter University to read French and Spanish, after a paradoxical youth in which she was, in her own words, 100% Wiltshire born and bred yet 100% Polish. Having trained on the legendary MFL PGCE course at Bath, she cut her teeth with two years at Churston Ferrers, followed by another two at the equally renowned Alice Smith School in Kuala Lumpur. I always believed that a teacher of her calibre would only ever be passing through our department, but we can be grateful that she chose to spend twice as long with us as in her previous posts. She soon revealed herself to be characterised by consistency in all things. Always the first to arrive of a morning, always prepared

with books marked and lengthy positive comments made, always chirpy and ready to offer a kind word to pupils no matter how she may have felt, always willing to take on whatever responsibility came her way, and always with a welldeveloped sense of silliness and an enjoyment of the ridiculous. In particular she always made herself available to staff our various trips, accompanying hundreds of pupils to Normandy over her four years, and as both my deputy and deputee in Spain in four successive October half-terms. Her commitment to the success of these trips never wavered, whether this required dressing up as a banana, giving a vote of thanks to the mayor of Cuenca, producing lengthy bakery items for the daily pâtisserie-against-theclock challenge, or taking children’s packed lunch orders while they were

Mary Sanders S CH O O L NUR SE 2012-2018

M

ary joined Exeter School in September 2012 and provided the Exeter School community with six years of the most

caring and professional service as our School Nurse. Quietly and efficiently, Mary contributed to many areas of the school – not just

submerged in a foot of mud on an assault course (and incomprehensibly remaining clean). The evening she insisted on doing bed duty and fell asleep standing up leaning on the doorpost is a moment we proudly recall each year. She moves back to the tropical pastures of Malaysia, taking with her these experiences and those forged in the crucible of Third Form tutoring and as a Flight Officer in the RAF cadet

section, despite being scared stiff of flying. Whether she will make use of her sporting expertise remains to be seen, as her knowledge of the rules of netball and rounders is like nobody else’s, but I can only express intense envy at the good fortune of her new head of department, and our warmest possible best wishes for the slings and arrows of the next stage of her career. Dziękuję bardzo, i powodzenia. BY MR LATIMER

administering expert first aid and medical attention to those injured or unwell. She also provided reassurance to our parents, taught health education from Junior School to Sixth Form, provided the medical advice and equipment to enable Exeter School to run its ambitious trips programme, ran the pupil vaccination programme, gave staff training on emergency first aid, whilst coping with all of the regulation, safeguarding, red tape and record keeping. And all to an exemplary standard! But I think Mary will be most remembered for the care that she took with individual pupils, with the support and kindness that she provided to those who were upset or unhappy. The teenage years are not always without bumps in the road and Mary was always willing

to listen to a pupil in distress with an understanding ear and with a willingness to dispense kindness and understanding. Mary was calm and unflappable, thoughtful and considerate in all her actions. When I took over as Senior Deputy, I had the privilege of working very closely with Mary, and along with the Chaplain, Revd Tom, and Pastoral Deputy, Nicky Fairweather, we would meet weekly as a core team to review the pastoral care and welfare of pupils and to plan actions for the week ahead. Mary’s knowledge of the pupil body was always impressive and her compassion always evident. In the school’s quest to care for the welfare of the individual pupil, Mary was always a crucial member of the pastoral team. BY MR HUGHES

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 13


THE EXONIAN 2019

Chloe McIlrath P E AN D G AM ES TE AC H E R 2018-2019

C

hloe has spent the year working in the PE department as maternity cover for Miss Carter. At interview, her reference from her university tutor stated she was an outstanding student teacher who would do well in the profession and after three terms working with Chloe I fully endorse those early views. Chloe has been a brilliant colleague to work with, the pupils have loved her enthusiasm and passion for her subject. She is an all-round sportswoman, having taken a lead role with the swimming coaching, as well as teaching, hockey, netball, cricket, athletics, rounders and tennis, not to mention her PE teaching responsibilities with both the Junior and Senior School. She has umpired matches at the weekend, and has been caring and kind and an excellent role model to young people in helping them develop their skills, but more importantly their love of sport and exercise. She will be missed by pupils and staff as she moves on to teach in Torquay Girls’ Grammar School for September, but luckily for us she will be back to coach hockey in the autumn term. We wish her all the best in her future career. BY MR MASON

Alice Brookes

enthusiasm. She is certainly a ‘do-er’; alongside her teaching in Biology, Alice has made positive contributions BI OLOG Y to the Army Section of CCF, she has given several T EAC HER weekends to help with Ten 2018-2019 Tors training, assisted the Geography department on lice Brookes has only the Saas Grund trip as well as been with us for a regularly coaching hockey. year covering Kate As a Biology teacher, she has Coe’s maternity cover but, to won the hearts of her pupils, anyone who was unaware, one would be certain she was who are sad to see her depart. a fully-embedded, permanent She has proved to be a most effective teacher from Upper member of staff at Exeter Two through to the Sixth School. I suppose, as a past Form, engaging pupils with pupil of the school, there is a fun activities whilst setting degree of familiarity, but we high standards. I thank her have been most impressed for her positive contributions with the way she has thrown to the department, for her herself into every aspect of energy and verve… and for school life with maximum

A

sparking many a funny memory from Pete about her days as a pupil here! We will miss her considerably but we wish her all the very best in her new job at Munich International School and we look forward to hearing more of her motorbike and surfing adventures in times to come. MRS METCALF

Rachel Currie

R EP ROGR A PHI CS M A N AGER 2015-2019

R

eprographics is one of the most essential cogs in the Exeter School machine, one that does not often make the front page, despite being integral in its production. It is a huge tribute to Rachel that staff and pupils very rarely, if ever, experienced any kind of delay or frustration with the comprehensive, rapid and reliable service she has provided so expertly during her four years with us. Rachel’s impact on the school stretches well beyond her work in Reprographics, having immersed herself into the Exeter School community. On several occasions she has been a most reliable assistant on Field Days, and she has even attended a CCF camp. I think it is fair to say her main contribution and her greatest passion was, and remains, her design work. She was our skilled programme, poster, advert and publication designer, with an exceptional eye for detail and a real talent in crafting posters for major school events. Rachel was

14 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

our The Exonian editor and designer for the last two editions, where her talents resulted in a school publication of the highest standard. You will have all seen her work and I am sure you agree, the professionalism of her output was something to behold. She will be missed by all, but our loss is the wider design community’s gain. We wish her the best of luck as she leaves us to further develop her career in the world of design. BY MR BONE

Katie List PHYSI CS TEACHER JANUARY 2019 J U LY 2 0 1 9

K

atie has been a wonderful addition to the Physics department for the two terms she spent with us. Her time in Australia has led to interesting insight into other educational systems around the world and her stories have always been fascinating! She has been a valued member of Daw House, regularly attending House meetings and taking tutor sessions. Katie has also been involved with the coaching of girls’ games across the terms. We wish her all the very best in her new role as Exams Officer at Blundell’s School. BY MR TUOHEY


LEAVING STAFF

Dario Cortese PHYSI CS TEACHER 2017-2018

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t was a pleasure to work with Dario over the course of his time here: he was always thoughtful and diligent with his work, fostering a strong sense of respect from the pupils – and not just for his moustache! A keen academic, Dario leaves us to focus on his scientific research in his new role at Exeter University. We wish him the best of luck in his future pursuits and look forward to staying in touch. BY MR TUOHEY

Ryan Davies P O O L S U P E RV I SOR 2015-2019

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yan joined Exeter School in January 2015 as part of the Maintenance department. One of his early roles was to look after the old outdoor pool. In those days it wasn’t uncommon for pupils to swim in the rain, in the heated pool, with the PE staff teaching with umbrellas and there was many an occasion when a drenched Ryan would trudge past having completed one of the daily pool checks. When the new pool was built and opened in summer 2017, it was clear that a full time presence was needed in the building to take care of the myriad of daily needs. With a qualification in Sport Science from the University of Gloucestershire, Ryan’s background made him the ideal candidate. He made an immediate impact in the swimming pool supervisor role. His warm and friendly character was the perfect welcome to all who walked through the pool doors; whether it be pupils from the Senior or Junior School to pupils from the local primary school or visiting for galas. He showed a wealth of knowledge to staff and parents alike about the pool and took real pride in showing people around

the facility. He took great care in looking after the maintenance side of the pool, running the plant room that was like something from the flight deck of the Starship Enterprise! Ryan also took charge of all the technology involved in running lifeguard training and galas, including the main display screen in the pool and the touch timing system. One of his biggest contributions was in the running and organisation of the lifeguard team to ensure that the pool ran smoothly. His friendly and professional approach to the lifeguards got the best out of them – their respect for him ensured they worked hard and were committed to the role. For some, the leadership that they were able to show in this area was a highlight of their school careers. The greatest compliment to pay to Ryan was that as a sports teacher you could just turn up and think about teaching and coaching – in the knowledge that everything else had been done.  Ryan has moved on to take on a role for Swim England and we wish him all the very best. BY MR MASON

Anna Johannson

Ben Pote

JUNIOR SCHOOL JUNIOR SCHOOL TEACHING ASSISTANT GAP YEAR 2018-2019 STUDENT 2018-2019

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nna Johannson joined us as our gap year student assistant straight from Upper Sixth, last September. She soon got to know the children very well and proved herself to be a most reliable addition to our staff, approaching everything with a calm, positive and cheerful attitude. She always had time to listen and help with whatever was needed. We wish her every success when she starts university in the autumn term. BY MRS MARKS

F

rom the minute Ben arrived he established caring and supportive relationships with the children, and very quickly earned the respect of the staff. Throughout his time with us, he has always quietly and competently just got on with the job, whether it has been supporting in the playground, supervising changing or attending fixtures. We will all miss him very much and wish him all the best for September, as he begins his journey towards training as a primary teacher. BY MRS MARKS

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 15


THE EXONIAN 2019

Sustainable

EXETER

The rapid and irreversible change to our global climate is undoubtedly one of the greatest challenges facing humanity in the 21st Century. Companies relentlessly pursuing profit over all else have dominated the high street for decades, but there is something resembling a silver lining emerging: a growing awareness of the urgent need to change how we consume goods and dispose of waste. As a team, we wanted to celebrate the admirable efforts of local companies that are helping to change and evolve the shopping industry, promoting sustainable products and practices that one day will hopefully be the norm.

Georgia Ling chatted to Sarah Martin, owner of Magdalen Road’s zero waste store, Nourish. Sarah, who owns Nourish, has a first degree and a doctorate in Environmental Science, so has always been acutely aware of the damage that we have been having on the planet. Though the dangers of plastics have been advertised through documentaries such as Blue Planet, there still remains an abundance of unnecessary plastic packaging in supermarkets. This urged Sarah to make shopping plastic free easier, thus Nourish was born.

HAVE THERE BEEN ANY PRACTICAL DIFFICULTIES IN SOURCING YOUR PRODUCTS? “It is difficult to find suppliers who take the zero waste ethic seriously – one supplier supplied stainless steel straws, but every straw was in its own little plastic wrapper! It has taken a lot of time, research, and collaboration with other zero waste stores around the country to find suppliers who supply high quality products, ethically sourced and who use sustainable packaging for posting out their products as well. Within this community, we are all willing to share any new and innovative products that we stumble across. The ‘become a supplier’ link

16 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

on the website has been a hotspot for collaboration between smaller local producers.” HOW DO YOU THINK NOURISH’S ENVIRONMENTAL AGENDA HAS INFLUENCED THE SURROUNDING AREA? “On a local scale, awareness has been made on plastic use, and the surprisingly simple alternatives. For example, our milk sales alone from the milk dispenser has saved the use of over 1,200 two-pint plastic milk containers. Additionally, we raise funds to support local charities. Through rounding up the financial purchase price up to the nearest 10p, we have managed to raise

of £300 for Hospiscare. We also collect objects that are difficult to recycle conventionally, such as writing instruments, beauty and home care packaging. These items are sent to Terracycle, and the money earnt is donated to the local primary school.” HOW ARE YOU PLANNING ON IMPROVING/ ADVANCING YOUR STORE IN THE FUTURE? “We will continue to evolve with our customers’ needs, and will start advising businesses on how they can reduce their plastic waste.”


FEATURES

On 7 February, Kalkidan Legesse, the owner of Sancho’s, gave a talk on ethical fashion. WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO CREATE AN ETHICAL CLOTHING BRAND? “During my travels to Ethiopia, I noticed that many of the workers were already skilled in the textile industry. As the textile industry is labour intensive, I appreciated the opportunity to positively impact the livelihood of those people in the production chain. In particular, the immediate impact on local community is one factor that led me to create Sancho’s. All of our materials used in our clothing are either organic,

natural or recycled. Through various auditing bodies, we ensure that our workers are paid minimum wage and paid overtime, ensuring our clothing is ethically made.” HOW HAS THE LOCAL COMMUNITY RESPONDED TO YOUR MISSION? “Initially, there was some confusion surrounding ‘fair trade’; many associated it with charity. However, we have noticed in recent years that people are becoming

5 tips to reduce plastic output: Go 1-6 months without buying clothing with any plastic (polyesters/nylons/acrylics). 20% of plastic in ocean comes from the wash cycle, as micro-plastics easily escape the water systems.

to repair their clothing, expanding its lifespan. We also hold clothes swaps, events and talks.“

more environmentally aware. The impact of excess consumption on our planet has been successfully conveyed to the public, through policies such as the 5p plastic bag tax, and programmes such as Blue Planet 2. This has led to the public responding to our mission more positively.” HOW HAS SANCHO’S INFLUENCED THE IMMEDIATE COMMUNITY? “Sancho’s holds a number of events to spread information, such as a week in February where we hold sessions teaching people how

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO PERSUADE PEOPLE TO OPT FOR A MORE ETHICAL APPROACH TO FASHION? “I would ask whether they are actively concerned about globally significant issues such as climate change, or the role of slavery and forced labour within supply chains. If they are worried about the impact their consumption has on these issues, I would then advise that they consume less.”

Look at your wardrobe and assess what items of clothing are used often, and which items are rarely used. This way, you can identify which garments are used effectively. Make food at home. Buy a reusable coffee cup. Go to a farmers market.

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oston Tea Party was where our journalistic team was based for the Autumn Field Day. With a range of vegan and vegetarian options, coffee beans carefully sourced and a nation-wide push to stop using single-use plastics, Boston Tea Party has a lot to be admired. The company, who have 22 shops around the south-west area, have been named the UK’s most ethical coffee shop by Ethical Consumer, the not-for-profit magazine and website – check it out for yourself! Boston Tea Party is based at 84 Queen St, Exeter, EX4 3RP.

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 17


PHOTO: KATARINA-JARVINEN

THE EXONIAN 2019

Celebrating literature

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arly 2019 saw Exeter School celebrate the UK’s oldest and most prestigious children’s book awards - with an exciting twist! The CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals recognise outstanding writing and illustration in children’s literature. The Junior School has been shadowing the Kate Greenaway medal shortlist, whilst members of the Senior School shadowed the Carnegie Award. This year, our very own Upper One pupil Kate Daybell presented the actual award. Throughout the summer term, pupil librarians read, discussed and reviewed the books shortlisted by CILIP’s panel of librarian judges and engaged in reading-related activities online such as writing reviews, contributing to a blog and posting interesting facts about the books and authors. Exeter School Librarian Belinda Jackson kindly visited the Junior School every week to introduce each book. The shadowing inspired wider reading repertoires, introducing new genres and authors during the twice

18 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

weekly discussions. Over the weeks, confidence grew when voicing opinions about texts, while interpretation and analysis skills were honed. The wonderful array of nominated books also encouraged wider cultural and historical awareness. To mark the end of the project, pupils undertook an illustration workshop to express their personal interpretations of the books. You’re Safe With Me, illustrated by Poonom Mistry, inspired Anna Brookes-Ferrari and Berenice Rydin-Orwin to combine gold spray paint and Indian fabric swatches to replicate the safe haven of the jungle, in a joint piece of artwork. Talented young artist Nathan Masters produced a combination of several of the books using his treasured easel and acrylic paints, while Ocean Meets Sky, illustrated by Terry Fan, inspired Zoe Carson to compose a ‘dreamscape’ that included

her own beloved grandpa. The group then watched a live broadcast of the awards ceremony, hosted by Konnie Huq, and were delighted to witness their friend Kate Daybell present her certificate to the winner of the Carnegie Shadowers’ Choice on stage. Kate’s certificate design was selected as a winner of the Carnegie and Greenaway Shadowers’ Choice Certificate Design competition. Form One pupil Lottie Cumbley was runner-up for the Shadowing Scheme diary writing competition and was awarded with her own copy of each nominated book. It was a joy to watch the creativity of our school’s youngest pupils recognised and applauded. BY MRS HARDY

‘Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.’ – Frederick Douglass


FEATURES

N TO BEE OR TO BEE T

his spring term Exeter School held their first Great Spelling Bee. Houses competed against each other in teams to win the beautifully designed wooden trophy in the form of a Scrabble board. There were five rounds in the first stage of the competition, with the first being a team round in which pupils were given ten commonly misspelt words by quizmaster and Head of English Mr Dobson. In the next round, junior and senior pairs in each team were given five words to spell, and finally there was an individual round in which all four team members had their own words to spell. In Round 4, they were given the definitions of 10 words, for which they had to fill in the

Have a go yourself - get a friend to test you on these tricky words: Business Conscience Rhythm Accommodate Fluorescent Necessary Liaison Harass

blanks in a sentence, followed by some fiendishly difficult anagrams in Round 5. After a small break, so that the contestants could refresh their brains, the five teams with the lowest scores were brutally eliminated, leaving Dowrich, Drake, Goff, Raleigh and Townsend to battle it out in the Sudden Death round. Each team nominated their best speller to compete, and special mention here must go to Toby Page in 3D, who was chosen by his team mates to represent Dowrich. Amidst rising tension, Drake eventually emerged victorious when Oliver Tucker was able to spell correctly the word ‘phosphorescent’. Well done to all the pupils who took part and congratulations to Drake! BY DAISY BISHOP

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 19


THE EXONIAN 2019

The

Being part of the Harry Potter night was amazing. It was truly magical! SARA SARI

of

I was sorted into Ravenclaw and I was very happy because it is the intellectual house.

Exeter School

TOBY PAGE

chosen out of the Goblet of Fire and sorted into wizarding houses. They all enjoyed What I love about a magical potions lesson complete with fire-breathing Harry Potter is the dragons and mysterious mixture of the colour changing potions, a two worlds. trip to the Leaky Cauldron BENJAMIN CREEK to make Butterbeer and a banquet in the Great Hall, lit by floating candles. In ur school was the Divination classroom, transformed into a wizarding wonderland they mapped their futures in tea leaves and spent time on Friday 8 February to join decorating wands. Their the national event of ‘Harry memories were tested by Potter Night’ in its fifth year. a short quiz in Professor Specially selected Third and Dumbledore’s office, where Fourth Form wizards and some of them were brave witches were dispatched enough to complete Bertie from the muggle world of Bott’s Every Flavour Bean Exeter School and enjoyed Challenge. Some of them an enchanting evening in even found the secret Room our very own Hogwarts. of Requirement in order to The names of wizards were

O

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complete a scavenger hunt for the evening. Throughout the evening they were awarded House points for being brave, kind or clever, and at the end of the night, the House Cup was awarded to Ravenclaw. Then it was off to the dormitory for hot chocolate and a surprise visit by Professor Dumbledore for a bedtime story. BY MADDY KING

My favourite part was definitely the scavenger hunt. I enjoyed gaining House points while exploring all the rooms along the way. HENRY BILL


FEATURES

DOWRICH HOUSE:

One Year Old! D

owrich House have enjoyed an excellent first year as the tenth pastoral house at Exeter School, as Mr Seaton-Burn explains… “Both Mrs Sail and myself have loved the experience of starting a brand new house, with Dowrich now feeling fully established as an important part of the whole school. The pupils have excelled in so many

areas, including coming top of the merit lists for all three terms, winning the prestigious Merit Cup, and also winning Third Form House Hockey! We could not be more proud of the pupils, who have been a joy to work with, and look forward to continuing to develop our close links with the custodian of the real Dowrich House, Michael Lee.” MR SEATON-BURN

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 21


THE EXONIAN 2019

PLAYING A PART OF HISTORY F rom replica baroque trumpets to the brown Bechstein piano that still sits on the stage, the Music School hides a wealth of intriguing stories. Many of these instruments are still played by promising musical pupils today, and some have travelled with those pupils to subsequent universities, and returned to the school later. Perhaps the most interesting of these instruments are the Bechstein piano and a Boullangier violin, given to gifted violinists as they grow through the school. The Bechstein piano was originally owned by Brian Moser, the son of an amateur pianist and concert violinist, living in Abbotsbury. However he married a leading Columbian soprano and the two of them moved to Begota Columbia, leaving the Bechstein behind. Despite the piano’s gloried heritage – Bechstein pianos were considered some of the best in the world, only succeeded by Steinways at the beginning of World War II – it languished in Abbotsbury Church until 2010 where it

was only played a few times a year. In 2010 the piano was discovered by Catherine Hayek, an accomplished violin teacher at our school, who joined forces with Mr Tamblyn to arrange for the piano to be loaned to the school. The transporting of the Bechstein was very kindly paid for by the Exeter School Parents Association, and it has since found new life on the stage in the Music School were it can be more easily appreciated by teachers and pupils alike. The Boulangier has a more intimate connection with Exeter School. It was originally played by Jeremy Terry, an Exeter School alumnus, who played the Boulangier at the Exeter Music Festival in 1968. Jeremy died tragically in 1983 and his violin remained unplayed until 2000 when a vet on a visit to the Terry family’s farm in Belstone remarked upon the violin’s unique appearance. The vet’s daughter, Hattie Davis (who was

22 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

Head Girl of Exeter School at the time), borrowed the violin for a time. She played the violin for her teacher, Fiona Mclean-Buechel, who picked up on its unique tone and took it to be valued in 2011. It was then that they discovered Jeremy’s violin was a Charles Boullangier violin, made in London in 1881, and valued at £25,000. Jeremy’s mother, Diana Terry generously loaned the violin to the Exeter School Music department, and it has been in use constantly ever since. The Boulangier violin is given to the most promising violinist in school each year and is currently played by George Guthrie. It has been played by eight violinists since Hattie Davis,

including Finn Connolly in 2014-2015 who took it to Cambridge with him after he left school. Both the Boulangier violin and the Bechstein piano have benefitted pupils for years, but many pupils have never heard their stories. Every instrument has a story behind how it got where it is today, and many of the instruments in the Music department have especially interesting ones. Thank you so much to Mr Tamblyn and the Music department for their help in collating these stories. BY ROSIE CROMWELL

Every instrument has a story behind how it got where it is today.


FEATURES

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THE EXONIAN 2019

WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE Tuesday 30 July J uly saw 24 pupils enjoy an expedition of a lifetime in Borneo, Malaysia. Led by Miss Booth, and supported by Ms Roff and Mr Seaton-Burn, the fortnight was packed with incredible experiences. These extracts from the trip’s blog explain further…

Wednesday 24 July Wednesday’s boiling sun and cooling breeze set the scene for a stunning day of diving. Catfish, lion fish, stingrays, clown and parrot fish formed a beautiful welcoming party as we explored the coral reef just off the beach at Sapi Island.

Thursday 25 July Sting rays; yellow snappers; oh, and a black-tipped reef shark to round the day off in style - the second full day of diving was a stunner. With the six small groups relocating to Bulinjong Bay, we plunged (in a safe and controlled manner, obviously) to the depths of 18 metres to explore the sea bed.

Friday 26 July Diving = complete! On the spotted list today were razor fish, an octopus and, for a lucky few, even a turtle or two. Sadly, Kiran’s claim of seeing ‘Poseidon riding a whale’ appears to be unfounded, but the exotic wildlife sightings should continue as we head into the jungle tomorrow.

Saturday 27 July Well, that was a day that’ll stick long in the memory banks! Having left Kota 24 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

Kinabalu, we trekked out into the jungle, keeping one eye on the path and one out for the demonic tiger leaches. The jungle camp itself was a work of staggering craftsmanship and natural beauty, exhibiting the ingenious ways that natives have overcome the challenges facing them and their way of life for thousands of years.

Sunday 28 July A night in the hammocks was something to be endured rather than enjoyed, with the persistence of the mosquitos leading to a night thoroughly wrapped up in nets, and only one falling out - of a hammock, not a friendship, luckily. The trek out was a sheer climb in stifling sun, a serious test for the whole group, but completed with very little fuss.

Monday 29 July Still giddy from the excitement of eating crinklecut chips, we left Mt Kinabalu and headed for Sepilok, to see the incredible sun bears. Our subsequent night-time canopy walk allowed us to witness one of the more remarkable features of the Borneo jungle, the flying squirrel launching across the foliage.

A few hours of travelling saw us reach our remote lodge at Danum Valley. ‘Room temperature’ showers; enormous spiders and friendly lizards; no electricity after 11pm... this evening was a return to the reality of the expedition!

Wednesday 31 July What Danum Valley lacks in luxury, it more than makes up for in terms of sheer natural beauty and unique moments. This morning’s activity was a trek out into the jungle where WE SAW AN ORANG-UTAN AND HER BABY. Ahem. After escaping a sudden attack from gigantic evil wasps, we plunged into a natural pool, complete with waterfall and nibbling fish: paradise after two sweaty hours of hard walking.

Thursday 1 August Danum Valley has been entirely worthwhile: the chance to see such incredible wildlife, to swim in natural pools, to learn from worldrenowned scientists - it has been an incredible few days here.

Friday 2 August Having said goodbye to our two local bearded pigs, our day consisted of journeying out of Danum Valley before flying from Lahad Datu to KK once more.


TRIPS AND TOURS

Saturday 3 August

Sunday 4 August

Monday 5 August

The Marine Ecology Research Centre is something special: snorkelling our way through shoals of tropical fish in order to plant our sea grass, the surrounding ocean stretched into the horizon, only interrupted by intricate wooden huts. To complete a staggering day, we climbed to watch the dying embers of the day from the towering Sunset Observatory Tower.

With the weather disrupting our original ideas, our day plan transformed: once the sun had returned, perusal of the local shops and market stalls was a great experience.

Making the most of our stop-over in futuristic Singapore, the bus tour of the ‘city within a garden’ was a real hit. It has been a genuine pleasure to take all 24 pupils on such an incredible expedition, two weeks that constantly felt like a oncein-a-lifetime experience for all involved. Resilient, funny, thoughtful and engaging: they have been fantastic. BY MR SEATON-BURN

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 25


THE EXONIAN 2019

LEGATO in Liguria T

he 2019 music tour to Liguria began with 36 excited tourists, five teachers, two bus drivers (who managed to stay sane throughout the journey) and a 26-hour coach journey that was ‘helped’ along by the tour choir rehearsal whilst travelling through Switzerland.

26 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


TRIPS AND TOURS

around Diano Marina, taking in some more of the Italian culture and getting to know the local old ladies. After a filling lunch, we went to the beach to top up our tans and prepare ourselves for the last full day in Liguria. Feeling refreshed and rejuvenated, we went to our third concert, performing in Area Manifestazioni, Via Roma, Stellanello, where we also had a We arrived at our base, the Hotel Iva in fabulous evening meal cooked Diano Marina on Monday afternoon and for us. We were joined by some royal guests after throwing our bags in our rooms with and their daughter, who ate with us and our allocated roomies, we all went for a walk enjoyed dancing along to YMCA! The actions around our locality to stretch ourselves out to which were bravely performed by some and get a good dose of well needed fresh air! Choir rehearsal had already been ticked off on ‘willing’ volunteers! Our final full day was the coach so a break and a good evening meal enjoyed at the Caravelle was enjoyed in our hotel. Waterpark, where we spent Before the first concert the following day, Everything about the time swimming and we went sightseeing in the Liguria region – exploring the park, hoping on the coach again! Luckily, and mostly due the evening was not to catch a glimpse of to the bright red tour hats, no one got lost dazzling: from the Mr T in his Speedos! There and this was followed by a trip on the Rapallo magical lighting were numerous slides and Cable Car which took us up 600m to the and atmosphere, to even a water disco where Montallegro Sanctuary. This had spectacular the musical tones quite of few of us busted views over the Ligurian coast and the out some moves to cheesy Mediterranean Sea. of the choir. Italian pop music. Just a few ice cream stops later, we For our final concert, we performed at departed to Alassio and after an evening Parco delle Farfalle, via Fontana, Andora. meal in a nearby local restaurant, our first The highly excited atmosphere was fuelled concert of the trip was held in Piazzia dei by our ice cream treat beforehand - with Partigiani. On the stage, we sang and played flavours ranging from Parma violet to, the in front of a buzzing crowd of Italians, whilst Italian favourite, Nutella! There was an upbeat also managing to gather a crowd of fellow atmosphere as we sang and played in what international tourists. was, for a few people their last concert as An early morning excursion to Monaco Exeter School pupils. After an encore or two began with a tour on the ‘Petit Train’- a however, it was time to prepare ourselves for sightseeing road-train, that took us past the journey home. the famous landmarks ranging from the On the Saturday morning, with enough Oceanographic Institute time for the last minute shopping for lavish to the iconic hotels and gifts… or to find the ‘cheapest tat’ for the casinos, and part of the competition at the end of the week (well Formula 1 circuit. done George), we left Diano Marina behind, Our second concert beginning the long coach journey back. was at the Giardini Lowe We would like to thank all the tourists, in Bordighera. This was a teachers, coach drivers and organisers for beautiful open air garden, making this trip so enjoyable and ensuring with a stage. Everything that we all have happy memories of our time about the evening was in the Italian sunshine! BY LILY HOWE dazzling: from the magical lighting and atmosphere, to the musical tones of the choir, singing a variety of songs from ‘Super Trooper’ to ‘The Lonesome Road’. However, the reality for many was that we needed to drown ourselves in bug spray for the next concert - LOL! Thursday was our relaxation day after a busy few days of travelling from one amazing place to the other. The morning was spent swimming in the hotel pool and strolling

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THE EXONIAN 2019

Mr Keyes made an excellent tour guide – other tourists stopped to listen in to his interpretation of the Forum!

Sun, statues and senators O

n Saturday 10 October, thirty pupils with classical inclinations set off on a five-day trip to discover the wonders of Rome and Ostia Antica ably led by Mrs Dunlop, Mr Keyes and Ms Shrubb, who organised the whole trip. The pupils involved discovered fantastic food stops – although some had to resist their inclinations to head straight to McDonalds – and thoroughly enjoyed the various competitions that were run over the course of the week. The trip was jam-packed with visits to museums and archaeological sites, and was just as fun as it was tiring. Holly Cromwell commented: “The Rome trip was a fast-paced week in

the sun. The Colosseum was amazing, each museum was intriguing in its own way, and the food was great. Taking the Italian metro, in a group of 36, was an adventure in itself and taking the bus was so much more so that we only did it once. Mr Keyes made an excellent tour guide – other tourists stopped to listen in to his interpretation of the Forum. I loved the tranquillity of the Ara Pacem so much that a picture I took of it was my lock screen photo for several months afterwards. We saw way too much to ever describe adequately in so few words but I loved the experience even if I slept for a week afterwards!” BY ROSIE CROMWELL

28 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


I really enjoyed going to the very top of the resort as the views were incredible. PHOEBE

The pizza night was really funny: something appeared lost in translation when we were given ‘pepper-only’ pizza instead of pepperoni…

SNOW CHANCE OF GETTING BOARD

LAUREN

T

his year, the Middle School Ski Trip hit the slopes of the stunning Saas Fee resort in Switzerland. Stunning conditions for skiing, with plenty of blue skies and sun, helped make the week an enormous success; pupils and staff alike worked on their parallel turns, navigation of tricky

slopes and demolishing extremely large pizzas on the mid-mountain lunch stops. Bowling, swimming and quizzes were all on the evening activity programme as the group enjoyed some well-deserved down time. Anyway, we’ll let the pictures speak for themselves… BY DAISY BRETT

The instructors were really kind and helpful. My skiing developed so much! MILLIE

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THE EXONIAN 2019

The trip was incredible, everyone was very kind and friendly and the views were amazing!

SAAS GRUND

MEGAN R

L

ower Fifth and Middle Fifth geographers spent six days at the end of the summer term exploring the awe-inspiring alpine landscapes of the Upper Rhone Valley in Switzerland. Bringing a ‘work hard, play hard’ ethos, pupils learnt about the glacial system in situ at the Aletsch, Langfluh and Spielboden glaciers and the threats to these flowing bodies of ice from climate change; the risk avalanche and mass movement hazards; the use of hydroelectric power at the Stausse-Mattmark Dam; and the combination of tourism with geothermally heated pools at Brigerbad and the sustainable management of this industry in Zermatt and Saas Fee. They have proven to be an enthusiastic, kind and fun-loving group. Thank you also to the staff that supported the trip and made it such a success - Miss Brookes, Mr Davidson, Helen Clark (governor), Hugh Clark (OE) and Sixth Former, James Harris.

BY MR HYDE (HEAD OF GEOGRAPHY)

30 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE TRIP IN THREE WORDS/PHRASES? Scenic, fun, educational (Jacob Otter and Henry Wheatley) Stunning, exciting, a once in a lifetime opportunity (Millie Markham and Megan Rhodes) WHAT WERE YOUR HIGHLIGHTS OF THE TRIP? Seeing world renowned locations like the Matterhorn and the Aletsch Glacier and taking part in great activities like the Rodelbahn.

The unique history and geography of the Swiss Alps – especially how the landscape is formed and changing particularly due to climate change, and the development and importance of tourism in the Alps. IF YOU COULD GIVE ANY TOP TIPS FOR ANYONE WANTING TO VISIT SAAS GRUND AND THE RHONE VALLEY, WHAT WOULD THEY BE? Always go up for seconds at the hotel – to make the most of the trip you needs lots of energy. Don’t play Frisbee on a windy day!

Brigerbad thermal pools, a clear view of the Matterhorn, and seeing the Aletsch Glacier which is described as one of the seven wonders of Europe.

Make sure you take advantage of the great lessons after the days out to help you write down what you saw and create a lasting memory.

WHAT DID YOU LEARN ON THE TRIP? It was interesting and useful to see what we had learnt from glaciers in the past right in front of our eyes – it made so much more sense.

Visit as many amazing sites as you can, especially the Matterhorn (known as Toblerone Mountain). Read up on the geography and history of the Rhone Valley as it puts these sites into context. Try the chocolate – it’s amazing!


I got to socialise with people in my dorm and around my table and in the great outdoors of Dartmoor. WILLIAM MARKHAM

Dartmoor

DELIGHTS

T

he new school year wouldn’t be the same without the Third Form’s trip to Pixies Holt, a Dartmoor residential designed to help each form group integrate into their new school. The trip is filled with fun outdoor pursuits with pupils rock-climbing, abseiling, weaselling and exploring their local environment. This year, many pupils felt like they really had the chance to mix with their peers by spending time being

active together, although they were glad to get back in time for a hot chocolate in the windy weather. The evenings were a chance for the new friends to engage in several fun activities such as a fashion show and the cardboard box game before spending the night in dorms. Many pupils fondly remember this trip as a real icebreaker in their first term at the Senior School and this year’s participants definitely agree. BY LILY ALFORD (UPPER SIXTH)

[I really bonded with my form] when people cheered me on when playing the cereal box game. HOLLY METCALF E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 31


THE EXONIAN 2019

UPPER FIFTH STUDY VISITS TO GRANADA & MONTPELLIER

If a picture paints a thousand words...

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TRIPS AND TOURS

A FRENCH FANCY THIRD FORM TRIP TO NORMANDY

It was very fun and exciting if a little confusing at times! LOUISE RODGERS

It was absolutely amazing, the food was delicious and the activities were super fun. If you are thinking of going next year you should 100 percent do it!

It is a great end to the term.

The aeroballe was exhilarating and exciting and it is a really good sport to play. The archery was also very fun to try! TOBY PAGE

PHOEBE REDFERN

BODIE BLAKE

TOP 5 EVENTS

(ACCORDING TO THE PUPILS!) “The talent show was great! Some ‘interesting’ talents were clear…” “A day on the beach followed by some free time in St Malo.” “Getting really muddy on the assault course!” “Eating garlic snails dressed as stereotypical French people.” “The wildlife everywhere! We were surrounded by rabbits constantly and Kevin the peacock was also extremely noisy.”

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THE EXONIAN 2019

ABSOLUTELY BEAMING

E

arlier in the year the Lower Two went on a residential to Beam House: some a little nervous, some a little hungry and some just plain little. All soon started having a fantastic time in Torrington. The pupils, after settling in their rooms, soon got straight into activities including archery, zip wiring, surfing and abseiling. Everyone really enjoyed the trip, learning new skills and demonstrating their openness to trying new and seemingly daunting activities. BY DAISY BRETT

34 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


TRIPS AND TOURS

SEW MUCH FUN!

U

pper Two pupils stepped back in time on their visit to Coldharbour Mill, near Cullompton. It proved to be an informative and enjoyable day at the unique location, with the real life conditions adding to the authenticity of the experience. The children had a tour of the factory where they learnt about how wool is transformed into a range of manufactured products, with lots of little fingers enjoying the opportunity to twist and twirl the various samples from each machine.

They also found out what it was like to be a child worker in a textile mill in Victorian Britain. There was a realistic drama activity where Mr Robson, the factory foreman, put the children to work to decide their suitability for a job at the mill. Staff and children all wore Victorian costume to help further the experience, with the pupils writing letters of application, in advance, to express why they needed work at the mill. Henry Batty said: “Mr Robson was very realistic and kept us all in line. I’m glad I managed

to impress him with my knowledge, as he was very strict!’ Yasmin Tucker enthused: “I liked how we were all kept involved in the drama and I liked how he shouted at us (I laughed, but only when he wasn’t looking!)” Alex Wreford and Sam Benzimra agreed: “The machines were really loud and complicated. We all had lots of free samples of wool, which was good.” BY MR BLAND

From farm to fork P upils in Upper One had a hands on experience during their visit to the Farmwise event at Westpoint Arena. This was a fantastic experience to gain a better understanding about the farming industry and to bring their autumn term topic of ‘Farming in Devon’ to life. There were many exciting

workshops and displays for the children to participate in, these included baking bread, milking cows, planting potatoes and making smoothies. BY MISS ROBINSON

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 35


THE EXONIAN 2019

HEAVEN AT HAVEN

E

xeter Junior School pupils sampled the multi-million pound Haven Banks Outdoor Education Centre down on Exeter’s quayside. Every year, Upper Two and Lower Two pupils enjoy an activity day at the centre and this year was no exception. BY MR ASHMAN

36 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


TRIPS AND TOURS

LOVELY Lulworth

U

pper Two pupils participated in a field trip to Lulworth Cove as part of their Geography studies to see firsthand the natural processes of the coastline. The pupils were met by two excellent rangers at the Lulworth Heritage Centre who provided them with an interesting educational talk about the Jurassic Coast and then showed the Stair Hole and Lulworth Cove. During the day the children were able to develop their field sketching skills as there were many stops to observe the impressive sights. The day was a great success and the Upper Two learnt plenty of new information about the geology and landscape of this particular part of the Jurassic Coast. BY DAISY BRETT

Pwitah rpatrtiyerosom! hire & gift

Outdoor Adventures

01392 400150

www.haven-banks.co.uk

- Taster Sessions - Birthdays & Parties - School Holiday Courses


THE EXONIAN 2019

CCF: RAF

A

nother successful year in RAF Section began with recruit training for the Middle Fifth, who joined the sections just before Christmas. We welcomed record numbers into the section, all of whom have now passed their Part 1 (First Class Cadet) course, had belay training for climbing, weapons training, leadership exercises, pool sessions and the opportunity to fly, as well as a Field Day of water sports at Haven Banks. Some have opted to do Duke of Edinburgh through CCF. Upper Fifth started the year with a certificated first aid course, before completing their part 2 (Leading Cadet) course. They have also had sessions in self-defence, climbing, fire safety and lifesaving. The autumn Upper Fifth Field Day was based around survival skills, finishing with a challenging mud run and obstacle course. The Sixth Form have run most of the activities,

particularly the syllabus content and the leadership tasks. The Lower Sixth take a leadership course before delivering activities for the younger years, while Upper Sixth have been heavily involved in the recruit phase and big activities such as the night exercise (Nitex). Air experience flying has been a highlight this year, especially the amazing experience of cadets flying Grob Tutors (alongside a pilot) out of MOD Boscombe down. The enjoyable annual Nitex on Woodbury Common included camp cooking and an evasion exercise run by the Sixth Form for the Middle Fifth and Upper Fifth cadets. An important event in the RAF calendar is the Royal Air Squadron Trophy Competition (RAST). This includes several training sessions between November and January for the most dedicated cadets. The team of 13 then travel to Blandford Garrison in Dorset to compete

38 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

in drill, first aid, leadership, aircraft recognition, RAF knowledge and shooting. We were pleased to have a second consecutive Lord Lieutenant’s Cadet from Exeter School CCF and from the RAF Section again. Kit Seale took on the role in October 2018, when Daniel Wilcock passed on his duties in his A Level year. Two cadets completed the highly regarded Air Cadet Leadership Course at the RAF Officer training school at RAF Cranwell. Alex Byron and Kit Seale took the week long course in July 2018. Lily Howe, Oliver Irons and Finlay Scott have all been accepted onto the course for 2019. We were pleased to welcome OE Tobi McCrone, who gave a talk to the RAF Section about being a pilot before starting his basic fast jet training. Fg Off McCrone joined the RAF after completing his degree and has completed basic pilot training.

Ten cadets from the RAF Section attended summer camp based at Stanford Training Area, West Tofts Camp in July. This was part of a Supercamp - an initiative from the RAF air cadets which brought together schools and Air Cadet Squadrons from the South of England and Scotland. The cadets were split into 4 groups and each one ran a camp from the same base. Activities included the Flying Legends Airshow, visits to Apache helicopters, Fire Section, Swimming, Police Section, DCCT Shooting and one group were allowed very rare access to the USAF base at RAF Lakenheath, home of the Strike Eagle Command, F15 jets. Many thanks to all of the staff involved in all of the activities and trips throughout the year in particular to Fg Off Alborough, Fg Off Rose and Mr Tear for their roles in the section. BY SQN LDR SMALE


OUTDOOR PURSUITS

CCF: ARMY

T

he Army Section have had another busy year full of a wide range of adventurous activities. The autumn term saw all Middle Fifth recruits complete the Tri-Service Common syllabus course, where all recruits were given basic training in drill, first aid, navigation and military knowledge. Upper Sixth Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs) from all three sections played an important part in organising and running this training. The culmination of the recruit basic training phase was the confirmation and testing day which all Middle Fifth recruits successfully completed on the October Field Day. The Upper Fifth started working towards their Advanced Army Proficiency Certificate in the autumn term and visited the Footsteps of Discovery site in Cornwall for an overnight exercise on the October Field Day. Here they completed survival and bushcraft training and were able to practise the skills they learnt in an outdoor, remote environment. Meanwhile, the Lower Sixth began their leadership course. An enjoyable Field Day at Blackrock Outdoors involved a high ropes confidence course and a range of team building challenges.

In January, the new intake of 33 Middle Fifth cadets joined the Army Section. They commenced their Basic Army (cadet) Training under the watchful eye of their Upper Sixth NCOs and the Directing Staff led by Lt Hyde. All Middle Fifth cadets became proficient in the drills for the SA80 (cadet) weapon and completed their weapon handling tests. The Upper Fifth cadets all completed their Basic Signals Certificate with Sgt Hodgkins from the Cadet Training Team. The Lower Sixth NCOs completed their CFIT (Cadet Forces Instruction Training) course run by Capt Trim and Capt Murrin. This has prepared them well to conduct lessons and training in the next academic year.  Summer term brought about the CCF awards parade - a fitting way to send the Upper Fifth and Upper Sixth Cadets off on their study leave. In the parade Archie Tamblyn was promoted to Senior Cadet for next year and Hope Evans, Tom Barlow, Freddie Herring, Tom Wright and Patrick Gilbert were awarded medals for their outstanding contribution to the Army Section. Stan Hart was congratulated for being selected as the Lord Lieutenant’s Cadet for next year. Hope Evans was also

congratulated on receiving a prestigious Army Scholarship and for gaining a place to complete a gap year commission with a regular Army Unit. The summer term Field Day saw all Middle Fifth and Lower Sixth cadets complete an overnight tactical exercise on Woodbury Common. The cadets were split into two platoons before patrolling out to their harbour areas where they enjoyed the delights of the military ration pack before deploying on a number of recce patrols that lasted well into the evening. On these patrols the cadets gathered intelligence about the enemy location and their intentions with the aim of setting an ambush for them the following morning. After a few hours of sleep the cadets were up early to

rehearse and receive orders for their ambush. The two Platoon Commanders, Archie Tamblyn and Harry Emmett, delivered clear and concise orders and the ambush was successfully set. At the beginning of the summer holidays a group of 11 cadets attended the annual Army Section summer camp. This year we attended a centrally organised camp along with other schools at Longmoor Camp in Hampshire. All the cadets equipped themselves very well and impressed their instructors with their military skills, attitude and conduct. BY CAPTAIN TRIM

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 39


THE EXONIAN 2019

CCF: NAVY

I

n early September, the Upper Fifth and Lower Sixth cadets took to the water for two Friday evening training sessions with kayaking and beginner sailing at Haven Banks Outdoor Education Centre and race training at Exe Sailing club. Back in school, the Upper Fifth completed First Aid qualifications and started working towards their Able Cadet 1* promotion, while the Lower Sixth began their Leadership Cadre. During the autumn term, Upper Sixth cadets from all three sections worked together to conduct the basic recruit training for the new Middle Fifth cadets. The sessions covering navigation, first aid, drill and military knowledge culminated in the October Field Day, an exercise on Woodbury common with stands testing their knowledge, communication and teamwork. The Middle Fifth cadets then experienced taster sessions with each of the sections. The Navy taster included the completion of the CCF swim test in the swimming pool and a team challenge planned and led by Lower Sixth cadets. The October Field Day was a wet and windy one. The Upper Fifth cadets bravely went out onto the water on rafts they had built with Haven Banks as part of a team building day, whilst the Lower Sixth concluded their leadership training by planning inventive leadership tasks before trialling them on each other. We were joined by the 25 new Middle Fifth cadets in January who immediately began working towards the first qualification in the Royal Navy cadet syllabus, taught entirely by Lower Sixth cadets fresh from their leadership training. Meanwhile, the Upper Fifth learned selfdefence and how to instruct,

40 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

with the Upper Sixth running sessions in leadership styles and instruction methods. Upper Fifth and Upper Sixth’s final parade at the start of May saw Bella Allan hand over to Kiran Lake as Head of Section for next year. The RN Section’s James Harris received the Jack Sadler Trophy for his commitment and contribution to the contingent during his time as a cadet. Bella and James, along with Juliette Bundy and Leiney Frankpitt, also received medals for their work with the Royal Navy Section. May also saw the Middle Fifth and Lower Sixth cadets take part in further waterbased training with stand up paddle boarding now added as an option as well as sailing (beginner and advanced) and kayaking. 16 Middle Fifth cadets from the RN and RAF Sections completed both the practice and qualifying expeditions for their Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award this summer term, the latter starting on the scorching hot June Field Day. Through some tricky navigation and tough conditions, I was impressed by the positivity and determination of the groups I met during the course of the two day walk. June Field Day also saw the Lower Sixth spending the day on the water at Exe Sailing Club for a Regatta Day. In beautiful sunshine and with a gentle wind, a fantastic day was had by all, developing seamanship and boat handling skills under the guidance of the excellent instructors at ESC. Many thanks to Lt A James, SLt Reynolds, SLt Sheehan, SLt Charters, Lt Cdr Chapman, Lt C James, Ms Shrubb and Mr Lowles for all their hard work running activities and trips, driving minibuses and supporting the Royal Navy cadets this year. BY LT MORLEY


OUTDOOR PURSUITS

THESE SHOES WERE MADE FOR WALKING - THE 1633 CHALLENGE

O

n 30 May, 60 pupils from Exeter School and two teams of pupils from St James School participated in the 1633 Challenge. On the previous Friday, our kit had been checked and we drove up to the Dartmoor Training Centre, where we camped for the night. The pupils started at 7am on the Saturday morning and walked throughout the day until we got to the wild campsite which unfortunately had no toilet but did have Dartmoor ponies. We pitched up our tents, cooked our food and tried to get some sleep. The next morning, we woke up at 4.30am, however due to the clock change this felt like 3.30am (some groups even accidentally woke up then!). After adjusting to this new world of cold hands, darkness and watery porridge, we prepared to walk the remainder of the route to the Dartmoor Training Centre. Most of the teams reached the centre at about 1pm, where we receive some well-earned cake and a certificate. The weather was also a nice bonus, rather than having winds at 50 mph like other sessions, we spent the Saturday walking under a clear sky (which had the additional benefit of meaning I dried quickly after falling in a river). Overall, the 1633 Challenge was a really fun and interesting experience and we all learned lots about the moors and navigation. I would like to thank Mr Sharpe, Mrs Sail, Mr Porter and all the other staff and volunteers that helped.

BY OTTO OLDRIDGE

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THE EXONIAN 2019

T EN TORS O

n Friday 10 May, having completed many training walks, all the pupils doing Ten Tors arrived at school, ready for the real thing. After planning our routes and doing final preparations, we drove to Okehampton Camp where it was raining, and enjoyed some delicious spaghetti bolognese kindly cooked by the staff. We then went to sleep ready to be woken by ‘Chariots of Fire’ the next morning at 5am. We joined the masses of people as we walked to the start line and enjoyed watching a parachute jump, just before the cannon fired, officially marking the start of Ten Tors 2019. Thanks to our amazing training and the pleasant, dry weather, we were all able to complete the challenge with relative ease compared to some of the training weekends. Having said this, waking up at 4am on Sunday morning was not a pleasant experience and at times it seemed impossible, but our great teamwork helped us through this. It was also a gruelling yet fun experience due to the sheer distance and the tough terrain, as well as not mentally giving in. We will all remember Ten Tors for the rest of our lives and the great sense of achievement at the end is definitely worth all the training and pain. On behalf of all the pupils, I would like to thank all the staff for all the time they gave up to help prepare us as effectively as they did, especially Colonel Sharpe, Mr Porter and Mrs Sail. BY BETH LEDGER

42 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

We will all remember Ten Tors for the rest of our lives and the great sense of achievement at the end is definitely worth all the training and pain.


OUTDOOR PURSUITS

SILVER

W DUKE OF EDINBURGH

hilst inclement weather hampered and then delayed the silver qualifying expedition in October, with storms perhaps not being ideal weather to walk in, the challenge finally went ahead following the completion of GCSE exams in the summer. Everyone who completed the three days succeeded in passing the silver stage of the DoE qualification, impressing with their positive attitude, excellent navigation and strong team ethic. We look forward to seeing how they cope with the final stage next!

BY MS ROFF

GOLD

J

uly saw our expeditioners set off in glorious sunshine to complete their gold award route in order to complete the final hurdle of their Duke of Edinburgh Award. They were faced with an intimidating four-day trek through the breath-taking Brecon Beacons but performed admirably, putting their extensive training to good use. With the Gold challenge being the pinnacle of the DoE scheme, it is great to see the commitment from each and every one of those involved, overcoming adversity and developing a considerable skill set. Congratulations to all involved! MR SEATON-BURN

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THE EXONIAN 2019

44 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


CHARITY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE

FUNDRAISING!

THIS YEAR WE RAISED

£50,658.48! SENIOR SCHOOL

E

xeter School took a record four months to reach over £10,000 for charity in the 2018-2019 school year. Pupils from a committee of Sixth Form representatives chose to support Rowcroft Hospice charity for the course of the autumn term. The independent charity provides a wide range of specialist palliative care services for the people and their families with progressive life-limiting illnesses in South Devon. Mufti days for this raised £1,325. Later in the year, our own Revd Tom found inspiration in the work of St Petrock’s charity and offered to shave his head if donations from the school raised £5000 by the end of the year. After a tense few weeks, all of the money came in by the penultimate day of term, reaching £5,500. Another notable fundraising activity was

the annual Christmas concert, which raised £271 for WaterAid, encouraging voluntary donations in return for cups of water and squash between the two intervals. Revd Tom expressed his delight with the news: “Thanks to pupils, parents and staff for giving so generously to the school’s charities over the last term. As the Ten Tors season really begins, we look forward to raising funds for this term’s charity Dartmoor Search and Rescue Group, as well as supporting many other worthwhile organisations.” The spring term brought an eggs-travaganza of charity activity. With Ten Tors looming ahead, the chosen charity of Dartmoor Rescue Group was agreeable to the school community. Donations were certainly generous to this local charity, with the money raised coming to £1,200 in total. We managed to raise £800

on Red Nose Day, creating a sea of red across the school as pupils bought red noses to celebrate. The delivery of Easter Eggs to pupils by Crossing House, alongside a photo quiz run by Daw, were a great send off to the spring term and showed the spirit of Exeter School students. Mufti days in the summer term saw all proceeds donated to Pete’s Dragons, a charity dedicated to helping those affected by suicide. We urge you to look up these fantastic organisations, many of which are close to home, as they do critical work in our society that often goes

overlooked. We are proud to donate as much as possible each year and look forward to continuing to work with these essential charities.

JUNIOR SCHOOL

E

xeter Junior School pupils, parents and staff threw themselves into charitable activity this academic year with gusto. Children in Need was celebrated with enthusiasm and industrious cake-baking, selling and eating! Red Nose Day was enjoyed by the entire school community with money raised to support Comic Relief.

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 45


THE EXONIAN 2019

Upper Two entrepreneurs enjoyed a week of selling their products as part of the Virgin Money Make Your £5 Grow, raising over £1,000 for charity! The pupils set up stalls over break and lunchtime to sell the items they dreamed up, designed and made as part of their Independent Maths Project 2019. 75% of profit was donated to Get Kids Going, Rays of Sunshine and Cancer Research UK. The remaining profits will be put towards fun maths games to enhance our pupils’ learning further.

Get Kids Going, a charity that helps disabled children participate in sport, became a focus charity for the year, in the Junior School. Mrs Marks, Headmistress of the Junior School, ran the London Marathon for the charity and the pupils were also significantly active with their support, running throughout the spring term in their Games lesson warmups and totalling their miles together for sponsorship. They were so committed that when every form totalled their miles they found

GIVING BACK T raditionally, the Community Service programme is a wonderful opportunity that gives pupils the chance to contribute positively in the local community on a regular basis. The pupils are involved with visiting local elderly people, who live on their own and see few people, and regard their weekly visit as a genuine highlight of their week. Others visit residential homes in the local area, help out on a regular basis in the Junior School, or even volunteer at local sports clubs: quite a considerable range! In addition, helping at the Hospice and in charity shops offers a different strand of volunteering. All of these activities can be very rewarding in their own right, but demand a considerable degree of personal commitment and initiative. Every year, the school also

organises two high profile events, a Christmas Party and a summer term coach outing. The 2019 outing was a major success, taking local elderly residents to the stunning National Trust property of Montacute House, with around 35 joining the coach trip. We would highly encourage all younger pupils to get involved when considering their Friday options and look forward to the continued good work in the community. BY DAISY BRETT

46 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

they had each run a collective marathon and the whole schools miles totalled the distance from London to Exeter and back, over 400 miles! Further fund raising activities included a mufti day and the sale of interval refreshments at the U2 leavers’ show, It’s All Greek!. Altogether, throughout the year they managed to raise over £2000 for this very worthwhile charity! Thanks so much to everyone for the wonderful support for all the Junior School charities this year. BY ROSIE CROMWELL


CHARITY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE

OVER 12 MONTHS, ST PETROCK’S HAS: Supported 1,881 homeless and vulnerably housed people Helped 1,045 people into accommodation Held 246 mental health, nurse and chiropody appointments Provided 10,065 meals

AN EXCELLENT CAUSE S t Petrock’s is a local life changing charity that provides essential help to rough sleepers. This year, St Petrock’s was chosen by Reverend Tom as the chaplain’s charity. When asked about his visit to St Petrock’s he commented on how he was really impressed with the help those who come to their centre receive. “I feel that St Petrock’s is an excellent cause and by giving to this charity it helps us to realise that we can do something about the problem.” With over 600 people per annum facing homelessness in Exeter, the support that St Petrock’s provides is vital in supporting rough sleepers, those facing imminent homelessness and those recently released from prison, hospital or mental health facilities. Gill Luckings, a representative from St. Petrock’s, said how delighted they are to have been chosen as the Chaplin’s charity for this year. “We are very grateful to Exeter School for the

support it has shown, at Harvest Festival in particular.” In addition to the Harvest Festival donations, Dowrich House chose their first charitable endeavour to be in support of St Petrock’s, collecting sleeping bags from far and wide to donate to the local homeless charity. Pupils and friends donated in considerable numbers to ensure that even those struggling for accommodation had some access to warmth and comfort in the coming weeks and months. BY EMILY MOUDIOTIS E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 47


THE EXONIAN 2019

Building a sustainable future

Proud to work with Exeter School

As the South West’s leading recycling and waste management specialists, we’re proud to work with local businesses, schools and community projects to educate, encourage and support an increase in resource recovery and a more sustainable future for all.

Our services include:

Skip hire

Wheelie bins

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Confidential shredding

Materials Recycling

Get in touch to see how Coastal Recycling can help you play your part in a sustainable future.

Call: 01392 826456

48 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

coastaluk.co.uk

 coastalrecycling

 Coastal_Waste


SIXTH FORM

EYES ON THE ENTERPRISE T

his year, the Lower Sixth mustered up teams of two determined businesses, to take part in healthy competition against each other and the rest of county across the marketplaces of Devon. Seasonal Sips published their own booklet of refreshing soft drinks, concocted with a keen eye on reducing the burning issue of waste and its detriment to the environment. Intent on producing a fun and easy introduction to mindfulness and to tackle stress in the home, school and professional organisations around Britain,

Firedragons produced a sleek card game made up of mindful exercises and activities. The Christmas and Easter markets boasted sales to notable clients such as the Mayor of Exeter, and local MP Ben Bradshaw. The Young Enterprise experience galvanised the entrepreneurial spirits of its participants as well as expanding upon communicational and intrapersonal skills. Their extreme hard work and preparation paid off as Firedragons were given the unique chance to appear on Radio One’s mindfulness podcast. BY JAMES BRODERICK

FROM BRAINWAVES TO THE AIRWAVES

I

t started early on Monday morning at Exeter St. David’s. George, James Ian and I all met there. We travelled up on the 8:20 train and pulled into Waterloo at about 11:45. On the train up we discussed what was important to say and even played our mindfulness card game to settle the nerves; it actually worked! After arriving and admiring the shops and buildings for a few minutes we went to visit the BBC Broadcasting House. After getting a picture outside the famous buildings we walked the one of the wings and entered the reception area. We were handed ID cards and were ushered up to the 8th floor (the best floor, as the receptionist said). After walking through what seemed a spaceship corridor with cool lights in

the ceiling, walls and even floor, we met Grace who I had been emailing for the last month. Her and Sophie (her assistant) played a quick game with us: they really enjoyed the game and it helped settle my nerves even more. On our tour we walked through to a studio with 1xtra being recorded just metres away and with Radio 1 on air just next door, it was pretty surreal. After some professional pictures with the equipment, on the way out we walked right past Nick Grimshaw himself with his headphones in. By the end of the visit we were all buzzing with happiness, knowing that it had been an extremely fun yet highly successful day. BY EDDIE LISTER


THE EXONIAN 2019

50 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


SIXTH FORM

EXPLORING THE

FUTURE M

onday: To get ideas flowing a issues an bout plast d solution ic s for the B Enterprise usiness a Day, the g of listenin nd roup had g to two re the privile levant an Kirsty Bark ge d interest er gave a in g speakers b rilliant pre experienc . sentation e doing th on her e Atlantic the Ocea Row as p n’, and th art of ‘Row e current who are a work of P For iming for lastic Free the comm Plastic Fre Exeter unity to b e Status b e given th y2 company e , Coastal R 020. Richard Mars h, whose ecycling, managem ru ns recycli ent servic ng and w es across commun aste Devon w ity projec hile supp ts , followed We also e orting this. njoyed an Humphri inspiratio es and M nal talk fr yles Hopp om OEs G Mindful C er, who c iles hef, a com o-founde pany that recipe bo d The sells healt xes. Being hy and fre young an related to sh d local, th the pair; th e pupils e ey talked a compan asily about ho y by findin w to set u g a gap in problems p the marke and bene fits of entr t, and the Then it w epreneurs as time fo hip. r the Low in which er Sixth sp eac orts aftern armed wit h House represen oon ts a coun h face pa try, heavil int and co of choice y stumes. T were a th he ‘sports’ rowback days, with to Junior events su S c hool sport c h throwing as limbo, s . Ita penguin run and e the USA (T ly (Acland) narrow gg ly ownsend stole the ) through win from rock, pap a tiebreak er, scisso er round rs. Ed Liste Fishwick of rw dressed a s an ‘anim ith his kilt/toga, H Sheppard arry e schoolgir as a daffo l’ and Han dil were a dressed. B nah warded a Y EMILY D s the best IXON

s ur Future t day of o g rs in fi e rn o th m n nt the e p n s e s w e , ercis ru Week ilding ex u b ry d m e a of th on te king use t attin. Ma ixth wen M S l r u e a P w o L by le f o o h the w etition r a comp weather, fo s ld a e w fi his the d flags. T out onto ckets an pt to get ro , m s e lt tt u a p e id cata w ng ra g gutteri by a ye cket usin t u followed b a to a alls in was a gre ip skills tennis-b h e time. It rs m e a d s a e le th all at arn new s. le to x e y it m am opportun ving a break fro e g rvey av s ha llison Ha ’ as well a A , ia n d o e o M l ern d Socia n a In the aft s e ik L any on ‘Sex, uggle m us a talk n the str o mental t h ir g e li th g e with v sheddin a h e g a social f our terms of people o in y e ll ia c spe reat advic health, e giving g s a . y ll it e rs w s ive media, a s and un eas lationship gave us lots of id re t u o b a s e m e m gra t for th Both pro ink abou a y and th a eek off to w a w e s k to ta r future u o g in tt e future, g ALFORD rt. BY LILY ta s t a re g

O

three e had . In w y a d ed r Thurs ons plann i mina n the s s d a se by g se a n i h t i e c ex gw ills ornin nal sk n the m interperso ing sessio t a g n n i i g velop a fasc ethin on de lmon and , som ught g n a i S d o Julie onal bran of dn’t th rs us ha chie. Both f o on pe y us r n a u g n M m i o ovid r p which uch, by J , , g m views agin about s were eng n for inter In s. tio lk the ta ar prepara nd our CV e to a le s at c n n h o u t i at wi ort applic , we were f hef James y S A C c U ad on nal TV terno dy Ste the af e professio en on Rea bout e th sa have , who has b o talk to u s yet t uggle er n r i t n , s n e r a e o T th rk. We and m g and Cook able fishin field of wo licious in de his susta ies in ry the r us rtunit nough to t repared fo nd o p p o p e g y h fis a luck bein f fresh ce. were at we saw o p u au de th food ession ma my white s s a e e r h c t in in a ables veget A HALSE

O

RTH BY MA

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 51


THE EXONIAN 2019

F

OPENING DOORS

ifty of Exeter School’s Lower Sixth visited Cardiff University Open Day, as part of their preparation for life beyond Exeter School. They attended subject talks and were given the opportunity to find out about student life and the opportunities to study subjects such as Law, Medicine, Business, Languages, Geography, History and English. The pupils found the day very useful as part of the UCAS process. Other members of the Lower Sixth were attending a range of universities, or taking part in independent research at school, preparing personal statements. BY MRS MARSH

Asking the right questions I

n October, 44 professionals kindly volunteered to interview the Upper Sixth Form pupils at Ashfords. This event is part of a wider Futures Programme which offers our Sixth Form pupils careers, employability and university focused lessons,

workshops, talks and events. In order to reduce the anxieties that accompany any first interview, this scheme aims to alleviate these pressures through two interviews with friends of the school. Many pupils have found this scheme to

52 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

be an invaluable step towards developing interview skills, which will be vital in their future endeavours. The interviewers came from a wide range of professions, including engineering, law, fundraising, computing, medicine and academia.

Questions asked ranged from ‘what is your biggest achievement’ to ‘if you were a biscuit, what kind of biscuit would you be?’ Many thanks to the volunteer interviewers, and the staff who dedicated their time to organise this scheme. BY GEORGIA LING


MAKING THE DIFFERENCE The Ashfords Foundation is a grant making charity that aims to make a real difference in the communities in which our people live and work.

Some of the charities helped to date • Action East Devon • Art Care Education (ACEnt) • CHICKS • Caring in Bristol • Devon Adventure Therapy • Devon Youth Games Trust • Dexter’s Odyssey • Freedom Wheels • Homeless Shoebox Appeal • Tiverton Swimming Club

ashfordsfoundation.org.uk


THE EXONIAN 2019

We were thrilled to have our spring London dinner sell out weeks in advance and have over 100 people attend the charity quiz that was put together by the OE Club and our Sixth Form.

See the OEs M

y first few months with the Alumni Office have been non-stop; it has been a great year so far! We have run a brilliant events programme taking us across the country, providing something for all with fantastic dinners, drinks receptions, business networking opportunities, sport events and even a wine tasting evening. It has been great to meet with so many alumni from across the years. We were thrilled to have our spring London dinner sell out weeks in advance and have over 100 people attend the charity quiz that was put together by the OE Club and our Sixth Form. We have had over 50 amazing alumni volunteers this year, giving time to career talks, run workshops and support mock interviews. We released an engagement survey amongst all our alumni, with a great response which is going to help shape future activity, results will be shared in the next alumni magazine and online. Alumni Officer Karen Dart and I are busy planning for next year and organising our annual Exeter-based reunion – OE Day which takes place in September. I look forward to meeting more alumni and launching some new exciting plans in the months to come. Thank you to all the staff who have helped the Alumni Office this year. BY MRS MAGEE

54 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


ALUMNI LINKS

EARNING HIS WINGS The Exonian’s Allegra Letts chatted to OE Tobi McCrone (2001-2009) on his visit to school in October to talk to the RAF Section

DID YOU ALWAYS KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A PILOT? Since I was four years old, I knew I wanted to work in the military. My family has always been quite military-savvy, so it was an easy decision for me to make. Only time I changed my mind was at six years old, when I thought being a bus driver would be quite fun! ARE THERE SPECIFIC A LEVELS YOU WOULD ADVISE PEOPLE WANTING TO PURSUE AN RAF CAREER WOULD TAKE? Not necessarily. While I was at Exeter School, I took History, Maths, Chemistry and Physics. I ended up studying a degree in History! You don’t need a degree in Engineering or Maths to make it in the military, as the training provides you with skills and knowledge you will need for your career. WHAT SKILLS DO YOU NEED FOR THE RAF? The most important is teamwork. You’ll be a follower in groups more than you will be a leader, and need to make significant contributions to the team. Of course, leadership skills are important for those instances when you are responsible for your team. Other than that, you need be decisive and think quickly and confidently.

HOW DID EXETER SCHOOL PREPARE YOU FOR YOUR CAREER? The main thing that Exeter School has offered me to prepare me for my pursuits would be the CCF; it allowed me to gain great flying experience, see air squadrons and realise my ambition to be a part of the Royal Air Force. WHAT WOULD YOU RECOMMEND PUPILS GET INVOLVED IN IF THEY WANT TO PURSUE A CAREER IN THE MILITARY? Applicants need to show that they are driven and dedicated; taking part in a variety of clubs and activities such as CCF and Duke of Edinburgh will show that you have selfmanagement and organisational skills valued by the military. WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE OF YOUR CAREER SO FAR? Definitely the first few weeks of military flying training. You wake up at 6am every day for room inspections, and go to bed at half twelve. The training is meant to prepare you to cope with the harsh environment of the military later on, dubbed ‘shock of capture’.

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 55


THE EXONIAN 2019

Facts, figures and fun OUR FAVOURITE QUESTION IN WHICH INDOOR GAME MIGHT YOU USE THE FOLLOWING TERMS?

A Boondock; a Carnovsky; a Squidger; a Squop; and a John Lennon Memorial Shot. (See bottom left of page for answer)

O

n the evening of the Ides of March 2019, an amalgamation of old pupils, current pupils, staff and friends of the school descended upon the school hall for fantastic quiz night organised by Old Exonians Steve Perring, Peter German, Chris Bush and the multifaceted John Davidson as well as an arrangement of current staff. Ably led by

school librarian, Mrs Jackson, and Head of History, Mr Trelawny, as quiz masters, the night was full of quick wit, devilish questions and a spirited music round led by Mr Tamblyn on the piano. A small group of Sixth Form pupils marked each round, fielding bribes of £50 and over but resolutely withholding the answers. BY ROSIE CROMWELL

(ANSWER: Tiddlywinks)

O ECO-FRIENDLY FASHION INSPIRES 56 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

n 7 February, Exeter School was delighted to welcome alumni, parents and members of the local business community to our latest business networking evening. In addition to a prize draw, and a meal, there was also a talk from Kalkidan Legesse: local social entrepreneur and cofounder of ethical fashion shop, Sancho’s. Many thanks to the Alumni Office, sponsor WBW Solicitors, and Kalkidan Legesse for making this event a success. BY GEORGIA LING


COMMEMORATIVE DAYS

A THANKSGIVING SERVICE E xeter School’s annual Founders’ Day Service was held at Exeter Cathedral on Wednesday 27 March. The whole school, comprising over 920 boys and girls aged 7-18, staff and governors, gathered to give thanks to its founders in a beautiful service. The Dean of Exeter, the Very Reverend Jonathan Greener, reflected on dealing with weakness and how it can become a strength. Huw Phillips, Isobel Cann, William Maynard and Maria Turnbull Pomares from the Junior School led the intercessions beautifully with some prayers that they had written in RS lessons. BY MR WOOD

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 57


THE EXONIAN 2019

I HOPE THAT THERE ARE ENOUGH OF US POINTING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION TO MAKE AN IMPACT.

PHOTO: FRANCES GARD

The Exonian’s Rosie Cromwell spoke to TV presenter Miranda Krestovnikoff about her funniest on-camera mishaps and her hopes for the future 58 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


COMMEMORATIVE DAYS

It’s great for the mind, the soul, the body.

T

his year’s Speech Day speaker was Miranda Krestovnikoff, a talented wildlife TV presenter, author and public speaker. She greeted the crowd with a smile, and proceeded to charm the room with stories about everything from the amazing opportunities that she has had to her inspirational Biology teacher who set her on her path. Miranda mentioned in her speech that she was not the best behaved pupil in school, and when asked about it remarked that the rules were just a bit too tight back then, and that it was her inquiring mind that tended to get her into trouble. She says that it is important to nurture the individual and creative thought, and that school rules now aren’t as ridiculous but it is important to be an individual. When it comes to the future of the environment, Miranda is endlessly positive but is “dismayed by the laziness of people who only want convenience”. She is sure that we will find a solution, she only hopes that it will

be in time. Part of her sees the worst happening but the positive part of her usually wins. Miranda believes that we need to do what we can here and then to try and spread our solutions elsewhere. Her own future is a little more certain – more of what she is doing now. She is juggling parenthood and trying to increase awareness about the natural world. Miranda would like to continue to work in her community with charities to show people how stimulating nature really is. Miranda was inspired by her Biology teacher to follow the path that she did but she always had a passion for being outside. It is where she feels most like herself, she says, but there was no one moment of inspiration – she just feels good when she is outside. She has had her troubles though, she faced a major setback soon after her first presenting job. She got an offer from a company who wanted her to sign an

All I want to do at the end of the day is to share my passion. exclusive six-year contract, which she managed to negotiate down to two years. After a year, they ran out of work for her. This meant that Miranda couldn’t work for them, but couldn’t work for anyone else either, because of her exclusive contract. She managed to get by tutoring, decorating and cleaning until the contract expired. For the first time it brought her face to face with how unpredictable her job could be, she questioned her choice of careers. Things often get pulled at the last minute that’s just the nature of TV, she says. What she does get to do is amazing. With the One Show, she recently sat

An enormous thank you goes to Miranda for taking the time to chat to us - we look forward to seeing where her exploits take her next!

on a rock in Scotland with her flute and a violinist to play a duet for the seals. She has skydived, fly boarded and has caved in a newly discovered cave in Cheddar Gorge that they were trying to prove was the biggest in the country. She was the twelfth person into the cave, the second woman. Miranda has had some hilarious moments on camera with the One Show, including a live segment involving a frog. The frog used to rehearse sat perfectly still the entire time but was swapped for with a much more active one for the live broadcast. When Miranda opened her hand, so you could see its eyes and nose, it made a bid for freedom. It ended with her co-host screaming and Miranda lunging across the studio to catch the frog - on live TV. Around Easter, there was another segment that aired with two rabbits in a rabbit run. For the rehearsal there was a grid separating the two but the separating grid was removed for the live recording. There was one male rabbit and one female. The camera ended up just slowly panning away. BY ROSIE CROMWELL

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 59


THE EXONIAN 2019

Remembrance Service

A

s our solemn frames crouched in parades of foldaway chairs in the breathless hall, we were met with an unfamiliar atmosphere, incongruous with any other assembly, for its formidable presence manifested in the hearts of all. No more was there the fervour of a restless Third Form, chattering and bickering, but rather something much more conspicuous; a deafening silence held us in its tenacious vice of sympathy, with nothing but our mourning breaths swelling the room. Silent it may be to the unheeding, however, our collective thoughts were loud and unruly in remembering the brave lives of those who fought and fell, over one hundred years ago. Thoughtful artwork painted by the Third Form was cast in carousel around the hall, further aiding us in our admiration. All

ears stood to attention as a reading from the prophet Isaiah lead us gently by the hand, with sunray fingers, to a time - hopefully not too far over the dusky horizon - of blissful, attainable peace. Our very own field of poppies formed of pupils reeled in harmony, echoing the redtipped blades of Flanders Fields, as we stood in unison to sing ‘Dear Lord and Father of Mankind.’ As we revered in a moment of silence, only the footsteps of the Heads of School and senior CCF cadets could be heard in between the aching cries of the bugle. One by one, they lay down befitting wreaths on stage, paying homage to a tradition firmly seeded in the gardens of our school history. The wreath, dedicated to all those who fought, most notably remembers the past Exonians who tragically lost their lives – lives rich in memories, experiences and love. We were then enriched by our guest speaker, Reverend Juliette Hulme, former

The Cherr y Tr BY EDWA ees RD THOM AS The cherry trees bend On the old over and are shedd ro ing Their peta ad where all that passed are ls, strewin g the gra dead, This early ss as May morn when there for a wedding is none to wed.

Sang Everyone IED SASSOON g; FR G ut singin BY SIE ly burst o light n e d d su e Everyone lled with such d m, s fi in freedo a w d n I fi d n st u A m s d ir ite ed b As prison dly across the wh s; il ld w e fi g n in e g Win rk-gre s and da sight. rd a h rc O of and out on - on ly lifted; s sudden g sun: a w e ic o ’s v ttin Everyone came like the se ; and horror ty ars u te a e h b it d An shaken w eryone s a w rt My hea , but Ev ss; s wordle way ... O Drifted a and the song wa ; d e. Was a bir ill never be don gw in g n si e th 60 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

Chaplain of Wells Cathedral School. Originally trained as a teacher, then ordained a priest in 1995, Hulme became the British Army’s first female Chaplain. She went onto serve with the Royal Corps of Signals in Germany and with the Royal Army Medical Corps in Iraq respectively, until 2005. She talked about the grave reality of death which continues to plague our young service people in Iraq, reminding us the horrors of a war so alien to us, troubles which we thought we overcame, still practiced and prevalent today, tearing families of a whole new generation apart. Solace was served however, as she was able to recall a few humorous

moments soldiers shared with her – lending an extreme meaning to ‘comic relief’. Hulme challenged pupils with a resonating plea for peace, not only in their future endeavours, but within the walls, halls and grounds of the school. To take a piece of peace and apply it with certain nurturing care appears a little price to pay in return for the millions upon millions who sacrificed themselves for the War To End All Wars: “What a shame it seems outlandish, almost laughable, for me to request this. “What a shame we learnt nothing from a country left frayed, torn and blemished.” BY JAMES BRODERICK

LEST WE FORGET

T

he Junior School Remembrance Service started with the presenting of standards from Junior School pupils in their youth organisation uniforms. Reverend Tom welcomed the congregation to the service, reminding pupils that they were gathered to remember the dead from the two world wars and more recent conflicts. In particular, he mentioned the former pupils of this school, including Trooper Jack Sadler, who gave his life in the service of his country in Afghanistan

in 2007. He reminded pupils that this year is the 100th anniversary of the Armistice, which was signed to end the conflict in the First World War. The choir sang ‘A Clare Benediction’ by John Rutter and we heard three poems. Lydia McLeod (U2W) read a poem which she had composed herself. In Flanders Fields was beautifully read by Benji Cooling (U2A). We then heard Everyone Sang by Siegfried Sassoon, read by Megan Roberts (U2W). The address this year was given by Fr Alex Hobbs, the curate at St.

Michael’s, Heavitree, who spoke to us about the importance of remembering those who gave their lives as a sacrifice. Remembrance, he said, should also make us think about peace and how we can live more in harmony with each other. We were grateful to Upper Sixth Former Jamie Stephenson who played The Last Post beautifully. Revd Tom commended the Junior School for observing the service in a respectful manner and closed the service with a blessing. BY MRS BROOKES-FERRARI


GOOD ADVICE IS PRICELESS

A fine Chinese blue and white vase, Qianlong seal mark

Sold for £460,000

Auction room open for free verbal valuations Monday to Friday Home visits throughout the South West with no fee or obligation St. Edmund’s Court, Okehampton Street, Exeter. EX4 1DU T: 01392 413100 W: www.bhandl.co.uk E: enquiries@bhandl.co.uk


THE EXONIAN 2019

BANKSY IN BRISTOL

O

n Friday 5 October, Sixth Form artists went off to Bristol to find inspiration for their wide variety of projects. On their quest for museums and galleries, the Banksy works scattered across their path were added bonuses for the keen creatives. M Shed, a museum dedicated to Bristol’s history, was first on their list; this by no means depleted the group’s enjoyment of all the other artwork there was on offer in the city, which they were looking forward to interpret in their own styles. Their final stop was the harbour, where they sat in the sun to sketch different parts of the landmark. All in all, the trip was a well-rounded day of art that everyone enjoyed.

BY LEXIE DI-VINCENZO

Inspired by the ocean O

n Monday 24 September, six Lower Sixth Art pupils spent the morning at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth. Our A Level theme this year in Lower Sixth is water and to get inspiration for our artwork we travelled to Plymouth in order to take pictures and draw sketches that would inform etching plates and various aspects that we could use across our books. After a very bumpy minibus journey courtesy of Mr Saunders, we were relieved to arrive at the aquarium and finally exit the minibus. Each pupil was given a year’s free pass to return which proved to be the

62 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

highlight of the trip for some of the girls. We stopped at various fish tanks to take sketches using a variety of different drawing mediums for our individual booklets made prior to the trip. After a wandering Mr Saunders was found by Mrs Rafferty-White and Mrs Escott lurking near the jellyfish tanks we made our way up to the lunch area and marvelled at our interesting yet creative drawings from earlier in the day. The trip was rounded off with a slightly less bumpy bus ride back to school. Our thanks to Mrs Escott and Mrs Rafferty-White for such an enjoyable trip. BY LEXIE DI-VINCENZO


ART

Staff Art Show

H

ave a look at some of the fantastic efforts from Exeter School staff, produced and displayed for the Art Summer Show. Mrs Davidson, Mr Reynolds, Mrs Whittall, Mrs Metcalf and Mrs Taylor all submitted pieces – can you work out which one is theirs? E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 63


THE EXONIAN 2019

DAY 1

MAKING A MARK IN ST IVES

Cornish Pasties on the sea front while battling the wind On the first day of our trip, we and devious seagulls, the went straight to the Newlyn group went to the Tate. This Art gallery in Penzance. Here was incredibly interesting as we were introduced to Greg, most artwork was so modern our tour guide. We took a that the true meaning was series of photos of ourselves unknown at first sight, but its posing in funny positions, beauty and complexity soon picked our favourite and became clear. Back at the sketched it. After the gallery, hotel, local artist Greg then we spent the afternoon at helped us make, and in some the Tremenheere Sculpture cases salvaged, our own Gardens, exploring the sites abstract work. around the trail. First, in the Aqua Obscurer, we carried DAY 3 out a blind drawing of what On Sunday, it was pouring we were able to see in the it down so we weren’t able dark. From there we walked to make sand sculptures on to the Sky Scape, drawing the beach. However, this five different images of the did not stop us from having exterior and interior aiming an unforgettable day. We to capture its different travelled to the elements. Tate Gallery and DAY 2 listened to an interesting talk Saturday started with a walk by Katie Schwab into St Ives with the hope of who informed finding the various Barbara us of the Hepworth sculptures dotted complex story around the town. Next, was a of the crysede guided tour of the Hepworth textile factory museum, which allowed us and its attractive to develop real appreciation fabric prints. for her artwork. After eating 64 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

Personally, I am extremely interested in fashion and hearing about its influence in previous years, even during the war, making it an eyeopening and informative experience. I am sure that in the future many of us will be influenced by her work for our final pieces. This was a brilliant way to end our St Ives trip and I am sure everyone will look back with fond memories of the trip. BY SORREL MITCHELL, OLIVIA PORTER, AND XANTHE HEALY


ART

Which witch is which?

I

nspired by the Lower School production of The Witches by Roald Dahl, the Fourth Form presented their own adaptations of Quentin Blake’s illustrative style through the depiction of witches. The quick and loose strokes of the art style juxtapose the exaggerated features of the witches, which portrays their villainous character and conveys the fun and quirky imagination of the Fourth Formers. Head of Art, Mrs Escott, said their final outcomes really captured the spirit of the story. BY DAISY BRETT

ARTISTS FROM TOP LEFT: Freddie Porter-Goff, Georgia Read, Henry Bill, Isabelle Cortizo, Oscar Clements, Amber Stratham, Betsy Hale, Delphi.

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 65


THE EXONIAN 2019

Visitors flock to summer shows

O

n Monday 24 June, over 200 pupils, parents, staff and governors visited the Art studios and DT workshops for the annual exhibitions. Work by pupils in the Third Form through to the Upper Sixth Form was on display and visitors were treated to musical accompaniment form the string quartet, cello quartet and the saxophone quartet. Head of Art, Mrs Escott, said: “This annual event is a

66 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

fantastic opportunity to see the wide range of creative work produced by our pupils in just one year. It is also a great opportunity to see the vibrant and well-equipped studio and workshop spaces in which the work has been created. We are always immensely proud of what our pupils have achieved in Art and Design Technology and enjoy celebrating their success with the wider school community.� BY MRS RAFFERTY-WHITE


ART

TAKE ONE PICTURE

a private view

E

very year, as part of their Take One Picture programme, The National Gallery invite primary schools nationwide to focus on one of their paintings and respond creatively to its themes and subject matter, historical context, or composition. Take One Picture aims to inspire cross-curricular learning, as well as a lifelong love of art. This year, schools have responded to Joseph Wright of Derby’s An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump. The painting was chosen for the wide range of subjects that are explored: the depiction of a scientific experiment and its entertainment value, the human drama happening in a night-time domestic setting, and the references to the Age of Enlightenment.

Upper Two pupils have had a very exciting learning journey linking Science with Art which has encompassed a whole team effort; from the Art and DT teaching team, to our wonderful Glass Artist, Mrs Michelle Keay and Science input from Mrs Marks, and the amazing skills of Mr Rose (Head of DT in the Senior School). The children learnt all about the properties of glass; how to create and colour glass; hands on experience creating their own colour puddles linked to the colour wheel; and finally all about the double helix structure of DNA! The children have created beautifully coloured glass diamonds, which have been arranged in a double helix design, carefully constructed by Mr Rose. We submitted our work to the Gallery in

October and were delighted to discover that we were successful! We were immensely proud of the learning journey integral to the sculpture and were very excited that our achievements were recognised at a national level. The icing on the cake was being invited to the private viewing of the exhibition, featuring works by children from 31 different primary schools in a diverse range of media. The project can be summarised by a quote from one of our pupils: “This project has been awesome! We started by just looking at a picture and by the end we learnt about glass, made glass puddles, extracted DNA from a strawberry and together created an amazing piece of art.” Benji, aged 10. BY MRS HANDLEY

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 67


THE EXONIAN 2019

ART

PLAYFUL ART

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he theme for this year’s Big Draw event was ‘Play’. The Art department interpreted this by setting up a series of games that participants would need to engage with in order to decipher their colour, shape and time to produce their mark. This has resulted in a series of large scale, expressive and colourful panels that are full of gestural shapes and lines. The gallery space was completely immersed with marks inspired by artists such as Henri Matisse, Sonia Delaunay, Terry Frost, Jackson Pollock and Wassily Kandinsky. Once again, the turn out for the event was excellent, with over 400 pupils participating this year.

BY MRS RAFFERTY-WHITE

Leadership opportunity Local artist inspires Junior School

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his was the second year of Art Monitors at Exeter Junior School and this year’s Upper Two cohort worked very hard to provide taster art sessions for their fellow pupils during Tuesday break times. Lower Two pupils were offered the chance to learn the skill of mono printing. The monitors demonstrated how to make a printing plate using Styrofoam and they then set up a printing production line to allow the Lower Two pupils to use a variety of coloured printing inks, (not forgetting the all-important clearing up responsibilities too!). The

role of the Art Monitor has evolved this year and this is due to the commitment and hard work demonstrated by these pupils, which displays a very mature approach to their responsibility. Thank you Art Monitors – you are doing a fantastic job! Daisy Brough (L2B) really enjoyed the whole experience and was impressed with the way the art monitors helped her print her turtle design. Martha Herniman (U2G) really liked the way the Lower Two pupils listened to their instructions and came out with really beautiful designs. BY MRS HANDLEY

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he Art Monitors enjoyed a fantastic opportunity to work alongside Rachel Toll, a local watercolour artist. Rachel kindly agreed to visit our school after Martha Herniman (U2G) shared her lovely work she had previously completed in a workshop with Rachel. After explaining the different paints and brushes she uses, Rachel demonstrated a piece for the children to have a go at. They loved applying the different colours and watching their beautiful work evolve. Caitlin Ampleford (U2W) cannot wait to try out the ideas at

home, Martha Herniman (U2G) really enjoyed working alongside her art teacher again and Yasmin Tucker (U2W) loved learning the new skills. Whilst they were waiting for the paint to dry, Rachel then demonstrated how versatile watercolours can be by showing the group some of her beautiful wildlife work. The results were simply stunning. If you are interested in seeing Rachel’s work, please visit: watercoloursbyrachel. co.uk. We are extremely grateful for Rachel’s time and expertise and all came away completely inspired! BY MRS HANDLEY


DT

AUTOMOTIVE ATTRACTION

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n Sunday 24 March, Middle Fifth pupils embarked on the annual Design and Technology trip to automotive factories in the Midlands, adeptly guided by Mr Rose, Mr Lowles and Miss Lewis. They reached Droitwich in time for indoor go-karting, won by Woody Powderley-Turner although the fastest lap went to Finlay Tabor with a time of 23.2 seconds. On the Monday the group split in two, with pupils touring either Jaguar or Land Rover in Birmingham depending upon preference. The tours were conducted by retired experts from the workforce who had seen the evolution of new technologies over decades of work.

BY ROSIE CROMWELL

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 69


THE EXONIAN 2019

LOVE, LAUGHTER, TEARS TRAGEDY

&

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DRAMA

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ith a rotating cast of main characters, a lovable troupe of Lovespotters and a backing track of fantastic live music, the Senior School production of Tristan and Yseult was a roaring success. Continuing in a long line of imaginative and unique shows directed by Mr Brough, the performance had the audience alternately laughing at the clowning Lovespotters and crying at the emotional portrayal of denied love. Every member of the cast worked hard to achieve the energy necessary to carry such a physical show - between fight scenes, dancing and clowning around, everyone involved left the show exhausted and exhilarated. One audience member commented that every Lovespotter seemed capable of being a main character in their own right, such was the skill they conveyed. The audience participation was broadly well received, each night better than the last in this respect, culminating with a dance-off

between two members of the audience on the last night. Behind the scenes the tech crew worked tirelessly, not only to cue the numerous lights and sound effects but also to set up and sustain a functioning livestream for the rest of the production crew backstage. As always the hair and makeup team fought to corral the performers into

A challenging but deeply rewarding experience. makeup at the right time, while the props and costume teams fought a losing battle to keep order backstage. They were rewarded on the last night by generous gifts of flowers and chocolates bought for them by the cast Tristan and Yseult was Mr Harknett’s first show with the school. He said: “It has been a challenging but deeply rewarding experience and I’ve met many incredibly hard

working and enthusiastic pupils whom I have never had the privilege of teaching, whose hard work translated into something they can be truly proud of.” He commended the backstage crew, saying that they showed “remarkable dedication, competence and leadership skills that reminded me daily why working with young people is the most amazing job.” While it was Mr Harknett’s first show, for many of the cast it would be their last. Ettejean Girvin, an Upper Sixth Former who played Whitehands on the Saturday performance, said it was probably one of the weirdest yet most wonderful experiences of her life and that she couldn’t have asked for a better final play. BY ROSIE CROMWELL

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 71


THE EXONIAN 2019

BUT THIS IS NOT A

FAIRY-TALE. THIS IS ABOUT

RE A L

WITCHES

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ndeed, many of the audience found aspects of this year’s Lower School Production frighteningly realistic as keen actors from Third Form to Lower Fifth brought Roald Dahl’s beloved tale, The Witches, to life. Head of Drama Mr Brough explained how the largest cast and crew took on the challenge of retelling this

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classic which offered the chance for pupils to get involved as cast members, technicians and costume makers. With many of the central characters being played by different performers each night, the audience got to see the depth of the performing talent within Exeter School as everyone had the opportunity to shine. BY LILY ALFORD


DRAMA

W HAT ARE WE . . .

HUM ANS?

OR ANIMALS?

OR SAVAGES? R

ehearsals for The Lord of the Flies started about three months in advance of the performance, and by the end we were rehearsing up to three times a day. During the Christmas holidays, plenty of time was spent practising our lines, and when we came back to school, we had all improved and were generally much more confident in delivering a solid performance. Nearer to the performances, we rehearsed on three separate weekends, which consisted of lots of pizza (and a bit of spear fighting), with a small amount of rehearsing between! We managed to make real progress and big improvements to the play during these rehearsals. On the last weekend, the crew came and gave us the opportunity to rehearse with sound and lighting; this made everything feel much more real and professional. The day of the first performance arrived but the cast and crew were faced with quite a dilemma as it had decided to snow. Luckily this didn’t affect any of the main characters,

meaning we were able to carry on the performance as usual. The plays went well and the acting by everyone on stage was amazing. All the props and the lighting and the sound effects all came together on the opening night, which was a relief as in rehearsals we had a few stumbles with the effects. Mr Harknett did amazingly well to put on the performances and organise everything, considering the small amount of time he had to prepare it. On the first night due to the weather we had a smaller audience than expected but still that didn’t affect the standard of the performance. On the second night we had a very good turn out with nearly a full house, and it went very well. All the performers put a lot of work into the shows and should all be proud of the achievement. We would like to say a big thank you to rest of the cast, the crew, all the staff that helped out, and Mr Harknett, who helped us put on a fantastic show. BY OTTO OLDRIDGE AND ALICE GITTOES-DAVIES

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 73


THE EXONIAN 2019

It’s All Greek! A

ll Upper Two pupils participated in an end of year production called It’s All Greek!. The theme was Ancient Greece, of course, and involved three different myths performed by three different classes. Pandora’s Box was an exciting, magical tale told by Upper Two G. Upper Two W told us the story of Echo and Narcissus – a very emotional and funny myth. The final myth, Hercules, was performed by Upper Two A. It was a dramatic, dark and humorous story. Each myth had lots of different music - rock and roll, ballads and beautiful classical music and all the Upper Two children enjoyed dancing and singing. Every pupil in Upper Two had lines to say and a time to shine. The audience could see how much each Upper Two enjoyed themselves on stage and rewarded them with a huge standing ovation.

BY MARIA TURNBULL-POMARES AND TODD ROOK

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WORKSHOPS

DRAMA

and reviews

PLAY REVIEWS

War Horse

P A professional collaboration

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ixth Form pupils studying Drama were joined by the renowned international touring theatre company Complicité, where pupils were able to work with some of the actors to explore their collaborative curiosity in the process of ‘devising.’ Sixth Form pupils were asked to work together to produce movement sequences in particular settings as well as soundscapes, testing the extent of theatrical boundaries. The company is famous for making its work through extensive research and development and so one of the tasks in this workshop was to find the most emotive details from the script in order to then be able to explore these sections physically, working both independently and in groups, creating evocative and probing images. The main lesson of the day was that exploring dialogue through physical theatre is often far more effective than just projecting this dialogue. “Complicité produces the most imaginative theatre to be found anywhere”– The Independent. BY MADDY KING

upils studying Drama started the autumn term with a trip to see the National Theatre’s dynamic play of War Horse, based on the novel by Michael Morpurgo. The play intertwined with the theme of fate whilst following the journey of young Albert and his beloved horse, Joey, during the horrors of the First World War. This poignant and heartrending drama, suffused with compelling music and folk song is a show of remarkable creativity. One of its finest elements was its use of life-sized horses by South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Company, making the audience relish in the precision and artistry as the puppets portrayed a striking sense of life throughout. One pupil commented: “War Horse was an incredibly emotive and tear jerking performance with a skilful use of puppetry.” 5 stars!

Humorous Heist

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n early October, to further their studies in theatre practitioners, Middle Fifth pupils were given the opportunity to see the farcical play, The Comedy About A Bank Robbery at the Theatre Royal in Plymouth. The pupils relished in the slapstick humour that was executed perfectly and the cast’s ability to be both physically daring and have exquisite comedic timing. The pupils were not only exposed to this vibrant theatrical style but undoubtedly enjoyed a lively evening at the theatre that left them laughing out loud.

BY MADDY KING

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 75


THE EXONIAN 2019

Fun for all E the family

xeter Junior School parents and friends enjoyed an entertaining rendition of the classic tale of Peter and the Wolf. Almost 40 Form One and Upper One children took to the stage to perform in a brightly coloured medley of costumes. Written and directed by English and Drama Coordinator Mrs Pettet, with music arranged by peripatetic

music teacher Mr Pettet, the show highlighted the confidence and poise of our youngest pupils. Thirty-eight children have been meeting for half an hour every week as part of our lunchtime Drama Club since September. They have worked very hard to put on this production and I am very proud of them all; well done! BY MRS PETTET

A great telling of a great tragedy

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fter many weeks rehearsing in our afterschool drama club and an intensive Saturday workshop, Lower Two and Upper Two Drama Club took on Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy Macbeth. In rehearsals, the children learned the outline of the story, then worked on little scenes, improvising and using play to draw out characters and experiment with style. As a result, we had an unusual portrayal of the

witches as little girls in white, singing the famous “hubble bubble toil and trouble” lines. This provided an unusual and unnerving dimension. The cast created the set using their bodies only – no props. The castle, complete with drawbridge, was hugely imaginative. During the performance, the children displayed maturity and enormous selfcontrol and interpreted the story with exceptional clarity. BY MRS PETTET

EXE PLAYERS

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n several Wednesday afternoons in the last year, the Exe Players visited numerous different primary schools in Exeter. We delivered workshops to Years Three and Five, centred around the themes of bullying and The Witches, by Roald Dahl. We were inspired to create a workshop about The Witches from the performance by the Lower School in the spring term. We have really enjoyed the experience and the schools were always very welcoming. We have now done workshops for over 300 children, an achievement we are all proud of. BY MR BROUGH

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ENGLISH

Capturing history

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he Lower Fifth War Poetry Anthology features original poems that were written by members of the year group following their History trip to the battlefields of Flanders and the Somme. Pupils were given free range concerning how to approach the subject matter and received support from their History and English teachers in this undertaking. The process to select the poems for inclusion was very difficult, owing to the high quality of all entries, but a committee of staff drawn from across departments eventually chose 20 for publication. Enjoy some of the highlights!

Soldiers left to time By Millie Tucker As we grow old they stay young, locked below, never ageing as time moves on. The flowers above their shallow graves, inherit the colour of their spilt blood. Alone they lie, with only the company of time. Never knowing whether the war was won or lost. Hoping that death wasn’t in vain. Friends, family, widows all at home, wondering if they will return. Now poppies grow, where we once stood.

On Passchendaele By Iris Mason

Shells flying through the Smoke By Toby Collins Shells flying through the smoke, As the gas rolls in you start to choke, Boys fall down in the mud, As the bullets strike you hear a thud. The rats, they scurry to and fro, Where poppies now grow row on row, The bugle sounds the last post now, Our brave boys can now take a bow,

On Passchendaele ‘neath the grass Lie the soldiers In their dreamlike state Their souls still wandering, A hundred days we still remember, Never to be at peace That same day in November, For they are the nameless The other conflicts lest we forget, Sufferers. The memories of the fallen we must protect. Not among the fortuitous Given a resting place, And although the mothers Of the nameless sufferers Still wept And mourned their sad demise, they will forever Wander, lost and forgotten.

BACKGROUND ARTWORK BY THIRD FORM PUPILS: DARCY HEDDEN, FRAN JENNER, TAY HARRIS AND WILLIAM MARKHAM

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 77


THE EXONIAN 2019

CREAT IVE W R IT IN G:

THE PEN IS THEIR PAINTBRUSH The sorrow pervading these streets was easy to notice. It had soaked into the sidewalk cracks and into the graffitied walls; it was in the stores that were once loaded with designer goods and now house everything for a dollar; it was in the back alleys where the few restaurants who persist in trading have their bins searched several times a day, and not just by cats; it was etched in every gaunt and dejected face that had given up on life getting any better than mean survival on mean streets. AJ GOODMAN Upper Fifth Form

Fierce, merciless voices barked orders and waved guns around. A rancid stench engulfed me; men stank of sweat and jostled to make a place on the train theirs. My arm was weak and tired, but I knew not to complain. Suddenly I found myself stumbling up the steps, brutes pushing me forward. I was a rag doll in a tornado. CHARLIE HILL Fourth Form

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OUTCASTS They are watching. They are staring. Staring with a gaze as cold as the harsh January winds. JAY STEVENSON Fourth Form


ENGLISH

EXETER JUNIOR SCHOOL WORLD BOOK DAY:

Reading Around the World

T

hursday 7 March saw World Book Day 2019 set in motion with the pitter patter of purple paws, a clattering of clogs and international inventiveness in abundance, as our playground teemed with vibrant characters from a multitude of countries, the world over. Pupils delighted each other by parading their book character costumes on stage to a range of international themed ‘pop’ songs, accompanied by much singing, dancing, clapping and hilarity; all in the name of literature. Junior School staff contributed their own international attire, even performing a version, or possibly ‘a vision’, of the Macarena. An exciting whole school reading initiative was launched by Junior School pupil librarians, to encourage wider reading of different cultures and characters with different nationalities. Each pupil was given a passport in which they could collect flags, associated with their chosen books. In celebration of World Book Day, classes were each given a box of books from around the world to choose from. Once eight flags were collected, pupils had read

their way around the world, totalling their kilometres travelled as they went. Certificates were awarded in assembly and passports added to our ‘Reading Around the World’ book display in the Hall. A wonderful treat was in store, as we welcomed back much-loved storyteller, Katy Cawkwell, to conduct workshops and perform interactive stories from the far corners of the globe. Our librarians attended a specially tailored workshop based on The Man Who Looked for Luck; enthusiastically retelling this story as a group. At lunchtime, the journey around the world resumed, as meals were devoured from all over the world and culinary fancies from different countries were appraised. Pupils made flags to identify the international cuisines and had much fun identifying them, not mention munching them. The creation of a whole school collaborative book was embarked upon: Around the World in 180 Days, in which each pupil has written their

The more you read, the more things you’ll know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go. DR SEUSS

own fictional piece of writing, detailing their excursions to amazing sightseeing wonders. The book is about a journey around the world and experiences in different countries. Pupils enjoyed finding out about their country and specific places to visit. They spent

time researching the geography, the locals, the culture, food, climate and places to visit. This will be a book to be treasured, with contributions from every pupil and a novel way to ‘Read Around the World!’ BY MRS HARDY

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THE EXONIAN 2019

C HANG I NG L IVES M

rs Pettet was delighted to receive over 140 entries to our poetry competition held to coincide with National Poetry Day in October. The theme was ‘Changes’ and there were many different expressions of ‘Change’ among the poems. We enjoyed reading poems about the seasons; poems about changes of school or class; changes in our lives through bereavement; even changes in our loved ones through illness. The children, as ever,

N atu ra l p oe t s !

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were enormously creative and inventive, using all types of poetry to express their feelings. There were twenty-two winners from across the school who each received a certificate, a case of colouring pencils and in Lower Two and Upper Two, a Parker fountain pen. Every individual entry was copied and made into our very own Poetry Anthology for 2018 and this now holds pride of place in our Junior School Library. BY MRS PETTET


GEOGRAPHY

Out in the open

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ower Fifth pupils spent a sunny day at Axe Valley Wetlands, learning new data collection skills to help write up their own formal investigation into the microclimates there. In the words of Luca Di-Vincenzo: “This is the place to go to learn about microclimates, minibeasts and invertebrates.” They also measured the cross-sections and velocity of a stream; walked around the site to learn about its management from a ranger; and used kick sampling to find the cleanliness of Stafford Brook. The trip is a great addition to the Lower Fifth Geography course and an opportunity to get out of the classroom into the fresh air.

BY LILY ALFORD

The coast fun they’ve had in years! Living

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he Geography department took a keen group of GCSE pupils to the nearby seaside resort, Dawlish Warren, for a pleasant day at the beach. However, it was also an opportunity to collect data for their physical fieldwork projects about coastal landforms and processes of erosion and longshore drifts. Head of Geography, Mr Hyde said: “Pupils brought a cheery and enthusiastic attitude to the day and were a pleasure to be out with.”

BY LILY ALFORD

it up in Lyme

L

ower Sixth Geographers were given a new fieldwork opportunity in the summer term: developed this year to support the new A Level specification, the group visited Lyme Regis to focus on the development of a tourist honeypot and explore the effects of mass movement and coastal processes. The mix of physical and human geography was a hit, with nearly 40 pupils developing into fine young geographers, many of whom are keen on studying related courses at university. MS ROFF

CLIFFS, CAVES AND COASTLINES

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he Third Form travelled to Beer to explore the Caves and enjoy a walk along the Jurassic Coastline. The pupils were captivated with tales of the caves which included a hidden priest and a covered-up murder. The afternoon was spent following the cliffs across to Beer where pupils were able to see the Hooken Cliffs which had collapsed in 1790. On arrival in Beer, pupils and staff were able to enjoy an ice-cream before returning to school. BY MR BIRD E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 81


THE EXONIAN 2019

STREET STUDY

I

n October 2018 F1 undertook field work in the streets around Exeter School. They developed their map reading skills and recorded the different housing types. Terraced houses, semi-detached, detached, flats, and bungalows, were all marked on their maps. Back in school, the children used Digi Map, tally charts and histograms to show their results. BY MRS JONES

City centre quest

L

ower Two braved the winds and unpredictable showers to walk into Exeter in early March to study land use around the city centre. The children spotted several areas of multiple use in Princesshay and the High Street. They also compared the shopping experience of the High street and Princesshay. After a brief break in the Library

cafe, we walked around the Northernhay area and through Gandy Street to the Cathedral Green, identifying categories of land use on route. The children were very knowledgeable about the city, sharing information with one another from their previous leaflet research. We even squeezed through the smallest street (probably) in Europe! BY MRS JONES

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activities include...

FOR BOOKING ENQUIRIES

lasercamp.co.uk


THE EXONIAN 2019

A LASTING IMPRESSION The LFA course has a simple aim – for pupils bear witness to the Holocaust.

E

ach year, the Holocaust Education Trust (HET) runs their Lessons From Auschwitz (LFA) course. Places are available to pupils in schools across the Southwest. Typically, each school is offered two places for pupils, occasionally a place for a teacher. The LFA course has a simple aim – for pupils to bear witness to the Holocaust. Over the course of two seminars and a trip to Poland, pupils study Jewish life before Auschwitz, hear the testimony of a Holocaust survivor, witness a snapshot of the Holocaust through visits to Oswiecim (the town that the

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Germans named Auschwitz) and nearby Auschwitz 1 and Auschwitz-Birkenau (once functioning concentration camps), and look at echoes of the Holocaust/antiSemitism in the present. The emphasis of the course is that the perpetrators of, and collaborators in, the Holocaust were just as human as the victims they murdered, and they make sure to show the strange situations that arose from the Holocaust – such as the Commandant of Auschwitz playing with his children on the edge of the labour camp he oversaw, or the SS Helferinnen who worked at Auschwitz-

Birkeanu, listening to music and eating blueberries on their day off. Pupils complete the LFA course as ambassadors for the Holocaust Education Trust, and go on to spread their knowledge about the Holocaust. This year Rosie Cromwell and Lydia Waggett attended the course. They returned to speak in the final assembly of the spring term and hold a series of talks in House meetings in order to go into further detail of their experiences and new found knowledge about the Holocaust. Many thanks to Mr Porter for his able liaison with HET. BY ROSIE CROMWELL


HISTORY

CLOVER THE W BORDER

umlin Museum and the Cr e were in for an s really wa ere Road Gaol. Th dy, action-packed bo ery ev r fo g somethin three days, a in ted from those interes da lot of Italian food an history (The Book al iev ed m Irish parts of whistle-stop tour of of Kells and certain ded clu in p tri e ose th d an culture. Th e) stl Dublin Ca as the history ne ari m historical stops such in ted es inter quarters ) Dublin GPO, head (the Titanic Museum g; in ris Up r in ted es of the 1916 Easte to those inter e Irish e Irish the Dáil Éireann, th modern politics (th use Parliament still in t). en m Parlia of today; and the Book With this first-hand d ate str illu nt rrent Kells, an ancie insight into the cu in of Dublin ry sto manuscript housed hi d affairs an ll we as ; ge lle Co wer and Trinity and Belfast, the Lo ch as su ps sto ral ns ltu ria cu sto as Upper Sixth Hi for en wh ce pla Temple Bar, famed are in a good ic, in g in dy live traditional mus stu to es it com Fest”; vel the middle of “Trad or revising the A Le ain m e th tee Str ough, on th Al aft . Gr Ireland Course Dublinost m at th shopping street in y sa it is fair to Tour ually eq re and the Black Cab we p ou gr of the ern rth No e th g in ltu in expla led by the cu ral exploring enthral d an s ble ou Tr sh Iri of the trip and the ace Wall. aspects ion of both sides of the Pe welcoming disposit its to ROSIE BY There were also vis le. op pe sh e of Lords, the Iri Y ALFORD the old Irish Hous CROMWELL AND LIL Titanic e th e, stl Ca n bli Du

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 85


THE EXONIAN 2019

IN MEMORY W ith 2018 marking the centenary of the Great War’s armistice, it was a privilege for this year’s Lower Fifth to pay their respects to the fallen, at the very fields where those fateful battles unfolded. Pupils were given the opportunity to experience the life of the average British soldier on the Western Front. They clad themselves in khaki, fastened their brass buttons and handled old – but not live – grenades. Joe Gough was just one of those trusted with the rifle, adding that the experience gave him a distinct and unique insight – one that our school is in a fortunate

position to have – which enabled him to gain a more profound connection with the brave men who fought. Joe also enjoyed the social aspect of the trip; while the expedition is one of lament and remembrance, there is also time for leisure and shopping, in the quaint Belgian city of Bruges. To show our school’s honour and reverence for the brave old Exonians, all 102 pupils gathered around the grave of former Head Boy, Richard Sterling, who was tragically killed by a sniper near Sanctuary Wood in Belgium. Reverend Tom read aloud his story as Izzy Trelawny and Alex James laid poppies on behalf of the

school. Pupils were given the opportunity to seek and pay respects to lost members of their own families, allowing them to return to the comfort of their own homes with a feeling of resolve; but also of relief that we are members of a generation which can thrive in relative peace. BY JAMES BRODERICK

A ANCIENT ENSEMBLES

glittering sight met our eyes as Form One embarked on their Ancient Egyptian day. They wore a fantastic array of costumes, with Pharaohs, Egyptian cats and even budding archaeologists. They spent the morning learning through wonderful story telling and drama activities. They also participated in a mini-mystery murder: Who killed Tutankhamun? Following this they

86 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

participated in a themed dance workshop led by Miss Lunn. The children also created their own amulets and cartouche, displaying their name in hieroglyphics. Much was gained from the day and further history lessons will see the children write a diary extract from the view point of famous archaeologist, Howard Carter. BY MRS HANDLEY AND MISS ROBINSON


HISTORY

TUDOR TIMES S

toryteller Steve Manning held an informative workshop for Lower Two, depicting the adventures of English seafarers during Tudor times. Pupils were enthralled to learn about the harsh life led, including the gruesome conditions with scurvy and biscuits crawling with maggots! A select lucky few also enjoyed trying on some of his costumes. Tom Madgwick thought it was really good how Steve used different accents to make the stories really realistic, as well as giving them lots of interesting facts. Toby Kenefick said: “I really enjoyed Steve’s acting and having the opportunity to try on a rich person’s clothes.” Emelia Biggers and Chloe Wallace said: “It was exciting listening to the strange things the sailors did, including sometimes having to eat their own leather boots if food supplies ran out!” BY MR BLAND

THE HOME FRONT

U

pper Two enjoyed a morning with storyteller Steve Manning, who vividly described life on the Home Front during World War II. He showed a number of different displays, gas masks and gadgets, which the pupils found fascinating. Steve got into the role of the informative, if somewhat bumbling and absent minded ARP Warden, Colonel Trotter. Using authentic artefacts and stories, Steve brought the period to life with true life tales, rhymes and an air-raid quiz. Lucy Netherton said: “It was clever how he changed into Colonel Trotter with his old fashioned clothes and helmet, he seemed very realistic.” George Gillingham thought the old equipment was really interesting: “It was amazing looking at all the old fashioned gas masks and how the babies had to be enclosed in a special suit to protect them.” BY MR BLAND

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 87


THE EXONIAN 2019

Carnegie award A

nother year, another fantastic Carnegie Award shortlist for our pupils to get their teeth into. See if any take your fancy!

Things a Bright Girl Can Do by Sally Nicholls

I

found this book to be an incredible read! It had many relevant and interesting topics ranging from gender inequality to LGBT+ rights, from war to pacifism, from friendship to loss; and all these topics were brought together in an interesting and engaging book. Each character was developed extremely well and each chapter focused on the life of one of the three main suffragists who all mingled together throughout the book in their fight for women’s equality, and each chapter was well written in a believable style to the time without being difficult to read. It was thought-provoking and showed a largely untold story of the difficulties at home during WWI and the lengths that the suffragettes went to, to get their vote, and how significant they believed the vote to be that they sacrificed everything including their homes and their lives. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and I think that this book is definitely worthy of winning the award this year for being written well with relevant topics and being thought-provoking whilst teaching the reader about an important and revolutionary period of history that has impacted modern lives forever. REVIEWED BY TOBY

A Skinful of Shadows by Frances Hardinge

T

his book is a dark, mysterious, gothic read that is set in the English civil war. This book incorporates historic facts with dramatic and subtle fiction using Frances Hardinge’s unique style. I found Frances Hardinge’s style hard to read at first but then it became a great and descriptive book. I enjoyed the main character, Makepeace’s stubborn honesty and how easily she contained her secrets (although the reader could understand her perfectly). This was a welcome contrast to the Elder’s cruel and all-seeing glare... REVIEWED BY TILLY

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ken Legs with Chic The House derson An by Sophie is ken Legs with Chic a t u o ab he House ry o arming st a heart-w lives with e Sh . ka Marin girl called guide the helping to s. Baba Yaga, to the star eir journey ants w e sh at dead on th wh this is not ants to be However be, she w to y n ti es n doing so her d er p g al livin like a norm things. In the book ing ing normal liv lenges, liv many chal s ce fa e y. sh jo ws but also ginality of with sorro yed the ori jo en most ly al I re ay it felt al and the w this book . I would like a dream mmend reco y el it n efi d as I felt it this book ell written w ry was ve ry good ve a and had storyline.

T

BY PETER REVIEWED

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

T

he Poet X was an enthralling read; the book was well written in verse and I found it was easy to understand the characters’ motivations. Acevedo’s book follows the story of a young Dominican girl living in America called Xiomara. Xiomara fills notebooks with powerful poetry, and you learn her story through these notebooks. There is an interesting dynamic between Xiomara and her twin Xavier and despite their differences the two continually support each other in whatever way they can. The book is a wonderful read about first love, religion and finding your voice. REVIEWED BY MEGAN


LIBRARY

Who’s who? O

n World Book Day this year, Mrs Jackson ran a school-wide competition to discover the favourite books of as many staff members as possible. The staff who took part ranged from science technicians to heads of department and lots of fun was had by all. Mrs Jackson has agreed to let The Exonian magazine rerun her competition, for those who missed their chance on World Book Day.

The rules are simple: simply match the teachers to their favourite books but be warned! There are only nine different titles and ten different teachers – two of them have the same favourite book. How many did you guess? BY ROSIE CROMWELL

Helpful hints The culmination of a staggeringly creative, thoughtful and emotional series, this book was the most anticipated novel in my lifetime. Narrative and character arcs are crafted and developed convincingly before being brought to a stunning conclusion, whilst each rereading of the text offers up something different every time. Most importantly, though, these books have an ability to capture the reader in a way that very few authors can.   - Mr Seaton-Burn These fantasy books have been the number one best sellers for decades.  Where heraldry and jewellery meet they convey unique cultures, legends, languages, histories and geography.  They have male and female warriors and wizards influencing with command and wisdom and little folk in peril who muster with great courage.  A work of literature with venerable towers, crumbling statues and forest clearings where friends gather around a crackling fire for fellowship.  This struggle of good against overwhelming evil is something you will want to read for pleasure again and again.  - Mr Lowles

SEE ANSWERS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE.

TEACHERS LIST: MR DOBSON MR EVANS MR LOWLES DR ROBB REVD TOM MR SEATON-BURN MS ROFF MRS FAIRWEATHER MRS WHITTALL MS PINCHES

Answers: Mr Dobson: Heart of Darkness, Mr Evans: Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH, Mr Lowles: The Lord of the Rings, Dr Robb: The Lord of the Rings, Revd Tom: The Northern Lights, Mr Seaton-Burn: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Ms Roff: Touching the Void, Mrs Fairweather: The Catcher in the Rye, Mrs Whittall: I Capture the Castle, Ms Pinches: Little Women.

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THE EXONIAN 2019

COUNT ME IN! Senior Maths Challenge:

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE Intermediate Maths Challenge:

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

Team Challenges

A

team of four hopeful mathematicians accompanied by Dr Chapman participated in the UKMT Senior Team Maths Challenge at Exmouth Community College on Thursday 22 November. The team comprising of Jamie Stephenson, Ed Frankpitt, Joel Seaward and Josh Grier took part in three gruelling rounds which tested all aspects their problem solving ability, mathematical ability and teamwork under pressure. The teams were generally very close so teams couldn’t afford to drop many marks.  They finished in a credible eleventh place out of a hall full of very strong teams. On Tuesday 12 March, Mr Hall took Fourth Formers Albert Hughes and Vedang Mandalia and Lower Fifth Formers Isabelle Bill and Jim Dixon to the Intermediate Team Maths Challenge. Whilst they too did not make it into the top ten teams this time, they enjoyed a good day of Maths and were able to hone their skills in a highly competitive environment.

Junior Maths Challenge: Third and Fourth Form NAME

SCORE

TJ McDonald

113

Daniel Hammond

105

Albert Hughes

104

George Dow

100

Tom Bracey

98

Phoebe Redfern

96

Vedang Mandalia

91

Amber Statham

90

Oliver Stevens

90

Oscar Clements

85

Joel Westley

83

Senior and Intermediate Maths Challenges: Lower Fifth to Upper Sixth

Matthew Lomas

76

Tom Weekes

76

William Dean

75

Jay Stevenson

75

F

Harry Williams

74

Benjamin Palmer-Challen

73

Albert Cooper-Wedge

73

Matthew Roberts

73

Duncan Brown

71

red Croft, Adam Wajed and Billy Palmer were all awarded Best In Year group for the Intermediate Challenge, with Adam being awarded Best in School. Ed Frankpitt, Joshua Senior: Grier and Ollie Bennett Gold certificates achieved Best In Year Group with Best In Fred Croft School being given to Ed Adam Wajed Frankpitt for the Senior Challenge. Tom Harris-Deans

Ollie Bennett Sam Allman Emma Halford Max Cockram Rachel Hammond Billy Palmer

Intermediate: Gold certificates Ed Frankpitt Jamie Stephenson Joshua Grier Joel Seaward Ollie Bennett

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A

ll pupils achieved Gold certificates with these impressive scores. TJ McDonald was awarded Best In School, as well as Best In Year alongside Phoebe Redfern. Having qualified for the Junior Mathematical Olympiad, TJ went on to achieve a merit in this follow-on round. Vedang and Daniel qualified for the Junior Kangaroo papers, in which they both achieved merits. A total of 16 silver and 26 bronze certificates were also achieved in the Junior Maths Challenge.


MATHS

Helpful hackers W

e enjoyed a morning of code cracking in the Andrews Hall. We were each paired with a group of Year 5s from another school and helped them learn different methods of cracking codes such as Morse code and Pigpen. The experience was great as we had a chance to meet new people and teach them the art of code cracking. The Year 5 pupils were patient but very eager to learn, even those who already had code cracking experience. Watching the younger children complete task after task and become more confident, I felt that I had achieved something important. Towards the end, the teachers acted out a message from the Ministry of Defence declaring that the Europe’s safety was on our hands and we needed to crack some codes immediately. Overall, we all had a brilliant morning. - CHIYUAN SUN

O

n Wednesday 22 May, some Year 7s took part in a very exciting code cracking morning with year 5 pupils from a variety of local primary schools. We helped them with anything they got stuck on and we learnt about Semaphore, Morse Code, The Pigpen Cipher and even tried the beginnings of the infamous Enigma Code. It ended with an exciting message from the Ministry of Defence and we had to try to crack codes of all sorts. It was a great bonding and learning experience. - CHARLIE DICKER

Enrichment day is “fantastic”

O

n 20 June, 10 pupils from set 1 and 2 of Middle Fifth visited Exeter University for a day of maths enrichment courses. Our day consisted of fun activities related to further education of maths and its application in our futures. With fun activities including Japanese puzzle solving, building flexagons and understanding the application of origami in maths and participating in a team challenge the day was extremely interesting and enjoyable. We also received multiple lectures including one about the importance of maths in our futures. Overall the day was awesome and I encourage others to participate in fantastic events like this! BY STELLAN AALTO E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 91


THE EXONIAN 2019

MATHS IN THE JUNIOR SCHOOL Pupil thoughts on the day:

Problem solving

A

t the end of the autumn term, we welcomed The Problem Solving Company into school and each year group very much enjoyed their sessions working in small teams to solve exciting challenges. Our two instructors, Kirsty and Alex ran fun, challenging, and inclusive sessions, with plenty of hands-on practical activities and problems to solve. The teams rotated around the hall to taking part in a variety of challenges including Pentomino Shadows, Soma cubes, Lego structures created to satisfy certain conditions, Towers of Hanoi, Number Bond trees, Polygon Challenges and Daisy Chains (where petals could only be placed where there were matching colours next to each other). During these sessions, not only are our pupils developing a wide range of key maths skills: sequencing, ordering, patterns, logic

“GOT MY BRAIN COGS TURNING.”

and reasoning, verbal reasoning, estimation, trial and improvement, elimination, tessellation, permutations, area, visual/ spatial awareness, 3-D construction, positioning and shape, but

Henry Batty (U2G)

“THE BLOCK MAKING WAS BRAIN TURNING.” Anna Brookes-Ferrari (U1R)

“WE LOVED THE RUBIK’S CUBE. IT WAS REALLY FUN PUTTING IT TOGETHER YET AT THE SAME TIME, REALLY HARD.” Dexter Leck (F1C), Oscar Wallace (F1H) and Jaden Sclater-Black (F1H)

“I LOVED IT!” Andrew Reynolds (U2G)

also key life skills: collaboration, teamwork, perseverance, complex problem-solving, creativity, critical thinking, judgement and decision-making and emotional intelligence. BY MS BARNES

“YOU REALLY HAD TO USE YOUR TEAM TO TRY TO WORK IT OUT. WE SOLVED THE CHALLENGE TOGETHER!” Hanna Sari (L2B)

“WE REALLY LIKED THE NUMBER BOND TREE. IT WAS REALLY FUN!” Thomas Gordon-Lennox and Catherine Fernandes-Cooke (L2B)

Primary Maths Challenge and Christmaths

I

n November 2018, 88 pupils from Upper One to Upper Two took part in the annual National Primary Maths Challenge, enjoying the challenge of solving a variety of written problems. Three pupils achieved an outstanding Gold Certificate, Noor Shariff (U2A), Alex Raichura (U2G) and Frey Kotting (U2W) and Alex Raichura has been invited to take part in the Bonus Round Final in February 2019. Silver Certificates were achieved by 13 pupils, while 31 pupils achieved a Bronze Certificate. As this was also very much about taking part in a national challenge, as well as looking at maths from a different angle, all pupils who took part but did not achieve a Gold, Silver or Bronze Certificate this time were presented with

a Taking Part Certificate. In December, Christmaths Congratulations were delivered by Mrs Cartwright, Head of Mathematics, Senior School, our judge for the 2018 annual independent mathematics competition. She awarded certificates and prizes to the winners from each year group in our final assembly. Mrs Cartwright said that this time she really felt that all the entries were very impressive, making it very difficult to judge! The 2018 topic was fractions and she said that it was amazing to see the varied ways that the pupils came up with of thinking about and displaying fractions, from fractions in real life, to fractions as part of games, to fraction advent calendars… the list goes on. Mrs Cartwright was

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particularly pleased with the way that pupils had worked independently outside of the classroom to produce creative ways of demonstrating their understanding of the topic and, in doing so, they will have cemented and deepened their understanding of fractions, which is excellent! The winners were as follows: Form One, Bronze, Dexter Leck, Silver, Mollie Jenner and Gold, Jack Kenefick. Upper One, Bronze, Kate Daybell, Silver, Anna Brookes-Ferrari and Gold, Evie Handley. Lower Two, Bronze, Hanna

Sari, Silver, Grace Stevenson and Gold, Toby Kenefick. Upper Two, Bronze, Seb Charlton-Anne, Silver, Gus Lovell and Gold, Caitlin Ampleford. BY MS BARNES


MATHS

JOIN THE FAMILY

EXETERGCC.CO.UK

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 93


THE EXONIAN 2019

T

he longstanding collaboration between Exeter School’s Modern Languages department and the Onatti Theatre company continued this year with a visit from two Spanish actors, to perform El Viejo saloon (The old saloon) to all of the Hispanists in the Lower Fifth form. This brand-new play was performed entirely in Spanish using the scenery, props, costumes and sound system the actors themselves brought with them, this year transforming the Drama Studio for the afternoon into a Wild West saloon. Recalling the frontier era of the 19th century when many of the southern states of the future USA were parts of the United States of Mexico, the saloon was owned by the rambunctious Dolores and her father, with the bar staffed throughout the 55-minute production by Lauren Cornfield, who played a pivotal role interacting with the myriad of characters passing through the establishment, including assisting with an impending birth.

Spanish saloons

Iris Mason learned not to play cards with strangers in a dive bar, and Jodie Blackmore and Louis Sadeghi performed the testing task of talent contest judging, as various hopefuls attempted to dance, sing, play the mouth organ and ventriloquize their way to glory. We were delighted to welcome Onatti director Andrew Bardwell to the school once again, as he joined us to see the play how the play that he wrote had developed since its inception last autumn. We were also thrilled to welcome back Asturian actor Lucía, who has performed previously for Onatti for our pupils, and newcomer Sergio from Barcelona, who among other things navigated his way through Miss Hendrick’s legendary Wednesday lunchtime hospitality for the first time. Stuffing, gravy and chocolate rice pudding may yet make it to Catalonia… The atmosphere in the audience was joyful and fully interactive, and the word of the afternoon was agradecido (grateful), as the actors kept on expressing their thanks

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for the traditional warm Exeter School welcome, and the way our pupils managed to strike the perfect balance between enthusiastic participation and attentive spectating. Before the end of term we welcomed not one but two French productions from Onatti in school, and the MFL team has been invited to act as pedagogical consultants for the theatre company as they broaden their offer into new areas for schools in the UK and continental Europe. At a time when MFL teaching is seeing challenging times nationally, the energy and vision of the Onatti theatre company is greatly supportive, and highly refreshing. BY MR LATIMER


MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES

More linguistics? Now you’re talking!

A

s part of National Careers Week, Old Exonian Alex Mortimore, who left the school in 2005 and went on to study Languages at Warwick University followed by an MA, and then more recently completing a DPhil in Medieval and Modern Languages at Oxford University, gave an interactive address to a room full of

pupils interested in possibly taking languages further. He spoke of his own experiences and then a number of pupils questioned him about his year abroad, the use of having a language degree and combining languages with other subjects, and even the effects of Brexit! Alex then gave a further talk to the Upper Fifth and Lower Sixth Germanists about the

ideas of his doctoral thesis: Goethe and the French Revolution. Pupils found this topic interesting and asked some probing questions,

before asking him more about studying German, the year abroad, and his future career plans. BY MRS WILSON

La Nativité E arly in December the two Form One classes each gave fantastic performances of nativity plays spoken entirely in French! They were able to use words and phrases learned in French lessons this term while enacting the Christmas story in a wonderful array of colourful costumes. They also sang two songs in French, including Vive Le Vent (to the tune of Jingle Bells), alongside the traditional Away In A Manger and We Three Kings in English. Every pupil was involved in both speaking and singing and parents were able to enjoy a great deal of superb acting as well as some excellent French! Joyeux Noel! BY MRS GUTHRIE

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THE EXONIAN 2019

CHAMBER CONCERT T

he cosy Chamber Concert opened this year’s concert season with a stunning range of the Senior School’s musical talents. Chamber Choir opened with Rutter’s uplifting The Lord Bless You and Keep You, setting a high expectation for what was to come from individual singers. Ette-Jean Girvin and Cesca Vercoe’s beautiful blending of soprano voices in their duet, alongside Emily Moudiotis’s spell binding solo, illustrated the Sixth Formers’ aptitude and skill with complex melodies. The three also featured in Belles Canto’s intimate Pie Jesu followed by the girl choir’s haunting rendition of An Irish Blessing and the upbeat, acapella

California Dreaming. The Boys Barbershop’s My Evaline and Vocal Ensemble’s jazzy Sinner Man, both bringing American blues to life in the school’s Chapel, mirrored this performance. However, Exeter School’s musicians have a huge variety of abilities outside of vocals. Ciara Morris’ complex bassoon solo, Lily Howe’s lovely and dynamic oboe piece and Rose Sail’s Fantasiestücke by Schumann would have made any of the school’s woodwind players proud, while the string section was richly represented in several quartets. Ending the night was the Chamber Orchestra’s intense finale, featuring talented solos from Louis Solon, Oliver Bates and George Guthrie. BY LILY ALFORD

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MUSIC

NATIONAL TRUST CONCERT

T

he National Trust concert continues to be a highlight of the academic year for many pupils and teachers alike, and is always such a privilege to perform in the beautiful setting of Exeter Cathedral. Traditionally, a young treble opens the concert with the first solo verse of Once In Royal David’s City and this was delivered with beautiful composure by Alex Bartle. The audience was then treated to a variety of pieces from Benjamin Britten’s challenging Ceremony Of Carols which all featured beautiful harp accompaniments by Liz Grier. Ettejean Girvin entranced the congregation with her rendition of That Younge Child and the Senior Choir filled the Cathedral with their addition of the boys’ 1st XV rugby team heartily singing Deo Gracias. Symphony Orchestra played two movements from Bizet’s Carmen Suite No. 1 with spirit and vivacity. The Middle School Choir and Harp Strings gave mesmerising

performances before we enjoyed a hilariously entertaining Christmas reading from four talented Junior School pupils. The first half was brought to a close with Senior Choir singing Santa Baby and Shine by Take That. After the interval, we heard Chamber Orchestra play two movements of Vivaldi’s Winter from The Four Seasons with concertino players delivering outstanding solos. After a lovely reading of a poem by Daniel Wilcock, the girls’ acapella group Belles Canto spread festive cheer with Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas followed by the Senior Brass. Chamber Choir and Vocal Ensemble gave us three beautiful Christmas Carols much to the audience’s delight. The evening concluded with a whole-hearted performance of Hark! The Herald Angels Sing with the whole school and audience. BY FRANCESCA VERCOE

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THE EXONIAN 2019

A FESTIVE FEELING T

he school’s musicians ended 2018 with a bang, as 18 different ensembles convened in the Main School Hall to give a joyous Christmas concert. While most of our concerts centre on orchestras and choirs, the equally skilled smaller groups were also given the opportunity to shine on 20 December. Flute Choir’s intricate Jingle Bells alongside Maxi Brass and Sax Quartet, allowed the audience to experience some of the school’s uniquely talented musicians. Rachel Honeyball even composed and performed the song Change. From Blue Note and Birdland to Swunkette and Swunk: the upper years of jazz musicians could show off their skills under the respective tutoring of Mr Tamblyn and Mr Bowen. The accomplished Jazz Bands 1 and 2 secured the appreciative atmosphere towards the school’s brass. Junior Orchestra kicked off

98 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

the proceedings with Jingle Bells, while Santa Claus’s conduction of Concert Orchestra seemed to add even more magic to Del Borgo’s wistful composition and Symphony Orchestra’s fiddly movement from Carmen Suite reminded us of the sheer talent of the senior orchestras. The choirs kept up the merry mood- Middle School Choir singing Rocking around the Christmas Tree and Belles Canto dancing through All I want for Christmas is You. Senior Choir’s memorable performances of Santa Baby - featuring the 1st XV rugby squad dressed as elves - is certainly something to go down in the school’s musical history. Ending the whole occasion with a rousing Hark the Herald Angels Sing, no one could leave the Hall without being in the Christmas spirit. BY LILY ALFORD


MUSIC

HALLELUJAH! S

pring’s Choral Society concert was yet another wonderful performance, thanks to the hard work of pupils, staff and guests throughout the term. Under Mr Tamblyn’s careful conducting, the orchestra’s opening of The Thieving Magpie plunged the audience straight into the atmosphere, followed by the sweetness of Rutter’s The Lord Bless You and Keep You, performed by Chamber Choir, which was perfectly fitting for the Cathedral setting. Poulenc’s Gloria was made especially memorable by OE and professional singer Bethany Partridge (20062011); the beautiful soprano solo performance blended perfectly with the choir and orchestra in both the Domine Deus and Dominus Deus, Agnus Dei. Her final haunting ‘Amen’ after the chorus’ final burst of joy in the finale, Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris, was a beautiful end to the first half.

After the interval, Handel’s Messiah Part Two shone vividly in the spotlight - its joyous and warm choruses creating a certain buoyancy to Hallelujah that only such a large ensemble can create. Five Sixth Form girls had the chance to perform solos in this prestigious piece: Beth Pittman and Lily Alford opened with a rousing conversation between two alto voices, while soprano soloists Isabella Flashman, Ette-Jean Girvin and Francesca Vercoe awed the audience with their ranges. While Upper Sixth Formers Beth Pittman and Ette-Jean Girvin returned to the stage with confidence, the Lower Sixth performances suggest promise for next year, as Francesca Vercoe also performed alongside the Middle School

Choir in How Beautiful Are the Feet. Male voices were equally well presented, however. Bass soloist Mr Latimer (Head of MFL) and tenor Mr Harknett (Drama teacher) were great examples of how experience pays off. In this incredible feat of co-ordination, talent and enjoyment, the Choral Society concert affirms its reputation as a highlight of the school year. Its ability to welcome all keen singers, support the growth of our aspiring musicians and exhibit the skill of staff and teachers is really quite incredible. BY LILY ALFORD

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 99


THE EXONIAN 2019

JAZZ CONCERT

hits all the right notes

W

ith professional lighting, a crew of pupils on sound desk and delicious refreshments provided by the school’s catering team, the annual transformation of the Assembly Hall into an atmospheric Jazz Club was created. A evening of great entertainment lay ahead, organised by guitar teachers and leader of Swunk and Swunkette, Mr Bowen. The music came from the many jazz, swing and funk groups who rehearse regularly throughout the school year, and also included two groups who meet with the guidance of Mr Painter and Mr Evans as part of Rockschool each Wednesday after school. The full big band sounds were delivered by Jazz Bands 1 and 2. Every Little Thing and Main Event provided an upbeat start to the concert

from our younger musicians in Jazz Band 2, featuring some tight and rhythmic ensemble playing. Jazz Band 1 enjoyed two sets, ranging from classic numbers such as Blue Monk and Hefti’s Cute, to funky Mambo Loops, opening with a surround-sound Quint Valley Samba by director Mr Moore. Many of the band took solos across the seven numbers, highlighting the individual talent across all sections of the band. The smaller jazz/funk groups Blue Note and Birdland merged over the last year to form Bird Note. Solos in their two numbers were shared out, with the group’s director, Mr Tamblyn, beside the band offering encouragement and support. Rock School is an opportunity for pupils to explore rock and pop styles

100 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

and form their own bands. Representing them at the concert once again were established Rockschool performers Jessica Billingham and Rachel Honeyball, who this year were joined by ‘cellist Lauren Hughes, performing Skyline. Building on their successful performance at the Middle School Concert, Lost Authority chose the classic by Lynyrd Skynyrd Sweet Home Alabama and performed with great attitude. Both bands received an enthusiastic response from the appreciative audience. Swunkette, featuring vocals from Tabi Evans and Beth Pittman, performed Feel Like Making Love and Cry Me a River. The band created a smooth and easy sound and a great laid-back feel, perfect for the summer evening heat of Friday. The concert closed with

Swunk’s second set, enabling musicians Francesca Vercoe, Dmitry Barker-Privalov, Jamie Stephenson, George Daldorph, Charlie Hayman, Ed Frankpitt and Mark Malone to demonstrate their talent playing as a unit and individually within improvised solos. With each piece featuring solos from most of the band there was lots to enjoy, although there perhaps was a touch of sadness as the concert marks the final jazz performances at Exeter School of those Upper Sixth members of the band who have provided jazz inspiration and leadership to younger pupils throughout their time at school. The event was sponsored by Charles Stanley Wealth Managers, whose support of the concert was greatly appreciated. BY MRS DALDORPH


MUSIC

Musical magic in the Junior School

A

s the biggest musical event of the year in the Junior School, the Spring Concert gives all of the instrumental and vocal ensembles the opportunity to perform. Titled ‘Musical Magic’, this year’s programme included a wide variety of pieces on a magical theme. The Junior Singers sang Sing a Smiling Song from Sleeping Beauty and the Junior Orchestra played the themes from Harry Potter and Pirates of the Caribbean. The whole school sang songs from magical musicals, with Upper Two pupils singing solo parts and performing linking narrations. It also featured lively choreography and some costumes for central characters. Three songs from Mary Poppins featured, with A Spoonful of Sugar reprised at the end of the concert with a change of lyrics to say

“farewell” to Mrs Ruth Sherrell, who was shortly to be leaving the school after 19 years in the Junior School. An immensely enjoyable and magical evening in every way! CHRISTMAS The Christmas Carol Service is another highlight, focusing on the telling of the Christmas Story punctuated by songs performed by the whole school, the separate year groups and the two choirs. The Orchestra and the Junior Wind and Brass Group also perform at the beginning and the end of this joyful occasion. Also in December, the Junior Choir had a leading role in the Advent Carol Service, and gave a lovely performance to residents at Jack Simpson House just before Christmas. Some of the Junior Singers then delighted with carol singing at the annual Pensioners Christmas

Party organised by the school Community Service Group. CELEBRATION! The final Junior School musical event of the year was a ‘Musical Celebration’ afternoon in the summer term, which highlighted the wide range of musical activities enjoyed by our younger pupils. Performances were given by the Junior Orchestra, the Junior Singers and a number of soloists on various instruments. All of Form One demonstrated their violin skills, while many Upper One pupils played recorders, everybody participated in singing and a new ukulele group, run by one of our Sixth Form pupils, gave its first performance. Such an event was possible due to the high proportion of children learning instruments in individual lessons (around 70%) as well as pupils having first-hand experience of a variety of instruments in their classroom Music lessons. All Form One children learn the violin, then play the recorder and have a taste of the trumpet in Upper One, learn the ukulele in Lower Two and explore a range of percussion instruments, including Samba Band in Upper Two. Pupils also work regularly at developing their keyboard playing, alongside their singing, listening and composing skills.

MUSIC ENSEMBLES The following extracurricular groups continue to thrive in the Junior School: JUNIOR WIND AND BRASS GROUP: run by Mrs Goldsworthy and welcoming wind and brass players. JUNIOR ORCHESTRA: directed by Mrs Guthrie with Mrs Goldsworthy and open to players of orchestral instruments at all levels. MAXI BRASS: directed by Mr Moore and open to existing brass pupils from both Junior and Senior School. SIZZLING STRINGS: directed by Miss Willson, one of our string specialists, and giving string players an opportunity to shine. JUNIOR AFRICAN DRUMMERS: a vibrant and exciting group run by Mr Crossen, one of our percussion specialists, and open to all. JUNIOR SINGERS: a choir for any pupils in Form One or Upper One, directed by Mrs Guthrie. JUNIOR CHOIR: a choir for pupils in Lower Two and Upper Two. This group is divided into two sections – decani and cantoris – and sings an anthem in chapel every week, as well as performing in concerts throughout the year. In addition to these established groups there are other exciting smaller groups springing up including a delightful harp ensemble and a guitar group.

BY MRS GUTHRIE

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THE EXONIAN 2019

1ST PLACE OLIVER IRONS

Biology Photography Competition

I

n the course of the second half of the Summer term, the Biology department launched a photography competition linking to the RSB National competition ‘Capturing Movement’. We invited pupils (and staff) to capture nature in motion. We were delighted with the number of entries, especially at such a busy time of year for the pupils, and with the diverse range of subjects photographed. Entries ranged from British wildlife, pollinators and pets to previous holiday photos from more exotic climes. Members of both the Biology and Art departments carried out the judging and all staff involved were particularly impressed with the quality and skill of the photography. Congratulations to the first place winners, Maisie Hodges

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from Third Form for her perfectly captured ‘Leaping Dog’ and Oliver Irons in Upper Fifth for his ‘Mallard in Motion’. Well done also to runners-up Faye Chapman for her inquisitive chicken, Georgia Pugh for the beautifully photographed bumblebee. Also to Lower Sixth Formers Fran Vercoe for her graceful horse and rider, and Oliver Harper for her artistic aquatic entry. Several of the staff also wanted to get involved. Dr Smale stole the winning spot with his superbly poised bumblebee, whilst Mrs Irons and Mrs Sail came close second and third place respectively with the beautiful close-up of the snail and the rather wind-ruffled puffins. Thank you to everyone who took part. It was great to see your amazing photos and to know that you are enjoying and engaging with nature. BY MRS METCALF


PSYCHOLOGY AND SCIENCE

TOM KINGSNORTH

2ND PLACE (STAFF)

MRS IRONS ANGUS HARRIS

OLIVE HARPER

3RD PLACE

TOBY GRIER

GRACE SAIL

ANNABEL BURTON

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 103


THE EXONIAN 2019

Re-psych-ling the year

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t the end of the spring term the Lower Sixth were given their own egg to look after as part of a Psychology project on Attachment. Some of the eggs were cared for very carefully and were taken everywhere by the pupils. The eggs attended a number of key events including the Choral concert in Exeter Cathedral, A driving test, the Psychology conference in London and one even made it to Rosslyn park to watch the Rugby. The Lower Sixth then had to present a project on their findings. There were some excellent results produced with most of the pupils able to form a link between the attachment they formed with their egg and how this related to the many different Psychological theories on attachment. On 26 March the Lower Sixth Psychology group attended the annual Student Psychology Conference in the Emmanuel Centre, London. The conference had some

eminent speakers, including Dr Philip Banyard, Cara Flannagan, and Drs Reicher and Haslam who all gave fascinating talks. The pupils were also the first to hear the latest research by Professor David Wilson on the Jack the Ripper case studies and had an enlightening talk from Dr Elizabeth Loftus, the world’s leading expert on Psychology and Memory, which included many relevant case studies. The whole group were inspired by hearing so many key Psychology researchers and were excited to have the opportunity to meet Dr Loftus. In December Mrs Gooddy and Mrs Godfroy took a group of both Lower and Upper Sixth to a Science and Psychology conference at Bristol University. The conference was organised so that the students could see how Psychology is intrinsically linked to Scientific research. There were a number of talks, which looked at psychological

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research, Psychology and Music and the psychology of magic. Some of the students learnt a very impressive magic trick! The day ended with a session on the psychology of hypnotherapy. The pupils witnessed 16 people being group hypnotised, although none of our pupils were brave enough to volunteer. It was a really educational and valuable trip. BY MRS GOODDY

It was thoughtprovoking and entertaining. I especially enjoyed the hypnosis. BETH GRIBBLE


PSYCHOLOGY AND SCIENCE

Yearly review I

t has been another funpacked year in Biology, with the Challenge being just one of many highlights… The Biology Challenge is a national competition for schools organised by the Royal Society of Biology. Pupils sit two 25-minute papers on-line, in which they must demonstrate their understanding of GCSE topics as well as tackling questions that require a breadth of knowledge from beyond the syllabus. Over 47,000 students from 527 schools took part in the competition this year. From the 75 Middle Fifth pupils who took part, 9 achieved a Gold Award, there were 17 Silver certificates awarded and 16 pupils obtained a Bronze Award.

Biology Events 2018-19 •Q  &A with Speech Day speaker •N  ettlecombe Upper Sixth residential •C  atalyst Club on food caching behaviour of squirrels

The nine pupils achieving Gold Award are:

Most of the remaining 28 M5th who took part were Commended or Highly Commended for their performance. This is a fantastic achievement, particularly at the top end. Congratulations to all Middle Fifth pupils who took part. MRS METCALF

Morgan Bucci Kai James Katie Ledger Dominic Manning Barnaby O’Brien Otto Oldridge Aidan Robins Henry Wheatley Mark Pugh - achieved best in school

Sixth Form residential to Nettlecombe Court, Somerset

U

pper Sixth Biologists had a very productive and hopefully enjoyable weekend, uncovering the ecology of Somerset and Devon. Despite the changes in weather, the pupils were still very productive by studying the variant habitats, and as a result, the group were able to discover new species in the wildlife, whilst studying and comparing their unique adaptions. Pupils were found wading into the waters of the river, exercising their extensive knowledge, whilst carrying out experiments and statistical tests. The trip was widely successful as the pupils learnt about the changes in biodiversity and were able to further their interest in this fields of work. BY MRS METCALF

•D  igestion Dome for Fourth Form (and cells talk for Lower Sixth) •B  iology Olympiad for Upper Sixth •G  ene Technology day for Upper Sixth •L  ower Fifth Men in White Coats trip •M  iddle Fifth Biology Challenge •A  nimal Encounters (part of British Science Week events) E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 105


THE EXONIAN 2019

EXPLOSIVE ACTIVITY

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here has been a lot happening in Chemistry since the last edition of The Exonian but this is only natural for a school as busy and vibrant as Exeter School.

There were a number of strong performances in the RSC Olympiad from the Upper Sixth this year with the standout achievement of a very prestigious Gold Award being achieved by We have participated in the Louis Withers, along with regular range of regional a solid performance in the laboratory based competitions Lower Sixth year group in such as the Salter’s festival the Cambridge Chemistry of Chemistry in which our Challenge, in which Ed very young team made a very Frankpitt achieved a very rare creditable of performance. Gold award. Higher up the school, Alfred Croft (Fourth Form), Toby Collins (Fourth Form), Katie Pitts (Middle Fifth) and Mark Pugh (Middle Fifth) travelled to represent the school in the annual heats of the RSC “Top of the Bench Competition” in The University of Bristol’s department of Chemistry undergraduate teaching laboratories.

C4 was turned into a murder scene with UV analysis, blood splatter and testing and police tape for the summer Open Evening. We were lucky to have a visit from two police cadets and a real forensics investigator from the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary and our thanks go to Chief Constable Sawyer for his help in this.

Our biggest success would have to have been made by our senior team consisting of Freya Harris, Samuel Mullan and Joshua Grier representing Exeter School who won the Western Division of the RSC Analytical Competition for the first time in many years and advancing to represent the school and the southwest region at the national competition; an event that has been held abroad in recent years but is held this June up in Manchester.

Guest lecturers this year included Martin Grossel, emeritus lecturer of Chemistry at Southampton University and Fellow of Oxford, with a couple of talks on micro machines and how chemistry courses differ at Southampton and Oxford Universities. Dr Hannah Batchelor from Birmingham University gave a very interesting talk on drug design and pharmacokinetics. Finally, Dr David Read from Southampton University

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talked to the pupils about problem solving and Chemistry. The Middle Fifth went to see a series of lectures in Bath delivered by the most prominent TV Science stars as part of the “GCSE Science Live” lectures. Seeing the likes of Prof Robert Winston, Prof Alice Roberts and Jim Al Khalili cannot help but inspire young pupils to study sciences. We have been working to build the Primary Science Outreach programme and gone out to visit Ladysmith Primary School, The New School and Halberton Primary School this year. Thanks go to the coordinators at these schools, our laboratory technicians and pupils who

gave up their time to help make these events a growing success. The Science Outreach sits alongside our annual Primary Science Day run by Mrs Johnson that continues to invite local primary schools to visit the school and use its facilities. This spring we celebrated for the first time British Science Week. We had guest speakers such as Chris Larmour (OE) on “Space Engineering and Kevin Parker (OE) on “Solving problems using Science”. In addition to these we were invited to get involved in explosive demonstrations, quizzes, competitions, animal visits and ice cream tasting by departments in Science. BY MR TEAR


PSYCHOLOGY AND SCIENCE

Promising physics

prizegiving E

ach year, the Ogden Trust Exeter and East Devon Partnership gives schools in the area the opportunity to award prizes to two of its most promising Physics pupils. This year, Exeter School’s awards went to Emma Halford and Tom Harris-Deans in the Upper Fifth; this was just the start of a year of pupil success. In the main Physics Olympiad, Ben Harvey achieved a Silver, André Orchard and Tom Wright received a Bronze I and Rowan Leeder won a Bronze II award. In the AS Challenge, Josh Grier won a Bronze I whilst Joel Seaward and Henry Coleman received a Bronze II. In the GCSE Challenge, Theo Collins achieved a Gold award (given to roughly 100 pupils in the country), Tom Harris-Deans received a Silver, Sam Allman, Oscar Cobb, Emma Halford and Luca Riezzo won a Bronze I and Bronze II awards went to Adam Wajed and Ollie Bennett. At the end of the Spring term a group of Sixth Form physicists (André Orchard, Matthew Cox, Josh Grier and Joel Seaward) took part in a local Ogden Trust Physics Team Challenge competition and worked very well together over a number of challenges including estimations, practical

problem solving and the ‘very hard question’ round. In November, a group of Lower Sixth physicists travelled to Oxfordshire to visit the Diamond Light Source, one of the world’s leading research facilities where pupils were able to go inside the tunnels and have a guided tour by resident experts. It was a great opportunity to find out about the science and engineering of the facility and the wide range of research that was going on there. Thirteen Middle Fifth pupils attended a series of Christmas Lectures run by Exeter University on the sinking of the Titanic, the use of tidal energy for Christmas lights and how social networks mirror the spread of genetic diseases. Pupils really enjoyed the day, and went back to school with the realisation that science is a more diverse, interconnected and fascinating discipline than what they had thought before. During National Careers Week, we received a talk by OE Chris Larmour (1981-1986), sharing insight and advice on his career since leaving Exeter School and his current role as CEO of Orbex a leading British aerospace company that is developing a small commercial orbital rocket. BY MR TUOHEY E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 107


THE EXONIAN 2019

Junior scientists O

ur budding scientists in the Junior School have thrown themselves into a whole range of exciting activities over the course of the year: check out some of our highlights! Robot making! We loved our morning with Redfern Electronics and their Crumble Controllers, constructing our very own robots with 4tronix components. Staff ran an exciting STEM day in the summer term, with a large amount of pupils from local schools getting involved and sharing their enthusiasm for science. Upper Two enjoyed a fascinating morning at Westpoint for the Big Bang Fair, where we listened to interesting talks and had the chance to see high level scientific equipment up close. Our regular Upper One cross-curricular trip to the stunning Stover Country Park – pupils loved ponddipping before spending time classifying quirky species and exploring their habitats. Environmental stewardship - we are proud to have helped to introduce a number of measures to minimise the school’s impact on the climate. BY MR PIDWELL

JUNIOR SCHOOL

Computer Science

E

xeter School pupils’ messages for astronauts were sent into space as part of Astro Pi Challenge and displayed on board in May!

What is an Astro Pi?

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n Astro Pi is a Raspberry Pi computer encased by a housing specially designed for conditions in space. It also has an add-on board called the Sense HAT, made specifically for the Astro Pi mission. The Sense HAT has a joystick, an LED display, and sensors for recording temperature, humidity, pressure, and orientation.

BY MRS MORGAN

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THE EXONIAN 2019

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT COMETS CLUB

C

omets Club has had another exciting year with a wide range of activities and sessions in various subjects. All participating children have had fantastic opportunities to stretch their thinking and fire their imagination. Back in the autumn term, Comets Club headed to the Science department for ‘Fantastic Fireworks’ led by Dr Smale. The children partook in three experiments: testing the colours found in fireworks, to know why fireworks pop and to understand how sparklers work. The children loved

making their own sparklers using magnesium and iron filings. Another popular session was ‘3D printing’ led by Design Technology’s Mr Rose in the Senior School. Pupils were challenged to build a model of a Lego brick on the computer, before getting the chance to see the 3D printer at work, and all going home with their own printed mini Lego brick! All the events have been most enjoyable and lots of new knowledge has been gained during this very successful year! BY MISS ROBINSON

CROSSING CLUB

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CATALYST CLUB

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atalyst Club has had another successful year, with a really enthusiastic group of Third to Lower Fifth Formers regularly attending. The year began with Colourful Chemistry, a session so popular we had to split into two laboratories. Mrs Sheehan ran a session explaining the intricacies of Politics, followed by the first ever Psychology session, which looked at illusions and perception, led by Mrs Godfroy. As tradition, We ended the autumn term with a Christmas quiz. Spring term started with a talk, organised by Biology’s

Mrs Metcalf, from Dr Lisa Leaver from Exeter University who discussed the dilemmas faced by squirrels in the winter. Mr Brough ran an interactive human puppet session, while Mr Hyde led a Geography session on the causes of forced migration. The year finished with the PE department leading a session on the biomechanics of which muscles and joints we use in sporting actions. A challenging but engaging and fun year for all the pupils. A huge thank you to everyone who gave up their time to help make it a success. BY MRS GOODDY

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nspEXE is an event of short inspirational talks given by pupils and staff. The five speakers this year covered a range of topics. Dr Wilson delivered a talk on neuroplasticity and the science behind how we learn, whlie Daniel Wilcock spoke of his prestigious role as a Lord Lieutenant’s Cadet and the various duties he had. James Harris discussed how sailing instructing helped him gain confidence and develop leadership skills. Yasmin Western told us about her experience volunteering for local charity Balloons, who help people through bereavement, after they helped her family through the loss of a loved one. In a poignant talk on his family’s expulsion from Uganda in the 1970s, Mr Chitnavis told the audience how he and his little sister were just children when they were forced to leave their country, despite being citizens. He spoke fondly of how welcoming the people of Devon had been. In this year’s Great Debate, Upper Sixth Formers debated

the motion ‘This house believes there should be a limit to freedom of speech’. Speakers gave an opening statement before taking questions from the audience and questions from the opposing team. After some heated and well-structured debate, the audience took a vote and narrowly the motion was passed! The Mock Trial this year was presided over by Mr Hugh Cornford in the role of the judge. Defendant Frankie Kerrie, played by Ariana Beka, had been accused of stealing from Sam Simmonds, played by Honour Budiman. Defence Lawyers Harry Fishwick and Patrick Gilbert based their argument around the validity of the evidence provided and pushed the idea that it was a case of mistaken identity. Prosecution Lawyers Hannah Sheppard and Georgie Thompson tried to pick apart the defendant’s alibi, but a closely fought case was eventually won by the defence and the defendant walked free. BY ALLEGRA LETTS


BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

YOUTH SPEAKS

“It was one of the best experiences of my life!” Get Kids Going (a national charity giving disabled young people the opportunity to participate in sport), Rays of Sunshine (granting wishes for children with terminal illnesses) and Cancer Research UK. Remaining profits will be put towards maths games to further enhance our pupils’ learning. Our governors were struck by how our pupils understood the bigger picture and were driven by knowing they were donating their profits to charity, to which some pupils have personal connections. They also admired the pupils’ fantastic energy, enthusiasm and teamwork. Mr Mackintosh was amazed by the fantastic products created and Mrs Marks said what a very worthwhile project this had been for learning important life skills. Congratulations to all our Upper Two for delivering way beyond our expectations and for being such professionals. BY MS BARNES

BY MRS PETTET

Upper Two Virgin Money Independent Project Best Poster Summary of Work: Kububble Most Investible Product: Pretty Little Things Best Profit: Tutti Frutti Most Creative Product: Yub Nub Best Teamwork: Millionaire Bears and Money Makers (joint winners) Overall Winners: Tutti Frutti complimented on their wonderful ideas and very popular products and great enthusiasm.

I

n March, our six shortlisted ‘Make Your Money Grow’ Maths Teams from Upper Two presented their products at our ‘Dragons’ Den’. Our wonderful Dragons were Jeanne Volschenk from Virgin Money, Mr Mackintosh, Head of Economics and Business Studies, Headmistress Mrs Marks, Mrs Hooper, Assistant Accountant, and Mr Cheney and Mrs Clark, two of our school governors. Our Dragons were hugely impressed by the way pupils created, marketed and sold their products, handled money and managed costs and worked successfully as a team to make a profit on their original £5. The level of creativity, being healthy and thought for the environment was definitely stepped up by all our pupils! Overall, Upper Two made an outstanding profit of £1010, which will be divided equally amongst

E

very year, children from Upper Two take part in the Exeter Junior School Public Speaking Competition. The judges, Headmaster, Mr Griffin, Junior School Head, Mrs Marks and Head of Senior School Drama, Mr Brough have the unenviable task of picking the winning team. This year’s team, consisting of Emma Barton, Speaker, Rosie Batchelor, Chair, and Grace Lister, Vote of Thanks, progressed through previous rounds of the Rotary Club Youth Speaks Competition and were invited to Junior District Final in Saltash. They spoke very convincingly, using sophisticated scientific explanations as to why Santa Claus does exist. Their delivery was natural, clear and utterly charming. It was a very strong field and our girls did exceptionally well coming third out of eleven finalists, each receiving a certificate and Amazon gift voucher.

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 111


THE EXONIAN 2019

CHESS CLUB

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hess is a busy and thriving club with over thirty children playing. Mr Beckwith, who though retired comes in to help and adjudicate, and I are kept very busy. Our children love to challenge each other, and the adults to play. Mr Beckwith has won nearly all of his games, unfortunately I have not! Todd Rook (U2A), Joshua Hwang (U2W), Benjamin Ledwidge (U1R) and Pengxiao Zhu (F1C) are at the top of our leader board, and are part of the ‘Sharks’ team. Our ‘Piranha’, ‘Pikes’ and ‘Minnows’ also compete and there is a fierce competitive spirit between the groups. We have several players in the Devon team. Our new Form One players are to be commended for their excellent playing and wonderful behaviour when they have represented the school. We are very fortunate to have a Chess coach who used to play for England and organises tournaments at the highest level. Mr Victor Cross coaches several of our children and encourages them to enters for many competitions and tournaments.

BUDDIES

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pper Two look forward to the new school year and taking on the responsibilities of being a Buddy to the new Form One children. Our children remember what it was like to be new to the school and they love helping the younger children and encouraging them as they start their new school. House lunches and House meetings create a bond between the children. They immediately seem to bond and chat away, sharing thoughts and fun. Experience has shown us that this special relationship can carry on into Senior School as past Buddies connect again with each other.

BY MRS GOLDSWORTHY

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Pupils are our true Mindfulness Ambassadors!

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ur Paws B Mindfulness Programme (mindfulnessinschools.org) well and truly spread and embedded itself in Exeter Junior School over this year, with all our pupils embracing and noticing its positive impacts on many aspects of their lives both in and outside school and across a range of activities. From Upper Two to Form One, all our pupils have completed the Paws B programme and now know how they can train their minds to train their brains, understanding how different parts of ‘Team Brain’ (prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and insula) respond and how they can influence our thoughts, feelings and actions. Our 23 Upper Two Mindfulness Monitors (all volunteers) have worn their badges with pride and have been running mindfulness practices in every Monday in our whole school assembly, as well as visiting classes around the Junior School every day, during morning and afternoon form times. We have also welcomed Sixth Formers to run a ‘FOFBOC’

and ‘Torchlight of Attention’ practice for us. In addition, our two weekly ‘Mindful Minutes’ drop-in sessions a week (lunchtime and after school) have been welcomed by pupils who wish to come and just pause and be in the moment and they also enjoy running different practices for their friends. Mindfulness interventions for pupils have shown the potential to improve attention, social skills, academic engagement, test anxiety, and psychological health. Mindfulness trains us to direct our attention to whatever is happening in the present moment: our breathing, other physical sensations, thoughts, emotions, or even everyday activities like walking and eating. This awareness means we can respond more skillfully to whatever the present-moment throws at us. BY MS BARNES

Starting assemblies with a short practice is a great way to begin the week.

I love running practices for other pupils and hearing them telling me that it has helped them feel calm.


BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

T Success in F1 in Schools

he F1 in Schools Competition is a challenge aimed at developing precocious skills in science technology, engineering and maths. Two teams comprised of Lower Fifth stalwarts and one team of experienced Lower Sixth collaborated in producing and presenting a model F1 car. After months of painstaking hard work, auspicious sponsorship deals and other sundry monotonous preparations, only our school’s professional class entry, Team Dynamic Motion, advanced through to the National Finals, taking away awards for best-engineered car, fastest car and best presentation—edging ever closer to the grand finish line in Singapore later on this year. We hope that the school minibus safely abides with the national speed limit as they transport them to Silverstone, unlike their breakneck testament to engineering. BY JAMES BRODERICK

New iDEAs i DEA, created by the Duke of York, is a free international programme aiming to help people of all ages develop career-enhancing digital and enterprise skills. It currently consists of two levels: Bronze and Silver. Gold is due to be released during Summer 2019. To complete Bronze, participants must gain a total of 250 points by gaining a minimum of 40 points in four categories (citizen, worker, maker and entrepreneur). They gain points by completing short online courses/games in topics from Cyber Spies to Design

Psychology, and Virtual Reality to Blockchain. To complete Silver, participants must complete four of five categories and gain 100 points in five categories (citizen, worker, maker, entrepreneur and gamer). Participants complete Foundation (20 points), Activation (30 points), and Resolution (50 points) badges to complete overall categories. Each badge is interactive and game-like, covering employability skills and digital training. Gold promises to be similarly interesting and interactive. BY ROSIE CROMWELL

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 113


THE EXONIAN 2019

(E)co-education “Under business-as-usual scenarios, the Earth could warm to a climate not seen in 50 billion years over the next 120 years, reversing a multi-million year cooling trend in less than two centuries.” - Burke K et al (2018) ‘Pliocene and Eocene provide best analogs for near-future climates’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America [PNAS]. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1809600115

2

019 has seen a boom in political activity surrounding environmental issues in a movement led by children of secondary school age all over the country. In particular, the ‘Extinction Rebellion’ has brought climate change into the limelight of current affairs, but this more radical action is not the only way that Exeter School students can get involved in this national movement towards a more sustainable planet. Eco Society, run by Reverend Tom and Mr Brimelow, has been working hard alongside the Bursar for the past year to make small changes within school that will make a big impact on our environment. Pen and battery collections have been started in every classroom; the monthly meat-free Thursdays have brought a creative

aspect to school dinners and several talks from influential figures in this area have both educated and inspired pupils in the thrice-termly meetings. PhD student at Exeter University, Olivia MiltonThomas, kicked off with expert insight into the benefits and drawbacks of fracking, which drew interest from geographers and chemists alongside members of Eco Society. Spring’s lecture saw Coastal Recycling CEO, Richard Marsh, explain the recycling process that his company uses in order to make the trading of plastic waste almost free from carbon emissions as well as explaining how the issues that arise from landfill can be reduced through his company’s system. Finally, Jerry Alford represented the Soil Association - the leading farming, food and

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environment charity - in the Summer, where discussions turned to the future of agriculture after Brexit, the viability of eating organic and how the market will have to adapt to the demands of the climate crisis. Getting involved with Eco Society has created a more open relationship between pupils and staff when it comes to the infrastructure of Exeter School, with pupils offering their own opinions and campaigns with active and enthusiastic results. The school works hard to be environmentally friendly. The new swimming pool came equipped with solar panels, the grounds are organically fertilised and grass cuttings are reused. As well as the often themed vegetarian lunch menus once a month; single-use plastic has been removed from the dining hall

“70% of our UK diet is processed food, 51% ultraprocessed compared to 14% in France.” Soil Association blog: ‘Soil degradation, massinsect decline and ultraprocessed foods.’ 13 Feb 2019, Joanna Lewis

and food waste and glass are recycled. In terms of energy conservation, computers are kept on standby and - where possible - the low energy lights are turned off at night. Revd Tom and Mr Brimelow, along with the keen team of pupils involved with the Society, are optimistic for the future of the school’s sustainability, hoping to expand upon the improvements of its first year. BY LILY ALFORD


BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

O

M.U.N is F.U.N! Exeter College Conference: n Saturday 22 September, 15 pupils from Exeter School attended the Exeter College Model United Nations Conference. We had a highly successful day with 11 pupils winning an award. Unlike normal MUN, we participated in the Historical Security Council, where instead of current countries, we saw former countries like the Soviet Union and Imperial Japan being represented. This meant we were working with the League of Nations instead of the United Nations. This committee offered the topic of the Spanish Civil War, something I had never debated before. Most of the day was spent in committee debating a simulation of the civil war, but instead of debating the actual timeline, the committee was played out as to how we wanted it to run. In other words, if we, as the delegate for Nazi Germany wanted to send air attacks over Madrid, send in food supplies to the rebel government-in-exile or deport sectors of society, such as communists, we were able to so!

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Onto the next conference… Over half-term, four ambitious Exeter School delegates attended the fourday Royal Russel International Model United Nations conference in London, one of the most prestigious conferences in the UK. Our delegation adopted the viewpoint of Zimbabwe, a politically unstable nation, where we were up against 400 delegates from across the world representing 100 nations. Our first three days comprised of debating in committees on various topics, from the issues of Jerusalem to cryptocurrency. We proposed and wrote resolutions, made strategic allies and debated constructively to show Zimbabwe’s view on the world stage. Although high level debating is Royal Russell’s main attraction, socials were laid out during the conference. These included MUN’s Got Talent, a movie night watching Leonardo di Caprio in The Beach and a disco every night, where all of us showed how Exeter parties.

n Friday 22 March, Huw Bagwell, Yasmin Western, Finlay Scott, and Patrick Gilbert (representing Yemen), and Otto Oldridge, Mark Pugh, Sam Allman and Allegra Letys (representing Morocco), went to the annual Haileybury MUN Conference. We spent Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the conference. There were over 650 delegates at the conference, and we debated topics such as Middle Eastern conflicts, bee populations and state religions. Yasmin, Finlay and Otto received Distinguished Delegate awards, which are presented to three people in each of the 10 committees. Winning an award feels really nice, especially after you have

put in three days debating and scheming with others. In addition, the delegation of Yemen received a Highly Commended Delegation award, which is presented to three delegations. At the start of the conference, the former British ambassador to North Korea spoke about his experiences in the country, which gave an insight into what life is like under a dictator. We all had a great time and it was a really interesting and enriching experience. I would like to say thank you to Mrs Wilson and Mr Marshall who took us there, and to Mrs McCluskey who run the club at school. I would really recommend taking part, as it has really improved my public speaking skills, and debating. BY OTTO OLDRIDGE

Last, but certainly not least… On Sunday 18 November, Exeter School hosted its eighth annual MUN conference for over 60 delegates from seven schools across the South West to debate ambitious topics such as access to contraception, cyber warfare and nuclear states. The Upper Sixth MUN team got the chance to chair committees and General Assembly, and spent months planning ahead to make sure the conference was a success. Congratulations to Exeter School delegates, Finlay Scott and Oliver Irons, for winning highly commended delegate awards. Model United Nations Conferences give pupils the opportunity to practise debating and public

speaking in a friendly and fun environment. The range of topics discussed at conferences ensures there is something to interest everyone. At Exeter School, MUN is open to anyone Lower Fifth and above. BY JAMES HARRIS, DANIEL WILCOCK, ALLEGRA LETTS

Congratulations to everyone who took part in this fascinating conference and a special well done to our pupils who won awards on the day. MRS MCCLUSKEY

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 115


THE EXONIAN 2019

Wellbeing at Exeter School A

ll Wellbeing Ambassador projects this year were focused on promoting a positive outlook on individual wellbeing. Each year group contributed their thoughts, of the causes of stress in our lives and coming up with positive strategies to care for our mental health as we do

our physical health. The Wellbeing Ambassadors organised a Wellbeing Week before the Easter holidays, with each group promoting a different aspect of wellbeing. Third Form proudly promoted a positive attitude while Fourth Form encouraged pupis to do thoughtful things for

each other. The Lower Fifth promoted friendliness while Middle and Upper Fifth demonstrated the benefits of mindfulness. The Sixth Form Wellbeing Ambassadors had a slightly different project. They each received peer mentoring training and have spent time with individual groups of

Third Formers, fostering a supportive relationship and giving advice on exam stress and homework troubles. Similarly, a number of Third Form Ambassadors received anti-bullying training from the Diana Award. We look forward to another year of wellbeing at Exeter School. BY ROSIE CROMWELL

MEDSOC

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his year’s Medical Society programme has been varied and informative, with a plethora of varied talks, special events run by parents and Upper Sixth Formers as well as the regular in-House meetings. Several alumni returned to school to provide fascinating and helpful advice to our medics, including Adrian Jacobs (OE 1959–1966) who has had a broad and influential career. Professor Max Essex, Chair of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS initiative, delivered a challenging and personal talk on his research on retroviruses and his pioneering work with HIV and AIDS. Dr Emma Hartsilver helped the Upper Sixth grapple with medical ethics and its application in the daily life of a doctor and Alasdair Dow (intensive care consultant) and Catherine Allman (senior cardiology nurse) gave

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insightful talks on what life in medicine is really like. The year started with our MedEXE event, in which pupils talk on a subject of their choice. The standard of these talks was outstanding. Dr Hartsilver also arranged for nine local doctors to take part in our MMI (multiple mini interview) practice morning. With interviews just around the corner for our Sixth Form, this speed dating format, now used by most Medical Schools, tests the key attributes required for a life in medicine. Alongside Mr Griffin’s monthly lunchtime discussions with the Upper Sixth, our candidates have gained invaluable experience in a grueling few months of interviews. It has been wonderful to see the pupils growing in confidence and determination as the year has gone on. The health profession will be fortunate to have them. MR BODDINGTON


BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

THINKING OF THE

FUTURE Middle Fifth Exeter School’s Morrisby Careers Programme

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Upper Fifth Work Experience

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he Gatsby Benchmarks state that having experiences of the work place is essential in order for our young people to make informed and positive choices about what they want to do after leaving school. Our Upper Fifth pupils are able to spend two weeks in the summer term gaining work experience. Placements allow pupils to gain an insight into daily working life, to find out what the profession is like

in reality and to understand what transferable skills are useful to employers. As ever, pupils made the most of this opportunity and found placements in many different sectors, including medicine and healthcare more widely, engineering, finance, physiotherapy, veterinary medicine, law, media and the wider creative sector, retail, journalism, the charity sector and architecture. BY MRS CHEESMAN

inding the right career is a tricky task. For some, knowing what career path to follow has always been simple however, for a vast majority of us choosing a career is an exciting but complex question that must be unravelled. Many avenues of research need to be taken and one of these is Morrisby, a detailed psychometric programme which asks pupils to answer a series of verbal, numerical, abstract, spatial and mechanical problems along with questionnaires on values, interests, study interests and priorities. Pupils then receive tailored information about apprenticeships, colleges and degree courses in addition to a database of potential suitable careers (including salary expectations and the different routes to employment). Although this will not tell a pupil ‘this is the career for you’, it is one of the tools we use in helping guide our young people towards thinking about different ideas for life after Exeter School. The aim is for them to make informed choices about their future. BY MRS CHEESMAN

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 117


THE EXONIAN 2019

RUGBY 1ST XV REPORT

A

fter a very promising tour to Argentina, the squad met Crediton in the annual preseason fixture. Unfortunately, in a physical encounter upfront it ended up in a narrow loss, but a good chance to look at a big squad of 25 players. Despite this, the team bounced back with a convincing win against West Buckland 36 – 0, with a strong performance from Cameron Dennis in his official first team debut, who then went on to receive the players’ player award. The following week we met Devon rivals, Plymouth College at Brickfields and through good handling, many tries were scored in the wide

channels. After a draw against QEH Bristol in torrential rain and an unfortunate loss to Kings College Taunton in the schools National cup, we found ourselves in the Plate competition. This resulted in a long trip down to Truro in the next round in which the boys dug deep in the second half to claw back a wholesome victory, despite some shuffling in the backline in which Daichi Budiman lead from the front. Following this in the cup was the best performance of the year when we welcomed Taunton School to a first team pitch in which was heavily supported by the school on a Wednesday afternoon. A try in the last 3 minutes from Harry Emmett after a great break from Guy Roche lead to a promising win 19 – 15 in front of the home crowd. In the next round of the plate, we met future finalists Sherborne for only the second every time in the school’s history,

118 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

which again was a wellsupported encounter. Unfortunately, a lazy first half meant Sherborne could get away, and it was too much for our winning second half performance to claw it back. Although the weather hampered fixtures, there was a good flow to the end of season with strong performances against Truro and Clayesmore, as well as an agonising defeat against King’s College being 6-5 up with 5 minutes to go and giving one of the most complete performances of the year. The array of games allowed many of the school’s future senior rugby players to display their talent with a classy shifts from Tom Kilmartin and

lots of leadership displayed from Oscar Stewart. The final game of the season was to be played under lights at Shaftesbury Park against a strong Colston’s side. It was the last game for many and proved an emotional experience, unfortunately coming out with a loss despite a heroic performance from Freddie Herring, who was everywhere. This year’s first team season was an unbelievable experience with many memories made and an awesome send off for all the rugby players moving on. Thank you very much to Mr Wilson and Mr Ross for making it such an enjoyable group to be a part of. BY TOM WATKINSON AND JACK SYRADD (CO-CAPTAINS)


SPORT

As a team we have stood in the face of adversity, battled against sides double our size and come out victorious, not once breaking our composure. 2ND XV REPORT gaps quickly, leading to many of our tries. However, none of his year’s team have this would’ve been possible been ground breakers: without the coaching of the first 2nd team in Mr Trelawny who carefully school history to have their own kit and remain unbeaten constructed the game plan that lead to this year’s against second teams (home unbeaten season. Awards this and away), to name just a season went to Lower Sixth few accolades. As a team Formers Archie Tamblyn we have stood in the face of adversity, battled against sides (Players’ Player) and Andrew double our size and come out Donovan who won Coach’s victorious, not once breaking Player. Players to watch next season include: Andrew our composure. The Lower Donovan, Archie Tamblyn, Sixth who joined senior Alex Peacock, Caspar Raworth rugby this year have taken to and Hamish Hunter. Cheers the game quickly and show for a great final season boys. great success and are well Good luck next year. equipped for future seasons. The Upper Sixth have played BY PADDY GRAY (2ND XV CAPTAIN) an incredible final season with many of them SENIOR SCHOOL RUGBY RESULTS making first team appearances and P W L D even achieving their ties like fullback 14 8 5 1 1st XV James Butler and centre Harry Hayter. 7 6 1 0 2nd XV The forwards have been a small pack 5 3 2 0 but with a strong U16A attitude. Man to 9 4 5 0 man we have been U15A smaller in size, yet we have run faster, 13 5 7 1 U14A hit harder and put more effort in than 2 1 1 0 U14B any team we have come up against. 12 9 2 1 U13A The backs have worked effectively 6 3 1 2 U13B as a group, running plays smoothly and 9 5 2 2 U12A taking control of the game and exploiting 3 1 2 0 U12B

T

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 119


THE EXONIAN 2019

IN SEVEN HEAVEN T progress over the term, his year Rugby Sevens ending in a series of excellent had an extra incentive, performances at the East the Rosslyn Park Devon District Sevens National School Sevens tournament. tournament, the Playing five games biggest schoolboy in all across an sporting event they in the world. There are afternoon, were able to build This meant that big things to their knowledge everything built come from and understanding, up to this point and not even the this group at finishing at the weather (although a senior level semi-final stage. it tried hard) could next year. The U16s were the unlucky victims stop the progress of the weather and development with a series of tournaments of all players. cancelled due to wet pitches. The U15s started their However, they trained well Sevens journey with steady alongside the senior squad and played a friendly match against Plymouth College where they were able to assess their development. There are big things to come from this group at a senior level next year. Finally, the 1st VII were able to play a few tournaments, some friendly matches and head off to Rosslyn Park. They certainly were up against it playing some of the strongest sides in the country at the Millfield tournament, but were better

120 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

for it. Competing in the Vase tournament at Rosslyn Park, they went unbeaten in their pool on day one, but lost an evening playoff match to drop into the Bowl competition for day two. A brilliant morning meant that they went further into the semi-final stages and finished the tournament strongly against the eventual runners up, Felsted, demonstrating how far they had come and mixing it with the traditional powerhouses of school rugby. This meant finishing in the top 24 out of 180 schools and a great experience to finish the rugby season on. BY MR ROSS


36

PUPILS

67

SCORED TEN OR MORE

9-7

GRADES

THE NUMBER OF CANDIDATES WHO ACHIEVED 8 OR MORE GRADES AT

9-7

74% 9-7 GRADES

81%

A*, A &B Grades

A LEVEL

GCSE

SPORT

PASS RATE

34 pupils

100%

scored 3 or more A* or A grades E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 121


THE EXONIAN 2019

There was great team spirit, which allowed us to grasp the victory of winning 12 out of 16 matches in the tournament. DANIEL ADAMS (U10A)

We cheer each other on instead of shouting criticisms if something goes wrong.

JUNIOR SCHOOL RUGBY RESULTS

LOCHIE HUGHES (U9B)

JUNIOR SCHOOL RUGBY U11A RUGBY REPORT

T

he U11As had a terrific start to the season, with comfortable wins over good opposition. They also played extremely well in the Plymouth College Rugby Festival. They beat every team they played except their last match, where they were

We made sure we focused on being supportive to everyone in the team. OLIVER LISTER (U9A)

Colours: Rory Clarke, Tom Byrne, Jed Smith, Wilfred Venn, Alex Vosper Player of the Year (Kilmartin Cup): Rory Clarke House Competition: Scott

unlucky to draw against Trinity, after having three of their tries disallowed! The U11A, U11B, U10A and U10B travelled to Queen’s College and did very well to compete in matches playing an unfamiliar touch rugby format. For the U11A team, injury problems made fixtures against strong teams like KES Bath, Blundell’s and Queen’s very challenging. As Captain Rory Clarke was keen to say: “We didn’t lose any matches where we had our full side. I really enjoyed this season and was delighted to be chosen as captain of rugby. I was delighted at how the whole

122 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

P

W

L

D

U11A

12

8

3

1

U11B

6

2

4

0

U11C

1

0

1

0

U10A

13

8

4

1

U10B

4

4

0

0

U9A

19

15

2

2

U9B

9

3

4

2

team got stuck in, each player doing his bit for the cause. I think the noncontact training actually helped our passing game and it made us work better as a unit.” All the players across the school have developed their skills and, perhaps most importantly, really enjoyed their rugby. The team spirit was hugely evident in the always enjoyed and successful House Rugby Tournament. Every boy in Upper Two had a great three games. It was fantastic to see all the boys encouraging their team mates; teamwork and fun were certainly the

We were able to tackle very well as a unit. RUFUS LOVELL (U10B) watchwords of the day! Thus, despite the challenges of weather, hard pitches and injury, the Junior School has had another terrific and very encouraging rugby season. Well done, to each and every player in the school! BY MR PIDWELL AND RORY CLARKE (CAPTAIN)

Very, very awesome. AIDY WILSON (U11B) DESCRIBING HIS TEAM IN THREE WORDS


SPORT

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 123


THE EXONIAN 2019

HOCKEY

GIRLS’ HOCKEY REPORT t has been another exciting year for girls’ hockey at Exeter School, with pupils of all ages getting stuck in to a series of competitive matches and tournaments. The determination, bravery and considerable skill shown by all of the girls has been a pleasure to see, with great competition for places in all of the age groups really pushing everyone to new heights. It was clear that the buzz generated by the incredible tour to Argentina last summer trickled down to all of the teams, and added that extra motivation to keep working hard. The first and second XIs enjoyed competitive seasons, whilst a special mention goes to the U14 team who

SENIOR SCHOOL GIRLS’ HOCKEY RESULTS

I

celebrated becoming Devon Champions before Christmas, and the U13s who were West Finalists: the future looks bright! We particularly look forward to seeing the U15s’ progression into the senior teams next year. Whilst there were a whole range of stand-out performance across the year groups, individual mentions

124 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

need to go to Emma Corney and Lauren Hughes, who both fully deserved their selections for the West Hockey Performance Centre. Well done, girls! BY MRS MARSH AND MISS LUNN

P

W

L

D

1st XI

8

4

1

2

2nd XI

9

2

6

1

3rd XI

5

1

3

1

U15A

9

6

3

0

U15B

6

3

2

1

U14A

6

2

3

1

U14B

5

1

2

2

U13A

7

7

0

0

U13B

8

6

1

1

U12A

5

4

1

0

U12B

3

3

0

0

U11A

1

1

0

0

U10A

1

0

1

0


SPORT

We bonded as a team and supported each other through matches. BECKY TRELAWNY (2ND XI)

We learnt how to work well together, combining all our unique skills to be Devon Champions. EMILY GOODISON AND GRACE JURY (U14)

We had clear goals for each other and for the team which we worked hard to achieve. LAUREN HUGHES AND EMMA CORNEY (U15A)

We had a clear idea of how we wanted each game to turn out and everyone worked hard to get the ball to the goal. LEXIE DI-VINCENZO (3RD XI)

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 125


THE EXONIAN 2019

HOCKEY

It has been an excellent season, going unbeaten all year! MATT ROBERTS (U12A)

SENIOR SCHOOL BOYS’ HOCKEY RESULTS P

W

L

D

1st XI

5

2

2

1

2nd XI

4

1

3

0

U16A

2

1

1

0

U15A

6

0

5

1

U15B

1

0

0

1

U14A

8

3

4

1

U14B

3

0

3

0

U13A

4

1

2

1

U13B

4

3

0

1

U12A

4

3

0

1

U12B

5

2

3

0

U12C

1

0

1

0

BOYS’ HOCKEY REPORT

B

oys’ hockey continues to grow and the strength of the main spring term sport is evident in the way all of the boys have participated in fixtures and training. There were many highlights in the

2018/19 season with the U13s claiming the biggest success with their win in the Devon Finals. The U14 and U16 school squads put in some memorable performances, just falling short of regional recognition. The 1st XI performed to an

126 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

exceptionally high level and worked together to build a sense of togetherness amongst a great group of boys. The 1st XI has seen an Upper Sixth group take the lead of a slightly less experienced side but have benefited from a strong group mentality. There has been plenty of rotation within the 1st and 2nd XI squads, which has helped to ensure players feel they have been given an opportunity to demonstrate their ability. A great advert for 2nd XI hockey is the amount

of players that have been able to make that jump to gain their 1st XI caps. Each year group develops their own method of beating opposition schools: The U12s played intelligently in possession; the U13s excited us with their free flowing attacking style; the U14s built a reputation for their dogged and rugged style; the U15s frustrated opposition with careful pressing and flamboyant goal scoring. Every pupil that represents the school in hockey needs to be congratulated for all of their efforts and enthusiasm this year. The staff are always full of admiration for the commitment and dedication by the pupils to weekend


SPORT

sport which helps to keep the pride and passion for hockey going from year to year. Exeter School remains one of the most prestigious hockeyplaying schools in the South West. Finally, thanks must go to the staff that have put their time and energy into ensuring the coaching is of the highest quality, even throughout the rain and snow! Well done to all. BY MR JONES

The motivation of the team this year has been really high, which is mainly down to the passion of our coach Mr Charters. MATT ROBERTS (U12A) E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 127


THE EXONIAN 2019

JUNIOR SCHOOL HOCKEY

Winners of Exeter Junior School U11 Tournament Colours: Rosie Batchelor, Yasmin Brown, Emma Barton, Megan Roberts, Rosie Selley Winners of House Competition: Grenville U11A GIRLS’ HOCKEY REPORT he 2018 hockey There has been great season for the communication Junior School between all members started brilliantly, with excellent attendance at the of our team! Especially pre-season session in the during our match holidays. Throughout the against the Third autumn term, a total of 31 Form; because of our individual matches have teamwork skills we been played across the were able to win 1-0! board and 5 tournaments attended. LYDIA MCLEOD (U11B) When speaking to the U11A Hockey Captain, Rosie Batchelor, she explained the reasons why she loved playing hockey here at Exeter We’ve all learnt to Junior School. “The teachers are brilliant and playing sport work really well on is such a great experience. different techniques. You develop friendships and ALICE BRAUER the sense of sportsmanship and, of course, it’s been

T

128 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

JUNIOR SCHOOL GIRLS’ HOCKEY RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11A

24

11

9

4

U11B

7

4

2

1

U11C

2

0

0

2

U10A

10

0

9

1

U10B

2

0

2

0

U9A

13

6

6

1

U9B

3

1

0

2

U8A

2

1

0

1

U8B

1

1

0

0

really fun! I just love how hockey gets my adrenaline pumping!” We have great It has been brilliant teamwork skills. We’re to witness every single all really close friends girl in the Junior School and have a great bond represent Exeter School in matches against a wealth which really shows on of different schools. Girls the pitch. across the age range have BEATRICE HUGHES really developed their skills including passing, the came together and worked use of space, knowledge of positions and tactics to outwit really hard on and off the ball for each other. As a result, opponents. We have had a we ended up winning those wealth of girls wanting to play in goal on a weekly basis, matches.” It has been a pleasure which has displayed just how working alongside the pupils versatile our players are. of all ages and the staff during Rosie’s highlight of the the autumn term. It has been season was the Devon brilliant to help ignite pupils’ Tournament in Plymouth. “It passion, not only for sport in was such a great experience. general, but for the game of I felt like we have learnt to hockey. An excellent season be more like a team because has been had by all! BY MISS we have had to learn to win and lose together. The last WRIGHT AND ROSIE BATCHELOR two games we played at the (CAPTAIN) tournament were the best. We


SPORT

JUNIOR SCHOOL BOYS’ HOCKEY RESULTS

EXETER JUNIOR SCHOOL U11A BOYS’ HOCKEY REPORT

defensive line up stuck to its task throughout and all grew in confidence, showing an improving understanding he U11A team had of the game as the season a challenging, but progressed. Goalkeeper, rewarding season. The Jack Wills, was Player of the boys struggled somewhat to Season, deserving much keep possession and whilst there was some good build up credit for keeping us in contention on numerous play, the final decisive strike occasions, with some was too often lacking. Oliver fabulous saves. Rochester was a reliable Hockey Captain Oliver captain, providing much Rochester’s thoughts: “In a of the drive, alongside Gus hard-fought season we still Lovell and Wilfred Venn. The

T

had some good wins. Our best game was against Exeter Cathedral School where we played really well as a team. It was good because we scored six goals and really supported each other!” BY MR BLAND AND OLIVER ROCHESTER (CAPTAIN)

P

W

L

D

U11A

20

5

10

5

U11B

9

5

4

0

U11C

1

0

1

0

U10A

4

2

1

1

U10B

4

4

0

0

U9A

1

0

1

0

U9B

4

1

3

0

U8A

1

0

1

0

Colours: Oliver Rochester, Jack Wills Winners of House Competition: Grenville E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 129


THE EXONIAN 2019

FOOTBALL 1ST XI TEAM REPORT

in Charlie Pullen and Cam Dennis who were both influential in a 4-2 win verall, the 1st XI team in our first home game has had a positive against Shebbear. The season with definite momentum continued progress throughout the into our first two league 2 terms. We started with fixtures with a 2-0 win a disappointing 4-2 loss against Blundell’s including at Colyton [due to a slow some well worked corner start in the first half] but routines and some solid improvement after the break defensive performances brought encouragement for our next game. Since then, we and the highlight of the season being a 2-1 win secured strong wins against against Taunton; this Queen’s Taunton, where we was a team we haven’t dominated the game and beaten since 2010. There Woodroffe School, including were heroic efforts from a a world class goal from number of players in this Sam Corney after the ball one, allowing us to clinch rebounded off his back! We then faced the toughest game a last minute winner. Our positive league form brought of the season against Exeter College Football Academy but about a deciding game against Wellington, but a 2-1 despite the loss, there were encouraging signs, including loss against a very decent outfit meant a hard fought strong performances from second place finish. The Ed Lister and Jamie Browne. season finished with the Old Unfortunately, our first Isca Exonians game and a narrow League fixture was cancelled against King’s Taunton due to loss after going 2 goals up, but special mentions a waterlogged pitch: a game going to James Horler and that, if it had gone ahead, Max Haddican, who both could have secured us the had good games and Tom league with a win. Muskett for completing his Moving into the spring first game this season without term (after a big spending transfer window), we brought injury!

O

130 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

Exeter Senior School - 2nd XI RESULTS Opposition

Result

Scorers

Taunton School (A)

Won 2-1

Tom Peters Caspar Raworth

Blundell’s (H)

Lost 1-2

Tom Peters

King’s, Taunton (H)

Won 4-1

Joey Bown (pen) Ed Lister (pen) Joel Seaward George Hobbs

Wellington (A)

Won 7-0

Joel Seaward 2 Adam Wajed 2 Charlie Killen 2 Tom Peters

Won – 3

Drew – 0

Lost – 1


SPORT Despite this, the success has been spread across the group with 9 different scorers and 7 different man of the matches across the season. This resulted in a 10 way tie for player of the season, showing the all-round ability of the team, with Max Haddican taking the trophy. The seconds have also had a largely positive season finishing second in their league by only 2 goals after being level on points. This campaign included an Assistant Manager debut for Ed Lister and a comfortable 4-1 win over King’s Taunton followed by a huge 7-0 win over Wellington, thereby showing off Mr Charters’ attacking flare. Overall, a great effort from all the lads and a big thank you to Mr Ashman and Mr Charters for their coaching and continued efforts all year. BY ROB STOYLE (1ST XI TEAM

Exeter Senior School - 1st XI RESULTS Opposition Colyton GS (A)

Result

Scorers

Lost 2-4

Rob Stoyle Ben Harvey

Queen’s College, Taunton (A)

Won 2-0

Sam Corney Angus Harris

The Woodroffe School (A)

Won 2-1

Thomas Muskett Ed Lister

Exeter College (A)

Lost 0-5

Shebbear College (H)

Won 4-2

Charlie Pullen 2 Ed Lister [pen] Cameron Dennis

The King’s School, Ottery (A)

Lost 2-4

Charlie Pullen Rob Stoyle

Taunton School (A)

Won 2-1

Charlie Pullen Ed Lister

Blundell’s (A)

Won 2-0

Charlie Pullen 2 (1 pen)

Wellington (A)

Lost 1-2

Ed Lister

Old Exonians (H)

Lost 2-4

Joey Bown Ed Lister

Won – 5

Drew – 0

Lost – 5

CAPTAIN)

JUNIOR SCHOOL FOOTBALL Exeter Junior School – Season 2018 / 19 RESULTS Team

Played

Won

Drew

Lost

Cancelled

U11A

22

14

3

5

1

U11B

7

3

0

4

1

U10A

4

2

0

2

1

U10B

4

2

1

1

1

U9A

10

5

2

3

0

U9B

4

3

1

0

0

U8A

4

1

0

3

1

Total

55

30

7

18

5

U11A FOOTBALL REPORT

O

Winners of ESFA Primary Schools Cup (Exeter & East Devon)

nce again, the U11A team had a busy Winners of EJS U11 season; twenty-two Tournament matches were played, including those Colours: Tom Byrne, in tournaments. The first half of the Jack Wills season was fairly challenging, but the Winners of House boys kept persevering Competition: Blake and working hard to improve their skills, both individually out to be a season of real and collectively. They were progress. rewarded for their efforts at We started the season the Exeter and East Devon with plenty of enthusiasm Round of the Danone Cup and much excitement. in early December, winning seven and drawing one of the Unfortunately, the results in the first couple of months eight matches played. After didn’t go our way. However, Christmas, we continued we came back really strongly our progression, with a very creditable set of performances and finished off the season by winning the Exeter Junior at the Exeter City FC round School Tournament by one of the Kids Cup, where we goal!” BY MR ASHMAN AND TOM reached the quarter-finals. Captain Tom Byrne takes BYRNE (CAPTAIN) up the story on what turned E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 131


THE EXONIAN 2019

NETBALL

NETBALL RESULTS P

W

L

D

1st VII

9

7

2

0

2nd VII

10

7

3

0

3rd VII

7

3

4

0

4th VII

1

1

0

0

U15A

14

13

1

0

U15B

8

4

4

0

U15C

1

0

1

0

U14A

15

5

9

1

U14B

12

9

2

1

U14C

1

0

1

0

U13A

13

9

4

0

U13B

7

6

1

0

U13C

1

1

0

0

U13D

1

1

0

0

U12A

7

6

1

0

U12B

7

3

4

0

U11A

3

1

2

0

U11B

2

1

0

1

U11C

1

1

0

0

U10A

1

0

1

0

132 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

A

n enormous congratulations has to go to all of the girls who have played netball for the school this year, with all year groups performing well and showing great enthusiasm. The netball teams have had a highly successful season, with teams playing A and B fixtures in each of the age groups. The 1st team played consistently, having competitive matches against Blundell’s and

Taunton, with the match experience being crucial. The second and third teams were strong and committed throughout, and played with enthusiasm and commitment. The U15A team played well throughout, winning the vast majority of their matches - we look forward to seeing their progress into the 1st Team next season. U12s, 13s and 14s enjoyed their season, with a highlight being the U14B team, winning 9 out of 11 games (one of the defeats was to a mixed U16 team!). Grace Jury, Elusha Gribble and Sophie ShoreNye all captained the team at different times, and Hettie Bower and Bea OliverStephens were outstanding shooters. BY MRS MARSH


SPORT

JUNIOR SCHOOL NETBALL JUNIOR SCHOOL NETBALL RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11A

12

5

7

0

U11B

10

6

2

2

U11C

7

3

4

0

U10A

10

4

6

0

U10B

10

2

8

0

U9A

10

5

5

0

U9B

4

1

2

1

U8A

2

1

1

0

U11A NETBALL REPORT

H

aving had great attendance at the autumn term netball club, the U11A team was well prepared for the season that lay ahead of them. With matches against Millfield, Blundell’s, The Maynard, Plymouth and Queen’s College, the card was a mixed and full one. The squad’s campaign started against the Third Form, providing a testing and challenging game for them from the offset. As the term progressed, the team developed and grew, with pupils being able to play in a number of positions to a high standard, as well as homing in on key positional tactics. Towards the middle of the season the U11s enjoyed playing in a number of competitive triangular matches with Exeter School hosting. The final push towards the end of term was the Exeter Junior School Netball Tournament, with nine schools competing. Exeter successfully won the group stages, beating West Buckland and Wellington comfortably. Exeter then met Queen’s College and Blundell’s in the final stages. The game against Queen’s was very exciting to

Runners-up: EJS U9 Tournament Runners-up: EJS U10 Tournament Colours: Rosie Batchelor, Yasmin Brown, Emma Barton, Megan Roberts, Charlotte Greenwood Winners of House Competition: Grenville watch and it was a close affair with Exeter losing narrowly, resulting in Exeter coming third overall. Yasmin Brown, the U11A team captain, had to say this about the season: “I think everyone in the A, B and C teams played amazingly and all the girls experienced different positions. The U11A team was brilliant in the end of season tournament, especially against Queen’s College!” BY MISS WRIGHT AND YASMIN BROWN (CAPTAIN)

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 133


THE EXONIAN 2019

CRICKET

W

Donovan joined Emma in the 1st team in the match against a touring South African team. In all age groups it has been pleasing to see so many players turning up for nets and representing the school at A and B team level. In the younger age groups, the U12 and U13 A teams have had impressive seasons. Between them, they have played 16 matches, winning 14 and losing only 2. The U13s lost our narrowly in the county cup final whilst the U12 won the cup with a dominant performance over Torquay BGS. With the ball, both teams have bowled some good lines and lengths and are starting to understand the skill of bowling in partnerships to build up pressure on the batsmen. With the bat it has been BOYS’ CRICKET RESULTS impressive to see players willing to P W L D play clever cricket, rotating the strike

hilst we have been able to bask in sunshine over the final few weeks of the summer term, it has been a cricket season hit by bad weather. In total 24 matches have been lost to the rain. Despite this, we have played 47 matches, winning 37 and losing only 10 – a win percentage of 79%. It has been especially pleasing to see the growth in girls’ cricket and to see girls playing in most of the school’s A teams across the age groups. History was made against Mount Kelly when Emma Corney, who opens the batting for the Devon women’s team, became the first girl to play for the School 1st XI. A few days later Katie

12

11

1

0

U15A

3

2

1

0

U15B

1

0

1

0

U14A

8

4

4

0

U14B

1

1

0

0

U13A

8

7

1

0

U13B

3

2

1

0

U12A

7

6

1

0

U12B

3

2

1

0

1ST

134 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

with soft hands rather than trying to bludgeon every ball to the boundary. There is real talent in these younger age groups that bodes well for the future. In the U14 and U15 teams there have been some excellent results in the Saturday matches and some excellent individual performances. In the U14s James Tyler scored 103 not out against a Devon Development XI and against Blundell’s Alex James bowled an excellent spell, finishing with 7 wickets for 30 runs: the best bowling figures across the school for the season. The 1st XI have had an outstanding season and the best in recent memory, winning 11 of their 12 games in a busy exam term. The strength of the squad becomes clear when you realize that 25 players have played across the 12 matches. Despite a narrow

loss by 26 runs in the first match of the season against Devon Dumplings, the team bounced back with solid wins against strong Plymouth College and Exeter College teams. The four week playing break over the exam period did not break this winning streak and over the last 16 days of the term the team won nine games in a row, including wins against the MCC and touring teams from South Africa and Hertfordshire. Sam Corney has led the team superbly, maintaining the balance between playing at a high standard along with having fun and enjoying the team environment. All members of the squad have played key roles in different games but Sam Read, James Horler and Andrew Donovan have proved themselves to be the key figures around which the team has performed so well. Sam’s off spin has been key to many results and his miserly economy rate of 3.5 has squeezed opposition scores. Andrew has scored an unbeaten 121 against Queens Taunton, 51 not out against Haberdasher Askes and a rapid 73 off 30 balls against the Old Exonians. All of these have been match winning performances. James Horler has also had a monumental season! He has scored 700 runs at an average of 100. This has included two centuries (141 and 139 not out) and four 50+ scores. BY MR MASON


SPORT

GIRLS’ CRICKET RESULTS

JUNIOR SCHOOL CRICKET

P

W

L

D

U15A

1

1

0

0

U13A

3

3

0

0

JUNIOR SCHOOL GIRLS’ CRICKET RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11A

6

6

0

0

U11B

6

6

0

0

U11C

1

0

1

0

U10A

4

1

3

0

U10B

4

3

1

0

U9A

3

1

2

0

U9B

2

1

1

0

U8A

4

2

2

0

GIRLS’ REPORT

T

his year was the first full season of girls’ cricket and all players took to it extremely well. The U11A team consisted of a squad of 13 players all varying in strengths from batting, bowling, wicket keeping to fielding. The E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 135


THE EXONIAN 2019 squad played on Wednesdays, Fridays and on Saturdays against some strong opposition including Millfield, Blundell’s and Wellington School. Due to the hard work and dedication in and outside of curriculum time, the team this season, having played 6 matches, were unbeaten! Needless to say, this season could not have gone any better! Captain Megan Roberts says: “I have loved cricket this year. It has been so much fun and I am so proud to say that we have not lost a single match this term! I think we have all worked so hard and all know how to play cricket well and confidently. We have all improved so much and it has been a pleasure to be cricket captain.” BY MISS WRIGHT

Colour: Rosie Batchelor, Yasmin Brown, Megan Roberts, Charlotte Greenwood, Lydia Mcleod Winners of House Competition: Scott

by means of a bye, we were delighted to host the County Finals once again. The boys performed with great skill to comfortably beat Trinity, Mount Kelly and West Buckland to become U11A BOYS REPORT Devon champions for the fifth time in six years. The fter the fantastic summer of 2018, there West Region Finals took place at King’s College, Taunton. was a real contrast Played in a similar roundin 2019, with the weather robin format, we fell just only really picking up for short of gaining a place in the the last couple of matches! National Finals with a defeat Performances in the regular fixtures were mixed, although against a very accomplished King’s Hall. However, the boys individuals performed can take great credit for two with great credit; Oliver excellent wins against the Rochester’s innings of 61 other regional qualifiers. against Blundell’s Prep was Once again, we rounded the standout performance. off the season with a match However, as has been the against a touring side, case so often in the past, the Magdalen College Junior true test of how far the team School. A fantastic game could go was seen in its performances in the Saracens ensued and it ended up being one of the highlight of the Cup, a national hardball season. competition, conducted in a Our captain, Gus Lovell, pairs format. takes up the story: “A 25 over With qualification for the Devon Hardball Finals assured game against the touring

A

136 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K

side meant that there was a chance for both batsmen and bowlers to show their skills. We batted really well in this match, scoring at over a run a ball. William Maynard had a great knock and scored 45. He was well supported by some of the middle order. We bowled and fielded tightly with Rupert Murray and Tom Byrne both taking three wickets; there were also some great catches!’” It had been a memorable end to another very productive season! BY MR ASHMAN AND GUS LOVELL (U11A CAPTAIN)

JUNIOR SCHOOL BOYS’ CRICKET RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11A

9

6

3

0

U11B

3

1

2

0

U10A

3

2

1

0

U10B

3

1

2

0

U9A

4

2

2

0

U9B

4

2

2

0

U8A

2

1

1

0

U8 mixed

3

1

2

0

Winners: U11 Devon Hardball Finals Runners-up: U11 West Region Hardball Finals Colour: Gus Lovell, Oliver Rochester, Rory Clarke, Tom Byrne Batting Cup: Oliver Rochester Bowling Cup: Gus Lovell Winners of House Competition: Scott


SPORT

ROUNDERS

JUNIOR SCHOOL ROUNDERS RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11A

1

1

0

0

U11B

1

1

0

0

U9

1

1

0

0

U8

1

0

1

0

JUNIOR SCHOOL ROUNDERS

W

hilst girls across the year groups enjoyed getting stuck in to rounders this year, the U11A team was only able to play one game this season due to the weather, playing against The Maynard and winning comfortably. This year rounders mainly featured during extracurricular clubs after school on Wednesdays and Thursdays. As is tradition, the Upper Two girls hosted the annual parents v Upper Two girls’ rounders matches, which were once again highly competitive! Despite the conditions, we still made sure the House Rounders competition took place, ensuring the profile of the game remains as strong as ever. BY MISS WRIGHT

SENIOR SCHOOL ROUNDERS hilst there has not been as much rounders played this year due to the enthusiasm shown for girls’ cricket, some of our younger years have enjoyed competitive fixtures, performing well. House rounders was also an enormous success, with boys and girls competing well.

W

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 137


THE EXONIAN 2019

ATHLETICS SENIOR SCHOOL ATHLETICS

I

n a short athletics season it was nice to have success at the Exeter v East Devon event with six pupils qualifying for the County Championships. Oliver Capps won his

1500m in the County Championships and came third in the South West Championships at Exeter Arena. This was his second running success of the year after reaching the national cross country finals in Leeds earlier in the year. BY MR MASON

Ollie Capps

Junior Boys

1500m

Cleo Turley

Intermediate Girls

Shot Put

Eliza Heard

Junior Girls

High Jump

Bea Oliver-Stephens & Poppy Parker

Junior Girls

80m Hurdles

Elizabeth Doherty

Junior Girls

800m

House Standards Cup: Scott Sports Day: Scott Colours: Rory Clarke, Tom Byrne, George Gillingham, Milly Traylor, Tess Hughes, Emma Barton, Yasmin Brown

JUNIOR SCHOOL ATHLETICS

O

ff the back of some excellent performances in PE and Games sessions, the athletics teams were selected. This year the Junior School took part in the Blundell’s and the Exeter Cathedral School meets. Having never entered into the Blundell’s event before, it was brilliant to see so many of the Exeter School athletes shine and contribute towards Exeter winning the U11 and U9 competition. The same standard was displayed at Exeter Arena when we attended the Exeter Cathedral School meet and once again Exeter brought home the silverware, winning the overall event. There have been some fantastic and promising performances displayed this term at events such as Sports Day and I know we are already looking forward to seeing what 2020 brings! BY MISS WRIGHT

JUNIOR SCHOOL ATHLETICS RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11

2

2

0

0

U9

1

1

0

0

138 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


SPORT

GOLF A season they will never forget

T

he team have continued their great form following last year’s success in qualifying for the National Finals of the England Schools’ Golf Championships. The HMC foursomes was the first match of the season which saw us win 3-0 against Blundell’s, followed by another 3-0 win against Sherborne in the quarter-finals of the West, South West and Wales group. A very tough draw against Millfield saw the ‘stand out moment’ of the season. The entire match depended on the last hole where the final pairing secured the win to take us through to the regional finals. In April, in a very tight match, we unfortunately lost to Malvern College on the last

hole, missing out on a three day final in Sussex. Golf remains very strong at Exeter School with the entire team of Fred Bishop, Louis Hayman, Sam Corney, Ben Reynolds, Tom Peters and Jack Parry all achieving single figure handicaps, with four representing Devon. BY BEN REYNOLDS

It can also be reported that in the South West Six Counties U16s Championship at Truro GC in May, Fred Bishop won the tournament by one shot from Ben Reynolds, who won the handicap section on the day too. It is a rare achievement for the winners of both competitions to come from the same school. BY MR WILCOCK

SQUASH

JUNIOR SCHOOL REPORT

T

his year we were able to compete against a strong St Peter’s Lympstone side, train during lunch and after school, enter into the IAPS competition and hold the annual George Aplin Tournament. For the IAPS Tournament, six pupils travelled up to Nottingham to compete in mixed singles, mixed doubles and girls’ singles tournaments.

Highlights of the tournament came in the U11 girls’ singles competition whereby Upper One pupil Grace Golsworthy came second with Upper Two pupil Yasmin Brown winning. It was excellent to see so many players enter into the Exeter Junior School Tournament for girls and boys with some very worthy winners receiving silverware. BY MISS WRIGHT

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 139


THE EXONIAN 2019

SWIMMING

T

he swim squad had seen an increase in numbers over the last year, with three squads training per week, two after school on one before school. The Senior School team that has competed in 12 friendly galas have won 10 of these fixtures. A new addition to the calendar has been a round robin event between West Buckland, Wellington School, Queen’s College Taunton and Exeter, with each school hosting one gala per year. Five age group teams also entered the English Secondary School Relays with the senior boys’ team qualifying for the National final in London. To add variety, 19 pupils participated in a Swimathon and swam 76 km to raise over £3000 for Cancer Research UK and Marie Curie. A team of 7 pupils completed the distance of the channel overnight in Wiveliscombe pool in 11 hours 13

minutes and 55 seconds and 11 pupils competed in the 2.1 km Henley class open water swim, with Anna Czipri coming a very impressive third in the U18 girls category. Pupils have also enjoyed a term of water club after school in the spring term, as well as lifesaving clubs working towards Rookie awards in the autumn and summer terms. This year another 12 pupils have gained a National Pool Lifeguard Award through the school and 11 of the outgoing Upper Sixth pupils have renewed this qualification for the next two years. What a year! BY DR ROBB

140 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


SPORT

JUNIOR SCHOOL SWIMMING

A

very successful year was had in the pool with both the competitive and the newly established development squad. The competitive squad had six galas this year, as well as competing at the annual IAPS competition. At IAPS a number of pupils came not only in the top 50, but the top 20 in the individual races across the whole country, with Lower Two pupil Hanna Sari coming eighth, thus qualifying for the National Finals. At the London Aquatics centre, the same pool used at the London 2012 Olympics, Hanna achieved fourth in U10 25m breast stroke. At the interschool galas, the squad was able to experience countless successes and wins. In addition, it was brilliant this year to provide the development squad with the taste of how competitive galas run. Captains of the competitive swimming squad Tess Hughes and George Gillingham said: “The swimming this year has been amazing and everyone got involved in the annual House Swimming Gala. Outside of the curriculum we have been provided so many opportunities to competitively swim, as well as being able to include the development squad at the King’s Hall Gala.”

JUNIOR SCHOOL SWIMMING RESULTS P

W

L

D

U11

6

4

1

1

U10

6

4

1

1

U9

4

3

1

0

Colours: George Gillingham, Gus Lovell, Sam Benzimra, Tess Hughes, Yasmin Brown Rosie Batchelor House Gala: Scott

BY MISS WRIGHT

E X E T E R S C H O O L . O R G . U K 141


THE EXONIAN 2019

THIRD TIME LUCKY! E

xeter School hosted the South West Target Sprint Championships for the third year running with an excellent turn out, welcoming athletes from all over the country. Exeter School pupil Tom Gray was crowned the South West Youth Men Champion and secured his place at the National Series Final as did Lily Howe who took gold in the Junior Women class. Fellow pupil Chiyuan Sun took silver having tried Target Sprint for the first time in an Exeter School Games lesson. Event organiser Georgina “Gorgs” Geikie, who represented Great Britain in the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, said: “A huge thank you to the whole team at Exeter School, for hosting a fabulous South West Target Sprint Championships in their beautiful grounds. “The sun shone on many brilliant performances and it’s great to see Exeter School leading the way in the new sport of target sprint in the region. “It’s wonderful to see such a wide variety of sports, activities and opportunities available to their students; there really is something for everyone.” BY MR MASON

142 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


THE EXONIAN 2019

TENNIS T he next generation of Murrays and Kontas have flourished this year, with a string of excellent results for pupils across both the Junior and Senior School. Top-spinning and slicing their way to the regional finals, particular mention must go to the U13 boys’ team. Oscar Clements takes up the story: “We have had a brilliant season this year! We had to work hard, which showed in some close matches, particularly with Kingsbridge. We have rotated the team with everyone performing really well.”

The girls’ U13 tennis has also gone extremely well this year with Elle Golsworthy, Phoebe Redfern, Izzy Cortizo and Roxanne Bosch winning the Devon County Finals and qualifying for the regionals in September. Elle and Phoebe were both unbeaten in their singles and doubles, whilst Izzy and Roxanne were unbeaten in their double games. The girls now have their sights set on winning the regional finals and building from there.

BY MRS MARSH

JUNIOR SCHOOL

SPORTS DAY

A

s ever, Junior School Sports Day was keenly contested and enjoyed by all, with great weather adding to the atmosphere. Very well done to all competitors!

144 QDS E X E T E R S C H O O L U K


www.exeterschool.org.uk QDS ExeterSchoolUK Headmaster/Admissions 01392 273679 Junior School 01392 258738

Exeter School Victoria Park Road Exeter EX2 4NS 01392 258712

Profile for Exeter School

Exonian 2019  

The annual magazine of Exeter School showcasing events and activities across the school from the Junior School to the Sixth Form.

Exonian 2019  

The annual magazine of Exeter School showcasing events and activities across the school from the Junior School to the Sixth Form.

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