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Infrastructure Sustainability Update 2013


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Contents 2 Foreword | David Singleton, Chairman, Infrastructure

36 RA’s collaborative approach makes inroads in sustainability

debate | David Stuart-Watt, Roads Australia

Sustainability Council of Australia

3 The future for Australia’s infrastructure | The Hon Warren

40 IS – now and next | Rick Walters, Infrastructure Sustainability

Truss, Deputy Prime Minister

6 Industry embraces IS | Antony Sprigg, Chief Executive Officer,

Council of Australia

CERTIFIED RATINGS

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Introduction to Certified ratings | Rick Walters, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

Garry Bowditch, SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong

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Whitsunday Sewage Treatment Plant Upgrades

12 Delivering on sustainable public transport infrastructure |

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Great Eastern Highway Upgrade

REGISTERED RATINGS

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Introduction to Registered ratings | Rick Walters, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

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Enlarged Cotter Dam

23 Leveraging the opportunity to delivery high-performance

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North West Rail Link

assets | Dr Dennis Else, Cooperative Research Centre for Low Carbon Living

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Rous Head Industrial Park

26 Transforming the business to meet the sustainability

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Gold Coast Light Rail

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Gateway WA

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Googong Water Treatment Plant Chemical Facility Upgrade

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Wynyard Walk

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Elizabeth Quay

Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

10 Next generation infrastructure planning: A SMART partner |

Fil Cerone, Transport for NSW

16 Sharing the sustainability journey | Peter Olsen,

Thiess Pty Ltd

20 Serving the infrastructure sustainability markets | David

Kinniburgh, GHD

challenge | Sally Wright, ACTEW Water

30 Assets, energy use and ISO | Sally Nugent,

Asset Management Council

32 Australia’s infrastructure – time to take action |

Megan Motto, Consult Australia

33 Building a sustainable future | Romilly Madew, Green

Building Council of Australia

34 Infrastructure and sustainability – ownership and evolution |

Brendan Lyon, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia

58 The benefits of membership with ISCA | Tim Carter,

Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

59 Industry partners 60 Member directory

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Foreword In a period of scarce capital and many competing priorities for investment, a mature debate is needed about what constitutes sensible infrastructure investment.

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hat are the characteristics of such investments? How should they be paid for, and by whom? How should these proposals be evaluated? Unfortunately, there have in the past been some examples of poor decisionmaking, poor proposals and inadequate evaluation. A transparent process needs to be employed so that decisions about what kind of infrastructure Australia requires can be made in a sensible way. There is no shortage of capability within our industry to deal with complex, multifaceted infrastructure proposals, with appropriate community engagement. Our IS rating scheme aims to improve Australia’s infrastructure on a number of fronts. It delivers continuous social, economic and environmental improvements across the design, construction and operation phases of infrastructure assets. It is a world-leading risk and opportunity assessment framework, providing a new benchmarking tool to allow the infrastructure sector to gather information around continuous improvement, and it highlights and rewards achievements for leadership in sustainability implementation. Most

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importantly, it has started defining the business case for sustainability. Since the launch of the IS tool in February 2012, we have seen steady progress with industry take-up; this is described in the report from Antony Sprigg, our CEO, that follows. We are pleased with this progress, but there is more for us to achieve, and Antony describes our plans in this area.

The way forward is clear. Investment in new infrastructure is an investment on behalf of current and future generations The way forward is clear. Investment in new infrastructure is an investment on behalf of current and future generations. Australia is using up infrastructure in which our predecessors invested; the current generation must make a contribution. And so, it is important that these investments are optimal, with both high-value, low-cost infrastructure investments and the significant high-cost projects, being considered. IS provides the framework for assessing all such proposals, and demonstrates the benefits of including sustainability considerations in the business case for each new infrastructure asset.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

There is widespread agreement that investment in our cities and regions is vital to the economic development of Australia. This is, in turn, an investment in Australian communities, and we as an industry should reflect on the fact that communities are made up of people, buildings and infrastructure. Both people and buildings rely on the right mix of infrastructure, and we are compelled to get that mix right. My board and our operations team are proud to have the opportunity to assist in that process.

David Singleton Chairman Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia


The future for Australia’s infrastructure By Hon Warren Truss MP, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development

The new Coalition Government is determined to build the infrastructure for the 21st century to improve productivity, stimulate growth in the economy and ensure that Australians have the infrastructure our country needs.

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fficient infrastructure is vital to unlocking our nation’s potential.

I am proud that Australia has developed a world-leading tool to improve sustainability in infrastructure. The IS rating scheme, developed and administered by the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA), is an industry-based voluntary framework to establish benchmarks, encourage and reward best practice, and foster innovation.

Sustainability performance (social, economic and environmental) of infrastructure assets is of key importance to unlocking capital, establishing enduring governance and enhancing global competitiveness for Australia. Over the last two decades, transport productivity growth has been higher than the national average, but it has also slowed in line with the broader decline in productivity.

Sustainability performance (social, economic and environmental) of infrastructure assets is of key importance to unlocking capital, establishing enduring governance and enhancing global competitiveness for Australia Without continuing productivity improvements in transport, costs across the economy will increase, making Australian goods less competitive globally, and increasing the cost of living for all Australians.

Ipswich motor upgrade

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Yet, it is clear that infrastructure spending has not kept pace with the demands of our modern economy. That is why the Coalition Government has set an ambitious infrastructure agenda that will quickly see major new projects underway across the country. We will build WestConnex and the F3 to M2 link in Sydney, finally finish the duplication of the Pacific Highway between Newcastle and the Queensland border, commence work on the East West Link in Melbourne, set up the Gateway Motorway upgrade in Brisbane, start on a comprehensive upgrade of the Bruce Highway, get on with the job of upgrading the NorthSouth Corridor in Adelaide, and finish the Gateway project in Perth… to name just a few of our priorities. These projects will have a lasting positive impact on the lifestyle of people who use these major thoroughfares, easing congestion and improving the connectivity of our cities and regional centres, as well as increasing the efficiency of our freight networks.

Our miners, farmers and manufacturers will continue to supply products that the rest of the world needs. But the issue is: are we, as a nation, geared to get those goods from regional areas to ports, via roads and/or rail, in the most cost-effective way possible and, thereby, maximise our competitive advantage and grow jobs? Clearly not. So, hand-in-hand with the global and domestic demand on the horizon for Australia must come comprehensive and forward-looking infrastructure investment. In addition to continuing the $2.2 billion Roads to Recovery, Black Spot and Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity programs, the Coalition Government will partner with state and local governments to invest $600 million in repairing and upgrading local road bridges across the country. This program will address some of the significant constraints in our freight network, and improve access for local people – and others – to their service centres. Our significant capital works agenda is only part of the picture.

These projects will have a lasting positive impact on the lifestyle of people who use these major thoroughfares, easing congestion and improving the connectivity of our cities and regional centres, as well as increasing the efficiency of our freight networks Infrastructure Australia The Coalition Government will reform Infrastructure Australia to enhance its capability as an independent, transparent and expert advisory body. The Coalition Government will implement changes to the Infrastructure Australia Act 2008 to give Infrastructure Australia a Chief Executive Officer who will be answerable to the Infrastructure Australia Board. Infrastructure Australia will be tasked with developing a fifteen-year pipeline of major infrastructure projects, to be revised every five years based on national, state and local infrastructure priorities. By better coordinating and planning long-term major infrastructure projects, we can give the private sector the surety and confidence it needs to co-invest and give construction companies and their workers a more secure future. I am determined to ensure that the Australian Government is continually

Qld –Trackstar Rail Alliance

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


looking to the horizon for the next phase of investment that is required to keep pace with emerging demands. That’s how we ensure that Australia remains at the cutting edge of global competitiveness and how we avoid the costly build-up of jobs that keep being put off on the never-never.

Our significant capital works agenda is only part of the picture Infrastructure Australia will also be tasked by the Coalition Government with undertaking a fresh, evidencebased audit of our infrastructure asset base, to be run in collaboration with the states and territories, many of which now have an infrastructure advisory body of their own. This audit will also be revised every five years, and will help inform the fifteenyear pipeline plan. The Coalition Government believes that a reformed Infrastructure Australia has the potential to take a much more proactive role in identifying the infrastructure priorities our nation needs. Rather than just rely on submissions from states, territories and third parties, Infrastructure Australia itself should be working with them to identify, assess and rank infrastructure priorities across the nation. The Coalition Government also intends for Commonwealth infrastructure expenditure exceeding $100 million to be automatically subject to analysis by Infrastructure Australia to test costeffectiveness and financial viability. This will include dams, telecommunications, transport, hospitals, educational institutions, energy projects and water

networks, but not defence projects. The Coalition Government also sees an expanded role for the private sector in infrastructure delivery, planning and maintenance. While it is abundantly clear that there is no ‘silver bullet’ to trigger the level of investment we need, the Coalition Government is determined to work cooperatively with the private sector to explore innovative funding approaches to get more infrastructure projects underway. It is clear that a one-size-fits-all approach to infrastructure financing and delivery will not maximise return on the Australian Government’s investment.

A dedicated unit The Coalition Government will create a dedicated Funding and Finance Advisory Unit within Infrastructure Australia, tasked with evaluating financing options for nationally significant infrastructure projects and investigating and reporting on funding models. Our goal for this Unit is to assist a diverse range of projects in coming to market, using models that are tailor-made for each project. Whether it is a significant road or rail upgrade, a greenfield port development or the expansion of a major regional airport, we need to look at the suitability of each project for private sector investment on a case-by-case basis. Prime Minister Tony Abbott and I have made it clear that infrastructure is a national priority. To this end, we have committed to making an annual statement to the Parliament on infrastructure delivery, setting out the construction status of major infrastructure projects, Australian Government investment in infrastructure, and relevant delivery milestones over the preceding twelve months.

The Coalition Government is also establishing an Industry Advisory Council for infrastructure, to be co-chaired by the Infrastructure Australia Chief Executive Officer, and myself as the Infrastructure Minister. This forum will create closer links between the Australian Government and industry, allowing us to streamline the infrastructure task and give industry a meaningful conduit by which to effectively engage with government. Each of these reforms is significant. But, together, the Coalition believes they will maximise the value of public and private sector investment, achieve greater benefits for the economy and community, and deliver on infrastructure for the 21st century.

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Industry embraces By Antony Sprigg, Chief Executive Officer, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

Since the first Infrastructure Sustainability (IS) registration in September 2012, we have received twelve IS rating registrations, and we are currently finalising registration agreements with five more projects. In addition, we are in conversation with more than twenty project or asset stakeholders who are interested in seeking an IS rating soon.

The scalable application of the IS tool (current project CAPEX from $6 million to $8 billion).

The suitability of the IS tool for all infrastructure types is reflected and reinforced.

There is strong geographical and jurisdictional traction and take-up of the IS rating scheme. It is currently in use in Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Western Australia, with IS rating registration discussions with infrastructure delivery agencies and contractors from South Australia and Victoria.

The stakeholders registering demonstrate the appeal and merits of the business case for pursuing an IS rating (private and public sector owner/operator/delivery agencies, as well as contractors).

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The nature of the infrastructure projects registering for an IS rating reflects a number of interesting trends

he first IS Design rating was awarded to the Whitsunday STP Upgrades project by Tenix and Whitsunday Regional Council. The first IS As Built rating was awarded to the Great Eastern Highway Upgrade by the City East Alliance (including Main Roads WA, Leighton Contractors and GHD). Both certified ratings are outstanding industry achievements, and reflect the inherent partnerships required between the public and private sectors to plan for and deliver good infrastructure. The nature of the infrastructure projects registering for an IS rating reflects a number of interesting trends:

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The contract types for project delivery and operations range from fixed-cost design and construct, to construct only, and alliance through to public-private partnership, thus exploding the myth that ‘sustainability is best achieved on alliances’.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

As many of you may know, ISCA also provides external and in-house training on infrastructure sustainability, through our IS Foundation Training. Over the past fifteen months, we have trained over 275 professionals. The sectors and infrastructure stakeholder groups they represent have been: •

40 per cent professional services

35 per cent contractors

20 per cent owner/operator/ regulators

5 per cent academia/peak bodies.

Once again, these statistics reflect the growing IS trend in project planning, delivery and operations. Many of the attendees, now qualified as Infrastructure Sustainability Accredited Professionals (ISAPs), are using the knowledge and the network to assist with applying IS for both internal corporate and project/asset management purposes, in addition to formal application on projects/assets pursuing IS ratings.


Industry collaboration Another area in which ISCA has been very active is establishing strong collaboration-based relationships with a number of key infrastructure and built environment related industry peak bodies. ISCA’s mission is to be the principal industry catalyst for advancing sustainability in the planning, procurement, design, construction and operation of Australia’s infrastructure. We believe that collaboration on common and complementary issues is a powerful means to assist with achieving this mission. In many cases, these collaborative relationships also result in extending certain benefits to our respective members. Organisations with which we have been collaborating over the year include Roads Australia, Consult Australia, the Green Building Council of Australia, the Asset Management Council, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia and the Institute for Public Works and Engineers Australasia.

IS development I am very excited to announce that Thiess has just funded Stage 1 (Scoping Study) of the development of the Workforce Theme. Thanks to Thiess’s contribution, ISCA can now commence the industry consultation process regarding what the scope of this Theme should comprise. We are actively seeking industry support to develop the Workforce and Economics Themes and I encourage you to read the article ‘IS – now and next’ (page 40) in which there is more information on this development. ISCA has almost completed an important pilot trial of the IS Operations tool. The pilot trial has had a focus on council road maintenance and operations, and is a partnership with the Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government, the Institute for Public Works and Engineers Australasia, and four councils across Australia – namely, Redland City Council, Launceston City Council, Brisbane City

Council and Logan City Council. We look forward to further piloting the IS Operations tool with other sectors, asset classes and stakeholder groups.

We believe that collaboration on common and complementary issues is a powerful means to assist with achieving this mission Industry initiative An important industry initiative to which we are central, and with which we are directly involved, is the establishment of the Australian Construction Supply Chain Sustainability School (the School). This initiative is being led by the Australian infrastructure and construction industry, and Net Balance. The objective of the School is to increase sustainability knowledge and competence in the Australian infrastructure and construction sector supply chains. The Australian School will be designed to build on the experience of the UK School, which was launched in June 2012. The School will provide a virtual and face-to-face knowledge-sharing and learning environment to assist contractors, product and service providers to develop their own sustainability capabilities.

had a new website developed. We are now building on this work and have commissioned our website developer to revitalise our knowledge hub, which will be the navigable storage facility for infrastructure sustainability related case studies, information and data, and also a suite of online forums providing our members with the opportunity to share issues and ideas and ask questions. I should also mention that in 2014, ISCA is planning on hosting our inaugural Gala Dinner and Awards Night, and Infrastructure Sustainability Conference. Please visit our website for more information on opportunities to support and participate in these national events. Finally, I would like to take the opportunity to thank our Board for its ongoing strategic and governance contributions, and our Operations team for making it all happen on a day-today basis. Thank you also to all of our members for your ongoing support. Membership is a partnership, and we encourage active involvement with ISCA. We welcome the opportunity to sit down with key management, technical and marketing people from your organisation to establish how you would like to be involved with ISCA throughout each year, and leverage your membership. I am also more than happy to present to your Executive on IS trends nationally and internationally, and on emerging business, research and policy opportunities.

ISCA delivers You may recall that earlier this year we changed our name and overall brand from AGIC to ISCA, from green to blue. Thank you for all of the positive feedback associated with this change. As part of this rebrand, we

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Sponsored Article

Pioneering sustainability for the future By David Robinson, Chief Executive Officer, McConnell Dowell

With sustainability firmly entrenched as a core value of the business, operating under the clear mantra ‘act today with the future in mind’, McConnell Dowell is in it for the long run.

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nfrastructure design, procurement and delivery have undergone significant changes over the years. Markets have become increasingly competitive and volatile, while at the same time constraints on resources have continued to tighten. Couple this with the fundamental role that infrastructure plays in today’s society, and the reason why sustainable practices must be embedded in order to ensure long-term success becomes clear. At McConnell Dowell, we not only understand the need for sustainability, we’ve embraced it as a process for many years. Today, our highly developed holistic model ensures that we balance economic, social and environmental interests across multiple sectors, disciplines and geographies. By incorporating key sustainability considerations right through the planning and decision-making stages, we harness opportunities, manage risks and deliver innovative and sustainable development, which, in turn, provides real strategic value to our clients. McConnell Dowell has received numerous accolades and industry awards for a number of recent projects thanks to our ability to understand and address sustainability requirements. These awards not only recognise our dedication to innovative sustainability, but they also motivate us to continue to push the boundaries of what’s possible when developing and delivering sustainable solutions.

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For the current Gold Coast Light Rail Project, we incorporated sustainability practices right from the outset, through a comprehensive sustainability management framework, which was implemented throughout the design, construction and delivery stages. This has resulted in our registration for an As Built rating with ISCA. The Adelaide Desalination Plant was delivered with a strong commitment to achieving a durable and cost-effective engineering solution that encouraged both innovation and environmental excellence – right through from feasibility to completion. In addition to this, by respecting the values of the traditional land owners and the concerns of the local community throughout the entire process, we were able to deliver an excellent outcome – one that has seen the project receive numerous industry awards.

NoAuBnIcLi lI ToYf AUuPs D II nNf F r aRsAt rSu Tc R t uUr eC TS uUsRt aE i nSaUb Si l Ti tAy I C t rA a lTi aE Y2e0a 1 r b3o o k 2 0 1 3

As a core value of the business, sustainability is delivered by every McConnell Dowell employee across all operations each and every day. It’s been a key contributor to the growth and success of the McConnell Dowell business over the past 51 years, taking us from a small construction company to a major player in sustainable infrastructure development on an international scale. It’s a philosophy that really differentiates McConnell Dowell from its competitors and ensures that we deliver long-term value for our shareholders, customers, employees and communities as we continue to ‘act today with the future in mind’.


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Next generation infrastructure planning: A SMART partner By Garry Bowditch, Director and CEO, SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong*

The settlement system in Australia during the past 100 years has relied on a relative abundance of land, scant regard for the environment, low population densities and modest community involvement – all of which belong to the past. The question for policymakers is how we reform the institutions of government to better plan infrastructure for the future.

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ustralia is a unique place, with its thin ribbon of urban settlement from north of Brisbane through to Melbourne. This ribbon holds about nineteen million people – the vast bulk of our population. This intense coastal settlement pattern sits oddly with, if not as a contradiction to, the vastness of land that Australia has at its disposal. What will Australia’s settlement pattern and population look like in the next 100 years?

Surprisingly, policymakers and infrastructure planners overlook this question. There is also a tendency for government to frame the future infrastructure requirements in terms of individual projects – such as a road or a school – without an appropriate consideration to demography, spatial planning and the broader infrastructure network that these assets will connect with.

From a national perspective, infrastructure planning must identify the key criteria for ensuring future productivity growth and living standards There are many regions in Australia that are critical to our future economic and social wellbeing. The east coast is an obvious one, but so are the resourcerich regions of southern and western Australia. From a national perspective, infrastructure planning must identify the key criteria for ensuring future productivity growth and living standards. At the core of these criteria is the need

for the cities and regions that make up the Australian economy to be connected, both within and between them. Internationally, Singapore is a good example: the governments are actively shaping their future prosperity, with population, infrastructure and land-use planning being brought together as a coherent whole. A national perspective is important to support the country’s interest, enabling cities and regions to work together to improve international competitiveness. Australia, with its federation structure, will need to be increasingly cognisant of international examples such as Singapore. Australia must then identify better long-term planning regimes that enable its competitive position to be improved rather than undermined by short-term decisions, which limit the provision of future infrastructure networks necessary to drive an efficient and equitable outcome for all Australians. A recent report by the Federal Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development1 concluded that, when a jurisdiction undertakes rigorous long-term planning and robust business cases, the likelihood of success is greatest. The need for longterm planning, therefore, is not only concerned with public policy outcomes, but also with strengthening the interface between government and the private sector, as there is an increasing need to rely on private capital to fund public infrastructure. While there has been some success in this regard with publicprivate partnerships, there are numerous impediments to the deployment of private capital – particularly owing to high risks such as design, patronage, 1 Department of Infrastructure and Transport, Infrastructure Planning and Delivery: Best Practice Case Studies, December 2010 p. 7

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regulatory and environmental, to name a few. All of these are challenging, and in need of reform. The challenge for Australia is to establish a more coherent and consistent approach to long-term planning for infrastructure. This challenge for all levels of government has resulted in the establishment of the SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong. The research at SMART builds the rationale and mandate for the answer to a question that all of us have intuitively seen as important: how can Australia better plan, design, procure and manage for the long-term infrastructure requirements of our rapidly growing economy? Is there an infrastructure-planning recipe for Australia that allows our communities and assets to come together as a whole that is greater than the sum of its individual parts; therefore, having a positive impact on productivity, the wellbeing of the community, and adaptation and resilience to change? This is both our challenge and purpose at SMART, where the following ‘grand challenge’ guides our research and policy development direction. ‘Given that infrastructure is not an “engineering artefact” but an “agent of change”, is it possible to imagine infrastructure systems that can meet the needs of double today’s population with half of today’s resources while providing twice the liveability?’ (Factor 8)2

Bringing together growth, prosperity and change Australia’s future ability to remain a competitive, attractive and resilient society will depend on how, over the next twenty years, we deal with 2 Factor 8 is SMART’s ‘Grand research challenge’, an interdisciplinary approach proposition that will allow us to do soon what others will do later.

some critical issues. These include the competing calls for new infrastructure, the phenomena of network congestion, stressed water and energy systems, lowering carbon emissions, and how best to procure, implement and manage expensive and risky infrastructure projects and systems. The benefit of this innovation should be that it enables Australia to better function as a single system. In doing so, it should unleash investment, productivity and new aspirations that enable more of the population to contribute to and benefit from the national economy. The construction of the transcontinental railway in the United States challenged the existing status quo of transport infrastructure, and established a vital new physical transport network that revolutionised both the population and economy of America’s west. This is a good example of how the ability to adapt legislative and regulatory frameworks to new infrastructure can result in economic success. Such adaptation ensures that the second-round effects of the investment, such as innovation, can be quickly translated into productive growth and new opportunities.  Next-generation infrastructure planning is more evidence-based. That is, to achieve city-wide/regional benefits from infrastructure, policymakers will need to be better equipped to understand the impact of their decisions, and nuance their objectives in complex and challenging environments. Data from cities, regions, government agencies, private sector and the community itself will support deeper insight about the ways in which infrastructure impacts productivity, wellbeing of constituents and resilience of systems (water, energy, transport and social infrastructure). Effective infrastructure planning must be informed about the way suburbs

and precincts change over time, and the implications of that change on physical infrastructure. The use of land within cities and regions, as well as the demographics and behaviours of the population, are important; for example, choice of transport mode, access to employment, building size, income levels and density all represent key drivers of change. If these drivers are not accounted for in a dynamic and rigorous way in the planning process, there is an increased risk of not achieving the intended social and economic outcomes. Land-use activity has an important impact on transport assets, and there is a need to ensure they are aligned in the planning process. When they are not, new suburbs are without adequate public transport, highway expansions occur without coordination with local rail systems, and ports and airports are expanded without solving bottlenecks on connecting roads and rail networks. SMART has built a prototype large-scale agent-based model to integrate land use and transport planning for Sydney. The model, created in partnership with Transport for NSW, enables rigorous scenario development of future dynamic changes across population demographics, land-use planning and infrastructure requirements. This model can be adapted to other jurisdictions and infrastructure types. There are major social and economic challenges associated with the planning and delivery of infrastructure in Australia and across the globe. Governments have a fundamental role to play in ensuring that planning regimes and delivery agencies are able to adapt and be front-footed to the rapidly changing environment of cities and their national economies. SMART is an important new partner in ensuring the success of infrastructure planning institutions through research, development of analytical tools to support evidence-based decision-making, and professionals who are trained to be holistic and globally cutting-edge in the skills they use to deliver a smarter infrastructure future. *Garry Bowditch is the inaugural CEO, SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong, Australia. More information is available at smart.uow.edu.au.

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Delivering on sustainable public transport infrastructure By Fil Cerone, Principal Manager Sustainability and Systems, Transport Projects, Transport for NSW

Transport for NSW is the New South Wales Government’s lead transport agency, responsible for improving the customer experience, planning, program administration, policy, regulation, procuring transport services, infrastructure and freight.

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ransport for NSW has been an active member of the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) for a number of years, and is supportive of ISCA’s mission to enhance the liveability and productivity of our major cities and regional communities through advancing sustainability in infrastructure planning, procurement, delivery and operation. We are committed to working in partnership to deliver innovative and sustainable transport networks that make New South Wales a great place to live and work. Our commitment to sustainable infrastructure was first embraced in 2008, when the former Transport Infrastructure Development Corporation developed a set of sustainability targets for delivery of rail infrastructure projects. Since then, a renewed set of indicators and targets has been developed to reflect our expanded portfolio of projects, and now applies to rolling stock, fleet assets, light rail, commuter car parks, station upgrades and pedestrian links, such as Wynyard Walk. This has enabled us to keep up with trends in sustainable infrastructure and global best practice.

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sustainable over time and in line with our customers’ expectations. One of the revised targets mandates that all construction projects with a capital expenditure greater than $50 million achieve a rating using the ISCA rating tool.

The drivers for sustainability The sustainability framework The Transport for NSW sustainability framework is outcomes-based and seeks to improve our environmental and social performance while achieving value for money. The framework can be found on the Transport for NSW website (www.transport.nsw.gov.au).

The framework has been developed to ensure that:

Transport for NSW believes that there is a range of environmental, economic and social benefits to be gained from adopting a sustainability perspective into our daily project and corporate activities. Value to Transport for NSW: •

resilient infrastructure that will withstand the effects of climate change

reduced costs from the efficient use of resources such as energy, materials and water

our transport system is sustainable over time

it reflects NSW 2021, the New South Wales Government’s 10-year plan, which focuses on delivering an integrated, customer-focused transport system

management of environmental risk

higher-quality outcomes in the products and services procured

enhanced relationship with the supply chain and the community

it reflects the New South Wales Long Term Transport Master Plan, Transport for NSW’s comprehensive and integrated strategy for all modes of transport

improved staff engagement and productivity.

it supports the delivery of the Transport for NSW Corporate Plan 2012–17 to minimise the impact of transport on the environment.

The framework includes specific targets, which can also be found on the Transport for NSW website. We will continue to review and measure our performance against these targets to ensure our transport system is

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Value to the community: •

better environmental outcomes such as air and water quality

opportunities to influence decision-making

greater transparency

improved health and wellbeing

improved community connectedness and amenity

enduring positive outcomes.


Sustainability guiding principles

One of the revised targets mandates that all construction projects with a capital expenditure greater than $50 million achieve a rating using the ISCA rating tool

In order to guide decision-making in the design and construction of resilient transport infrastructure, Transport for NSW has established six key sustainability principles: •

Consider whole-of-life costing – the potential future costs – such as operating costs, the environmental and social costs, and the initial capital expenditure in the assessment of the best option. This will ensure that the true cost of the asset over its lifetime is fully considered.

Integrated planning – work with delivery partners to develop integrated transport services and infrastructure that meet the existing and future requirements of our customers.

Encourage innovation – drive continual improvement in the environmental performance

of transport infrastructure and services during planning, design, construction and operation. This will help to ensure that best practice is maintained. •

Customer focus – consider the needs and expectations of our customers in the planning, design,

construction and operation of transport services and infrastructure. The customer is at the centre of our decision-making and our approach. •

Engage partners – the successful delivery of transport services and infrastructure also depends on the performance of our private sector and government partners. Transport for NSW aims to develop strong and trusted relationships with its partners to ensure that transport services and infrastructure meet stakeholders’ expectations – value for money, innovation and environmental performance.

Measure and report performance – reporting progress against our sustainability indicators and targets. This includes biannual internal reporting to an Executive Committee, and annual reporting to external stakeholders.

Sydenham Station upgrade

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Sustainable design guidelines The Transport for NSW Sustainable Design Guidelines introduce initiatives and outcomes aimed at improving the sustainability performance of transport infrastructure and reinforcing our ongoing commitment to sustainability. The guidelines seek to deliver sustainable development practices by embedding sustainability initiatives into the design and construction of transport infrastructure projects. These guidelines form part of the Transport for NSW Sustainability Framework. Some of the initiatives in the guidelines directly relate to the measurement and reporting of the framework targets. It is important that these guidelines facilitate the rewarding of innovation. Project teams that design and implement initiatives that are not covered by, or that exceed, the guidelines’ requirements can be recognised and rewarded. A copy of the Sustainable Design Guidelines can be accessed via the Transport for NSW website.

Moving forward The sustainability targets and associated rating tools have been created, in part, to meet community expectations that public transport infrastructure should be designed, constructed and operated in an environmentally sound manner. Transport for NSW has developed frameworks that enable sustainability considerations to be factored into the project lifecycle. The implementation of this strategy will be demonstrated through two large-scale transport infrastructure projects in New South Wales: the $8.3 billion North West Rail Link, and the $1.6 billion CBD and South East Light Rail. These projects will be able to confirm that sustainable infrastructure makes good economic, environmental and social sense.

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Tree planting day

Transport for NSW definition of sustainability Transport for NSW acknowledges the three spheres of sustainability: environmental, social and economic. The Transport for NSW Sustainability Policy focuses on the conservation and enhancement of air, water, soils, energy, resources and other factors in the environment needed for biodiversity and our communities. Social sustainability (individual and community wellbeing and safety) and economic sustainability (economic prosperity and productivity) are equally important to Transport for NSW, and are managed and reported separately from environmental effort.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


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Sharing the sustainability journey By Peter Olsen, Executive General Manager, People, Safety and Environment, Thiess Pty Ltd

For nearly 80 years, Thiess has played a pivotal role in building vital infrastructure, delivering for the resources sector and providing essential services for communities. Today, the company has amassed enormous depth and breadth of experience, and capabilities, to become one of Australia’s leading construction, mining and services contractors.

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he company has embarked on a journey to raise the profile of environmental management so that policy becomes reality and our people

are empowered to achieve our objective – ‘smaller footprint, bigger future’ – a core driver in every part of our business. We recognise that innovation and sustainability are the keys to realising our vision of ‘Creating a brighter future, together’. We strive to achieve outcomes that deliver better results today and in the future for our projects, our clients, our 19,000-strong workforce, the environment and the communities in which we operate. Thiess has a long history with the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA). This commenced with championing the establishment of ISCA and the development of a national infrastructure sustainability rating scheme through the provision of seed funding and dedicated resources. Once ISCA was formed, Thiess became its first corporate member – under its previous name, the Australian Green Infrastructure Council (AGIC) – with Board representation in its first four

years. Thiess’s rationale for its active involvement in ISCA’s establishment went beyond demonstrating its commitment to progressing sustainability in the infrastructure sector, to: •

demonstrating leadership in driving innovation and sustainable solutions

introducing the Infrastructure Sustainability (IS) rating tool to ensure sustainability concepts can be translated into an easily understood practical roadmap, and integrated into project contracts and decision-making

providing a metric system that can be used internally for performance, benchmarking and continual improvement purposes

reducing tendering costs by adopting a nationally consistent language: a flexible framework adaptable to a broad range of infrastructure types, and based on stretched targets and benchmarks that cater for the vast range of

The Hunter Expressway Project

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


The use of biodiesel generators on the M80 project in Melbourne generated cost savings, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and minimised noise and air-particle emissions.

The use of alternative construction materials on the M80 project provided several direct benefits to Thiess, as well as contributing to developing the local supply base: geopolymer concrete, the Green Pipe for temporary stormwater drainage, and crushed glass as an alternative to bedding sand in utility installations.

Multiple examples of the reincorporation of mildly contaminated soils, railway ballast and crushed asphalt pavement back into project landforms in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria have saved millions of dollars, in comparison to traditional landfill disposal options. This was achieved through our team’s meticulous material classification, risk assessment, engagement with client and regulators, and good design.

In 2012, six of Thiess’s infrastructure projects diverted more than 90 per cent of waste material from landfill as a result of recycling and reuse efforts.

Thiess is dedicated to being smart, resourceful and values-driven, but above all, future-focused. Our core focus, through innovation, is to deliver the best solutions for clients; whether they be cost savings, whole-of-life durability, meticulous programming, or the highestquality outcomes to enhance the environment, the communities in which we operate, and relationships with stakeholders.

A hybrid excavator achieved improved environmental outcomes on the Hunter Expressway Project without extra cost

standards across multiple tiers of government and industry.

The surge of IS rating requirements Since the launch of ISCA’s nationally recognised sustainability rating scheme in 2012, an increasing number of agencies and government departments have adopted IS ratings as a contractual requirement. Some of the early supporters include Transport for New South Wales, and Main Roads Western Australia, with others considering its adoption, and voluntary registration of projects for IS ratings. Furthermore, two Thiess projects are currently registered for IS ratings (Wynyard Walk in Sydney’s CBD, and one other) with both targeting ‘Excellent’ ratings. More are anticipated to follow suit.

Sustainability – it’s not just a rating! While ISCA and the IS rating tool have brought undeniable benefit to the infrastructure industry in terms

of sustainable development, Thiess’s commitment to sustainability goes beyond compliance. This is nowhere better demonstrated than in a recent example, where Thiess provided an alternative solution to an energy company installing a pipeline through a sensitive marine environment. Thiess’s tunnelling proposal proved to be superior over a dredging option in an environmental context, accelerated the receipt of planning approvals, and reduced costs. Thiess has also been able to establish significant cost and time savings through the implementation of other sustainable initiatives, including the following: •

The use of hybrid electricdiesel excavators on the Hunter Expressway Alliance at no extra cost, and with the same performance, reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent in comparison to an equivalent-sized excavator, as well as reducing our carbon footprint, noise and air emissions.

Through our leadership and innovation in forging environmentally sustainable development, we are striving to help create a brighter future for us all.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Sponsored Article

Infrastructure: planning for randomness By Professor Michael Regan

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nfrastructure is one of Australia’s largest asset groups, and plays a central role in our economy. In its various forms, infrastructure provides the framework for Australia’s output capacity, contributes to growth and productivity, directly affects private transaction costs, and furnishes the essential services that underpin the liveability of our cities and regions. Infrastructure is also under pressure from past underinvestment, high depreciation that accounts for over half of all new investment, and the destruction caused by natural events, including cyclones, bushfires and floods. Central to improving the sustainability of this important asset class is better planning and engineering design, innovation and technology, the adoption of sustainability standards and regular comparative review and assessment, and improved risk management to minimise the impact of natural events. Much work is now being done to improve these drivers of sustainability; however, more remains to be done on the question of managing infrastructure for random events. The majority of contemporary risk management practice treats risk and

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uncertainty interchangeably, and is focused on traditional measurement methods designed to protect complex and fragile assets and systems from random events. The tools include probability theory, historical records of natural events, deterministic and stochastic modelling and reliance on the experience, and judgement of decision-makers to identify optimal risk mitigation and management solutions. Complex systems are vulnerable to unanticipated risk and nonlinear responses. London’s transport network runs at 98 per cent efficiency every morning of each working day, and even a localised power blackout can bring large parts of the city to a complete halt. Auckland’s power shutdown in 1998 closed much of the city for five weeks, Melbourne’s Longford gas plant explosion left the city without fuel in 1998, and a number of signal and energy failures in Sydney’s peak hours in 2009 and on several occasions in 2013 caused major disruption to most of the city. These events support the argument that we cannot predict random events, nor can we fully protect our infrastructure systems and wider society from their consequences. In the past decade, two researchers have presented alternative approaches.

Benoit Mandelbrot measured uncertainty in nature and developed his fractal geometry thesis, which argues that there is subtle order in chaos, which is capable of measurement and therefore prediction. Mendelbrot’s work provides insights to randomness in capital markets. Nassim Taleb adopted a different approach, but also one that challenges present risk measurement practice. In his bestseller, The Black Swan, Taleb argues that we cannot predict future natural events, and he disputes the accuracy of probability theory and the Gaussian bell-shaped distribution curve. In Antifragile, Taleb makes a persuasive case for greater innovation and technology and wider use of ‘bottom up’ planning and design solutions. He argues that we accept the inevitability of random events and modify our planning and design approach to embrace nonpredictive decision-making, adaption and sustainability, and reduce the complexity of our infrastructure systems to minimise unanticipated effects. Mandelbrot, B. and Hudson, R.L. 2005, The (Mis) behaviour of Markets, A Fractal View of Risk, Ruin and Reward, Profile Books, London. Taleb, N.N. 2010, The Black Swan, The Impact of the Highly Improbable, Random House Trade Publication, New York. Taleb, N.N. 2012, Antifragile, How to Live in a World We Don’t Understand, Allen Lane, London.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013 INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Serving the infrastructure sustainability markets By David Kinniburgh, Global Market Leader – Transportation, GHD

When it comes to infrastructure, societies around the world are re-examining what is economically, socially and ecologically practical. With a strong need for resource efficiency and more resilient infrastructure, many of the traditional approaches to infrastructure delivery are being reconsidered.

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s a leading global engineering, architecture and environmental consultancy, GHD plays a critical role in infrastructure design and delivery. Through each of our internal business streams, we have developed effective approaches to integrate sustainability across our entire business.

While there are many definitions of sustainability, for us it means improving human wellbeing without compromising the local or global environment over the long term. This is not an ‘add-on’ to our business, but an integral part of our operations.

GHD is a founding member of the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) and has played a critical role in the project management and development of the ISCA IS rating tool. In February 2012, GHD sponsored the national launch of the Infrastructure Sustainability scheme at Parliament House in Canberra. We are also members of Green Building Councils in Australia, New Zealand, the Middle East, the United Kingdom and the United States. Sustainability has a strong commercial driver; increasingly, our clients face an economic imperative to use their assets more efficiently. We are helping clients rehabilitate and refurbish existing assets instead of replacing them, as well as

GHD worked on the M80 Ring Road Upgrade Project, which received an Earth Award from Civil Contractors Federation, Victoria

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


looking at ways to improve efficiency, and to lower operating and maintenance costs. These needs guide the thinking of our teams serving the five markets of water, property and buildings, transportation, energy and resources, and environment.

Water When it comes to water, we need to maximise its application for human wellbeing and minimise any impact on the environment. In addition, our clients in the water sector are looking to maintain service quality, despite increasing energy prices and ageing infrastructure. GHD has developed a software algorithm, for use in conjunction with existing pumps and blowers, that is capable of reducing energy use and maintenance costs, and predicting pump or blower failures or wider system disruptions. With some 50 per cent of energy costs of most water infrastructure being attributable to pump assets, we believe that including this tool as part of remote monitoring or supervisory control and data acquisition

(SCADA) systems is one of the cheapest and most effective ways of minimising energy costs. In a further effort to reduce energy costs for our clients, GHD has produced a proprietary energy benchmarking database, which includes information from 600 water and wastewater facilities in the United States. The relative performance of a given water or wastewater plant can be compared to this database in order to find areas for improvement. We are working on expanding our benchmarking database offering to include other asset types and performance characteristics. For example, a client may require a dataset for the chemical or operational costs of a desalination plant. GHD has also played a key role in implementing the ISCA IS framework across key water projects in Australia, including delivery of the Enlarged Cotter Dam through the Bulk Water Alliance, and working with Tenix on the

two sewage treatment plant upgrades in the Whitsundays. The latter was certified as the first IS rating in Australia, and demonstrated forwardthinking approaches applied in the areas of stakeholder management and climate change.

Property and buildings At GHD, we believe that sustainability is a core feature of well-designed buildings and cities. It requires a combination of skills in architecture, engineering, planning and sustainability services. Our traditional design disciplines are complemented by offerings in energyand water-efficient design, whole-of-life cycle analysis, embodied energy, water and pollutant minimisation, passive design and indoor environment quality. We also conduct audits and work according to international rating standards including LEED, Green Star, NABERS, Estidama, BREEAM, HK BEAM and China System.

GHD has played a key role implementing the ISCA IS framework across key water projects in Australia, including delivery of the Enlarged Cotter Dam through the Bulk Water Alliance. Photo courtesy of Bulk Water Alliance

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Transportation Sustainable transport is about finding ways to move the growing number of people and goods efficiently in ways that reduce overall impacts. GHD was part of the City East Alliance that delivered the first IS-rated project in Western Australia – the Great Eastern Highway Upgrade. In addition, the Great Eastern Highway Upgrade, the M80 Ring Road in Victoria and the Pacific Motorway Upgrade in Queensland have recently received Earth Awards from the Civil Contractors Federation for innovations that minimised environmental impact. Our national and international transport teams are working effectively to develop smart road, rail and port design to reduce project material, transport and construction costs.

Energy and resources Worldwide, there is growth in energy demand as populations increase and nations improve living standards. GHD is working to reduce reliance on fossil

fuels through assisting renewable energy projects and advancing the development of cleaner fuels, such as gas. In Australia, we have worked to support Acciona Energy, Union Fenosa and Westwind in advancing wind farms, while also delivering engineering services for renewable energy projects in the Philippines. GHD has taken a lead role in facilitating the development of largescale solar and biofuel projects.

In Australia, navigating the complex approvals for infrastructure projects across the state and federal legislative frameworks continues to be a priority for our clients. In carrying out planning and environmental impact assessments, our environmental professionals work with our engineers and designers to offer integrated sustainable solutions from the outset. Our teams are also pioneering novel approaches.

GHD is also playing a key role in the development of cleaner energy sources, such as coal seam gas and liquefied natural gas, in Australia, including advice on overcoming water management and environmental challenges.

In regional New South Wales, GHD has been working with our clients to establish biobanking schemes – a market-based approach to managing biodiversity impacts. With biobanking, the detrimental impacts of development can be offset by purchasing ‘biodiversity credits’ in the open market. These credits are generated by landowners who encourage and protect flora, fauna and ecosystems on their land, and in return receive an income from the sale of credits. Biobanking schemes help protect areas of high biodiversity and produce revenue from what may otherwise have been highly constrained land.

Environment GHD’s environmental business has grown rapidly over the past decade in response to global urbanisation and increasing environmental standards. Our goal is to create smarter solutions for infrastructure delivery, while meeting the expectations of stakeholders and our communities.

As part of Team M1, GHD worked with the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads, the BHA Joint Venture and Bonacci Group on the Pacific Motorway Upgrade at Daisy Hill.

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Leveraging the opportunity to deliver high-performance assets By Dr Dennis Else, Chair, Research Advisory Committee, Cooperative Research Centre for Low Carbon Living, General Manager for Sustainability, Safety and Health, Brookfield Multiplex

When it comes to sustainability, we need to take a long-term view and think more broadly than just environmental value; we also have to maximise the social and economic value of assets. By investing in broader thinking, and doing so at the front end, we can deliver high-performance assets that drive value across the triple bottom line.

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s an industry, we have a significant role to play in reducing carbon emissions and achieving environmental targets, and much is being done to maximise this opportunity; however, the pursuit of low-carbon projects provides a huge opportunity to simultaneously improve the performance of our buildings and infrastructure assets. The creation of the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Low Carbon Living brings together a national consortium of forty-five participants, including universities, government, and construction and building industries. The CRC for Low Carbon Living was established in 2012 to provide government and industry with social, technological and policy tools to overcome identified market barriers.

CRC for LCL sees ISCA’s role as encouraging the industry to invest in extra thinking and planning at earlier stages of projects, and we believe it will lead to betterperforming assets

Fiona Stanley Hospital

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One Shelley Street

The CRC’s aim is to prevent the adoption of cost-effective low-carbon products and services, while maintaining industry competiveness and improving quality of life. The CRC for LCL brings together key property, planning, engineering and policy organisations with leading Australian researchers. This helps to unlock barriers to cost-effective carbon reduction opportunities, empower communities, and facilitate the widespread adoption of integrated renewable energy, enabling the sector to transition and contribute to Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions targets. With this intrinsic interest in constructing assets that optimise performance outcomes and deliver long-term value – be it financial, social or environmental – the CRC has partnered with Brookfield Multiplex as a key industry stakeholder. In 2009, Brookfield Multiplex carried out an operational excellence study to determine the best way to optimise project performance. This study assessed 259 projects delivered across different regions and sectors to uncover performance trends. The study showed that the ability to influence project outcomes (including

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safety, quality, sustainability, time and cost) was much greater in the preplanning stage than in the construction phase. It showed that the extra time invested in up-front thinking was repaid in spades with higherperforming projects. The study highlights the opportunity for the entire industry to drive highperformance outcomes by collaborating at the front end of projects. One project on which Brookfield Multiplex has been able to demonstrate this is the $2 billion Fiona Stanley Hospital – the largest infrastructure project ever undertaken by the Western Australian Government. Under an Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) model, the project scope was collaboratively agreed on, and resolved building issues before the project became too advanced. Also key to the success of this project was the application of evidence-based design to incorporate natural outlooks, rooftop gardens and internal courtyards that would positively impact on patient recovery times. As a result, the project is now 95 per cent complete, and both on time and on budget. But, more broadly, good

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

planning means it will have a lasting social impact on patient and staff health and wellbeing. Brookfield Multiplex’s pursuit of high-performance assets is naturally aligned with the thinking of ISCA, and the company has been a member of its global reference panel since its inception. The CRC for LCL sees ISCA’s role as encouraging the industry to invest in extra thinking and planning at earlier stages of projects, and we believe it will lead to better-performing assets. Evidence will be the key to driving this shift in approach. For many years, Brookfield Multiplex has been researching and contributing to the evidence base for high-performance projects, and helping clients to understand how they can unlock greater value from their assets. Now, the CRC for LCL is enabling the necessary critical mass and diversity of built environment stakeholders to address this complex multidisciplinary task, and provide government and industry with a vehicle for trialling alternative infrastructure and community engagement solutions.


Sponsored Article

‘Our vision for sustainability is the clever integration of people, communities and the built environment’ By Suzanna Remmerswaal (Northrop Sustainability Consultant)

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orthrop is a multi-disciplinary firm with a strong emphasis on sustainability. We have over 35 years of experience in civil and structural works across the public domain sector. We are known for our clever collaboration with project stakeholders to ensure the delivery of the best solution for the project and the environment. ‘Northrop has a strong understanding of sustainability issues across project disciplines. Northrop has provided proactive advice and practical solutions that satisfy, and in many cases exceed, expectations.’ Viv Allanson, CEO, Maroba Caring Communities.

Our recent award-winning projects include: •

Ballast Point Park – Embracing world-leading sustainability principles, the design minimises the carbon footprint and ecologically rehabilitates the site for the local community.

Bourke Street Cycleway, ‘Making Sydney a cycling city’ – Through careful consideration of Bourke Street’s built and landscape heritage, the facility provides a new appreciation of one of the great streets in Sydney’s inner east.

Kingston Foreshore Pedestrian Bridge – The bridge echoes the original industrial nature of the site through clever use of sustainable materials.

SUSTAINABILITY

BEYOND BUILDINGS

Congratulations! ‘PCA Future Leader of The Year’ Karen Billington, Northrop sustainability expert, has been awarded the coveted Property Council of Australia ‘2013 ACT Future Leader of The Year’, recognising her contribution, excellence and industry achievements. Karen is the Manager of Northrop’s Sustainability Group.

“Karen was a stand-out in a very strong field of nominees. She has the potential to become one of Australia’s future sustainability stars.” Catherine Carter, Excecutive Director, Property Council of Australia

Contact our Sustainability Team on: Sydney: (02) 9241 4188 | Canberra: (02) 6285 1822 Sustainability Consulting Advice across the Built Environment BUILDINGS | INFRASTRUCTURE | PRECINCTS | POLICY

www.northrop.com.au

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Transforming the business to meet the sustainability challenge By Sally Wright, Business Sustainability Project Manager, ACTEW Water

In July 2012, ACTEW Water accepted direct responsibility for the management and operation of water and sewerage services in the Canberra region. This involved taking over operation of the Australian Capital Territory’s network of dams, water and sewage treatment plants, reservoirs, pumping stations, mains, and other related infrastructure servicing 360,000 people, as well as supplying bulk treated water to Queanbeyan in New South Wales.

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anberra, like many other Australian cities, faces the twin pressures of an increasing population – which has been growing faster than the national average in recent years, making Canberra Australia’s largest inland city – and changing climates with hotter and drier conditions expected over time. Canberra was originally developed as Australia’s capital city in 1908 due to the potential supply of water in the area, so water security is high on the agenda for ACTEW Water (ACTEW). Also of importance is continuing to deliver safe drinking water and reliable sewerage services to the community in a sustainable manner – reducing emissions, energy use and utility costs where possible – and being a major contributor to the social and environmental interests of the Capital Region. With the integration of these water and sewerage responsibilities, ACTEW took the opportunity to drive a business transformation program to set a new, clear strategic direction for the organisation. This included a new mission and vision statement and a set of seven strategic imperatives, with a greater emphasis on improving the sustainability of the business and its operations.

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A sustainability framework was developed soon after to help deliver on the new corporate goals and achieve a balanced approach to maintaining four elements of sustainability: financial, cultural, social and environmental health. The sustainability framework laid out the foundations for how sustainability was to be driven across the organisation through policy, process change, tool development, technology improvements, cultural change and continuous improvement.

Sustainability framework – a holistic approach Through a commitment to go beyond regulatory requirements and implement best practice wherever practical, one of the first steps ACTEW took in its sustainability journey was to engage with its customers and stakeholders via a sustainability materiality assessment. This assessment aimed to discover the areas of sustainability that were valued most by customers and stakeholders in order to ensure that ACTEW’s priorities aligned with those values. Interviews and surveys were conducted to gain insight into the views of key external and internal stakeholders. The issues that shared the highest priority included safety, water security, environmental

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

protection, wastewater management, legal compliance, availability of skilled personnel, infrastructure maintenance and augmentation, and energy use, among others. These issues have been used to develop ACTEW’s sustainability performance measures, and to help inform sustainability strategy and action planning. A diagnostic of the business was also undertaken, which highlighted various process improvements that could be made to improve the sustainability of the organisation. Actions to address these opportunities are currently being incorporated into ACTEW’s operations and services. One of these actions is the development of a sustainability scorecard – a practical tool to drive sustainability across ACTEW capital works programs. This tool has been integrated into ACTEW’s capital works planning process, and enables all project managers to apply the tool and assess the sustainability of different project options at the initiation of a project. The sustainability score for each option provides the project manager with an understanding of the project option that will provide the most sustainable outcome, helping to determine which option to pursue.


ACTEW is a founding member of ISCA, and is in the process of implementing sustainability assessments for the design, build and operation phases of infrastructure projects using the IS rating tool. This has been incorporated into two of ACTEW’s strategic infrastructure projects: the Googong Water Treatment Plant Chemical Facility Upgrade, and the recently completed Enlarged Cotter Dam.

Case study – leading through innovation: driving sustainability across the Cotter Dam The Enlarged Cotter Dam construction represents one of the most significant infrastructure projects in Canberra’s history. The dam was designed and built to deliver long-term water security for Canberra and to address drought and climate change variability. It will also support Canberra’s future economic growth and development by providing an additional 35 per cent volume of the Australian Capital Territory’s water storage capacity (a growth from the previous dam’s four-gigalitre capacity to the enlarged dam’s 76-gigalitre capacity). ACTEW, as part of the Bulk Water Alliance, has received several national awards for the innovation and sustainability of the Enlarged Cotter Dam project, including the Australian Water Association National Water Award in Program Innovation 2013, the Engineers Australia Engineering Excellence Award 2013, and the prestigious international Environmental Excellence Award 2013 from the International Erosion Control Association. Some of the sustainability features of the dam, and benefits to the local area, include the following: •

Throughout the construction process, resources were re-used wherever possible. One million tonnes of foundation bedrock was quarried and retained on site to be crushed and used in the construction of the dam wall.

Processing this bedrock on-site to produce concrete saved nearly three million kilometres of construction vehicle journeys. •

In a world first, approximately seven kilometres of specially created freshwater rock reef was constructed to protect the endangered Macquarie perch. The rock reef will continue to assist university research well beyond the construction of the dam.

More than 120 grass trees (Xanthorrhoea sp.) from the inundation zone were relocated to nearby areas of the Cotter catchment, and the Australian National Botanic Gardens and National Arboretum in Canberra.

To offset the biodiversity impact of constructing the new dam, 420 hectares of land in the Cotter Dam catchment area were rehabilitated with native plantings. These plantings stabilise the land as well as enhancing the water quality of the catchment area.

In consultation with the local Yurung Dhaura Indigenous working group, a nursery of bush medicine and traditional food species was planted. Any aboriginal artefacts discovered in the Cotter dam location were returned to country.

Local recreation areas were improved. The Cotter Avenue recreation area was upgraded, and a Cotter Dam Discovery Trail was created together with a dam-viewing platform. Over 250,000 people have visited the Discovery Trail since it was opened to the public.

A specific environmental education program was developed for six- to eighteen-year-olds with around 1600 pupils already in attendance.

Approximately 2.5 million working hours were dedicated to this project, and the project delivered leading-edge safety management

strategies to ensure that site safety was never compromised. •

All carbon emissions associated with the construction and operation of the dam project are being offset through programs in Western Australia.

Sustainability in practice The water and sewerage network that ACTEW operates is sophisticated and sizeable, with more than 6000 kilometres of water and sewerage mains, 47 water reservoirs, and more than 50 water and sewage-pumping stations, in addition to large water and sewage treatment plants. As such, reducing energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and operating costs are critical issues for the business. ACTEW has developed a strategy for reducing its energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in order to help build the organisation’s resilience to rising energy prices and reach greenhouse gas emission targets set by the Australian Capital Territory Government. Already, ACTEW has achieved its target of fifteen per cent renewable energy supply by 2012–13, to comply with the Australian Capital Territory Government’s target for renewable energy supply. In addition, through its commitment to emission reduction, ACTEW has lowered its greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 860 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (excluding carbon offsets) in the last year. Embedding sustainability across all areas of a business is a long and complex process. ACTEW is committed to making continual improvements, and aims to become a leading, sustainable water utility.

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Sponsored Article

Representing IPWEA members’ interests The Roads and Transport Directorate represents members’ interests in a variety of forums, including: •

National Asset Management Strategy (NAMS) meetings

IPWEA (New South Wales) Road Safety Panel

The Street Openings Conference

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) reviews including: •

Road Maintenance Council Contracts (RMCC) Review Committee

natural disaster arrangements

state road asset maintenance responsibilities.

Transport for NSW Level Crossing Working Group

Transport for NSW Network Development Workshops.

The Directorate makes presentations to a variety of audiences including: •

each of the 13 IPWEA (New South Wales) Regional Group Forums

the New South Wales Local Roads Congress

a number of IPWEA group meetings

Australian Institute of Traffic Planning and Management regional forums

Roads, bridges and road safety are critical issues for local communities.

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waste association groups covering the use of recycled crushed glass in civil construction.

Recent publications include: •

indexing of previously unpublished research projects

ROADguide – pavement and seal design and the implications of the fourth power rule to the assessment of Higher Mass Limits Vehicles on local roads

2012 Asset Benchmarking Reports

Construction Cost Forecasts 2012 to 2022.


IPWEA (NSW) ROADS & TRANSPORT DIRECTORATE

The Roads & Transport Directorate is a joint undertaking between the Local Government and Shires Associations of NSW and IPWEA (NSW). The Directorate commenced operations in October 2004. The Directorate was set up to meet the following objectives: Assisting members in discharging their road management roles: • • • •

Effectively In accordance with current legal obligations Using the most recent technical practices Applying consistent and cost effective asset management

Assisting: • • • • •

IPWEA (NSW) The Local Government Association of NSW The Shires Association of NSW Individual Councils Directorate members

In lobbying: • For a higher priority to be placed on road infrastructure provision and maintenance • For a more equitable share of resources and funding

Providing for: • IPWEA members and • The Local Government Industry – A powerful technical and research resource on transport issues at Regional, State and National level.

Can we help you? Contact us at: IPWEA (NSW) ROADS & TRANSPORT DIRECTORATE ACN: 093 562 602 ABN: 35 093 562 602 www.roadsdirectorate.org.au

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Assets, energy use and ISO By Sally Nugent, Chief Executive Officer, Asset Management Council

Assets such as infrastructure and utilities are required to provide facilities for ever-expanding urban areas and the demands of modern living. As such, industry realises the need for more effective ways of managing these generally large investments in a sustainable way.

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ustainability is about long-term planning for services or products and, in turn, the assets that achieve those business or service outcomes. Sustainability requires the development of systems that serve the needs of today, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Physical assets, and hence asset management, are intrinsically linked to the transformation and use of energy. The Asset Management Council defines asset management as: ‘the life cycle management of physical assets to achieve the stated outputs of the enterprise’. Managing these physical assets is critical to the operational success of organisations in which equipment and machinery depend on complex systems to deliver services or a defined outcome. Asset management is

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a life cycle process that seeks to balance the delivery of services or outcomes and the creation of assets with the risks and costs associated with their ongoing use. This includes their sustainability. Understanding how assets use energy, and how much energy they release, is

a key part of the asset design process. When machines fail in use, knowing how much and what type of energy is released enables us to identify realisable and significant risks associated with their use. Our awareness of the role of energy in the design and use of assets to produce desired outcomes (or products or services) is the key to understanding and managing the risks associated with the use of assets. It is this same process that allows us to appreciate how the good management of assets can make a significant contribution to a sustainable modern environment, including the global warming challenge. This is exactly what sustainable asset management is concerned with. No doubt the impending release of the Asset Management Systems Standards, ISO 55000–2 series, will raise industry capability to improve asset productivity and sustainability. The Standards will assist the development of specific asset management frameworks that suit various economic and social conditions, and improve management of the cost, risk and performance balance, further enabling a sustainable environment. References: Framework for Asset Management Council – Asset Management Body of Knowledge, ISBN 978-0-9870602-2-8, published by the Asset Management Council Ltd., May 2011 ISO/FDIS 5500(0-2) Series: 2013 (E) www.amcouncil.com.au/files

The Asset Management Council is a non-profit member network committed to advancing asset management knowledge and capability of members and the broader community. As an independent professional body, the Asset Management Council unites professionals and organisations from asset-intensive industries to work together and enhance Australia’s international competitiveness. Information on the Asset Management Body of Knowledge (AMBoK) is available at www.amcouncil.com.au, or for more information, contact us on +61 3 9819 2515.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


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Australia’s infrastructure – time to take action By Megan Motto, Chief Executive, Consult Australia

Consult Australia has long emphasised the importance of acknowledging infrastructure as a key economic driver for the nation, with its power to improve the productivity and liveability of our cities and urban areas.

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he fact that the recent federal election showdown focused on which upcoming prime minister could spend more on infrastructure is positive – this vernacular inherently reflects the importance of the built and natural environment to Australians. With Tony Abbott, the self-proclaimed ‘infrastructure prime minister’, now in the seat of power, it is time to advance the discourse around infrastructure from, ‘Yes, I’ll pay for it,’ to ‘How do we plan, fund, govern and manage our current and future infrastructure stock more effectively?’ Securing a sustainable investment base for urban infrastructure – for which there are numerous mechanisms – should now be a primary focus in the national debate. Funds raised by issuing urban infrastructure investment products (bonds) would capitalise a specialpurpose statutory investment vehicle that would then provide attractive seed finance. Consult Australia has long advocated for such a scheme – more recently through the Urban Coalition, comprising ten leading industry

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bodies, and their collective call for the establishment of an Urban Infrastructure Fund. By setting up such a fund – or ‘bond bank’ – in partnership with the states and territories, we would see the return of greater certainty and stability. Alternative methods, such as value capture, also have enormous potential to contribute to Australia’s urban renewal and public transport funding shortfall. It is critical that we look right across the spectrum at the myriad funding mechanisms that are out there. A by-product of this funding debate is the discussion around how best to establish robust governance frameworks for infrastructure decision-making. Infrastructure Australia has been, and remains, an encouraging initiative; however, it is one constrained by the organisation’s accountability to a minister. Recently, there has been an increasing number of calls, not only from within the built environment industry but also from reputable economists and business leaders, that the governing mechanism for infrastructure should be as independent as the Productivity Commission. I believe that to achieve this we need a separation of politics and pipelines. The establishment of an expanded focus, additional resources and independence for Infrastructure Australia would see a set pipeline and infrastructure funding debate lasting across political cycles. It is crucial that part of the remit of the independent governing body – whatever form it takes – is on decreasing waste and improving the productivity of infrastructure production. We need to have a good look at how to remove unnecessary regulatory approval processes and inconsistent workflows

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

Megan Motto

that result in the constant ramping up and down of industry. These factors can cause lengthy delays and additional cost to the development of nationbuilding infrastructure. The new government and the increasing public debate around Australia’s infrastructure present industry, the wider business community and government with significant opportunities. Now is the time to take action to deliver a new productivity dividend, drive efficiency and value for money for taxpayers, and improve the urban environments in which Australians work, live and play.


Building a sustainable future By Romilly Madew, Chief Executive, Green Building Council of Australia

‘First life, then spaces, then buildings: the other way around never works,’ acclaimed urban design specialist and architect, Jan Gehl, has said.

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uality infrastructure is at the heart of life – whether that is at the community, city or national level. Quality infrastructure is the foundation for services and employment; it connects people in the community and provides a base for future growth and investment. But what is quality infrastructure? In the building sector, a quality building is a green building. For more than a decade, the property and construction industry has been using Green Star as the method of measurement for sustainable buildings. Today, more than 1000 building projects around Australia have been influenced by Green Star. The Property Council of Australia’s Guide to Office Building Quality identifies 5 Star Green Star and 5 star NABERS Energy ratings as the benchmarks for new premium-grade office buildings, for example. Chief Executive Officer of ISPT Super Property, Daryl Browning, has said that ‘Green Star certification is one of the quality assurance measures everyone can rely on with confidence’, while Grocon’s Daniel Grollo has said, ‘If you’re not building Green Star, you’re building in obsolescence.’ In much the same way that Green Star has changed the way we design and deliver green buildings, the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia’s IS rating tool will drive

more sustainable solutions and help the infrastructure industry to understand that ‘quality’ and ‘green’ are synonymous. Until recently, urban planning and development has focused on the ‘hard infrastructure’ of roads and railways, ports, power and telecommunications, water and waste. Certainly, sustainability considerations have significant implications for the design and operation of hard infrastructure – through improved public transport networks, management of storm water and sewerage systems, and the conservation of energy and water. However, our communities and cities are social as well as physical environments. ‘Soft infrastructure’, such as health, education and employment services, recreation and cultural facilities – the infrastructure that enables social relationships – is just as important. Last year, the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA) launched a rating tool that assesses sustainability at the community scale, and for the first time addresses this ‘soft infrastructure’. Almost thirty projects have registered to achieve Green Star – Communities ratings and are working with us to benchmark their developments against thirty-eight credits in the categories of Liveability, Economic Prosperity, Environment, Design, Governance and Innovation. Projects range from small inner-city infill developments to large greenfield developments that will one day be home to hundreds of thousands of people. The Green Star – Communities ‘Liveability’ category rewards projects that encourage healthy, active living through parks, playgrounds, cycle

Romilly Madew

ways and footpaths, as well as through local food production. The ‘Economic Prosperity’ category encourages projects to consider proximity to employment and education opportunities, and access to high-speed internet. Strategies for improving housing affordability, developing local skills and enhancing investment in community infrastructure are also encouraged. Australia’s built environment – whether that’s buildings or roads or ports – is essential to making our nation strong. Australia is currently well behind many other OECD countries when it comes to infrastructure spending. Rating systems like Green Star and IS enable us to make informed investment decisions about the infrastructure projects that will not only enhance Australia’s long-term competitiveness, but that will also help us build a future that is liveable, productive, resilient and sustainable.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Infrastructure sustainability – ownership and evolution By Brendan Lyon, Executive Director, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia

Australia’s infrastructure sector has much to be proud of in terms of normalising sustainable principles at a project, corporate and sectoral level. But our evolution towards a shared understanding and application of sustainability remains very much a work in progress.

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he fundamental links to complete the circuit include maximising the degree of leadership shown by public procuring agencies; the support and refinement of rating processes such as the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia’s IS rating tool; and, the consideration of applied sustainability for existing assets and services. Sustainability is evolving from an abstract and academic concept to something more meaningful in the context of infrastructure delivery and operation. At the same time, stakeholders are increasingly embracing an understanding that sustainability is about more than just reducing energy use or recycling construction waste; rather, it is about ensuring ‘fit for purpose assets and associated services’, where fitness is a function of capacity to: •

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balance social, economic and environmental trade-offs over an asset’s whole of life

be resilient and adaptable to changing external circumstances (not just environmental but economic and technological)

be an integral and consistent part of the wider infrastructure jigsaw

fulfil community expectations by helping to solve broader sustainability challenges.

This more practical understanding and application of sustainability is by no means limited to new builds; owners and operators across a range of sectors are also taking steps to maximise sustainability benefits and minimise risks for their businesses. But while progress made to date is already delivering improved project outcomes and wider community benefits, the consistent application of sustainability as it relates to infrastructure has remained somewhat elusive. These challenges are clearly for the sector as a whole to overcome; however, the public sector, as the largest procurer of infrastructure, has a unique role to play. In particular, public procuring agencies have an unmatched capacity to drive change through public tendering and procurement processes. Through gateway review processes, central agencies also have skin in the game. ISCA’s IS rating scheme should provide government – and the private sector – with guidance in this regard, facilitating a shared understanding of what sustainability means and how it can be applied. With continued strong support and ongoing refinement, the IS rating scheme has the potential to serve as a real catalyst for change. But the sector cannot rely on the IS rating scheme alone to deliver the transformation in approaches to sustainability that is needed.

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

Real change will also require early and continuous consideration of sustainability – from the earliest stages of project inception, through initial scoping and contract development, to the end of an asset’s useful life. Achieving early and continuous consideration of sustainability in infrastructure will, above all, require sustainability to be consistently applied in project delivery frameworks, including gateway review processes. At the same time, government – in partnership with private sector stakeholders – must continue to encourage applied sustainability for existing assets and services. Ensuring that contracts governing thirdparty owners and operators, such as a concession, are sufficiently incentivised to drive continuous improvement should be an area of focus in this regard. Ensuring sufficiently flexible regulatory pricing frameworks, so that utilities are not unfairly penalised for making sustainability investments, is also important. The foundations have been laid for Australia to lead the global sustainability movement. But to do so will require consistent, unified action from industry and government stakeholders, with real, enduring engagement and innovation on best practice to manage new and existing infrastructure assets. N.S. Fleming (2010) ‘Working towards sustainable infrastructure’, Achieve Magazine, Issue 3, Sinclair Knight Merz, Sydney.


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From compliance to sustainability for construction and CSG infrastructure

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n ever-increasing focus and weight has been added to environmental and project compliance on infrastructure projects. A lessdocumented concept, applied within the planning and execution of projects to achieve environmental compliance and, more so, sustainability, is ‘environmental maturity’. This is the application of behavioural-based safety practice and culture to environmental and sustainable practice and culture. An environmentally mature project should limit incident occurrence and increase sustainability outcomes. Bridging the gap between compliance/ compliant systems and environmentally mature and sustainable projects requires leadership and innovation, supported

by integration and communication, implemented through action and response (management and workforce), and improved through continued application and lessons learnt. The management style needed to achieve this environmental maturity is not command and control, but engage, educate and empower.

Maturity, conceptualises this theory perspective, and suggests that an increasingly informed and trusting workforce will provide a behavioral, or better, a cultural adeptness toward a ‘resilient and sustainable’ business model or project. A full paper on this concept and practice is available from dan@EMContractors.com.au.

With the concepts mentioned above in mind, the ISCA Rating Scheme meets a number of these intended management tools, and has the capacity to further demonstrate an environmentally mature and more sustainable project over the various phases of the infrastructure’s lifespan. The illustration of Environmental Maturity (right), adapted from OHS

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RA’s collaborative approach makes inroads in sustainability debate By David Stuart-Watt, President of Roads Australia

Roads Australia (RA), the peak industry body for road transport stakeholders, is making a practical contribution to the development of more sustainable infrastructure outcomes. EastLink

can go beyond environmental legislation in terms of achieving successful results. In July this year, the RA Sustainability Chapter hosted a National Sustainability Forum in Sydney, attracting over seventy experts from forty-two different organisations. The Forum focused on where industry needs to concentrate its attention in order to improve sustainability outcomes. Some of the key messages that came across at the Forum included the following:

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Embed sustainability early, and include the legacy you want to leave.

oads Australia has a different approach to policy development, seeing itself as a forum fo r ideas and practical solutions for change in the traditional sense.

‘This is done in a collaborative, rather than adversarial, environment. We’re all focused on the best practical outcomes for the broader community of road users and stakeholders.’

Test innovation before the projects become live, by working early in collaboration with the supply chain.

Be clear and concise about sustainability objectives.

It does this through the vehicle of its Sustainability Chapter: a nationwide forum of some 300 sustainability experts drawn from across the construction and consulting industries, and government road agencies.

The RA Sustainability Chapter agenda is centred on two main areas in which it believes it can make a difference – sustainability in procurement, and resilience of infrastructure, specifically:

Monitor and measure.

Various members of the Chapter come together regularly around Australia to discuss road transport sustainability policy ideas and solutions. ‘The Chapter model we’ve adopted works in two important ways,’ says RA National Policy Director Donna Findlay. ‘Firstly, it provides an industry sounding board for government agency initiatives and ideas, and secondly, it provides a forum for industry to work with government on key initiatives.

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balancing prescriptive procurement and co-investment in sustainable procurement

benchmarking international rating systems and tools that have already been created

increasing resilience in a changing climate (broad-based industry change).

Ms Findlay says a ‘pain and gain’ share-split approach to embedding sustainability in major projects can be effective, but outcomes-based measures

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

The role of the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) is growing into an imperative one. One of the major outcomes of the Forum that is currently being developed is a roadmap for sustainability in infrastructure; this draws on participants’ and broader industry feedback on the specific steps that need to be taken to improve sustainable outcomes via the pathways of procurement, adaptation and rating tools/systems. Anyone interested in discussing the roadmap or sharing their ideas on this, or other sustainability issues in the road transport sector, can make contact with the Chapter via RA Policy Officer Mandi Mees: mandi@roads.org.au.


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Our deep knowledge and advisory capability provides market-leading solutions to the transport, industrial and community infrastructure sectors Australia-wide. To support this, pitt&sherry has an Infrastructure Sustainability (IS) accredited professional within the organisation, and across the business has the skills and experience to deliver quality outcomes in accordance with the principles of the IS rating tool. pitt&sherry provides a full range of sustainability services to public and private sector clients, including risk assessments, energy analysis, carbon strategy, business case planning, strategic

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lueScope is proud to be an organisational member of the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) and has been involved with ISCA since its inception as the Australian Green Infrastructure Council in 2008. BlueScope is also proud to have been a co-sponsor of the materials category of the Infrastructure Sustainability (IS) rating scheme. When gathering evidence for IS rating scheme certification of your project, consider BlueScope in the following categories:

Climate change adaptation, and procurement and purchasing BlueScope products offer strength, resilience and thermal qualities necessary for adapting to a range of climate change events: •

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BlueScope has a dedicated sustainability team, holds ISO 14001 Environmental Management System accreditation, and has documented environmental policies in place. BlueScope is an active member of the World Steel Climate Action Program; as well as a leading member and sponsor of the Steel Stewardship Forum.

Materials and water BlueScope life cycle inventory (LCI) data is accurate and conforms to the requirements of the ISCA materials calculator. BlueScope is a leading

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– now and next By Rick Walters, Technical Director, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

ISCA has been delighted with the strong uptake of the IS rating tool. Since the launch of the tool in February 2012, and as at October 2013, thirteen projects have registered to pursue an IS rating, with two of these having achieved a Certified rating. This is an average of almost one new registration per month since September 2012. A summary of the Registered (and Certified) ratings is shown in Table 1. Table 1. Summary of Registered and Certified IS ratings. NAME

STATE RATING TYPE

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE

CAPITAL VALUE ($M)

STATUS

Enlarged Cotter Dam

ACT

As Built

Water storage and supply

300

Registered

Whitsunday STP Upgrades

QLD

Design

Sewerage and drainage

45

Certified

Great Eastern Highway Upgrade

WA

As Built

Road

300

Certified

North West Rail Link (NWRL)

NSW

Design, As Built, Operation Railway

8000

Registered

Rous Head Industrial Park

WA

As Built

Port

15

Registered

Gold Coast Light Rail (Stage 1)

QLD

As Built

Light rail

437

Registered

Gateway WA – Perth Airport and Freight Access

WA

Design, As Built

Road

1000

Registered

Googong Water Treatment Plant Chemical Facility Upgrade

NSW

Design

Water supply

9

Registered

North West Rail Link – Early Works

NSW

As Built

Railway

80

Registered

Wynyard Walk

NSW

Design, As Built

Cycleways and footpaths

286

Registered

North West Rail Link – Tunnel and Station Civils

NSW

Design, As Built

Railway

1150

Registered

CBD and South East Light Rail

NSW

Design, As Built, Operation Light rail

1600

Registered

Elizabeth Quay

WA

As Built

439

Registered

Since the launch of the rating tool, ISCA has: •

developed and implemented all of the processes for administering the rating process, using the pilot trials as a starting point established and regularly convened a Technical Steering Committee to oversee the rating process

Roads, wharfs and utilities

verifiers to confirm each of the ratings, from the initial verifiers involved in the pilot trials •

begun all ratings with a kick-off workshop at each project site. These have provided a great opportunity to raise the level of commitment and understanding of the project teams, clarify issues and generally commence the assessment process on strong footing

established a panel of independent

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

supported all ratings in the assessment process, including responding to technical clarifications and credit interpretation requests

verified and subsequently certified two ratings, including conducting events and marketing to celebrate each rating certification

recruited and trained technical resources to deal with the growing rating workload.


There has been a roughly equal split of Design and As Built ratings to date. This reflects that projects have picked up the rating tool at the relevant stage they had already reached by the time the tool was launched, and they were able to achieve senior management support. We are seeing more projects now engaging with ISCA early, and this should be reflected in a greater proportion of Design ratings, then flowing on to As Built ratings in the future. It is clear, even at this early stage of tool application, that the preferred route is a Design rating and then an As Built rating. This helps to ensure that suitable decisions are locked in at the design stage, rather than taking the risk that they may or may not be picked up in the construction phase. Prior to tool launch, the rating tool had only undergone limited trials relating to the operation of infrastructure (i.e. the Operation rating). Therefore, we deemed it necessary to undertake another Operation rating pilot trial to further test the rating tool in operational mode prior to launch of version 1 of this rating. ISCA has undertaken a joint project with the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA) to pilot the tool on the road management activities of local councils. Further Operation rating pilot trials are also planned. The capital value of projects ranges from $6 million to $8 billion, highlighting the scalability of the IS tool. It should be noted that at the lower end of this scale, these projects are typically part of a larger project or program, thereby bringing the benefits of more resources and more sophisticated systems. There may be the need for a more tailored ‘Small Project’ rating in the future, which is discussed in ‘future plans’. The infrastructure types include water supply and storage, wastewater, light and heavy commuter rail, road upgrades, complex major highways and intersections, and port expansions,

reflecting and reinforcing the suitability of the IS tool for a wide range of infrastructure types. Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Western Australia are the states in which the current suite of registered projects are based; however, we are currently in discussions with infrastructure delivery agencies and contractors from South Australia and Victoria, indicating strong geographical and jurisdictional traction with IS. The ratings pipeline looks very strong, with ISCA currently at various stages of discussion with some 28 other projects/ assets (with a total capital value of $36 billion) regarding potential IS ratings.

Figure 1

Number of  IS  Ra.ngs   12   10  

6 4   2   0  

Figure   1.  The  Total   Number   of  Registered   and  Cof ertified   Ratings  over  time   Figure 1. The Total Number Registered and

Ratings over time

Future plans In addition to further trialling of the Operation rating, ISCA plans to develop two additional Themes to add to the current rating tool – Workforce and Economic. The results from the original industry consultation on the sustainability scope of the IS tool concluded that the IS tool should include Workforce and Economic Themes,

Certified

Certification naturally  lags  behind  registrations  by  the  length  of  design  and  construction  stages.   Since  the  launch  of  the  rating  tool,  ISCA  has:  

but we adecided be developed nd  implemented  athat ll  of  the  pthey rocesses  fshould or  administering   the  rating  process,  using   the  pilot  trials  as  a  starting  point   developed after thea  Tcurrent ISCommittee   tool to  had established  and  regularly   convened   echnical  Steering   oversee  the  rating   process   •been established   a  panel  of  independent   verifiers   to  verify  each  Along of  the  ratings,   from  the  initial   developed and applied. with verifiers  involved  in  the  pilot  trials   •the kicked   off  all  ratings   w ith  a  kick-­‐off  workshop   at  each   project   site.  Tthe hese  have  provided  a   level of traction of the IS tool, great  opportunity  to  raise  the  level  of  commitment  and  understanding  of  the  project  teams,   clarify  issues  and  generally  commence  the  assessment  process  on  strong  footing   feedback from government and private • supported  all  ratings  in  the  assessment  process,  including  responding  to  technical   clarifications  and  credit  interpretation  requests   sector stakeholders is that these Themes • verified  and  subsequently  certified  two  ratings,  including  conducting  events  and  marketing   to  celebrate  each  rating  certification   are required as soon as for the • recruited  and  trained  technical  resources   to  dpossible eal  with  the  growing   rating   workload.   following reasons: • •

Specific case studies from the first two projects in Australia to achieve a certified IS rating are detailed in the section on Certified ratings.

Cer1fied

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Rating benefits Benefits from applying the IS scheme to projects have already been demonstrated to include cost savings; reductions in waste, energy and GHG emissions, water and material resources; engagement of the supply chain to achieve more sustainable outcomes; implementing measures to manage climate change risk; enhancements to ecological value within and around the project sites; improvements to quality of water discharges; good stakeholder participation; and, innovative solutions.

Registered

There has  been  a  roughly  equal  split  of  Design  and  As  Built  ratings  to  date.  This  reflects  that  projects   have  picked  up  the  rating  tool  at  the  relevant  stage  they  had  already  reached  by  the  time  the  tool   was  launched,  and  they  were  able  to  achieve  senior  management  support.  We  are  seeing  more   projects  now  engaging  with  ISCA  early,  and  this  should  be  reflected  in  a  greater  proportion  of  Design   ratings,  then  flowing  on  to  As  Built  ratings  in  the  future.  It  is  clear,  even  at  this  early  stage  of  tool  

The IS tool needs full triplebottom-line coverage for it to be a game-changer for infrastructure in Australia, and potentially globally. The addition of these two Themes will do just that.

There is a need to quantify and value the benefits of sustainability initiatives, which would incentivise (provide the business case for) the sector to commit to infrastructure sustainability and lift the performance bar.

The workforce is a key enabler for delivering sustainable outcomes throughout the infrastructure supply chain. This would be realised through identifying and benchmarking sustainable performance processes and initiatives, and incorporating them into the current IS tool, connecting with many of the current Categories and Credits.

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ISCA has commenced actively seeking industry support for the development of these two Themes.

The Economic Theme prospectus offers the following description: This Theme focuses on the overall economics for the project or asset in determining the scope and whether to proceed. How has cost-benefit been analysed? Have wider benefits been considered? How has this information been used in decision-making? How have capacity-building and productivity been considered? It might include Categories on costbenefit, wider impacts, decision-making, options analysis and valuing sustainability.

The Workforce Theme prospectus offers the following description: The infrastructure industry provides employment for a large number of people. Often, the work comes with potential safety, health and wellbeing risks to people, their families and the community. Wellbeing brings in important social sustainability aspects, such as fairness and diversity. It is also recognised that engagement (or ‘buy-in’) of the workforce is critical to achieving sustainable outcomes. Integrating and demonstrating sustainability motivates the workforce, as well as attracting new staff. By enhancing workforce wellbeing through skill and capability development, the ability to deliver sustainable outcomes can be enhanced. It might include Categories on safety, health and wellbeing of workforce; diversity and fairness; and knowledge, capacity and performance. Each of these Themes will be developed through a scoping study, and then a phase of full Theme development. We are very excited to announce that Thiess has just funded Stage 1

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(Scoping Study) of the development of the Workforce Theme. Thanks to Thiess’s contribution, ISCA can now commence the industry consultation process regarding what the scope of this Theme should comprise.

Current Tool review and update Over the next twelve to eighteen months, ISCA aims to undertake a review of the current IS rating tool. This review will look at the existing Tool and its functionality, as well as potential additions and enhancements. Following the review, we will look to launch an update to the IS rating tool.

Functionality The functionality review will include review of weightings (including use of flexible weightings), mandatory Credits, Scorecard improvements and updates to the Technical Manual.

Other rating types Through application of the rating tool and industry stakeholder feedback, it has been identified that other rating types may be beneficial to users. We are therefore looking for partners to trial the IS rating tool to determine if and how the current IS rating process and scoring process needs to be modified for the following applications: •

‘integrated infrastructure’ (for example, large-scale precincts)

‘program of works’ for multiple projects that are part of a program of works

‘small project’ for smaller projects below a certain size (capital value).

‘How to use IS’ Guidelines Many ISCA stakeholders are currently using, or are interested in using, the IS rating tool in the stages prior to project delivery. Based on this usage and stakeholder need, ISCA is

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

seeking funding to develop industry guidelines for ‘Business Case and Project Development’, ’Investors’, and, ‘Procurement’. The work would be through collaborative workshops with the relevant industry stakeholders. The guidance will inherently assist with building sustainability into the critical pre-project stages.

Industry forums and Knowledge Hub ISCA is currently investing in establishing sophisticated back-end aspects to our new website. Online forums for strategic and tactical infrastructure sustainability issues will be set up, which ISCA will moderate. We are also updating a Knowledge Hub so that IS case studies and other relevant industry infrastructure sustainability information can be stored, linked and accessed.

A global IS tool Domestic and international stakeholders have approached ISCA and indicated that what Australia has developed is worldleading. For IS to be applicable and beneficial beyond Australia, a globalised version needs to be researched and developed. This would be the next most important and urgent development work for ISCA and the IS tool after the two new Themes. It would firmly position Australia as an industry leader in this space. Given the connection that has been made by public and private investors regarding the use of a globalised version of the IS tool to reduce risks, create value, benchmark performance and unlock capital, the benefits and kudos would extend well beyond just sustainability circles for partners associated with this.


Introduction to Certified ratings By Rick Walters, Technical Director, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

There have been two Certified ratings achieved to date.

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he first Certified rating was a Design rating for the Whitsunday STP Upgrades project by Tenix for Whitsunday Regional Council. The project achieved an ‘Excellent’ rating level, which is a great achievement given that the project had commenced before the IS rating tool was launched. Tenix helped to demonstrate the business case for pursuing a rating, since they set their own requirement that ‘the rating should not cost any more’, which they achieved. ISCA member Tenix recognised the benefits from the rating process and learned a great deal along the way. We are pleased that they have gone on to pursue further ratings on other projects with other clients, and are building the IS rating process into their internal systems.

The first As Built rating was for the Great Eastern Highway Upgrade by the City East Alliance (including ISCA members Main Roads WA, Leighton Contractors and GHD). The project achieved a ‘Commended’ rating level, which is also a great achievement given that the project had commenced even before it was used as one of the pilot trial projects for the IS rating tool. Main Roads WA, GHD and Leighton Contractors have each built upon their experience from this rating. Many of the personnel involved in the project have since moved on to the Gateway WA project – which is also pursuing an IS rating – strongly positioning themselves to deliver good sustainability outcomes. We congratulate the organisations, teams and people involved in achieving these first ratings, and thank them for demonstrating leadership to the industry.

DESIGN V1

Whitsunday STP Upgrade

The rating levels awarded under the IS rating scheme are below:

SCORE

RATING LEVEL

< 25

Not eligible to apply for a certified rating

25 - 49

Commended

50 - 74

Excellent

75 - 100

Leading

AS BUILT V1

Great Eastern Highway Upgrade

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Whitsunday Sewage Treatment Plant Upgrades The upgrade of two treatment plants at Proserpine and Cannonvale are to serve growing communities and meet the most stringent effluent discharge requirements to protect the Great Barrier Reef. They will also provide benefits to the local community by reducing sewage overflows, and improving noise and odour. Overview PROPONENT:

Whitsunday Regional Council

CONTRACTOR:

Tenix

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Sewerage

RATING TYPE:

Design

LOCATION:

Whitsundays, Queensland

CAPITAL VALUE:

$45 million

START DATE:

May 2012

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

May 2014

RATING STATUS:

Certified

CERTIFIED DATE:

5 April 2013

RATING LEVEL:

Excellent

DESIGN V1

The (IS) rating process encouraged Tenix to identify and implement best practice and innovative sustainability solutions. Receiving Australia’s first IS Rating has endorsed Tenix’s ability to deliver longterm environmental, social and economic benefit for local communities – in this case, local Whitsunday residents, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and the 74 Whitsunday Islands that fringe the coastline. Ross Taylor Chief Executive Officer, Tenix

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Highlights CATEGORY/CREDIT

SCORE

Management Systems

7.3/10.5

Procurement and Purchasing

4.2/5.0

Climate Change Adaptation

4.2/5.0

Energy and Carbon

5.1/10.5

Water

3.9/7.0

Materials

7.0/7.0

Receiving Water Quality

2.9/2.9

Ecological Value

2.0/2.0

Innovation

5.0/5.0

ACHIEVEMENTS • Good management systems integrating the IS rating tool into practices • Knowledge-sharing clearly demonstrated • Strong commitment to and application of sustainable procurement including local procurement: • 50 per cent of total spend in the Whitsunday region • 30 per cent of total spend in greater Queensland • Did a thorough, formal climate change risk assessment and implemented controls to reduce 22 ‘high’ or ‘very high’ risks to a ‘moderate’ or ‘low’ rating • 305 megawatt hours of electricity saved over operational life – thus a 14 per cent reduction equating to a $75,000 saving per year • 14,000 tonnes of CO2-e avoided over life cycle • Use of B20 Biodiesel, avoiding 272 tonnes of CO2-e (cost-neutral) • 15 per cent reduction in water use over life cycle, with associated cost benefit • Reduced the materials footprint by 25 per cent: • Used 4329 tonnes less concrete • Used 298 tonnes less steel • Used eco-cement with 30 per cent fly ash • Eliminated asphalt from the design • More than 75 per cent reduction in N and more than 90 per cent reduction in P (44 tonnes less nutrients annually) to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park • Ecological value enhanced through more than 5000 square metres of regenerated native habitat and 1000 square metres of wetland • World-first trial of parallel nitrification and de-nitrification (PND): • Significantly improves nitrogen removal • More compact • Less construction materials • More energy efficient

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Great Eastern Highway Upgrade A 4.2-kilometre section of the Great Eastern Highway, between Kooyong Road and Tonkin Highway, was widened from four to six lanes with a number of ancillary improvements, including central medians, upgraded intersections, on-road cycling facilities, bus priority lanes and continuous paths for pedestrians. The project was jointly funded by the Commonwealthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nation Building Program, and the Government of Western Australia. Overview Main Roads Western Australia (MRWestern Australia) City East Alliance (MRWestern Australia, Leighton Contractors, GHD, NRW)

PROPONENT: CONTRACTOR: INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Road

RATING TYPE:

As Built

LOCATION:

Perth, Western Australia

CAPITAL VALUE:

$350 million

START DATE:

July 2011

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

March 2013

RATING STATUS:

Certified

CERTIFIED DATE:

23 May 2013

RATING LEVEL:

Commended

AS BUILT V1

The IS rating process has encouraged Main Roads WA to formally identify major projects where project teams are able to implement best practice and innovative sustainability solutions to deliver long-term environmental, social and economic benefit through WA road infrastructure. Leo Coci Executive Director Infrastructure Delivery Directorate, Main Roads Western Australia

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Highlights CATEGORY/CREDIT

SCORE

ACHIEVEMENTS

Management Systems

6.3/10.5

• Commitment to mitigating negative environmental, social and economic impacts • Accredited management systems • Thorough risk and opportunity assessment • Knowledge-sharing clearly demonstrated • Strong decision-making approach incorporating sustainability aspects

Water

2.9/7.0

• Opportunities to reduce water use identified and implemented • Instead of using high-value potable water, the project installed groundwater bores and constructed a weir, which, on completion, was handed to the local council to irrigate parks

Materials

6.2/7.0

• Significant reduction in materials’ life cycle impacts through extensive use of recycled materials, reducing the use of nonrenewable resources of limestone, sand and bitumen • The highway now has the largest use of recycled material on any Western Australian state road, with 43 per cent of imported material being recycled

Previous Land Use

3.3/3.3

• More than 75 per cent of land used for the project was previously disturbed

Heritage

2.3/5.0

• Thorough approach to heritage assessment and management • Monitoring overseen by appropriately qualified persons

Innovation

1.7/5.0

• Warm-mix asphalt was used on the project, applying innovative foaming technology to mix the bitumen into the asphalt mix • This was a first for Western Australia, reducing energy use and GHG emissions

The entire Project Team was enlisted to support the achievement of this rating, from generating ideas relating to protecting the environment and sustainability during the design phase, through to making a difference in minimising the use of water and correct disposal of waste during construction. Stephen Nicolay City East Alliance Director Project Manager, Leighton Contractors

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Sponsored Article

Sustainable visions Having been awarded ISCA’s first IS rating, Tenix is well on the way to realising its vision of being recognised as a leader in sustainable infrastructure solutions.

T

enix joined ISCA (then AGIC) in January 2010, recognising the potential of the then-in-development sustainability rating scheme to transform the infrastructure industry and to provide sustainable solutions to communities. When awarded a contract in February 2012 by Whitsunday Regional Council to upgrade two sewage treatment plants, Tenix recognised the opportunity to engage with the Council to pursue an IS Design Rating for the project. It also sought to demonstrate that the rating could be achieved without incurring additional cost.

ways that will create real benefits for the Council, local communities and the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef. The design avoids the use of 4800 tonnes of construction materials and 15,400 tonnes of carbon emissions during construction and operation. It will also reduce operating costs by

around $4.5 million over the plants’ working lives. Having been awarded an IS Design rating at the ‘Excellent’ level in April 2013, Tenix has started applying the lessons learnt across its business and is seeking to use the scheme on a wider range of infrastructure.

By using the IS scheme, Tenix was guided to design and construct the plants in

First in Australia to receive an Infrastructure Sustainability rating. Tenix has been awarded Australia’s first IS (Infrastructure Sustainability) design rating for two wastewater treatment plants. The IS scheme is Australia’s only comprehensive scheme for evaluating the sustainability of the design, construction and operation of infrastructure.

TX595 – 08/13

www.tenix.com Follow us on LinkedIn

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2013


I R

Introduction to Registered ratings By Rick Walters, Technical Director, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

E

leven projects have registered to pursue an IS rating, including the two that have been certified. The range of projects is diverse, including: •

a roughly equal split of Design and As Built ratings

a very wide range of project capital values (from $6 million to $8 billion), highlighting the scalability of the IS tool

a wide range of infrastructure types – including water storage and supply, sewerage and drainage, light and heavy commuter rail, road upgrades to complex major highways and intersections, and port expansions – reflecting and reinforcing the suitability of the IS tool across the range

application in a number of Australian states and territories, including Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Western Australia

various key stakeholders driving the ratings, from proponents to designers and contractors.

We look forward to these projects achieving Certified ratings in the future, and thank them for demonstrating leadership to the industry.

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Enlarged Cotter Dam

A

n Enlarged Cotter Dam is being built downstream of the existing dam to increase the Cotter Reservoir’s capacity from four gigalitres to seventy-six gigalitres. The Enlarged Cotter Dam forms part of ACTEW’s continued response to ensuring a secure water supply for the Australian Capital Territory, and to address drought, climate change and variability.

PROPONENT:

ACTEW

CONTRACTOR:

Bulk Water Alliance (JGH, Abigroup, GHD, ACTEW)

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Water Storage and Supply

RATING TYPE:

As Built

LOCATION:

Australian Capital Territory

CAPITAL VALUE:

$299 million

START DATE:

2008

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

2013

RATING STATUS:

Registered

Identifying a more sustainable and economically viable method of deriving the main materials for the dam from on site was a major sustainable delivery ‘win’. The commitment to sustainability through the development of the Sustainability Policy and the BWA Charter were based on the IS framework, and drove decisionmaking and the culture of the project team Kirilly Dickson Group Manager Safety, Environment, Quality and Regulation (SEQR), ACTEW Water

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


North West Rail Link

T

he North West Rail Link is a priority rail infrastructure project for the New South Wales Government. Eight new railway stations are proposed at Cherrybrook, Castle Hill, Showground, Norwest, Bella Vista, Kellyville, Rouse Hill and Cudgegong Road, as well as 4000 commuter car parking spaces. The rail link includes 15 kilometres of tunnels between Bella Vista and Epping – Australia’s longest rail tunnels.

Overview PROPONENT:

Transport for New South Wales

CONTRACTOR:

Four packages of works

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Railway and associated infrastructure

RATING TYPE:

Design, As Built and Operation

LOCATION:

North West Sydney, New South Wales

CAPITAL VALUE:

$8.3 billion

START DATE:

Q2 2011

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

2019

RATING STATUS:

Registered

Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) requires its contractors to register with the ISCA IS rating scheme and achieve a high rating using the IS rating tool. Adoption of the tool enables North West Rail Link (NWRL) to holistically collate the environmental and social outcomes of its three major contracts and early works package within a nationally recognised and measurable framework. The processes and outcomes embedded in the tool support the NWRL sustainability objectives, while promoting innovation within each of the contracts. Tom Gellibrand Deputy Project Director Customer Strategy and Planning, North West Rail Link

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Rous Head Industrial Park

T

he project relates to the development of the reclamation area in Rous Head and comprises partitioning into lots, construction of the access roads, and the various services to the boundaries of the lots to allow subsequent tenants to develop business servicing the port.

PROPONENT:

Fremantle Ports

CONTRACTOR:

Brierty Limited

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Roads (Port Infrastructure)

RATING TYPE:

As Built

LOCATION:

Fremantle, Western Australia

CAPITAL VALUE:

$15 million

START DATE:

2012

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

2013

RATING STATUS:

Registered

Some really simple changes put in place to address IS credits are having a significant impact on project sustainability outcomes and project team culture. For example, including an item for ‘Innovations/Opportunities’ in weekly project meetings has resulted in conversations about sustainability in practice, and many great ideas – particularly around material reuse – being implemented on site. Significant decisions about design, such as ‘best use’ of a public area, have been informed by scored assessment, community engagement and consultation with stakeholders. A key feature is to create a rookery habitat to attract a listed vulnerable bird species (the Australian fairy tern) in the hope that they will breed there early next year Adam van der Beeke Environmental Advisor Fremantle Ports 52

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Gold Coast Light Rail

T

he project relates to the development of a light rail system that passes through the key activity centres of Southport, Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach. The 13-kilometre Stage One corridor and any future stages promise to significantly improve the liveability of the Gold Coast by improving accessibility, while reducing the effects of congestion that comes with a rapidly growing city. It is one of the most important pieces of transport infrastructure ever undertaken on the Gold Coast.

PROPONENT:

GoldLinQ Consortium

CONTRACTOR:

McConnell Dowell

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Light Rail Systems

RATING TYPE:

As Built

LOCATION:

Gold Coast, Queensland

CAPITAL VALUE:

Stage One â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $437 million

START DATE:

2012

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

2014

RATING STATUS:

Registered

The IS rating scheme has challenged the way in which the Gold Coast light rail project procures materials. A greater emphasis on engaging potential suppliers prior to releasing packages has helped ensure sustainability targets are realistic and achievable. We have incorporated sustainability right from the onset, throughout the design, construction and delivery stages. This has allowed the project to go beyond the status quo and identify opportunities to minimise material usage, along with associated stakeholder and energy impacts. Anna Carleton Environment and Sustainability Manager McConnell Dowell

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Gateway WA

T

his, the largest infrastructure project ever undertaken by Main Roads Western Australia, is a billion-dollar project involving a major upgrade to the road network surrounding Perth Airport, and the freight and industrial hubs of Kewdale and Forrestfield.

PROPONENT:

Main Roads Western Australia (MRWestern Australia)

CONTRACTOR:

Gateway Western Australia Alliance (MRWestern Australia, Leighton Contractors, Georgiou, AECOM, BG&E, GHD)

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Roads and Bridges

RATING TYPE:

Design and As Built

LOCATION:

Perth, Western Australia

CAPITAL VALUE:

$1 billion

Pursuing an IS rating for Gateway WA is an important way that the Alliance Partners can demonstrate their commitment to, and the implementation of, sustainability on projects. We are also using the pursuit of an IS Excellent rating to drive the extensive use of recycled materials as part of promoting sustainable road design, construction and operational practices in Western Australia Nick Combe Alliance Director Gateway WA Alliance

START DATE:

2012

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

2017

RATING STATUS:

Registered

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Googong Water Treatment Plant Chemical Facility Upgrade

A

new, secure chemical unloading, bulk storage, handling and dosing facility will be constructed to replace the existing systems, which will be fully decommissioned and removed. The new facility will reduce workplace safety risks and hazards, comply with dosing requirements for public water, improve treatment processes and capacity, provide sufficient system redundancy, and increase operational efficiency.

PROPONENT:

ACTEW Water

CONTRACTOR:

AAT Alliance (ACTEW Water, Tenix)

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Water Supply

RATING TYPE:

Design

LOCATION:

Googong New South Wales

CAPITAL VALUE:

$6 million

START DATE:

September 2013

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

April 2015

RATING STATUS:

Registered

As part of ACTEWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to sustainability, we are pursuing an IS rating on the Googong Water Treatment Plant Chemical Facility Upgrade, as it provides a framework that will help identify key sustainability opportunities, adds value to the project and allows us to demonstrate our commitment Andrew Hayes Manager Projects Delivery ACTEW Water

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Wynyard Walk

W

ynyard Walk is a new pedestrian tunnel within the Wynyard precinct of Sydney’s CBD. It will provide a world-class, fully accessible pedestrian link between below-ground Wynyard station, the above-ground footpath networks, and the developing western corridor of the CBD and Barangaroo via a pedestrian bridge.

PROPONENT:

Transport for New South Wales

CONTRACTOR:

Thiess

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Cycleways and Footpaths

RATING TYPE:

Design and As Built

LOCATION:

Sydney, New South Wales

CAPITAL VALUE:

$154 million

START DATE:

2012

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

2015

RATING STATUS:

Registered

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

Thiess appreciates the importance of this highprofile project and has decided to pursue an IS rating to promote and achieve recognition of excellence in sustainable design and construction Nick Kouvaris Project Director, Thiess Pty Ltd


Elizabeth Quay

E

lizabeth Quay will cover nearly 10 hectares of prime riverfront land in the heart of the city. The project will create a magnificent precinct featuring a 2.7-hectare inlet surrounded by a split-level promenade, shops, cafés, restaurants and other exciting entertainment venues.

PROPONENT:

Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority

CONTRACTOR:

Leighton Broad

INFRASTRUCTURE TYPE:

Wharfs, roads and utilities

RATING TYPE:

As Built

LOCATION:

Perth, Western Australia

CAPITAL VALUE:

$440 million

START DATE:

2012

PRACTICAL COMPLETION:

Q4 2015

One of the MRA’s key redevelopment goals is to enhance environmental integrity by encouraging ecologically sustainable design, resource efficiency, recycling, renewable energy and protection of the local ecology. Elizabeth Quay is no exception and the IS rating tool will provide an independent assessment of the project’s achievements against sustainability credits.

RATING STATUS:

Registered

Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority

Elizabeth Quay

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The benefits of membership with ISCA By Tim Carter, Communication and Relationships Manager, Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia

ISCA is a member-based organisation advancing sustainability in infrastructure planning, procurement, delivery and operation. We have developed a membership framework to augment the launch of our new brand, the IS rating scheme, and industry take-up of ratings and training. The new membership framework reflects the diversity and complexity of stakeholders along the infrastructure supply chain.

training, resources, advertising, conferences and events. These discounts can easily absorb the initial cost of becoming an ISCA member.

B

y becoming a member of ISCA, your organisation is able to influence and shape the future of sustainability across Australia’s infrastructure sector. Members have access to papers, articles and forums to stay informed of developments in industry and improve your organisation’s market placement.

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ISCA also provides unique opportunities to engage with decision-makers, policymakers, investors, planners, researchers, designers, deliverers and so on, through networking events to encourage collaboration and unity in improving the nation’s infrastructure sustainability. Membership with ISCA provides significant discounts for project ratings,

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

Members are able to seek benefit through the following: •

support and engagement

competitive advantage

networking

events and conferences

education and training

information and knowledge

IS rating registrations

representation

advocacy

partnership.

For more information, or to become a member of ISCA, please contact us: info@isca.org.au.


Industry partners ISCA has established, and will continue to establish, formal relationships with key industry peak bodies to collaborate and share information regarding common opportunities and issues. These relationships enable discussions and initiatives to promote, enhance and develop infrastructure sustainability throughout Australia.

Asset Management Council The Asset Management Council (AMCouncil) is a peak professional body in Australia for the discipline, science and practice of asset management and maintenance. The AMCouncil is a not-for-profit, mostly volunteer organisation whose mission is to create a broad awareness of the value of asset management, nurture a common understanding of asset management, and provide a portal to asset management knowledge and resources. AMCouncil’s first objective is to strengthen and enhance the asset management and maintenance engineering capabilities of asset management practitioners and organisations. For more information: www.amcouncil.com.au

Consult Australia Consult Australia is the leading not-for-profit association that represents the business interests of consulting firms operating in the built and natural environments. We do this at a commercial, community, industry, and government level through collaboration, education, support and advocacy. Our member firms’ services include, but are not limited to: architecture, cost consulting (quantity surveyors), engineering, environmental science, landscape architecture, planning, and project management. For more information: www.consultaustralia.com.au

Green Building Council of Australia Launched in 2002, the GBCA is a national, not-for-profit organisation that is committed to developing a sustainable property industry for Australia by encouraging the adoption of green building practices. It is uniquely supported by both industry and governments across the country. For more information: www.gbca.org.au

Infrastructure Partnerships Australia Infrastructure Partnerships Australia is the nation’s peak infrastructure body. Our mission is to advocate the best solutions to Australia’s infrastructure challenges through facilitating open dialogue, and genuine, enduring partnerships between government and the private sector. It is through these partnerships that Australia can be best equipped with the facilities and services we need to secure strong and enduring economic growth and high living standards. For more information: www.infrastructure.org.au

Roads Australia Roads Australia is a not-for-profit, non-political industry association, the members of which are drawn from all corners of the Australian road sector. RA champions the interest of a vital national asset – Australia’s road transport system – and provides a forum for policy development, networking and communication. For more information: www.roads.org.au

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Member directory Company ACTEW Water

www.actew.com.au

ACTEW Water owns and operates the water and sewerage assets and business in the Australian Capital Territory. ACTEW provides safe, efficient and reliable water and sewerage services, and operate in accordance with environmental and sustainable practices. AECOM

www.aecom.com

AECOM is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including transportation, facilities, environmental, energy, water and government. With approximately 45,000 employees around the world, AECOM, a Fortune 500 company, delivers solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural, and social environments. Arrium (Onesteel)

www.arrium.com

1800 178 335

Arrium Limited is an international diversified mining and materials company with three business segments: Arrium Mining, Arrium Mining Consumables and Arrium Steel. These Arrium businesses encompass a global portfolio of iron ore, mining consumables, recycling and steel assets. Arrium’s operations are underpinned by its commitment to safety and delivering on its customer promise. Arup

www.arup.com

Arup is an independent firm of designers, planners, engineers, consultants and technical specialists offering a broad range of professional services. Founded in 1946 with an initial focus on structural engineering, Arup first came to the world’s attention with the structural design of the Sydney Opera House. Ash Development Association of Australia

www.adaa.asn.au

(02) 4228 1389

The Ash Development Association of Australia (ADAA) was formed in 1990 with the primary objective being to conduct industry-relevant research and technology transfer to develop market opportunities in the use of CCPs for members, stakeholders and the wider community. Aurecon

aurecongroup.com

Aurecon provides engineering, management and specialist technical services for public and private sector clients globally. We have responded to broader sustainability and immediate climate change challenges. We encourage innovation and support sound scientific and engineering research into enhanced energy, building, water and infrastructure solutions that meet community needs. Australian (Iron and Steel) Slag Association

www.asa-inc.org.au

(02) 4225 8466

The Australasian (Iron and Steel) Slag Association was formed in 1990 by members representing producers, processors, marketers, customers and suppliers of iron and steel slag to conduct research and present technical information to support the beneficial usage of slag materials and other potential end-use avenues. Australian Asphalt Pavement Association

www.aapa.asn.au

(07) 3870 2644

The Australian Asphalt Pavement Association (AAPA) is a progressive and innovative representative industry association. Formed in 1969 as a non-profit organisation, AAPA has maintained, as its major objective: To disseminate technical knowledge aimed at continual improvement in asphalt- and bitumen-bound technology, and economic use based on commercial grounds. Australian Society for Concrete Pavement

www.concretepavements.com.au

(02) 9918 2610

Founded in October 2007, the Australian Society for Concrete Pavements (ASCP) is an Australian not-for-profit organisation that aims to facilitate improvements in the design, construction and quality of concrete pavements in Australia through education, technology transfer and research. BlueScope Steel

www.steel.com.au

BlueScope is a global leader in advanced steel building products and solutions, employing over 16,000 people globally, and is committed to developing sustainable steel products and solutions in Australia for Australian conditions. BlueScope’s portfolio contains well-known brands including COLORBOND® Coolmax® steel, COLORBOND® steel with Thermatech®, ZINCALUME® steel, DECKFORM® steel, TRUECORE® steel and the LYSAGHT® range of building products using 100 per cent Australian steel. Brookfield Multiplex

www.brookfieldmultiplex.com

Brookfield Multiplex is a leading global contractor focused on creating landmark buildings and complex infrastructure assets that deliver real benefits to people and communities. Since 1962, we have delivered in excess of 800 projects valued at more than $54 billion, and the financial stability of our parent company, Brookfield, continues to drive our growth today. Capital Metro Agency

www.capitalmetro.act.gov.au

In July 2013, the Australian Capital Territory Government established the Capital Metro Agency to deliver light rail for Canberra. The Agency is responsible for ongoing planning, design and delivery of the first stage of a possible Canberra-wide network. The first stage will link the city to the developing suburbs of Gungahlin in the north.

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Cement Concrete and Aggregates Australia

www.ccaa.com.au

(02) 9437 9711

Cement Concrete and Aggregates Australia (CCAA) is the peak national body representing the interests of Australia’s $7 billion per year heavy construction materials industry, covering the cement, premixed concrete and extractive industries. CCAA’s members operate rock quarries, sand and gravel extraction sites, cement production and distribution facilities, and concrete batching plants throughout Australia. Civil Contractors Federation

www.civilcontractors.com

(07) 3360 7933

The Civil Contractors Federation (CCF) is the peak body representing Australia’s civil construction industry; supporting members’ businesses and providing a unified voice to all levels of government. CCF has branches in all states and territories, supporting around 2000 members nationally. CCF’s members construct and maintain Australia’s civil infrastructure, including roads, bridges, pipelines, drainage and ports, as well as commercial and housing land developments.

Clayton Utz

www.claytonutz.com

(02) 9353 4751 (Nick Thomas, Partner, Sydney)

Clayton Utz is one of Australia’s largest and most respected independent full-service national law firms, with offices in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Canberra, Perth and Darwin, and also Hong Kong (in association with Haley & Co.). A consistent track record and team of highly motivated and skilled lawyers are central to Clayton Utz’s performance, and are fundamental to the reason clients retain Clayton Utz. Colonial First State Global Asset Management

www.cfsgam.com.au

Colonial First State Global Asset Management (CFSGAM) is the consolidated asset management division of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. With over A$170 billion (as at 30 June 2013) in funds under management, CFSGAM is a world-class asset management business with a global footprint, incorporating environmental, social and corporate governance issues in all of its investment processes. Edge Environment

www.edgeenvironment.com.au

(02) 9438 0100

Edge Environment is a dynamic research, consultancy, education and eTools business. Edge Environment provides practical solutions to sustainability issues, based on sound science, and prides itself on its technical capability and the pursuit of positive change. We offer services and solutions on: strategy and supply chain, climate change and adaptation, policy and reporting, infrastructure, and the sustainable built environment. Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate – ACT Government

www.environment.act.gov.au

The Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate (ESDD) has a strong commitment to ensuring a sustainable future for Canberra. ESDD brings together the key policy levers and service delivery areas that assist the ACT Government to deliver its ambitious sustainability policies and targets across a range of areas including climate change, waste, heritage, planning policy (including transport planning), and development, natural resource management, energy and water. Environmental Management Contractors

www.EMContractors.com.au

0438 500 758

Environmental Management Contractors Pty Ltd (EMC) is an innovative organisation specialising in major infrastructure pipeline projects in Queensland. EMC assists in strategic environmental management, approvals, compliance systems, and in-field construction, weed, erosion sediment control, land and rehabilitation management, and has CEnvP and ISCA IS Accreditation

Fremantle Ports

www.fremantleports.com.au

(08) 9430 3555

Fremantle Ports is a Western Australian Government trading enterprise that strategically manages Fremantle Port – the state’s biggest general cargo port and Australia’s fourth-largest container port. Fremantle Ports operates on commercial principles to ensure the needs of importers and exporters can be met in a sustainable way with the support of customers and the community.

GHD

www.ghd.com

GHD is one of the world’s leading engineering and environmental consulting companies. Established in 1928, GHD employs more than 5500 people across five continents. Wholly owned by its people, GHD is focused exclusively on client success. GHD’s network of professionals collaborates to deliver sustainable outcomes to communities and clients in the global markets of water, energy and resources, environment, property and buildings, and transportation. Herbert Smith Freehills

www.herbertsmithfreehills.com

As one of the world’s leading law firms, Herbert Smith Freehills advises many of the biggest and most ambitious organisations across all major regions of the globe. Their clients trust them with their most important transactions, disputes and projects because of their ability to cut through complexity and mitigate risk. The firm has 2800 lawyers in offices spanning Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East and the United States. Holcim Australia Pty Ltd

www.holcim.com.au

(02) 9412 6600

Holcim has been delivering construction materials in Australia since 1901, originally under the well-known Readymix and Humes brands. Today, Holcim is one of the world’s leading building materials producers and continues to operate across Australia, supplying high-quality construction materials such as readymix concrete, aggregates, engineered precast and prestressed concrete solutions.

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Holding Redlich

www.holdingredlich.com

(07) 3135 0500

Holding Redlich provides innovative commercial legal advice. Its reputation for delivering excellent results for our clients has developed over nearly 40 years with offices in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. Holding Redlich understands its clients’ commercial issues, and coupled with impeccable application of the law, Holding Redlich delivers results. Hyder Consulting

www.hyderconsulting.com

Hyder is a leading multinational design and engineering consultancy that has a reputation for working on some of the world’s most iconic projects. Hyder’s work is characterised by the highest standards of engineering and design, a reputation for innovation and results that stand the test of time. Hyder works with clients in the resources, transport, water, energy, environment and property sectors. International WaterCentre

www.watercentre.org

(07) 3014 0200

The International WaterCentre (IWC) is dedicated to providing the most advanced education and training, applied research and knowledge services to promote a whole-of-water cycle approach and develop capacity in integrated water resource management around the world. John Holland

www.johnholland.com.au

John Holland, a wholly owned subsidiary of Leighton Holdings Limited (ASX: LEI), is one of Australia’s leading engineering, contracting and services providers to the infrastructure, energy and resources and transport services sectors. Operating across Australia and in New Zealand, South East Asia and the Middle East, John Holland’s business is driven by its collaborative approach to project delivery and its diversity of skills and capabilities. KMH Environmental

www.kmh.com.au

(02) 9468 9300

KMH Environmental is dedicated to providing high-quality environmental and sustainable outcomes for our clients. The KMH team delivers practical sustainability outcomes for major infrastructure projects across Australasia. KMH partners with designers, constructors and project owners to deliver project approvals, and support the design, construction and operations of infrastructure projects. Leighton Contractors

www.leightoncontractors.com.au

Leighton Contractors, a wholly owned subsidiary of Leighton Holdings Limited, is one of Australia’s leading contracting and project development groups. Employing more than 14,000 people in Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Africa, Leighton Contractors delivers projects for clients across the infrastructure, mining, telecommunications, civil construction, industrial, energy, health and services sectors. Lend Lease Engineering

www.lendlease.com

(02) 9499 0999

Lend Lease’s Engineering business provides one of the most comprehensive and experienced civil engineering capabilities in Australia. Drawing on the significant resources of the Lend Lease Group, Lend Lease Engineering offers whole-of-life services for civil infrastructure assets, including design, development, financing, construction and long-term operation and maintenance. Their focus includes roads, bridges and tunnels, rail and civil infrastructure. Linking Melbourne Authority

www.linkingmelbourne.vic.gov.au

(03) 8562 6800

Linking Melbourne Authority (LMA) is a special-purpose statutory authority, responsible for managing complex road projects on behalf of the government and the wider community. Under the guidance of a highly experienced Board, LMA uses its project management, engineering, commercial and communications capabilities to facilitate major road project delivery on behalf of the government. Local Government Infrastructure Services

www.lgis.com.au

(07) 3842 4700

Local Government Infrastructure Services was created for Queensland local governments. We offer a range of services to help local governments deliver for their community. We take a whole-of-life approach to infrastructure delivery, from planning, procurement and project management to deferring capital and operating expenditure. LGIS is committed to helping councils achieve financial sustainability. Main Roads Western Australia

www.mainroads.wa.gov.au

138 138

Main Roads Western Australia is responsible for Western Australia’s highways and main roads, which represent almost 30 per cent of the state’s total assets. It is one of the largest geographically spread road agencies in the world, covering 2.5 million square kilometres. We are committed to achieving the state government’s vision to provide the best opportunities for current and future generations. McConnell Dowell

www.mcconnelldowell.com

(03) 9816 2400

Formed in 1961, McConnell Dowell is a major engineering, construction, building and maintenance contractor. With the ability to deliver end-to-end projects, we pride ourselves on our engineering excellence in three key industry sectors: building (commercial and industrial, social and public, defence); infrastructure (power, transport, water); and, resources (mining, oil and gas, petrochemical). Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority

www.mra.wa.gov.au

(08) 6557 0700

The Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority is driving the regeneration of Central Perth and key centres around the metropolitan area. Our role enables us to build Perth’s capacity by providing new commercial, residential, retail and public spaces, and transform urban spaces to meet the challenges of a growing city by creating successful communities where people want to live, work and visit.

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INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


MWH

www.mwhglobal.com

MWH is a global engineering, construction, technology and consulting company, recognised for delivering sustainable solutions to clients in the water, wastewater, transport, mining, infrastructure development, manufacturing and defence industries. In Australia, MWH employs approximately 450 people throughout offices in Melbourne, Sydney, Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra, and on Queensland’s Gold and Sunshine Coasts. Net Balance

www.netbalance.com

Net Balance is Australia’s largest sustainability advisory firm, with over 60 specialists based in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and London. Net Balance offers services in strategy, implementation and reporting; climate change adaptation; energy efficiency and carbon; economics and policy; community investment and social impact evaluation; environmental management; supply chain and procurement. Net Balance operates in all sectors, including infrastructure. Northrop

northrop.com.au

Northrop Consulting Engineers presents a refreshing and flexible approach to engineering that facilitates practical and holistic design solutions within a multidisciplinary team environment. We are passionate about sustainability and future-proofing our clients’ assets against an ever-changing environmental, social, and economic landscape. NSW Public Works

www.publicworks.nsw.gov.au

NSW Public Works provides expert advice and professional services to enable government agency clients to deliver their services to the community. Expertise and experience in planning, design, delivery and maintenance of building and engineering projects enable its clients to maximise value, minimise cost and manage risks in infrastructure programs and asset management. Office of Environment and Heritage

www.environment.nsw.gov.au

(02) 9995 5000

The Office of Environment and Heritage is an office of the New South Wales Department of Premier and Cabinet, supporting the Premier, the Minister for the Environment and the Minister for Heritage. OEH works to ensure that the people of New South Wales have a healthy environment and are supported to access, protect and enjoy their natural and cultural heritage. pitt&sherry

www.pittsh.com.au

1300 748 874

pitt&sherry is a leading multi-specialist infrastructure consultancy that has been delivering intelligent and sustainable solutions to industry, government and communities for over 50 years. With a relentless client focus that adds value to businesses, governments and communities, pitt&sherry services a range of markets including transport, industrial, mining, energy, food and beverage, and community infrastructure. Port of Melbourne Corporation

www.portofmelbourne.com

1300 857 662

Port of Melbourne Corporation (PoMC) is the strategic manager of Australasia’s largest maritime hub for the efficient movement of automotive and containerised cargo. Responsible for the integrated management and development of land and maritime functions, PoMC is charged with managing its operations in a sustainable manner to ensure it continues to provide economic and community benefits now and in the future. PrixCar Services

www.prixcar.com.au

(03) 9284 2888

PrixCar specifically services the varying and unique requirements of the Motor Vehicle Importers throughout Australia. PrixCar continues to develop its organisation, supported by information technology and world-class facilities, to meet this ever-changing and growing market. Its focus is to provide a high level of service and operational integrity while supporting the imported vehicle segment. Public Transport Authority of Western Australia

www.pta.wa.gov.au

The Public Transport Authority of Western Australia (PTA) operates all public bus, train and ferry services in the Perth metropolitan area and regional centres, coach and rail services to regional areas, and administers and manages School Bus Services. The PTA is also responsible for designing, building and maintaining public transport infrastructure and protecting the long-term viability of Western Australia’s rail corridor and infrastructure. Roads and Maritime Services

www.rms.nsw.gov.au

132 213

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) is a service delivery agency for Transport for NSW. RMS is responsible for building and maintaining the NSW road network, regulating and licensing road vehicles, commercial and recreational boating and marine safety. RMS is also responsible for the management of submerged lands in Sydney Harbour, Newcastle Harbour, Botany Bay and Port Kembla. RPS Australia Asia Pacific

www.rpsgroup.com.au

(02) 9248 9800

RPS is an international consultancy providing world-class, local solutions in energy, mining, infrastructure, urban growth and natural resource management. RPS employs more than 5000 people globally on a diverse range of projects. With local knowledge and national expertise supported by international experience, RPS has the capability to deliver first-rate services where and when they are needed. Sinclair Knight Merz

www.globalskm.com

(02) 9928 2100

Sinclair Knight Merz is a leading projects firm, with global capability in strategic consulting, engineering and project delivery. It operates across Asia Pacific, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, deploying some 7500 people from more than 40 offices. SLR Consulting Australia Pty Ltd

www.slrconsulting.com

1300 434 443

SLR is a progressive firm of consulting engineers and scientists providing innovative solutions for improving and sustaining our environment. With numerous offices across Australasia, SLR has established a reputation for providing high-quality, specialist and responsive environmental, hygiene and scientific services to clients in the infrastructure sector for over 35 years. INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013

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Sustainable Built Environment National Research Centre

www.sbenrc.com.au

(08) 9266 4788

The Sustainable Built Environment National Research Centre (SBEnrc) is a key research broker between industry, government and research organisations servicing the built environment industry. The three research streams focus on environmental, social and economic sustainability, areas identified by national industry stakeholders as the key areas that will drive productivity and industry development in the built environment industry. Sustainable Engineering Society

www.seng.org.au

(02) 6270 6189

The Sustainable Engineering Society (SENG) is a technical society of Engineers Australia. SENG strives to provide national focus and leadership to engineering and sustainability professionals. Membership is open to anyone with an interest in and a desire to contribute to the advancement of environmental and sustainability issues. Tenix

www.tenix.com

Tenix provides design, construction, operation, maintenance and asset management services and systems to owners of gas, electricity, water, wastewater, heavy industrial and mining infrastructure across Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific. Our vision is to be the leading sustainable infrastructure solutions, services and delivery partner. Thiess

www.thiess.com.au

Thiess plays a pivotal role in building vital infrastructure, delivering for the resources sector and providing essential services for communities. Today, the company has amassed enormous depth and breadth of experience, and capabilities, to become one of Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading construction, mining and services contractors. Transport for NSW

www.transport.nsw.gov.au

(02) 8202 2200

Transport for NSW is responsible for improving the customer experience, planning, program administration, policy, regulation, procuring transport services, infrastructure and freight. Transport operating agencies have been freed up to focus on service delivery â&#x20AC;&#x201C; providing safe, reliable, clean and efficient transport services. Transurban

www.transurban.com

(03) 8656 8900

Transurban manages and develops networks of urban toll roads in Australia and the United States. Transurban is an ASX Top 50 company and has been in business since 1996. Transurban is focused on being an infrastructure partner of choice for government, providing effective and innovative network solutions to support the growth and wellbeing of our cities.

Individual David Hood Eddy Wajon Erin Cini Scott Losee Joan Ribi

Thank you to all our members 64

INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE 2013


Infrastructure

Lighting Solutions Advanced Lighting Technologies have been supporting consulting engineers, project managers and developers in infrastructure projects in the Australian marketplace for over 20 years. For practical and energy saving lighting solutions for your next project, contact our team of specification sales engineers.

Call 03 9800 5600 or visit www.adlt.com.au

Advanced Lighting Technologies Australia Inc Advanced Lighting Technologies New Zealand Ltd Advanced Lighting Technologies Asia Pte Ltd

110 Lewis Road, Wantirna South, VIC 3152 8 Boeing Place, Mount Maunganui Block 4008, Ang Mo Kio Avenue 10, #04-06, Techplace 1

Australia New Zealand Singapore

61 03 9800 5600 64 07 579 0163 65 6844 2338

www.adlt.com.au www.adlt.co.nz www.adlt.com.sg


Studies in Sustainability UWS School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics

We offer a diverse range of innovative professional degree programs at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels in a dynamic yet relevant mix of disciplines in engineering, construction and industrial design. Most programs are available with the flexibility of full-time or part-time attendance, and some post graduate programs are offered externally, which gives students control over the path they take to develop skills in their chosen profession.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

• At least 10% of all engineering, construction and industrial design courses material are related to sustainability. • Sustainability concept is introduced in the first year and the concepts are reinforced in subsequent years. • Staff with expertise in the field of sustainability. • Student projects are regularly aligned to sustainability theme.

Postgraduate Programs

• • • • •

• • • • •

Bachelor of Engineering Science Bachelor of Engineering (Advanced) Bachelor of Engineering Bachelor of Construction Management Bachelor of Industrial Design

Engineering Fire Safety Engineering Building Surveying Bush Fire Protection Doctor of Philosophy

CAM4149 1/11/13

Visit uws.edu.au/scem or call us on 1300 897 669

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2032 isca 2013  

2032 isca 2013  

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