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CLUBS&PUBS manager Autumn 2013

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Contents NEWS Police and clubs tackle drunken troublemakers

2

GAMING Players choose Player’s ChoiceTM

6

Simplifying the regulations and the approval process 10 Save the dates for Australasian Gaming Expo 2013

12

Be good for goodness’ sake

14

Should the gaming industry be monopolised?

18

Just the ticket

24

Orion Art delivers quality and innovation

26

CLUBS + HOTELS EXPO Clubs + Hotels Expo returns bigger and better in 2013

28

INTERIORS AND ARCHITECTURE Design that exceeds expectations

33

LED-ucation – how to confidently select LED lighting for your venue 35 New gaming venue drives revenue for Revesby Workers Club

37

Editor: Eden F. Cox

‘Switch’ to the next generation of design

38

Designed by: Alma McHugh

Slips + falls – an expensive problem

40

Published by:

Profit from play

41

FOOD AND BEVERAGES ABN 30 007 224 204

Meat Free Week

43

430 William Street, Melbourne VIC 3000 Tel: (03) 9274 4200 Fax: (03) 9329 5295 Email: media@executivemedia.com.au Web: www.executivemedia.com.au

Sometimes, looks do matter

46

Cover image: Eatons Hill Hotel in Brisbane, designed by KP Architects. See article on page 33. The editor, publisher, printer and their staff and agents are not responsible for the accuracy or correctness of the text of contributions contained in this publication or for the consequences of any use made of the products, and the information referred to in this publication. The editor, publisher, printer and their staff and agents expressly disclaim all liability of whatsoever nature for any consequences arising from any errors or omissions contained in this publication, whether caused to a purchaser of this publication or otherwise. The views expressed in the articles and other material published herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor and publisher or their staff or agents. The responsibility for the accuracy of information is that of the individual contributors and neither the publisher nor editors can accept responsibility for the accuracy of information that is supplied by others. It is impossible for the publisher and editors to ensure that the advertisements and other material herein comply with the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (Cth). Readers should make their own inquiries in making any decisions and, where necessary, seek professional advice.

Does your table and buffetware portray the look you are hoping for?

48

Australian PorkFest

50

Tasty grains and legumes for health-conscious patrons 54

SECURITY Camvex celebrates 25-year milestone

58

Dark Knight Security – We are serious about service

61

Club security: tell someone who cares

62

SPONSORED ARTICLES A credit union for club industry employees?

4

The most secure way to pay for both you and your customers

8

Queue management stanchions have a lot of responsibilities!

15

© 2013 Executive Media Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited.

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 1


NEws

Police and clubs tackle drunken troublemakers The ‘STOP! Is it worth $550?’ campaign is a new initiative that warns violent, drunk or disorderly patrons that they will be fined $550 by police if they refuse to leave a licensed venue when asked to do so by a club or hotel.

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he New South Wales Police Force (NSWPF) is running the campaign in conjunction with ClubsNSW and the Australian Hotels Association in New South Wales (AHA). Since the launch of the campaign in December 2012, posters, beer coasters and flyers have been placed in prominent positions throughout clubs and hotels warning patrons that they face a hefty fine if they ‘fail to quit’ and vacate the premises when told to. Promotion of the campaign has also appeared on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. A video highlighting the $550 fine has also run on plasma screens in the 4000 clubs and pubs statewide, whilst a radio commercial has also been aired.

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news

The joint move by police, clubs and pubs comes after police issued a record number of fines to people who refused to leave licensed premises when instructed to during ‘Operation Unite’. ‘Operation Unite’ proves that some patrons don’t realise that when they’ve had too much to drink and licensees ask them to leave, by law, they have to leave. ‘If police have to be called to make you leave, you will be fined – it’s as simple as that,’ says Deputy Commissioner Nick Kaldas. ‘There can be serious, long-term consequences for excessive drinking, especially if you are arrested and end up with a criminal record.

‘In the three months prior to the campaign launch, 753 infringement notices were issued to people in relation to ‘fail to quit’ offences. From its launch until the end of February 2013, 893 notices were issued for that offence: an increase of 140 (just over 18 per cent),’ Superintendent Paroz says. ‘While the increase could also be attributed to the increased business seen at licensed premises over summer, I have no doubt the awareness created by this campaign, for both venue staff and police, is a significant contributor.’

Some instances of violence resulting from situations where patrons failed to leave licensed

‘We want everyone to… enjoy a drink, but stop before you’ve had too much, stop before you are asked to leave, stop before you refuse to leave and definitely stop before you become antisocial or violent.’

premises when asked, or who

New South Wales AHA CEO Paul Nicolaou says even though assault rates on licensed premises are at the lowest levels in a decade, some patrons still aren’t getting the message.

• A doorman at a pub in Petersham had to be taken to hospital on Friday 7 December 2012 to be treated for a broken jaw and loss of teeth after being punched in the face for refusing entry to someone who was too drunk. A 32-year-old man was arrested a short time later and charged with recklessly causing grievous bodily harm.

‘People need to be responsible for their own actions… We are tired of being persecuted for the actions of a few; clubs and hotels across New South Wales work closely with local police to ensure that patrons have a good night out. For those few who play up and don’t accept the umpire’s decision, there’s a $550 fine waiting for them.’ ClubsNSW CEO Anthony Ball says that registered clubs have driven assaults to record lows by keeping the pressure on the small number of people who do the wrong thing. ‘The vast majority of people go to their local club to have a good time with their family or friends. However, a very small percentage make bad decisions and end up in trouble – whether it’s because they think they’re okay to drive or because they simply refuse to accept it when they’re told they’ve had enough. ‘Clubs are safe, family-friendly venues and we’re not going to tolerate drunk or disorderly behavior. So if we say you’ve had enough and offer you a cab, take us up on the offer and get home safely. ‘If you don’t, the club will call police and you’ll end up $550 poorer than you were at the start of the night.’

were refused entry and caused trouble, include:

• At Oatley on Saturday 8 December 2012, a 20-yearold man became aggressive towards police after being asked to leave a licensed premises where he had fallen asleep at his table. He was arrested and charged for failing to quit, assaulting police, resisting arrest and offensive language. • At about 12.30 am on Sunday 9 December, a police officer was assaulted by a man on River Street, Ballina, after the man was refused entry to a licensed hotel due to intoxication. The officer sustained cuts to his left arm and sprained his right wrist. A 36-year-old man was arrested at the scene and charged with assaulting police and resisting arrest. ‘Significantly, in November alone there were 327 infringement notices issued for “fail to quit” offences, while in December, 571 were issued – this is an increase of 75 per cent. I believe that can almost directly be attributed to the campaign and the increased positive response by both venues and police taking action against individuals who do the wrong thing,’ says Superintendent Paroz. C&PM

To find out the results of the campaign so far, Clubs & Pubs Manager also spoke to Superintendent Patrick Paroz, who is the Commander of the NSWPF Drug and Alcohol Coordination.

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 3


Sponsored ARTICLE Article SPONSORED

A CREDIT UNION FOR CLUB INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES?

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n recent times there has been a lot written about competition in the banking industry and the market share dominance of the big banks. But there are fourand-a-half million Australians who prefer to bank at a place that isn’t a bank at all; a place with all the products of a major bank that delivers the same member-focused service that clubs deliver every day to their own members. The good news for club industry employees is that they now have access to Community First, Sydney’s largest community-based credit union. Just like clubs, Community First is member-owned and run for the benefit of members – not for external shareholder profit.

SO WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH COMMUNITY FIRST CREDIT UNION? Community First Credit Union, as a ClubsNSW Silver Corporate Partner and also a sponsor of Club Managers Development Australia (CMDA), is extending exclusive offers on their award-winning home loans, personal loans and credit cards. To help get your banking relationship with Community First Credit Union started, Community First have put together a suite of competitive products that are available exclusively to club employees (whose employer is a member of ClubsNSW) and business partners of ClubsNSW and CMDA. First of all, just like your club, you need to be a member of Community First to take advantage of our banking services. Our current specials are: • A special home loan with an interest rate guaranteed to be lower than our already discounted True Basic Home Loan. That’s an additional 0.15 per cent per annum discount for three years, and what’s more, it comes with a redraw facility and no monthly loan fees. • A six-month introductory rate of just 4.99 per cent per annum* on retail purchases, balance transfers and cash advances on our low-rate Visa card. At the end of the introductory period the rate reverts to our low ongoing rate – currently only 9.50 per cent per annum. • $0 application fee^ on all car and personal loans until 30 June 2013.

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HOW CAN CLUB EMPLOYEES ACCESS THESE OFFERS? Simply call Community First Direct on 1300 13 22 77 or visit www.communityfirst.com.au/club-employee-offer. C&PM

All lending is subject to lending guidelines. Terms and conditions, fees and charges apply – details available on application. Community First Credit Union Limited ABN 80 087 649 938, AFSL/Australian Credit Licence No. 231204. This offer is only available to employees of member clubs of ClubsNSW and CMDA and their business partners. Offer starts on 17/01/13 and can be withdrawn at anytime without notice. ^Offer is only available on new car loans up to three years old and is not available for refinances from existing Community First Credit Union car loans. *Rate is current as at 18/12/12 and subject to change without notice.


An exclusive offer, just for Club employees... 3 Year introductory rate home loan...

Home loan features:

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One low rate on retail purchases, cash advances, and balance transfers.

For more information call Community First Direct on 1300 13 22 77 or visit www.communityfirst.com.au/club-employee-offer. PROUD SPONSOR OF

3 Year Introductory Basic Home Loan is a discounted Variable Rate loan, available for new borrowings only, which reverts after the 3 year period to the True Basic Variable Rate current at the time. This offer is only available to employees of member clubs of Clubs NSW and CMDA and their business partners. All lending is subject to lending guidelines. Terms and conditions, fees and charges apply – details available on application. *Rate is current as at 18/12/12 and subject to change without notice. **Comparison rate is calculated on a loan amount of $150,000 over 25 years. WARNING: This comparison rate is true only for the example given and may not include all fees and charges. Different terms, fees or other loan amounts might result in a different comparison rate. ^This is an introductory rate for 6 months from the date of card funding on retail purchases, cash advances and balance transfers. At the end of the introductory period the rate will revert to our standard McGrath Pink Visa card rate – currently 9.50%p.a. and subject to change without notice. Community First donates $20 to the McGrath Foundation from the annual fee for each McGrath Pink Visa card. The McGrath Foundation supports McGrath Breast Care Nurses in communities across Australia and educates young women to be breast aware. For more information visit www.mcgrathfoundation.com.au. #$12 introductory Member Allowance is for one year. Under our Member Allowance system you will start to receive free transactions based upon the combined total balances of your loans and deposits with Community First. Any transaction charges, in excess of your monthly allowance, will be debited monthly. ^^Offer starts on 17/01/13 and can be withdrawn at anytime without notice. Offer is only available on new car loans up to 3 years old and not available for refinances from existing Community First Credit Union car loans. Community First Credit Union Limited ABN 80 087 649 938 AFSL/Australian Credit Licence No. 231204.


gaming GAMING

PLAYERS CHOOSE Player’s Choice™

Aristocrat’s product portfolio strategy for 2013 marks a watershed moment for clubs and hotels with the pending release of up to three Player’s Choice™ games throughout the year. Aristocrat places a high value on direct feedback from venue operators across the state, and it’s that feedback that has been fed into the 2013 game development pipeline from an assortment of industry events and key insight forums.

C

raig Blesson, Marketing Manager ANZ, asserts, ‘The recent success of the Player’s Choice™ brand has been built on a platform of flexibility – for both player and venue. The Multigame affords with a limited capacity for space the ability to effectively increase their floor from one to four games, while catering to a wide cross-section of player types. Venues understand the need to cater to all player types, and see the Player’s Choice™ brand of games as a good way to do so. The Player’s Choice range, with a selection of four unique games, adds diversity to the gaming floors and drives high occupancy rates through off-and on-peak play. With several exciting Player’s Choice™ games due in 2013, it’s an exciting prospect for club and hotel operators alike to maximise their gaming potential.’ 2013 will see the introduction of Player’s Choice Grand™ – the first Player’s Choice™ to be released on the Viridian WS™. Player’s Choice Grand™ will include the preprogrammable Nteractiv™ LCD button deck, which

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THE RECENT SUCCESS OF THE PLAYER’S CHOICE™ BRAND HAS BEEN BUILT ON A PLATFORM OF FLEXIBILITY – TO BOTH PLAYER AND VENUE allows the bet configurations to dynamically match the selected game. Player’s Choice Grand™ brings a whole host of players’ favourites including More Chilli™, Double Happiness™, Wild Stallion™ and Panther Magic™. With this release pending in early 2013 – and several more throughout the year – clubs and hotels can rest assured knowing that Aristocrat is providing them with a continued choice that is built primarily for their businesses. C&PM


PLAYER’S CHOICE GRAND

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CHOICE HAS NEVER BEEN SO GRAND INTRODUCING PLAYER’S CHOICE GRAND™ THE FIRST PLAYER’S CHOICE™ MULTIGAME TITLE ON THE VIRIDIAN WS™ FEATURING NTERACTIV™ LCD BUTTON MID TRIM.

For more information contact:

(03) 9644 1000 ©2013 Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Limited. Aristocrat, it’s all in the game, Viridian WS and the Aristocrat logo are trade marks or registered trade marks of Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Limited. ARISTOCRAT PROMOTES RESPONSIBLE GAMBLING


SPONSORED Sponsored ARTICLE Article

THE MOST SECURE way to pay for both you and your customers H

&L Australia continues to be the innovator in the hospitality industry, and has teamed up with OneTab to bring a convenient, fast and secure mobile payment system that streamlines the transactional process between your customers and your venue. The free OneTab app allows your customers to set up, track and complete tab orders with their smart phones in real time. All they need to do is find your venue, open a tab, set a credit limit and show the unique code to the bartender. They can then order as normal, and when ready to move on just click ‘pay’ and OneTab links their phone with your venue. This allows your customers to order as they need and pay when they want without waiting for staff; and if they forget to pay, you can close the tab from the point of sale (POS) and they will receive a receipt via email. As a vendor, you can expect: • No more credit cards over the bar • Easy opening and closing of tabs over smartphones • More customers: your venue name and location is readily available on the app, giving you increased exposure to thousands of potential customers. • Social media/digital exposure: OneTab is designed for your business and socially driven. OneTab is active through Facebook, Twitter and the OneTab website, and will promote your venue through all these channels. • More sales: customers can pay in their own time, from anywhere, without your staff, and as they are not handing over cash, they are likely to spend more over a longer period of time. • Increased staff productivity: integration with H&L’s POS streamlines the transaction process, automatically reconciles the transaction, and reduces the amount of cash in the drawer (less cash means less to count at the end of trade).

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• Increased security: no need to handle or store any credit card information, less cash, and less temptation for staff. OneTab means the end of unpaid tabs, as it allows you to close the tab from your H&L POS system, so accounts are never left unsettled. Payments are guaranteed, as the amount nominated by the customer is pre-authorised via OneTab, prior to the first drink being poured!

THE FREE ONETAB APP ALLOWS YOUR CUSTOMERS TO SET UP, TRACK AND COMPLETE TAB ORDERS WITH THEIR SMART PHONES IN REAL TIME • Increased promotion of your venue: in phase two, where licensing regulations permit, OneTab will allow you to push exclusive offers to all OneTab users. And here is the clincher: OneTab securely integrates with the H&L POS system, without additional hardware costs, to simplify and enhance the relationship between customers, staff and venues. $0 setup, $0 subscription costs – just pay per tab, similar to EFTPOS and credit cards. OneTab, no worries. H&L POS and OneTab: the most secure way to pay, for both you and your customers. C&PM

For more information visit our website www.hlaustralia.com.au or contact: Burt Admiraal, Director of Business Development, Sales & Marketing, H&L Australia, M: 0418 550 005, E: burt@hlaustralia.com.au


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gaming

Simplifying the regulations and the approval process

By Ross Ferrar,
Chief Executive Officer, Gaming Technologies Association

A lot of confusion was cleared up in the last month or so of 2012 when the Federal Parliament finally passed poker machine legislation after more than two years of political and media debate.

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he legislation includes requirements, which will take effect on a range of dates from December 2018 to December 2022, about pre-commitment and dynamic warnings. With a lead time of between six and 10 years, adequate time is available to comply with these requirements effectively and efficiently. The lead time provides the opportunity for regulators and suppliers to align federal and state requirements, so that any changes to new games and machines can be sensibly developed and coordinated across all states at the lowest possible cost and least possible distraction. All in all, that’s a pretty good outcome. What some politicians had been trying to push through would have been disastrous. But that’s what prohibitionists do. A federal election is due in September 2013. Everybody has an opinion about whether there’ll be a change of government, but one thing is clear: it’s extremely unlikely that the poker machine legislation passed in November 2012 will change. Fortunately, there is genuine, informed discussion underway at the state level, and 2013 brings optimism that the complexity of standards and requirements of poker machines and games is at least being considered. It’s a good time to consider these, because the new federal requirements have the potential to make the process of getting approval for the supply of poker machines and games very complex indeed.

Online gambling is the elephant in the room The real ‘elephant in the room’ is online gambling, particularly on mobile devices including smartphones and

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tablets. There are two important aspects of online gambling. Firstly, everybody’s doing it. Whether betting on sport or lotteries, it’s convenient to place a bet using the gear you always carry around. But like everything, online gambling is changing, with some social network games including forms of gambling. Social network games are amongst the most popular games played in the world, with several products with tens of millions of players. This alone will change the worldwide gambling landscape in the very near future. Secondly, online gambling doesn’t really recognise boundaries. You can pick up a smartphone now and be playing casino-style games for real money within a minute. Those games won’t be physically in Australia, but may well be regulated in some other country where online gambling is legal and licensed. The interesting thing about online casino games is that players tend not to care about where they’re located – they just enjoy the activity and the convenience – and never mind the prohibitionists. What’s very funny about online gambling is that some Australian politicians seem to think they can control it. Their advisers ought to learn that the internet doesn’t care about politics! What’s not very funny about online gambling is that if you’re playing a game that is not physically in Australia, any money you spend goes straight out of the Australian economy, along with jobs.

2013 and the future Critics’ fixation on poker machines is misplaced when they’re only located in secure hospitality venues. In time, critics will realise that poker machines are not evil, they don’t get happy, they don’t get sad – they just run software. And they’ll probably look back on the current long-term reduction in problem gambling with some nostalgia. People gamble because they enjoy a bit of fun. Don’t try to take that away any time now or in the future. C&PM


GAMING gaming

SAVE THE DATES

FOR AUSTRALASIAN GAMING EXPO 2013

T

uesday 13 to Thursday 15 August are this year’s dates for the Australasian Gaming Expo at the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre.

More than 110 exhibition stands have already been booked, taking up more than 85 per cent of the 15,000-squaremetre exhibition space. All indications are that the exhibition will again be full to capacity with a wide range of companies showcasing the world’s best gaming and related equipment and services – including last year’s ‘Best Stand’ winner Task Retail Technology, which has booked a stand of some 30 square metres. Last year’s Gaming Expo saw a number of changes as a result of feedback from visitors and exhibitors. Apart from a new and colourful logo and theme, the event now operates on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday – which was very well received last year. Ninety-three per cent of surveyed visitors indicated that they go to the event to see new products and technology, while 99 per cent saw what they had wanted to see.

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The event owner and operator, the Gaming Technologies Association, will again add to the fun by offering visitors the chance to win a surprise trip for two to Las Vegas at each day of the Expo. The Association’s members, whose exhibition stands would sit comfortably alongside the world’s best at any global event, will be in full force at the Australasian Gaming Expo. Note: The Australasian Gaming Expo is a trade exhibition, for management representatives of gaming industry organisations only including government, regulatory, research and support bodies, clubs, hotels, casinos, resorts and similar hospitality industry venues. Trade suppliers are not eligible to attend the event unless exhibiting. For further information contact: Ross Ferrar, CEO, Gaming Technologies Association. Ph: (02) 8216 0931 or 0418 686 075 or email rferrar@gamingta.com.


gaming

Be good for goodness’ sake Image courtesy of Darius Zka

BY Sally Gainsbury, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Gambling Education and Research, Southern Cross University

Harm minimisation is essential for success, and the Australian gambling industry can proactively demonstrate corporate social responsibility through voluntarily implemented harm minimisation efforts.

T

he history of social and environmental concern stretches back almost 5000 years. In Ancient Mesopotamia (around 1700 BC), King Hammurabi introduced a code in which builders, innkeepers or farmers were put to death if their negligence caused death or major inconveniences to local citizens. In Ancient Rome, businesses were shamed if they failed to contribute sufficient taxes to fund military campaigns. Numerous definitions exist for corporate social responsibility (CSR), which, generally agreed, is a voluntary policy adopted by companies to improve the wellbeing, or at least to not harm, the communities in which they operate, the environment and their employees.

Proponents of CSR generally advocate the moral and economic advantages of this approach. A moral stance claims that corporations (profit and nonprofit) have a responsibility to make a positive contribution to society, as no organisation exists in isolation. The economic argument posits that CSR represents a holistic approach to business that can meet corporate objectives and create market advantages. To test these theories, researchers from the University of Western Ontario’s Ivey School of Business in Canada conducted a series of experiments in which they showed consumers products – coffee and t-shirts – with varying statements describing the ethical standards of the companies and prices. In all cases, consumers were willing to pay a small premium for more ethical products. In contrast, they would only buy unethically made products if offered at a major discount. In the context of gambling, the Productivity Commission defines harm minimisation strategies as those that aim to minimise the risks associated with gambling and facilitate responsible gambling, without overtly disturbing those who gamble in a non-problematic manner. For the majority of individuals, participation in gambling is comparable continued on page 16

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Sponsored ARTICLE Article SPONSORED

QUEUE MANAGEMENT stanchions have a lot of responsibilities!

W

aiting lines can be a profound source of tension between customers and businesses, and the club and pub environment is no exception. For this reason, any consideration of queue management in the hospitality industry is not complete without a specific focus on the role of the stanchion in queue management and line formation. Here are some of the ways stanchions can be used to improve queue management:

MAKE THE LINE CLEAR When patrons see a belted stanchion, they immediately recognise the waiting line. That first stanchion says it all: ‘Line up here.’ Stanchions form a clear clue to the queue.

ENHANCE SAFETY An orderly line is a safer line. High traffic settings including larger clubs, amusement parks, movie theatres, airports and retail outlets require a well-designed queuing strategy, as much for safety as for efficiency and customer satisfaction. Stanchions play a large part in enhancing crowd control and safety by establishing clear boundaries and forming a fair and logical progression for customer flow. All of this translates into a safer experience for all. So if queuing features as any part of your facility, in order to serve your customers, the question isn’t whether or not you will need a queue management solution; it’s which solutions will benefit you most. C&PM

ALLOW LINES TO EXPAND AND CONTRACT In most clubs and pubs, customer traffic ebbs and flows throughout the day, week, or due to seasonality. Stanchions allow a line to scale quickly and easily, since the belts between stanchions can be removed to shorten the line during slow periods or connected to expand the line during busy periods. In hospitality and retail, retractable belts are sometimes placed in between merchandising panels to easily open up the flow of traffic.

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CLUBS CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013••15 X


gaming

continued from page 14

to purchasing and participating in a general range of recreational activities. However, for a minority of community members, gambling behaviour can become episodically or chronically excessive, resulting in significant negative consequences with associated gambling-related harms affecting personal, familial, marital, social, employment and legal functioning. Recognising the potential for harm, governments and gambling operators have a responsibility to implement public-health oriented harm minimisation measures designed to minimise excessive gambling behaviour and its negative outcomes across all strata of the general population.

Surveys of gamblers have repeatedly shown high levels of support for the introduction of harm minimisation and responsible gambling policies The gambling industry is in danger of being seen as similar to the tobacco and alcohol industries: not well connected with socially responsible behaviour. In a recent study I conducted with my colleagues, more than half of the 4326 gamblers surveyed believed that the harms of gambling outweigh the benefits, and only 16 per cent believed that the benefits of gambling outweigh the harms (Gainsbury et al., 2012). Evidence of the existence and impact of problem gambling has become irrefutable after two comprehensive independent reviews by the Productivity Commission, resulting in the condition gaining prominence as a topic of public health concern. The expression of community concern is demonstrated in the increasing number of media stories describing gambling-related harm and the

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exertion of political pressure for appropriate responses from governments and industry operators. Industry operators have implemented several responsible gambling strategies, including mandatory requirements complemented by voluntary codes of conduct. Surveys of gamblers have repeatedly shown high levels of support for the introduction of harm minimisation and responsible gambling policies. The implementation of CSR policies increases consumer trust and demonstrates corporate integrity. These findings suggest that implementing effective harm minimisation strategies will have substantial advantages for the gambling industry from both a moral and economic perspective.


gaming

However, the manner in which harm minimisation policies are introduced is important to their success both in reducing harm and increasing favourable attitudes towards a company. Policies that are viewed to be a marketing exercise or a token effort may generate a negative reaction among customers, who may become sceptical of future endeavours. Similarly, actions that appear to be reactive, for example, to political or community debates and media coverage, will be less effective in achieving positive attitudes. To be successful, harm minimisation efforts must be proactive, socially motivated and be appropriately aligned with corporate objectives. A Harvard Business Review article discussing the importance of the motivation to be socially responsible (McNulty, 2013) gave an example of how the CEO of a start-up clean energy company thought about what he would say to his own family if they asked why his company provided health insurance to its workers: because healthy workers tend to perform better and are absent less often, or because it was the right thing to do. He also thought about the ripple effect of the message he was sending to his family and the families of his employees and how it would affect the image of his company. Similarly, managers in the gambling and hospitality industries should consider how and why they implement harm minimisation policies and what these are trying to achieve; what policies would you put in place if your family members were employees and customers? The Australian gambling industry can play a key role on the international stage by proactively demonstrating CSR through further voluntarily implemented harm minimisation efforts. It is well known that gambling is associated with serious problems for some people, and continued political debate about how harms should be addressed seriously risks overshadowing the positive contributions of the industry to the community. Harm minimisation cannot be left solely to governments, which have strong conflicts of interest in regulating the gambling industry. Waiting for, debating and implementing regulated policies to minimise harm robs the gambling industry of the opportunity to demonstrate the importance that it places on social responsibility and harm minimisation. Responding to regulation also fails to capitalise on the wealth of knowledge and expertise gaming managers have on the best ways to minimise harm. Political discourse and

Waiting for, debating and implementing regulated policies to minimise harm robs the gambling industry of the opportunity to demonstrate the importance that it places on social responsibility and harm minimisation debate on gambling policies is positive if it leads to actions; however, in the absence of effective action by government, the industry should develop and enact voluntary standards of care. Such efforts would also reduce the risk of less informed policies being imposed by regulators and demonstrate that the gambling industry can govern its own actions and protect its customers. Ideally, harm minimisation strategies should be based on theory and evidence of effectively addressing gambling problems, but this does not mean that industry members and venues cannot trial various strategies and communicate with expert researchers about the best ways forward. The Australian Psychological Society and Australian Medical Association have both highlighted the importance of addressing problem gambling and called for further actions to minimise harm. These organisations and expert researchers have made many recommendations about what can be done by the gambling industry to reduce the risks of harms. After harm minimisation strategies are implemented, it is essential that they are independently evaluated using rigorous and robust research methods. It is insufficient for corporations to simply add initiatives without establishing their effectiveness. Otherwise, the schemes may only have face value, which says nothing about their outcome – that is, reduced harm. As mentioned above, token CSR efforts, without follow-up, may be counterproductive both in terms of actual impact in reducing harm and improving favourable attitudes towards a corporation. Collaboration between industry members, researchers, policymakers and the community is the key to making a positive contribution to society, particularly in terms of protecting employees and customers from harm, and ensuring that companies and organisations do good, for the right reasons. C&PM For more information contact Dr Sally Gainsbury at sally.gainsbury@scu.edu.au.

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 17


gaming

Image courtesy of Janice Waltzer.

Should the gaming industry be monopolised? By Catherine Prentice, Faculty of Business and Enterprise, Swinburne University

A monopoly enterprise is one that serves its primary market (those purchasing its products) without a competitor that is selling identical or basically similar services or goods within the market. As a practical matter, all the customers must purchase the products from the one enterprise if they desire to have the product; there is no competition, as the sales of the product are controlled by the single enterprise. continued on page 20

18 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013


gaming

continued from page 18

Monopolies are supported by the notion that certain businesses need especially large capital investment. Accordingly, they find that investors (banks, et cetera) are reluctant to furnish capital funds without the assurance that the businesses will achieve a high profit level

I

n an oligopoly, a few enterprises will control the distribution of the service or good to the market. Oligopolistic situations also arise if several producers work together, or collude, in order to control the supply and the price placed upon the products they sell. Such combinations of sellers may be called cartels. With monopolies and oligopolies (or cartels), the enterprises control the market, and they typically seek to maximise their profits by setting higher prices that consumers must pay if they want their products. These enterprises may also use practices that preclude other enterprises from coming into and competing in the markets – such as lowering prices to levels with which the others cannot compete, and when the competition goes out of business, raising the prices considerably. In the gaming industries, there are some cases of open market competition that approach situations recommended by most economists; but many gaming arrangements find structures of oligopoly. Many more – perhaps even the majority of cases – involve gambling operations running as government-created monopolies in local markets (defined arbitrarily as geographical circles of 50 or 100 miles, with travel times of several hours to the next casinos). Why would the government decree that a gaming enterprise should operate as a monopoly? There seem to be surface answers – almost obvious, without need for independent proof and support – as to why society would monopolise and regulate an enterprise delivering electricity, natural gas supplies, and water. These are critical goods for the survival of a society. Arguments that telephone companies and television stations have to be monopolies or oligopolies seem not to be made anymore. There are even arguments against the notion that governments must have monopoly control over all

20 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

operations of prisons, firefighting services, and police forces. Does a government-approved monopoly on providing gaming services make sense? A variety of industry structures have been approved for casino venues. The industry structure has been set forth in specific laws, which give legal standing to casinos. Unlike the situation for most other industries, casinos may exist only with a legal authorisation. While the authorisation process is usually accompanied by a debate, that debate is almost entirely consumed by a consideration of whether or not gambling activity that takes place within the walls of a gaming venue is moral, appropriate as a form of entertainment, and likely to produce considerable employment as well as tax revenue for a venue. The debate rarely looks at the merits of monopolies vis-à-vis oligopolies and open market structures for the casino industry. There is little research evidence that has been drawn from studies of the effects of the varying industry structures on casino industry performance (for example, job development, growth and profits, tax revenues and price structures). The literature suggests that some industries are appropriate ones for having monopoly enterprises. Does gaming fit in with these industries? Gambling is simply not a product or service that is vital for society; at best, it is a recreational service that may be enjoyed by many with potential, but not necessarily economic, benefits. At worst, as its moral critics may assert, it involves activity that can become addictive and quite harmful to the individuals involved in gambling and also to the general society. No reasonable assessment would offer that gambling fulfils such a critical need for society that its institutions need the special protection of monopoly status. Governments, as well as private gaming monopoly owners,


gaming

Efficiency is often offered as a reason to support monopolies. One scenario holds that many competitive establishments operate with the same customer base, then one performs more effectively and with greater efficiency. Their costs are reduced, and subsequently they reduce the prices they charge and expand their facilities.

Monopolies are supported by the notion that certain businesses need especially large capital investment. Accordingly, they find that investors (banks, et cetera) are

reluctant to furnish capital funds without the assurance that the businesses will achieve a high profit level – levels that only monopoly businesses can achieve. It is also recognised that if competitive enterprises seek to offer the same product, there will be major inefficiencies with duplicate

PL

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FREEZE

G U

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A

In a world of change, there’s one thing that hasn’t

HOS

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A N T EE

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The Fee Freeze Guarantee is applicable to HOSTPLUS core and personal products only. The information in this document is general in nature and does not consider any of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this information, you should consider obtaining advice from a licensed financial adviser and consider the appropriateness of this information, having regard to your particular investment needs, objectives and financial situation. You should obtain a copy of the HOSTPLUS Product Disclosure Statement and consider the information contained in the Statement before making any decision about whether to acquire an interest in HOSTPLUS. Issued by Host-Plus Pty Limited ABN 79 008 634 704, AFSL No. 244392, RSEL No. L0000093, HOSTPLUS Superannuation Fund ABN 68 657 495 890, RSE No. R1000054. For further information on Chant West ratings visit http://hostplus.com.au/info/chant-west-disclaimer THEDMGROUP HOST7343/CPM/FF

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 21


gaming

investments, such as multiple telephone poles on the same street, or duplicate sets of train tracks over the same pathways. Certain modern gaming venues may carry costs approaching several billions of dollars; however, such high costs are not necessary to produce gaming facilities.

The literature suggests that some industries are appropriate ones for having monopoly enterprises. Does gaming fit in with these industries? Gaming, historically, has been created in side rooms off other facilities. In the not too distant past (and even today) some gaming facilities were but temporary locations for the playing of games simply using decks of cards or pairs of dice. Moreover, it can be noted that the most extravagant gaming venues today – ones with investments over a billion dollars each – are found in very competitive marketplaces such as Las Vegas, Atlantic City, Macau, and Singapore. Gaming organisations do not need monopoly protection in order to attract capital investment funds. Monopoly protections are supported in the hope that profits guaranteed by monopoly status may be used to 22 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

develop new, innovative products that will be beneficial for society. While gaming firms are constantly tweaking their games, with rules changes and graphic appeals, the level of innovations in the gaming premises is minimal. For example, the games in casinos are very old and the concept has been around for centuries. Casinos do not sell products; they sell services. The innovation in their service delivery is not capital intensive. Most casino innovations have come either from suppliers who sell to all establishments, or from the minds of entrepreneurs who likely as not are located in competitive casino facilities. Efficiency is often offered as a reason to support monopolies. One scenario holds that many competitive establishments operate with the same customer base, then one performs more effectively and with greater efficiency. Their costs are reduced, and subsequently they reduce the prices they charge and expand their facilities. Their competitors are unable to meet their prices, and they lose their customers, and the most efficient enterprise forces the others out of business. Hence, the most efficient wins a monopoly position in the economy. These monopoly gaming firms do not earn their monopoly standing. Their standing is given to them by the government. Some do earn their governmental gift through a competitive bidding process, but many do not even do that (when they are the sole qualified bidder for a casino licence in a particular location). There is an argument that monopolies may exist, if they are subject to strict government regulations. Some may even suggest that monopolies are good because they necessitate strict regulation. Does the rationale fit the gaming industry? The truth is, strict gaming regulation was first applied to the gaming industry. C&PM


I N D U S T RY LEADERS

Operational Services and Systems (Aust.) P/L, (OSS), began operating in January 1994 and has been a leader in developing multi jurisdiction computerised gaming machine reconciliation and performance reporting systems.

System One

Gaming Machine Management System › Servicing the gaming industry for 18 Years › Compatible with Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania

PROVEN PERFORMANCE

At OSS we are working with

Intralot the successful CMS provider, to ensure that you the Venue Operator, has the best tool to continue the gaming machine reconciliation and performance analysis process.

› All in one Meter Collection, Reconciliation, Deployment and Compliance System › Central Managment System for Hotel and Club Groups › Compliant with Victorian Gaming Legislation Changes, August 2012 and beyond › 7 Day week helpline support

U N S U R PA S S E D SUPPORT

With OSS products we run a 7 day a week, 365 day a year, 1300 telephone Helpline from 8am to 6pm. Our industry standard programs “System One” and “Gold Coin” are used by over 600 Clubs and Pubs Australia wide.

OSS HELPLINE

1300 130 541


GAMING gaming

JUST THE TICKET F

ounded in 1983, FutureLogic is the leading manufacturer of innovative ticket printing and couponing solutions to gaming technology providers and operators around the world. As the premier supplier of super-robust thermal ticket printers to the global gaming industry, FutureLogic has shipped more than 1.5 million printers for casino gaming, video lottery, AWP, LPM, SWP and kiosk applications worldwide. Headquartered in Glendale, California and with offices across North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia, FutureLogic’s sales and engineering teams provide direct support and local knowledge for manufacturers and operators around the world.

Macau, China. In 2008, FutureLogic entered Latin America just as TITO was becoming adopted throughout the region. Another milestone in the expansion of FutureLogic was reached in 2010, when the company supplemented its service and support platform with the opening of FutureLogic Australia in Bondi Junction (Sydney) and the recruitment of Barry Cook as Technical Sales Manager for Australia. Strategic Business Units in EMEA, Latin America, Asia and Australia show FutureLogic’s commitment to providing on-the-ground service and support to all the OEM and Operator customers across the region. With more than 1.5 million gaming printers shipped worldwide, FutureLogic printers are the preferred choice of major electronic gaming machine manufacturers and gaming operators alike. The GEN2 Universal™ printer, FutureLogic’s flagship gaming printer, demonstrates a reliability rate of 99.96 per cent, which is testimony to the product’s superior design, excellent manufacturing standards and outstanding quality. The GEN2 Universal’s print head has a lifespan of more than 10 years, and usually outlives the gaming machine.

The company’s management team has more than 80 years’ combined experience in printing and related industries, and its engineering staff has established a reputation for developing reliable, innovative solutions that help reduce operating expenses, improve end-user satisfaction, and enable new game concepts. FutureLogic’s manufacturing operations are located in a 30,000-square-foot facility in Phoenix, Arizona that includes dedicated high-volume production lines and state-of-theart test and inspection equipment. Experienced, highly trained personnel ensure efficient, high-quality production of FutureLogic’s award-winning thermal printers. In 2004, the company went truly international when the first operation outside of the United States, FutureLogic Europe, opened a 7000-square-foot facility near London. In 2006, FutureLogic expanded its global support and distribution network into the Asia-Pacific market, with the official opening of its new sales, service and distribution centre in

X 24• •CLUBS CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013

WITH MORE THAN 1.5 MILLION GAMING PRINTERS SHIPPED WORLDWIDE, FUTURELOGIC PRINTERS ARE THE PREFERRED CHOICE BY THE MAJOR ELECTRONIC GAMING MACHINE MANUFACTURERS AND GAMING OPERATORS ALIKE The FutureLogic mission statement is to ‘anticipate, create and deliver innovative solutions and world-class experiences that excite, satisfy and inspire’. To fulfil this mission statement, FutureLogic aims to develop and produce ticket printing and couponing solutions designed to support its core printer business and add more value to the end customer. And FutureLogic’s global team continues to lead the way. C&PM


The Only Choice for Ticket Printing and Promotional Couponing for Gaming Operators World-wide

Outstanding, Rock-Solid Performance ƒ Future-proof for PromoNet® promotional couponing operations ƒ The most decorated and award-winning printer in gaming ƒ The most reliable printer with the longest lifespan

futurelogic-inc.com/gen2universal

Contact Barry Cook at +61 418 405028 or on barry.cook@futurelogic-inc.com


GAMING gaming

ORION ART delivers quality and innovation O

rion Art provides premium signage products to casinos, clubs and hotels throughout Australia and Asia.

FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS Orion Art Pty Limited started in 2003 as a small designbased company supplying the New South Wales gaming industry with our specialised signage products. We quickly established ourselves as a leading signage supplier to clubs around Sydney, and within a couple of years had expanded into the Asian market as the gaming industry exploded in Macau and Singapore. Our focus on providing the highest level of service, design innovation and manufacturing quality available has proven a winning formula. From the smallest clubs in outback New South Wales to the largest casinos in Asia, our level of service and quality remains second to none.

LAS VEGAS INFLUENCE Our involvement with the Las Vegas resort boom in the 1990s has helped pave the way for our success in supplying gaming signage to other parts of the world. Having designed some of the most prestigious signage packages for major casinos and resorts along the famous Las Vegas strip, our team brings decades of experience and creativity to the Australian and Asian markets. Our ability to custom design to an endless array of interior styles stems from this experience, and has been fundamental to the company’s achievements.

POWERHOUSE IN ASIA During the mid-2000s, we looked to Macau as a new challenge. Our adaptability and efforts proved successful, and we expanded our export business into Macau and other Asian countries. As sole supplier for Wynn Resort Macau, Crown Macau and MGM Grand Macau, our designs and products met the incredibly stringent quality standards demanded of these resort-style venues. More recently, numerous major resort casinos have followed suit. Orion Art signage now appears in every resort casino in Macau and Singapore, with 2012 seeing the addition of MGM Ho Tram Vietnam and Solaire Manila to the list. Although style and functionality have changed over the years, products such as overhead signs, bank end displays and satellite signs remain an integral part of gaming floors. Eye-catching signage provides vital information while creating a level of excitement and entertainment for players. Promoting your premium products to players, providing marketing or regulatory information or enhancing a particular theme or interior style are some other benefits of properly designed signage throughout a gaming venue. Whether revitalising a bank of stand-alone machines or promoting a link or jackpot, overhead gaming signage is essential to the performance of any bank of EGMs. X 26• •CLUBS CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013

OUR HOMELAND We remain Australian-owned, our products Australian-made and ever devoted to offering our experience and dedication to Australian gaming venues. Orion Art provides an invaluable resource to all Australian clubs and pubs, as we continually evolve to meet the challenges that the Australian gaming laws bring to us all. C&PM

Phone: 02 9520 5665 Email: info@orionart.com.au Website: www.orionart.com.au


Clubs + Hotels Expo

Clubs + Hotels Expo returns bigger and better in 2013

Clubs + Hotels Australia returns to the Melbourne Exhibition Centre from 30 April – 1 May this year. A high point in the Victorian calendar for those in the hospitality and gaming industries, Clubs and Pubs Manager explores the agenda for the expo, and what attendees can look forward to seeing on the day.

28 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

C

lubs + Hotels Australia 2013, Victoria’s largest dedicated platform for those in the gaming and hospitality industries, will return to Melbourne this year. It is set to be significantly larger than the successful 2012 expo. Conrad Patrick, Clubs + Hotels 2013 Business Development Manager, comments that the industry support for the 2013 Melbourne expo has been strong: ‘Particularly in light of the new gaming regulations in Victoria, those I have spoken to in the industry have agreed that we need our own dedicated event.’ Given the recent changes to the Victorian gambling regulations of 2012–2013, which transformed the twooperator system into a venue-owner model, the 2013 expo is timely. As a result of deregulation, many venues have been left to source, service and manage their own gaming


Clubs + Hotels Expo

interests, meaning it is important for clubs and pubs to have a sound understanding of the regulatory environment and responsible gaming requirements. Deregulation can also be seen as an excellent opportunity. Conrad comments, ‘The new gaming structure gives clubs and hotels the opportunity to re-examine their gaming operation and the services they provide, and to take a fresh look at product procurement.’ Initial support for the 2013 Melbourne expo was garnered from several leading gaming manufacturers. Clubs + Hotels Australia has announced that Aristocrat will be returning for a second year, and will be joined by IGT Australia, Konami, and SHFL Entertainment. Matt McCarroll, Aristocrat’s Senior Sales Manager for Victoria and Tasmania, says, ‘Aristocrat, being the first Gaming Machine manufacturer to support and attend the Clubs + Hotels Expo, is proud to be back at the show in 2013. The Clubs + Hotels Expo gave Aristocrat the opportunity to educate customers on the transition, and to demonstrate leading gaming technology. This year will see Aristocrat bring some of its strongest ever products to the Clubs + Hotels Expo.’ Theo Toklis, IGT State Sales Manager in Victoria, says, ‘As most people know, the Victorian hotel and club market is undergoing significant change, so the timing of this event this year is ideal for us. The show promises to be a central event for the market at a time of change, bringing the main providers together so that our customers can get a good overview of the commercial opportunities, products and services available to help improve their businesses. IGT has a strong presence in Victoria, and is investing in our team to help our customers grow their gaming revenues. We look forward to meeting our customers, old and new, at the show.’

Australian Photo Booth Company, offer specialised food and entertainment services. A strong focus of Clubs + Hotels Australia will remain on education, and a series of industry-specific seminars will again be a major drawcard. Short, sharp and businessfocused, these complimentary seminars provide attendees with an opportunity to learn from leading industry experts, and remain up to date with the latest industry standards and practices.

The schedule for the seminars is as follows: Tuesday 30 April 10.30 am – 11.15 am Victorian Gaming Monitoring – Now and into the future Frank Makryllos, Intralot In 2012–2013, the Victorian gaming industry underwent the most significant change in its brief history when it was transformed from the two-operator system into a venueowner model. A key aspect of this transformation has been the appointment of Victoria’s first sole Licensed Gaming Monitor, Intralot Gaming Systems. Makryllos asks: ‘Now that this migration is behind us, what does the future hold for monitoring services? What lessons from migration are helping to shape better monitoring services now and into the future?’

The expo focuses on four key pillars: hospitality, leisure/ sport, food/service and gaming – showcasing products, services and equipment for each of these industries. Venue products, design and fit-outs are a particular focus, with exhibitors showing a range of cash-handling solutions, catering and bar equipment, point of sale equipment and software, gaming machines and monitoring solutions. Exhibitors will showcase a variety of products and services at the 2013 expo. Micros Fidelio Australia Pty Ltd, for example, is an IT specialist for the hospitality industry, and has worked with a number of high-end establishments, including Hugo’s in Manly, and Cafe Sydney, both in New South Wales. Round6 is a new player in the architecture and interior design market in Victoria, providing a fresh perspective on hospitality design. Camvex Video Surveillance Systems offer total CCTV solutions, while other companies, such as Bite Size Coffee Treats or the CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 29


Clubs + Hotels Expo

Tuesday 30 April 11.45 am – 12:30 pm

• Defining sexual harassment.

A regulator’s update to industry

• Defining equal employment opportunity and discrimination.

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) will deliver the latest updates. It is vital for the liquor and gaming industries to keep up to date with their obligations under gaming and liquor laws. Being better educated about gambling and liquor regulation is a key means to improving business performance. Hear from Commission experts about the latest information and developments in gaming and liquor regulation. The presentation will focus on regulatory, licensing and compliance topics for both gaming and liquor participants. Tuesday 30 April 1.00 pm – 1.45 pm To make or buy – Where the costs lie Andrew Briese, Cooking the Books It’s difficult to be objective when deciding whether to make or buy. The arguments are often: ‘We’ve got to do it ourselves because products made inhouse taste better.’ ‘My apprentices won’t learn anything if I order portioncontrolled meats.’ ‘The customers expect that we do everything ourselves.’ ‘I’m selling out if I buy it in. My integrity is being compromised if I buy it in.’ Andrew will analyse the costs of each alternative and give you the tools to make decisions that are right for your business. Tuesday 30 April 2.15 pm – 3.00 pm Workplace behaviour – Managing bullying, sexual harassment and discrimination Gary Sepping, SIAG Principal Adviser at SIAG, Gary has extensive global and national experience as an adviser to executive leadership teams in human resources strategic planning, organisational and cultural change, and industrial relations. This seminar will examine the current and proposed law on workplace bullying, sexual harassment and discrimination. Incorporating case studies and practical examples, it will include: • What is workplace bullying? • What is not workplace bullying?

30 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

• Managing complaints. Tuesday 30 April 3.30 pm–4.15 pm Dealing with prosecutions, infringements and disciplinary proceedings Brendan Reidy, Wisewould Mahony Lawyers The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation is the single regulator for the liquor and gaming industries in the state. Disciplinary procedures may be instigated by the liquor and gaming inspectors and other authorised persons, such as police or protective services officers. Brendan will talk on assisting those in the industry to manage the potential risks of their operations, deal with disciplinary action by the regulator and defend criminal prosecutions. Wednesday 1 May 10.30 am – 11.15 am Gaming floor strategies John Willis, Aristocrat Hear John examine how the EGM installation components of jackpots, denomination mix, RTPs and Competitor Analysis come together to maximise revenues by wellimplemented venue strategies. Wednesday 1 May 11.45 am – 2.30 pm Clubs and construction – An overview of pitfalls and tricks to get the most out of your renovation Luke Ponti, Round6 Architects With over 14 years’ experience specialising in the hospitality industry, Director of Round6 Architects and Brand + Slater Architects (Brisbane) Luke Ponti presents a seminar on


Clubs + Hotels Expo

the process of construction projects. Focusing on tips to achieve best results from projects, Luke will discuss the role of key players, the importance of contracts as the foundation for future development, and strategies for minimising cost and risk through budget and program. Wednesday 1 May 1.00 pm – 1.45 pm What’s happened in training – do you know? Glenn Parker, William Angliss Glenn will address trends in hospitality and compliance training, what has changed in recent years, new trends in industry and how training establishments, such as William Angliss, are addressing change. 2.15 pm Online marketing and your hospitality business Darren Vowles, Reach Local Australia The constant evolution of online technology means that your internet marketing needs to keep up with the changes. Just having a website is no longer sufficient in competing for customers online (and offline). This session will focus on what an internet marketing strategy needs to look like right now, and what it will need to do in the future: • what’s next in new media? Emerging trends and technologies • assessing which new technologies are best for you to use and making them work for you • ensuring you get bang for your buck when adopting new media such as Mobile, PPC, Social Media, Web video.

In addition to the seminars, other event highlights will include a feature installation by Bate Design, training by William Angliss, and a new product launch. Bate Design is a Melbourne-based team with more than 30 years of project experience, and clubs being a key area of expertise. Their installation for the expo has been developed to showcase ‘your local, with a wow factor’. Exhibitor William Angliss will be presenting barista training, which is bound to be extremely popular. Clubs + Hotels Australia is the event not to miss this year to witness the unveiling and worldwide launch of a brand new and exciting gaming machine from Atlas Gaming in Melbourne.  Atlas will introduce the Apollo 2 series, incorporating a slimline feature-packed cabinet with a leading-edge gaming platform and graphics capability packaged into the best out-of-the-box gaming machine on the market. Alex Ciampoli, Director of Atlas Gaming, says,  ‘Venues will be pleasantly surprised by what we are about to launch at the show in Melbourne. It is a very exciting time for the Victorian gaming industry and we look forward to providing venues with value for money and exciting, fresh games and features.’ C&PM

For more information, or to register, visit www.clubsandhotels.com.au What: CLUBS + HOTELS AUSTRALIA EXPO 2013 Where: Melbourne Exhibition Centre When: 30 April – 1 May 2013 Event organiser: Australian Exhibitions & Conferences Exhibitor information: Contact AEC on 03 8672 1200 or clubshotels@aec.net.au Web: www.clubsandhotels.com.au

A Sample Of The Exhibitors This Year:

Full House Group

Positive Outcomes International

Altitude Communications

Global Gaming Industries

Rhinoplay

Amtek Corporation

Igt Australia

Round6 Architects

Aristocrat Leisure Limited

Interactcard

Sewlex Group

Australian Photo Booth Company

James Richardson Group

Shfl Australasia

Bate Design

Konami Gaming

Shriro Australia

Bite Size Coffee Treats

Leigh Barrett & Associates

Silver Chef Limited

Blufi Wireless / J Tech Australia

Lightech Australia

Smart Training And Job Placement

Bluize

Long Range Systems Australia

Stoddart Manufacturing

Bsg Australia

Micros Fidelio Australia

The Gbi Group

Camvex Video Surveillance Systems

Nch Corporation

Unique Interior Services

Cashpoint Atm

Omnivision

Vectron Systems

Cashtronics

Operational Services And Systems (Aust)

Vfj Currency Management Equipment

Community Clubs Association Of Victoria

Ordermate

William Angliss Institute

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 31


CLUBS & HOTELS AUSTRALIA 2013 Clubs + Hotels Expo APRIL 30 - MAY 1

CLUBS & HOTELS AUSTRALIA 2013

Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Bays 1 - 4

APRIL 30 - MAY 1 Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Bays 1 - 4

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9

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G19 F20

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CONCIERGE

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9

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SHOW FEATURE

12

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63

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ENTRY/EXIT

ENTRY/EXIT

CLUBS & HOTELS AUSTRALIA CLUBS & HOTELS AUSTRALIA

BAY - 1

BAY - 2

BAY - 3

BAY - 4

To reserve your stand contact:

Australian Exhibitions & Conferences Melbourne BAY - 1 Tel +61 3 8672 BAY - 2 - Level 5, 267 Collins Street BAY - Vic33000 1200 Fax +61 3 9654 5596 Email clubshotels@aec.net.au Web www.clubsandhotels.com.au To reserve your stand contact: Australian Exhibitions & Conferences - Level 5, 267 Collins Street Melbourne Vic 3000 Fax +61 3 9654 5596 Email clubshotels@aec.net.au Web www.clubsandhotels.com.au

32 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN Tel2013 +61 3 8672 1200

Floorplan is subject to change without notice.

BAY Floor - 4Plan as at 25/01/2013 2:12:31 PM

Floorplan is subject to change without notice. Floor Plan as at 25/01/2013 2:12:31 PM


interiors and architecture

interiors and architecture

Design that exceeds expectations

Eatons Hill Hotel and Functions Centre, Brisbane, designed by KP Architects.

In the competitive hospitality industry, venue design is often a secondary consideration to other concerns, such as staff training and entertainment. But creating an inviting space through a renovation or extension can be very important, sometimes vital, when it comes to attracting patrons and retaining regulars.

F

or an insight into venue design, Clubs & Pubs Manager spoke to Kon Panagopoulos, one of two directors of KP Architects in Brisbane, a firm specialising in the refurbishment of hospitality venues. He says good venue design is all about creating memorable, inviting spaces.

33 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

Clubs & Pubs Manager (C&PM): Mr Panagopoulos, could you tell us a little about your experience working with clubs and pubs? Kon Panagopoulos (KP): KP Architects has been going 15 years and our work is predominantly hospitality-based. We have done work for various pubs and clubs over the years, including the Coles brand Spirit Hotels, as well as many smaller, private operators. We’ve done over 100 pub renovations. One iconic project we did was with The Breakfast Creek Hotel in Queensland. It’s a heritage-listed building and the project has given us a strong reputation in pubs. We haven’t done as much in the clubs arena, but we are slowly getting our feet into the club world. We recently completed a $3-million renovation and extension at the Kedron Wavell RSL in Queensland, in partnership with Paynter Dixon, and in 2011 completed the design of the Eatons Hill Hotel and Function Centre in Brisbane [featured on this edition’s cover], which is the biggest pub in Australia. C&PM: What constitutes good design for clubs and pubs? KP: Bad design often fails spatially. When you first start your design process, it’s all about understanding the spaces and not getting too hung up on finishes too early in the CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 33


interiors and architecture

Inefficiency of space is also a good reason to renovate; the movement of staff might be negatively impacted due to an inefficient layout process. We work out what will make an efficient, practical space, and visualise the space and how the various spaces relate to each other. We also think about the size of spaces. We find that’s important. Honest finishes are also very important. When designing a club, it’s easy to get carried away with finishes that date easily. What we want are natural finishes, such as natural timber and stone, because they don’t date. Those two together give you a result with longevity that still looks interesting and dynamic. C&PM: Why is good design important?

Inefficiency of space is also a good reason to renovate; the movement of staff might be negatively impacted due to an inefficient layout. Sometimes there’s a point at which managers need to make the decision to spend the money on renovations, or risk falling too far behind the competition to catch up. C&PM: How can design impact patrons (both negatively and positively)? KP: Negative spaces are often large spaces with very few people in them. There’s nothing nice about those big spaces. A lot of operators want big spaces in order to fit in as many people as possible, which is fine on a Friday night, but on a Monday when there are only 20 people in it, that becomes a negative, uncomfortable space. High-roofed spaces can also be negative and are often unpleasant to sit in. So, scale of space can be negative, but it can also be positive if it’s small and intimate, encouraging patrons to stay longer. Lighting is a very important aspect, as well. In many venues, the lighting is wrong, as it’s so bright it might burn your retinas! Too many light fittings isn’t nice. Moody light by which you can still eat a meal and relax is the most comfortable. Many venues get lighting wrong.

KP: Good design is subjective. What is good design? What I think is good design might be different to what the client thinks is good design. Over the years, we’ve come to understand what works and what doesn’t. In hospitality venues, people want to feel comfortable and relaxed, and that they can return on many occasions. Good design should draw patrons back to the club, and this goes for both architecture and landscaping. It’s not about the most expensive finishes, either; those things are temporary. You want long-lasting finishes that create memories of the space. When people come into a club, they don’t tend to remember the bar front; they remember the lighting, the atmosphere, and dynamic spaces. We have realised what it takes to create these memorable spaces over the years. C&PM: How will managers know when to embark on a refurbishment? KP: This one is a bit of a no-brainer, really. A good time would be when a competitor opens up next door and the venue has lost their competitive edge! Clubs might lose customers because their venue is seven years old and needs to evolve. We have found that hospitality venues are renovated every five to seven years, on average. Carpet tends to last about five years before looking tired and worn. In hospitality, you have a lot of wear and tear and things become old and dated.

Eatons Hill Hotel and Functions Centre, Brisbane, designed by KP Architects. continued on page 36

34 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013


INTERIORS interiors AND and ARCHITECTURE architecture

LED-UCATION How to confidently select LED lighting for your venue.

I

n all industries, rising energy costs are a major factor in operating budgets. There has been much information published on how to combat these costs by installing LED lighting technology. If your venue is faced with efficiency challenges, lighting upgrades can reduce your energy consumption and overall energy costs. These upgrades can be achieved within a reasonably short payback period, and substantially improve the appearance of the venue. However, without a full understanding of the technology, it is difficult to tell the genuinely ‘efficient’ products from the cheap imitations. Quality products are sold by reputable companies, and reputable companies have proud histories. If a lighting supplier has sprung up overnight to exploit rising energy costs, it is likely that their focus will be on short-term financial gains and not on the long-term satisfaction of their clients. Consult with reputable companies that will continue to support the product well into the future.

Get all the facts; low wattage does not necessarily mean energy-efficient. Comparison of lighting products should be based on various factors, including wattage, lumen output, efficiency, lamp life, beam control, optics, thermal management, maintenance, colour temperature, controllability, and upfront and ongoing costs. While you cannot be expected to understand all of these elements, it is important that your lighting supplier does. C&PM Lightech Australia has been supplying the hospitality industry with quality lighting systems for over 13 years. Contact Lightech on 1800 950 888 to assist your venue with energy efficient and reliable lighting solutions.

Australian Made LED Lighting Energy Efficient

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25 5 0

CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013••35 X CLUBS


interiors and architecture

continued from page 34

C&PM: What are some important considerations for club or pub managers when dealing with architects and designers?

like, managers need to have faith in their architect, allowing them creative licence to realise the best outcomes.

KP: Architects sometimes get a bad rap, but generally, the architect is engaged as the consultant that can bring considerable knowledge and understanding, and they���re there to offer you advice on planning and to hopefully create a dynamic space. We understand that the manager is the one who knows how to run the venue, how it should work and what is required. We encourage the manager to communicate exactly what is good and bad in the venue through a clear and concise brief. Along with providing a realistic budget, we believe managers should concentrate their energy not on what they want the new design to look like (for instance, what color of tiles or wallpaper), but the mechanics and program. Architects need to know what managers need for the business to operate well, for example: size of the kitchen, number of bars, and seating capacity.

Managers would be wise to choose an architect with hospitality experience. Whilst not essential, it does make the process a lot easier if the architect has done hospitality venues before. This allows the design process to progress smoothly and more efficiently. There is a certain science to a hospitality design and the experience from having completed the design, of several venues brings a wealth of knowledge that can be shared and deliver efficiencies that can be seen in the operation of the venue.

It’s a team project. We also encourage our clients to get out of their club or pub, and we make trips to different venues together and ask the manager what they like about each one in terms of lighting, spaces and airflow, for example. While we are interested in hearing about the finishes they

C&PM: Why should venues engage an architect? KP: Because of their overall knowledge. Architects can visualise things three-dimensionally and will have an understanding of how spaces will look, feel and work once complete. Draftspersons are there to put the client’s ideas on paper, whereas an architect can take these ideas and create something that really exceeds the client’s expectations. That’s the idea: architects exceeding expectations by enhancing the client’s vision and together creating something truly wonderful. C&PM

Nambour RSL, designed by KP Architects.

36 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013


INTERIORS interiors AND and ARCHITECTURE architecture

NEW GAMING venue drives revenue for Revesby R

Workers Club

evesby Workers Club has opened the first stage of a major club refurbishment, which includes a new gaming area and state-of-the-art Alfresco Gaming Room together with a new entertainment and general lounge area. The first-stage gaming and alfresco area has opened with impressive success reflected in a significant increase in gaming revenue. This success reflects the vision of the club CEO Edward Camilleri and the Club Board in commissioning Altis Architecture to design this gaming facility, which sets a new benchmark in the club industry. Altis have delivered a high-quality gaming area using clever focal design elements, and the alfresco area ticks all the boxes by providing the best possible ambience and operational environment for a gaming facility. This includes: • seamless indoor-outdoor connection – easy access to the alfresco area within a beautiful garden setting.

• full weather control utilising a courtyard design that provides wind and rain protection and total privacy for the patrons. Both winter and summer heat/ cold extremes are controlled with a combination of mechanical and passive services. • a room layout with a variety of gaming spaces, including individual gaming booths. • a glamorous new bar and dispense area. Overall, a successful solution that reflects the high-quality design vision of the club. C&PM

CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013••37 X CLUBS


interiors AND and ARCHITECTURE architecture INTERIORS

‘SWITCH’ TO the next generation of design

C

hic. Sophisticated. Architecturally-inspired. Geometric prints interspersed with vibrant hues. Rich, three-dimensional textures.

Didn’t think we were talking about carpet, did you? Brintons, world leaders in designing and manufacturing woven contract carpets since 1873, have brought fashionable trends to the floor in autumn 2013 with the launch of their latest stocked range, Switch, which has been designed specifically for Australian hospitality, gaming and leisure applications. Each pattern unites dramatic design with a profusion of delicious colour: moody slate and pewter form the backdrop to splashes of vibrant violet, bold grapefruit, electric tangerine and eye-catching rust. With a choice from ten striking woven Axminster carpets, Switch follows in the wake of two hugely successful ranges by Brintons, Fringe and Shadow. Fringe pushes the boundaries associated with stocked carpet design. This exceptional collection of eight broadloom woven Axminster carpets is designed to combine brilliant scale and pattern to create a capsule collection that is both easy to maintain and beautiful. Thoughtfully designed to complement Brintons’ stocked range Fringe, the six designs in Shadow can be used in isolation or in conjunction with those from Fringe to produce visually inspiring interior spaces. Both Shadow

38• •CLUBS CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013 X

and Fringe are woven in Brintons’ own blend of 80 per cent wool, 20 per cent nylon, and are available from stock in 3.66-metre widths. A Brintons woven Axminster carpet will enhance any interior design scheme, provide comfort underfoot whilst withstanding the heaviest traffic, reduce noise pollution and improve indoor air quality. Whether it is stock for fastturnaround projects, or custom bespoke work, Brintons will have a solution for your flooring needs. From Melbourne’s Crown Casino to the White House, it’s no surprise that Brintons Carpets are trusted to deliver flooring solutions the world over. Every day, millions of people throughout the word test the enduring beauty of a Brintons carpet, including in airports – from Hong Kong, where the carpet withstands a footfall of 25 million passengers a year, to Delhi, the world’s largest carpeted area, where 175,000 square metres of Brintons Axminster graces the floor. These capsule collections present a series of floor coverings that are versatile and easy to maintain, continuing Brintons’ reputation for innovative design technique, technical expertise and exacting global quality standards. C&PM For more information on any of these ranges, or to order a sample or download a brochure, please visit our new website www.brintons.net or call us toll free on 1800 332 694.


You’ve been walking all over us for 230 years...

But we still come back for more Call 1800 332 694 or visit www.brintons.net for more information

Brintons - making the world a more beautiful place


interiors and architecture

Slips– an+expensive falls problem By Jasmine Morris, Mark Dohrmann and Partners Pty Ltd

Have you ever been that person who finds themselves on the floor? One minute you are walking across a room without a care in the world, then, all of a sudden, you are down. Concerned bystanders close in to help you back onto your feet, but the damage has been done. If you are lucky, you get off with a dose of embarrassment and perhaps a bruise or two. Those who are not so lucky, however, may face hospital time and the judicial system in a claim for medical costs and lost earnings.

C

ontrary to popular belief, falling, slipping or tripping is not something that happens only to the clumsy, the inebriated, texters or the elderly; it can happen to anyone, and for a range of reasons. If such an accident befalls someone on your premises, you may be liable. Taking responsibility for the safety of your staff and patrons is commended. Recording proof that you have taken action to prevent hazards can boost your chances if it comes time to defend yourself in court. A recent legal case our firm dealt with involved an old building that had a 100-year-old dance floor made from bluegum boards. Around 10 years ago, the ageing floor was renewed by splitting the thick planks in half, then opening them out. The renewed floorboards were secured by spikes, which, after a few years, began to protrude here and there. The defect had been brought to the proprietor’s attention, but as the spikes were sticking out only by a few millimetres, he did not recognise it as an issue that needed fixing. However, a nail or spike that is not flat with the floor can easily catch on laces or shoes, or cause a cut if (for whatever reason) a person was walking there barefoot. Unfortunately, these few millimetres of protruding spike were all it took to send a guest crashing to the ground. continued on page 42

40 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013


INTERIORS interiors AND and ARCHITECTURE architecture

PROFIT FROM PLAY M

any venues avoid installing a playground for fear that it will be an expense requiring a large outlay with little return; however, those who have taken the plunge are proving that a well-designed playground can pay for itself in a matter of months. Playgrounds are a huge drawcard for families, and parents will drive past several venues to get to one with a playground. A playground can maintain and increase patronage to your venue, create new marketing opportunities and provide fewer lean periods during trading times – and in turn increase your profit. Not only will a playground bring more customers, but patrons are more relaxed when kids have somewhere to play, and relaxed patrons stay longer and spend more. Nothing draws families to a venue like playground equipment, and the staff at Goplay Commercial Playgrounds has over 30 years of experience in helping customers throughout Australia and the Pacific region invest in play. Goplay knows that every venue is different and that the best returns come from playground equipment designed

specifically for each venue’s individual needs. With a custom design service as standard, Goplay can guarantee that your playground will be a worthwhile, profitable addition to your venue. C&PM To take advantage of Goplay’s free Australia-wide design and quotation service, call (03) 9308 1800 or visit www.goplay.net.au.

CLUBS CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013••41 X


interiors and architecture

One of the best floor surfaces you can have is concrete. It is affordable and effective. It offers good friction in all weather conditions – even in rain continued from page 40

Human movement studies have shown that walking is an automated action. The brain controls each step without imposing on conscious thought. When we walk, our eyes are usually scanning the ground a few metres ahead. If they see any danger, our brains will bring it to our conscious attention so that we have the foresight to look down and manoeuvre over obstacles. In the example, a person walking normally is unlikely to see a slightly protruding nail, and therefore may easily become its victim. An interesting fact about walking is that there is no absolutely correct way to do it. Since a person’s gait is as individual as their signature, it is very difficult to blame someone for their own fall. Furthermore, if you are in the pubs and clubs industry, it is perfectly reasonable and acceptable for patrons to be consuming alcohol (which may impair their usual gait and judgment), and wearing highheeled shoes. The onus still falls on proprietors to make floors as safe as possible. The other problem with serving drinks is that, at some stage, there will be a spill. We all know from experience that liquid on the floor increases our chances of slipping over. Hard surfaces are especially slippery when wet. To overcome this, clean up a spill as soon as it occurs, block the space off until it dries and erect a caution sign. We have been involved in another legal case where, in the middle of a bright, sunny day, a patron entered a dimly lit bar. It takes a few seconds for the eyes to adjust to the dark – enough time for this patron to step straight into a spill that was rendered invisible by the change in lighting in those few seconds after she entered the venue. Accordingly, you may wish to consider how well lit your bar is, especially around the entrance. Generally, slip, trip and fall danger is posed when the floor surface changes. Walking from carpets onto floorboards 42 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

can send a person down because the walker has not adjusted their tread for the new, riskier surface they step on. This is a situation we face every day. To help fix these danger areas, you can put up a handrail, or install an overhead warning sign, and ensure that there are no gaps or trip hazards where the two floor surfaces meet. Floors are considered slippery when they have low or reduced friction. The finish of a floor affects exactly how slippery it is. Shiny surfaces have a bad reputation for being the most slippery, but hospitals and shopping centres that polish their floors daily to a high shine have proved that investment in slip tests (on wet and dry surfaces) will lead you to buy the right flooring materials and care for them appropriately. One of the best floor surfaces you can have is concrete. It is affordable and effective. It offers good friction in all weather conditions – even in rain. To give floor surfaces lasting shine, long-term coating is popular. Although it has the obvious benefit of retaining its looks after long wear, bits of coating usually come off. Cleaners then make the ill-thought decision to fix only the affected areas – thus an uneven surface is created (even if it is only slight), which has the potential to cause a slip. The message is to take the effort to strip the whole floor down and recoat. There is no shortcut to safety. Slips, trips and falls are largely preventable, and with a bit of forethought, you can take good care of your staff, guests, and even yourself. C&PM


Food and BeverageS

Simon’s Corn tamales with lime, coriander & red onion salsa. Recipes from the book Simon Bryant’s Vegies by Simon Bryant and photography by Alan Benson.

Meat Free Week

It may seem unusual to be talking about Australia’s inaugural Meat Free Week, which was held from 18 to 24 March this year, in a publication published for those most likely to be cooking with meat. Yet this is exactly who the organisers of Meat Free Week hope to reach.

C

o-founders Lainie Bracher and Melissa Dixon believe that chefs can influence change in the way we view meat; specifically, how much meat we eat and where that meat comes from. They’re also most likely to create delicious and inspiring meat-free meals – ones that are celebrated in their own right (despite having no animal protein). The first thing to note is that Meat Free Week is not about encouraging people to become vegetarian or to give up meat for life. Rather, it’s an opportunity for people to take a seven-day break from eating meat and discover some fantastic plant-based meals. It’s also a chance to consider the impact that excessive meat consumption has on animal welfare, the environment and human health.

chicken, pork, beef, lamb, rabbit, fish and more. We have seen the tradition of eating meat every day, and often at every meal, become widespread and commonplace.  With an average of 120 kilograms of annual meat consumption per capita, Australians are ranked as the second-biggest meat eaters in the world (behind the United States). The numbers are staggering when you consider our population of 22.8 million ate, in one month alone, more than 624,000 cows, 47,000 calves, 540,000 sheep, 1.68 million lambs and 382,000 pigs. In a year, it is estimated that almost nine million heads of cattle, 13 million sheep, 20 million lambs, six million pigs and over half a billion chickens are killed for meat. This does not take into account the millions of turkeys, ducks, rabbits and fish also consumed.

As our population and affluence have grown, so too has the amount of meat we cook and eat – everything including CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 43


Food and BeverageS

Matt Wilkinson’s broccoli linguine, from Mr Wilkinson’s Favourite Vegetables, published by Murdoch Books, 2012. Photograph by Jacqui Melville.

That consumption isn’t possible without factory farming – the industrialised farming of animals, which causes suffering to more than 500 million animals in Australia each year. It is the number one cause of animal cruelty today. And while it’s predominantly chickens and pigs that are impacted by factory farming in Australia, there are plenty of issues with other animals, too. ‘Factory farming has long been a veiled industry. It has come at a significant cost, not only to animal welfare, but also to our health and the environment,’ says Lainie. ‘We are confident anyone working in this industry would be well aware of the shift in consumer sentiment – animal welfare has become a hot topic. Increasingly consumers want to know more about where their meat comes from and how it was raised.’ While developing the Meat Free Week website, Lainie and Melissa were most surprised by the overwhelming body of research on the detrimental effect meat production has on the planet and its resources. ‘There are massive consequences if we choose to remain on our current path of a Western diet based around meat, including chronic water shortages within the next 40 years,’ says Melissa. ‘The world quite literally cannot sustain the amount of meat we’re eating.’ Meat Free Week’s aim was to get people thinking and talking. ‘The question we keep asking ourselves is “what’s it going to take for people to start talking about this?”’ says Melissa. ‘For too long, the debate has been around whether you’re a meat eater or not; it’s a highly emotional

44 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

Matt Wilkinson’s Foil Roasted Beet. Photography by Jacqui Melville.

issue and all that’s been achieved is a greater divide.’ Lainie adds, ‘Very few people are talking about responsible and ethical meat consumption and that is what we aim to do with Meat Free Week. And if animal welfare or the environment is not enough, then we hope at least the issue of human health will get people thinking and talking.’ Simon Bryant’s Rapini with Penne and Chickpeas. Recipes from the book Simon Bryant’s Vegies by Simon Bryant and photography by Alan Benson.


Food and BeverageS

Bill Granger Stir fried curry brown rice with cashews Recipes and images taken from Easy by Bill Granger, published by HarperCollins.

to leading United Nations scientist Dr Mahendra Shah. Chefs Simon Bryant, Belinda Jeffery, Matt Wilkinson and Bill Granger are among many who have provided a range of delicious meat-free recipes for the campaign. Chef and ambassador Simon Bryant explains: ‘There is a way to eat meat without contributing to the unnecessary cruelty of factory farming. By purchasing ethically sourced meat, eating less of it or perhaps giving it a miss altogether, we have the power to make a lot of lives so much better. As custodians of this planet, it is our job to make these changes happen by asking the right questions and rewarding farmers who follow best practice with fair prices for their work and produce.’ Money raised by those who signed up for the Meat Free Week Challenge went to Voiceless, the animal protection institute. Voiceless is a not-for-profit think-tank that drives reform and helps build the animal protection movement by offering grants and prizes, creating influential networks, promoting informed debate and conducting research to expose legalised cruelty.

According to a report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Australians eat almost three times as much meat as the world average. What’s more, 90 per cent of people aged 16 years and over failed to eat the recommended five serves of vegetables each day. We know that eating more plant-based meals will cut ones risk of contracting coronary heart disease and strokes, and that plant-based diets help protect against many types of cancer. Much of the problem is a diet in which meat is the hero and vegetables the poor cousin: an afterthought. However, eating less meat does not need to be as challenging as it seems. In fact, with the huge choice of fresh produce we have in this country, eating less meat can be both rewarding and easy!

So this autumn, in the spirit of Meat Free Week, why not add some amazing meat-free dishes to the menu? Help spread the word – meat-free meals can be interesting, delicious and celebrated. What’s more, they have a positive effect on animal welfare, the environment and human health! And if you really want to get on board, consider signing up for the challenge in March 2014, or make a donation through Meat Free Week to Voiceless. Visit meatfreeweek.com for information on the campaign as well as delicious meat-free recipes and information on how to take part. C&PM Simon Bryant.

Lainie and Melissa hope that Meat Free Week will inspire a revolution where as much passion and thought is put into the creation of scrumptious and nutritious plantbased meals. While not suggesting people give up meat entirely, they hope that by understanding the benefits of eating less meat, consumers will choose to make a serious commitment to reducing their meat consumption; and that when they do eat meat, they only choose meat that is ethically produced and sourced. Meat Free Week has attracted a wide range of supporters who are embracing the cause, from media identities Laura Csortan and Deborah Hutton, and actress Krew Boylan,

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 45


FOOD Food AND and BEVERAGE BeverageS

SOMETIMES, looks do matter

Y

our food makes a statement. Why shouldn’t your kitchen?

Until recently, the design of heavy-duty, commercial kitchens has focused largely on performance – on providing the ultimate convenience and functionality, and being modular enough to suit the specific needs of every kitchen. While aesthetics have always been a priority, most manufacturers have typically played it safe, opting for neutral, practical and industrial designs that blend seamlessly into any restaurant environment. Now, Moffat has changed the rules of heavy-duty kitchen design forever with their remarkable new Waldorf Bold range. This high-performing offering has all the equipment, power and innovation you would expect from Moffat, but with a sleek, new aesthetic twist. Designed for innovative chefs who want their kitchens to look the part, the Waldorf Bold range is available in three striking colours: deep burgundy, chilli red and dramatic black. From every angle, the lines are sleek, seductive and sophisticated – right down to the custom plinth mounting. An impervious enamel surface has been applied to all nonfunctioning stainless steel pieces, to give the overall solution a refined edge – without imposing on usability. Importantly, despite its supermodel looks, the appeal of Waldorf Bold is anything but superficial. This new range also impresses in terms of functionality, and enhances the

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Waldorf 800 Series’ highly regarded speed, power and efficiency. According to Michael Lillico, Moffat’s General Manager of Sales and Marketing, this daring new range is all about bringing colour and fun back into the kitchen. ‘It’s about restaurateurs and businesspeople being able to make a choice about how they want their businesses to be seen. This release is all about choice. Moffat gives operators the ability to tailor and personalise their commercial kitchens, so they can have a design that represents their business,’ he says. ‘Offering Waldorf Bold should give more reason for restaurateurs to bring the Moffat cooking equipment to the front of house,’ he adds. Indeed, with many contemporary restaurants opting for an open-plan layout where the kitchen is literally on display, Waldorf Bold enables restaurateurs to showcase their kitchens with true confidence, and actively involve customers in the entire food experience. So if your kitchen needs to attract and enthral – as well as perform – why not make a bold choice? C&PM Visit www.moffat.com.au for more information, or call 1800 023 953 to speak to a sales representative who can identify a solution that’s right for your business.


FOOD Food AND and BEVERAGE BeverageS

DOES YOUR table and buffetware portray the look you are hoping for?

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hen planning the details of a new restaurant venture – whether a refurbishment or just a change of look – often the emphasis is put on the ambient design and the menu, leaving the choice of the tableware as one of the last decisions in the planning process. This often leads to poor-quality choices designed to suit a diminished budget. There is a wise saying when it comes to food: ‘You eat with your eyes.’ When making a dish look enticing, the actual plate is as important as what is on it.

recognise that clubs and pubs operate on tight budgets. ‘Our new Echelon and Essentials Buffetware Collection proves that having a tight budget doesn’t mean that your tableware can’t look impressive,’ says Andrew Ross, General Manager Reward Distribution. The new Essentials Buffetware Collection features a range of unique shapes that can be mixed, matched and displayed either as a set or individually. Reward Distribution can provide a unique serving solution to bring its customers’ concepts to reality – one that is only limited by their imaginations.

In a culture that loves reality cooking shows, clubs and pubs are competing for savvy consumers who are increasingly expecting better quality from the food and the full dining experience. Reward Distribution listened carefully to its customers, and responded by developing exciting new ranges that meet the challenge of quality, functionality and style. Echelon fine tableware brings a refined combination of elegance, with its brilliant white surface; quality, with its fiveyear chip-resistant warranty; and functionality to suit every dining experience, from casual to à la carte.

‘Functionality is paramount in the high-impact environment of clubs and pubs, and our Echelon and Essentials Buffetware commercial crockery ranges tick all the boxes. Our goal is to bring quality products to the market at affordable prices,’ says Andrew Ross.

Reward Distribution understands that the full dining experience is what keeps a customer coming back, and

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Customers agree with Reward Distribution. With increasing demand, Reward Distribution’s new Echelon and Essentials Buffetware Collection has found an overwhelming acceptance in a variety of food service operations. C&PM


Food and BeverageS Pork and scallops.

Australian PorkFest

to ring cash registers this April As Australia cranks up for a relentless barrage of federal election pork barrelling and porkies, the people of Australia can at least be rewarded with one month of pork in April that is easy to swallow! And there will be absolutely no bull.

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pril is Australian PorkFest, a month-long celebration of the versatility and appeal of fresh Australian pork. It is an initiative, timed for when Australian pork is in its peak season, that encourages pub, club, and restaurant chefs to tempt dining patrons with their own pork-inspired dishes. Why PorkFest and why April? April is the time when pork is at its most plentiful, at its peak quality and its most economical – when there is an abundance of all pork cuts from nose to tail... everything but the squeal. Australia’s pig herd predominantly consists of three white pigs: duroc, large whites and landrace. They are leaner, faster-growing pigs that traditionally don’t breed and grow out as well over the warm summer months. In winter, their growth rate and fertility increases because of the cooler weather. It takes about nine months to get a pig from


Food and BeverageS

Pork Masterclass with magazine food editors.

farrow to finish and off to market. Pigs born in June, July and August hit the market around April of the following year. And as it gets cooler, their growth rate increases as well – so much so that earlier piglet batches catch up in size with previous litters. Consequently, more pigs come onto the market at that particular time of the year. April is when pork is at its seasonal best – it’s of great quality and there’s plenty of it. Major pub group Australian Leisure and Hospitality Group (ALH) has been a huge supporter of April’s Australian PorkFest from day one. It understands the importance of using the best ingredients, with its food philosophy firmly grounded in produce provenance and quality. Boasting 900 fully qualified chefs and over 200 apprentices, ALH prepares 10 million meals per year. For many years, ALH has worked with and supported Australian Pork Limited (APL) by including pork on everyday menus, as well as featuring pork on selected state and national food promotions. Pork Cutlets on plate.

‘More and more chefs have recognised the importance of featuring pork as part of a well-balanced menu and the ever-increasing popularity of pork products in our bistros has confirmed this trend,’ says ALH’s Food Support Manager Michael Kratz. ‘ALH will continue to offer pork dishes on our menus and encourage chefs and customers to enjoy the versatility and fantastic value of Australian pork in our venues.’ Last year, more than 200 ALH hotels dished up an estimated 30,000 juicy pork cutlet specials to their clientèle over the month of April for Australian PorkFest, and this year, they are expecting an even greater result. Again, Barkers Creek premium pork cutlets will be their choice of pork cut to showcase throughout April. Each state will have menu variation (featuring the cutlet) that best suits those customers’ tastes. Victoria will feature Barkers Creek Pork Rib Eye on seeded mustard mash with grilled scallops and roasted vegetable medley. Barkers Creek premium pork is selected from prime cuts of quality grain-fed Australian pork and is guaranteed to be tender, juicy and tasty every time. Moisture-infused Barkers Creek Pork is specially prepared to provide a guaranteed consistent product. The Barkers Creek Premium Pork range has been developed specifically for the foodservice, catering and wholesale markets.

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 51


Food and BeverageS

The ALH Group endeavours to offer its customers ‘great food and great value’ at its bistros and restaurants to bring city value to the suburbs and other regional cities throughout the country. To make Australian PorkFest an all-encompassing occasion, chefs in small and large, private- and groupowned venues across the country will be featuring their best pork dishes, together with more than 1000 butchers and supermarkets showcasing pork throughout April. Earlier this year, Australia’s leading food directors from the country’s biggest consumer magazines attended a nose-totail pork workshop in readiness for Australian PorkFest. At the workshop, a pig carcass was broken down into primal and secondary cuts – and everything in between. Each cut was explained and described according to its cooking qualities and potential menu use. With the nation’s glossies primed to run mouthwatering pork dishes over April, dining patrons will be suitably primed to look for pork on the menu when they are dining out. Pork is so versatile and inspirational. Think of any pork cut, like a pork leg steak cutlet, scotch, shoulder, belly, fillet, trotter, loin, hock, leg or mince. Then think of a dish from almost any country in the world, like schnitzel with a pork leg steak, cannelloni with mince, Aussie barbecue cutlets and ribs, Asian pork belly, hock, won tons, Pad Thai or char sui, or even pulled pork, tonkatsu or a roast with crackling

Pork Masterclass Club with Pino Tomini-Foresti.

or suckling pig, and everything in between. It’s almost like being on a cook’s world tour. Australian Pork (APL) is hoping that many Australians will embark on travelling the world of pork on their plates during Australian PorkFest – with fresh Australian Pork as their culinary passport to pleasure. After enduring years of crippling feed prices from drought and the continuing devastating effect of imported, subsidised pork meat stealing the local processed market for bacon and ham, the Aussie farmers are hoping April will be good for them, good for chefs and consumers alike. If Australian PorkFest is all about the best local fresh pork, then Australian Bacon Week (5–12 May) is all about showcasing Australia’s best bacon, made from 100 per cent home-grown Australian Pork. Central to Australian Bacon Week is the Australian Bacon Week Awards for Excellence and the announcement of Australia’s best homegrown bacon. Homer Simpson may have been the first to come up with Bacon Day, but Australian Bacon Week surpasses Homer’s wildest dreams. A delicious initiative to highlight the pink square PorkMark – the only guaranteed way to find your way through the vague and ambiguous Australian labelling laws and be sure of Australian provenance. When it comes to cured pork – like bacon (and ham) – chefs should think pink. They should ensure that the smallgoods they order from their suppliers carry the pink PorkMark label – the hallmark of bacon and ham made from homegrown Aussie pork. Some 70 per cent of bacon and ham sold here is made with imported pork meat shipped frozen from overseas. Even though it is processed here, the meat comes from who knows where – not clean, healthy green Australia. While Australian Bacon Week is a celebration of everyone’s favourite food, it is more importantly a show of support for the local pork farmers as well as Aussie bacon, ham and smallgoods manufacturers that are committed to using and selling products made with 100 per cent Australian pork. So let’s put the sincerity back into our sizzle. And for a bit of fun, enter the Australian Bacon Impression Competition on YouTube. Check out the sizzling, writhing bacon impersonators at www.youtube.com/user/australianbaconweek. C&PM

A ready guide to suppliers of Australia’s best homegrown bacon can be found at www.pork.com.au.

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Food and BeverageS

Tasty grains and legumes for health-conscious patrons

By Chris Cashman, Nutrition Project Officer, Grains & Legumes Nutrition CouncilTM

More and more Australians are looking for healthy foods when they eat out. Whole grains and legumes provide an easy, economical and tasty way to boost the healthiness of your venue’s menu.

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reating a healthier menu can be as easy as incorporating a variety of quality grains and legumes. Along with a health boost, this will add variety to the menu with new flavours and combinations. And the other great thing about grains and legumes is that they are dried after they are harvested; so, unlike fresh fruits and vegetables, they can be enjoyed all year round. Let’s get to know some of Australia’s grains and legumes and how they can be easily added into a delicious, nutritious and uniquely Australian menu.

To create a supremely nutritious menu, add more whole grains; they are great options for side dishes, salads, soups and even snacks. Cooking grains is easy; follow the same method as for cooking rice and simply boil them in water or stock until tender – microwaving and pre-soaking allows for much faster cooking times. Whole grain Oats

Ready in 50 minutes

Healthy menu ideas

Getting to know grains Grains and grain foods have been staples in the diets of cultures around the world for thousands of years. The Australian dietary guidelines tell us we should choose whole grains and high-fibre grain foods where possible, because people who eat them are less likely to develop diabetes, obesity, heart disease and some cancers. The Grains & Legumes Nutrition CouncilTM recommends Australians enjoy grains three to four times per day, choosing at least half as whole grains or high-fibre varieties. Making healthier grain choices can be as easy as using whole grains, such as brown rice, oats, barley, millet and quinoa, or simply by choosing high-fibre or wholegrain breakfast cereals, breads and pasta more often.

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Oats help to lower cholesterol and are the traditional grain for porridge, which makes them a favourite at breakfast time. They are also great additions to burgers, meatballs or as a crispy topping for crumbles. Freekeh

50 minutes

Healthy menu ideas Freekeh is the name given to any grain that is harvested while immature and then roasted. Greenwheat FreekehTM is an Australian variety, which has a crunchy and nutty taste. It’s ideal as a side dish, or can be incorporated into rissoles and salads for an element of texture.


Food and BeverageS

Millet

45 minutes

Healthy menu ideas

Millet was the staple grain in Asia prior to rice and has a mild flavour that pairs well with other foods. Millet is glutenfree and becomes fluffy when cooked, which makes it great as a side dish or in pilafs.

Rye

60 minutes

Healthy menu ideas

Rye has proven digestive health benefits and is most commonly used in making bread. Rye berries (wholegrain rye seeds) can also be added to soups in winter, or used as the base for a summer salad.

Wheat

60 minutes

Healthy menu ideas

The whole grain can easily be added by incorporating wholemeal varieties of flour, pasta and couscous into the menu. Alternatively, wheat berries or burghul are great as a side dish or in a salad.

Quinoa

15 minutes

Healthy menu ideas

2013 is the International Year of Quinoa, and it is a standout nutritionally, being low-GI, high in protein and rich in antioxidants. Quinoa has a short cooking time and a subtle, nutty taste that marries well with all kinds of ingredients. Enjoy Quinoa in soups, salads or as a fluffy, nutritious side dish.

Legumes: so much more than beans on toast Did you know that Australia is one of the leading producers and exporters of legumes in the world? The industry has grown in leaps and bounds in recent years, and today Australia grows a huge variety of legumes, including chickpeas, lentils, peas and a variety of beans. Legumes are versatile in the kitchen and can easily be added to soups, salads and casseroles, mashed with vegetables, mixed with couscous or rice, or even ground into flour for baking. Being available all year round also means they can be incorporated into seasonal favourites to suit any menu. A standout feature of legumes is their higher protein content; this makes them unique among plant foods. They also contain a wide range of essential nutrients, including iron, healthy fats, fibre, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. To obtain the health benefits associated with legumes, the Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council recommends that Australians aim to eat two to three serves per week as part of a balanced diet. Legume Chickpeas

Ready in 45–60 minutes

Healthy menu ideas Did you know there are two types of chickpeas? The desi chickpea is traditionally used in soups or used as flour in baking. The kabuli chickpea has a nutty flavour and is often prepared as hummus, or can be added to salads or roasted and served as a crispy snack.

Faba beans

60 minutes

Healthy menu ideas Faba beans (broad beans) taste great and can be used in soups, salads and baked goods. They can be served as fresh beans, sprouted or eaten as a snack.

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 55


Food and BeverageS

Field peas

45 minutes

Healthy menu ideas Green peas, which are eaten as a vegetable, are the immature form of field peas. Field peas can be purchased as dried whole or split and are excellent in soups. Lentils

15–30 minutes

Healthy menu ideas As one of the oldest food crops, lentils are incorporated into many traditional ethnic dishes, including curries and soups. Another advantage of lentils is that they have a short cooking time. Lupins

60 minutes

Healthy menu ideas Largely unknown, lupins are Australia’s largest legume crop and are nutritionally similar to the popular soybean. Lupins are most commonly used as flour that can be incorporated with wheat flour to make healthier breads, muffins, and baked goods. Mung beans

30 minutes

Grain recipe: wheat berry and quinoa tabouleh • Serves: Six (as a side dish). • Preparation time: 10 minutes. • Cooking time: One hour.

Ingredients • 1 cup wheat berries (or wheat grains or brown rice) •  1/3 cup white quinoa

Healthy menu ideas

•  2 /3 cup salt-reduced vegetable or chicken stock

Mung beans are often sprouted and served in salads or as a garnish. They are also a great addition to stir-fries and salads.

• 200 grams grape tomatoes, halved •  3 /4 cup chopped fresh continental parsley •  1/2 cup chopped fresh mint

Cooking tips with legumes

• 2 green onions, thinly sliced

Many people assume that dried legumes need to be soaked for hours prior to cooking; however, they can be prepared much faster by simply bringing them to the boil and simmering them until tender (cooking times are provided in the table). Alternatively, using canned legumes offers an instant and cost-effective way to boost the nutrition of soups, casseroles or salads. If you are using canned legumes, remember to rinse and drain them to reduce the salt content of the meal.

•  1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

Here are two recipes – one for a grain dish and one for a legume dish – that are sure to be a hit with healthconscious diners at your venue. You might like to try these small-quantity recipes out on your friends, family and staff before chalking them up on the menu! 56 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

• 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil • Lemon wedges, to serve.

Method 1. Place wheat in a saucepan with 3 cups of water and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for 50–60 minutes or until wheat is tender. Drain and set aside to cool 2. Meanwhile, add quinoa and stock to a small saucepan. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat to low. Cover and cook for 10–12 minutes, or until stock is absorbed and quinoa is tender. Fluff with a fork and set aside to cool.


Food and BeverageS

3. Add quinoa, tomatoes, parsley, mint and onion to the wheat. Toss to combine. 4. Combine lemon juice and oil in a jug and season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour over wheat mixture. Toss to combine. 5. Serve with lemon wedges.

Nutrition information per serve: Energy = 817 kilojoules, protein = 4.9 grams, fat = 6.9 grams, saturated fat = 1.1 grams, carbohydrate = 28.7 grams, fibre = 5.9 grams, sodium = 125 milligrams. Recipe and image provided by Grains & Legumes Nutrition CouncilTM.

Did you know…

Popular ‘ancient grains’ including spelt, emmer, einkorn (faro) and kamut are all actually different ancient varieties of wheat? These ancient grains can be enjoyed in salads, breads, baking and soups.

• 2 litres chicken stock or water •  3 /4 cup McKenzie’s Red Lentils •  1/4 cup long-grain rice • 1 red capsicum, deseeded and finely diced • 2 carrots, finely diced • 800 grams tinned crushed tomatoes • 2 tablespoons tomato paste • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon • 1 bunch coriander, chopped • Salt and pepper to taste.

Method 1. Heat oil and add meat. Cook until lightly browned. Add onion and cook until softened. 2. Add the chickpeas and stock or water and bring to the boil, then simmer for 1–1 ½ hours, until the chickpeas are tender. 3. Add the lentils, rice, capsicum, carrot, tomatoes, tomato paste and cinnamon. Simmer, stirring often, for 30 minutes or until all ingredients are tender. 4. Stir in chopped coriander just prior to serving and season to taste.

Legume recipe: Moroccan red

Tips:

lentil and chickpea soup

For an alternative meal, reduce stock (or water) by half to produce a thick consistency and serve as a tasty filling in wraps for lunch.

• Serves: Six (as a main). • Preparation time: 15 minutes. • Cooking time: 1 ½ – 2 hours.

Nutrition information per serve

Ingredients • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Energy = 1490 kilojoules, protein = 25.8 grams, fat = 12.8 grams, saturated fat = 2.8 grams, carbohydrate = 30.1 grams, fibre = 9.3 grams, sodium = 330 milligrams C&PM

• 400 grams lean beef or lamb, cubed

Recipe and image kindly provided by McKenzie’s Foods.

• 1 large onion, finely diced •  3 /4 cup McKenzie’s Chickpeas

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 57


security The Whiteside Jones Band playing at Camvex’s 25-year anniversary party

Camvex celebrates 25-year milestone Statistically, over 50 per cent of new businesses fail within four years, and the security and CCTV industry has been a revolving door of new companies coming and going. Businesses involved in technology must constantly evolve and adapt to the changing business landscape, technologies and requirements of their clients, or they will fail. Clubs & Pubs Manager caught up with Andrew Del Biondo the Founding Director of leading security company Camvex Video Surveillance Systems, to discuss the industry.

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amvex has certainly adapted well over the years, and celebrated its 25-year anniversary in style at Milanos Brighton Beach Hotel, inviting clients and suppliers, and current and former staff. The event was hosted in the upstairs function room on a warm December evening, and guests enjoyed Melbourne’s finest hospitality and beautiful views of Port Phillip Bay. The Whiteside Jones Band (WSJ) kept everyone entertained throughout the evening with a mix of their originals and a range of popular cover songs from the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, ’90s and the present day. The crowd enjoyed a versatile spread of songs by artists ranging from Paul Kelly and The Church, through to Santana and David Bowie. One of the guests described WSJ as ‘a little rocky, a little ballady and a little bluesy.’ Later in the evening, Andrew Del Biondo presented staff awards to three of his team members for their outstanding contribution to the business and exceptional customer service. He also thanked all his other past and present staff, clients and suppliers for their support over the 25 years. We spoke to Andrew Del Biondo after the celebrations to talk about the Camvex business and developments in CCTV technology and its use in licensed premises. ‘Clubs and pubs have been utilising CCTV for many years, but the systems have become larger, more difficult

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security

CCTV technology has advanced significantly over recent years, with users having a choice of four different CCTV technologies to manage and confusing when it comes to technology choices. Compliance has become a major issue with CCTV for satisfying standards for liquor licence and gaming regulations. ‘Much confusion exists within the industry regarding interpretations of the CCTV standards and objectively measuring compliance.

‘Many hotels have conditions on their liquor licences requiring identification of customers at entrances and exits of bars and dance floors; however, most are not really compliant, as cameras on dance floors don’t achieve “identification” standards because the area is too dark and the customers aren’t framed up tight enough.

CCTV GAMING COMPLIANCE & LIQUOR LICENCE CCTV compliance for gaming and liquor licence applications has become an important issue for most hotels and clubs.

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AMVEX VIDEO SURVEILLANCE

Camvex has had 25 years as a specialist CCTV provider and is regarded as the market leader and expert in this field. 99 CCTV9system9audit9compliance 99 Choice9of9equipment9to9suit9budget9&9performance9needs 99 Multi-platform9VMS9that9supports9different9CCTV9technologies 99 Advanced9E-mapping9options

CAMVEX VIDEO SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM DESIGN – SALES – INSTALLATION – SERVICE PHONE: 03 9543 4844 EMAIL: info@camvex.com.au 323276A RHS_CAMVEX | 1847.indd 24

www.camvex.com.au

CAMVEX (VIC) PTY LTD 1860 DANDENONG RD CLAYTON VICTORIA 3168 A.B.N. 86 100 905 048

4/12/12 1:17 PM

CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013 • 59


security

‘Australian CCTV standards stipulate that to achieve “identification”, the entire target person should represent not less than 100 per cent of screen height. It is assumed that a person’s face (head) occupies around 15 per cent of a person’s height (see figure). Good lighting is critical to provide identification image standards. ‘Liquor licensing has publicly acknowledged that it isn’t practical to achieve identification in these low-light areas and has suggested that “recognition” standards may be more appropriate. However, the conditions on most liquor licences don’t reflect this admission, and many of the people involved in auditing the CCTV systems for compliance have not been adequately educated about these issues. ‘New gaming regulations for CCTV came into effect in August 2012. These proposed CCTV standards will require most gaming venue operators to make improvements to their CCTV systems, ranging from minor to major upgrades. The extent of the improvements required will depend upon how well venue operators have deployed and maintained their CCTV systems. ‘Fundamental requirements of the proposed standard relate to the level of CCTV coverage, quality of the images, continuous recording as opposed to motion-activated recording, recording frame rates per camera, recording duration, file formats for incident backups (exports) and system maintenance. ‘There will obviously be issues for some with understanding these requirements and objectively measuring compliance with them. Camvex specialises in working with users to design CCTV solutions that meet reasonable interpretations of the CCTV standards required for liquor licence and gaming compliance. ‘CCTV technology has advanced significantly over recent years, with users having a choice of four different CCTV technologies, including standard-definition (SD) analogue, 960H, HD-SDI and HD IP. These technologies all have their various pros and cons. Typical systems deployed in most licensed premises are usually SD analogue, which provides standard-definition video images generally transmitted over coaxial cable. ‘However, just as we have seen the evolution of SD TV to high-definition (HD) TV become more popular and affordable, we now see it happening with CCTV. There are two types of full HD CCTV technologies currently available: HD-SDI (transmits over coaxial cable) and HD IP (transmits over ethernet cable).

60 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013

‘Both provide exceptional HD pictures, but which technology should you use? ‘For new camera locations that require cable installation, we tend to recommend HD IP, but for upgrading existing SD analogue cameras to HD, we recommend considering HDSDI because the existing cable can be utilised subject to its length and condition, which can save on cost. ‘Many CCTV users who want to migrate either all or some of their cameras to HD now have a choice of how this is done. Many years ago, Camvex identified issues with changing technology and issues with software for managing CCTV systems. ‘Hence, six years ago, we commenced a joint venture program with a CCTV software developer to create our own Australian-made Freedom VMS. It is the only CCTV software program in the world that supports all four types of CCTV technologies across multiple manufacturer brands. ‘This means we can mix and match different technologies and brands of equipment, but manage them all from one common software platform. Most of the major hotel groups in Melbourne have already standardised on Freedom VMS solutions and are enjoying the benefits it provides. ‘Licensed premises quite often have multiple DVR systems with 32 to 80 cameras. Many of them require playback of each DVR individually, which is cumbersome and inefficient. Freedom VMS permits simultaneous synchronised playback of multiple cameras from multiple DVRs or NVRs regardless of camera technology type. ‘Cameras can be selected from a camera list, or they can be dragged and dropped from an eMap that displays the locations of all cameras in the venue. This feature is a world first and favourite amongst users of multiple DVR CCTV systems. ‘About 10 years ago, we saw the “digital revolution” in the CCTV industry, with users upgrading from analogue VHS tape recording systems to digital video recorders (DVRs). We have now entered the “HD revolution”, with users wanting to upgrade their systems to higher picture quality standards and refine their CCTV management software for easier and more efficient operation. ‘I’m not sure what new hardware we will be using when we celebrate our 30th anniversary, but I do know we will be managing it with our Freedom VMS, which will continue to be backward-compatible with hardware we provided 10 years earlier.’ C&PM


SECURITY security

DARK KNIGHT SECURITY

We are serious about service

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ominic Dominguez has always had a passion for security, the law, protection, and customer service, so it only seemed natural for him to start up his own security company, Dark Knight Security. As an accomplished business owner for 15 years, and with security experience ranging from concierge, to security guard, and security manager, his insights distinguished him from current players who lacked customer service and quality employees. ‘After years in the security industry, I decided I could fill the gaping gap in customer service.’ Dominic lists professionalism and customer service among his core principles, and adds, ‘Thankfully, the security industry is slowly changing to more responsive and effective regulation.’

This further helps Dominic enforce the company ethics that Dark Knight Security espouses.

WHAT MAKES DARK KNIGHT SECURITY DIFFERENT? • Believing that clients shouldn’t have to deal with any issues when it comes to their security – 24/7 access to their Account Manager is guaranteed. • A rigorous hiring process and continuous training means your property is always covered by fully qualified, topquality security guards. Not just anyone will be looking after your property. • If required, there will always be a second ‘on call’ who also thoroughly knows the site. • Customer feedback is always valued, and effective systems are put in place to ensure the client is 100 per cent satisfied. Call Dark Knight Security; when it comes to protecting your business, you will be guaranteed professional, reliable service. C&PM

If you’re serious about security, we’re serious about service. Specialising in clubs, pubs and private events.

1300 995 367

www.darkknightsecurity.com.au

Email: info@darkknightsecurity.com.au Master licence number: 410845428

CLUBSAND ANDPUBS PUBSMANAGER MANAGERAUTUMN AUTUMN2013 2013••61 X CLUBS


security

Club security:

tell someone who cares By Peter Johnson, senior consultant, ASIAL

‘Who dares wins’ is a wellknown expression, but when it comes to the provision of security services to the hospitality industry in today’s environment, ‘who cares wins’ is a much more appropriate motto.

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ho Cares Wins also happens to be an event for CSR Europe, which is a leading European business network for corporate social responsibility. It is not suggested that the provision of security services to clubs and pubs has to compete for a rating of corporate social responsibility; however, an attitude of responsibility and the provision of services with a significant degree of ‘care’ will go a long way. In the service industry and the security industry, many are scared by the expression ‘duty of care’, from a legal perspective, as it is often brought up in cases of professional negligence. This doesn’t have to be the case. In lay terms, duty of care can be defined as ‘an obligation, recognised by law, to avoid conduct fraught with unreasonable risk of danger to others’. Although there is no clear-cut formula to establish when a duty of care is owed between individuals, two important factors give rise to a duty of care: reasonable foresight, and proximity. In everything we do in the provision of services, we should

62 • CLUBS AND PUBS MANAGER AUTUMN 2013


security

Crowd control at hospitality venues is possibly one of the hardest roles of the many and varied security functions. Add a pinch of attitude and a slurp of alcohol and we have a recipe for potential conflict consider the relationship we have with a person and the responsibility we have for that person. In most cases, that person is the ‘patron’. This duty of care naturally also extends to employees and contractors. The law tends to deal only with cases where very serious potential breaches of duty of care are in question and the law is guided by, but not subject to, professional codes of conduct and operating procedures that can impose high standards of conduct of members of a profession. Underpinning the operation of any organisation and venue can be the understanding and implementation of workplace health and safety requirements. Understanding and communicating to staff and contractors the standards of conduct and response procedures is part of that process. Within this communication process, security is not a backroom function, but part of the management and leadership buy-in helping to mitigate risk and add value to the successful operation of the organisation and venue.

A six-step program identified and recommended by the New South Wales Government includes: • Develop appropriate workplace health and safety policies and programs. • Set up a mechanism to consult about workplace health and safety matters with employees and contracted services. • Establish a training strategy. • Establish a hazard identification and workplace assessment process. • Develop and implement risk control strategies. • Promote, maintain and improve these strategies. Organisations contracted to provide security services to hospitality venues should be an integral part of an organisation’s planning, preparedness and

response. Duty of care obligations do not conflict with work health and safety (WHS) legislation. Both areas of the law focus on personal obligation to others and a systematic program of measures to prevent accidents (incidents). Crowd control at hospitality venues is possibly one of the hardest roles of the many and varied security functions. Add a pinch of attitude and a slurp of alcohol and we have a recipe for potential conflict, especially if the situation overheats. Industry research, (ARC Report Sarre and Prenzler: ‘Private Security and Public Interest’, April 2011), found that 57 per cent of crowd controllers had experienced a major physical assault at least once in the previous year, 86 per cent had experienced a minor assault at least once and all crowd controllers had experienced verbal abuse. What would be expected as the standard of care guides the consideration as to whether or not a duty of care has been breached. The question asked is what the allegedly negligent person was doing when the conduct in question occurred, and was it standard conduct in the industry, or would it have been considered to be below standard? In understanding the ‘standard’, it is not simply stating world’s best practice – although we often use such words to reflect a desired position – nor is it a position that the person was acting better than another person who may be a poor performer. Setting the standard involves considering what is reasonably expected given the circumstances. What is expected can be referenced back to industry standards and the organisational and premises standards that are articulated in protocols and procedures. The Australian Security Industry Association Limited (ASIAL) has established a professional code of conduct for members, and has actively supported the development of workplace health and safety guidelines for the security industry. Many of the guidelines provide a supportive base for the development of appropriate operating procedures for security at venues for the safety and conduct of all.

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As an example, WorkSafe Victoria produced a practical occupational health and safety guide for crowd control at venues and events, including safety assessments and consultation underpinned by risk management principles. The development of area and regional Liquor Accords has demonstrated a value-added process in the bringing together of interested parties, including the community, police, government departments, venue management and operators and security providers in identifying common objectives for the care of all at hospitality venues.

Their aims include to: • Encourage and implement best practice in the management of licensed premises. • Promote responsible standards of behaviour by patrons and protect their safety. • Maintain high standards of behaviour in and around licensed premises. What is evident from reviewing hospitality venues with high reputations, quality service and quality staff is the

relationship and trust between parties, documented procedures, training and the buy-in of all stakeholders. This translates into people that care about their staff, the venue and patrons. C&PM

Peter Johnson Peter is a Senior Consultant, Compliance & Regulatory Affairs for ASIAL. Peter has over 38 years’ experience within the security and associated industries with emphasis in general security, aviation and healthcare industries operational and emergency management. Peter has broad industry and commercial experience through holding senior management roles in both the private and public sectors. ASIAL is a peak national body representing 80 per cent of Australia’s $6-billion private security industry. Its 3200 members employ over 130,000 personnel. The comments and information in this article are provided for information and discussion only and do not constitute, nor are they intended to be, legal advice.

Think Security… THINK ASIAL When securing your business, don’t take any chances. Always use a licensed security professional and make sure they are a member of the Australian Security Industry Association Limited (ASIAL). To find an ASIAL member visit www.asial.com.au

The peak body for security professionals 323436A_Aust Security | 1847.indd 1

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Clubs & Pubs Manager Autumn 2013