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ETNA

ECODISTRICT PLAN A plan to improve quality of life for all Etna residents

First Edition | Published December 2019

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ETNA

ECODISTRICT PLAN


PUBLISHED

First Edition published December 2019

PREPARED FOR

The people who live, work, and play in Etna, PA.

ETNA ECODISTRICT PARTNERS Borough of Etna Etna Community Organization Etna Economic Development Corporation Etna Neighborhood Association Garden of Etna Triboro Ecodistrict

POWERED BY

evolve environment::architecture Christine Mondor, Principal Anna Rosenblum, Associate Chris Guignon Nico Azel Jianxiao Ge

FUNDING PROVIDED BY Henry L. Hillman Foundation

Ecodistricts focus on both the hardware or physical systems of places, as well as the software of social and cultural resiliency. The Etna EcoDistrict, along with its Triboro Ecodistrict partners in Millvale and Sharpsburg, is focused on six key areas of planning and strategic action: water, mobility, air, energy, food, and equity. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Special thanks to the work pioneered by Millvale, Etna, Sharpsburg, and evolveEA to develop the Quality of Life Issue Areas and the Triboro Ecodistrict approach. Also, a special acknowledgment to EcoDistrictsÂŽ for the development of their EcoDistricts Protocol and for encouraging the Etna EcoDistrict to crosswalk into their protocol system and apply for certification.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 6

Opening Letter Executive Summary

STATE OF THE ETNA ECODISTRICT

Etna Today Etna Tomorrow

12

ACTION PLAN 25 Water Mobility Air Energy Food Equity

KEY PLACES 114

Grant & Crescent District Bridge Street District Butler Street District

SOURCES 164 APPENDICES 168

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Etna EcoDistrict Plan is the community’s roadmap to improve quality of life for all Etna residents. The Plan includes projects, programs, and places that integrate social equity, community resilience, and environmental stewardship into the fabric of the community, while contributing to the achievement of Etna’s EcoDistrict Vision Statements.

The view of Etna from Sharps Hill. 6 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


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ETNA O UR

VI SI ON

WATER VISION

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MOBILITY

AIR

VISION

VISION

Etna is a resilient community that protects its people and waterways through creative water interventions.

Etna is a connected community where people of all ages have safe, reliable, and affordable mobility options.

Etna is a healthy community with empowered advocates that take a balanced approach to air quality.

ENERGY

FOOD

EQUITY

VISION

VISION

VISION

Etna is an innovative community that takes collective action to provide smart energy solutions.

Etna is a food-secure community with opportunities to grow, buy, share, and eat food locally.

Etna is an inclusive community that embraces diversity and activates everyone to shape our future together.

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


O UR

OUR

PL A N

P LACES

24

GOALS t h at we s tr ive to ac h i eve.

113

GRANT & CRESCENT DISTRICT

Etna’s northern gateway will be a connected hub of activity.

ACTIONS

to h e l p us a c hi eve o u r g o al s .

34

INDICATORS

BRIDGE STREET DISTRICT

Etna’s eastern gateway will strengthen the connection between Etna and the riverfront.

to d ef i n e what s u cce s s is .

10

YEARS to ac h i eve the f u t u re we env is io n!

BUTLER STREET DISTRICT

Etna’s business district will include new and existing assets that improve quality of life for all.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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We need expanded access to fresh and healthy food.

Kids and teens need a place to learn and grow.

We should grow our portfolio of stormwater management projects.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


OPENING LETTER From Robert Tuñón, ECO Board Member For Etna, sustainability isn’t a choice; sustainability is an imperative for the health, safety, and the quality of our lives. Our location at the confluence of the Allegheny River and the Pine Creek Watershed has placed us at the epicenter of the climate crisis. We have endured so many catastrophic events in our history - both environmental and economic - that resiliency has become a core component of who we are. Officials at the Borough created a new path forward when they decided that Etna was no longer going to be a victim of the watershed, but rather a national leader in green infrastructure and stormwater management. Our community’s interest in EcoDistricts came as a natural evolution of the Borough’s leadership in environmental stewardship, beginning in 2016 after learning of the efforts of our neighbors. Like many new initiatives, a year was spent in fact-finding and fundraising that was quiet and uncertain. In 2018 we issued a call to action throughout the community and received a resounding response; our first community meeting registered 110 attendees with passionate testaments about the need to work towards a more vibrant and sustainable future. Before starting a planning process, we followed in the footsteps of our neighbor, Millvale, by spending a year of collaborative learning to better understand the issues that affect us. By leading with education, a shared language and knowledge was created that enabled all of our family members, neighbors, and coworkers to participate in the process. The further the initiative progressed, the better we understood that the Etna EcoDistrict is not about any project, program, or even this plan; it is about the people and their activation through their own ideas. So often, community engagement is a secondary effort to a primary objective. Activating Etnians became our reason for doing the work at all. Over the course of the last two years, we held thirty-five free, all-ages, open-to-the public events to engage as many members of the community as possible around this work. We grew from a team of four to a grassroots organization of over 400 volunteers, each donating two or more hours of time to the Etna EcoDistrict initiative. The benefit of this approach has been a broader base of support for the work, now and in the future, and significantly more buy-in for what is proposed in this plan. We know very well that our capacity to achieve this collective vision for a more equitable and resilient future is only possible when Etna’s stakeholders are the drivers of this positive change. None of what we’ve accomplished is possible without our incredible partnerships. At the highest level, we are most deeply indebted to Anna Rosenblum, Christine Mondor, and Brian Wolovich for showing us what an equitable community process looks like. From day one, Etna’s Borough Manager Mary Ellen Ramage and Mayor Tom Rengers were at our side in bringing forward the Etna EcoDistrict. On a daily basis, former VISTA and current ECO Director Alexis Boytim captured and carried out the expressions of the community’s voice to ensure that this document is responsive to our expressed needs, hopes, and dreams. And to the many volunteers, we are sincerely grateful for your time and your efforts to come together as a community.

“... OUR CAPACITY TO ACHIEVE THIS COLLECTIVE VISION... IS ONLY POSSIBLE WHEN ETNA’S STAKEHOLDERS ARE THE DRIVERS OF THIS POSITIVE CHANGE.”

Robert Tuñón, on behalf of the Etna Community Organization

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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STATE OF THE ETNA ECODISTRICT The Etna EcoDistrict was launched in 2016 to improve quality of life for all Etna residents through planning and strategic action in the areas of water, mobility, air, energy, food, and social equity. The community has already made progress and has plans for continued action over the next ten years.

Butler Street, looking east. 12 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


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3,422 Etna residents

3,679

3,556

Sharpsburg1

Millvale1

1,605

$37,831

1

Etna households1

Etna median household income1

2,770

U. Lawr.1

$31,821

Sharpsburg1

$37,225 $38,128 Millvale1

1,767

1,677

U. Lawr.1

Sharpsburg1

1,221

Millvale1

U. Lawr.1

11%

Other (1%) Government (2%) Industrial (2%)

Other 18.1%

Housing

30.7%

Food

12.5%

Transportation

12.3%

Commercial (11%)

Pensions and Social Security Health Care

9.9%

Entertainment and Recreation Support Payments/ Cash Contributions/Gifts in Kind

4.5%

8.2%

3.3%

Annual expenditures2

Renter occupied1

26.0%

39.5%

42.3%

61.5%

60.5%

57.7%

Sharpsburg

Millvale

U. Lawr.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

75 +

65 - 74

55 - 64

45 - 54

35 - 44

25 - 34

20 - 24

211

182

15 - 19

Etna businesses3

162

181

10 - 14

33.7

U. Lawr.1

167

37.3

Millvale1

5-9

39.0

Sharpsburg1

171

Median age1

0-4

36.4

Age distribution1

303

Etna

38.5%

518

74.0%

455

Owner occupied1

490

Residential (84%)

514

84%

249

NUMBER OF BUILDINGS BY USE

Number of existing buildings by use4

ETNA 2017


ETNA

TODAY In the mid-1800s, a traveler once wrote that “The combination of the flowing sky, and the rumble of industrial operations filled the air and aroused the senses - as if one were witnessing the eruption of a volcano.” The name stuck and “Etna” (named for Mount Etna) was established. While visitors may no longer experience the excitement of a volcano, the Etna community has numerous other assets to offer, as well as challenges they are working to address.5 WE ARE A FAMILY FRIENDLY COMMUNITY Located in the respected Shaler Area School District, Etna has many amenities that are attractive to families, such as ballfields, playgrounds, and numerous family-friendly community events throughout the year. The average population is the youngest compared to neighboring communities because younger families are starting to move to Etna. OUR HOMES ARE OLD BUT ARE BECOMING MORE VALUABLE Etna is a dense urban community with little vacant land to accommodate new construction. Most homes were built in the early 1900s, with 1939 being the median year of construction. About 74% of the housing units in Etna are owner-occupied, which gives the municipality a high rate of homeownership, especially in comparison to neighboring communities. Etna is becoming a community of choice for movers, and over the past ten years more people from the greater Pittsburgh area, and even across the country, are moving to Etna. While Etna is currently considered affordable (the median home value is $82,000), sale prices have been gradually increasing. In 2014 the median home sale price was $50,000, which increased to $85,000 in 2018. With a continued increase in sales prices projected, Etna has started working with the

City of Bridges Community Land Trust to preserve affordability and prevent displacement.6, 7

On average, Etna residents spend

5.2%

WE HAVE NEW BUSINESSES MOVING IN Etna is home to many locally owned businesses, ranging from appliance sales, to candy stores, and pierogi shops. New businesses are also moving in, including the Shiny Bean and Kiya Tomlin Fashion. Etna has approximately 181 registered businesses in the community, including many retail trade, servicerelated, and construction-related businesses. Out of all of the building square footage in Etna, 11% is commercial and 2% is industrial.8, 9 THE ARTS ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR IDENTITY Etna is home to several artists and makers, many of whom work in local art studios. ID Labs, a recording studio for local and national artists, is located in the business district. Etna’s passion for the arts is celebrated annually during the Etna Art Tour, an event where community members can explore artist studios, engage in arts activities in the street, and enjoy live musical performances. WE ARE RICH WITH RECREATIONAL AND NATUREBASED ASSETS While Etna is a dense urban community, if you walk a few steps off of the main street you will suddenly

of their annual household income on energy (the average American spends 3.5%).12 On average, Etna residents spend

15.6%

of their annual household income on food (the average American spends 10.1%).12

ESRI 2017 Forecast based on U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1 2 ESRI, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Expenditure Surveys 2013 and 2014. 3 ESRI, Infogroup, 2016. 4 Allegheny County Property Assessments, 2017. 5 Norm Meinert, 2015. 6 U.S. Census Bureau, ACS 2011 - 2015. 7 Lawrenceville Corporation, City of Bridges CLT, 2018. 1

STATE OF THE ETNA ECODISTRICT

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


feel like you are deep in the woods. The Dougherty Nature Trail and the Riverfront Park (currently under construction) provide amazing opportunities for residents to reconnect with nature, and water in particular. In addition to this, several ballfields and urban walking trails provide outdoor recreational opportunities for residents. WE HAVE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES While Etna has some fantastic environmental assets, the community suffers from some environmental challenges as well. Heavy rain events can lead to flooding and combined sewer overflows into Pine Creek and the Allegheny River. The Pittsburgh region’s air quality is in the dirtiest 6% in the country for particle pollution. Heavy regional polluters, the predominant wind direction, Etna’s location near to active railroad tracks, and two busy highways contribute to this pollution. Lastly, pollution impacts water quality in Pine Creek which has an affect on local flora and fauna.10 WE ARE WORKING TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO EDUCATION Etna was once a place with its own school, teachers, and libraries. As time passed, schools in the region consolidated and individual communities no longer had their own schools. While Etna has fantastic recreational opportunities for kids, the community now lacks places for kids and teens to learn. The Etna Community Organization (ECO) is currently in the process of acquiring funding to transform a building along Butler Street into a Community Library that can serve this purpose. WE HAVE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHALLENGES Like many municipalities in Western Pennsylvania, several Etna residents have suffered from air quality-related health impacts, such as heart disease. The death rate due to heart disease in Etna is 85% higher than in Allegheny County as a whole. Etna has the second highest median

household income compared to their peer communities, but on average basic needs account for almost half (47.8%) of the average resident’s annual expenditures. The community has no grocery store in town, making it difficult for residents to procure fresh and healthy foods. Etna is, however, lucky to have several institutions that provide needed services in the community, including Calvert Memorial Church, North Hills Community Outreach, and the Borough of Etna. 11, 12 WE HAVE BEEN WORKING TOGETHER TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR YEARS Etna contains many active and passionate organizations who have been successfully working together for decades to make Etna a better place. Etna Borough, the Garden of Etna, Etna Economic Development Corporation, Etna Neighborhood Association, and many others are filled with passionate champions whose work improves the community. While the initiative to improve quality of life did not begin with the establishment of the Etna EcoDistrict, it is a way to bring together existing initiatives and champions to continue to drive change. WE ARE PROUD OF OUR COMMUNITY AND LOVE TO CELEBRATE TOGETHER If you are interested in viewing a parade, making a new friend, eating some delicious food, and enjoying a variety of activities, then Etna is the place for you. Etna residents takes great pride in their community and they do an amazing job of showing it. Demonstrated by the dozens of community events held each year, Etna uses every opportunity to bring the community together to celebrate the people and places of Etna.

ESRI, InfoGroup, 2018. Allegheny County Property Assessments, GIS, 2018. 10 The Breathe Project, U.S. EPA, Clean Air Task Force, 2017. 11 Allegheny County Dept of Human Services, 2018. 12 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Expenditure Surveys, 2013 - 14. 8 9

STATE OF THE ETNA ECODISTRICT

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Our community is inclusive and collaborative.

We will be connected to each other and the region.

Our community is resilient and a protector!

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


ETNA

TOMORROW Over the next 10 years, the Etna community will take ownership over its future and work collaboratively to implement the projects, programs, and places outlined in this Plan. By the year 2030, we will have put forth our best effort to actualize our Community Visions and improve quality of life for all who live, work, and play in Etna. What does an equitable, resilient, and sustainable community look like? The answer to this question comes in many forms, each as unique and distinctive as the people and places that make up the community in question. For Etna, over the past two years in our EcoDistrict process we have worked to craft a collective vision that places us and our needs at the center of our own change. Creating an equitable future will be about providing all Etna residents with what they need to be successful and empowered to live a life of choice. To us, it is imperative that we all have full and equal access to opportunities that enable us to reach our greatest potential. Creating a more resilient future will be about not only strengthening our capacity to bounce back from shocks or stresses, but also about transforming adverse events into opportunities for growth, and thereby bouncing forward. It is imperative that we be proactive, adaptive, and transformational when facing adverse events, whether social, environmental, or economic, so that we can come through the other side even stronger. Creating a sustainable future will be about implementing systems in which our current needs do not compromise those of future generations. To us, it is imperative that we take local actions in our community to care for both our built and natural environments in

tandem to have the greatest impact in protecting our community’s overall health. While these overarching imperatives provide guidance and direction to our work, choosing to vision more deeply around the issues that are directly related to our daily quality of life has allowed us to create tangible starting points for activation. Water, Mobility, Air, Energy, Food, Equity - each of these areas intimately touch the lives of every one of us, without exception. Etna’s Community Visions in each of these Quality of Life Issue Areas describes the future conditions that we aim to achieve by the year 2030. They describe a future where the environment, health, and the financial burden of basic needs are no longer barriers to pursuing a life of choice, but catalysts towards achieving our greatest potential. Setting this foundation before

EVERYONE IN ETNA DESERVES THE OPPORTUNITY TO THRIVE AND LIVE A LIFE TO THEIR FULLEST POTENTIAL.

STATE OF THE ETNA ECODISTRICT

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jumping into the planning phase allowed us to clearly visualize where we are, who we hope to be, and what we need to do to get there. We now have defined goals that we can work towards, as well as ways to measure our progress. By activating the projects, programs, and places outlined in this Plan, we hope to pave the way towards a future in which Etna is a protector of its people and its waterways; safe and connected with affordable and reliable transportation options; healthy and empowered to positively impact our air; a leader in innovative energy solutions that promote efficiency and reduce the financial burden for our community; food-secure with plentiful access to healthy, affordable food options; and inclusive, diverse, and a community that activates its residents to shape their future. It has taken years of learning and collaborating to get to the point we are at today, but truly the real work is ahead of us. The next ten years and beyond will be about stepping up, taking ownership over our future, and working collaboratively to implement the projects, programs, and places outlined in this Plan. A reflection of our community, this Plan is a living document that will be updated as needed in response to progress we make towards meeting our goals and to our changing priorities for community improvement.

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Through the implementation of this Plan, we hope to pay homage to the transformational work done before us and to honor both existing and new partnerships going forward. We recognize how Etna’s spirit of collaboration has broken barriers for the community in the past and how creating a bright, equitable future will largely be dependent on deepening and enhancing this spirit of collaboration. At the end of the day, the Etna EcoDistrict is not about one person or organization, project or place; the Etna EcoDistrict is about everyone. Creating positive change will require each of us to contribute our individual voices and efforts to actualizing our vision of a more vibrant future. The Etna EcoDistrict initiative has provided and will continue to provide opportunities for us to truly understand what amazing things we are capable of. Looking at where Etna was ten years ago and where Etna is now, we are confident that our trajectory is upward, with strength and vigor, towards an equitable, resilient, and sustainable future. Contributed by Alexis Boytim, Director, Etna Community Organization (ECO)

EQU I TA BL E

R ES IL IE N T

S U STA IN A B LE

communities welcome all of its citizens to participate in civic life and create a shared vision.

communities take proactive steps to address adverse conditions with innovative, forward thinking.

communities thrive today without compromising the potential of future generations.

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


STATE OF THE ETNA ECODISTRICT

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ACTION PLAN The Etna EcoDistrict Action Plan is composed of policy, program, and project recommendations that will help Etna achieve its community vision statements by 2030. To track progress, these recommendations are accompanied by performance targets and indicators to measure success.

Pine Creek, slightly upstream of Etna. 22 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


23


Air quality monitors will help us understand the current conditions.

Complete Streets improvements will make our community safer.

Let’s improve our homes so they consume less energy.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


ETNA ECODISTRICT

ACTION PLAN The Etna EcoDistrict Action Plan defines a pathway to improve quality of life for everyone who lives, works, and plays in Etna. The development of the Action Plan was guided by several principles. INTEGRATE PLACEMAKING, PERFORMANCE, & EQUITY Ecodistricts are comprised of enjoyable places to build community, goals for reducing the community’s environmental footprint, actions that improve quality of life for all, and indicators to measure progress. The Etna EcoDistrict Action Plan integrates placemaking, performance, and equity to maximize impact, expose the invisible aspects of the quality of life areas in visible ways, and create beautiful places that reflect Etna’s values. KEEP OUR EYES ON THE STARS AND OUR FEET ON THE GROUND The Etna community has identified ambitious goals for the EcoDistrict, and is not afraid to think big. The Action Plan is intended to create impactful change in the community, while remaining realistic about what is achievable within the selected timeframe, capacity of the stewarding organizations, and available funding. The Action Plan prioritizes recommendations from community feedback on what is of the greatest need and importance to the community. STAND ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS Community change did not begin with the establishment of the Etna EcoDistrict. Etna is composed of many active organizations and leaders that have worked to make Etna a better place for decades. The Action Plan acknowledges the existing and imminent work of partners (such as Etna Borough, EEDC, and others), and provides

recommendations that compliment and tie together these various initiatives. The Action Plan would not be possible today without the work that has come before it. PRIORITIZE COMMUNITY COCREATION AND EMPOWERMENT The Action Plan is the direct result of community ideation, refinement, and feedback. The recommendations are meant to serve the community and are a direct result of their participation. The process leading to the development of the Action Plan was intended to inform, educate, and activate community members to not only participate in the creation of the Plan, but empower them with the tools to assist in Plan implementation upon completion. MAINTAIN THE PLAN AS A LIVING DOCUMENT The Etna EcoDistrict Action Plan is intended to be a living document, one that is updated and evolves over time. Changes in funding, property ownership, market pressure, or opportunities may require the Plan to course-correct and address immediate needs. The Plan will be continuously refined informed by each public meeting and event. As stewards of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan ECO intends to update the document on a biannual basis and re-release it to the public.

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GOALS

113 ACTIONS

34

INDICATORS

10

YEARS

ACTION PLAN

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WATER

MOBILITY

AIR

Etna is a resilient community that protects its people and waterways through creative water interventions.

Etna is a connected community where people of all ages have safe, reliable, and affordable mobility options.

Etna is a healthy community with empowered advocates that take a balanced approach to air quality.

GOALS

GOALS

GOALS

1. Minimize flooding and landslides

1. Increase the use of alternative transportation to connect to the region

1. Improve indoor air quality

2. Improve safety and connectivity

3. Mitigate harmful outdoor air contaminants

2. Reduce impacts of flooding 3. Celebrate water with productive and enjoyable places 4. Improve water quality to protect stream health and biodiversity

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3. Celebrate connectivity and mobility options 4. Increase the number and quality of mobility options

2. Minimize sources of outdoor air pollution

4. Create an informed and activated air quality culture

INDICATORS

INDICATORS

INDICATORS

14.96 MGal increase in stormwater managed

14.7% higher rate of alternative transportation use

79 additional “good� air quality days per year

15% decrease in number of buildings in the floodplain

18 point increase in Walk Score

7 additional green spaces and public spaces

83 additional rain barrels 6 projects over the next ten years

53 projects and events over the next 10 years

1 acre increase in habitat restored

12,500 ft. of bike friendly streets

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

6,000 ft. of Complete Streets

430 additional trees planted 922 additional participants in air quality education


ENERGY

FOOD

EQUITY

Etna is an innovative community that takes collective action to provide smart energy solutions.

Etna is a food-secure community with opportunities to grow, buy, share, and eat food locally.

Etna is an inclusive community that embraces diversity and activates everyone to shape their own future.

GOALS

GOALS

GOALS

1. Reduce the energy burden (including energy consumption)

1. Improve food security

1. Improve quality of life for all

2. Localize the food system

2. Engage in an equitable process

2. Maximize renewable energy production

3. Improve nutritional health and wellness

3. Build community wealth

3. Leverage energy initiatives to build community wealth

4. Minimize environmental impact

4. Improve community resilience

4. Support and celebrate Etna’s vibrant identity and culture

5. Build community through food

INDICATORS

INDICATORS

INDICATORS

50% reduction in energy consumption

11 additional food system locations over the next 10 years

20 fewer households living below the poverty level

1,320 mWh increase in annual renewable energy production

9,470 additional square feet of community garden space

100% of Etna has free public wi-fi

5 innovative energy projects over 10 years

245 additional participants in programs

70 additional meetings and events over the next 10 years

47 additional people working to implement projects and programs

260,800 lbs of waste composted

20 additional permanently affordable housing units

2 resilience hubs in 10 years

538 meals shared together every year for the next 10 years 6 additional food businesses with outdoor seating

564 additional participants

4 additional EcoDistrict employees 606 additional Etna residents who vote 1 additional public art installation every year for 10 years 9 cultural events every year for 10 years

ACTION PLAN

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WATER Pine Creek flows into the Allegheny River. 28 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna is a resilient community that protects its people and waterways through creative water interventions.

ACTION PLAN

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ETNA’S WATER STORY ETNA IS PART OF THE PINE CREEK WATERSHED. The Pine Creek Watershed is 67.3 square miles in area, is home to 91,000 people, and spans across 14 different municipalities. The watershed area in Etna is only 0.67 square miles, equating to 1% of the total area of the Pine Creek Watershed. However, due to Etna’s location, all stormwater from the Pine Creek Watershed flows through Etna before reaching the Allegheny River. HEAVY RAINFALL CAN LEAD TO FLOODING AND COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS. In 2018, Etna received 51% more precipitation than average. During heavy rain events, the combined sewer system becomes overloaded and sewage overflows into Pine Creek and the Allegheny River. Heavy rain events can also cause flooding and landslides. 23.5% of the buildings in Etna are located in or touch the floodplain, meaning that they are more susceptible to flooding.

ETNA BOROUGH HAS TAKEN SIGNIFICANT ACTIONS RELATED TO WATER. Green infrastructure planning and projects, a rain barrel program, streetscape improvements, participation in the Community Rating System, and the planned Riverfront Park all contribute to improving quality of life in Etna. ETNA RESIDENTS AND WATER CHAMPIONS ARE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE. June 2018 was “Water Month” in Etna. Residents came together to discuss water issues and opportunities as well as to develop Etna’s Water Vision Statement. To learn more about Etna’s Water Story, please read the Etna EcoDistrict Water Education Booklet, found HERE.

WATER QUALITY AFFECTS HUMAN HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH. Etna’s drinking water contains low levels of contaminants and is lovingly regarded by residents for it’s superior taste. Fish and other animals reside in Pine Creek and require healthy water to survive. ETNA CONTAINS MANY WATER PLACES. Etna contains many water places where residents can interact with, appreciate, and enjoy water. Etna also contains places where we avoid interaction with water.

Green Streetscape Tree Grate.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


RELATIONSHIP TO QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS Improving water in Etna can provide benefits related to the other five quality of life areas as well.

MOBILITY

AIR

Streetscape improvements and parks not only contribute to Etna’s mobility goals, but can integrate green stormwater infrastructure as well.

Park, trees, and vegetation not only contribute to improved air quality, but help to manage stormwater and stabilize hillsides to protect against landslides.

ENERGY

FOOD

Filtering water so that residents can drink it is a very energy intensive process. The less polluted our waterways are, the more energy we can conserve.

Water quality can affect animals, plants, and ecosystems that residents rely upon for nutrients. Local, sustainable food production practices can conserve water.

EQUITY Properties affect by flooding and landslides can suffer severe property damage and costs. Additionally, access to clean water to both drink and enjoy is essential to support human health.

WATER BENEFITS Taking action related to water can benefit both the environment and the economy, and it can contribute to a more equitable community.

$ ENVIRONMENT Water management can reduce flooding in our basements and protect the health of our beloved blue heron.

ECONOMY Water management can reduce our flood insurance premiums and minimize property damage during flood events.

EQUITY Clean and healthy drinking water keeps our families safe and allows us to interact enjoyably with Pine Creek.

ACTION PLAN

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WATER BIG IDEAS Etna contains a wonderful natural feature that runs right through the community - Pine Creek. However, due to topography and to Etna’s position at the bottom of the Pine Creek Watershed, Etna is sometimes prone to flooding. Luckily, the Borough of Etna has implemented several projects and has made significant improvements to reduce flooding. Finding additional opportunities to capture, convey, store, or infiltrate stormwater, even at a small scale, can make a big difference if placed strategically. In many cases, these projects can provide places for the community to interact with Pine Creek or help to strengthen the connection between destinations in Etna. The big ideas listed for water below inspired the recommendations for new and improved places in Etna.

1

Pine Creek Park

2

Blue Street: Dewey and Wilson Streets

3

Riparian Buffer Restoration

4

Dougherty Nature Trail & Ballfields

5

Creekside Restaurant & Brewery

Create a network of stormwater parks in key places to reduce flooding.

6

Green Streetscape (Phases 1 & 2)

Etna contains a few large sites that are not currently operating at their highest and best use. Several of these sites are located along Pine Creek and have been identified in the Green Infrastructure Master Plan as productive locations for green infrastructure. Converting these key sites into stormwater parks will increase stormwater infiltration and create green spaces where the Etna community can interact with and enjoy water.

7

Green Streetscape (Phase 5)

8

Tippins Splash Park

9

Poplar Greenway

BIG IDEA #1

During rain events water moves quickly down several streets in Etna, which can lead to flooding. In coordination with the stormwater parks, developing a network of blue streets that convey, store, and celebrate water is an effective means to reduce flooding. Blue streets can include bioswales, trees, vegetation, underground storage, permeable paving, and/or other small-scale green infrastructure strategies. BIG IDEA #3

Restore the natural edge of Pine Creek (the riparian buffer). The natural edge of Pine Creek has degraded over time due to erosion caused by heavy rain events and development. Restoring the riparian buffer that borders Pine Creek will prevent pollutants in stormwater runoff and sediment from entering Pine Creek, control erosion, stabilize hillsides, provide key habitat, and reduce flooding, all while improving views of Pine Creek.

(see page 154 for more information)

(see page 154 for more information)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 136 for more information)

(existing, see page 154 for more information)

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 154)

(see page 145 for more information)

(see page 145 for more information)

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Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park

11

Etna Riverfront Park

12

Blue Street: High Street

13

Green Streetscape (Phases 3 & 4)

14

Exit 4 Rain Garden

15

Kayak Launch and Fishing Pier

16

Shaler Crest Park

17

Blue Hillside: Parker Street

18

Blue Hillside: Kittanning Street

BIG IDEA #2

Expand the use of Blue Streets to slow down and absorb stormwater.

(see page 132 for more information)

(see page 147 for more information)

(project by Etna Borough, currently under construction, see page 144)

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 154)

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 154 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 154 for more information)

(see page 154 for more information)

Blue Streets

32 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Pine Creek

18

1

2 2

3 4

5

12

13

7

8

10

6 17 16

14

9

15 11

ACTION PLAN

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DEFINING SUCCESS: WATER GOALS Etna’s Water Story includes many existing assets as well as threats. To achieve Etna’s Water Vision the community must implement actions that build on their strengths to mitigate their common challenges.

1

Minimize the frequency of flooding and landslides

2

Reduce the impacts of flooding

3

Celebrate water with productive and enjoyable places

4

Protect our natural environment through intentional water interventions 34 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

In Etna, heavy rainfall can cause the combined sewer system to become overloaded, resulting in sewage overflows into Pine Creek and the Allegheny River. Heavy rainfall can also cause flooding and landslides. While Etna cannot control how much precipitation the community receives, they can implement actions that help prevent flooding and landslides.

23.5% of the buildings in Etna are within or touch the 100-year floodplain. While flooding cannot always be prevented, the community can work with upstream municipalities to reduce the quantity of stormwater that passes through Etna. Residents can also take proactive steps within Etna’s borders to prepare for flood events and minimize property damage and costs when flooding does occur.

Water should not be viewed only as a liability, but as one of Etna’s biggest assets. Creating places where residents can interact with, appreciate, and enjoy water will support resident health, grow an appreciation for water, and create beautiful places in Etna for the community to enjoy. When paired with stormwater management, these places can be both pleasurable and productive.

The quality of our waterways affects animals, plants, and local ecosystems, in addition to resident health. It is important to remember that every living organism on this earth needs water to survive. The choices that we make regarding our natural environment can affect water and habitat quality.


CATALYTIC PROJECTS The big ideas described in the previous spread inspired recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. Many of those places address multiple quality of life issue areas and can be catalytic for the community.

PINE CREEK PARK Pine Creek Park will manage stormwater and provide a place for community members to enjoy Pine Creek. It will be adjacent to an Open Air Market. An energy technology demonstration project will harness energy from Pine Creek.

TIPPINS SPLASH PARK Tippins Splash Park will manage stormwater and provide a place for community members to enjoy Pine Creek. It will be part of Etna’s trail network, and will support safe and enjoyable routes throughout Etna for pedestrians and bicyclists.

ACTION PLAN

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DEFINING SUCCESS: WATER INDICATORS Identifying and tracking indicators will help Etna set goals and measure success towards achieving those goals. The following information describes where Etna is today (baseline) and what Etna aims to achieve by the year 2030 (2030 target).

By the year 2030 we will... Increase the millions of gallons (MGal) of stormwater managed through green infrastructure projects1,2

Decrease the percentage of buildings within or touching the 100-year floodplain3

Increase the number of buildings with rain barrels

Increase the number of water projects implemented

Increase the acreage of habitat restored4

14.96 MGal

1.14 MGal

(2019)

16.1 MGal

increase in stormwater managed

15%

23.5% (2014) 20% (2030)

decrease in number of buildings in the floodplain

83

17 rain barrels

(2017)

100 rain barrels

additional rain barrels

6 projects

4 projects

10 projects

0 acres

(2019)

1 acre

increase in habitat restored

(2030)

baseline 2030 target

36 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

(2030)

(2019)

over the next 10 years

1 acre

(2030)

(2030)


Indicator MGal of stormwater captured annually through green infrastructure projects Baseline 1.14 MGal Baseline Year 2019 Source Includes Green Streetscape Phase 1 (0.641 MGal) and Green Streetscape Phase 2 (0.464 MGal), as described by the Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan and the Borough of Etna. 2030 Target 16.1 MGal (the Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan estimates that if the first five phases of projects were to be implemented, those projects would capture a cumulative 16.1 MGal of stormwater annually) Indicator % of buildings in Etna that are within or touch the 100-year floodplain Baseline 23.5% of buildings Baseline Year 2014 Source The baseline was calculated using ArcGIS to overlay the 2014 FEMA Floodplain layer and the 2015 Allegheny County building footprints layer. The percentage of buildings touching or in the 100-year floodplain can be decreased by converting vacant or underutilized buildings and land into green space and/or implementing improvements that reduce the area of the floodplain. 2030 Target 20% of buildings Indicator # of buildings with rain barrels (cumulative since 2017) Baseline 17 rain barrels Baseline Year 2017 Source This number was provided by Etna Borough who administers the rain barrel program. 2030 Target 100 rain barrels Indicator # of projects implemented (cumulative since 2014) Baseline 4 projects Baseline Year Cumulative since 2014 Source Projects include the Green Streetscape (all phases) (2), Freeport Street rain park (1), and the Etna Playground rain garden (1). 2030 Target 10 projects Indicator acres of habitat restored (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 0 acres Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source Not applicable. 2030 Target 1 acre

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resource Regeneration: Water indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resiliency/Living Infrastructure: Ecosystem Health indicator. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resilience indicator. 4 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resiliency/Living Infrastructure: Natural Features indicator. 1

2

ACTION PLAN

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WATER ACTION PLAN

Actions in bold will be prioritized in years 1 through 3.

1

Minimize the frequency of flooding and landslides2

2

Reduce the impacts of flooding

3

Celebrate water with productive and enjoyable places3,4

4

Protect our natural environment through intentional water interventions1

a. Expand existing rain barrel program to businesses and churches.5 b. Establish/strengthen a Pine Creek Watershed Association/Authority that will advocate for upstream improvements. c.

Restore the riparian buffer (vegetated area near streams that protect adjacent land).

d. Target tree planting and hillside stabilization on landslide-prone hillsides. e. Establish incentives for installing pervious pavement and maximizing green space on personal property.

a. Educate the community about water conservation and the floodplain. b. Activate the community to engage in behaviors that reduce water consumption and minimize flooding and its impacts. c.

Establish programs to retrofit/flood-proof low-income households in the floodplain.

a. Convert vacant or underutilized lots and buildings into green spaces with integrated stormwater management features. b. Work with artists to create artful interventions that celebrate water. c.

Establish stormwater parks, pocket wetlands, and gardens to reduce flooding and allow residents to enjoy water.

d. Create constructed wetlands where appropriate along and adjacent to Pine Creek.

a. Designate habitat support areas (fish, birds, etc.) in tandem with restoring the riparian buffer. b. Establish a residential water conservation campaign. c.

Manage pollution that can affect water quality (litter, gasoline, chemical runoff, etc.).

d. Work with PennDOT to reduce stormwater runoff from highways and improve the quality of water before it enters Pine Creek. e. Use combined sewer overflow material to fertilize wetlands or put to another productive use. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Living Infrastructure: Natural Features objective. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Living Infrastructure: Ecosystem Health objective. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Living Infrastructure: Connection with Nature objective. 4 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resource Regeneration: Water objective. 5 Existing rain barrel program is run by Etna Borough. 1

2

38 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


years 1 - 3

years 4 - 5

years 6+

period of focused time and attention on action establishment period ongoing effort, requires less time to maintain

ACTION PLAN

| 39


YEARS 1 - 3

GETTING STARTED The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given their projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame is unattainable. The community has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed below with accompanying detail describing how the community plans to accomplish them. The remaining actions will be evaluated in two years, at which time a new implementation plan will be created.

WATER GOAL 1A

Expand rain barrel program to businesses and churches. Schedule Year 2: Perform outreach to businesses and churches. Help them install rain barrels. Year 3+: Continue to recruit participants. Implementation Scale Community: Anyone in the community is able to participate. This will also impact those who do not participate by reducing the quantity of stormwater that enters the combined sewer system. Type Program (ongoing) Responsible Party Etna Borough with assistance from ECO Funding To be determined WATER GOAL 2A

Educate the community about water conservation and the floodplain. Schedule Year 1: Host Pine Creek Awareness Day to provide information about the floodplain and water conservation. Year 2: Work with the Etna EcoDistrict Water Champions and water partners to develop and implement programming. Implementation Scale Community: Anyone in the community is able to participate. This will also impact those who do not participate by encouraging residents to reduce the quantity of stormwater that enters the combined sewer system. Type Program (ongoing) Responsible Party ECO in collaboration with Etna Borough, Etna EcoDistrict Water Champions, and water partners. Funding To be determined

40 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Rain barrels are available for The playground rain garden A walking tour teaches attendees about Etna’s purchase from the Borough. manages stormwater. water initiatives. WATER GOAL 3A

Convert vacant or underutilized lots and buildings into green spaces with integrated stormwater management. Schedule Year 1: Incorporate stormwater features into EcoPark. Year 2: Prioritize additional sites. Years 3-5: Fundraise and implement projects. Implementation Scale Community: Anyone in the community is invited to experience and enjoy the new green spaces. Type Project Responsible Party ECO in collaboration with Etna Borough, Etna EcoDistrict Water Champions, and water partners. Funding To be determined WATER GOAL 4A

Designate habitat support areas (fish, birds, etc.) in tandem with restoring the riparian buffer. Schedule Year 2: Prioritize sites. Years 3-5: Fundraise and implement projects. Implementation Scale Community: Everyone in the community will experience the positive impacts of a supported ecosystem. These efforts will also minimize flooding, which will benefit the entire community. Type Project Responsible Party ECO in collaboration with Etna Borough, Etna EcoDistrict Water Champions, and water partners. Funding To be determined

ACTION PLAN

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MOBILITY Rail, road, and bicycle transportation networks pass through Etna. 42 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna is a connected community where people of all ages have safe, reliable, and affordable mobility options.

ACTION PLAN

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ETNA’S MOBILITY STORY ETNA TRANSITIONED FROM A RIVER TOWN, TO A RAIL TOWN, TO A ROAD TOWN. While the region still uses the river and railroads to transport people and goods, the Borough is now predominantly a road town (people and goods are transported by vehicle). ETNA IS EASY TO ACCESS VIA CAR. 90.5% of Etna residents own a car, and a significant majority commute to work via car. Etna’s location allows residents and visitors to quickly travel between Etna, Downtown Pittsburgh, and other regional destinations. PUBLIC TRANSIT, BICYCLE, AND PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS CAN BE UNSAFE AND INCONVENIENT. Some Etna residents do not own a car or choose to travel by alternative means. Traveling via bus, bike, or by foot can at times be difficult due to the unreliability of the buses and the unsafe and inconvenient routes connecting Etna to neighboring communities and the greater region.

ETNA BOROUGH HAS TAKEN SIGNIFICANT ACTIONS RELATED TO MOBILITY. The Complete Streets resolution, Little Pine Creek Connector Trail feasibility study, North Hills Bike/ Ped Summit, ADA pedestrian ramp improvements, and the planned Riverfront Park all contribute to improving quality of life in Etna. ETNA RESIDENTS AND MOBILITY CHAMPIONS ARE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE. July 2018 was “Mobility Month” in Etna. Residents came together to discuss mobility issues and opportunities as well as to develop Etna’s Mobility Vision Statement. To learn more about Etna’s Mobility Story, please read the Etna EcoDistrict Mobility Education Booklet, found HERE.

ETNA CONTAINS MANY MOBILITY PLACES. Etna contains many pleasant mobility places where residents can safely enjoy traveling from one place to the next. Etna also contains places that do not contribute to a safe and enjoyable journey.

Cyclists compete in dirty dozen race on High Street.

44 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


RELATIONSHIP TO QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS Improving mobility in Etna can provide benefits related to the other five quality of life areas as well.

WATER

AIR

Streetscape improvements and parks not only contribute to Etna’s mobility goals, but can integrate green stormwater infrastructure as well.

Parks, trees, and vegetation not only contribute to improved air quality, but can also contribute to safer streets.

ENERGY

FOOD

Taking alternative transportation instead of driving reduces energy use, minimizes air pollution, and minimizes the production of greenhouse gas emissions.

One of the most important factors contributing to food insecurity is a lack of mobility options to grocery stores. Improving mobility options can better connect residents with fresh and affordable food options.

EQUITY Equitable communities contain access to reliable and safe transportation options. This helps residents access fresh food, educational opportunities, jobs, healthcare, and more.

MOBILITY BENEFITS Taking action related to mobility can benefit both the environment and the economy, and it can contribute to a more equitable community.

$ ENVIRONMENT When we walk, bike, or take public transit instead of drive, it improves the air quality in Etna.

ECONOMY Walking, biking, or taking public transportation can be a cheaper morning commute compared to driving.

EQUITY Improved mobility options help connect us to jobs, amenities, and essential services across the region,.

ACTION PLAN

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MOBILITY BIG IDEAS Etna contains many desirable destinations, however, pedestrian and bicycle connections between these destinations can be improved. Enhancing corridors and intersections will make Etna a safer place to travel to, from, or through, and will also encourage more individuals to walk, bike, or take public transportation. Establishing a network of specific routes for pedestrians and bicyclists will help the Etna community to safely and enjoyably visit Etna’s parks and other destinations. The big ideas listed for mobility below inspired the recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. BIG IDEA #1

Strengthen connections between places in Etna with safe and enjoyable routes for bicyclists and pedestrians. Safe, enjoyable, and multi-modal routes to and through Etna will encourage more residents and visitors to explore Etna. Connections can be strengthened with safety improvements, crosswalks, curb bump-outs, bike lanes, sidewalks, and vegetation.

1

(see page 128 for more information)

2

Little Pine Creek Connector Trail

3

Grant Ave. and Crescent St. Intersection Improvements

There are several intersections in Etna that are confusing for motorists to navigate, especially for those who are not frequent visitors to the community. Clarifying intersections will slow down vehicles exiting the highway, provide clear wayfinding for motorists, and improve safety for pedestrians and bicyclists. BIG IDEA #3

Make it easy to get from one neighborhood in Etna to another, and to the Butler Street commercial district. Etna is a relatively small community, however, the topography, highway, and unique shape of the community make it difficult to travel from one corner of Etna to the other by foot or by bicycle. Creating clear, safe, and enjoyable connections from each neighborhood to the Butler Street commercial district will encourage more individuals to walk or bike there, and will make the journey safer and more enjoyable.

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 144)

(see page 128 for more information)

4

Dougherty Nature Trail

5

Dougherty Nature Trail Extension

6

Pine Street Path to Butler Street

7

Locust Street Enhancements

8

Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail to Dougherty Nature Trail Extension

BIG IDEA #2

Improve safety with clear intersections for motorists.

Mt. Royal Blvd. Gateway Improvements

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

9

Bridge Street Intersection Improvement

(see page 155 for more information)

10

Poplar Street Trail Loop

11

Path to Riverfront Park

12

Three Rivers Heritage Trail Extension

13

Path to Ballfield

14

Shaler Crest Park and Overlook Trail

15

Etna Riverfront Park

16

Kayak Launch

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(project by Etna Borough, currently under construction, see page 144)

(see page 144 for more information)

Complete Streets Improvements (primary route for cars, pedestrians, and bicycles)

Route for Pedestrians and Bicycles Trail for Pedestrians

46 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


1

2 3

5 4 6

7

8

9

14 11

13 1

10

16 12 15

12 ACTION PLAN

| 47


DEFINING SUCCESS: MOBILITY GOALS Etna’s Mobility Story includes many existing assets as well as threats. To achieve Etna’s Mobility Vision the community must implement actions that build on their strengths to mitigate their common challenges.

1

Increase the number and quality of mobility options

2

Increase the use of alternative transportation to connect to the region

3

Improve safety and connectivity

4

Celebrate connectivity and mobility options

48 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Improving safety, reliability, and the overall experience of walking, biking, and taking public transportation will open up alternative modes as viable options for those who do not own a car or prefer alternative means of transportation. Increasing mobility options will improve connectivity to the region (including job opportunities) and will reduce Etna’s environmental footprint.

Whereas Etna is easy to access via car, using public transportation, biking, or walking to nearby communities and the greater region can be unsafe and inconvenient. Improving regional access will improve quality of life for residents and encourage more people to visit Etna. It will also make Etna more desirable by enabling residents to have car-free households.

Etna is a dense, walkable community. However, connectivity between different parts of the community and the business district is lacking. Enhancing connections with improved pedestrian infrastructure, bicycle infrastructure, and public transportation amenities will make the community safer and easier to traverse, with or without a car.

People arrive in Etna through four gateways: Exit 4, the 62nd Street Bridge, Route 8, and Mt. Royal Boulevard. Gateway improvements are an opportunity to improve safety and demonstrate community identity. Celebrating mobility options through events and activities can encourage the use of alternative transportation and teach residents how to move about safely.


CATALYTIC PROJECTS The big ideas described in the previous spread inspired recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. Many of those places address multiple quality of life issue areas and can be catalytic for the community.

PINE CREEK CONNECTOR TRAIL The Pine Creek Connector Trail will provide a safe and enjoyable path from Kiwanis Park in Shaler Township, through Etna’s business district, down to the Etna Riverfront Park.

ETNA RIVERFRONT PARK The Etna Riverfront Park will reconnect the community to the river as well as the region. It will be a key link in the Three Rivers Heritage Trail, which will provide a continuous path from Etna to Downtown Pittsburgh and beyond.1 1

Image: Environmental Planning & Design, 2018.

ACTION PLAN

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DEFINING SUCCESS: MOBILITY INDICATORS Identifying and tracking indicators will help Etna set goals and measure success towards achieving those goals. The following information describes where Etna is today (baseline) and what Etna aims to achieve by the year 2030 (2030 target).

By the year 2030 we will... Increase the percentage of residents who get to work by means other than driving1

Improve Etna’s Walk Score2

14.7%

20.7%

35%

higher rate of alternative transportation use

18

57

Increase number of mobility projects and events

Increase feet of streets with bike lanes or sharrows

6,000 ft.

75

0 ft.

6,000 ft.

7

60

0 ft.

(2030)

(2019)

projects and events over the next 10 years

12,500 ft.

(2030)

(2019)

of Complete Streets

53

(2030)

(2019)

point increase in Walk Score

Increase feet of Complete Streets (including sidewalk improvements, crosswalks, bike lanes, etc.)3

(2015)

(2030)

(2019)

12,500 ft.

of bike friendly streets

(2030)

baseline 2030 target

50 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Indicator % of residents who get to work using means other than driving (bus, carpool, walk, work from home, and bike.) Baseline 20.7% of Etna residents Baseline Year 2015 Source U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS) Population Summary 2011-15, Etna Borough, “Workers Age 16+ Years by Means of Transportation to Work”. Includes transportation by bus, carpool, walk, work from home, and bike. 2030 Target 35% of residents Indicator Walk Score Baseline 57 Baseline Year 2019 Source WalkScore, 2019, accessed in August 2019. Score is for Etna Community Library (341 Butler St.). 2030 Target 75 Indicator ft. of Complete Streets Baseline 0 ft. Baseline Year 2019 Source Not applicable. 2030 Target 6,000 ft. (includes Complete Streets on Grant Ave., Crescent St., and Butler St.) Indicator # of projects or events (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 7 projects and events Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source Includes walking trails, Etna Art Tour (2018 and 2019), EEDC Block Party, National Night Out, and North Hills Communities Bike/Ped Summit (2018 and 2019). 2030 Target 60 projects and events Indicator ft. of streets in Etna with bike lanes or sharrows Baseline 0 feet Baseline Year 2019 Source BikePGH’s Pittsburgh Bike Map Geographic Data, 2019. Updated June 2019. Accessed through WPRDC. 2030 Target 12,500 ft. (includes bike lanes or sharrows on Grant Ave., Crescent St., Butler St., Dewey St., Bridge St., and Washington St.)

1 2 3

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Connectivity: Mobility indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Active Living indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Safety indicator.

ACTION PLAN

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MOBILITY ACTION PLAN Actions in bold will be prioritized in years 1 through 3.

1

Increase the number and quality of mobility options

2

Increase the use of alternative transportation to connect to the region4

a. Target highly used bus stops for improvements, including benches, vegetation, lighting, and art. b. Issue a mobility survey with a focus on vulnerable populations to identify the biggest needs and barriers related to mobility. c.

Establish a weekly shuttle to grocery stores.

a. Establish a transportation baseline by issuing a survey asking where residents live, where they work, and how they get there. b. Advocate for PAAC routes that connect to regional job centers (like Oakland, informed by a transportation baseline survey, see below). c.

Establish the Pine Creek Connector Trail to connect the 62nd Street Bridge and the Etna Riverfront Park to Shaler (project by Etna Borough, currently under construction).5

d. Implement Riverfront Park Phase II, connecting Etna to the water and the region.5 e. Extend the Three Rivers Heritage Trail to the Etna Riverfront Park and to Sharpsburg.6 f.

Establish a Healthy Ride bike share station in Etna.

g. Offer free bikes, bike education, and/or bike repair at community events.

3

Improve safety and connectivity1,2,3

a. Support all modes of transportation through Complete Streets strategies, including bike lanes, crosswalks, traffic calming, intersection improvements, etc. b. Identify areas with more frequent crashes and target them with safety improvements. c.

Support last mile connections with a local shuttle, bike rentals, walking trails, or other connections.

d. Perform an innovative street analysis (on Bridge Street and Washington Street) to improve safety and weight limits. e. Engage youth and individuals with mobility limitations to perform a sidewalk audit/neighborhood walkability audit to identify areas for improvements (such as ADA ramps or new paving).

4

Celebrate connectivity and mobility options

a. Work with the local high school to create and mark urban walking trails throughout the community. b. Host an Open Streets Event every summer. c.

Improve all gateways into Etna with identity features and safety improvements.

d. Create art installations or murals on highway underpasses. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Active Living objective. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Safety objective. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Connectivity: Street Network objective. 4 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Connectivity: Mobility objective. 5 These projects are currently being led by Etna Borough. 6 This is an initiative of Friends of the Riverfront. 1

2

52 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


years 1 - 3

years 4 - 5

years 6+

period of focused time and attention on action establishment period ongoing effort, requires less time to maintain

ACTION PLAN

| 53


YEARS 1 - 3

GETTING STARTED The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given their projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame is unattainable. The community has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed below with accompanying detail describing how the community plans to accomplish them. The remaining actions will be evaluated in two years, at which time a new implementation plan will be created.

MOBILITY GOAL 1A

Target highly used bus stops for improvements, including benches, vegetation, lighting, and art. Schedule Year 2: Audit existing bus stops and communicate with the Port Authority of Allegheny County (PAAC) to determine the most frequently used bus stops and the existing conditions of all bus stops in Etna. Select highly used bus stops in poor condition for improvements. Years 3+: Establish site-specific improvements and implement them. Implementation Scale Community: This project will affect those who pass by or use the bus stops. Type Project Responsible Party ECO in coordination with PAAC and Etna Borough (especially the Public Works Department). Funding To be determined. MOBILITY GOAL 2A

Establish a transportation baseline by issuing a survey asking where residents live, where they work, and how they get there. Schedule Year 2: Meet with the Green Building Alliance to learn about and coordinate with their “Make My Trip Count� transportation baseline survey. Develop survey content. Meet with local partners to establish a promotional campaign. Year 3: Issue the survey to every Etna resident. Summarize and analyze the results. Implementation Scale Community: The survey will only be issued to Etna residents. Type Program Responsible Party ECO in collaboration with GBA and Etna Borough Funding To be determined

54 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Signs describe a network of safe, enjoyable, and energizing pedestrian routes in Etna (May 2019).

Residents participated in a Pine Creek Connector Trail planning meeting (July 2019).

MOBILITY GOAL 3A

Support all modes of transportation through Complete Streets strategies, including bike lanes, crosswalks, traffic calming, intersection improvements, etc. Schedule Year 2: Meet with Etna Borough and PennDOT to determine which Complete Streets improvements are feasible in the locations identified in this Plan, as well as other locations throughout the community. Years 3+: Determine next steps for implementation. Implementation Scale Community and Greater Area: The community and greater area will benefit from Complete Streets improvements. Type Project Responsible Party Etna Borough and PennDOT in collaboration with ECO Funding To be determined MOBILITY GOAL 4A

Work with the local high school to create and mark urban walking trails throughout the community. Schedule Year 2: Meet with high school teachers and students to determine the project scope and implementation timeline. Work with students to establish routes, produce signage, install markings, and promote the urban walking trails. Implementation Scale Community: The urban walking trails are available for anyone inside the community or visiting Etna to use. Type Project Responsible Party ECO in collaboration with local schools Funding To be determined

ACTION PLAN

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AIR Vegetated hillside of Sharps Hill from First Congregational Church Cemetery. 56 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna is a healthy community with empowered advocates that take a balanced approach to air quality.

ACTION PLAN

| 57


ETNA’S AIR STORY THE PITTSBURGH REGION’S AIR QUALITY HAS MADE GREAT STRIDES, BUT STILL HAS MUCH WORK TO DO. While the air quality in the greater Pittsburgh region has improved significantly over the past 50 years, Pittsburgh still ranks as the 8th most polluted city in the nation for fine particulate matter (PM2.5). ETNA CANNOT CONTROL REGIONAL POINT SOURCES, BUT DOES HAVE GREATER CONTROL OVER LOCAL POINT AND MOBILE SOURCES OF POLLUTION. The air quality in Etna is most significantly impacted by regional point sources, which is intensified by environmental conditions such as the wind direction and Etna’s location in a river valley. Local point sources and mobile sources have the greatest impact on the air quality in the immediate vicinity.

ETNA BOROUGH HAS TAKEN SIGNIFICANT ACTIONS RELATED TO IMPROVING AIR QUALITY. Air quality monitoring, community leadership meetings, and tree plantings all contribute to improving air quality in Etna. ETNA RESIDENTS AND AIR QUALITY CHAMPIONS ARE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE. July 2018 was “Air Quality Month” in Etna. Residents came together to discuss air quality as well as to develop Etna’s Air Quality Vision Statement. To learn more about Etna’s Air Story, please read the Etna EcoDistrict Air Education Booklet, found HERE.

AIR WITHIN BUILDINGS, LIKE HOMES, CAN BE MORE SERIOUSLY POLLUTED THAN OUTDOOR AIR. Etna residents have direct control over the air quality within their homes. Indoor air can be impacted by the building envelope, resident behavior, consumer choices, and presence of hazardous legacy materials. AIR POLLUTION CAN HAVE SERIOUS HEALTH, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND ECONOMIC IMPACTS. Air pollution is the 10th leading risk factor for death in the U.S. Air pollution also has significant economic and environmental impacts. Etna Playground with sycamore trees.

58 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


RELATIONSHIP TO QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS Improving air in Etna can provide benefits related to the other five quality of life areas as well.

WATER

MOBILITY

Filtering water is a very energy intensive process. The cleaner we keep our waterways, the less energy it will take to filter it, which will minimize the contribution to air pollution.

Taking alternative transportation instead of driving reduces energy use and contribution to air pollution.

ENERGY

FOOD

Consuming energy from nonrenewable resources produces air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

On average, food purchased at conventional grocery stores travels more than 1,500 miles to reach the shelf. The farther our food travels, the more it contributes to air pollution.

EQUITY Communities adjacent to pollution sources have a higher likelihood of health problems caused or exacerbated by air pollution. These communities are often low income and/or communities of color.

AIR BENEFITS Taking action related to air can benefit both the environment and the economy, and it can contribute to a more equitable community.

$ ENVIRONMENT Clean air quality supports the health of Etna’s trees, wildlife, and residents in our natural and built ecosystems.

ECONOMY Cleaner air allows Etna residents to live healthier lives with fewer airrelated healthcare costs.

EQUITY Clean air quality supports the health of Etna residents by lessening the risk of lung cancer, asthma, and other potentially fatal health issues.

ACTION PLAN

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AIR BIG IDEAS Etna contains well-loved and well-used parks. However, there are several opportunities to increase green space and improve air quality in the community. Establishing a network of new and existing green spaces that compose a sequence of places to play or seek respite, to absorb stormwater, and to improve local air quality will contribute to a healthier and greener Etna. The big ideas for air listed below inspired the recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. BIG IDEA #1

1

Pine Creek Park

2

Overlook Energy Park

3

EcoPark

4

Fugh Hall Playground

5

Dougherty Nature Trail & Ballfields

Improve indoor air quality in homes, businesses, and other indoor spaces.

6

Gateway Grove & Trail Loop

Etna residents are unable to control regional outdoor air quality, but they do have control over indoor air quality within their homes and other indoor spaces. Building retrofits, equipment upgrades, air quality-conscious behavior, and consumer spending choices all impact indoor air quality, and when implemented properly, can create healthier indoor environments.

7

Pool & Playground

8

Tippins Splash Park

9

Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park

Restore Etna’s tree canopy and enhance green spaces. Etna contains many green spaces and is currently planting several trees as part of an ACHD Pollution Prevention grant. Planting additional trees, converting underutilized sites into green spaces, and enhancing existing green spaces will contribute to stormwater management, improve air quality, and provide spaces that the community can enjoy. BIG IDEA #2

(see page 132 for more information)

(see page 129 for more information)

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 130)

(see page 131 for more information)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 136 for more information)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 145 for more information)

(see page 147 for more information)

BIG IDEA #3

10

Poplar Greenway

Measure local air quality to create an informed and activated air quality culture.

11

Etna Riverfront Park

12

Hafner Ballfield

13

Exit 4 Rain Garden

14

Shaler Crest Park

15

Shaler Overlook

16

Railroad Arbor

As the old saying goes, you can’t manage what you don’t measure. Integrating air quality monitors throughout the community in a visible way that contributes to placemaking will raise awareness about air quality, educate the public, and inspire Etna residents to take action.

(see page 145 for more information)

(project by Etna Borough, currently under construction, see page 144)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

Network of Clean Air Parks

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1 2 3

4 6 5 7

8

9

14

16 15

10 12

13

11

ACTION PLAN

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DEFINING SUCCESS: AIR GOALS Etna’s Air Story includes many existing assets as well as threats. To achieve Etna’s Air Vision the community must implement actions that build on their strengths to mitigate their common challenges.

1

Improve indoor air quality

2

Minimize sources of outdoor air pollution

3

Mitigate harmful outdoor air contaminants

4

Create an informed and activated air quality culture

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

People spend approximately 90% of their time indoors, however, the air quality within homes and other buildings is often times more seriously polluted than outdoor air. Luckily, out of the many sources of air pollution we come into contact with, community members have the most control over air pollution within their own homes.

The air quality in the Pittsburgh region consistently ranks in the worst 10% in the nation, especially for PM2.5, groundlevel ozone, and sulfur dioxide. While Etna residents do not have much control over regional point sources of pollution, they can minimize air pollution locally by minimizing local point and mobile sources of pollution.

While there is little that Etna residents can do to affect regional outdoor air quality, Etna residents can implement initiatives within the community that mitigate pollution locally. Planting trees, for example, absorbs air pollutants and filters particulates out of the air, in addition to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

In order to create regional change, the Etna community must be informed about our region’s air quality issues and know how to advocate for change and activate around local initiatives. Measuring, monitoring, and communicating the Pittsburgh region’s air quality and explaining this to Etna residents will build an informed community of advocates.


CATALYTIC PROJECTS The big ideas described in the previous spread inspired recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. Many of those places address multiple quality of life issue areas and can be catalytic for the community.

ECOPARK EcoPark will be an outdoor community space for all to enjoy. It will include representation of each Quality of Life Issue in its design. The design will be informed by input gathered from the Etna community in 2020.

RAILROAD ARBOR The Railroad Arbor will contain trees and green space between the railroad tracks and Railroad Street to mitigate air pollution, reduce noise, and beautify the community.

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DEFINING SUCCESS: AIR INDICATORS Identifying and tracking indicators will help Etna set goals and measure success towards achieving those goals. The following information describes where Etna is today (baseline) and what Etna aims to achieve by the year 2030 (2030 target).

By the year 2030 we will... Decrease the number of days per year that Etna’s local air quality monitor has an air quality index (AQI) above 501

Increase number of green spaces and public spaces2,3

Increase number of trees planted4

Increase number of participants in air quality education (both indoor and outdoor air quality)

79

229 days 150 days (2030)

additional “good” air quality days per year

7 additional green spaces and public spaces

430

3 spaces

70 trees

(2019)

922

10 spaces

(2030)

500 trees

(2030)

(2019)

additional trees planted

additional participants in air quality education

(2018)

78 participants

(2019)

1,000 participants

baseline 2030 target

64 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

(2030)


Indicator # of days per year that Etna’s local air quality monitor has an air quality index (AQI) above 50 Baseline 229 days (for the greater Pittsburgh area, Etna-specific data is unavailable) Baseline Year 2018 Source EPA Air Quality Index Report for Pittsburgh, PA, 2018. This includes all of the days that were not considered “good days”, as indicated by an AQI above 50. 2030 Target 150 days Indicator # of green spaces and public spaces Baseline 3 Baseline Year 2019 Source Includes Dougherty Nature trail and ballfields, Hafner Ballfield, and Etna playground and pool. 2030 Target 10 spaces Indicator # of trees planted (cumulative since 2019) Baseline 70 trees Baseline Year Cumulative since 2019 Source Etna Borough 2030 Target 500 trees (Etna Borough received an ACHD Pollution Prevention grant to plant 100 trees in 2019-20) Indicator Increase number of participants in air quality education (both indoor and outdoor air quality cumulative since 2018) Baseline 78 participants Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source Includes the air quality education meeting (2018 - 40 people), air quality champions meeting (2018 - 17 people), air quality walking trail project (2019 - 13 people), air quality idea round-up participants (2019 - 4 people), and ROCIS participation (2019 - 4 people). 2030 Target 1,000 participants

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Health indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Public Spaces indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Living Infrastructure: Connection with Nature indicator. 4 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resource Regeneration: Air & Climate indicator. 1

2

3

ACTION PLAN

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AIR ACTION PLAN

Actions in bold will be prioritized in years 1 through 3.

1

Improve indoor air quality

a. Strengthen ordinances around lead, mold, and healthy indoor environments. b. Establish an indoor air quality education program to inform residents how to improve indoor air quality at home, such as using green and healthy consumer cleaning products. c.

Offer free residential radon testing.

d. Enforce building code issues for absentee landlords to ensure optimal indoor air quality for renters. e. Update the municipal building code and zoning code to protect sensitive populations from sources of air pollution.

2

Minimize sources of outdoor air pollution1

a. Establish air quality monitors throughout Etna to better understand sources of air pollution. b. Work with heavy polluters in Etna to reduce their contribution to air pollution. c.

Enforce a no idling policy (especially for school busses).

d. Establish Borough construction standards to limit air pollution and dust. e. Work with residents in Etna to reduce their personal contribution to air pollution.

3

Mitigate harmful outdoor air contaminants

4

Create an informed and activated air quality culture

a. Establish a clean air park to showcase air quality technology. b. Use vegetation to screen, filter, and beautify major roadways, such as Route 8, Route 28, and the railroads. c.

Create a network of green spaces throughout the community to sequester pollution.

d. Incentivize the installation of green roofs and walls on private property.

a. Create a community of air quality advocates through education and engagement. b. Engage residents in air quality monitoring by participating in ROCIS (an existing indoor air program) or other programs. c.

Create an Etna air quality dashboard that educates residents by visualizing data from the air quality monitors.

d. Collaborate with air quality partners (GASP, CMU, The Breathe Project, etc.) to bring air quality events and education to the community. e. Perform an air quality perception survey to better understand misperceptions related to air quality. f.

Work with artists to create air quality related installations and demonstrations.

1

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resource Regeneration: Air & Climate objective.


years 1 - 3

years 4 - 5

years 6+

period of focused time and attention on action establishment period ongoing effort, requires less time to maintain

ACTION PLAN

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YEARS 1 - 3

GETTING STARTED The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given their projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame is unattainable. The community has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed below with accompanying detail describing how the community plans to accomplish them. The remaining actions will be evaluated in two years, at which time a new implementation plan will be created.

AIR GOAL 1A

Strengthen ordinances around lead, mold, and healthy indoor environments. Schedule Year 2: Review and revise ordinances with assistance from air quality partners. Year 3+: Enact new ordinances, educate the community about them, and enforce them. Implementation Scale Community: These ordinances would apply to all properties in the Borough. Type Policy (followed by enforcement) Responsible Party Etna Borough with assistance from ECO and air quality partners Funding To be determined. Funding may only be needed for ECO staff time and air quality partners’ staff time. AIR GOAL 2A

Establish air quality monitors throughout Etna to better understand sources of air pollution. Schedule Year 1 - 2: Install an air quality monitor at the EcoPark. Years 3+: Continue installing monitors throughout the community. Implementation Scale Site: The first monitor will be placed on a single site. Community: Additional monitors will be added throughout the community. Greater Area: Air quality does not adhere to municipal boundaries. Even though the air monitor(s) are in specific locations, the air quality measured is an indicator for air quality in the greater area. Type Project (multiple) Responsible Party Etna Borough and ECO Funding To be determined

68 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Shaler High School students provided air quality facts to post on the fence at the Etna playground (May 2019).

Etna residents participated in a ROCIS cohort to measure indoor air quality (July 2019).

AIR GOAL 3A

Establish a clean air park to showcase air quality technology. Schedule Years 1-3: Install air quality technology at the EcoPark. Implementation Scale Site: The park will be located on a single site. Type Project Responsible Party Etna Borough, ECO, and the Triboro Ecodistrict Funding This project is funded through the Henry L. Hillman foundation grant AIR GOAL 4A

Create a community of air quality advocates through education and engagement. Schedule Year 2: Meet with air quality partners to plan air quality education events and campaign. Year 3: Implement education events and campaign. Implementation Scale Community and Greater Area: An informed community of advocates can make change that impacts air quality beyond Etna’s borders. Type Program (ongoing) Responsible Party ECO with assistance from Air Quality Champions and air quality partners Funding To be determined.

ACTION PLAN

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ENERGY 70 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna is an innovative community that takes collective action to provide smart energy solutions.

Solar canopy at the Garden of Etna. ACTION PLAN

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ETNA’S ENERGY STORY THE PITTSBURGH REGION HAS A HISTORY OF ENERGY INNOVATION. Western Pennsylvania is home to many firsts and impressive feats related to coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy. The region is also growing as a leader in renewable and innovative energy sources. ETNA’S ENERGY COMES FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES, BUT IS MOSTLY POWERED BY COAL. 77.16% of the energy consumed in Pennsylvania comes from nonrenewable sources. However, renewable energy has been increasing every year, and currently accounts for 22.84% of the energy consumed in PA.

ETNA RESIDENTS AND ENERGY CHAMPIONS ARE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE. August 2018 was “Energy Month” in Etna. Residents came together to discuss energy issues and opportunities as well as to develop Etna’s Energy Vision Statement. To learn more about Etna’s Energy Story, please read the Etna EcoDistrict Energy Education Booklet, found HERE.

HOMES, BUSINESSES, AND INDUSTRY ALL USE DIFFERENT QUANTITIES OF ENERGY. Building size, use, condition, age, design, and other factors all impact how much energy a building consumes. OUR ENERGY CHOICES IMPACT THE ENVIRONMENT, HUMAN HEALTH, AND THE ECONOMY. By choosing renewable energy options to power our needs we can reduce our environmental footprint and better protect our water, air, and personal health. Energy can be an economic driver but it can also be a financial burden for some families. A community’s energy source can impact it’s ability to be resilient. ETNA BOROUGH HAS TAKEN SIGNIFICANT ACTIONS RELATED TO ENERGY. A solar canopy at the Garden of Etna, a solar co-op, a solar ordinance, and converted streetlights all contribute to improving quality of life in Etna.

72 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Solar installation on private residence.


RELATIONSHIP TO QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS Improving energy in Etna can provide benefits related to the other five quality of life areas as well.

WATER

MOBILITY

AIR

Filtering water is a very energy intensive process. Reducing our use of clean water minimizes the energy required to filter water for potable uses.

Taking alternative transportation instead of driving reduces energy consumption, air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Consuming energy produced by non-renewable resources produces air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

FOOD On average, food purchased at conventional grocery stores travels more than 1,500 miles to reach the shelf. The farther our food travels, the more energy is consumed to transport it.

EQUITY Homes that consume less energy have lower annual household energy costs. Clean energy jobs provide an opportunity for the community to build wealth.

ENERGY BENEFITS Taking action related to energy can benefit both the environment and the economy, and it can contribute to a more equitable community.

$ ENVIRONMENT Consuming less energy from nonrenewable resources improves Etna’s air quality and lessens Etna’s environmental footprint.

ECONOMY Consuming less energy from nonrenewable resources and producing renewable energy can save Etna residents money on their utility bills.

EQUITY Consuming less energy from nonrenewable resources improves air quality and the environment in Etna, which also supports health.

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ENERGY BIG IDEAS Access to affordable and reliable energy sources is essential for a resilient, sustainable, and equitable Etna. Reducing the community’s energy footprint requires the implementation of successful programs and initiatives, as well as place-based energy projects. Advancing innovative energy solutions will improve quality of life and create places that are enjoyable and demonstrate the community’s values. The big ideas listed for energy below inspired the recommendations for new and improved places in Etna.

1

All Saints Resilience Hub

2

EcoPark

3

Artful Energy & Water Demonstrations

4

Wind Turbines

5

Solar at the Welcome to Etna Sign

BIG IDEA #2

6

Overlook Energy Park

Integrate innovative energy technology into Etna’s places.

7

Route 8 Highway Wind Turbines

8

Borough Building Improvements

9

Library & Resilience Hub

BIG IDEA #1

Establish resilience hubs in different parts of Etna. Resilience hubs are places where the community can go during times of emergency. Residents may visit a resilience hub to access renewable energy when the energy grid is down, access clean water when there is a water main break, breathe clean air during air quality actions days, or access food when they are food-insecure. Establishing resilience hubs in the northern and southern portions of Etna will support equitable access and ensure that the community is resilient during times of need.

Demonstrating innovative energy technology in the community will not only make Etna more resilient, but will also contribute to the community’s identity. Highly-visible innovative energy technology can expand adoption of renewable energy, provide education about renewable energy, and can contribute to unique and enjoyable places. BIG IDEA #3

Create networks of renewable energy production. Creating networks of renewable energy production (such as with micro-grids) will allow buildings to share energy and use energy more efficiently. This will make Etna more resilient, less vulnerable when the grid is down, and will minimize the community’s environmental impact. These networks should be orchestrated by Etna’s resilience hubs.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

(see page 155 for more information)

(in process by Etna Borough, see page 130)

(see page 129 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

(existing, see page 129 for more information)

(see page 129 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

(see page 158 for more information)

10

Garden of Etna Solar Canopy

11

Net Zero Energy Public Works Building

(existing, see page 162 for more information)

(see page 163 for more information)

12

Etna Solar Grab-n-Go (see page 162 for more information)

Energy places


4 6 1 2 3 5 7

8

10

9 3

12 4

11

ACTION PLAN

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DEFINING SUCCESS: ENERGY GOALS Etna’s Energy Story includes many existing assets as well as threats. To achieve Etna’s Energy Vision the community must implement actions that build on their strengths to mitigate their common challenges.

1

Reduce energy consumption and economic burden

2

Maximize renewable energy production

3

Leverage energy initiatives to build community wealth

4

Improve community resilience

76 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

On average, Etna residents spend 5.2% of their annual household income on energy, which is more than the average U.S. household (3.5% of annual household income). Energy costs can be particularly burdensome for renters who pay their own utility bills and live in buildings that are not energy efficient. Reducing energy consumption will reduce household energy costs.

Non-renewable energy sources contribute to air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which can affect our health. Maximizing renewable energy sources protects against future utility price increases, does not contribute to air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, and can make the community more resilient during blackouts of the regional electrical grid.

Pennsylvania ranks 11th in clean energy jobs among all 50 states (according to the Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance Clean Jobs Report, 2018). Training residents to enter this field will allow the community to build wealth from renewable energy initiatives. Installing renewable energy technology can also save the community money over the long-term. Involving youth in solar programs prepares them for future positions in clean energy jobs.

A community’s decision about where their energy comes from may affect that community’s ability to react and bounce back during a natural disaster where an energy source may be at risk. The use of renewable energy sources that operate independently from the grid will make the community more resilient during adverse events, will protect against rising utility costs, and will reduce the community’s contribution to climate change.


CATALYTIC PROJECTS The big ideas described in the previous spread inspired recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. Many of those places address multiple quality of life issue areas and can be catalytic for the community.

OVERLOOK ENERGY PARK The Overlook Energy Park will provide an amazing view of Etna, including a view of future wind turbines, Solar at the Welcome Sign (existing), and a future artful energy and water demonstration project.

ETNA SOLAR GRAB-N-GO The Etna Solar Grab-n-Go will provide access to fresh and healthy food. It will be powered by solar panels and wind turbines that are located between the property and Route 28. This building will be a visible demonstration of the community’s values.

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DEFINING SUCCESS: ENERGY INDICATORS Identifying and tracking indicators will help Etna set goals and measure success towards achieving those goals. The following information describes where Etna is today (baseline) and what Etna aims to achieve by the year 2030 (2030 target).

By the year 2030 we will... Reduce community-wide energy consumption

Increase annual megawatthours per year of renewable energy produced1

Increase number of innovative energy projects

Increase number of people who earn income by working on EcoDistrict projects and programs2

Increase number of resilience hubs

50%

TBD

reduction in energy consumption

1,320 mWh

TBD

2.6 mWh

(2019)

increase in annual renewable energy production

5 innovative energy projects over 10 years

47 additional people working to implement projects and programs

2 resilience hubs in 10 years

(2003)

(2030)

1,230 mWh

1 project

3 people

o hubs

(2030)

(2019)

6 projects

(2030)

50 people

(2030)

(2019)

(2019)

2 hubs

(2030)

baseline 2030 target

78 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Indicator % reduction in community-wide energy consumption Baseline This will be determined as part of the Triboro Energy Baseline project, to be determined in Spring 2020 Baseline Year 2003 Source Etna’s energy baseline is being determined as part of the Triboro Energy Baseline project. To align with the 2030 Challenge, Etna aims to reduce energy consumption by 50% compared to a 2003 baseline. 2030 Target 50% decrease in energy consumption Indicator Megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced Baseline 2.6 mWh Baseline Year 2019 Source Includes the solar canopy at the Garden of Etna. According to Project Sunroof Data Explorer (last updated November 2018, a project of Google), if 10% of the flat roof buildings (primarily industrial and commercial buildings), and 10% of the south-facing non-flat roof buildings (primarily residential) in Etna installed solar arrays, this would result in approximately 1,320 mWh of annual renewable energy production. This is equates to about 1.5% of Etna’s 2019 building energy consumption. If 100% of the existing roof area in Etna contained solar panels, this would produce about 23% of Etna’s 2019 building energy consumption. 2030 Target 1,230 mWh Indicator # of innovative energy projects in Etna (cumulative since 2019) Baseline 1 project Baseline Year Cumulative since 2019 Source Includes the solar canopy at the Garden of Etna. 2030 Target 6 projects Indicator # of people who earn income by working on EcoDistrict-related projects and programs (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 3 people Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source Includes EIS employees who installed the Garden of Etna solar canopy. 2030 Target 50 people Indicator # of resilience hubs in Etna Baseline 0 resilience hubs Baseline Year 2019 Source Not applicable. 2030 Target 2 resilience hubs 1 2

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Climate Protection indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Prosperity: Innovation indicator.

ACTION PLAN

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ENERGY ACTION PLAN

Actions in bold will be prioritized in years 1 through 3.

1

Reduce energy consumption and economic burden

2

Maximize renewable energy production

a. Collect actual energy consumption data for Etna to establish a more accurate energy baseline. b. Partner with organizations such as Conservation Consultants Inc. (CCI) and Rebuilding Together to establish an energy efficiency program that provides assistance to homeowners and renters to receive free or reduced cost energy audits and retrofits. c.

Establish energy education programs for adults and youth.

a. Solarize municipal-owned & nonprofit-owned buildings, such as the Borough Building and the Community Library. b. Start a campaign encouraging the residential adoption of solar panels. c.

Incentivize large parking lot owners to install solar arrays with electric vehicle charging stations and electric vehicle car rentals.

d. Establish a renewable energy commitment program encouraging businesses and residents to install solar panels or purchase green energy. e. Investigate efficacy of wind turbines along the highways. f.

Perform a microgrid feasibility study to determine how to establish microgrids connected to solar farms and large-scale arrays in Etna.

g. Partner with restaurants to implement an anaerobic digestion program that converts food waste into energy. h. Harvest kinetic energy from waterways (hydro-power) and maximize it’s visibility in relation to Etna’s identity as a rivertown.

3

a. Establish multi-municipal teen solar fellowship. b. Train youth to perform energy audits. c.

Train residents for energy conservation and renewable energy jobs.

Leverage energy initiatives to build community wealth1

4

Improve community resilience

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

a. Create pathway for Etna residents and businesses to participate in a solar co-op. b. Create resilience hubs in each neighborhood through off-grid solarization (see page 155 for more information).

1

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Prosperity: Innovation objective.


years 1 - 3

years 4 - 5

years 6+

period of focused time and attention on action establishment period ongoing effort, requires less time to maintain

ACTION PLAN

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YEARS 1 - 3

GETTING STARTED The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given their projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame is unattainable. The community has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed below with accompanying detail describing how the community plans to accomplish them. The remaining actions will be evaluated in two years, at which time a new implementation plan will be created.

ENERGY GOAL 1A

Collect actual energy consumption data for Etna to establish a more accurate energy baseline. Schedule Year 1: As part of the Triboro Energy Baseline project, Etna’s true energy baseline is currently being calculated. This will be completed in Spring 2020. Years 2+: Collect updated information to track progress every 3 years. This is an ongoing project. Implementation Scale Community: The energy baseline is being calculated for all properties within the Etna community. Type Project Responsible Party New Sun Rising and evolveEA Funding This project is funded through the Henry L. Hillman foundation grant ENERGY GOAL 2A

Solarize municipal-owned & nonprofit-owned buildings, such as the Borough Building and the Community Library. Schedule Year 2: Solarize Etna Community Library. Year 3+: Solarize one additional building every year. Implementation Scale Community and Greater Area: Solar panels will reduce operating costs for these community facilities. The increase in renewable energy will also result in a benefit for the greater community, including less air pollution and strain on the grid. Type Project Responsible Party Etna Borough and ECO Funding Potentially a PA State Solar Grant

82 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


A solar canopy powers an electric vehicle charging station at the Garden of Etna (September 2018).

Etna teens learn how to install solar panels as part of a Teen Solar Fellowship (April 2019).

ENERGY GOAL 3A

Establish multi-municipal teen solar fellowship. Schedule Year 1: Work with the Triboro Ecodistrict to plan, promote, and implement the third of three teen solar fellowships. Year 2+: Continue to host the program. Implementation Scale Community: Any teen from the Etna community is eligible to apply. Type Program Responsible Party Triboro Ecodistrict with assistance from ECO. Funding This project is funded through the Henry L. Hillman foundation grant ENERGY GOAL 4A

Create pathway for Etna residents and businesses to participate in a solar co-op. Schedule Year 2: Meet with existing solar co-ops to learn how they operate. Work with solar co-op partners to establish pathways for participation. Implementation Scale Community and Greater Area: Participation in a solar co-op will reduce costs for participating households. The increase in renewable energy will also result in a benefit for the greater community, including less air pollution and strain on the grid. Type Program Responsible Party ECO and solar co-op partners Funding To be determined

ACTION PLAN

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FOOD Basil plants grow in the Garden of Etna. 84 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna is a food-secure community with opportunities to grow, buy, share, and eat food locally.

ACTION PLAN

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ETNA’S FOOD STORY THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ETNA RESIDENTS AND FOOD HAS CHANGED OVER TIME. Where we purchase food, how much we eat, what we eat, and how much food we waste have all changed significantly over the past 100 years. FEEDING A COMMUNITY REQUIRES A DIVERSITY OF FOODS AND A LOT OF LAND AREA TO PRODUCE AND PROCESS THE FOOD. To grow enough food to feed all Etna residents for a year would require an area over seven times larger than Etna. WHILE MOST PEOPLE COME INTO CONTACT WITH FOOD ON A DAILY BASIS, THE FOOD SYSTEM IS LARGELY HIDDEN FROM VIEW. The food system is complex and consists of many stages, including production, processing, distribution, consumption, and disposal. The food consumed by Etna residents comes from a variety of sources, ranging from hyper-local (made in Etna) to international sources.

ETNA BOROUGH AND THE PEOPLE OF ETNA HAVE TAKEN SIGNIFICANT ACTIONS RELATED TO FOOD. The Bread of Life Food Pantry, the Garden of Etna, and the Etna Farmers Market all contribute to improving quality of life in Etna. ETNA RESIDENTS AND FOOD CHAMPIONS ARE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE. October 2018 was “Food Month” in Etna. Residents came together to discuss food issues and opportunities as well as to develop Etna’s Food Vision Statement. To learn more about Etna’s Food Story, please read the Etna EcoDistrict Food Education Booklet, found HERE.

OUR FOOD CHOICES AFFECT THE ENVIRONMENT, HUMAN HEALTH, THE ECONOMY, AND EQUITY. The food system creates jobs and local businesses are able to recirculate money in the community. The food system both affects and is affected by the environment. Food insecurity is an issue in the region, which is impacted by food costs, transportation, and other factors.

Late summer harvest from the Garden of Etna.

86 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


RELATIONSHIP TO QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS Improving food in Etna can provide benefits related to the other five quality of life areas as well.

WATER

MOBILITY

AIR

The food system is a very water intensive process, accounting for 70% of all water consumed worldwide. Sustainable food practices can reduce water consumption.

On average, food purchased at conventional grocery stores travels more than 1,500 miles to reach the shelf. Mobility options are an important aspect of food security.

All aspects of the food system, especially food processing practices and food distribution, consume energy, which results in air pollution.

ENERGY

EQUITY 491 people in Etna are foodinsecure. On average, residents spend about 15.6% of their annual household income on food. Equitable communities have access to fresh, healthy and affordable food options.

The food system is a very energy intensive process, accounting for 30% of all energy consumed worldwide. It takes 1 calorie of fossil fuel energy to produce only 0.1 calories of food energy.

FOOD BENEFITS Taking action related to food can benefit both the environment and the economy, and it can contribute to a more equitable community.

$ ENVIRONMENT Locally produced food, such as in the Garden of Etna, contributes to cleaner air, healthier soils, and less waste.

ECONOMY Growing food locally can save Etna residents money by reducing transportation costs. Food-related businesses in Etna contribute to the local economy.

EQUITY Healthy food contributes to healthy Etna residents. Local food distribution places help to improve food access and reduce the number of food-insecure households in Etna.

ACTION PLAN

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FOOD BIG IDEAS There are several food-related businesses in Etna that contribute to the local food system and Etna’s identity. However, the lack of a grocery store and limited access to fresh and healthy food makes it difficult for the Etna community to meet the entirety of their food needs within the borough. Establishing additional food places in Etna that connect people to fresh and healthy food, connect existing food places to one another as part of a network, and bring people together, will contribute to a more cohesive and food-secure community. The big ideas listed for food below inspired the recommendations for new and improved places in Etna.

1

Open Air Market

2

Creekside Restaurant and Brewery

3

Food Pantry

4

Commercial Redevelopment

5

Etna Community Cafe

Create networks that close loops and localize the food system.

6

Garden of Etna

Creating communication networks and resource flows between existing and new food places in Etna will reduce food waste, reduce environmental impact, improve efficiency, and help to close loops locally in Etna’s food system. These networks should be orchestrated by nonprofit food hubs, such as the Farmers Market, Garden of Etna, and Etna Community Cafe.

7

Commercial Redevelopment

8

Etna Solar Grab-n-Go

9

Sharpsburg Grocery

BIG IDEA #1

Establish new food hubs in Etna to meet the full range of food needs. The majority of Etna’s existing food places are located in the Butler Street commercial district. Establishing additional food places that act as hubs for food-related activity would allow a greater portion of the Etna community to more easily access food. This will include the year-round Farmers Market and quick stops such as the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go. BIG IDEA #2

BIG IDEA #3

Create food places that contribute to community identity and that bring the community together. Eating together is a way to build community, strengthen relationships, foster an inclusive and equitable culture, and activate commercial districts. Creating places for the community to come together over food, and food places that contribute to a lively sidewalk culture, can add to Etna’s identity and make the community more food-secure.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

10

(see page 132 for more information)

(see page 136 for more information)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(in progress by Rear End Gastropub, see page 156)

(in progress by ECO, see page 158)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 156 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

(see page 146 for more information)

Gateway Grove (see page 134 for more information)

New food places Existing food places


1

10 2

3

4

5

6 7

9

8

ACTION PLAN

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DEFINING SUCCESS: FOOD GOALS Etna’s Food Story includes many existing assets as well as threats. To achieve Etna’s Food Vision the community must implement actions that build on their strengths to mitigate their common challenges.

1

Improve food security

2

Localize the food system

3

Improve nutritional health and wellness

4

Build community through food

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Nearly 1 in 7 Allegheny County residents is food-insecure (equating to approximately 489 people in Etna). Improving mobility options, increasing food distribution locations, providing affordable and nutritious food, and providing food education can help to improve food security.

On average, food travels approximately 1,500 miles before reaching the shelf at your local grocery store. Producing, processing, and distributing food in and near Etna can reduce Etna’s environmental impact by minimizing food-related energy use, water use, and air pollution. Localizing the food system can also create jobs and increase the number of food-secure households. Etna is within 150 miles of many local farms and can maximize local food sources by strengthening partnerships.

Access to healthy food is directly linked to health. While Etna’s obesity rate is lower than the City of Pittsburgh and equivalent to Allegheny County, access to and education about healthy food is essential for the 28% of Etna residents who are considered to be obese (and the many more who are considered to be overweight).

A great way to build community and engage in conversations with your neighbors is by literally breaking bread together. Food is often associated with traditions, memories, and social gatherings. What better way is there to strengthen a community than over something we all enjoy - food?


CATALYTIC PROJECTS The big ideas described in the previous spread inspired recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. Many of those places address multiple quality of life issue areas and can be catalytic for the community.

OPEN AIR MARKET The Open Air Market will make fresh, healthy, and affordable food accessible to Etna residents year-round. It will include areas for education and gathering. A future adjacent park will manage stormwater and harness energy from Pine Creek.

CREEKSIDE RESTAURANT & GATEWAY GROVE The Creekside Restaurant will allow patrons to enjoy the view of Pine Creek with a beverage or snack. Adjacent to the Restaurant, a future Gateway Grove will provide a space to grow, pick, and learn about food.

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DEFINING SUCCESS: FOOD INDICATORS Identifying and tracking indicators will help Etna set goals and measure success towards achieving those goals. The following information describes where Etna is today (baseline) and what Etna aims to achieve by the year 2030 (2030 target).

By the year 2030 we will... Increase number of food production, processing, and distribution places1

Increase area of community garden space2

Increase number of unique participants in health and wellness related programs

Increase pounds of waste composted annually3

Increase number of meals shared together

Increase number of foodrelated businesses with outdoor seating

11

34 places (2019) 45 places

additional food system locations over the next 10 years

9,470

4,530 ft.2

additional square feet of community garden space

(2019)

14,000 ft.2

245

55 people

0 lbs

615 meals

(2030)

260,800 lbs

(2030)

(2019)

meals shared together every year for the next 10 years

6

300 people

(2019)

lbs of waste composted

538

(2030)

(2019)

additional participants in programs

260,800

(2030)

6,000 meals

2 businesses

(2019)

8 businesses

additional food businesses with outdoor seating

baseline 2030 target

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(2030)

(2030)


Indicator # of food production, processing, and distribution places in Etna Baseline 34 food system locations Baseline Year 2019 Source Food production places include an apiary (1), coffee shop (1), and the Garden of Etna (1). Food processing places include commercial kitchens (5), and restaurants and catering businesses (21). Food distribution locations include convenience stores (2), the food pantry (1), the farmers market (1), and frozen grab and go meals (1). The food system locations were counted using the Etna Borough website, EEDC business inventory, and Google Maps. 2030 Target 45 food systems locations Indicator area of community garden space Baseline 4,530 ft.2 Baseline Year 2019 Source Area was measured using Google Earth. 2030 Target 14,000 ft.2 of community garden space Indicator # of unique participants in health and wellness related programs (cumulative since 2019) Baseline 55 participants Baseline Year Cumulative since 2019 Source Includes Grow Eat Cook event (55 participants). 2030 Target 300 participants Indicator lbs of waste composted annually Baseline 0 lbs of waste Baseline Year 2019 Source In the greater Pittsburgh area, Shadyside Worms estimates that the average household produces approximately 650 lbs of compostable waste annually. If a quarter of Etna’s 1,605 households were to compost 650 lbs of waste annually, that would total 260,800 lbs of compost. 2030 Target 260,800 lbs Indicator # of meals shared together (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 615 meals Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source This includes meals shared at the EcoDistrict Education Series, Champions meetings, community meetings, and related events (615 people). 2030 Target 6,000 meals shared together Indicator # of food-related businesses with outdoor seating Baseline 2 businesses Baseline Year 2019 Source This includes Shiny Bean and Cop Out Pierogies. 2030 Target 8 businesses

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Prosperity: Economic Development indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Food Systems indicator. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resource Regeneration: Waste indicator. 1

2

ACTION PLAN

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FOOD ACTION PLAN

Actions in bold will be prioritized in years 1 through 3.

1

Improve food security

a. Develop a pay-what-you-can community cafe or food hub. b. Designate an Etna Food Coordinator tasked with connecting residents to food resources. c.

Establish partnerships with existing food organizations such as 412 Food Rescue, Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, and Grow Pittsburgh.

d. Market or develop pathways for fresh and healthy food delivery in Etna for free or a reduced cost (ex: Giant Eagle). e.

2

Localize the food system1,2

Accept WIC (federal assistance to purchase food) at the Etna Farmer’s Market.

a. Expand the Garden of Etna to create community gardens in each neighborhood. b. Establish a food co-op or small grocery store that sells food from local farms. c.

Establish relationships with regional farmers to promote Community Supported Agriculture in Etna.

d. Start a small-scale Etna farm for educational purposes, local food production, and to better connect people with their food. e. Establish a community composting program. f.

3

Improve nutritional health and wellness3

4

Partner with Pennsylvania Resources Council to make all Etna events zero waste.

a. Make kitchen kits available for loan to teach residents how to cook. b. Work with convenience stores to add fresh and healthy food to their offerings. c.

Host regular cooking classes specifically for youth as part of an afterschool program.

d. Incentivize a diversity of food-related businesses to move to Etna, including healthy and affordable options.

a. Host Etna EcoDistrict dinners as a space for community connections and conversations. b. Encourage food-related businesses to provide outdoor seating, garage doors, or another way to connect to the activity of the sidewalk/street.

Build community through food Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Food Systems objective. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Resource Regeneration: Waste objective. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Health & Wellbeing: Health objective. 1

2

94 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


years 1 - 3

years 4 - 5

years 6+

period of focused time and attention on action establishment period ongoing effort, requires less time to maintain

ACTION PLAN

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YEARS 1 - 3

GETTING STARTED The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given their projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame is unattainable. The community has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed below with accompanying detail describing how the community plans to accomplish them. The remaining actions will be evaluated in two years, at which time a new implementation plan will be created.

FOOD GOAL 1A

Develop a pay-what-you-can community cafe or food hub. Schedule Year 1: Meet with partners and develop a business plan and funding sources. Years 2+: Develop an implementation plan and launch. Implementation Scale Greater Community: Individuals from the community and greater area are welcome to visit the cafe or food hub. Type Project Responsible Party ECO Funding To be determined. FOOD GOAL 1B

Expand the Garden of Etna to create community gardens in each neighborhood. Schedule Year 2: Assess the feasibility of various sites for expansion throughout the community. Year 3: Acquire properties and develop an implementation plan, including funding and construction. Implementation Scale Community: The Gardens of Etna will be open and available to all members of the community who would like to participate. Type Project and Ongoing program Responsible Party Garden of Etna in partnership with ECO and the Borough of Etna Funding To be determined

96 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna Food Champions provide a food demonstration at the Garden of Etna (August 2019).

The community shares a meal together at the 2018 EcoDistrict Celebration (December 2018).

FOOD GOAL 3A

Make a kitchen kit available for loan to teach residents how to cook. Schedule Year 1: This is an initiative of the Food Idea Round-up group. Implementation Scale Community: Anyone in the community will be able to rent the kitchen kit. Type Program Responsible Party Etna EcoDistrict Food Champion (with assistance from ECO) Funding $2,000 was provided by the Idea Round-up (part of the Henry L. Hillman grant)

FOOD GOAL 4A

Host Etna EcoDistrict dinners as a space for community connections and conversations. Schedule Year 2: Plan locations, frequency, funding, etc. for Etna EcoDistrict dinners and implement them. Year 3+: Continue to implement dinners (this is an ongoing program). Implementation Scale Community: The entire Etna community is invited and encouraged to attend these dinners. Those who are not members of the Etna community are also welcome to participate. Type Program Responsible Party ECO Funding To be determined. Sponsorships may be acquired to pay for the food

ACTION PLAN

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EQUITY 98 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna is an inclusive community that embraces diversity and activates everyone to shape their own future.

The view of west Etna from the hillside. ACTION PLAN

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ETNA’S EQUITY STORY EQUITY MEANS HAVING FULL AND EQUAL ACCESS TO OPPORTUNITIES THAT ENABLE YOU TO REACH YOUR FULL POTENTIAL. Equity aims to promote fairness and justice, which means that different groups may require different resources or opportunities to succeed. EQUITABLE COMMUNITIES CONTAIN A DIVERSITY OF PEOPLE WHO CONTRIBUTE TO THEIR COMMUNITY’S IDENTITY, CHARACTER, AND VALUES. People are at the heart of every community, and equitable communities include residents that are diverse in age, income, sexual orientation, and ethnicity. Etna’s identity is a combination of the community’s values and future aspirations, which is what makes Etna special.

ETNA RESIDENTS AND EQUITY CHAMPIONS ARE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE. November 2018 was “Equity Month” in Etna. Residents came together to discuss what equity means for Etna as well as to develop Etna’s Equity Vision Statement. To learn more about Etna’s Equity Story, please read the Etna EcoDistrict Equity Education Booklet, found HERE.

EQUITABLE COMMUNITIES HAVE CHOICES, INCLUDING ACCESS TO EDUCATION, JOBS, FOOD, HEALTHCARE, AND HOUSING. Communities of choice provide the resources needed for residents to live an affordable and high quality of life. Residents should not have to choose between living in Etna and having a good job, or living in Etna and having resources for their children. ETNA BOROUGH HAS TAKEN SIGNIFICANT ACTIONS RELATED TO IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE. The Borough and its partners provide youth outdoor activities, resident services, and community events to improve the quality of life for residents.

100 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

“Etna is for Everyone” poster in window.


RELATIONSHIP TO QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS Equitable communities provide full and equal access to opportunities that enable all residents to reach their full potential. Creating an equitable community is about improving the quality of life for everyone by providing residents with what they need to be successful. This includes various aspects of all five quality of life issue areas, as well as some unique categories. In a way, the equity quality of life area is like an umbrella for the other five areas. By integrating equity into the projects and programs of all of the quality of life areas, the Etna EcoDistrict can ensure that all recommended initiatives contribute to a more equitable community for all.

EQUITY HOUSING

JOBS CULTURE

WATER

EDUCATION IDENTITY

MOBILITY

AIR

HEALTH

ENERGY

FOOD

TYPES OF EQUITY Equitable communities address equity in their process, decision-making, and outcomes.

PROCESS An equitable process consists of inclusive and authentic engagement of individuals and organizations, especially those most vulnerable to change.

DECISION-MAKING Equity in the decision-making for process is transparent and accountable.

OUTCOMES Equitable outcome means there is a fair distribution of benefits and burdens of projects and programs across all populations, and current and future generations.

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EQUITY BIG IDEAS There are several places in Etna that improve community members’ quality of life. However, equitable communities have a diversity of places that support residents with full and equal access to opportunities that enable them to reach their full potential. Maintaining and enhancing the community’s identity, strengthening the connections between new and existing places, and ensuring that the benefits of all places are equitably distributed in the community will contribute to an Etna that is inclusive and supportive of all people.

1

Mt. Royal Blvd. Gateway

2

All Saints Resilience Hub

3

EcoPark

4

Permanently Affordable Housing

5

Entry Art & Grant Ave. and Crescent St. Intersection Improvements

(see page 128 for more information)

(see page 155 for more information)

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 130)

(Locust St. site in progress by City of Bridges CLT. Crescent St. site is not a CLT site. See page 156 for more information)

(see page 128 for more information)

BIG IDEA #1

Artful Energy & Water Demonstrations

Establish a network of places that enable people to reach their full potential.

6

Etna contains many outdoor recreational assets, but lacks indoor public space, such as a library or community center. Creating indoor public spaces or third spaces can support social inclusion and provide a gathering place for Etna residents. Creating additional places that address some aspect of equity, such as education, job training, food access, healthcare, and affordable housing will only help community members to reach their full potential. Establishing a network of equity places will connect community members to the programs that the need.

7

Etna Hillside Sign

8

Fugh Hall Playground

9

Kittanning Street Gateway improvements

10

Health & Social Services Hub

BIG IDEA #2

11

Historic Building Sites

12

Etna Center for Arts & Culture

13

Upper Floor Apartments (various sites)

14

Library & Resilience Hub

15

Commercial Redevelopment

16

Bridge Street Gateway Improvement

Ensure that the benefits of all places are equitably distributed. Identifying community needs and filling gaps with projects, programs, and places will ensure that community members have what they need to succeed. Distributing the benefits of these projects, programs, and places equitably will provide opportunities to fulfill residents’ individual needs, while also meeting the collective needs of the community.

(see page 129 for more information)

The first impression of a community is what the gateway into the neighborhood looks like. Most of Etna’s gateways are confusing for motorists to navigate and do not represent the community’s identity. Improving the gateways with intersection realignments, vegetation, trees, signage, and art will provide a good first impression and communicate the community’s identity to visitors.

(see page 131 for more information)

(see page 136 for more information)

BIG IDEA #3

Improve Etna’s gateways and have them demonstrate the community’s identity.

(see page 129 for more information)

(see page 156 for more information)

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 159 for more information)

(see page 156 for more information)

(in progress by ECO, see page 158)

(see page 156 for more information)

(see page 145 for more information)

17

Exit 4 Gateway Improvements

18

Railroad Arbor

(see page 162 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

Equity places Gateway improvements

102 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


1

4

2

7

3

6 5 8 9

10 11 13 12

4

6 15

14 18

16

17

ACTION PLAN

| 103


DEFINING SUCCESS: EQUITY GOALS Etna’s Equity Story includes many existing assets as well as threats. To achieve Etna’s Equity Vision the community must implement actions that build on their strengths to mitigate their common challenges.

1

Improve quality of life for all

2

Engage in an equitable process

3

Build community wealth

4

Support and celebrate Etna’s vibrant identity and culture 104 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Improving quality of life for the Etna community is the overarching mission and purpose of the Etna EcoDistrict. Quality of life refers to a person’s satisfaction about their life, and includes health, comfort, happiness, and more. The recommendations presented in the Plan are intended to improve quality of life for all residents.

A plan that is not created by everyone cannot truly be for everyone. The Etna EcoDistrict is a joint initiative that is committed to engaging in an equitable process. An equitable process involves inclusive and authentic engagement of individuals and organizations, including those most vulnerable to change.

Job training, educational opportunities, entrepreneurial support, small business support, and other strategies can help build wealth within the Etna community. Local leadership will allow the community’s identity to persevere through change as well as prevent displacement. Investing in community wealth building will improve quality of life for all residents.

Etna’s community identity is a combination of their values and future aspirations. Etna residents show their pride in a number of ways and the strong sense of community is evident to residents and visitors alike. It is important that Etna residents represent their identity through social events, but also celebrate their community’s character in physical form.


CATALYTIC PROJECTS The big ideas described in the previous spread inspired recommendations for new and improved places in Etna. Many of those places address multiple quality of life issue areas and can be catalytic for the community.

ETNA COMMUNITY LIBRARY The Etna Community Library will provide access to educational resources for the Etna community. It will also house the Etna Community Cafe, it will have a solar array on the roof, and will act as a community resilience hub.

CENTER FOR ARTS & CULTURE The Center for Arts & Culture will be the main hub of cultural activity in Etna. It will function in tandem with the Library and will offer programs and space for makers and musicians, and offer an outlet for creative expression for all ages.

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DEFINING SUCCESS: EQUITY INDICATORS Identifying and tracking indicators will help Etna set goals and measure success towards achieving those goals. The following information describes where Etna is today (baseline) and what Etna aims to achieve by the year 2030 (2030 target).

By the year 2030 we will... Decrease percentage of the population living below the poverty level1

Increase number of public spaces that have free wi-fi2

Increase number of unique Etna EcoDistrict participants3

Increase number of Etna EcoDistrict meetings and events

Increase number of dwelling units that are permanently affordable4

20

11.3% (2015) 10% (2030)

fewer households living below the poverty level

100%

0% (2019) 100% (2030)

of Etna has free public wi-fi

564

186 people

(2019)

750 people

additional participants

70

30

additional meetings and events over the next 10 years

20 additional permanently affordable housing units

(2019)

100

0 units

(2030)

(2019)

20 units

(2030)

baseline 2030 target

106 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

(2030)


Indicator % of people living below the poverty level Baseline 11.3% of Etna residents Baseline Year 2015 Source U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS) Population Summary 2011-15, Etna Borough, “Households by Poverty Status”. According to ACS 2011-15, 13% of Allegheny County residents and 13.5% of U.S. residents live below the poverty level. Etna’s poverty rate is currently lower than this, but Etna seeks to decrease it further to 10%, equating to 20 households in Etna that are no longer living in poverty. 2030 Target Reduce by 1.3% Indicator % of Etna that has free wi-fi Baseline 0% Baseline Year 2019 Source Not applicable. 2030 Target 100% Indicator # of unique Etna EcoDistrict participants (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 186 participants Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source ECO Contact Info Google Sheet. 2030 Target 750 participants Indicator # of Etna EcoDistrict meetings and events (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 30 meetings and events Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source This includes the education series (5), champions meetings (5), community planning meetings (3), ECO community meetings (3), and other related events (14). 2030 Target 100 meetings and events Indicator # of dwelling units that are permanently affordable (rental and owned properties, cumulative since 2019) Baseline 0 units Baseline Year Cumulative since 2019 Source Not applicable. 2030 Target 20 units

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Economic Resilience indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Connectivity: Digital Network indicator. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Engagement & Inclusion indicator. 4 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Housing indicator. 1

2

ACTION PLAN

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By the year 2030 we will... Increase the number of full-time employees hired to work directly on the Etna EcoDistrict5

Increase voter participation rate6

Increase number of public art installations and culturally interpretive installations7

Increase number of cultural events

4

1 person

(2019)

5 people

additional EcoDistrict employees

606

42.3% of Etna residents (2016) 60.0% of Etna residents

additional Etna residents who vote

1

(2030)

1 installation

(2019)

11 installations

additional public art installation every year for 10 years

9

(2030)

11 events

(2019)

100 events

cultural events every year for 10 years

baseline 2030 target

108 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan

(2030)

(2030)


Indicator # of full-time employees hired to work directly on the Etna EcoDistrict Baseline 1 person Baseline Year 2019 Source This includes the ECO Director. 2030 Target 5 people Indicator % of Etna residents voting in elections Baseline 42.3% of Etna residents Baseline Year 2016 General Election Source Etna residents cast 1,447 votes in the 2016 general election (NYTimes, 2016 Voting Precinct Maps). In the year 2016 it is estimated that 3,422 people lived in Etna (ESRI 2016 forecast, U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1). This equates to 42.3% of Etna residents who voted in the 2016 general election. 2030 Target 60.0% of Etna residents Indicator # of permanent public art installations and culturally interpretive installations (cumulative since 2018) Baseline 1 installation Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source Includes the mural produced as part of the 2018 Etna Art Tour (1). 2030 Target 11 public art installations and culturally interpretive installations Indicator # of cultural events Baseline 11 events Baseline Year Cumulative since 2018 Source Includes Etna Art Tour (2), Grow Cook Eat event (1), and parades (8). 2030 Target 100 events

Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Prosperity: Access to Opportunity indicator. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Social Resilience indicator. 7 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Culture & Identity indicator. 5

6

ACTION PLAN

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EQUITY ACTION PLAN

Actions in bold will be prioritized in years 1 through 3.

1

Improve quality of life for all3,7

a. Establish the Etna Community Library. b. Create dedicated spaces for kids and community enrichment, including the Library and the All Saints Recreation Center. c.

Identity and augment Etna’s network of social service providers and connect it to residents.

d. Develop and implement a housing plan that allows elders to age in place with proper support networks. e. Transition upper floors of commercial properties into apartments. f.

2

Engage in an equitable process1

Support growth of essential services in Etna.

a. Perform an in-depth community needs assessment or community survey with responses from a variety of stakeholders and publicize the results transparently. b. Develop an equitable and inclusive engagement plan to meet people where they are. c.

Pursue EcoDistricts Certification and engage in the EcoDistricts peer network.

d. Engage in a transparent decision-making process that equitably distributes the benefits of projects and programs. e. Invite the region to learn from Etna, and engage in opportunities for Etna to learn from regional peers. f.

3

Build community wealth4,5,6

Create a Youth EcoDistrict Committee.

a. Provide permanently affordable housing through a Community Land Trust in addition to related affordable housing strategies. b. Provide small business start-up support and mentoring, including a co-working space. c.

Establish a Triboro Ecodistrict small business network to share resources, ideas, connections, etc.

d. Provide free financial literacy coaching and education. e. Establish a green business district collaborative. f.

Provide access and training for local, high-quality, and/or green jobs.

g. Incentivize green businesses to re-locate to Etna.

4

Support and celebrate Etna’s vibrant identity and culture2

a. Continue to convene the community around EcoDistrict planning and implementation. b. Provide support for the arts, makers, and culture. c.

Create beautiful, functional places for all.

d. Maintain and improve access to a healthy natural environment. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Engagement & Inclusion objective. Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Culture & Identity objective. 3 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Public Spaces objective. 4 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Place: Housing objective. 5 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Prosperity: Access to Opportunity objective. 6 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Prosperity: Economic Development objective. 7 Satisfies EcoDistricts Certification Connectivity: Digital Network objective. 1

2

110 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


years 1 - 3

years 4 - 5

years 6+

period of focused time and attention on action establishment period ongoing effort, requires less time to maintain ACTION PLAN

| 111


YEARS 1 - 3

GETTING STARTED The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given their projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame is unattainable. The community has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed below with accompanying detail describing how the community plans to accomplish them. The remaining actions will be evaluated in two years, at which time a new implementation plan will be created.

EQUITY GOAL 1A

Establish the Etna Community Library. Schedule Year 1: Apply for Facade Improvement grants and energyrelated grants. Year 2+: Continue to acquire funding and renovate Library when funding allows. Implementation Scale Building and Community: The Library will be located on a specific site. However, all Etna community members are welcome to visit. Type Project Responsible Party ECO Funding To be determined EQUITY GOAL 2A

Perform an in-depth community needs assessment or community survey with responses from a variety of stakeholders and publicize the results transparently. Schedule Year 2: Meet with the Millvale Community Library to understand and learn from their experience performing a community needs assessment. Meet with community partners. Develop survey content. Year 3: Launch survey and promote it. Summarize and analyze the results. Post the results publicly. Implementation Scale Community: This assessment will only consider the Etna community and will help prioritize projects and programs for the future. Type Project Responsible Party ECO Funding To be determined

112 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Etna Energy Champions discuss Etna’s Energy Vision (August 2018).

Councilwoman Tuñón introduces a new initiative the Etna Community Library (April 2019).

EQUITY GOAL 3A

Provide permanently affordable housing through a Community Land Trust in addition to related affordable housing strategies. Schedule Year 1: Work with the City of Bridges Community Land Trust (CLT) to create permanently affordable housing options in Etna. Implementation Scale Community: The creation of permanently affordable housing will help to prevent displacement of Etna community members. Type Program Responsible Party City of Bridges CLT in collaboration with ECO and Etna Borough Funding Funding for this program is acquired by City of Bridges CLT

EQUITY GOAL 4A

Continue to convene the community around EcoDistrict planning and implementation. Schedule Ongoing: ECO will continue to convene the community around all of its initiatives. Implementation Scale Community: This will contribute to an inclusive and equitable EcoDistrict process. Type Program Responsible Party ECO Funding To be determined.

ACTION PLAN

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KEY PLACES Three districts in Etna have been identified as opportunities to improve the community, enhance existing initiatives, and demonstrate Etna’s commitment to sustainability. The community’s quality of life goals and vision statements have been applied to these districts to show a potential future scenario for the community.

The view of Orchard Avenue facing south. 114 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


115


116 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


ETNA ECODISTRICT

KEY PLACES While Etna is only about 0.8 square miles in land area, the community contains several uniquely distinct areas, each with their own opportunities and challenges. Each district contains one to three key places that are in close proximity and work together as a network. These key places have been re-imagined to include projects that improve quality of life and contribute to the achievement of Etna’s quality of life vision statements.

GRANT & CRESCENT DISTRICT

The Grant & Crescent District is located at a critical juncture between Route 8, Crescent Street, and Grant Street. For those entering the community from the north or from Route 8, it acts as a gateway into the community. The future vision for this district includes an Open Air Market located adjacent to Pine Creek, a re-activated gym that can serve as a community resilience hub, and a hillside overlook that will provide amazing views of the community, including views of various renewable energy technologies. For those entering the community via Kittanning Street, an entry orchard and creekside restaurant will provide a pleasant first impression and reconnect residents to nature.

BRIDGE STREET DISTRICT

Bridge Street is a critical link in the path that connects the Butler Street Commercial District down to Etna’s new Riverfront Park. The future vision for this district includes the Pine Creek Connector Trail, which will link into a series of new stormwater parks and adjacent trails that will provide an enjoyable and safe experience for residents as they walk or bike to the Riverfront Park. These gateway improvements will enhance safety for motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists entering the community from the 62nd Street Bridge or from Sharpsburg.

BUTLER STREET DISTRICT

The Butler Street Commercial District is rich with existing assets and activity. The future vision for this district includes streetscape improvements and new businesses that will enhance existing initiatives and contribute to a lively and active business district. A few blocks down Butler Street, a re-purposed gas station will greet motorists entering the community from Route 28 and provide access to quick and easy healthy food options. A stormwater park and highly visible demonstrations of renewable energy will show a visual commitment to sustainability.

KEY PLACES

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HOW TO ADDRESS PRIVATELY OWNED PROPERTY Some of the recommendations for key places described in this chapter are located on property that is currently privately owned. These are hypothetical recommendations that can only be implemented if the current owner is interested in selling the property or if the current owner is interested in transforming their property into the visions described in this Plan. Recommendations for privately owned property were only incorporated into this Plan if the following conditions applied:

1. The community shared that the property is not currently reflecting their vision for the future. 2. The property is currently vacant, blighted, and/or unsafe. Implementing the proposed recommendations for privately owned property can have many benefits, including;

1. A new use would improve quality of life for residents. 2. A new use can contribute to the Etna EcoDistrict’s social equity, environmental stewardship, and/or resilience goals. 3. A new use could contribute more significantly to the Borough’s tax base. The Etna EcoDistrict stakeholder organizations WILL NOT use eminent domain to gain control of privately owned property to implement these recommendations. Property will only be acquired if it is MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL for the lead organization and the current property owners. Alternatively, private property owners may choose to work with an Etna EcoDistrict stakeholder organization to transform the current use of their property to reflect the visions proposed in this Plan. Assistance could include relocation of the existing business to a new site, assistance in program development, and assistance navigating Borough codes and approvals.

The images to the right depict existing conditions and proposed future visions for select privately owned properties identified in this Plan.

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OPEN AIR MARKET & PINE CREEK PARK

TIPPINS SPLASH PARK

ETNA SOLAR GRAB-N-GO

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HOW TO ADDRESS PROPERTIES IN THE FLOODPLAIN Some of the recommendations for key places described in this chapter are located fully or partially within the 100-year floodplain. New construction and redevelopment projects located fully or partially within the floodplain are required to abide by stringent requirements to reduce contribution to stormwater runoff and to minimize the risk of flood damage. These requirements are detailed in Etna’s Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) and in Etna’s Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353). The design of these properties must comply with one of the these three options to meet FEMA Floodplain Regulations.1 To learn more about building code and the floodplain, please visit FEMA Substantial Improvement and Substantial Damage Desk Reference.

RETROFIT DIAGRAMS

ELEVATE

Elevate the structure, reconstruct the foundation, relocate utilities and mechanical equipment, and reconstruct the entry to be located above the base flood elevation. This can be achieved by filling the lowest level, or elevating the structure with piles, posts, piers, or columns.

FLOOD-PROOF

Retrofit structures to be floodproof up to the base flood elevation with flood-resistant materials. This includes all portions of the building below the base flood elevation, including foundation elements such as floor beams and joists.

FLOW-THROUGH

Retrofit structures with flowthrough openings. Relocate utilities and mechanical equipment above the base flood elevation and use materials and methods that allow the lower level to flood with limited damage.

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RETROFIT EXAMPLES

Left Photo: Elevated residential structure.2 Right Photo: Elevated non-residential structure.3

Left Photo: Etna Borough building with drop-in flood shields to protect the doors and windows. Right Photo: Floodproofed building with permanently installed flood shield.3

Left Photo: Store with flood-resistant materials on the first level.3 Right Photo: Building with flood openings for flow-through.3

FEMA NFIP Floodplain Management Requirements Image: Curbed NY, 2017. 3 Image: FEMA Flood-proofing Non-Residential Buildings, 2013. 1

2

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GRANT & CRESCENT DISTRICT Provide community amenities and enhance connections. The Grant and Crescent District currently contains a cluster of both active and vacant businesses and acts as a critical connection for motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists traveling from every direction. Improving the Grant and Crescent Street intersection will enhance the connection from the Pine Creek Connector Trail down to Butler Street. Vacant land and properties will be transformed into productive use by re-purposing them into community amenities. Improving the Kittanning Street gateway will provide a better first impression to visitors and will help residents reconnect with nature.

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GRANT & CRESCENT DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS AND EXISTING CONDITIONS

The Grant and Crescent District contains three entry gateways - Mt. Royal Blvd., the intersection of Grant and Crescent Street, and Kittanning Street. All three are unsafe and confusing for motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists. This, along with a mix of active businesses, underutilized land, and vacant buildings, makes an unpleasant first impression of the community. This district does, however, include existing recreational assets, such as the ballfields and Dougherty Nature Trail.

CATALYTIC PROJECTS

OPEN AIR MARKET

FUTURE VISION

The Grant and Crescent District will become a pleasant first impression for those entering the community, one which reflects Etna’s identity and values. This district will enhance connections with intersection and Complete Streets improvements, the Pine Creek Connector Trail (currently in progress by Etna Borough), and the existing Dougherty Nature Trail Extension. Underutilized properties will be transformed into community amenities. This includes an Open Air Market, stormwater park, permanently affordable housing, creekside restaurant, resilience hub, hillside overlook park, and entry garden.

OVERLOOK ENERGY PARK

CREEKSIDE RESTAURANT

RELATIONSHIP TO THE ECODISTRICT QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS WATER Pine Creek Park will be designed to absorb stormwater, especially when Pine Creek is high. Transforming Dewey and Wilson Streets into Blue Streets, and restoring the Pine Creek riparian buffer, will also contribute to green stormwater management.

MOBILITY Intersection and Complete Streets improvements will increase safety and enhance connections between this district and other areas in Etna. New and existing trails will contribute to a trail network for pedestrians and bicyclists.

AIR New parks and tree plantings will compliment existing recreational and green assets in this district to improve air quality. Air quality monitors will be installed in the district and will provide direct feedback for residents and commuters.

ENERGY The Overlook Energy Park will not only contain wind turbines and a solar array, but will also provide a view of various renewable energy technologies in Etna, such as the existing Solar at the Welcome Sign and future artful energy and water demonstration, resilience hub, and EcoPark.

FOOD The Open Air Market will increase access to fresh and healthy food. The creekside restaurant will provide another location for the community to gather around food and enjoy Pine Creek. The Gateway Grove will be a space to grow, pick, and learn about food.

EQUITY Community assets such as the EcoPark and entry art will be visible demonstrations of Etna’s identity and values. Amenities such as the resilience hub and permanently affordable housing will support residents in times of need and strive to prevent displacement.

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EcoPark

Entry Art and Crosswalks

(in progress by Etna Borough, see page 130)

(see page 128 for more information)

All Saints Resilience Hub (see page 155 for more information)

Little Pine Creek Connector Trail (in progress by Etna Borough, see page 144)

Blue Street: Dewey and Wilson Streets

Open Air Market* (see page 132 for more information)

Flood-proof Redevelopment* (see page 156 for more information)

(see page 154 for more information)

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Grant Ave. and Crescent St. Intersection Improvements (see page 128 for more information)

Fugh Hall Playground

Solar at the Welcome Sign

(see page 131 for more information)

(existing, see page 129)

Dougherty Nature Trail

Complete Streets Improvements

(existing, see page 144 for more information)

(see page 155 for more information)

Riparian Buffer Restoration

Define Curb with Trees

(see page 131 for more information)

(see page 155 for more information)

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Pine Creek Park* (see page 132 for more information)

Overlook Energy Park (see page 129 for more information)

GRANT & CRESCENT DISTRICT

Grant & Crescent Intersection

Etna Hillside Sign (see page 129 for more information)

Green Highway Buffer (see page 145 for more information)

* NOTE: These proposals are on privately owned property. Please see page 118 for more information.

Turbines and Trees along Route 8 (see page 129 for more information)

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MT. ROYAL GATEWAY AND GRANT/CRESCENT ST. INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS Gateways provide the first impression of what a neighborhood is like. The northern gateway into Etna along Mt. Royal Blvd. is not friendly, and motorists often speed down this street. Improving the northern gateway with gateway gardens, traffic calming, pedestrian and bicycle improvements, and intersection realignment will provide a safe, pleasant signal that you are now entering Etna. To implement these improvements, Etna will have to work with PennDOT and Shaler Township because Mt. Royal Blvd. is a PennDOT-owned road and most of the improvements shown are just over the boundary in Shaler Township. Farther down the road, the intersection of Grant Avenue and Crescent Street is another confusing intersection for motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Implementing traffic calming and street improvements at the intersection of Grant Avenue and Crescent Street will slow down traffic and improve safety. These improvements can include curb bumpouts at crosswalks, realigning the intersection of Grant Avenue and Crescent Street to make the roads closer to perpendicular, narrowing the intersection for pedestrian safety, adding street trees where appropriate, adding a traffic light, and improving sidewalks. Placing public art on the sidewalk at this intersection or painting artistic crosswalk murals can demonstrate Etna’s identity and signal to visitors that they are entering Etna. These improvements will increase safety for all modes of transportation and will strengthen the connection between the northern neighborhood in Etna, the EcoPark, Pine Creek Park, the Dougherty Nature Trail, and the Butler Street commercial district. Existing condition of Mt. Royal Blvd., Herman Street, Short Street, and Grant Avenue intersection. Gateway gardens

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ARTFUL ENERGY & WATER DEMONSTRATIONS There are several locations in Etna where Pine Creek and the highway come in close proximity to one another. These locations are opportunities to demonstrate alternative energy generation, as well as to manage stormwater runoff from the highways. A small-scale hydro-power plant (also known as micro hydro power system) can be placed in Pine Creek adjacent to both Pine Creek Park and Route 8. A system of this scale can likely produce a small amount of renewable energy that can power lighting at the park or contribute to the energy consumed by the Open Air Market. The placement of this system will be highly visible and accompanied by an artful sign or installation that catches the attention of those on Route 8 and in the park so they are aware of the system and can learn about it. A kinetic energy harvesting system can generate energy from cars driving along Route 8 or Route 28. Similarly, this energy could power lighting or energy loads produced in nearby Pine Creek Park, Tippins Splash Park, Poplar Greenway, or the Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park. This system will also be deployed in an artful and educational way. If installed adjacent to the small-scale hydro-power plant, there is an opportunity to have the two systems interact and perhaps power an EcoDistrict art installation.

Design inspiration for the Artful Energy & Water Demonstrations.1

Lastly, these locations can collect stormwater runoff from Route 8 and Route 28 and filter it before it enters Pine Creek. This can be combined with a small-scale hydro-power plant and/or the kinetic energy harvesting system. While these interventions may be small in scope and impact, highlighting them in an artful way will educate the community about innovative alternative energy generation in addition to being interesting, beautiful, and functional.

OVERLOOK ENERGY PARK The top of the steep hillside adjacent to Route 8 (accessed by Garrard Street) provides an amazing view of Etna. Converting this site into an Overlook Energy Park will allow the Etna community and visitors to enjoy this unique view and see attractions such as the Solar at the Welcome to Etna Sign and Artful Energy and Water Demonstrations from above. The park will contain trees and other vegetation to help improve air quality and will contain a safe viewing platform with telescopes. Locating wind turbines on the edge of the park will create a highly visible statement to those in Etna and driving along the highway that Etna is committed to renewable energy. Similarly, a solar canopy will shade the parking area and power lighting and an electric vehicle charging station. Lastly, mounting a creative “ETNA” hillside sign on the edge of the hillside will contribute to the community’s identity and is an opportunity to demonstrate it’s values of environmental stewardship and sustainability if covered in vegetation (a “living sign”).

View from Overlook Energy Park.2

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ECOPARK At the corner of Wilson Street and Grant Street, a former bakery and apartment building was destroyed by the Hurricane Ivan flood in 2004. The property sat abandoned for over a decade before demolition in 2017 through the Allegheny County Community Development Block Grant Program. In 2018, the vacant lot was acquired by the County through the Allegheny County Vacant Property Recovery Program, and then property ownership of the lot was successfully transferred to the Borough of Etna in October 2019. Community ownership will now allow the site to be transformed from a vacant lot into the Etna EcoPark, an outdoor community space for all to enjoy.

Existing condition of EcoPark site. The bottom photo shows the former building on the site.

The Etna EcoPark will include representation of each Quality of Life Issue in its design. There are currently opportunities for stormwater management features, air quality monitoring (through an air quality monitoring station and bench in progress by the Triboro Ecodistrict), vegetation and tree plantings, accessible mobility options, public art, and more. Ultimately, though, the Quality of Life components of the EcoPark will be informed by input from the Etna community. Beginning in 2020, Etna Borough and ECO will host community workshops to engage residents around Etna EcoPark planning and design to ensure that the park is a space that is beautiful, functional, and meets the needs of the nearby community members.

Photo to the left and below: Professionals from around the world visited the EcoPark site during the 2019 EcoDistrict Summit to provide design recommendations for the Park.

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FUGH HALL PLAYGROUND Situated directly adjacent to Fugh Hall, Dougherty Ballfield, and Pine Creek is an underutilized lot that, if converted into a playground, would provide a fun, safe space for kids to play as a stop along the Dougherty Nature Trail or while passing time during a baseball game. The playground would incorporate a splash park and/or nature-based elements and a dog park. Transforming this site into a family-friendly playground will require collaboration with the Etna Borough Volunteer Fire Department who owns the lot.

RESTORING PINE CREEK’S RIPARIAN BUFFER Pine Creek is bordered on both sides by a naturally vegetated area known as a “riparian buffer.” This riparian buffer prevents pollutants in stormwater runoff and sediment from entering Pine Creek, controls erosion, stabilizes hillsides, and provides key habitat. Restoring the riparian buffer along Pine Creek will reduce flooding by slowing down water flow and promoting infiltration. Restoring this area can also have ecological benefits and improve views of Pine Creek.

Existing condition of Fugh Hall Playground site.

Design inspiration for Fugh Hall nature-based playground.3 Existing condition of Pine Creek’s riparian buffer.

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PINE CREEK PARK & OPEN AIR MARKET

Etna contains a few large underutilized sites, including the site of Pine Creek Park, which is currently privately owned property and located partially in the floodway and partially in the 100-year floodplain. However, if the property were to be sold in the future it could become a park that manages stormwater and floodwater from Pine Creek, in addition to a place where the Etna community can enjoy Pine Creek. Pine Creek Park would be a part of Etna’s park network, which will include seven additional Parks (Tippins Splash Park, Poplar Greenway, Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park, Overlook Energy Park, EcoPark, Railroad Arbor, and the Gateway Grove). The park would contain pavilions built with reclaimed materials from the structure that exists on the site today, a rain garden, and natural habitat area. The pavilions could be rented out by the community and would provide a beautiful view of Pine Creek. The park would be designed to absorb and store floodwater when Pine Creek rises too high during heavy rain events and threatens to flood Etna (this site was identified in the River Bend Comprehensive Plan as being a key site for stormwater management as well).4 Design inspiration for the Open Air Market. Findlay Market, Cincinnati, OH.7,8

FARMER’S MARKET

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The vision for Pine Creek Park also includes an Open Air Market. The existing structure on the site would be renovated and transformed into the Open Air Market that would include large openings to encourage visitors to enjoy their food purchases in the park, as well as encourage park visitors to get a bite to eat. The market would act as a new and expanded location for the Etna Farmers Market, allowing it to operate year-round. The market could include booths for independent vendors, a food business incubator, a community kitchen, a cooking demonstration space, and a community dining room that could be rented for events. The building would have solar panels to meet some or all of the building’s energy needs, as well as other renewable energy technologies, such as geothermal heating. Due to its location in a floodway, the building would need to be designed for flow-through or secured against flooding with flood enclosures to protect from heavy rain events (see page 120 for more information) and would need to meet the requirements of Etna’s Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) and Etna’s Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353).5,6

Design inspiration for the Open Air Market. The Foundry at 41st, Pittsburgh, PA.9 Image: Mark White Fine Art Image: Robert Tuñón 3 Image: Mile High Flood District 4 River Bend Comprehensive Plan, Environmental Planning & Design, 2014. 5 Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) 6 Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353) 7 Image: Red Lips & Tortilla Chips 8 Image: The Cincinnati Region 9 Image: Fort Willow Developers 1

2

RIVER TRAIL

PINE CREEK

WIND TURBINES

ROUTE 8

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Pine Street Path to Butler Street

Creekside Restaurant and Brewery*

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 136 for more information)

Riparian Buffer Restoration

Complete Streets Improvements

(see page 131 for more information)

(see page 155 for more information)

Gateway Grove and Trail Loop (see page 136 for more information)

Dougherty Nature Trail Extension (see page 144 for more information)

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


GRANT & CRESCENT DISTRICT

Kittanning Gateway

* NOTE: These proposals are on privately owned property. Please see page 118 for more information.

KEY PLACES

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CREEKSIDE RESTAURANT & BREWERY Gateways provide the first impression of what a neighborhood is like. The first thing that a motorist sees when entering Etna from Route 8 onto Kittanning Street is a school bus storage facility, which is not the highest and best use for this highly-visible site along Pine Creek. This facility is currently privately owned, however, if the property were to be sold in the future it could become a Gateway Grove and Creekside Restaurant & Brewery for all to enjoy. The Creekside Restaurant and Brewery would have an outdoor space in the rear of the building, allowing patrons to enjoy the view of Pine Creek with a beverage or snack. The building could be powered by photovoltaic panels on the roof or the building could contain a rooftop garden. Due to its location in a floodway, the building would need to be designed for flow-through or flood-proofed to protect from heavy rain events (see page 120 for more information) and would need to meet the requirements of Etna’s Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) and Etna’s Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353).1,2

Design inspiration for the Pine Creek Restaurant & Brewery. New Belgium Brewery, Asheville, NC.3

Those traveling along the bicycle/pedestrian path to Butler Street would welcome this stop along the way as an opportunity to re-hydrate and take a break. A bike share dock and bike tools station could be located here to support bicyclists. Planting a Gateway Grove adjacent to the restaurant and brewery would provide a buffer between patrons and Butler Street, and would also provide a pleasant first impression for those entering Etna from Kittanning Street. The Gateway Grove will also be a space to grow, pick, and learn about food. Acquiring the site of the Pine Creek Restaurant and Brewery would allow the Dougherty Nature Trail to extend past it’s current conclusion at the pedestrian bridge along the Creek, and the trail could loop around the Gateway Grove up to Crescent Street.

Design inspiration for the Pine Creek Restaurant & Brewery. Long Trail Brewery, Bridgewater Corners, VT.4,5

BALLFIELD

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

8’ SIDEWALK 8’ PARKING LANE

12’ DRIVING LANE


1 Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) 2 Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353) 3 Image: Explore Asheville 4 Image: TripAdvisor 5 Image: Gwen Kidera

12’ DRIVING LANE

22’ PERPENDICULAR PARKING

BIOSWALE

RAILROAD TRACKS

KEY PLACES

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


BRIDGE STREET DISTRICT Connect residents to the river and enhance green space. The Bridge Street District contains an important gateway into the community from the 62nd Street Bridge and in the future, the Three Rivers Heritage Trail. Currently, this gateway is confusing and dangerous for motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Complete Streets improvements will enhance this gateway, making it safer and more enjoyable for all travelers. Additionally, a formalized pedestrian walking route will provide safe access to the Riverfront Park (project by Etna Borough, currently under construction). A series of parklets along this path will help manage stormwater, provide opportunities for residents to interact with Pine Creek, and define the curb edges to enhance safety.

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Tippins Splash Park

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BRIDGE STREET DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS AND EXISTING CONDITIONS

The Bridge Street District currently contains a tangle of streets that intersect under the Route 28 bypass, directing travelers either to Sharpsburg, Route 28 towards Pittsburgh, across the 62nd Street Bridge, or up Bridge Street into Etna. Inconsistent and unclear signage makes for an unsafe and unwelcoming gateway. To help improve this area, Etna Borough is currently constructing a Riverfront Park that will reconnect the community to the Allegheny River. The Borough is also implementing a Green Streetscape and underground stormwater management projects to improve conditions and minimize flooding along Bridge Street. While these improvements will help, more work will need to be done to make the path to the future Riverfront Park safe and well defined.

CATALYTIC PROJECTS

TIPPINS SPLASH PARK

FUTURE VISION

The Bridge Street District will contain a series of stormwater parklets that define the path to the Riverfront Park, manage stormwater, provide opportunities for the community to interact with Pine Creek, and provide a safe and enjoyable route. The addition of these parklets in tandem with Complete Streets improvements will clarify the tangle of streets at this gateway and will provide a pleasant first impression for those entering the community - one which reflects the community’s values.

ETNA-SHARPSBURG GATEWAY PARK

SHARPSBURG GROCERY

RELATIONSHIP TO THE ECODISTRICT QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS WATER Tippins Splash Park, Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park, Railroad Arbor, and Poplar Greenway will be designed to not only manage stormwater, but to reconnect the community with Pine Creek. Green Streetscapes (in progress by Etna Borough) will also manage stormwater and enhance connections.

MOBILITY Intersection and Complete Streets improvements will increase safety and enhance connections between the riverfront and the rest of Etna. The path to the riverfront will become part of the experience. A kayak launch will allow for water mobility.

AIR New parks and Green Streetscapes will both improve air quality and buffer the community from the highway and the railroad tracks. Safety improvements will encourage the use of active transportation, which reduces Etna’s contribution to air pollution.

ENERGY Artful energy and water demonstrations near Pine Creek and Route 8 will show innovative renewable energy technologies to community members and visitors.

FOOD A new highly-visible grocery store will serve both the Etna and Sharpsburg communities, and increase access to healthy and fresh foods.

EQUITY The Railroad Arbor and new parks will contribute to noise and air pollution reduction. The artful demonstration will contribute to community identity and will be an educational opportunity. The grocery store will increase food access and choice for multiple communities.

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Green Streetscape Phase 5A (coming in 2020 by Etna Borough, see page 154)

Pedestrian/Bicycle Trail to Dougherty Nature Trail Extension (see page 144 for more information)

Tippins Splash Park*

Artful Energy & Water Demonstration

(see page 145 for more information)

(see page 129 for more information)

Riverfront Park (project by Etna Borough, currently under construction, see page 144)

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Railroad Arbor

Poplar Street Trail Loop

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

Define Parking Edge with Vegetation

Poplar Greenway

(see page 155 for more information)

(see page 145 for more information)

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Park and Ride (see page 147 for more information)

Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park (see page 147 for more information)

BRIDGE STREET DISTRICT

Bridge Street Gateway

Sharpsburg Grocery (see page 146 for more information)

* NOTE: These proposals are on privately owned property. Please see page 118 for more information.

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PEDESTRIAN/BICYCLE ROUTE NETWORK Part of the big idea for Etna related to mobility is to create a network of routes designed specifically for pedestrians and bicyclists to help them safely and enjoyably navigate between destinations in Etna, neighboring communities, and regional destinations. This route could be supplemented with wayfinding signage, mile markers, and bike share docks. The Little Pine Creek Connector Trail is currently in progress (an initiative of Etna Borough and Shaler Township) and will be planned in 2020. The trail is planned to begin at the Kiwanis Park in Shaler Township, and will travel down Little Pine Creek Road to Dewey and Wilson Streets. Pedestrians and bicyclists will then continue along Crescent Street to Butler Street, or they will take the Dougherty Nature Trail. The Dougherty Nature Trail Extension will connect the trail to Butler Street, and pedestrians and bicyclists will have the option to continue their journey along Pine Creek to the Tippins Splash Park. Alternatively, pedestrians and bicyclists may choose to take a route less frequented by motorists and cross the pedestrian bridge to Pine Street, continue along the Pine Street Path to Butler Street where they will pass the Pool & Playground, Food Pantry at Calvert Memorial Church, and historic building sites that are accompanied by benches and signage. The path will then lead to High Street and down to Butler Street (or they may choose to continue along Locust Street to the Garden of Etna). With enhancements, the Locust Street path could become a designated “safe street”, meaning that pedestrians and bicyclists receive priority on these streets and motorists are encouraged to take a different route or drive slowly along this path. Design inspiration for the Tippins Splash Park and Etna-Sharpsburg Gateway Park. Liupanshui Minghu Wetland Park.3,4,5

From there, individuals may explore Butler Street or continue their journey along Bridge Street, through the future Poplar Greenway, then down to the Riverfront Park or along the Poplar Street Trail Loop. The gravel path leading from Poplar Greenway to the Riverfront Park should be improved and the bicycle connection to the 62nd Street Bridge should be strengthened. Phase II of the Riverfront Park will connect the park to the water, providing an opportunity for the community to interact with the Allegheny River. In the future, the park may include a solar array or solar lighting. The Park could be extended into Sharpsburg with the addition of a Kayak Launch and Fishing Pier. In a future phase of the Riverfront Park, the Three Rivers Heritage Trail will extend from Millvale, through Etna, to Sharpsburg and Aspinwall, creating a safe and easy trail that connects Etna to Downtown Pittsburgh and beyond (the trail extension was also identified as a priority in the River Bend Comprehensive Plan). Additionally, a water taxi could be established to transport the community from the Riverfront Park, to Sharpsburg’s James Sharp Landing, Millvale’s Riverfront Park, and Downtown Pittsburgh.2 Once individuals reach Butler Street, they may choose to explore the business district and continue to the western part of the community instead. The path along V.F.W. Way leads to the Hafner Ballfield. From there the path will meander along Cherry Street to Isabella Street, passing the Railroad Arbor and the net zero energy public works building, to the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go and Exit 4 Rain Garden. Individuals can then cross Butler Street and hike along the future Overlook Trail up to Shaler Crest Park and the Shaler Overlook, which will provide a wonderful view of the Allegheny River. The site of the Overlook Trail, Shaler Crest Park, and Shaler Overlook are currently privately owned property. These recommendations can only be implemented if the property were to be sold in the future. To see a map of the full proposed pedestrian/bicycle route network, please see page 60.

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TIPPINS SPLASH PARK & POPLAR GREENWAY Etna contains a few large sites, such as the site of Tippins Splash Park, which are currently privately owned property. However, if the property were to be sold in the future it could become a park that manages stormwater and provides an opportunity for the Etna community to interact with Pine Creek. This site was identified in Etna’s Green Infrastructure Master Plan (referred to as part of “Green Streetscape Phase 5A”) as an important site for stormwater management. The Green Infrastructure Master Plan recommends installing an infiltration bed (underground storage for stormwater) on this site. Pairing the underground storage with above-ground improvements, including a wetland or stormwater park, would provide the Etna community with a place to sit and enjoy nature. The park would also include a small dock so that the community can interact with Pine Creek, sit and observe the water, launch a kayak into Pine Creek, or go fishing. Other functional elements such as a pavilion and lighting should be considered for the park. The Dougherty Nature Trail Extension will connect to Tippins Splash Park by way of a trail along Pine Creek.2

The next step along the journey to the Riverfront Park from Tippins Splash Park will be to cross Bridge Street and follow a path through the Poplar Greenway. This park and the path that runs through it will provide a safe and enjoyable route down to the Riverfront Park. This path could be emphasized with an art installation that signals this pathway as a space for pedestrians, such as a portal similar to Cristo and Jean-Claude’s “The Gate”, but unique to Etna. Similar to Tippins Splash Park, Poplar Greenway will contain a small dock that the community can use to interact with Pine Creek. Etna Borough already plans to plant trees in this area by the end of 2019. In addition to serving a functional and experiential purpose, both parks are also important due to their location at the Bridge Street Gateway. Improving this gateway aesthetically will provide a pleasant first impression to motorists entering Etna from Bridge Street.

Existing condition of Tippins Splash Park and Poplar Greenway.

RAILROAD ARBOR & RECREATION SPACE Part of the big idea for Etna related to air is to convert underutilized land into green space and use trees and vegetation to enhance connections and experience. Planting trees along railroad tracks, highways, and parking lots can help to reduce noise, mitigate air pollution, define the edges of streets and pathways, and beautify the community. This would be particularly effective between the railroad tracks and Railroad Street (also known as the Railroad Arbor, which could even become a playground or dog park if acquired from the railroad company). Etna residents from Railroad and Cherry Streets presented their concerns and ideas for this site in 2019. New and existing recreational spaces should also be improved with additional vegetation. This includes improvements to the existing ballfields and the addition of a new nature-based playground and/or splash park adjacent to Fugh Hall with a small dog park.

Existing condition of Railroad Arbor.

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SHARPSBURG GROCERY Neither Etna nor its neighboring community Sharpsburg contains a grocery store, making it difficult for the community to access fresh and healthy food. Opening a grocery store in the building on N. Main Street in Sharpsburg would help improve accessibility for residents of both communities. The high visibility and size of the building makes it ideal for a grocery store or market that is similar to an Aldi, Trader Joe’s, or other affordable chain food store or independent market. Due to its location in a floodplain, the building would need to be designed for flow-through, flood-proofed, or would need to be elevated to protect from heavy rain events (see page 120 for more information) and would need to meet the requirements of Sharpsburg’s Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1812) and Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1406).8,9

Existing condition of the Sharpsburg Grocery.

First introduced as part of the Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan, the addition of a grocery store or market on this site is included in Etna’s EcoDistrict Plan as well because it is a short or drive away at rear Easywalk to access parking from Etna and because the project benefits both For of communities. building more information about the grocery store, please see the Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan.9

Easy to access parking at rear of building

G R OC ER Y

RG O Increase visibility C YREGROCER Y

E CAF

Re-align intersection

Sharpsburg Grocery as portrayed in the Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan.8

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Connect pedestrians from Etna and Sharpsburg


New “art-walk” with seating & amenities

Traffic calming & water capture

Art installation to capture overpass water

ETNA-SHARPSBURG GATEWAY PARK The large island of open space that is sandwiched between N. Main Street, Bridge Street, and Poplar Street is a site in both Etna and Sharpsburg. It contains a bus stop, trees recently planted by Sharpsburg Borough, and is becoming a place for large community events. The intersection adjacent to it is confusing for motorists, resulting in several crashes every year. Converting this space into a park space would help define the edges of this dangerous intersection, manage stormwater with a series of bioswales (including stormwater runoff from the highway above), utilize the highway pylons as an art gallery or vertical garden, and act as a beautiful gateway. It would contain paths, seating, and vegetation, as well as a shelter with benches at the bus stop. This may encourage individuals to use the now-formalized park and ride, which would increase public transit ridership. The park and ride could also be a stop on the “essential services shuttle”, a shuttle that transports community members to grocery stores, the Butler Street commercial district, and other locations near and in the community.

1 River Bend Comprehensive Plan, Environmental Planning & Design, 2014. 2 Buchart Horn and Landbase Systems, Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan, 2014. 3 Image: Landscape Performance 4 Image: Inhabitat 5 Image: Dezeen 6 Sharpsburg Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1406) 7 Sharpsburg Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1812) 8 evolveEA. Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan, 2019. 9 Image: evolveEA

The Park has been introduced as part of several planning initiatives, including the Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan. It is included in Etna’s EcoDistrict Plan as well because the project benefits both communities. For more information about the park, please see the Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan.9

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


BUTLER STREET DISTRICT Provide community amenities and enhance the business district. The Butler Street District contains Etna’s core commercial district, including businesses, institutional and religious assets, and community amenities. This district is already rich with existing assets and upcoming initiatives. Etna will implement improvements that compliment and enhance existing assets and initiatives, and contribute to a lively and active business district. Etna will transform underutilized properties into community amenities that connect residents with food, the arts, educational opportunities, and renewable energy technology.

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LOCUST ST. HIGH ST. BR

ID

GE

ST .

Etna Center for Arts & Culture Permanently Affordable Housing

BU TL ER

ST .

Community Library & Resilience Hub

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


BUTLER STREET DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS AND EXISTING CONDITIONS

The Butler Street District contains many existing assets, including the Garden of Etna, the Spang Mansion, Calvert Memorial Church, Green Streetscapes, and several small businesses and restaurants. Commercial redevelopment, community land trust, and green infrastructure projects are in progress and supported by Etna Borough. Additionally, many of the second and third floors of the buildings in the district are vacant and could be transformed into new healthy apartments.

CATALYTIC PROJECTS

ETNA COMMUNITY LIBRARY

FUTURE VISION

The Butler Street District will grow into a more lively and active business district, rich with businesses and community amenities that reflect the community’s identity and values. This district will contain a new library, new businesses, an arts and culture center, a health and social services hub, and a grab-n-go food distribution location. As the center of the community, enhanced connections in this district will help the community safely and enjoyably access the Riverfront Park, the Pine Creek Connector Trail, and several other parklets and trails that will run throughout the community. Stormwater management projects and energy demonstration projects will show the community best practices and will act as visible demonstrations of the community’s identity and values.

ETNA CENTER FOR ARTS & CULTURE

ETNA SOLAR GRAB-N-GO

RELATIONSHIP TO THE ECODISTRICT QUALITY OF LIFE AREAS WATER Green Streetscapes, Blue Street: High Street, and the Exit 4 Rain Garden will be designed to manage stormwater and improve the experience for community members as they walk past or stop to enjoy.

MOBILITY Intersection and Complete Streets improvements will increase safety and enhance connections between this district and other areas in Etna. New and existing trails will contribute to a trail network for pedestrians and bicyclists.

AIR New parks and tree plantings will compliment existing recreational and green assets in this district to improve air quality. Safety improvements will encourage the use of active transportation, which reduces Etna’s contribution to air pollution.

ENERGY The Etna Solar Grab-n-Go, net zero energy public works building, and wind turbines will be visible demonstrations of the community’s commitment to renewable energy, and will be opportunities for the community to learn about renewable energy.

FOOD The Etna Solar Grab-n-Go, Etna Community Cafe, and existing Garden of Etna will make fresh and healthy food more accessible in the community, contributing to a reduction in food-insecure households.

EQUITY Community assets such as the Etna Community Library, permanently affordable housing, health and social services hub, Center for Arts & Culture, and others will support residents in a variety of ways so that they can meet their fullest potential.

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Permanently Affordable Housing

Locust Street Enhancements

(in progress by City of Bridges CLT, see page 156)

(see page 144 for more information)

Historic Building Sites

Blue Street: High Street (in progress by Etna Borough, see page 154)

(existing, see page 144)

Green Streetscape (existing and in progress by Etna Borough, see page 154)

Complete Streets Improvements (in progress by Etna Borough, see page 155)

Upper Floor Apartments (various sites) (see page 156 for more information)

Commercial Redevelopment (see page 156 for more information)

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Etna Center for Arts & Culture* (see page 159)

Garden of Etna

Community Library & Resilience Hub

(existing, see page 144)

(in progress by ECO, see page 158)


Pine Street Path to Butler Street (see page 144 for more information)

Health & Social Services Hub* (see page 156 for more information)

BUTLER STREET DISTRICT

Commercial Center

Green Streetscape Phase 5A (in progress by Etna Borough, see page 154)

* NOTE: These proposals are on privately owned property. Please see page 118 for more information.

Commercial Redevelopment (in progress by Rear End Gastropub, see page 154)

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GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE & STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Part of the big idea for Etna related to water is to implement green infrastructure projects at both large and small scales in a way that also improves safety and experience for the Etna community. A few recommendations of how to implement this big idea across Etna’s places are listed below. Etna’s Green Infrastructure Master Plan has identified key sites for green stormwater management projects across the community. Etna Borough has already implemented several of these projects, including two phases of green streetscapes along Butler Street. The Borough plans to implement Green Streetscape Phases 3, 4, 5, and 5A. The Streetscapes will beautify the Butler Street District and manage stormwater through vegetation, trees, and underground storage. The Borough intends to implement additional underground stormwater storage projects on sites identified in the Plan, including the proposed site of Tippins Splash Park. An expected completion date for these projects has not yet been determined.1

Existing Green Streetscapes on Butler Street by Etna Borough.

Example of bioswales.4

Example of permeable paving.5

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan

Improving stormwater surge areas into Blue Streets is another way to manage rain events in Etna. Blue streets contain a network of water infrastructure that conveys, stores, and celebrates water. This can include bioswales, trees, vegetation, underground storage, permeable paving, and/or other small-scale green infrastructure strategies to slow the movement of water and promote infiltration. Blue streets often include curb bump-outs and street narrowing to increase the area for green infrastructure, while also minimizing crosswalk lengths and improving safety for pedestrians. Etna Borough is already planning to plant trees along High Street (Blue Street: High Street) with funds from an ACHD Pollution Prevention grant, contributing to stormwater management along this steep road. Implementing improvements along Dewey Street and Wilson Street (Blue Street: Dewey and Wilson Streets) will support the Little Pine Creek Connector Trail and contribute to stormwater management as well. Heavy rain events can oversaturate the ground and cause landslides. Improving hillsides into Blue Hillsides (such as along Parker Street and Kittanning Street) by planting trees and vegetation that hold the soil in place, improving surface and subsurface drainage, practicing erosion control methods, and other ecological design techniques can prevent landslides.


COMPLETE STREETS IMPROVEMENTS In 2018 Etna Borough passed a Complete Streets resolution in an effort to make the streets in Etna safer for all people and all modes of transportation. The resolution explicitly states that by adopting a Complete Streets resolution, the Borough fully supports community transportation projects that will improve access, mobility, public health, and quality of life for all Etna residents and all visitors to the community. The resolution will be used as a guide for transportation improvement projects on streets within the boundaries of Etna. This may include (where financially feasible) street infrastructure and landscape modifications such as the addition and improvement of sidewalks and crosswalks, shared use paths, sharrows, bike lanes, bike racks, wayfinding signage, street trees, stormwater management facilities, and accessible curb ramps that enable safe, convenient, and comfortable movement within the community for all users. Complete Streets improvements should be considered across the community, but there are some locations that are in greater need of improvements than others. For example, adding a sidewalk to Parker Street will make walking from the top of the hill down to Butler Street safer. Adding crosswalks and narrowing wide streets (such as Butler Street at Washington Street and the intersection of Grant Avenue and Crescent Street) will make it safer for pedestrians to cross. Additionally, confusing intersections can be made clearer by defining the edges of the curb with trees and vegetation. Etna Borough already plans to plant several trees in the Butler Street business district with funds from the ACHD Pollution Prevention grant in 2020. A comprehensive mobility audit would be helpful in identifying and prioritizing with certainty which areas of Etna are in greatest need of Complete Streets improvements.

Complete Streets examples.6,7

RESILIENCE HUBS Resilience hubs are places where the community can go during times of emergency. Resilience hubs are powered by renewable energy so that when there is a blackout of the electrical grid, they are self-sufficient and can still access electricity. Resilience hubs can also provide clean water to the community when there is a disruption in the water supply and they have air filtration systems that provide clean air to breathe during air quality action days. The Etna Community Library is currently in development and will be located on Butler Street in the business district. The library will be Etna’s home for equitable, sustainable development, and is a natural place to act as a resilience hub as well. In the northern portion of Etna, the All Saints Resilience Hub (located within the All Saints Gym) can provide similar resilience amenities without compromising its current function for Etna residents. Additionally, this site has the potential to host job training programs, fitness programs, and after-school programs. If the building must undergo a significant renovation to become a resilience hub, then due to its location in a floodplain the building would need to be designed as flood-proof to protect against heavy rain events (see page 120 for more information). It would also need to meet the requirements of Etna’s Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) and Etna’s Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353). Having two resilience hubs that are spread out geographically will ensure that the Etna community has equitable access to shelter and amenities during times of emergency.2,3

1 Buchart Horn and Landbase Systems, Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan, 2014. 2 Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378) 3 Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353) 4 Image: Watershed Council. 5 Image: LA Stormwater. 6 Image: New Jersey Bike and Walk Coalition. 7 Image: National Association of City Transportation Officials.

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COMMUNITY AMENITIES Part of the big idea for Equity in Etna is to provide places that improve community members’ quality of life and help them reach their full potential. Etna currently contains several businesses, services, and community amenities, however, there are gaps in these amenities that need to be filled for a more equitable future.

Shiny Bean, a new coffee shop on Butler Street.

Equitable communities have housing options that are high quality and affordable. Etna Borough and ECO are currently working with the City of Bridges Community Land Trust (CLT) to establish permanently affordable housing in Etna. This housing option will help Etna community members transition from renters to homeowners and will help prevent displacement. The City of Bridges CLT is currently developing permanently affordable housing along Locust Street. Additional sites in Etna (such as one along Crescent Street) have been identified as opportunities for affordable housing, but are not currently part of the City of Bridges CLT. In addition to this, the upper floors of businesses along Butler Street have great potential to transition into apartments (this was identified in the River Bend Comprehensive Plan, Downtown Etna Commercial Revitalization Report, and Etna Upper Floors Reuse Study as an opportunity).8,9,10 Etna is a very dense community with few opportunities to develop new buildings. Where appropriate, Etna will build new commercial developments along Butler Street that includes ground-level retail or restaurants and affordable apartments on the upper floors.

Existing conditions of health and social services hub building.

Encouraging essential services to move to the Butler Street commercial district will also help to improve quality of life for residents. The Downtown Etna Commercial Revitalization Report found that the market can support additional restaurant and retail spaces along Butler Street. This can be supplemented with a bank or credit union, a bakery, and other amenities as well. Several businesses have opened recently or will be opening soon in Etna, including the Shiny Bean (opened in 2018) and a commercial redevelopment project at the corner of Butler Street and High Street (Rear End Gastropub - expected to open in 2020). Keeping this momentum going will help fill vacant storefronts along Butler Street. Community ownership of new businesses and amenities should be investigated so that Etna residents can benefit from growth. This can be made possible through crowdfunding and platforms such as Small Change. Alternatively, Etna can support residents who are entrepreneurs and are interested in establishing one of these businesses in Etna.9 The building at the corner of Maplewood Street and Butler Street is currently a privately owned property that is partially vacant. However, if it were to be leased in the future it could become a health and social services hub that would help connect the Etna community to programs and services that are needed to improve quality of life. This hub could also provide job training and could house a medical office.

8 River Bend Comprehensive Plan, Environmental Planning & Design, 2014. 9 Urban Partners, Downtown Etna Commercial Revitalization Report, 2017. 10 Palo Alto Partners, Etna Upper Floors Reuse Study, 2017.

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ROOFTOP SOLAR PANELS

10’ SIDEWALK

7.5’ PARKING LANE

12’ DRIVING LANE

12’ DRIVING LANE

7.5’ PARKING LANE

10’ SIDEWALK

Decorative trench grate Impervious pavement Modular plastic storage units installed under the sidewalk Impervious liner protects adjacent buildings Underdrain protects nearby basements

**NOTE: The underground green infrastructure storage depicted in this section was designed by Buchart Horn. This drawing is an adaption of a section drawn by Buchart Horn and is their intellectual property.

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ETNA COMMUNITY LIBRARY While Etna may be rich with outdoor recreational assets, it has tragically lost many of its indoor civic spaces and educational resources. As a heartbreaking consequence of school district centralization and successive flooding events, Etna saw the closure of its public schools, private Catholic school, and public libraries. The revival of an indoor civic space is much needed and much desired by Etna residents. In an initial community survey to understand Etnians’ top priorities for the Etna EcoDistrict, a community library ranked overall as one of the most desired amenities.

The Etna Little Library is a free resource for community members to borrow books until the Etna Community Library is fully operational.

Etna residents would benefit greatly from having an indoor public space that offers educational resources and programming in the heart of the community. Libraries are community hubs that allow residents, particularly vulnerable populations, to engage in social inclusion and access essential opportunities. While it will be a place for early education, literacy, and lifelong learning, the Etna Community Library (ECL) will serve as a safe space where people of all ages can find friendship, support, and a sense of community. Sharing space with ECL will be the Etna Community Cafe (ECC), a pay-what-you-can or pay-it-forward restaurant that offers hearty plates at accessible prices. Above ECL and ECC will be five market-rate apartments that are designed to the highest standards of safety, energy efficiency, and healthy interiors. The income generated by the apartments, in addition to a rooftop solar installation, will be used to offset operating costs for the ground floor community amenities. In 2018, a group of Etna’s civic leaders, Etna EcoDistrict volunteers, and educators were convened to serve on an ECL Exploratory Committee. The group unanimously voted to proceed with the ECL initiative. ECO has a site control agreement on the proposed site and is pursuing funding to purchase and renovate the existing historic structure.

Etna Community Library Logo.

Etna Community Library in the 1880s, 2019, and a future rendering of what the completed project will look like.

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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


ETNA CENTER FOR ARTS & CULTURE While it may not be apparent at first glance, Etna is home to over onehundred workshops, galleries, and studios. Housed inside Etna’s former mill buildings, these spaces are spread throughout the community and support professional artists and musicians of all kinds. Unfortunately, the art itself remains largely invisible to the general public. To better connect residents, business owners, and visitors to Etna’s art culture, Etna’s community organizations host the annual Etna Art Tour - a free, open street, all ages event that exposes attendees to the vibrant creativity inside Etna’s workshop, gallery, and studio spaces, leaving all to ask, “How do we celebrate the arts every day?” To make the arts accessible throughout the year, the Etna Center for Arts & Culture (ECAC) will offer a dedicated maker space for children, teenagers, and adults to create, play, and design using the same materials, tools, and processes used by professional artists. Various programs will allow artists to share skills and interact with community members. The space will transform depending on the time of day to provide small-scale acting, comedy, dance, poetry, and music performances as well as film screenings. ECAC will allow residents and visitors to express themselves, learn new skills, and explore career pathways in the creative fields.

Existing conditions of Etna Center for Arts and Culture building.

The proposed site for ECAC is one of Etna’s most historic structures, both in its origin story and architectural value. The building exterior will be restored to preserve the historic character and will seek the use of historic tax credit financing. Apartment rental income, energy-efficient design, and solar energy generation will help reduce operating costs. The proposed site of ECAC is currently privately owned and if it becomes available in the future, it will be pursued by ECO for this use.

Residents enjoying the Etna Art Tour, 2018 and 2019.

Inside a gallery during the Etna Art Tour, 2018.

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Net-Zero Energy Public Works Building (see page 163 for more information)

Shaler Overlook*

Path to Ballfield

(see page 144 for more information)

(see page 144 for more information)

Shaler Crest Park & Overlook Trail* (see page 144 for more information)

Parker Street Sidewalk (see page 155 for more information)

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Etna Solar Grab-n-Go* (see page 74 for more information)

Crosswalk and Street Narrowing

Exit 4 Rain Garden*

(see page 155 for more information)

(see page 162 for more information)

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


Green Parking Buffer (see page 155 for more information)

Hafner Field Activation (existing, see page 144 for more information)

BUTLER STREET DISTRICT

Exit 4 Gateway

Wind Turbines* (see page 162 for more information)

* NOTE: These proposals are on privately owned property. Please see page 118 for more information.

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ETNA SOLAR GRAB-N-GO & EXIT 4 RAIN GARDEN Etna contains a few large sites that are not currently operating at their highest and best use. The site of the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go and Exit 4 Rain Garden is currently privately owned property and is for sale. However, it could be acquired and redeveloped as a healthy fast food and take-out location, as well as a stormwater park (following environmental site remediation). The existing gas station on the site would be renovated to create the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go, which would maintain one set of gas pumps but would also have several electric vehicle (EV) charging stations and a bike share dock. The building would contain tables for those who wish to dine-in and garage doors to allow customers to enjoy the view of the adjacent stormwater park while they eat. The building would be powered by photovoltaic panels on the roof and wind turbines along the edge of the highway. Etna contains many restaurants but is currently lacking a healthy fast food restaurant. This location, near to Exit 4 on the highway, would capture individuals heading home from work who are seeking a quick and healthy food option for themselves or their family. The Exit 4 Rain Garden will be located at the intersection of Washington Street and Butler Street. During heavy rain events, water flows down Washington Street very quickly, producing a flood hazard at and around the intersection with Butler Street. Creating a stormwater park adjacent to the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go would help to relieve flooding by absorbing stormwater on site. Bioswales could extend from the Exit 4 Gateway along Butler Street to the intersection with Ann Street as an additional opportunity to manage stormwater. A large “living sign” (vegetated sign) welcoming visitors to Etna could be located on the site of the Exit 4 Rain Garden or farther down Butler Street. Lastly, the wall supporting Route 28 could contain an Etna EcoDistrict mural, which would be visible from the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go.

RENEWABLE ENERGY LEADERSHIP Part of the big idea for Etna related to energy is to integrate innovative energy technology into Etna’s places and create networks of renewable energy production. This is already demonstrated by the Garden of Etna Solar Canopy that also acts as covered parking and includes an electric vehicle charging station. This is supported by the addition of photovoltaic arrays on the proposed Creekside Restaurant & Brewery, Etna Solar Grab-n-Go, Net Zero Energy Public Works building, Etna Community Library, and All Saints Resilience Hub. The Etna community will also be able to see wind turbines along the hillside adjacent to Route 8, between Route 8 and Pine Creek (across from Pine Creek Park), and adjacent to Route 28 behind the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go. The community will be able to learn about innovative energy technologies by visiting the artful energy and water demonstrations. Lastly, they will be able to learn about alternative fuel sources for cars by test driving or charging an electric vehicle at the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go.

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NET ZERO ENERGY PUBLIC WORKS BUILDING Etna Borough continually demonstrates leadership by implementing innovative and important projects throughout the community, such as the Green Streetscapes on Butler Street. Converting the Public Works building on Clark Street into a net zero energy building would support the Borough’s reputation as a leader by demonstrating best practices related to energy efficiency and renewable energy. The building would be retrofitted to be extremely energy efficient and would install photovoltaic panels on the roof. The Etna community would be invited to visit the building to learn about home energy conservation strategies and renewable energy technology. The building could also demonstrate microgrid technology and share energy with the nearby Etna Solar Grab-n-Go. In addition to this, other municipal buildings such as the Borough Building could implement energy efficiency improvements to demonstrate leadership and reduce their environmental footprint.

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SOURCES

Fireworks celebrating Etna’s 150th birthday. 164 | Etna EcoDistrict Plan


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SOURCES Allegheny County Department of Human Services, 2018. Allegheny County Property Assessments, 2017. Allegheny County Property Assessments, GIS, 2018. Buchart Horn and Landbase Systems. (2014). Etna Green infrastructure Master Plan. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Expenditure Surveys, 2013-14. City of Bridges Community Land Trust (CLT), Lawrenceville Corporation, 2018. Environmental Planning & Design. River Bend Comprehensive Plan for Etna, Millvale, and Sharpsburg. (2014). ESRI 2017 Forecast based on U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. ESRI, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Expenditure Surveys 2013 and 2014. ESRI, InfoGroup, 2016. ESRI, InfoGroup, 2018. Etna Borough. (2014, July). Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353). Etna Borough. (2018, revised November). Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378). evolveEA. (2019). Sharpsburg Community Vision Plan. FEMA, NFIP Floodplain Management Requirements. <https://www.fema.gov/pdf/floodplain/ nfip_sg_unit_5.pdf>. Meinert, N. (2015). Etna, Pennsylvania History. Retrieved from Allegheny River Family Archives: http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~njm1/genealogy/etna1.htm Palo Alto Partners. (2017). Etna Upper Floors Reuse Study. Sharpsburg Borough. (2014, September). Sharpsburg Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1406). Sharpsburg Borough. (2018, November). Sharpsburg Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1812). The Breathe Project, U.S. EPA , Clean Air Task Force, 2017. U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS) 2011 - 2015. Urban Partners. (2017). Downtown Etna Commercial Revitalization Report. Images All photographs provided by Robert Tuùón unless otherwise noted. Flood-proof Example: FEMA Flood-proofing Non-Residential Structures, 2013. <https://www. fema.gov/media-library-data/1541615774329-0190ea05ddbbb6fdc5f1170a018d41/P-936_1106-18_508r.pdf > Flood-proof Example: NY Curbed, 2017. < https://ny.curbed.com/2017/10/12/16462790/ queens-climate-change-jamaica-bay-flooding-photos> Kinetic Wind Sculpture: Mark White Fine Art, 2019. < https://markwhitefineart.com/kineticwind-and-water-sculptures/> Nature-Based Playground: Mile High Flood District, 2009. < https://udfcd.org/3-awesomenatural-playgrounds-redefining-how-kids-play/> Findlay Market: Red Lips & Tortilla Chips, 2014. <https://redlipstortillachips.com/2014/07/29/ findlay-market-cincinnati-oh-city-guide/> Findlay Market: The Cincinnati Region, 2019. <https://cincinnatiusa.com/things-to-do/attractions/ findlay-market> The Foundry at 41st: Fort Willow Developers, 2019. <http://www.fortwillowdevelopers.com/bay-41/> New Belgium: Explore Asheville, 2019. <https://www.exploreasheville.com/listings/newbelgium-brewing/8759/> Long Trail: TripAdvisor, 2019. <https://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g57195d677089-i222499493-Long_Trail_Brewing_Company-Bridgewater_Corners_Vermont.html> Long Trail: Gwen Kidera, 2017. <https://www.instagram.com/gwenkidera/?hl=en> Turenscape Wetland Park: Landscape Performance, 2015. <https://landscapeperformance. org/sites/default/files/Vogler-2015-Student-Example-Case-Study.pdf> Turenscape Wetland Park: Inhabitat, 2015. <https://inhabitat.com/turenscapes-regenerativewetland-park-cleans-up-a-post-industrial-landscape-in-china/> Turenscape Wetland Park: Dezeen, 2015. <https://www.dezeen.com/2015/01/11/turenscapethe-slow-down-liupanshui-minghu-wetland-park-meandering-causeways-landscapearchitecture/> Bioswale: Watershed Council. <https://www.watershedcouncil.org/bioswale.html>. Complete Streets: National Association of City Transportation Officials. <https://nacto.org/ publication/urban-street-stormwater-guide/stormwater-elements/green-infrastructureconfigurations/stormwater-curb-extension/>. Complete Streets: New Jersey Bike and Walk Coalition. <https://njbwc.org/debunkingcommon-complete-streets-myths/>. Permeable Paving: LA Stormwater. <https://www.lastormwater.org/green-la/low-impactdevelopment/residential-solutions/permeable-pavements-or-porous-pavement-systems/>.

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APPENDICES

Etna Food Champions present during the 2018 Equity Education Series meeting. 168 | Etna EcoDistrict Plan


169


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Etna EcoDistrict Plan


APPENDIX A

OUR JOURNEY The Etna EcoDistrict Plan is an outcome of an extensive, multi-year community engagement process. From day one, community engagement, education, and activation have been central to our journey. Over the course of the past three years, we have engaged over 400 community members through 35 free, all ages, open-to-the-public events that have allowed us to learn, plan, implement, and celebrate together. Etna EcoDistrict events from 2017 through 2019: 1.

Call to Action for the Etna EcoDistrict | Public Event

Wednesday, January 3rd, 2017 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM | Quickhatch Coffee & Food Agenda Intro to EcoDistricts; Lessons Learned from Millvale EcoDistrict Process Outcome(s) Consensus to hold second meeting

2. Team Building for Etna EcoDistrict | Public Event

Wednesday, February 7th, 2017 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM | Quickhatch Coffee & Food Agenda Lessons Learned from Sharpsburg Community Vision Process; Intro to Community Planning by evolveEA Outcome(s) Consensus to host larger Etna stakeholder meeting

3. Etna EcoDistrict Stakeholder Meeting | Community Meeting

Wednesday, March 7th, 2017 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Overview of Ecodistrict work in Pittsburgh by evolveEA; history of Millvale EcoDistrict; statements from Borough of Etna, EEDC, ENA, Garden of Etna, and ECO Outcome(s): Consensus to apply for funding for Etna EcoDistrict

4. Triboro Ecodistrict Grant Meeting | Public Meeting

Wednesday, April 4th, 2017 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM | Quickhatch Coffee & Food Agenda Review the intent and application of the Triboro Ecodistrict Grant to the Henry L. Hillman Foundation Outcome(s) Consensus to participate in the Triboro EcoDistrict Grant

5. Community Land Trust Meeting | Public Meeting

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM | Etna Municipal Building Agenda Learn about Community Land Trusts from the City of Bridges CLT team; review housing data and vulnerable areas in Etna Outcome(s) Consensus to send two Etna representatives to the City of Bridges CLT Steering Committee

6. Etna EcoDistrict Education Series (EEES): Water | Community Meeting

Wednesday, June 5th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda evolveEA-led, Etna-specific educational event on Water, Etna’s Water-related projects and Initiatives; develop a vision for Etna’s Water future Outcome(s) Input on Etna’s Future as it relates to Water; development of Water Champions committee

7. EEES: Water | Committee (Champions) Meeting

Wednesday, June 11th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | The Shiny Bean Coffee & Tea Agenda evolveEA-led focus group meeting to further discuss issues of Water in Etna and what can be done to improve this Quality of Life Issue Outcome(s) Development of a Vision Statement for Water

8. EEES: Mobility & Air Quality | Community Meeting

Wednesday, July 16th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Report out from the Water Champions committee; evolveEA-led, Etna-specific educational event on Mobility and Air Quality; develop visions around Etna’s Mobility and Air Quality future Outcome(s) Input on Etna’s Future as it relates to Mobility and Air Quality; development of Mobility Champions committee & Air Champions committee

9. EEES: Mobility & Air Quality | Committee (Champions) Meeting

Wednesday, July 25th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | The Shiny Bean Coffee & Tea Agenda evolveEA-led focus group meeting to further discuss issues of Mobility and Air Quality in Etna and what can be done to improve these Quality of Life Issues Outcome(s) Development of a Vision Statement for Mobility and a Vision Statement for Air Quality

10. Empowering Etna Dinner | Public Event

Monday, July 30th, 2017 | 6:00 - 8:00 PM | Bread of Life Food Pantry Agenda Provide outreach and education to community members not yet associated with the Etna EcoDistrict work Outcome(s) More people invited to participate in the Etna EcoDistrict process APPENDICES

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11. EEES: Energy | Community Meeting

Wednesday, August 8th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Report out from the Mobility Champions and Air Quality Champions committees; evolveEA-led, Etna-specific educational event on Energy; develop a vision around Etna’s Energy future Outcome(s) Input on Etna’s Future as it relates to Energy; development of Energy Champions committee

12. EEES: Energy | Committee (Champions) Meeting

Wednesday, August 15th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | The Shiny Bean Coffee & Tea Agenda evolveEA-led focus group meeting to further discuss issues of Energy in Etna and what can be done to improve this Quality of Life Issue Outcome(s) Development of a Vision Statement for Energy

13. Etna EcoDistrict Engagement Planning for the Etna Art Tour | Committee Meeting

Wednesday, September 5th, 2018 | 7:00 - 8:30 PM | E-Town Bar & Grille Agenda Develop an engagement activity for the 300+ attendees of the Etna Art Tour to collect input on the Etna EcoDistrict Vision Statements and Quality of Life issues Outcome(s) Development of engagement activity posters

14. Etna EcoDistrict Engagement at the Etna Art Tour | Public Event

Saturday, September 22nd, 2018 | 6:00 - 10:00 PM | Butler Street Agenda Engage with 300+ attendees of the Etna Art Tour to collect input on the Etna EcoDistrict Vision Statements and Quality of Life issues Outcome(s) More people included in the Etna EcoDistrict process

15. EEES: Food | Community Meeting

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Report out from the Energy Champions committee; evolveEA-led, Etna-specific educational event on Food; develop a vision around Etna’s Food future Outcome(s) Input on Etna’s Future as it relates to Food; Development of Food Champions committee

16. Solar Celebration | Public Event

Saturday, October 6th, 2018 | 12:00 - 4:00 PM | Garden of Etna Agenda Public event to highlight new solar array carport with electric vehicle charging station; participation in Pittsburgh-region Solar Tour; joint celebration with gardeners from Garden of Etna to highlight holistic sustainability; on-the-ground presentation of the six key Quality of Life Issues Outcome(s) Expanded education; early implementation project related to carbon neutrality; more people included in the Etna EcoDistrict process

17. EEES: Food | Committee (Champions) Meeting

Wednesday, October 10th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Cop Out Pierogi Agenda evolveEA-led focus group meeting to further discuss issues of Food in Etna and what can be done to improve this Quality of Life Issue Outcome(s) Development of a Vision Statement for Food

18. EEES: Social Equity | Community Meeting

Wednesday, November 7th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Report out from the Food Champions committee; evolveEA-led, Etna-specific educational event on Social Equity; develop a vision around Etna’s Equity future; launched “Etna is for Everyone” campaign Outcome(s) Input on Etna’s Future as it relates to Social Equity; development of Equity Champions committee; release of “Etna is for Everyone” poster

19. EEES: Social Equity | Committee (Champions) Meeting

Wednesday, November 14th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | The Shiny Bean Coffee & Tea Agenda evolveEA-led focus group meeting to further discuss issues of Social Equity in Etna and what can be done to improve this Quality of Life Issue Outcome(s) Development of a Vision Statement for Social Equity

20. Education Celebration | Public Event

Wednesday, December 5th, 2018 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Pop-up at 381 Butler St. Agenda Report out from the Food Champions committee; presentation of 2017-2018 Etna EcoDistrict journey Outcome(s) Celebrate partner organizations and volunteers for their contributions to the Etna EcoDistrict

21. Idea Round-up for Etna EcoDistrict | Public Event

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Quality of Life Champions groups to collaborate with subject-matter experts on five $2,000 grant projects; develop local leadership through small-scale projects Outcome(s) Five unique ideas with allocated funding to activate the Etna EcoDistrict

22. Education Booklet Launch & Workshop | Community Meeting

Wednesday, February 6th, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Release of six Quality of Life Education booklets documenting the Etna EcoDistrict process to date; work in teams to identify goals for Etna EcoDistrict Outcome(s) Development of goals by each Quality of Life Champions committees

23. Etna EcoDistrict Planning Workshop #1 | Community Meeting

Wednesday, March 6th, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Review goals set by Quality of Life Champion committees; identify how the overarching EcoDistricts Imperatives guide our Quality of Life Issues and overarching goals; develop clear commitments on Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Climate Protection as core principles of the Etna EcoDistrict Outcome(s) Commitments on three Imperatives; development of Imperatives Commitment Working Group; consensus to register the Etna EcoDistrict with EDO

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24. Equitable Places Workshop | Community Meeting

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Workshop to look at how the Etna EcoDistrict can define a future where more places directly address equity, diversity, and inclusion; discuss affordable homeownership through a community land trusts; discuss new park spaces, stormwater projects, and the restoration of educational assets in Etna Outcome(s) Increased understanding on community land trusts; community feedback and input on place-based implementation considering equity

25. Etna-Sharpsburg Earth Day Challenge | Public Event

Saturday, April 13th, 2019 | 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM | Etna & Sharpsburg Agenda Engage in a friendly stream and street clean-up competition with Sharpsburg by by collecting garbage bags of trash in Etna; celebrate Earth Day efforts with our neighbors at the Overpass Portal Park Outcome(s) Over 353 collective volunteers participate in community improvement efforts; two dumpsters worth of trash removed from our communities

26. EcoDistricts Incubator | Community Meeting

April 25th - 27th, 2019 | Millvale Food + Energy Hub Agenda Workshop led by EcoDistricts and independent team facilitator around EcoDistrict Formation, Roadmap, and Performance phases; Triboro Ecodistrict breakout session to identify areas for future collaboration Outcome(s) List of implementable indicators to incorporate into the Etna EcoDistrict Plan; first draft of the Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration; visions for the three EcoDistrict Imperatives

27. Community Priorities Workshop | Community Meeting

Wednesday, May 1st, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Prioritize projects and programs in each Quality of Life Issue to be included in the Etna EcoDistrict Action Plan Outcome(s) Prioritization of top-ten lists of projects and programs in each Quality of Life Issue; shared engagement and ownership by the community in the Etna EcoDistrict process

28. Tree Planting & Celebration | Public Event

Saturday, May 25th, 2019 | 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM | Etna Playground & Pool Agenda Recognize Pollution Prevention Grant awarded to the Borough of Etna; plant twelve new trees at the Etna Playground; showcase and celebrate the completion of the Etna Idea Round-Up Air Quality project; honor high school students involved in the creation and implementation of the Idea Round-Up project Outcome(s) Planting of twelve new trees; implementation of Etna Air Quality Awareness sculptures; creation and installation of new Urban Walking Trail Markers; more people included in the Etna EcoDistrict process

29. Etna EcoDistrict Planning Meeting #2 | Community Meeting

Wednesday, June 5th, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Review of evolveEA’s initial design proposals to transform three key sites in Etna; collect community input and feedback on designs; present intent to submit Declaration of Collaboration and Imperatives Commitment for Certification Review Outcome(s) Constructive feedback on the Etna EcoDistrict design proposals; consensus to submit Declaration of Collaboration and Imperatives Commitment for Certification Review

30. Grow, Cook, Eat | Public Event

Sunday, August 18th, 2019 | 2:00 - 4:00 PM | Garden of Etna Agenda Cooking demonstration; presentation on healthy food practices Outcome(s) Creation of new community tool - cooking kit; development of diversified leadership; expanded education; more people included in the Etna EcoDistrict process

31. Etna EcoDistrict Planning Meeting #3 | Community Meeting

Wednesday, September 4th, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Review of the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap and its Action Plan, Implementation Plan, Indicators, and Design Proposals in an open house setting Outcome(s) Collected feedback on the Etna EcoDistrict Plan; consensus to submit Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap for Certification Review

32. Etna Energy Fair | Public Event

Sunday, September 8th, 2019 | 2:00 - 4:00 PM | Fugh Hall Agenda Activate the Energy Champions committee; learn about home energy efficiency; learn about Etna EcoDistrict Energy Initiatives Outcome(s) Development of diversified leadership; expanded education; more people included in the Etna EcoDistrict process

33. Etna Art Tour | Public Event

Saturday, September 21st, 2019 | 5:00 - 9:00 PM | Butler Street Agenda Engage with 300+ attendees of the Etna Art Tour to collect input on the Etna EcoDistrict Plan Outcome(s) More people included in the Etna EcoDistrict process

34. EcoDistricts Summit | Public Conference

November 4-5, 2019 | August Wilson Center Agenda Participate in learning and sharing opportunities that help to catalyze, grow, and sustain the regional and national EcoDistrict movement Outcomes Greater knowledge of regional EcoDistrict movement; recognition for becoming the first Certified EcoDistrict

35. EcoDistrict Celebration | Public Event

Wednesday, December 11th, 2019 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM | TBD Agenda Celebrate three years of collaboration between partner organizations and the Triboro Ecodistrict; celebrate volunteers for their contributions to the Etna EcoDistrict; formal launch and publication of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan

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“ETN A SNAGS FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND HONOR FOR SUSTAINABILITY” W ESA, NOV. 5, 2019

“ETNA TO BE NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED FOR ITS ECODISTRICT” PIT T S B URGH POST GAZETTE, OCT. 24, 2019

“ETNA SEEKS WORLD’S FIRST ECODISTRICT CERTIFICATION” T RIBL IVE, OCT. 23, 2019

“ETNA SEEKS TO BECOME WORLD’S FIRST OFFICIAL ECODISTRICT AT NATIONAL SUMMIT IN PITTSBURGH” NE XT CITY, OCT. 14, 2019

“ETNA RESIDENTS START WORKING ON ECODISTRICT PLANS” PIT T S B URG H POST GAZETTE, JAN. 14, 2019

“ETN A ECODISTRICT ENJOYING SUCCESS, MAKING BIG PLANS FOR FUTURE” T RIBL IVE, SEPT. 9, 2019 174 |

Etna EcoDistrict Plan


APPENDIX B

EcoDistricts™ Certification Concurrent to the EcoDistrict Education Series and Planning engagement, the Etna EcoDistrict pursued EcoDistricts™ Certification and became the first community in the world to become certified by the national EcoDistricts Certification Board. DECLARATION OF COLLABORATION The Etna EcoDistrict Plan is the guiding document for the Etna EcoDistrict and shall be stewarded primarily by the Etna Community Organization (ECO) in strong collaboration with the Borough of Etna, partner organizations, and residents. The Declaration of Collaboration, or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), is a non-binding commitment to take actions necessary to implement the Etna EcoDistrict Plan successfully. See the following pages for more information. IMPERATIVES COMMITMENT The Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment describes the Etna EcoDistrict’s commitments to Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Environmental Stewardship, including how these Imperatives will be embedded in both the Etna EcoDistrict process and its implementation outcomes. See the following pages for more information.

ROADMAP The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap describes the Etna EcoDistrict’s plan to improve quality of life for all who live, work, and play in Etna. To achieve this goal, the Roadmap outlines an Action Plan towards fulfilling Community Vision Statements for each Etna EcoDistrict Quality of Life issue and advancing the Etna EcoDistrict’s overarching Imperatives of Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Environmental Stewardship. See the following pages for more information.

ECODISTRICTSTM CERTIFIES THAT

ETNA ECODISTRICT HAS RECEIVED FORMAL VERIFICATION FOR THEIR

Roadmap On October 28, 2019

By meeting the appropriate requirements as outlined in the EcoDistricts Certified Handbook.

BY APPROPRIATELY COMPLETING THIS SUBMISSION, THE ETNA ECODISTRICT IS FORMALLY ENDORSED AS

ECODISTRICTS CERTIFIED

ISSUED 10/28/2019

THROUGH 10/28/2021

ROB BENNETT CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

APPENDICES

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DECLARATION OF COLLABORATION INTENT The Etna Ecodistrict Plan is the guiding document for the Etna EcoDistrict and shall be stewarded primarily by the Etna Community Organization (ECO) in strong collaboration with the Borough of Etna, partner organizations, and residents. This Declaration of Collaboration, or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), is a non-binding commitment to take the actions necessary to implement the Etna EcoDistrict Plan successfully. DISTRICT & BACKBONE ORGANIZATION DESCRIPTION The Etna EcoDistrict represents the people, places, and processes of Etna, including residents, businesses, and friends of the borough. Through a multi-year community engagement process, the Etna EcoDistrict emerged as a grassroots movement to define a future where everyone in Etna has the opportunity to thrive and live healthy, fulfilling lives. Through the process, the community collaborated with evolveEA to develop the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. In 2016, ECO, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, began formation for the sole purpose of incubating, facilitating, and stewarding the Etna EcoDistrict work. Today, ECO operates as a community group dedicated to improving the quality of life for those that live, work, and play in Etna, PA. As a steward for the Etna EcoDistrict work, ECO will act as EcoDistrict Backbone Organization while closely collaborating with the Borough of Etna, partner organizations, and residents. Through continuous community engagement, ECO activates Etna’s citizens to take ownership over their futures by supporting projects and programs that integrate social equity, community resiliency, and environmental stewardship into the fabric of the community.

Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 1


BACKBONE ORGANIZATION: ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES As the Backbone Organization and primary steward of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan, ECO commits to: Organizational Structure ● Employ at least one (1) full-time staff person in support of the organization; ● Include at least one (1) representative from Borough Council on the ECO Board of Directors; provide an open invitation to the Etna Borough Manager for ECO Board of Directors meetings with the option of serving on the ECO Board of Directors; ● Provide full transparency of ECO operations and initiatives to the Borough with the Council representative responsible for communication and information sharing. Advancing the Etna EcoDistrict Plan ● Adopt the Etna EcoDistrict Plan as the guiding document for the organization; ● Seek funding to support ECO staff and operations and EcoDistrict project implementation when appropriate; ● Serve as fiscal agent when ECO is directly responsible for project planning and implementation; ● Support the stakeholder organization best suited to lead specific Etna EcoDistrict project implementation and/or programming; ● Incubate projects and programs not within the most current version of the EcoDistrict Plan but are in support of the EcoDistrict Imperatives and Quality of Life Goals; ● Update the Etna EcoDistrict Plan on a biannual basis guided by community feedback and indicator data reporting. Community Engagement ● Host quarterly community meetings related to the EcoDistrict with open invitations to stakeholder organizations; ● Clearly communicate all EcoDistrict meetings, planning, and implementation efforts to the Borough and the public; ● Commit to continuous learning, relationship building, and leadership development; ● Actively collect and share relevant, relatable, and understandable data pertaining to the Etna EcoDistrict to guide decision-making and demonstrate progress.

Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 2


DECISION-MAKING PROTOCOL Decision-making Principles The Etna EcoDistrict is our vehicle for sustainable community development by which stakeholders have opportunities to participate in shaping a collective future that benefits the community equitably. The following principles are to be employed in the decision-making process: ●

Public​. Meetings and events are to be all-ages and open to the public. The locations of meetings are to be accessible and connected by public transportation. Meetings are to be advertised in multiple forms of print and digital media.

Independent​. An independent facilitator is to develop agendas and meeting content that responds to and builds on stakeholder input.

Non-hierarchical​. All participants are to have equal points of input at meetings and events with a non-hierarchical participation structure.

Iterative​. Proposals for the Etna EcoDistrict are not to have a single point of decision-making but are to be developed over multiple rounds of presentation, comment, and revision through an iterative process.

Transparent​. Feedback sessions for the Etna EcoDistrict are to be conducted in open forum settings and shared publicly. The iterative process through the independent facilitator is to demonstrate how and why proposals are updated and refined at each public event. Progress for the Etna EcoDistrict’s Implementation Phase is to be reported transparently to establish accountability.

Living​. The Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to be continuously refined at each public meeting and event. Once published, the Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to be updated on a biannual basis and be managed as a living document.

Decision-making Body In the Roadmap phase, the Etna EcoDistrict decision-making body is to represent a series of community meetings and public events, rather than a formalized structure, where input is collected and responded to by an independent consultant. Decisions are not singular, but iterative. The Roadmap phase will help define which organization is best suited for each particular implementation project. Project implementation will then be stewarded by the selected organization through the rules that govern their organization. In the Implementation phase, projects for the Etna EcoDistrict are to conduct a public process and obtain input from stakeholders. As the primary steward of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan, ECO is to report out on progress at a quarterly community meeting. Projects that are designated to be implemented by ECO or in collaboration with ECO are to form committees where participation is open to all.

Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 3


Decision-making Procedures The Etna EcoDistrict is to be defined through an iterative process with a diverse range of opportunities for stakeholder input rather than singular decisions. As community input often reflects a full spectrum of responses to proposals, the Etna EcoDistrict Planning Phase is to be facilitated by an independent consultant. The independent consultant is responsible for scheduling meetings, setting the agenda, collecting input, reporting feedback, and developing points of consensus. Opportunities for stakeholder input and levels of engagement include but are not limited to: ● Community Planning & Input Activities - public meetings, consensus decision-making, captured by an independent facilitator ● Quality of Life Vision Statements - public meetings, consensus decision-making, authored by stakeholders and shared publicly at a community meeting ● Selection of Objectives - public meetings, consensus decision-making, captured by an independent facilitator ● Selection of Indicators & Targets - public meetings, consensus decision-making, captured by an independent facilitator ● Selection of Strategies & Projects - public meetings, consensus decision-making, captured by an independent facilitator ● Selection of Place-based Interventions - public meetings, consensus decision-making, captured by an independent facilitator ● Prioritization of Initiatives & Programs - public meetings, consensus decision-making, captured by an independent facilitator ● Facilitation of Strategies, Implementation, & Funding - project or program dependent on which organization is leading the effort. During the implementation phase, ECO is to hold Etna EcoDistrict Community Meetings with the following guidelines: ● Schedule: Meetings to occur on the first Wednesday of the month on a quarterly basis. Meetings will be held at Fugh Hall or other accessible, public venue. ● Agenda: Meeting topics to be focused on Etna EcoDistrict implementation work. Items will be collected a month in advance from each of the stakeholder organizations and will be prioritized based on urgency of implementation task. Meetings will be held to a two-hour time frame. ● Decision-making will take the form of consensus and feedback. Each organization is accountable to their own support networks. ECO will document input and share transparently with each stakeholder organization. Decisions are to be reported at the following community meeting on how feedback and input were incorporated. ● Community input and feedback drive decision-making, however projects and programs in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan may be elevated and pursued due to funding opportunities. Implementation decisions are to be reported transparently.

Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 4


Meetings that have occurred before the signing of this document held the principles and procedures outlined in this section and have been captured in “Community Engagement Schedule, Agenda, and Record” (DoC Exhibit F). ECO’s organizational decision-making and appointment procedures are outlined in ECO’s “Corporation Bylaws” (DoC Exhibit B). STAKEHOLDERS: DESCRIPTIONS, ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES, & RESOURCES Residents and Businesses of Etna Etna, PA has a population of approximately 3,400 residents and 160 businesses that make up the core constituency of the Etna EcoDistrict. Select individuals from this group serve in the community’s stakeholder groups and volunteer their time to advance the community and assist with Borough functions. In service to the Etna EcoDistrict, the greatest resource offered by the residents and businesses is their volunteer hours put into both planning and project work. Borough of Etna Municipal Government The Borough of Etna has an elected Mayor and a nine-person Borough Council that has legislative authority in the community. In addition to the elected officials, the Borough has a Manager, office staff, Police Department, Volunteer Fire Department, and Public Works. The Borough of Etna is dedicated to the safety and welfare of the community and provides a range of services related to the management of Etna. The inspiration for the Etna EcoDistrict grew out of the Borough’s work in Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management. The Borough’s relationship and responsibility to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to steward select projects and programs in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan as designated by the Etna Borough Manager and approved by the Etna Borough. Etna Economic Development Corporation EEDC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that is dedicated to the economic development and revitalization of Etna’s Business District. The EEDC currently serves as the fiscal sponsor for the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. EEDC’s relationship and responsibility to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to steward select projects and programs in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan as designated by their Board of Directors. Etna Neighborhood Association ENA is an all-volunteer organization that focuses on enriching and enhancing the life of our community, particularly as it relates to our residents and youth. ENA’s relationship and responsibility to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to support select programs in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan as designated by their Officials. Garden of Etna The Garden of Etna is both a place and a group of gardeners that collaborate on sustainable community agriculture. The Garden of Etna’s responsibility to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to

Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 5


support select projects and programs in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan as designated by the Garden of Etna Manager. Triboro Ecodistrict The Triboro Ecodistrict is an initiative to advance sustainable community development in Millvale, Etna, and Sharpsburg through partnership and collaboration. Formally, the Triboro Ecodistrict is a program of New Sun Rising, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit based in Millvale, and is led by a Director and six community representatives. The initial community engagement, education, and planning stages of the Etna EcoDistrict were supported by a joint grant awarded to the Triboro Ecodistrict. The Triboro Ecodistrict’s responsibility to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan is to support select projects and programs in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan as designated by Etna’s two community representatives. IMPERATIVES COMMITMENT ALIGNMENT This Declaration of Collaboration is a key step in embracing and advancing Etna’s Imperatives Commitment. Through this document, we are advancing our Social Equity Commitment by: ● Identifying ECO as the backbone organization, which serves to represent the Etna community to its fullest extent; ● Identifying ECO’s responsibility as a decision-making body to lead decision-making through non-hierarchical public meetings, consensus building, and transparency; ● Identifying ECO’s role to steward the Etna Ecodistrict Plan through an equitable process driven by community input. We are advancing our Community Resilience Commitment by: ● Sharing ownership and responsibility of Ecodistrict planning with residents, the Borough, and key stakeholders thereby creating a strong governance foundation; ● Identifying ECO’s role to engage with residents and key stakeholders in an inclusive and collaborative planning process where community members take on leadership roles to craft Etna’s visions and advance specific initiatives; ● Identifying ECO’s role in seeking financial resources to carry out Ecodistrict projects and programs, as well as support organizational operations. We are advancing our Environmental Stewardship Commitment by: ● Establishing a commitment to maintain community engagement and planning around our Quality of Life Goals (Water, Mobility, Air Quality, Energy, Food, and Social Equity).

Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 6


SIGNATORIES This declaration will renew each year without notice or review unless a majority of signatories requests that the declaration be reviewed. In the event that a signatory wishes to terminate this declaration, termination requires a majority vote from ECO’s Board of Directors. Signed on: September 18, 2019

Alexis Boytim

Kendra Clarke

Alexis Boytim​, EcoDistricts AP Director, Etna Community Org.

Kendra Clarke​, EcoDistricts AP Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, Third Ward Equity Champion

Jessica Kirin

Lydia Morin

Jessica Kirin​, EcoDistricts AP Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, First Ward Food Champion

Lydia Morin​, EcoDistricts AP Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, Third Ward Water Champion

Josh Purvis

Mary Ellen Ramage

Josh Purvis Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, Third Ward Energy Champion

Mary Ellen Ramage Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, Second Ward Manager, Borough of Etna Member, Etna Economic Dvt. Corp. Representative, Triboro Ecodistrict Water Champion

Megan Tuñón

Robert Tuñón

Megan Tuñón​, EcoDistricts AP Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, First Ward Councilmember, Borough of Etna Member, Etna Neighborhood Assoc. Member, Garden of Etna Etna Business Owner Mobility Champion

Robert Tuñón​, EcoDistricts AP Board Member, Etna Community Org. Resident of Etna, First Ward Member, Etna Economic Dvt. Corp. Member, Etna Neighborhood Assoc. Member, Garden of Etna Etna Business Owner Representative, Triboro Ecodistrict Air Champion

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EXHIBITS A. District Boundary:​ The EcoDistrict Boundary aligns with the legal municipal boundary of the Borough of Etna (see below), an area of approximately 0.8 sq. mi.

B. Etna Community Organization’s ​Articles of Incorporation​, ​Additional Provisions​, and Corporation Bylaws C. Memorandum of Understanding​ with the Borough of Etna D. Letters of Support from Stakeholder Organizations 1. Borough of Etna 2. Etna Economic Development Corporation 3. Etna Neighborhood Association 4. Garden of Etna 5. Triboro Ecodistrict E. Community Asset Map of Etna F. Community Engagement Schedule, Agenda, and Record G. Verification Review Response Letter to EcoDistricts Certification Team Etna EcoDistrict Declaration of Collaboration - 8


IMPERATIVES COMMITMENT Social Equity | Community Resilience | Environmental Stewardship Commitment Adoption Date September 18, 2019 Submitted by: Etna Community Organization Alexis Boytim Kendra Clarke Jessica Kirin Lydia Morin Josh Purvis Mary Ellen Ramage Megan Tuñón Robert Tuñón Supported by: evolveEA Christine Mondor Anna Rosenblum

Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment - 1


TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction Commitment to Social Equity Commitment to Community Resilience Commitment to Environmental Stewardship Exhibits

Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment - 2


INTRODUCTION

The Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment describes the Etna EcoDistrict’s commitments to Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Environmental Stewardship, including how these Imperatives will be embedded in both the Etna EcoDistrict process and its implementation outcomes. Within these overarching Imperatives, the Etna EcoDistrict focuses on six Quality of Life Issues: Water, Mobility, Air Quality, Energy, Food, and Social Equity, which were selected by community members as being most critical in affecting their livelihoods. To date, the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment preparation process has included a number of different engagement strategies to build the foundation for the Etna EcoDistrict and craft an Imperatives Commitment that reflects the community’s goals and visions for Etna. While community representatives from the Etna Community Organization (ECO), the Borough of Etna, and the Garden of Etna attended the 2019 EcoDistricts Incubator in Pittsburgh to begin developing the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment document, planning and formation around this has been occurring at the grassroots level for over 20 months. Beginning in June 2018, ECO and evolveEA, an architecture and urban design firm, hosted and facilitated a six-month Etna EcoDistrict Education Series. With two community meetings per month, ECO and evolveEA engaged Etna community members around the six Quality of Life Issues to develop a shared understanding of each issue, share information about existing issue-specific initiatives in Etna, and collect community input and feedback on priorities within each issue. These meetings were open to everyone and included attendance from Etna residents, organizational partners, municipal leaders, business owners, religious institutions, and other friends of Etna. Each week following the large-scale Education Series meetings, evolveEA and ECO hosted a Champions Meeting for individuals to engage in more in-depth conversation around each Quality of Life Issue. Champions used feedback from the larger community meetings to craft Vision Statements for each Quality of Life Issue that reflects the community’s aspirations for Etna’s future (Table 1). At the conclusion of the Education Series, six booklets, each capturing a unique quality of life issue and the engagement process, were released (see Exhibit B) and our year-long efforts were celebrated. Beginning in March 2019, ECO and evolveEA built on the feedback and visioning from the Education Series and engaged the community in a series of Etna EcoDistrict planning meetings and workshops. During these engagements, the Etna community prioritized projects and programs within each Quality of Life Issue, as well as places for place-based change, to be included in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Exhibit D is a record of each engagement in further detail. In particular to the Imperatives Commitment, on March 6, 2019, ECO and our independent consultants, evolveEA, hosted and facilitated a community workshop (Etna EcoDistrict Planning Meeting #1, presentation slides can be found in Exhibit E) to engage the Etna community around the overarching Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives and the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment. evolveEA presented Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Environmental Stewardship as the overarching principles that guide and offer direction to

Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment - 3


our efforts in each Quality of Life Issue. These three Imperatives best reflect the Etna community’s vision and priorities for a vibrant, sustainable future. evolveEA led the 37 attendees through a workshop in which everyone identified how Etna’s community visions (Table 1) align with these overarching Imperatives. From this we introduced ECO’s intent to steward the Imperatives Commitment, and attendees engaged in a Commitment adoption activity by adding their thumbprints and signatures to a paper button that was “pushed” to officially kick off the Imperatives Commitment and our path to official certification. Overall, each Education Series Meeting, Champions Meeting, Planning Meeting, Community Workshop, and additional community engagement has been part of the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment process and Working Group. This Imperatives Commitment is the result of over 20 months of community engagement and collecting and synthesizing feedback from community members regarding their goals, priorities, and visions for Etna’s future. Exhibit A lists all contributors to the formation of the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment through this engagement process. Our commitments to Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Environmental Stewardship are outlined in the rest of this document. Table 1:​ Community-crafted Vision Statements for each Quality of Life Issue representing the Etna EcoDistrict Quality of Life Issue

Vision Statement

Water

Etna is a resilient community that protects its people and waterways through creative water interventions​.

Mobility

Etna is a connected community where people of all ages have safe, reliable, and affordable mobility options.

Air Quality

Etna is a healthy community with empowered advocates that take a balanced approach to air quality.

Energy

Etna is an innovative community that takes collective action to provide smart energy solutions.

Food

Etna is a food-secure community with opportunities to grow, buy, share, and eat food locally.

Social Equity

Etna is an inclusive community that embraces diversity and activates everyone to shape our future together​.

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COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL EQUITY VISION AND SCOPE To the Etna community, social equity means that all people have full and equal access to opportunities that enable them to reach their greatest potential. Creating an equitable community is about improving the quality of life for everyone by providing residents with what they need to be successful and empowered to live a life of choice. This includes being an inclusive community that embraces Etna’s diversity of people and activates everyone to shape Etna’s collective future together. Social equity serves as the umbrella over which all of Etna’s Community Vision Statements operate. Etna’s Community Vision Statements apply to all of the people, places, and processes of Etna, including residents, businesses, and friends of the Borough. We commit to ensuring the inclusion and consideration of social equity while planning around each Quality of Life Issue, as well as embedding social equity into the planning outcomes of Water, Air Quality, Mobility, Energy, Food, and Social Equity initiatives in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Our Social Equity Vision Statement (Table 1) takes into account Etna’s vulnerable populations (Table 2) through inclusion, empowerment, and activation of ​everyone​ in Etna in all activities. This includes, but is not limited to, diverse community engagement strategies, equitable representation of the Etna community and its vulnerable populations in Etna EcoDistrict governance, consideration of social equity and inclusivity in decision-making and organizational hiring practices, and critical analysis of progress made towards advancing social equity in Etna EcoDistrict project execution, evaluation, and adjustment. Within this framework, we commit to ensuring 1) inclusive and authentic engagement of organizations that serve everyone in Etna, including Etna’s vulnerable populations, throughout the Etna EcoDistrict Formation, Roadmap, and Performance phases (procedural equity), 2) transparent decision-making that considers historic and current inequities, as well as accountability for equitable decisions (structural equity), and 3) the fair distribution of benefits and burdens of Etna EcoDistrict projects and programs across all populations in both current and future generations (distributional and cross-generational equity).

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CONTEXT Etna is home to different vulnerable populations that are included in Table 2. During the first half of the twentieth century, Etna was a booming hub of regional industry and manufacturing within the Greater Pittsburgh network. At its height Etna supported a population of approximately 7,500 individuals in 1930. However, as regional industry began to wane Etna experienced economic decline and lost much of its local manufacturing as well as key resources (e.g., education, food, energy) to support its overall population. In addition, Etna experienced many severe natural disaster events (i.e., Hurricane Ivan) and the construction of the Route 28 Bypass which displaced almost 400 households. Currently, Etna is home to approximately 3,400 individuals. Each of these historical events are major factors that led to the subordination of Etna’s vulnerable populations. Today Etna no longer has indoor educational assets (e.g., schools, community library) to support the growth and learning of Etna’s residents, particularly Etna’s youth. Additionally, access to essential services, including affordable healthy food, medical care, financial services, etc. is limited in the Borough, and restricted mobility options make it difficult for individuals to travel outside of the Borough to access these needs. Last but not least, lack of economic opportunity burdens individuals and households from pursuing a life of choice beyond fulfilling basic needs. Median household income in Etna is approximately $37,831 (compared to a national median household income of $59,039). Approximately 11.3% of Etna residents live below the poverty line, meaning that they earn only enough to support their basic needs of food, housing, and transportation. Across the community, these basic needs on average account for 47.8% of Etna residents’ annual expenditures.

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Table 2:​ Vulnerable populations in the Etna EcoDistrict out of Etna’s total population of approximately 3,400. Vulnerable Group

Distribution in Etna

Vulnerability

Renters

~ 413 households

Escalating rental costs; exposure to poor interior environment conditions

Households and businesses in ~ 427 buildings the floodplain

Location in floodplain; increasing frequency of 100-year storms

Low income households (below the poverty line)

~ 181 households

Historical loss of industry & manufacturing employment sectors; historic economic decline in the Borough; lack of educational and workforce development resources

Food insecure individuals

~ 489 people*

Limited accessibility to fresh, healthy food; access preferences those with growing knowledge, transportation, time, and money

Racial minorities

~ 171 individuals

Socioeconomic inequities; systemic racism

Youth (under 20)

~ 684 individuals

Historic loss of schools, libraries, and other educational assets; lack of youth programming and educational resources

Elders (over 65)

~ 448 individuals

Inequities in accessibility; higher risk of exposure to environmental health (e.g., air quality)

People with disabilities

~ 409 households with one or more individuals with a handicap

Historical socioeconomic inequities in development and accessibility

Unemployed individuals

~ 161 individuals

Historical loss of industry & manufacturing employment sectors; lack of educational and workforce development resources

Unhoused individuals

Insufficient data

Historic economic decline; escalating housing prices

Addiction sufferers

Insufficient data

Opioid epidemic

Recent immigrants

Insufficient data

Socioeconomic inequities; lack of educational and workforce development resources; lack of social services and ESL programs

*Estimated based on Allegheny County average (Just Harvest, 1 in 7 people)

Table 3:​ Equity policies, programs, and plans on the municipal, regional, and county scale that are applicable to the Etna EcoDistrict.

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Equity Policies, Programs, and Plans

Geography

Borough of Etna Diversity Policy

Municipal (Etna Borough)

River Bend Joint Comprehensive Plan

Municipal (Triboro)

Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) Health Equity Briefs

Allegheny County

Various social equity-focused policies, programs, and plans on the municipal, regional, and county levels apply to the Etna EcoDistrict and Etna’s planning around social equity (Table 3). At the municipal level, the Borough of Etna has adopted a ​Diversity Policy ​to support the “maximum practical utilization of certified Minority/Women/Disadvantaged Business Enterprises” through normal business practices and participation of subcontractors and suppliers. The Borough identifies its participation in the Etna EcoDistrict Education Series and EcoDistrict partnership with evolveEA as demonstrations of its commitment to serve underrepresented groups under this policy. Future partnerships and sub-contracts needed for implementation of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan will be analyzed to adhere to this policy. Additionally, Etna’s ​Joint Comprehensive Plan (River Bend)​ shared with the neighboring Boroughs of Millvale and Sharpsburg identifies shared issues throughout each community and opportunities for collaboration to access greater pools of resources to meet collective needs. This initial collaboration allowed for each Borough to share a zoning map to better distribute zoning requirements across the three Boroughs and led to the Triboro Ecodistrict Initiative. At the county level, the Allegheny County Health Department has published​ ​Health Equity Briefs​ on ​Health Access​, ​Chronic Disease and Risk Behaviors​, ​Environment​, ​Maternal and Child Health​, and ​Mental Health and Substance Use​ that describe the causes of differences in the quality of health across different populations and municipalities in Allegheny County, including Etna. The briefs identify disparities related to chronic diseases, access to healthcare, the environment, maternal and child health, and mental health and substance abuse. The Health Equity Briefs were used as a resource to provide statistics on health and equity in Etna during the Etna EcoDistrict Social Equity Education Series.

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WORK PLAN The following work plan describes what specific tasks will be integrated into each EcoDistricts Protocol implementation phase to advance Etna’s Commitment to Social Equity. Equity in the Formation phase​: Procedural: P1. Convene a small group of stakeholders (residents, Borough, Triboro neighbors) to understand Etna’s issues and opportunities, how they fit into the larger Triboro (Etna, Millvale, Sharpsburg) context, and the capacity to collaborate P2. Host an Etna Ecodistrict Education Series that will empower our community members with the knowledge needed to actively participate in our Ecodistrict planning process and make informed decisions in their own lives Structural: S1. Disperse leadership by empowering community members to take on leadership roles as Champions for each Quality of Life Issue / Host Champions meetings S2. Prepare a governance strategy that outlines our “backbone organization” (Etna Community Organization in close collaboration with the Borough of Etna), which will serve to represent the Etna community to its fullest extent and carry out the Etna Ecodistrict Roadmap through an equitable process driven by community input S3. “Form a district team” that represents the community and is committed to making decisions with the community’s best interests in mind, especially those of vulnerable populations Distributional / Cross-Generational: D1. Prepare an Asset Map that identifies social, economic, physical, and organizational assets to understand how assets are currently distributed in the community and where efforts can be concentrated so that all of Etna’s community can benefit Equity in the Roadmap phase: Procedural: P1. Host community workshops that prioritize projects, programs, and places in Etna to be included in the Roadmap, led primarily by community input Structural: S1. Align Etna’s Quality of Life Issue framework with EcoDistricts Priorities and corresponding objectives that best represent community input S2. Select indicators that best reflect community needs to advance equitable change and are feasibly measurable

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Distributional / Cross-Generational: D1. Draft an Ecodistrict Roadmap that is crafted by, implemented by, and representative of the Etna community so that all of Etna’s populations, including future generations, are considered in how projects and programs will impact the community Equity in the Performance phase: Procedural: P1. Collect data biannually based on chosen indicators and analyze to determine progress towards a more equitable Etna P2. Ensure transparency in data collection and reporting by making reports public and open to community feedback P3. Adjust the Roadmap as needed to advance equity in Etna Structural: S1. Host public quarterly ECO meetings to provide progress updates, collect feedback, and ultimately maintain our open and transparent public engagement process Distributional / Cross-Generational D1. Collect data after implementation of each project, program, and event to understand who is benefiting and to inform Roadmap adjustments as needed for a more equitable distribution of positive impact

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RESPONSIBILITIES AND SCHEDULE Table 4:​ Social equity responsibilities and timeline. Under “Equity task,” “P” represents a procedural equity task, “S” represents a structural equity task, and “D” represents a distributional / cross-generational equity task. The Equity tasks align with the previous “Work Plan” section. Equity Task

Responsible Party

Timeline

P1

Community leaders in Etna, Millvale and Sharpsburg

Completed: December 2016

P2

ECO, evolveEA

Completed: December 2018

S1

ECO, evolveEA

Champions Meeting completed with Etna EcoDistrict Education Series, December 2018 *will be an on-going effort going forward

S3

ECO, Etna Borough, evolveEA

Completed: February 2019

S2

ECO

Completed: March 2019

D1

ECO, Etna Borough

Completed: January 2017

P1

ECO, evolveEA

Began: February 2019 Anticipated completion by: September 2019

S1

ECO

Began: April 2019 Anticipated completion by: September 2019

S2

ECO

Began: April 2019 Anticipated completion by: September 2019

D1

evolveEA, ECO

Began: February 2019 Anticipated completion by: September 2019

P1

ECO

Biannually beginning 2 years after certification (Anticipated certification November 2019)

P2

ECO

Annually beginning 2020

P3

ECO

Biannually beginning 2 years after certification (Anticipated certification November 2019)

S1

ECO

Quarterly beginning January 2020

Formation Phase

Roadmap Phase

Performance Phase

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INDICATOR For the Social Equity Imperative, we will measure “percentage of population living below the poverty level,” as suggested in the EcoDistricts Protocol, which we define as only earning enough income to support the bare necessities of food, housing, and transportation. EVALUATION AND ADJUSTMENT Etna commits to measuring each chosen indicator, honestly reporting progress based on such data, using each progress report to evaluate our efforts, and adjusting our plan as needed to advance equity in Etna. We commit to transparency in this process and will allow opportunities for community engagement and public feedback to better align our Roadmap to our equity vision, as needed. LETTERS OF SUPPORT For our Commitment to Social Equity we have received Letters of Support from PA State Senator Lindsey Williams, PA State Representative Sara Innamorato, Allegheny County Councilwoman Anita Prizio, and Shaler Area School District that can be found in Exhibit C.

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COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY RESILIENCE VISION AND SCOPE To the Etna community, community resilience means being proactive, adaptive, and transformational when facing adverse events, whether they be social, environmental, or economic. Creating a resilient community is not only about strengthening our capacity to bounce back from shocks or stresses, but also about transforming adverse events into opportunities and thereby bouncing forward. We recognize that resilience must be integrated into each of our Quality of Life Issues, as well as into the overarching systems through which each Quality of Life Issue interacts with one another. To protect our residents and minimize impact from adverse events, we must take a holistic approach to Water, Air Quality, Mobility, Energy, Food, and Social Equity that prepares our community to face the expected and unexpected with strength. Community resilience also requires us to rely on networks of knowledge, expertise, and organizational resources that strengthen our ability to recover from shocks and stresses. We commit to: 1) integrating resilience into initiatives addressing water, food, energy, air, mobility, and social equity and empowering our community members and leadership with the knowledge and expertise needed to prepare for, recover from, and transform shocks and stressors (knowledge and expertise); 2) strengthening social networks, collective identity, and financial resources by building relationships through diverse engagement processes, advancing social equity, empowering community Champions as leaders, and securing continuous financial resources from a diverse pool of sources (organizations and networks), 3) strengthening the accessibility of essential services and economic opportunities that improve individual and community health, well-being, and overall quality of life (people), and 4) improving the health and functionality of Etna’s ecosystems and building infrastructure to withstand repeated physical stress and absorb shocks and stressors (place). Examples of knowledge, expertise, organizations, and networks in Etna that can be relied on to enhance the community’s resilience include community member knowledge and expertise, support networks at Etna’s various churches and affiliations, including Calvert Memorial and Bread of Life Food Pantry, the Senior Center, All Saints, and Roots of Faith; the Borough of Etna; the Etna Economic Development Corporation; Millvale, Sharpsburg, and the Triboro Ecodistrict; and CONNECT, among many others. Overall, we commit to being a resilient community by proactively identifying existing and potential shocks and stresses that could impact our community, empowering our residents with the knowledge they need to minimize or avoid their impacts, mitigating the negative impacts of shocks and stresses as a united community, and transforming adversity into opportunity so that our community may thrive.

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CONTEXT Various social, environmental, and economic shocks and stresses, as detailed in Tables 5 and 6, currently impact, have impacted, or may impact the Etna community. Actions in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan will aim to implement proactive strategies, better prepare the community, and lessen the impact of these shocks and stressors. Table 5:​ Potential social, economic, and environmental shocks in the district Shocks

Type

Character

Relative Magnitude

At-risk Population

Flooding

Social, Environmental

Occur most often in the spring and summer

High

Households in the floodplain

Infrastructure collapse

Environmental

Buildings and infrastructure are aging with limited funds for repairs

Medium

Everyone, especially homeowners

Landslides

Social, Environmental

Occur infrequently after heavy rain events

Medium

Homeowners on or below unstable hillsides

Heat wave

Social, Environmental

Extreme weather can cause blackouts and health concerns

Medium

Youth; Elders; Individuals with health concerns

Polar vortex

Social, Environmental

Extreme weather can cause blackouts and health concerns

Medium

Youth; Elders; Individuals with health concerns

Major employer Social, Economic moves to Etna or the region (such as HQ2)

A major employer moving in can put stress on cost of living and housing prices

Medium

Low income households; Renters

Economic collapse

Economic

National economic collapse would impact jobs and cost of living

Medium

Everyone, especially low-income and unemployed households

Disease outbreak

Social

Occurs infrequently but could put pressure on health care services

Low

Youth; Elders; Individuals with health concerns

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Table 6​: Chronic social, economic, and environmental stresses in the district. Stresses

Type

Character

Magnitude

At-risk Population

Pine Creek water Environmental quality (CSOs)

CSOs dump sewage into Pine Creek, affecting stream and animal health

High

N/A

Substance abuse

Social, Economic

The opioid epidemic is prominent and severe

High

Addiction sufferers

Food insecurity

Social, Economic

Access to healthy, fresh food is limited; ~489 people are food insecure

High

Low income households; households that do not own cars; youth

Educational access

Social

Lack of adult and youth educational resources

Medium

Youth; Unemployed individuals

Poor air quality

Environmental, Social

Greater Pittsburgh region suffers from NAAQS non-compliance for Ozone and PM2.5

Medium

Everyone, esp. youth, elders, and those with health concerns (esp. heart disease and asthma)

Aging infrastructure

Environmental, Economic

Buildings and infrastructure are aging with limited funds for repairs

Medium

Everyone, especially homeowners

Inefficient public transportation

Environmental, Economic

Bus service is limited, esp. on weekends; ~10% of residents do not own a car

Medium

Households that do not own cars

Rising cost of living

Economic

The greater Pittsburgh area is experiencing a steady rise in living costs

Medium

Everyone, esp. low-income households

Poverty

Social, Economic

~181 households in Etna live below the poverty line

Medium

Low-income households; Unemployed individuals

Energy burden

Social, Economic, Environmental

Rising energy costs; instability of the grid; environmental impact of burning fossil fuels

Medium

Low-income residents; Renters

Unemployment

Social, Economic

~161 individuals in Etna are unemployed

Low

Low-income households

Aging population

Social

~20% of Etna’s population is over the age of 65 and services to support them may be lacking

Low

Elders

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Table 7: ​Resilience policies, programs, and plans applicable to the Etna EcoDistrict. Resilience Policies, Programs, and Plans

Geography

Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378)

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353)

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Community Rating System

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

River Bend Joint Comprehensive Plan

Regional (Triboro)

Various resilience-focused policies, programs, and plans at the municipal and regional levels apply to the Etna EcoDistrict and Etna’s planning for community resilience (Table 7). At the municipal level, the Borough of Etna has adopted two ordinances to address stormwater runoff and flooding concerns: ​Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378)​ and ​Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353)​. Ordinance No. 1378 outlines requirements for the safe management of stormwater runoff in the Borough to protect the health, safety, and general welfare of Etna’s residents. Ordinance No. 1353 was adopted in 2014 to outline minimum requirements for new construction and development within areas of the Borough that are subject to flooding. The Borough of Etna also has a ​Green Infrastructure Master Plan​ ​and participates in the F ​ EMA​ ​Community Rating System​, ​both of which address stormwater mitigation. Etna’s Green Infrastructure Master Plan assesses the feasibility of green infrastructure projects as a way to reduce flooding and reduce or eliminate the need for new gray infrastructure projects. The plan outlines five phases of green infrastructure projects (23 sites) that are estimated to manage up to 16.1 million gallons of stormwater runoff per year. Participation in the Community Rating System program provides an opportunity to lower Etna’s vulnerability to flooding through a series of volunteer initiatives. Beginning in 1996, the Borough of Etna has reduced its class rating from 10 to 7, which allows for a 15% discount on flood insurance premiums to anyone in Etna purchasing insurance. These resilience initiatives in the Borough have been presented to the community as part of the Etna EcoDistrict Education Series, and future sites in the GI Master Plan have been included in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan designs. At the regional level, the ​River Bend Joint Comprehensive Plan​ offers guidance to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan and supports Triboro collaboration for the three Borough’s to address shocks and stresses together.

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WORK PLAN The following work plan describes what specific tasks will be integrated into each EcoDistricts Protocol implementation phase to advance Etna’s Commitment to Community Resilience. Resilience in the Formation phase: Knowledge & Expertise: KE1. Convene a core Ecodistrict team at the 2019 Pittsburgh Incubator to equip each community member with appropriate knowledge and process community input to best understand how resilience integrates into our planning strategy KE2. Empower community members and stakeholders with subject knowledge on our six Quality of Life issues and EcoDistricts Imperatives as they relate to community resilience through a year-long Etna Ecodistrict Education Series Organizations & Networks: ON1. Build up the Etna Community Organization as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with a staffed Director to serve as the backbone organization to carry out the Etna EcoDistrict Plan, in close collaboration with the Borough of Etna ON2. Form Champions Groups of Etna community members for each Quality of Life issue to decentralize leadership, build community and form relationships, and ensure sustainability Resilience in the Roadmap phase: Knowledge & Expertise: KE1. Engage all stakeholders in Community Planning Workshops to collect community input, leverage partner knowledge and expertise, and build an Ecodistrict Plan by the community, for the community Organizations & Networks: ON1. Develop a financial funding strategy that will diversify our resource pools to carry out our Roadmap ON2. Provide mini-grant funds during the planning process for community members to develop equitable projects around water, air, mobility, food, and energy, take ownership over small-win projects, and advance Etna’s Ecodistrict work People: PE1. Ensure that the health, well-being, and quality of life of Etna’s residents is at the center of each Roadmap action item, project, or program

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Place: PL1. Ensure that improvement of infrastructure and ecosystem health are considered in the Plan to build resiliency in Etna’s physical features Resilience in the Performance phase: Knowledge & Expertise: KE1. Collect and publicly report data bi-annually based on identified indicators in the Etna Ecodistrict Plan and use information to identify progress made and adjust plan as needed KE2. Engage the community in transparent feedback collection to analyze progress made towards fulfilling Etna’s community Visions and strengthen the plan accordingly Organizations & Networks: ON1. Pursue funding sources and other organizational collaborations that continually strengthen Etna’s Ecodistrict Plan and support its implementation in the district ON2. Report progress made over the measuring period to funders and partner organizations

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RESPONSIBILITIES AND SCHEDULE Table 8​: Community resilience responsibilities and timeline. Under “Resilience task,” “KE” represents a “knowledge & expertise” task, “ON” represents a “organization & networks” task, and “PE” represents a “people” task, and “PL” represents a “place” task. The Resilience tasks align with the previous “Work Plan” section. Resilience Task

Responsible Party

Timeline

KE1

ECO

Completed: April 2019

KE2

evolveEA, ECO

Began: June 2018 Completed: December 2018

ON1

ECO

Began: January 2018 Anticipated 501(c)(3) status: December 2019

ON2

ECO, evolveEA

Champions Meeting completed with Etna EcoDistrict Education Series, December 2018 *will be an on-going effort going forward

KE1

ECO, evolveEA

Began: February 2019 Anticipated completion by: September 2019

ON1

ECO

Anticipated completion by: December 2019

ON2

Triboro Ecodistrict, ECO

Began: January 2019 Anticipated completion by: September 2019

PE1

ECO

Anticipated completion by: September 2019

PL1

ECO

Anticipated completion by: September 2019

KE1

ECO

Biannually beginning 2 years after certification (Anticipated certification November 2019)

KE2

ECO

Quarterly beginning January 2020

ON1

ECO

Quarterly beginning October 2019

ON2

ECO

Biannually beginning 2 years after certification (Anticipated certification November 2019)

Formation Phase

Roadmap Phase

Performance Phase

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INDICATOR For the Community Resilience Imperative, we will measure “percentage of voter participation in the latest election” as a social indicator, “percentage of households in poverty” as an economic indicator, and “percentage of land area in a 100-year floodplain” as an environmental indicator. Percentage of voter participation will allow us to understand civic engagement and resilience in our community’s social network. Percentage of households in poverty will allow us to understand if quality of life is improved and gauge our community’s preparedness to face economic stressors or shocks. Percentage of land area in a 100-year floodplain will allow us to understand the most flood-vulnerable areas of the community and land uses (green space, residential, commercial) that may be impacted by severe flooding. EVALUATION AND ADJUSTMENT Etna commits to measuring each chosen indicator, honestly reporting progress based on such data, using each progress report to evaluate our efforts, and adjusting our plan as needed to advance equity in Etna. We commit to transparency in this process and will allow opportunities for community engagement and public feedback to better align our Roadmap to our resilience vision as needed. LETTER OF SUPPORT For our Commitment to Community Resilience we have received a Letter of Support from ALCOSAN that can be found in Exhibit C.

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COMMITMENT TO ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP VISION AND SCOPE To the Etna community, environmental stewardship describes the responsible use and protection of the natural environmental through community-led conservation, restoration, and the implementation of sustainable practices. As a community we are working to reduce the negative impact that we have on the environment (our environmental footprint), while working to maximize the positive environmental and social impact that we have (our handprint), so that our current needs do not compromise those of future generations. We understand that local actions in our community to care for our built environment and surrounding natural habitats together will have the greatest impact in protecting the health of the environment and the community. We commit to approaching environmental issues from a systems perspective that considers ecosystem health, habitat restoration, natural resource conservation, public health, and climate protection. We commit to being a steward for our environment. To do this successfully, we must be intentional about incorporating restorative and sustainable practices into each of our Quality of Life Issue focus areas. Within ​Water​, we commit to preserving and strengthening the Pine Creek ecosystem, conserving water through sustainable practices (e.g., rain barrel), and effectively managing stormwater through the support of green infrastructure projects. Within ​Mobility​, we commit to enhancing Etna’s walkability and bikeability, strengthening Etna’s public transportation connections to the region, and expanding alternative, renewable fuel options for vehicles to transition away from carbon-based transportation. Within ​Air Quality​, we commit to educating the community about harmful air emissions both indoors and outdoors, creating clean air buffers and carbon sinks through vegetation, parklets, and other strategies, and preventing pollution when possible. Within ​Energy​, we commit to improving energy efficiency, reducing building energy consumption when possible, decarbonizing electricity generation and reducing the use of grid-supplied energy to meet Borough energy demand, and achieving carbon neutrality by 2050 (to be refined in the Roadmap Phase). Within ​Food, ​we commit to encouraging local, low-input growing, strengthening the quantity and access to Etna’s food resources, and reducing food waste. Within ​Equity, ​we commit to strengthening access to healthy outdoor environments to everyone in Etna and ensuring that vulnerable populations are not disproportionately affected by environmental concerns. Overall, as a community we chose to address Environmental Stewardship as an Imperative rather than Climate Protection because it best resonates with our collective values and Quality of Life Issue Vision Statements. Despite this, we recognize EcoDistricts’ designated Climate Protection Imperative in the EcoDistricts Protocol as an important component to be incorporated within our Commitment to Environmental Stewardship. Furthermore, we recognize the importance of setting a commitment to carbon neutrality as a pathway for incorporating intentional practices in our community that will encourage us to be better

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stewards of our natural resources and overall environment. As an EcoDistrict, Etna is committed to implementing the necessary practices and tools to achieve carbon neutrality by the year 2050. To meet this goal, we will intertwine our efforts on reducing carbon emissions within each Quality of Life Issue with a particular focus on the built environment and transportation, building (residential, municipal, and commercial), and infrastructure sectors. If needed, this date can be refined in the Roadmap Phase as we work towards achieving our community visions.

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CONTEXT With respect to energy consumption, estimated annual energy consumption of all buildings in the Borough is over 260,000,000 kBTU (based on NREL estimates), with 60% attributed to residential buildings, 23% attributed to commercial buildings, and 17% attributed to industrial buildings. Likewise, based on the fuel source breakdown for Etna’s region and the source energy breakdown for the Ohio Valley electric grid (RFCW), it is estimated that Etna produces over 55,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions annually. This equates to 16 metric tons per Etna resident. Approximately 48% of these emissions are attributed to vehicles (80% gasoline/20% diesel), 11% is attributed to natural gas (15% industrial/50% commercial/35% residential)), and the remaining 41% is attributed to electricity (22% industrial/40% commercial/38% residential). While Etna does not contain any landfills, the waste produced in the Borough does have an impact on GHG emissions, however, we are unable to quantify to what extent at this time. The Etna EcoDistrict intends to calculate more specifically the Borough’s detailed baseline energy use, CO2 emissions inventory, and waste generation to the best of our ability during the Roadmap phase. In other ways, the Etna community has a strong relationship with the natural environment. Pine Creek is a central feature that runs through Etna’s urban environment before emptying into the Allegheny River. The Dougherty Nature Trail allows close access to Pine Creek for recreational activities. Work to restore Pine Creek’s riparian buffer is a priority of the Borough for beautification, habitat restoration, and flood absorption services. Etna is also home to many street trees and innovative green stormwater infrastructure projects that purify air, absorb stormwater, and harmonize Etna’s urban systems with natural ecosystem functioning. The Garden of Etna is a community garden located on a formerly vacant lot that allows residents to interact with the food production process by sustainably growing and harvesting their own food organically. The Etna EcoDistrict intends to build upon these assets to strengthen the community's relationships with the natural environment and ingrain sustainable practices into our daily lives. Table 8: Environmental Stewardship policies, programs, and plans applicable to the Etna EcoDistrict Environmental Stewardship Policies, Programs, and Plans

Geography

Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan (PCAP) 3.0

Regional (City of Pittsburgh)

PA State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency

State (Pennsylvania)

At the municipal level, the​ ​Etna GI Master Plan​ aims to effectively manage stormwater and reduce flooding as well as reduce or eliminate the need for new gray infrastructure projects (see the Commitment to Community Resilience). The Etna GI Master Plan incorporates sustainable practices in an urban environment that more closely mimic natural systems, such as the use of rain gardens, pervious surfaces, and stormwater catchments. Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment - 23


At the regional level, the​ ​Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan (PCAP) 3.0​ is a comprehensive plan to address climate change. Within this plan are 2030 District Goals that set national standards for high performance buildings by committing properties to 50% reduction in energy use, water consumption, and transportation emissions by 2030, while improving indoor air quality. The Etna EcoDistrict will use the PCAP 3.0 as a resource and potential model during the Roadmap Phase and future Plan revisions to reduce the Borough’s carbon footprint and transition to carbon neutrality. At the state level, there are a number of different ​incentives for renewables and efficiency to encourage individuals to be more energy efficient and transition to alternative fuel for their homes and/or vehicles. These include tax credits, rebates, and loan programs, including but not limited to Tax Credits for Consumer Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Products, the Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Rebate Program, and the Keystone Home Energy Loan Program. The Etna EcoDistrict Plan will consider these programs as options to share with the community when pursuing initiatives to reduce resident energy burden and encourage the use of alternative fuel.

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WORK PLAN Environmental Stewardship in the Formation Phase: 1. Empower community members and stakeholders with subject knowledge on our six Quality of Life issues and EcoDistricts Imperatives as they relate to environmental stewardship through a year-long Etna Ecodistrict Education Series 2. Invite key stakeholders and partners in energy, food and agriculture, environmental protection, water resources, and other fields to provide subject-matter expertise at community meetings to inform planning decisions Environmental Stewardship in the Roadmap phase: 1. Ensure that ecosystem health, preservation of green space, and relationship between Etna’s urban and natural systems are considered in Etna EcoDistrict Plan action items, projects, and programs 2. Collect baseline data on Etna’s energy consumption, pollution types and sources, proportion of conserved and preserved ecosystems, and other data that will establish our reference for progress as we implement the Etna EcoDistrict Plan 3. Refine the target year set to achieve carbon neutrality and minimize our overall environmental impact to net zero Environmental Stewardship in the Performance phase: 1. Collect and publicly report data bi-annually based on identified indicators in the Etna Ecodistrict Plan 2. Engage the community in transparent feedback collection to analyze progress made towards fulfilling Etna’s environmental stewardship and carbon neutrality commitments, identify areas for improvement, and adjust the plan accordingly .

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RESPONSIBILITIES AND SCHEDULE Table 9: Environmental Stewardship responsibilities and timeline Climate Protection Task

Responsible Party

Timeline

1

ECO, evolveEA

Completed: December 2018

2

ECO, evolveEA

Completed: December 2018

1

ECO

Anticipated completion by: September 2019

2

ECO, Borough of Etna

Anticipated completion by: May 2020

3

ECO, Borough of Etna

Anticipated completion by: September 2019

1

ECO

Biannually beginning 2 years after certification (Anticipated certification November 2019)

2

ECO

Quarterly beginning 2020

Formation Phase

Roadmap Phase

Performance Phase

INDICATOR For the Environmental Stewardship Imperative, we will measure “renewable power generated within the district” (in megawatt hours per year) to meet the Borough’s energy demands, as well as percentage of Pine Creek riparian buffer that is fully functioning. Renewable power generated within Etna to meet Etna’s energy demand will allow us to understand our progress towards the implementation of carbon-free, clean energy production strategies. Percentage of Pine Creek riparian buffer that is fully functioning will allow us to understand our progress towards restoring ecosystem health in critical areas that provide key services (e.g., recreation, flood absorption) to our community. EVALUATION AND ADJUSTMENT Etna commits to measuring each chosen indicator, honestly reporting progress based on such data, using each progress report to evaluate our efforts, and adjusting our plan as needed to advance equity in Etna. We commit to transparency in this process and will allow opportunities for community engagement and public feedback to better align our Roadmap to our environmental stewardship vision as needed. LETTERS OF SUPPORT For our Commitment to Environmental Stewardship we have received Letters of Support from Friends of the Riverfront and Conservation Consultants Inc. (see Exhibit C).

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EXHIBITS A. Etna Community Working Group​: This document includes everyone involved in the Etna EcoDistrict process to date, including attendance at meetings, workshops, and events and total engagements with the Etna EcoDistrict. The Etna EcoDistrict process has held approximately 33 public meetings with at least 325 unique participants and 1,118 points of engagement. In particular, the Etna EcoDistrict Planning Meeting #1 represents the adoption of the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives and initiation of the official certification process. See Exhibit D for descriptions of other meetings and engagements. B. Etna EcoDistrict Education Booklets: ​The Etna EcoDistrict Education Booklets are a set of educational resources on our Quality of Life Issues produced from the Etna EcoDistrict Education Series. They are a public resource that can be accessed digitally online by anyone. Additionally, there are 42 printed booklets that are shared and circulated by community members using a lending system. 1. Etna EcoDistrict Water Booklet 2. Etna EcoDistrict Mobility Booklet 3. Etna EcoDistrict Air Booklet 4. Etna EcoDistrict Energy Booklet 5. Etna EcoDistrict Food Booklet 6. Etna EcoDistrict Equity Booklet C. Letters of Support Social Equity 1. County Councilwoman, Anita Prizio 2. PA State Representative Sara Innamorato 3. PA State Senator Lindsey Williams 4. Shaler Area School District Community Resilience 5. ALCOSAN Environmental Stewardship 6. Conservation Consultants, Inc. 7. Friends of the Riverfront General 8. 412 Food Rescue 9. Grow Pittsburgh D. Etna EcoDistrict Community Engagement Schedule, Agenda, and Record:​ This document describes each of the 33 community engagements throughout our EcoDistrict process to date, as well as outlined future meetings. Date, location,

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agenda, and outcomes are included for each meeting. Information on attendees and contributors to the Etna EcoDistrict process thus far is displayed in Exhibit A. E. Etna EcoDistrict Planning Meeting #1 Presentation​: These slides serve to provide context on the first Etna EcoDistrict Planning Meeting in which our independent consultant, evolveEA, presented the three Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives to the Etna community. Attendees learned about each overarching Imperative, introduced as guiding principles to each Quality of Life Issue. At the close of the meeting, we reached consensus for adopting the Imperatives through an activity where attendees signed the Etna EcoDistrict Button with their names and thumbprints in ink. We “pushed” the button to officially kick of our EcoDistrict Certification journey. Please note that the entire Imperatives portion of the presentation is included, but some slides in the presentation have been omitted in this exhibit, such as introductory acknowledgements, prior meeting recaps, future meetings, etc. due to relevance and presentation size.

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ETNA ECODISTRICT ROADMAP Roadmap Adoption Date October 14, 2019 Principal Authors: Etna Community Organization Alexis Boytim Kendra Clarke Jessica Kirin Lydia Morin Josh Purvis Mary Ellen Ramage Megan Tuñón Robert Tuñón evolveEA Christine Mondor Anna Rosenblum

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction District Boundary Priority-Based Asset Map Census of Local Plans Ongoing & Imminent Activities by Others Priorities & Objectives Indicators Existing Conditions & Baseline Performance Assessment Existing Local Targets & Parallel Efforts Roadmap Horizon Year District Build-Out Estimate Horizon Year Performance Targets Potential Strategies Strategies Assessment & Ranking Responsibilities, Funding, & Implementation Schedule Exhibits

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 2


INTRODUCTION

The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap describes the Etna Community Organization’s plan to improve quality of life for all who live, work, and play in Etna. To achieve this goal, the Roadmap outlines an Action Plan towards fulfilling Community Vision Statements for each Etna EcoDistrict Quality of Life Issue (Table 1) and advancing the Etna EcoDistrict’s overarching Imperatives of Social Equity, Community Resilience, and Environmental Stewardship. Table 1:​ Community-crafted Vision Statements for each Quality of Life Issue representing the Etna EcoDistrict. Quality of Life Issue

Vision Statement

Water

Etna is a resilient community that protects its people and waterways through creative water interventions​.

Mobility

Etna is a connected community where people of all ages have safe, reliable, and affordable mobility options.

Air Quality

Etna is a healthy community with empowered advocates that take a balanced approach to air quality.

Energy

Etna is an innovative community that takes collective action to provide smart energy solutions.

Food

Etna is a food-secure community with opportunities to grow, buy, share, and eat food locally.

Social Equity

Etna is an inclusive community that embraces diversity and activates everyone to shape our future together​.

The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap preparation process has included a number of different engagements to build community consensus, align strategies with community values and goals, and activate community members and partners to assist in Roadmap implementation. Beginning in June 2018, the Etna Community Organization (ECO) and independent consultant evolveEA hosted and facilitated a six-month Etna EcoDistrict Education Series. With two meetings per month, this Series engaged Etna community members around the six Quality of Life Issues to develop a shared understanding of each topic, provide information about existing issue-specific initiatives in Etna, and collect community input and feedback on priorities within each issue. These meetings were open to everyone and included attendance from Etna residents, organizational partners, municipal leaders, business owners, religious institutions, and other friends of Etna. Each week following the large-scale Education Series Meetings, evolveEA and ECO hosted a Champions Meeting for individuals to engage in deeper conversation around each Quality of Life Issue. Champions used feedback from the larger community meetings to craft Vision Statements that reflects the community’s aspirations for Etna’s future (Table 1). At the conclusion of the Education

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Series, six booklets, each capturing a unique Quality of Life Issue and the engagement process, were released for community distribution (​Exhibit A​). Beginning in 2019, ECO and evolveEA hosted a series of community planning meetings and workshops to develop a plan of action building on the ideas conceived throughout the 2018 Education Series. Community members were engaged to develop and prioritize community goals, strategies, indicators, and 2030 targets. Attendees had the opportunity to provide feedback and ideas for refinement on several occasions during these meetings. All together, each engagement involved collecting and synthesizing feedback from the community regarding their priorities and how to best achieve Etna’s six Quality of Life Community Vision Statements. Final community feedback was collected and integrated into the Roadmap in September 2019. This was followed by an extensive review and editing process by the Etna Community Organization in October 2019. Overall, each Education Series Meeting, Champions Meeting, Community Workshop, Community Planning Meeting, and additional community engagement has contributed to the development of the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap (see ​Exhibit C ​for further detail of this process). The Etna Ecodistrict Roadmap shall be adopted by the Etna Community Organization through a consensus-based process in which each Board Member has reviewed the document and verified its alignment with Etna’s community goals and visions. Once endorsed, the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap will formally become a part of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​), which includes design proposals for key places in Etna, as well as additional information and context. The Etna EcoDistrict Plan is currently in draft and revision stages with December 2019 as the anticipated date of completion for formal adoption. Please note that finalization of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan will not change the contents of the Roadmap. The Etna EcoDistrict Plan shall be stewarded primarily by the Etna Community Organization in strong collaboration with the Borough of Etna, partner organizations, and residents. The names and affiliations of the adopters of the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap and the Etna EcoDistrict Plan include: ● Alexis Boytim, ECO Director ● Kendra Clarke, ECO Board Member ● Jessica Kirin, ECO Board Member ● Lydia Morin, ECO Board Member ● Mary Ellen Ramage, ECO Board Member ● Megan Tuñón, ECO Board Member ● Robert Tuñón, ECO Board Member The Etna EcoDistrict Plan will also be adopted as an addendum to the Borough of Etna’s Comprehensive Plan (River Bend) by Etna’s Borough Council at a future date. Please note that Borough adoption will not change the contents of the Roadmap. The names and affiliations of the adopters of Etna’s Borough Council include:

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● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Pete Ramage, Ward 2, Chairman David Becki, Ward 3, Vice Chairman Bill O’Dell, Ward 3 Greg Porter, Ward 1 Ron Trader, Ward 2 Rudy Milcic, Jr., Ward 1 Megan Tuñón, Ward 1 Edward V. Burke, III, Ward 2 Dave Farmerie, Ward 3

The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap was prepared from the outset in conformance with the Protocol, using a format different than the template provided in the EcoDistricts Certified Handbook. This document acts as a crosswalk to describe the location of plan content as it corresponds to the sections identified in the template.

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DISTRICT BOUNDARY The Etna EcoDistrict Boundary aligns with the legal municipal boundary of the Borough of Etna (see Figure 1), an area of approximately 0.8 square miles.

Figure 1: Map of Etna highlighting the district boundary in a light gray outline.

PRIORITY-BASED ASSET MAP The following table (Table 2) describes Etna’s existing assets organized by EcoDistrict Priority. As illustrated in the table, Etna currently contains many assets in each of the six EcoDistrict Priority Areas. Etna is rich with Place-related assets, including organizations, cultural assets, and events. The majority of Etna’s Prosperity-related assets are existing businesses and the organizations that support them. Health and Wellbeing assets are primarily places and activities related to recreation and food. Etna’s connectivity-related assets are related to improving physical connections with street and sidewalk improvements. Living Infrastructure and Resource Restoration assets consist of green infrastructure and

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stormwater management initiatives, and connecting to the Allegheny River and Pine Creek. Additionally, Etna contains several gardens contributing to improved air quality. The Connectivity and Resource Regeneration Priorities contain the highest number of assets located within Etna that are controlled outside of Etna. The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap builds on Etna’s existing assets, works to fill gaps, and focuses on improvements that are within ECO’s and Etna Borough’s control. Increased opportunities for Prosperity are needed, including start-up business support, innovative economic development opportunities, and more jobs and job training. While the community has several Health and Wellness assets, the Roadmap works to fill gaps related to food by providing additional opportunities to produce, process, and distribute food equitably. Existing Connectivity assets are strengthened by recommendations for complete street improvements, additional trails, and other projects that compliment or further these existing assets. Etna is lacking in digital network assets, which is addressed through the implementation of public wifi access points. Similarly, recommendations related to green infrastructure strengthen and compliment existing Living Infrastructure assets. Additional opportunities for ecosystem health and connecting the community to nature (especially Pine Creek) are identified. Lastly, the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap advances opportunities to improve air quality, water quality, and waste diversion, with a variety of Resource Regeneration recommendations. Additional Priority-Based Asset Map content, including detailed descriptions of Etna’s existing assets, can be found in the Community Asset Map of Etna (​Exhibit D​) and each of the six Etna EcoDistrict Education Booklets (​Exhibit A, 1-6​). Table 2:​ Existing Etna assets, organized by EcoDistrict Priority. Primary assets include those located controlled within Etna, secondary assets include those located within Etna but controlled outside of Etna, and tertiary assets include those located and controlled outside of Etna. EcoDistrict Priority

Primary Asset Located and controlled within Etna

Secondary Asset Located in Etna, controlled outside of Etna

Tertiary Asset Located and controlled outside of Etna

Place

Etna Borough Municipal Building; Council Chamber; Fugh Hall; American Flag and Poll; Borough Council; Public Meetings; Mayor; Borough Manager; Zoning and Code Enforcement; Etna Newsletter; Etna Borough website; Mural & War Memorial Gardens; Joint Comprehensive Plan (River Bend); Sustainable PA Community; Jockey Club Hall; Etna-Shaler Post 9197 V.F.W.; War Memorial; Mural at DOugherty Veterans Field’ Jester’s Court and Winschel St. Mural; 448 Studios; Etna Studios; I.D. Labs (recording studio); Etna Senior Center; Etna Commons; Union Hotel; Spang Mansion’ Spang Chalfant/Tippins Machinery; Etna Neighborhood Assoc.; Pride of Etna; Etna

City of Bridges Community Land Trust permanently affordable housing

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Teen Advisory Board; American Legion; Etna Community Day; Light the Night Celebration; Memorial Day Parade; EEDC’s Summer Carnival; All Saints Summer Festival; Night at the Races; Summer Concerts at the Park; Etna Art Tour; Emmanuel L.’s Senior Friendship; Boy and Girl Scouts; ECO

Prosperity

The ScareHouse; Butler St. Business District; Freeport Street Businesses; Bridge Street Businesses; Grant Street Business District; Etna Industrial Park; Forms & Surfaces headquarters; Etna Towne Center; Former Crescent Street Businesses; Route 8 Businesses; Etna Economic Development Corporation; EtnaLive.org

Facade Grant Program; Allegheny Together Program

Shaler Area School District; Shaler North Hills Library; North Hills Community Outreach Center

Health & Wellbeing

Etna Police Dept and Force; Etna Fire Dept and Volunteers; Etna Borough Public Works Bldg and Dept.; Garden of Etna and members; Live Well Allegheny Community; Etna Farmers Market; Dougherty Veterans Field; Sullivan Field; Batting cages; Hafner Field; Tony Damiano Memorial Deck; Etna Borough Pool; Etna Borough Playground; Etna Borough Basketball Court; Aikido of Pittsburgh; Ideal Dance; Art & Style Dance Studio, Snap Fitness; OMP Wrestling; En Garde Fencing Studio; Dirty Dozen Race on High St.; Etna Borough Athletic Club; Etna Deck Hockey Assoc.; Mayor’s Cup; Cops vs. Kids Game; Teen Day Open Streets; Water Aerobics; Dart Ball League; Urban Walking Trails; Etna Farmers Market; Bread of Life Food Pantry; Etna Food Businesses

Shaler EMS

Connectivity

Pine St. Pedestrian Bridge; Pedestrian Friendly Sidewalks; Pine Creek Connector Trail; Etna Complete Streets Resolution; Etna Pedestrian Alliance; Little Pine Creek Connector Trail; ADA Pedestrian Ramps

PA Routes 8; Route 28; Pennsylvania Railroad; B&O Railroad; PAAC bus routes 1, 2, and 91; US Post Office; Vehicular Bridges over Pine Creek; North Hills Bike/Pedestrian Summit

Sen. Robert D. Fleming Bridge

Living Infrastructure

Allegheny River, Pine Creek; Green Streetscape (phases 1+2); School Street Biofiltration System; Memorial Park’s Rain Garden; Green Infrastructure Masterplan; Pine Creek; Dougherty Nature Trail; Watershed Plan; Rain Barrel Program; Fishing at Pine Creek; Etna Riverfront Park; Air Quality Walking Trails

ALCOSAN

Resource Regeneration

Class 8 Community Rating System; Route 28 Portal Garden; Route 8 Gardens; Spirit Garden; Bell Garden; Clock Garden; Fireman’s garden; Garden at Fugh Hall; Susan B. Koman Rose Garden; Always in Bloom Garden; Etna Street Trees; ACHD Pollution Prevention Grant; Etna Borough Flood Improvement Initiatives; Garden of Etna Solar Canopy; Etna Solar Ordinance; LED Streetlight Conversion

Hampton Shaler Water Authority; Waste Management; Peoples Gas; Duquesne Light; Solarize Allegheny Program; ROCIS Program; Air Quality Leadership Meetings; Solar United Neighbors Solar Co-op; Duquesne Watt Choices Program

CENSUS OF LOCAL PLANS

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The following table and narrative describes existing policies, programs, and plans on the municipal, regional, and county scales that are applicable to the Etna EcoDistrict. Table 3:​ Existing policies, programs, and plans on the municipal, regional, and county scale that are applicable to the Etna EcoDistrict. Existing Policies, Programs, and Plans

Geography

Borough of Etna Diversity Policy

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Borough of Etna Complete Streets Resolution

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378)

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353)

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Community Rating System

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

Etna Green Infrastructure Master Plan

Municipal (Borough of Etna)

River Bend Joint Comprehensive Plan

Municipal (Triboro)

Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan (PCAP) 3.0

Regional (City of Pittsburgh)

Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) Health Equity Briefs

County (Allegheny County)

PA State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency

State (Pennsylvania)

Borough of Etna Diversity Policy At the municipal level, the Borough of Etna adopted a ​Diversity Policy ​in 2019 to support the “maximum practical utilization of certified Minority/Women/Disadvantaged Business Enterprises” through normal business practices and participation of subcontractors and suppliers. The Borough identifies its participation in the Etna EcoDistrict Education Education Series and EcoDistrict partnership with evolveEA as demonstrations of its commitment to serve underrepresented groups under this policy. Future partnerships and sub-contracts needed for implementation of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan will be analyzed to adhere to this policy. Applicable Priorities: T ​ his policy is related to Prosperity (and social equity) because it seeks to expand access to opportunity for certified minority/women/disadvantaged business enterprises.

Complete Streets Resolution At the municipal level, in August 2018 the Borough of Etna adopted a ​Complete Streets Resolution​ (No. 1377 D)​ in an effort to create a pathway for future mobility improvements in the Borough. Through this Resolution, the Borough of Etna seeks to support “community transportation projects to improve access, mobility, public health, and the quality of life for all of [Etna’s] residents and visitors to the community.” Various action items are outlined in the Resolution, including: a resolve to work with PennDOT (Pennsylvania Depart. of

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 9


Transportation) on implementing bike/pedestrian improvements as part of larger roadway improvements; a resolve to incorporate Complete Streets design considerations as a routine part of infrastructure planning, rehabilitation, and implementation to the extent financially and physically feasible; for Council Members to participate in the Mobility portion of Etna’s EcoDistrict Planning and Education Series, both during community-wide and as part of the Champions group; participation in improvements aimed at handicap installations and considerations for mobility-limited individuals; and to inventory publicly owned sidewalks to establish a baseline for improvement. Design proposals and action items within the Etna EcoDistrict Plan consider mobility improvements around Complete Streets principals given the adoption of this Resolution. Applicable Priorities:​ ​This Resolution primarily addresses Connectivity, as well as Health & Wellbeing within the Active Living Objective.

Borough Flood Management Policies & Programs At the municipal level, the Borough of Etna has adopted two ordinances to address stormwater runoff and flooding concerns: ​Etna Stormwater Management Ordinance (No. 1378)​ (revised in 2018) ​Etna Floodplain Management Ordinance (No. 1353)​. (enacted in 2014) outlines requirements for the safe management of stormwater runoff in the Borough to protect the health, safety, and general welfare of Etna’s residents. Ordinance No. 1353 was adopted in 2014 to outline minimum requirements for new construction and development within areas of the Borough that are subject to flooding. The Borough of Etna also has a ​Green Infrastructure Master Plan​ ​(completed in 2014) and participates in the FEMA​ ​Community Rating System​ (ongoing participation since 1996), both of which address stormwater mitigation. Etna’s Green Infrastructure Master Plan assesses the feasibility of green infrastructure projects as a way to reduce flooding and reduce or eliminate the need for new gray infrastructure projects. The plan outlines five phases of green infrastructure projects (23 sites) that are estimated to manage up to 16.1 million gallons of stormwater runoff per year. Participation in the Community Rating System program provides an opportunity to lower Etna’s vulnerability to flooding through a series of volunteer initiatives. Beginning in 1996, the Borough of Etna has reduced its class rating from 10 to 7, which allows for a 15% discount on flood insurance premiums to anyone in Etna purchasing insurance. These resilience initiatives in the Borough have been presented to the community as part of the Etna EcoDistrict Education Series, and future sites in the GI Master Plan have been included in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan designs. Applicable Priorities: A ​ ll four of these plans and initiatives are related to Living Infrastructure (improving connection to water, managing stormwater for ecosystem health, improving natural features), as well as Resource Restoration (improving water quality).

River Bend Joint Comprehensive Plan Etna’s ​Joint Comprehensive Plan (River Bend)​ (published in 2014) is shared with the neighboring Boroughs of Millvale and Sharpsburg and identifies shared issues throughout

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each community and opportunities for collaboration to access greater pools of resources to meet collective needs. This initial collaboration allowed for each Borough to share a zoning map to better distribute zoning requirements across the three Boroughs and led to the Triboro Ecodistrict Initiative. Applicable Priorities: T ​ his plan addresses Place (with recommendations related to public spaces and housing), Prosperity (addressing economic development and vitality), Health and Wellbeing (recommendations for a “food niche”), Connectivity (improvements related to street network and mobility), Living Infrastructure (connecting residents to nature and improving natural features), and Resource Restoration (land use recommendations and gardens to improve air quality).

Allegheny Health Department (ACHD) Health Equity Briefs At the county level, the Allegheny County Health Department has published ​Health Equity Briefs​ (published in 2018) on ​Health Access​, ​Chronic Disease and Risk Behaviors​, Environment​, ​Maternal and Child Health​, and ​Mental Health and Substance Use​ that describe the causes of differences in the quality of health across different populations and municipalities in Allegheny County, including Etna. The briefs identify disparities related to chronic diseases, access to healthcare, the environment, maternal and child health, and mental health and substance abuse. The Health Equity Briefs were used as a resource to provide statistics on health and equity in Etna during the Etna EcoDistrict Social Equity Education Series. Applicable Priorities: T ​ hese briefs primarily address Health and Wellbeing. Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan (PCAP) 3.0 At the regional level, the​ ​Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan (PCAP) 3.0​ (completed in 2018) is a comprehensive plan to address climate change. Within this plan are 2030 District Goals that set national standards for high performance buildings by committing properties to 50% reduction in energy use, water consumption, and transportation emissions by 2030, while improving indoor air quality. The Etna EcoDistrict will use the PCAP 3.0 as a resource and potential model to reduce the Borough’s carbon footprint and transition to carbon neutrality. Applicable Priorities: T ​ his plan is focused on Resource Regeneration (reducing greenhouse gas emissions, renewable energy, and reducing waste). It is also touches upon Health & Wellness (food system).

PA State Incentives for Renewable and Efficiency At the state level, there are a number of different ​incentives for renewables and efficiency to encourage individuals to be more energy efficient and transition to alternative fuel for their homes and/or vehicles. These include tax credits, rebates, and loan programs, including but not limited to Tax Credits for Consumer Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Products, the Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Rebate Program, and the Keystone Home Energy Loan Program. The Etna EcoDistrict Plan will consider these programs as options to share with the community when pursuing initiatives to reduce resident energy burden and encourage the use of alternative fuel.

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Applicable Priorities: T ​ hese incentives are focused on Resource Restoration (reducing greenhouse gas emissions, renewable energy, and energy efficiency).

It can be seen from the review local plans that there are several Priorities that are not currently being addressed. The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap seeks to align with existing plans and fill gaps in the areas of Place (engagement and inclusion, culture and identity, public spaces, and housing), Prosperity (innovation), Health and Wellbeing (active living, safety, and food systems), and Connectivity (digital network).

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ONGOING AND IMMINENT ACTIVITIES BY OTHERS

The following table (Table 4) and narrative describes important ongoing and imminent activities by organizations other than ECO that have been considered during Roadmap preparation because of their significance for the Etna EcoDistrict. Table 4:​ Ongoing and imminent activities by other organizations that are significant for the Etna EcoDistrict.

Ongoing and Imminent Activities

Description and Applicable Priorities

Etna Riverfront Park (Borough of Etna)

Phase I of the Etna Riverfront Park is currently under construction. The Park is located along the Allegheny RIver and will reconnect residents to the riverfront while also acting as a key link on a regional trail system (the Three Rivers Heritage Trail). This project is related to ​Place​ because it will become a key part of Etna’s identity as a Rivertown and will be a public space. It will also encourage ​Health and Wellbeing b ​ y encouraging active living. As a key link on the regional trail it relates to Connectivity​. Lastly, by providing a connection to nature it is supporting Living Infrastructure.

Three Rivers Heritage Trail (Friends of the Riverfront)

In the future (timeline TBD), Friends of the Riverfront will extend the Three Rivers Heritage Trail from Millvale through Etna to Sharpsburg and Aspinwall. This trail will improve ​Connectivity​ as well as support a connection to nature, as related to ​Living Infrastructure​.

Pine Creek Connector Trail (Borough of Etna)

The Pine Creek Connector Trail improves ​Connectivity​ to Shaler Township by providing a safe bicycle and pedestrian route from the Kiwanis Park in Shaler to Etna’s Butler Street Commercial District.

Green Streetscaping (future phases) (Borough of Etna)

Future phases of green streetscaping, including underground stormwater retention on site 5A, will support ​Living Infrastructure through natural features, supporting ecosystem health, and improving connection to nature. It will also support ​Resource Regeneration​ by improving air quality and managing stormwater.

Tree planting as part of the ACHD Pollution Prevention Grant (Borough of Etna)

The Borough of Etna received funding to plant 100 trees in the community to mitigate air pollution from heavy traffic ways. The addition of these trees will support ​Living Infrastructure​ through natural features, supporting ecosystem health, and improving connection to nature. They will also support ​Resource Regeneration​ by improving air quality and managing stormwater.

Permanently Affordable Housing (City of Bridges Community Land Trust)

The City of Bridges Community Land Trust (CLT) is in the early stages of developing newly constructed housing units that will be permanently affordable through a CLT. This is a housing project, contributing to the Place​ Priority.

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PRIORITIES & OBJECTIVES

The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap contains a series of community-identified goals and sub-goals for each Quality of Life Issue. These goals are equivalent to the objectives described in the EcoDistricts Certified Handbook. The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap, while not organized by the EcoDistrict Priorities, does include at least one goal for each of the priority objective categories, as shown in Table 5. Table 5: T ​ he Etna EcoDistrict’s Goals as related to each EcoDistrict Priority Objective Category. Please note that this is not a comprehensive list of Etna’s Goals and Actions. More information on the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap Priorities & Objectives​ c ​ an be found in E ​ xhibit E,​ a draft of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan, pages 25 - 113. Please refer to the footnotes on these pages. The language in this table describing the Etna EcoDistrict Goals incorporates further detail than is described in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan regarding the intent of these goals. In the Etna EcoDistrict Plan, the intent of these goals is reflected in the actions and indicators. EcoDistrict Priority

EcoDistrict Objective

Etna EcoDistrict Goal

QoL Issue

Place

Engagement & Inclusion

Engage in an equitable and transparent process that equitably distributes the benefits of place-based projects and programs throughout Etna

Social Equity

Place

Culture & Identity

Support and celebrate Etna’s vibrant identity and culture

Social Equity

Place

Public Spaces

Improve quality of life for all by creating dedicated public spaces for youth and community enrichment

Social Equity

Place

Housing

Build community wealth by providing permanently affordable housing options

Social Equity

Prosperity

Access to Opportunity

Build community wealth by training residents for jobs in emerging sectors such as energy conservation, renewable energy, and technology

Energy, Social Equity

Prosperity

Economic Development

Build community wealth by supporting and incentivizing businesses and essential services to relocate to Etna

Social Equity

Prosperity

Innovation

Leverage energy initiatives to promote innovative and build community wealth

Energy

Health & Wellbeing

Active Living

Provide enjoyable biking and walking route options throughout Etna that promote active living

Mobility

Health & Wellbeing

Health

Improve nutritional health and wellness

Food, Social Equity

Health & Wellbeing

Safety

Improve Etna’s street safety and connectivity

Mobility

Health & Wellbeing

Food Systems

Localize Etna’s food system across the full food life cycle from production to disposal

Food

Connectivity

Street Network

Support all modes of transportation through Complete Streets strategies, including bike lanes, crosswalks, traffic calming, and intersection improvements

Mobility

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Connectivity

Mobility

Increase the use of alternative transportation and advocate for enhanced public mobility options that connect Etna residents to the region

Mobility

Connectivity

Digital Network

Establish public access sites for free wi-fi available to all Etna residents

Social Equity

Living Infrastructure

Natural Features

Protect our natural environment through intentional restoration and conservation interventions

Water

Living Infrastructure

Ecosystem Health

Restore the Pine Creek riparian buffer (vegetated area near streams that protect adjacent land)

Water

Living Infrastructure

Connection with Nature

Celebrate water with productive, enjoyable places for Etna residents to connect with nature

Water, Social Equity

Resource Regeneration

Air & Climate

Maximize renewable energy production and minimize sources of outdoor air pollution

Energy

Resource Regeneration

Water

Establish stormwater parks, pocket wetlands, and gardens to reduce flooding, filter stormwater runoff pollution,​ ​and allow residents to enjoy water

Water

Resource Regeneration

Waste

Minimize the environmental impact of Etna’s waste cycle

Food, Energy

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 15


INDICATORS The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap contains a series of four to nine indicators for each of the six Quality of Life Issues. The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap, while not organized by the EcoDistrict Priorities, does include one unique indicator for each of EcoDistrict Priority Objective. Unique objectives for each of the Imperatives are included in the Etna EcoDistrict Imperatives Commitment. Additional information on Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap Indicators can be found in the “Action Plan” chapter of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​, pages 25 - 113). Please refer to the footnotes on these pages​. EXISTING CONDITIONS & BASELINE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT The existing conditions of the Etna EcoDistrict are documented in the Etna Education Booklets (​Exhibit A​). This includes the: ● Water Booklet​ - water supply, wastewater treatment, rainwater management, natural environment (Exhibit A1) ● Mobility Booklet​ - safety and transportation - all modes (Exhibit A2) ● Air Booklet ​- natural environment and climate (Exhibit A3) ● Energy Booklet​ - land use, energy use, carbon emissions, and climate (Exhibit A4) ● Food Booklet​ - solid waste management and climate (Exhibit A5) ● Equity Booklet​ - demographics, housing, employment, education facilities and programs, recreation facilities and programs, historic and cultural resources, and health and human services (Exhibit A6) In addition to the information provided in the Etna EcoDistrict Education Series Booklets, supplemental information about land use and public safety is provided below. Land Use A land use map can be found in the Energy Education Booklet (Exhibit A4, pg. 20), which is also displayed below (Figure 2). Etna contains 1,417 residential buildings (totaling 2,164,077 square feet), 129 commercial buildings (totaling 638,849 square feet), and 5 industrial buildings (totaling 484,891 square feet). Etna also contains steep wooded hillsides and urban green space (totaling approximately 6,052,003 square feet).

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 16


Figure 2:​ Etna land use map distinguishing between residential, commercial, industrial, and wooded hillside or green space land uses.

Public Safety General information about vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian safety can be found in the Mobility Education Booklet. To expand upon this information, Etna had 122 vehicle accidents over the past 12 months. Of these crashes, 32 required a vehicle to be towed or an injury was incurred; 2 crashes involved pedestrians; 1 involved a motorcycle; and 0 involved a bicycle. Etna contains a few intersections that have had clusters of traffic crashes over the Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 17


past ten years. The map below (Figure 3) provides a red dot for each traffic crash that has occurred in Etna within the past ten years, including along Route 8 and Route 28. The map shows clusters of crashes along Route 28, near the intersection of Washington Street and Butler Street, the intersection underneath the 62nd Street Bridge, Butler Street between Freeport Street and Parker Street, as well as along Mt. Royal Blvd. These areas tend to be unsafe for pedestrians and bicyclists as well.

Figure 3:​ Locations of reportable (required a vehicle to be towed or an injury was incurred) traffic crashes since 2018.

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 18


In general, Etna is a very safe community to live in with few incidents of violent or extreme crimes. According to Etna Borough Police Department incident report data, there have been less than 100 counts of criminal activity (e.g., thefts, burglaries, assaults, drug violations) since the beginning of 2019. Additionally, The Borough of Etna Police have a strong and positive relationship with the community. Every year, Etna’s youth participate in a “Kids vs. Cops” basketball game at the Etna Playground. Additionally, in August 2019 Etna celebrated it Police and Fire Departments with a National Night Out ceremony and event. Baseline Energy Consumption & CO2 Emissions Inventory At this time, Etna is only able to provide the baseline energy consumption and CO2 emissions inventory informed by regional averages and publicly available data instead of measured community-wide sub-metered energy data. Etna’s baseline energy consumption (using best available data from Summer 2019) is documented in the table and narrative below. There is no energy consumption or carbon emissions related to infrastructure (wastewater treatment facilities, landfills, etc.) within the physical boundary of Etna, and is therefore considered Scope 3 emissions. The energy baseline and CO2 emissions inventory only accounts for Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions as described in the Global GHG Protocol and the EcoDistricts Certified Handbook (page 56). The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy State and Local Energy Data City Energy Profile Tool was used to inform the baseline energy performance and CO2 emissions inventory, as well as train schedules, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, and the Borough of Etna’s utility bills. The process abides by the Global Protocol for Community-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventories.

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 19


Table 5:​ Etna’s baseline energy consumption in million BTU/year using best available data from Summer 2019. Energy End Uses

Scope 1

Scope 2

Buildings Using Natural Gas

Transp. Using Gasoline

Transp. Using Diesel

Residential

144,311

-

Non-Residential

82,580

Buildings Subtotal

Grid-Supplied Electricity

Total Annual Energy Use

% of Total Annual Energy Use

Buildings Using Electricity

Transp. Using Electricity

District Infra.

-

41,116

-

-

185,427

31.7%

-

-

42,310

-

-

124,890

21.3%

226,891

-

-

83,426

-

-

310,317

53.0%

On-Road Transportation

-

225,047

46,397

-

0

-

271,444

46.4%

Railroads

-

-

3,082

-

-

-

3,082

0.5%

Transportation Subtotal

-

225,047

49,479

-

0

-

274,526

46.9%

Street Lights

-

-

-

-

-

442

442

0.05%

Traffic Control

-

-

-

-

-

173

173

0.05%

Infrastructure Subtotal

-

-

-

-

-

615

615

0.1%

226,891

225,047

49,479

83,426

0

615

585,458

100%

BUILDINGS

TRANSPORTATION

INFRASTRUCTURE

TOTAL District Total

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 20


Table 6:​ Etna’s baseline CO2 emissions in metric tons/year using best available data from Summer 2019. Energy End Uses

Scope 1

Scope 2

Building s Using Natural Gas

Transp. Using Gasoline

Transp. Using Diesel

Residential

7,711

-

Non-Residential

4,412

Buildings Subtotal

Grid-Supplied Electricity

Total Annual CO2 Emissions

% of Total Annual CO2 Emissions

Buildings Using Electricity

Transp. Using Electricity

District Infra.

-

9,327

-

-

17,038

29.5%

-

-

9,598

-

-

14,010

24.3%

12,123

-

-

18,925

-

-

31,048

53.8%

On-Road Transportation

-

21,603

4,700

-

0

-

26,303

45.6%

Railroads

-

-

225.5

-

-

-

225.5

0.4%

Transportation Subtotal

-

21,603

4,926

-

0

-

26,529

46.0%

Street Lights

-

-

-

-

-

92

92

0.19%

Traffic Control

-

-

-

-

-

36

36

0.01%

Infrastructure Subtotal

-

-

-

-

-

128

128

0.20%

12,123

21,603

4,925.5

18,925

0

128

57,705

100%

BUILDINGS

TRANSPORTATION

INFRASTRUCTURE

TOTAL District Total

ADJUSTED BASE YEAR EMISSIONS On-Site Sequestration*

-

-

-

-

-

2.4

2.4

-

Excess Renewable Power Sales Offsets

-

-

-

0

-

-

0

-

Adjusted District Total

-

-

-

-

-

125.6

57,702.6

100%

*At this time, only includes Etna Borough planted trees (12 trees in 2019). Assuming 1 tree can sequester 48 lbs of CO2 annually (or .02 metric tons). (NC State University)

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 21


EXISTING LOCAL TARGETS AND PARALLEL EFFORTS There are currently no existing policies, programs, or plans on the municipal, regional, or county scales that set future performance targets that are applicable to the Etna EcoDistrict. The Etna EcoDistrict has chosen to align with Pittsburgh’s Climate Action Plan and Pittsburgh’s 2030 District future performance targets of reducing energy use, water consumption, and transportation emissions by 50% by the year 2030. Programs operated by entities other than the Etna Community Organization that serve Etna and have been included in calculating the achievement of 2030 performance targets have been described in the “Source” information that accompanies each indicator in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​, pgs. 24-113). ROADMAP HORIZON YEAR The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap’s horizon year is the year 2030. This is in alignment with the Triboro Ecodistrict’s horizon year and regional efforts related to the 2030 Challenge. The Etna EcoDistrict aims to be a carbon-neutral community by the year 2050. DISTRICT BUILD-OUT ESTIMATE The Borough of Etna is a densely populated community -- approximately 3,400 residents within 0.8 square miles -- with little room for infill development or new construction projects. To account for this, building reuse is being prioritized to improve underutilized buildings and bring new amenities to Etna, in addition to a few new construction projects. Over the next ten years, the Etna EcoDistrict Plan proposes three new construction projects (Permanently Affordable Housing and two Commercial Redevelopment projects), as well as nine renovation projects (Open Air Market, Grocery Store, Floodproof Redevelopment, Creekside Restaurant and Brewery, Etna Center for the Arts, Upper Floor Apartments, Community Library, Net-Zero Energy Public Works Building, and the Etna Solar Grab-n-Go). It is anticipated that these projects will result in a slight population increase, bring new jobs to Etna, and contribute to Etna’s EcoDistrict performance targets. More specifically, the impact of these initiatives will result in a population increase of 52 residents (increase of 1.75%) and 95 new jobs (increase of 5%). However, it must be noted that not all place-related projects proposed in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan will be achieved by the year 2030. Additionally, these projects must be implemented in tandem with the EcoDistrict Actions to achieve the performance targets established - neither the place-based projects nor the Action Plan can achieve the performance targets independently. Separate from the projects proposed in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan, residential population and employment growth is expected to stay relatively stable until the year 2050 (the carbon neutrality horizon year). Proposed new construction and major renovation projects are described in great detail in the Key Places chapter of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (pages 114 - 162) and are referenced in

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 22


the “Source” information that accompanies each indicator, where applicable. For more information, please see below: New Construction Projects Permanently Affordable Housing Four permanently affordable housing units are currently planned for Etna, which is a project of the City of Bridges Community Land Trust. These projects will accommodate approximately 16 additional Etna residents. This project directly contributes to increasing the number of permanently affordable housing units in Etna (Place: Housing performance target). This project indirectly contributes to other EcoDistrict performance targets as well, including decreasing the percentage of the population living below the poverty level (Economic Resilience performance target). The addition of these housing units will increase community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions, however, energy efficiency best practices and solar arrays are currently being investigated as part of this project, which would minimize the additional energy and carbon contribution to the greater community. For more information about this project, please see page 154 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Commercial Redevelopments (2 sites) Two commercial redevelopment sites are proposed as part of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. The first is located at the corner of Butler Street and High Street. The project is currently in progress by the Rear End Gastropub and will become a restaurant and brewery with green infrastructure along the corner of the site. This project will create about 20 new jobs in Etna. Rear End plans to reuse the existing building on the site and add an addition of equal or greater size. This project will increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target), by selling food in the community. Food processing may also occur on site. In addition, a green infrastructure project is planned for the corner of the site, which will increase the millions of gallons of stormwater managed through green infrastructure projects in Etna (contributing to the Resource Regeneration: Water and Resiliency/Living Infrastructure: Ecosystem Health indicators). The addition of this gastropub will increase community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions, however, energy efficiency best practices and solar arrays are currently being investigated as part of this project, which would minimize the additional energy and carbon contribution to the greater community. In addition to this, a second commercial redevelopment project is proposed on a vacant site along Butler Street between Elm Street and Walnut Street. The project would include a restaurant on the ground floor (creating 20 new jobs) and apartments on the upper floors. This project will increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target), by selling food in the community. Food processing may also occur on site. This project indirectly contributes to other EcoDistrict performance targets as well, including decreasing the percentage of the population living below the poverty level (Economic Resilience performance target) by providing affordable housing and preventing displacement. The

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 23


addition of this commercial redevelopment project will increase community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions, however, energy efficiency best practices and solar arrays will be incorporated as part of this project, which would minimize the additional energy and carbon contribution to the greater community. For more information about both commercial redevelopment projects, please see pages 152 and 154 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Renovation Projects Open Air Market The Plan proposes the renovation of a currently vacant industrial building into an open air market. This project would provide approximately 20 new jobs in Etna and would increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target) by providing a space for independent shop owners and farmers to distribute and sell their goods. Food processing may also occur on site. In addition, the building will have solar panels that meet the building’s energy needs (with the inclusion of carbon offsets if necessary). This will increase the community’s annual megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced (contributing to the Climate Protection performance target) and will neither increase nor decrease community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions. For more information about this project, please see page 130 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Grocery Store A small-scale grocery store or market is proposed for an underutilized site right outside of the boundary of Etna in Sharpsburg Borough. This project would increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target), by selling food in the community. Food processing may also occur on site. For more information about this project, please see page 144 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Floodproof Redevelopment Four permanently affordable housing units are proposed for a currently vacant building adjacent to the Open Air Market (referred to by locals as the “Blarney Stone”). This project would accommodate approximately 16 additional Etna residents. This project directly contributes to increasing the number of permanently affordable housing units in Etna (Place: Housing performance target). This project indirectly contributes to other EcoDistrict performance targets as well, including decreasing the percentage of the population living below the poverty level (Economic Resilience performance target). The project will demonstrate how to flood-proof a building in the floodplain with its elevated and FEMA floodplain compliant design. While this renovation project will not remove the building from its location in the floodplain, it indirectly contributes to decreasing the percentage of buildings within or touching the 100-year floodplain (Resilience performance target) by demonstrating flood resilient renovation practices that can act as a model for other

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 24


renovation projects. The addition of these housing units will increase community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions, however, energy efficiency best practices and solar arrays would be incorporated as part of this project. These would minimize the additional energy and carbon contribution to the greater community. For more information about this project, please see page 154 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Creekside Restaurant and Brewery A Creekside Restaurant and Brewery is proposed in the Plan on the site of an underutilized building at the intersection of Butler Street and Kittanning Street, creating 20 new jobs in Etna. This project will increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target), by selling food in the community. Food processing may also occur on site. In addition, the building will have solar panels that meet the building’s energy needs (with the inclusion of carbon offsets if necessary). This will increase the community’s annual megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced (contributing to the Climate Protection performance target) and will neither increase nor decrease community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions. For more information about this project, please see page 134 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Etna Center for the Arts The Etna Center for the Arts is proposed to fill a currently vacant building located at the corner of Freeport Street and Butler Street, creating 10 new jobs in Etna. This center will act as the hub of all arts activity in Etna by contributing public art and murals to various locations in Etna, organizing the Etna Art Tour, and offering classes and space for local youth and artists. This project will indirectly contribute to increasing the number of public art installations and culturally interpretive installations in Etna (contributing to the Place: Culture identify performance target) by acting as the organizer and convenor for these types of projects. In addition, the building will have solar panels that meet the building’s energy needs (with the inclusion of carbon offsets if necessary). This will increase the community’s annual megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced (contributing to the Climate Protection performance target) and will neither increase nor decrease community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions. For more information about this project, please see page 150 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Upper Floor Apartments Many of the upper floors of existing buildings along Etna’s Butler Street commercial district are vacant or underutilized. The Plan proposes that these upper floors be converted into apartments. This project would accommodate up to 20 additional Etna residents. This project directly contributes to increasing the number of permanently affordable housing units in Etna (Place: Housing performance target). This project indirectly contributes to other EcoDistrict performance targets as well, including decreasing the percentage of the population living below the poverty level (Economic Resilience performance target) by providing affordable housing and preventing displacement. The addition of these housing

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 25


units will increase community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions, however, energy efficiency best practices and solar arrays will be evaluated as part of this project, which would minimize the additional energy and carbon contribution to the greater community. For more information about this project, please see page 154 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Etna Community Library The Etna Community Library is currently planned for Etna, which is a project of ECO. The Library will provide books to lend, it will provide classes and resources to community members, and it will include a pay-what-you-can-cafe. This project directly contributes to increasing the number of public spaces that have free wi-fi (Connectivity: Digital Network performance target) by offering free use of computers with wi-fi and it will increase the number of people directly employed by the Etna EcoDistrict by adding 10 new jobs to Etna (Prosperity: Access to Opportunity performance target). This project indirectly contributes to other EcoDistrict performance targets as well, including decreasing the percentage of the population living below the poverty level (Economic Resilience performance target) by providing free access to resources for community members. The pay-what-you-can cafe would create an additional 15 new jobs in Etna and would increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target), by providing food to community members at a price they determine they can afford. Food processing may also occur on site. In addition, the building will have solar panels that meet the building’s energy needs (with the inclusion of carbon offsets if necessary). This will increase the community’s annual megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced (contributing to the Climate Protection performance target) and will neither increase nor decrease community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions. Net-Zero Energy Public Works Building Retrofitting the existing Etna Public Works Building into a net-zero energy demonstration building is proposed as part of the Plan. The building would be extremely energy efficient and would have a solar array on the roof that meets the energy needs of the building. This will increase the community’s annual megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced (contributing to the Climate Protection performance target) and will contribute to the community’s carbon neutrality goal by reducing carbon emissions from one building. For more information about this project, please see page 162 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Etna Solar Grab-n-Go In the Plan, a solar grab-and-go is proposed for the site of a former gas station located at the intersection of Butler Street and Washington Street. The grab-no-go would be a quick serve healthy fast food restaurant and would create 20 new jobs in Etna. This project would increase the number of food production, processing, and distribution places (contributing to the Prosperity: Economic Development performance target), by providing a place where the community can buy healthy food. Food processing may also occur on site. This project

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 26


would also contain electric vehicle charging stations, the presence of which will encourage community members to transition to electric vehicles. This would indirectly contribute to increasing the percentage of residents who get to work by means other than driving a vehicle powered by gasoline (Connectivity: Mobility performance target). In addition, the building will have solar panels and wind turbines that meet the building’s energy needs (with the inclusion of carbon offsets if necessary). This will increase the community’s annual megawatt-hours per year of renewable energy produced (contributing to the Climate Protection performance target) and will neither increase nor decrease community-wide energy consumption and carbon emissions. For more information about this project, please see page 162 of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. Additional Roadmap ​District Build-out Estimate ​content can be found in the “Key Places” chapter of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​, pages. 114 - 163).

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 27


HORIZON YEAR PERFORMANCE TARGETS The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap contains a series of four to nine indicators for each of the six Quality of Life Issues. The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap, while not organized by the EcoDistrict Priorities, does include one indicator for each of the priority objective categories and for each of the Imperatives. The baseline performance and 2030 targets for each indicator are documented in the Action Plan chapter of the Plan, and they are accompanied by supporting information about how the baseline and target performance was calculated. The short, mid, and long term projects are described in the Implementation Plan for each Quality of Life Issue. Additional Roadmap ​Indicators ​content can be found in the “Action Plan” chapter of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​, pages 25 - 113). Please refer to the footnotes on these pages. POTENTIAL STRATEGIES The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap contains a series of two to seven actions (equivalent to the EcoDistrict Certification requirement for “strategies”) for each of the Quality of Life Issue Goals. The Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap, while not organized by the EcoDistrict Priorities, does include at least one action for each of the priority objective categories. Please see the Exhibit B​ for more information. Roadmap ​Potential Strategies ​content can be found in the “Action Plan” chapter of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​, pages 25 - 113), as well as in the Actions Crosswalk (​Exhibit B). STRATEGIES ASSESSMENT & RANKING The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given ECO’s projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame in unattainable. ECO has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. These actions are listed in the “Getting Started” portion of the Plan. ECO has prioritized actions that are fully within the control of the organization, match the organizational capacity and funding available for the next three years, in addition to evaluating the benefits in regards to social equity, resilience, and environmental stewardship. ECO also considered risk, level of stakeholder support, and impact on 2030 performance targets when assessing these actions as well as the additional actions listed for the next ten years (see​ Exhibit B​ for the full strategies assessment).

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 28


Table 7:​ Ranking criteria and scoring descriptions for Etna EcoDistrict Action Items Ranking Criteria

Score 1

Score 2

Score 3

Technical Readiness

Few to no key steps for implementation of this project/program are in place

Some but not all key steps for implementation of this project/program are in place

All key steps for implementation of this project/program are in place

Financial Soundness

ECO has neither sufficient funds nor a fundraising plan to implement this project/program

ECO has partial funds and/or a fundraising plan to implement this project/program

ECO has full funds to implement this project/program

Risk

Implementation of this project/program has high risk of negative social, economic, or environmental consequences

Implementation of this project/program has moderate risk of negative social, economic, or environmental consequences

Implementation of this project/program has low risk of negative social, economic, or environmental consequences

Capacity to Manage

ECO will not have sufficient capacity to implement this project/program until 7+ years from now

ECO has sufficient capacity and partner support to implement this project/program within the next 4-6 years

ECO has sufficient capacity and partner support to implement this project/program within the next 3 years

Level of Stakeholder Support

Stakeholders have not expressed support for this project/program, or have expressed concern

Stakeholders have expressed moderate support of this project/program

Stakeholders have expressed enthusiastic and full support of this project/program

Impact on Targets

Implementation of this project/program would make minor progress towards fulfilling ECO’s six Quality of Life Vision Statements and carbon neutrality targets

Implementation of this project/program would make moderate progress towards fulfilling ECO’s six Quality of Life Vision Statements and carbon neutrality targets

Implementation of this project/program would make significant progress towards fulfilling ECO’s six Quality of Life Vision Statements and carbon neutrality targets

There are several actions listed in Etna’s EcoDistrict Plan that do not directly contribute to the goal of carbon neutrality, but indirectly or cumulatively contribute. The carbon impact of these actions are listed in column AE of ​Exhibit B​. Based on the actions and performance targets that are directly quantifiable, it has been calculated that the community will reduce its carbon emissions by 34,669 metric tons over the next ten years. This is about 60% of Etna’s baseline carbon emissions. After setting the groundwork over the next ten years, Etna will re-evaluate its carbon emissions inventory and progress towards carbon neutrality as part of a planning process in 2030 that will result in updated indicators, goals, and actions. Depending on the nature of these future actions, Etna will purchase carbon offsets to ensure that the EcoDistrict achieves carbon neutrality by the year 2050. See below and Exhibit B​ ​for more detail.

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 29


Pathway to Carbon Neutrality 1. Increase the rate of alternative transportation to connect to the region. ​This includes the following actions: ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Advocate for PAAC routes that connect to regional job centers Establish the Pine Creek Connector Trail to connect the Etna Riverfront Park to Shaler (already in process by Etna Borough) Extend the Three Rivers Heritage Trail to the Etna Riverfront Park and to Sharpsburg Establish a Healthy Ride bike share station in Etna Offer free bikes, bike education, and/or bike repair at community events Support all modes of transportation through Complete Streets strategies, including bike lanes, crosswalks, traffic calming, intersection improvements, etc. Support last mile connections with a local shuttle, bike rentals, walking trails, or other connections Develop a youth mobility campaign to encourage alternative transportation, including a youth walking campaign, neighborhood tours, scavenger hunts, etc. Target highly used bus stops for improvements, including benches, vegetation, lighting, and art Issue a mobility survey with a focus on vulnerable populations to identify the biggest needs and barriers related to mobility Establish a weekly shuttle to grocery stores

The impact of each individual action cannot be quantified at this time, however, the cumulative impact of these actions aims to increase Etna’s alternative transportation rate from 20.7% to 35% (a 14.7% improvement). Assuming that these actions can achieve this goal, this will result in a​ reduction of 9,073 metric tons of carbon emissions annually​. This is an ambitious goal for the year 2030. Additional actions will support achievement of this goal between the years 2030 and 2050. 2. Sequester carbon with trees and vegetation. ​This includes the following actions: ○ ○ ○

Use vegetation to screen, filter, and beautify major roadways, such as Route 8, Route 28, and the railroads Create a network of green spaces throughout the community to sequester pollution Incentivize the installation of green roofs and walls on private property

Etna has a performance target to plant at least 100 trees over the next 10 years, including the locations listed in the first action above. This will result in a reduction of 2 metric tons of carbon emissions annually. The impact of the other two strategies cannot be quantified at this time, however an estimate considering the green space proposals in the Etna EcoDistrict Plan indicate an additional reduction of 4 metric tons of carbon annually. Cumulatively considering all three actions, this will result in a​ reduction of 6 metric tons of carbon emissions annually​. This estimate is informed by the Plans established for the year 2030. Additional carbon sequestration actions will be taken between the years 2030 to 2050. 3. Reduce the energy burden. ​This includes the following actions: Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 30


○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Partner with organizations such as Conservation Consultants Inc. (CCI) and Rebuilding Together to establish an energy efficiency program that provides assistance to homeowners and renters to receive free or reduced cost energy audits and retrofits Establish energy education programs for adults and youth Start a campaign encouraging residential adoption of solar panels Solarize municipal-owned & nonprofit-owned buildings, such as the Borough Building and the new Library Incentivize large parking lots to install solar arrays with electric vehicle charging stations and electric vehicle car rentals Establish a renewable energy commitment program for businesses and residents Investigate efficacy of wind turbines along the highways Implement microgrid technology, connected to solar farms and large-scale arrays in Etna Establish an Etna solar co-op

Etna has a performance target to reduce energy consumption by 50% over the next 10 years. The first step is energy conservation, including the first two actions listed above. Energy efficiency improvements on average reduce energy consumption by 15 - 30%. In Etna the energy efficiency improvements will be aggressive and deep retrofits. This will result in a​ reduction of 9,314 metric tons of carbon emissions annually​. As a note, not all buildings will undergo a deep energy efficiency retrofit before 2030, but all buildings will by the year 2050. Next, Etna will install solar panels on solar-eligible rooftops, including two of the strategies listed above, in addition to residential and commercial solar installation. According to Project Sunroof, 78% of the roof area in Etna is solar viable. If all of the solar viable buildings installed solar arrays, this would result in 21,200 mWh of renewable energy produced annually. This will result in a ​reduction of 16,276 metric tons of carbon emissions annually​. As a note, installation of residential solar arrays is not in the Plan for the next ten years, but is part of the plan leading up to 2050. Following the year 2030, Etna will utilize new smart energy technology, employ additional carbon sequestration techniques, and install additional forms of renewable energy, such as solar arrays over parking lots and wind turbines along the highways. While these ideas are mentioned in the 2030 Etna EcoDistrict Plan, they benefit of these initiatives cannot be quantified at this time. Finally, Etna will purchase carbon offsets to reach their goal of carbon neutrality by the year 2050. See Table 8 below for Etna’s outlined pathway to carbon neutrality.

Etna EcoDistrict Roadmap - 31


Table 8: E ​ tna EcoDistrict carbon neutrality strategies and corresponding carbon emission offsets, reductions, and sequestrations. If all actions are implemented, including further strategies beyond our 2030 horizon year, Etna will achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. 2050 Carbon Neutrality Strategy

CO2 (metric tons)

2019 Carbon Emissions Baseline

57,705

Increase alternative transportation rate

- 9,073 (15.7% decrease)

Sequester carbon with trees and vegetation

-6 (0.01% decrease)

Reduce energy burden through improved energy efficiency

-9,314 (16.1% decrease)

Reduce energy burden through solarization

-16,276 (28.2% decrease)

Strategies in years 2030-2050

To Be Determined

Reduce the energy burden through carbon offsets (depending on the nature of projects occurring in the years 2030 to 2050, this number could be smaller)

-23,082 (40% decrease or less)

Total Carbon Emissions Removed

57,705

Net Carbon Emissions

0

RESPONSIBILITIES, FUNDING, AND IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE The Etna EcoDistrict seeks to achieve all of the actions listed in the Action Plan, however, given ECO’s projected capacity over the next few years, achieving all of the actions in such a short time frame in unattainable. ECO has prioritized the actions and chosen several to focus on over the next three years. An implementation plan has been created for each of the actions that ECO plans to achieve in the next three years, organized by quality of life area. This implementation plan includes responsible parties, potential funding sources, and an implementation schedule. Implementation costs will be determined on a project by project basis and is contingent on available funding. Actions to be completed after 3 years are represented with a rough timeline, which can be found in the Action Plan. Roadmap ​Implementation Plan ​content can be found in the “Action Plan” chapter of the Etna EcoDistrict Plan (​Exhibit E​, pages 25 - 113).

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EXHIBITS

A. Etna EcoDistrict Education Booklets​:​ The Etna EcoDistrict Education Booklets are a set of educational resources on our Quality of Life Issues produced from the Etna EcoDistrict Education Series. They are a public resource that can be accessed digitally online by anyone. Additionally, there are 42 printed booklets that are shared and circulated by community members using a lending system. 1. Etna EcoDistrict Water Booklet 2. Etna EcoDistrict Mobility Booklet 3. Etna EcoDistrict Air Booklet 4. Etna EcoDistrict Energy Booklet 5. Etna EcoDistrict Food Booklet 6. Etna EcoDistrict Equity Booklet B. Etna EcoDistrict Actions Crosswalk​:​ The Etna EcoDistrict Actions Crosswalk provides a list of each Etna EcoDistrict Action organized by Quality of Life Issue and goal. The priority objectives addressed by each action are noted to the right as well as the Strategies Assessment. The total number of actions that relate to each priority objective area are totaled at the bottom. C. Etna EcoDistrict Community Engagement Schedule, Agenda, and Record:​ This document describes each of the 33 community engagements throughout our EcoDistrict process to date, as well as outlined future meetings. Date, location, agenda, and outcomes are included for each meeting. D. Community Asset Map of Etna:​ ​The Community Asset Map of Etna graphically details Etna’s existing assets by category, including natural features; regional assets, such as neighboring communities and transportation routes; municipal assets; environmental assets; educational and spiritual assets; social, cultural, and historical assets; recreational assets, and commercial assets. E. Etna EcoDistrict Plan (Draft):​ The EcoDistricts Roadmap is considered an appendix to the Etna EcoDistrict Plan. The Roadmap refers to pages within the Etna EcoDistrict Plan for additional information. The Plan is near-complete but is still in draft form, and we request that EcoDistricts does not make this draft version publicly available. ECO will provide a link to the final version of the Plan when available.

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ETNA

ECODISTRICT PLAN


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