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July 24 - August 2 2020


Table of Contents

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28 – 29. . . . . . . . . . . .International human rights conference 30 – 31 . . . . . . . . . . . .EuroPride Parade 32 – 33. . . . . . . . . . . .The EuroPride 2020 street festival 34 – 35 . . . . . . . . . . .EuroPride 2020 party highlights 36 – 37 . . . . . . . . . . . .Timeline; Making EuroPride sustainable und accessible 38 – 39. . . . . . . . . . . .The budget of EuroPride 2020 40 – 41 . . . . . . . . . . . .Host and organiser of the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg 42 – 43 . . . . . . . . . . .Press and marketing 44 – 45 . . . . . . . . . . .Hamburg is a Rainbow-City and shows its colours 46 – 47. . . . . . . . . . . .How to get to Hamburg 48– 69 . . . . . . . . . . . .Letters of support 70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contacts

02 – 03. . . . . . . . . . . .Table of Contents 04 – 05 . . . . . . . . . . .Introduction 06 – 07 . . . . . . . . . . . .Hamburg Pride e.V. presents itself 08 – 09 . . . . . . . . . . .Gay rights in Germany 10 – 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A foray into Hamburg’s queer history 12 – 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hamburg’s queer hotspots 14 – 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hamburg: Gateway to the world 16 – 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hamburg’s history of Christopher Street Day (CSD) 18 – 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . .EuroPride 2020: Why Hamburg? 20 – 21 . . . . . . . . . . . .Interview with Hamburg’s Second Mayor Katharina Fegebank 22 – 23. . . . . . . . . . . .Hamburg 2020: A Year of Pride 24 – 25. . . . . . . . . . . .EuroPride Village in the heart of the city 26 – 27 . . . . . . . . . . . .Diversity at schools: A Euro-wide issue

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United in Pride

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countries don’t allow their citizens to live freely and determine their own sexuality.

t is said Hamburg has more bridges than Venice. So here in our city, we’re used to building bridges which connect people. Bridges enable interaction. They offer security and show the way. Bridges are points of both departure and arrival. Those who cross bridges can make new discoveries.

As a “gateway to the world”, Hamburg plays a particular role here. Our city has come a long way: From homosexual persecution during the National Socialist era and early Cold War days, to the so-called “Hamburger Ehe” legalisation of same-sex partnerships, to membership of the Rainbow Cities network. Today, the rainbow flag flies at the town hall and right across the city on Christopher Street Day as a symbol of solidarity and respect, allowing our city to set an example – including for some of our partner cities.

With its long tradition as a port city, Hamburg has always been building bridges: Embracing the world and open to new things. Because the only way our society can work together is through openness, diversity and mutual acceptance. We want to use the EuroPride 2020 as an opportunity to work with Hamburg’s LGBTI community to build lots of bridges: Into urban society, into our country, into Europe and beyond. The aim of EuroPride 2020 is to enable interaction, dialogue and reciprocal learning.

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destination for the LGBTI community. If Hamburg is to be awarded the EuroPride 2020 in September 2017, the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg - and myself personally together with Hamburg Pride e.V. will ensure that EuroPride 2020 is an unforgettable success.

As mayor of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, I expressly support the application of Hamburg Pride e.V. to the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg.

After the successful EuroPride 2004, this would be the second time that Hamburg could present itself as a city of diversity and a “gateway to the world”. Hamburg Pride e.V. has been organizing the Christopher-Street-Day (CSD) in Hamburg for almost 40 years and has proven itself in the past as a reliable and competent partner for the organization of such a major event. Last year, 165,000 people participated in the parade.

To mark the 40th anniversary of its Christopher Street Day, Hamburg has the opportunity to present itself to Europe and the world as a diverse, cosmopolitan city, and promote the values of an open, united and free society. The EuroPride will see our city build bridges. We invite the European LGBTI community to gather in Hamburg in 2020: UNITED IN PRIDE!

It is designed to set the course for asserting human and civil rights in Germany, in Europe, and the rest of the world. Sexual orientation and gender identity are important aspects of each individual’s personality established at a constitutional and human-rights level – no matter where they come from or where they live. But many

Olaf Scholz Mayor of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg

Hamburg has long been committed to the acceptance of gender and sexual diversity. Already in 1999, Hamburg introduced the “Hamburg marriage” and was thus a pioneer for the “registered life partnership” already possible in Germany since 2001 and due to recent marriage for all. In July 2016, we officially joined the international Rainbow Cities Network and in early 2017 Hamburg adopted an “Action Plan for the acceptance of gender and sexual diversity”, to which Hamburg Pride e.V. also contributed.

Nicole Schaening Deputy Chairperson

Stefan Mielchen Chairperson

This cosmopolitan and tolerant attitude towards LGBTI is the reason why a large community feels at home here and Hamburg has established itself as a popular

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The Board of Hamburg Pride (from the left): Stefan Mielchen, Patrick Orth, Nicole Schaening, Dominik Maggi, Meike Lockhorst, Matthias Laiß, Jan Ole Torreblanca.

The community’s mouthpiece

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s a voluntary, recognised non-profit association, Hamburg Pride is committed to reducing prejudice and discrimination against lesbians, gays, trans*, bisexual or intersex people, and promote full, legitimate equality for these groups in all areas of life. The association was founded in 2003, and has been recognised as non-profit since 2010. With around 500 members, we have the largest member base of all Pride associations in Germany. As a mouthpiece for the Hamburg LGBTI community, we have extensive contacts across the city, and are involved at a regional level in northern Germany, as well as nationwide through the Pride association network. We are also a member of the European Pride Organizers Association (EPOA), maintaining close ties at a European level, and co-operating with Gay Prides in cities like Copenhagen and Prague, as well as with activists in our partner cities such as St Petersburg and Dar es Salaam.

Our work revolves around calling for acceptance and equal rights, regardless of gender, sex or sexual orientation, and also irrespective of the country someone lives in or is from. Human rights apply globally, even though they are violated in many nations around the world. This is even truer in relation to the refugees who are currently coming to Hamburg seeking protection from war, persecution and discrimination. We were able to fund a number of projects for refugees in Hamburg in 2016. Our political pressure greatly helped ensure the city of Hamburg provided a safe haven for LGBTI refugees. As part of our project funding, we also support annual initiatives committed to breaking down prejudices against LGBTI people, and assisting victims of homophobic violence.

of some 15,000 participants marching through Hamburg City from the traditional starting point on the Lange Reihe. A total of 300,000 visitors attend our Pride weekend. But even away from Christopher Street Day (CSD), our association is constantly commenting on other political issues, as evidenced this year with our own rallies for the G20 summit and in the lead-up to the German federal election.

Politically active for human rights

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amburg Pride speaks up whenever the political situation requires it. Because even outside of Christopher Street Day, we consider ourselves important political players in our city. Below are four examples of our work: In January 2015, an organisation known as “Besorgte Eltern” (“concerned parents”) took to the streets of Hamburg to demonstrate against contemporary sexual education at the city’s schools. Our association stood up to this: With a broad alliance across the Hamburg LGBTI community, politics and society, Hamburg Pride organised a counter-demonstration which saw ten times as many

participants hit the streets – in heavy snow. The brutal attack in Orlando in June 2016 shocked the entire world. The day after, Hamburg Pride organised a vigil outside the US consulate general in Hamburg to remember the victims. Several hundred people showed up despite the short notice, and attendants included Hamburg’s Second Mayor Katharina Fegebank. The housing of queer refugees was one of the central demands of Hamburg Pride in the summer of 2016 – and it was successfully met. During CSD, Hamburg’s senator for social affairs announced secure accommodation would be provided for LGBTI refugees. A number of queer refugees

from all over Germany attended the CSD demonstration in August at the invitation of Hamburg Pride in a bid to raise awareness about their living conditions and create more visibility. In July 2017, Hamburg hosted the G20 summit. Hamburg Pride organised a rally which was not aimed against the meeting of the heads of state and government, but rather addressed the issue of LGBTI human rights in a number of the participating nations. Invited speakers included a representative of the Istanbul Pride (which was banned this year once again) and an activist from Queeramnesty.

2017 involves another very special focus for Hamburg Pride e.V., as it applies to host the EuroPride 2020. We want to bring this major European event to Hamburg – an event designed to boost Hamburg’s allure as a Rainbow City, but most importantly to shed light on human and civil rights issues for the LGBTI community across Europe and the world.

Our biggest event continues to be the HAMBURG PRIDE, with Pride Week, the political parade and the three-day street festival on the Binnenalster (Inner Alster Lake). The event has constantly grown in recent years: 2015 saw around 150,000 people line the streets, with a demo

Vigil for the victims of Orlando, queer refugees in the CSD parade, a spokeswoman for the Istanbul Pride at the G20 protest.

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Gay rights in Germany Work in progress

On 30 June 2017, the German Parliament legalised marriage for lesbians and gays; Die Grünen (“The Green”) party celebrated this in the plenary chamber.

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n 30th June, the German Parliament legalised same-sex marriage, ending a long political battle lasting more than a quarter of a century. One week prior, the Parliament had passed a law governing compensation and rehabilitation for victims of criminal law section 175. This section had been part of German criminal law for 122 years. It applied in West Germany until 1969 – in the intensified Nazi version. Criminal law was then reformed, and adult homosexuals were no longer at risk of persecution. But the section was not omitted from the German Criminal Code until 1994. Up to that time, homosexual acts by men were punishable – with varying legal prerequisites. As such, around 50,000 men were convicted in West Germany between 1949 and 1969. The sentences weren’t just relevant in terms of criminal law. The preliminary proceedings alone destroyed the relationships, families and professional careers of many affected parties. In 2002, the German Parliament reversed the judgements made against homosexuals during the National Socialist era. The judgements, which had been delivered in West Germany based on the same section intensified by the Nazis, have now also been reversed, and the affected parties still alive have received financial compensation.

munity continues to face discrimination – at the workplace, in schools, and, all too often, in public life and recreation.

already been implemented in the Berlin, Brandenburg, Bremen and Thuringian state constitutions.

Violence against homosexuals is a growing problem in many German cities. A 2015 survey conducted by the Federal Anti-Discrimination Agency on experiences of discrimination in Germany revealed that many people in Germany have reservations about or fears of contact with LGBTI people. For example, 38.4 percent of those surveyed stated they don’t like it when two men kiss in public. But hate crime based on sexual orientation is not explicitly established in German criminal law.

Fundamental improvements are also required in relation to the legal situation and lives of trans* and intersex people in Germany. Reforming the Transsexual Act is a top priority on the German LGBTI community’s political agenda. One of the aims is to ensure that the change in the sex/gender option and name on official documents is based purely on the respective person’s own decision, without any pressure to undergo prior psychological assessments, medical treatments or operations. There should also be an option to enter a third sex/gender.

Germany’s General Equal Treatment Act prohibits discrimination based on sexual identity. In doing so, it particularly prohibits discrimination at the workplace and during acts of daily life, such as going shopping or to the cinema. If someone is discriminated against based on their sexual identity, it is irrelevant whether the person is lesbian, gay or bisexual. The discriminator’s view and belief is the decisive factor. Unlike the General Equal Treatment Act, the German Constitution does not expressly protect sexual identity. Including the term in Article 3 would ensure LGBTI people receive the same protection from discrimination as members of other social groups. This protection has

The decisions made by the German Parliament in the summer of 2016 fulfilled two of the German LGBTI community’s key demands, which had played a central role in the political Pride parades for years. But there is still a lot left to be done in Germany to increase acceptance and understanding when it comes to diverse lifestyles. Because despite the legalisation of same-sex marriage, and the fact that the lives homosexual and bisexual people in Germany have generally improved in recent years, the LGBTI com-

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An active information and educational policy, and establishing sexual diversity as part of course curriculums nationwide, are key factors in achieving lasting success with an anti-discrimination policy. This includes providing information on same-sex lifestyles and sexual diversity in schools, and broadening curriculums to include the history of the LGBTI community. This is point of controversy in many German states, with Christian lobby groups in particular vehemently fighting against sexual education being taught, and both social and biological aspects being included in this framework.

Compensation for the victims of homosexual persecution in Germany was a major issue addressed at the HAMBURG PRIDE in 2016.

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Persecuted, tolerated – accepted? A foray into Hamburg’s queer history

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relaxed and then finally abolished in 1994. Even after the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) had been founded, Hamburg police and judicial authorities continued persecuting gay men in particular, in some cases even more intensively than during the Nazi era. Liberality and openness towards homosexuals were foreign concepts in Hamburg during the 1950s and well into the 1980s.

long with Berlin, Cologne and Munich, Hamburg is home to one of Germany’s largest queer scenes. As a port city, it has always been a hub for people from all over the world, and this has helped build the cosmopolitan vibe our city is famous for. But the LGBTI community had to fight hard for this openness and liberality; in some cases, they’re still battling for it to this day.

Pubs were regularly raided, while bars banned samesex couples from dancing for many years. The police kept so-called “Pink Lists” – the name given to files recording the names and details of homosexuals. Many men were blackmailed during this time. In the 1960s, Hamburg’s Senator of the Interior, Helmut Schmidt, who later became the West German Chancellor, ordered surveillance for public toilets: Police officers would sit in special rooms behind transparent mirrors monitoring what was going on on the other side and taking action if necessary. Families and employers were generally informed of the subsequent notices and criminal proceedings, which often meant social death for the persons affected. It was not until 1980 that this practice was spectacularly uncovered in Hamburg and made known to the general public, with gay activists smashing the toilet mirrors.

In the 1920s and ‘30s, Germany had an active homosexual movement which was also reflected in Hamburg. Civil rights and homosexual emancipation were one thing, subculture hangouts were another. Homosexuality was a punishable offence, and an open bar and pub scene took a while to get off the ground here. But there were certain gathering places for men seeking contact with other men, and also a handful reserved for women. Homoerotic plays were also performed on the stages of the Hanseatic city in the 1920s, having been censored until 1918. This all ended with the National Socialist dictatorship. Criminal law against homosexuals was tightened, and even in Hamburg, many homosexuals, particularly gay men, were put in jail or sent to the Neuengamme concentration camp, where a plaque has today been erected in their memory. After the war, criminal law section 175 remained in effect unchanged until 1969, before initially being

Homosexual life in Hamburg only emerged very gradually. The first Stonewall demonstration in 1980 ended with brutal police intervention. An infrastructure of self-help and

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ernment have additionally passed an action plan against homophobia and trans*phobia, which has been drafted up together with representatives of the community.

counselling facilities finally started being created in the mid 1980s, and continues to exist in Hamburg to this day. But even today, there is still a clear misunderstanding in terms of public funding, with projects by lesbian women continuing to receive much less financing than those run by gay men.

The support received for the EuroPride application from the Hamburg state parliament in July 2017 has been another highlight. All political parties consented to this – except for one: the right-wing populist “Alternative für Deutschland”, which pursues anti-minority objectives, including against the LGBTI community, and consistently opposes issues such things as modern sex education at Hamburg schools. In doing so, they speak for a small but serious minority in urban society, who continue to discriminate against people based on their sexual orientation and gender identity. Even in Hamburg, the image of a perfect, educated, liberal city still has its blemishes. There’s a lot of work yet to be done.

A symbolic gesture in 1999 saw Hamburg live up to its reputation as a cosmopolitan city, when the government at the time created the so-called “Hamburger Ehe”, allowing same-sex couples to register their partnerships, albeit without legal consequences. Nevertheless, this is considered to have been a major driving force behind the German Parliament’s decision to legalise registered civil partnerships two years later. The gay and lesbian scene, with its many bars and parties, also experienced a great boom during this time. The 1980 Stonewall demonstration became a significant event, which ended up being protected rather than monitored by police. The city hosted the EuroPride in 2004, a year after the founding of our Hamburg Pride e.V. association – which today boasts the largest member base of all German CSD associations. Politics is also on the side of the LGBTI community these days, with Hamburg joining the international network of Rainbow Cities in 2016. The parliament and gov-

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Liberal and modern: Hamburg’s queer hotspots

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amburg is an exciting travel destination for the LGBTI community. All around the Alster lakes and Elbe River, St Michael’s Church and the Reeperbahn, there’s a liberal vibe combining tradition with modernity. Germany’s second largest city is distinguished by its openness, offering everything the rainbow heart desires. Many hotels here focus specially on LGBTI guests. Anyone wanting to find out about the latest parties, events and cultural goings on is advised to have a read through hinnerk, Hamburg City’s queer magazine.

St. Georg

St. Pauli

The St. Georg district has acquired the reputation of being Hamburg’s Gay Village over the years. Located by the central train station, and right on the Alster lakes, it represents the entire city’s beauty and openness. It revolves around the bustling Lange Reihe street – where people shop, stroll and party. Various cafés and stores are the perfect places to sit, admire and enjoy. From the gay sauna to the queer bookshop and leather shop, there’s something for everyone here. Important community institutions such as the AIDS-Hilfe Hamburg and Hein & Fiete gay advisory centre are also all based in St. Georg and are open to the LGBTI community.

When looking for pulsating nightlife, Hamburg’s Kiez is the place to be. It’s main street, the Reeperbahn, is considered the “world’s most sinful mile”. The red-light district has the country’s highest concentration of pubs, attracting night owls from all walks of life. As John Lennon himself famously said: “I grew up in Liverpool but I came of age in Hamburg.” Among parties, striptease & Europe’s largest sex shop, the queer nightlife scene is also booming: In addition to the many clubs and pubs aimed specifically at a queer audience, many other nightlife venues also demonstrate the Kiez’s openness and acceptance. Even Olivia Jones, the nation’s most famous drag queen, feels

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at home here. And those who party through to sunrise can enjoy their breakfast at the nearby fish market. The Reeperbahn is also the central hub for queer culture, catering equally to theatre lovers and fans of drag cabaret and musicals. 2017, for example, saw the long awaited German premiere of “Kinky Boots” on the Reeperbahn.

haven for the alternative lifestyle which particularly embraces the LGBTI community. They are also home to the Junglesbenzentrum (Young Lesbian Centre) and Intervention lesbian association for lesbians of all ages. Locals enjoy going out in these trendy districts to soak up the unique atmosphere. And anyone looking for a great shopping alternative will be equally thrilled here, with stores selling pieces by young, famous or completely unknown fashion labels and jewellery designers.

Schanze and Karoviertel The hip Schanze and Karoviertel districts ooze their own special charm with lots of little boutiques, restaurants & cafés. Located just next to the Reeperbahn, they’re a

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Hamburg: Gateway to the world

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and has been destroyed several times throughout its turbulent history. The 106-metre-high lookout platform on its spire provides an impressive view over the entire city.

amburg made it onto the New York Times’ list of 52 Places to Go in 2017, while in August 2016, the renowned business magazine The Economist ranked it amongst the top ten most liveable cities in the world. Hamburg’s locals agree with this, seeing their city not only as a gateway to the world, but also as the world’s finest city.

Speicherstadt and Chilehaus: The over-100-yearold Speicherstadt is the world’s largest interconnected warehouse complex, and has been classed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2015. Visitors will find Wilhelmine Brick Gothic architecture and bizarre gables and turrets which are reflected in the canals, known as Fleete. The adjacent Chilehaus was built out of 4.8 million bricks, and is an example of 1920s Brick Expressionism, which was inspired by Brick Gothic and Expressionism. It, too, has been classified a World Heritage Site for its prominent role in the urban transformation of the 20th century.

With a population of 1.8 million, Hamburg is a cosmopolitan metropolis home to people from more than 180 nations. As one of the world’s largest port cities, it has symbolised freedom and tolerance for as long as anyone can remember, and its diversity is reflected in its 104 districts. Blankenese with its grand manors for the rich and famous; St. Pauli, one of Europe’s largest entertainment districts; or St. Georg on the Alster lake, with its large gay community. Below is a selection of tourist highlights:

HafenCity: The HafenCity is a unique urban development project transforming vacant port areas into a multi-purpose, state-of-the-art district. The HafenCity is an extraordinary fusion of the past and modernity. A true architectural and cultural delicacy!

St. Pauli Piers and port: The St. Pauli Piers are a 700m floating landing stage dating back to 1839. Port cruises and ferries all depart from here. The view over the port is unique; nowhere else can you get so close to ocean liners and giant cruise ships.

Town hall: Completed in 1897, Hamburg’s town hall (Rathaus) dominates the city centre with its impressive architecture. It has 647 rooms, and is supported by over 4000 oak piles. The magnificent sandstone building is home to the Senate and city parliament, and the rainbow flag flies here every year during Gay Pride.

St. Pauli and the Reeperbahn: The Reeperbahn, Hamburg’s mile of sin, continues to be the number one entertainment district. With its theatres, table dance bars, discos and music clubs, it’s all here on this 930-metre-long strip! Elbphilharmonie: The Elbphilharmonie is the new symbol of Hamburg. Since opening in January 2017, more than 1 million people have already visited the 37-metre-high public plaza. St Michael’s Church: St Michael’s Church, which everyone just calls Michel, is Hamburg’s historic landmark,

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From Stonewall to EuroPride – Hamburg’s history of Christopher Street Day (CSD)

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he first Hamburg drag queens were known for their blonde manes, dark dresses and roller skates. In 1980, they marched through the streets of the Hanseatic city as part of the Stonewall demonstration, which was the name given to Christopher Street Day (CSD) at the time. Since the early 1970s, homosexuals in West Germany had been increasingly going on the offensive to assert their rights. The first gay and lesbian demonstration in Germany took place in Münster, North-Rhine Westphalia in 1972, and the first Christopher Street Days to truly be called such were held in Bremen and Berlin in 1979. Hamburg was thus a little late to the party when it hosted its first Gay Pride Week in 1980. The focal point of the week was the Stonewall demonstration on 28 June 1980, the predecessor to the present-day CSD. It was the first time Hamburg’s gays and lesbians had gone out making public demands. They were against Section 175, which punishes homosexuality amongst men. “At that time, it wasn’t a colourful parade; it revolved primarily around improving our social position”, explains Wolfgang Krömer, who has been involved right from day one. The demonstrators marched through downtown Hamburg and into the Schanzenviertel district. Along the way, they were accompanied by a police car, from which

officers took photos. The demonstrators suspected the images would be used for “Pink Lists”, on which authorities recorded the names of presumed homosexuals. When the activists asked the police to hand over the films containing the images, there was an uproar. Tear gas and batons were used against the demonstrators, injuring several. The movement took the story to the press, who reported on the police’s actions and largely sided with the demonstrators. The first Stonewall demonstration in Hamburg was thus a success. Stonewall demonstrations were held regularly in Hamburg from then on. But there are differences between the various gay and lesbian movements. In the late ‘80s, hardly anyone came to the demonstrations, prompting creators to overhaul things in 1992, when organisers created a new event under the name of Christopher Street Day. The whole thing was much more colourful than before, though political statements were still made. The Catholic Church came into focus, the issue of outing was on everyone’s lips, and there were also discussions into whether teachers were allowed to be homosexual.

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CSD in Hamburg became a success story. Homosexual and heterosexual politicians take part in the demonstrations, attracting media attention. As such, it was a logical step for Hamburg’s mayor to make CSD a permanent fixture on the calendar. In 2004, Hamburg hosted the EuroPride under the auspices of it First Mayor Ole von Beust, a Christian Democrat who only made his homosexuality public a few years later. Today, more than 15,000 LGBTI people participate in the annual political parade through the streets of downtown Hamburg, cheered on by 150,000 spectators.

1980 in Hamburg: The first Stonewall demonstration ends in conflict with the police.

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EuroPride 2020: Why Hamburg?

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the EuroPride 2010 in Warsaw, for example, is at risk of regressing. And in Turkey, the political situation in general has grown more acute; efforts to hold Pride events have been constantly quashed with violence in recent years.

amburg’s LGBTI community is part of our diverse urban society. The Hamburg Pride e.V. association believes in exerting influence over cultural, political, economic and social life in our city, so as to reduce prejudice and discrimination against lesbians, gays, bisexuals, trans or intersex people, and encourage full, legal equality for these groups in all areas of life.

Hamburg wants to use the EuroPride 2020 to showcase itself to Europe as a “gateway to the world”, including for LGBTI people, and thus promote a free, tolerant Europe committed to protecting human rights. The Hamburg city parliament’s decision to support the application has made the EuroPride a matter for the whole city and its residents.

This aim extends well beyond Hamburg’s borders. We consider ourselves passionate Europeans, and, as a queer community, are part of the broader community of shared values which is currently facing major political and social challenges. The only way to overcome these challenges is for people to interact and talk to one another.

The aim of the EuroPride 2020 is to bring as many people as possible from all over Europe to Hamburg to work on these objectives – in keeping with our motto of “United in Pride”. We will be assisted in this by a vast political network and numerous contacts with organisations and activists across the entire continent. We want to use these connections to highlight the issues of human rights, equality and anti-discrimination well beyond our own community: In schools, among employers, in sport, in religious communities, at cultural institutions, in tourism, and in many other aspects of social life.

Europe is a fragile creature – but there are no alternatives for European cohesion, even beyond EU realms. The Turkey, Great Britain and Poland cases show Europe’s importance, including from an LGBTI community perspective. Great Britain set an example with its equality legislation, but has ceased to be a driving political force as a result of Brexit. Poland’s gradual liberalisation, demonstrated by

The EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg… • …brings Europe and its LGBTI issues into urban society and encourages interactions. A EuroPride Village, as a central venue in the heart of the city, will ensure visibility for Europe’s queer community and its issues for a whole week. Stages and information stands give organisations from all over Europe the opportunity to present themselves to the public. • …shifts public focus onto the interests of a discriminated minority by hosting an international human rights conference. An outreach programme enables activists from as many countries as possible to come to Hamburg and speak up for human rights. • …gives Hamburg the opportunity to discuss issues relating to diversity, acceptance and equality in Germany and Europe on a major public stage – during Pride Week and beyond. With a year-round events programme, 2020 will be the Year of Pride in Hamburg, covering as many areas of social life as possible.

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“An important contribution towards a cohesive Europe”

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amburg’s Second Mayor Katharina Fegebank explains why the Hanseatic city’s parliament and government support the application to host the EuroPride 2020

Ms Fegebank, why should Hamburg host the EuroPride 2020? Katharina Fegebank: Hamburg is a modern, cosmopolitan metropolis which embraces diversity and sees it as added value for society. We have long been campaigning for a free, tolerant Europe where everyone, regardless of their gender identity or sexual orientation, has access to all opportunities. Hamburg wants to set a good example and work with civil society to create an event highlighting the interests of the LGBTI community, their friends and families to a broader audience. The idea here is to promote a culture of openness and respect in society and government. Another thing in Hamburg’s favour is the fact that we have a very diverse, vibrant LGBTI scene, and have been a popular tourist destination for the international LGBTI community for m a n y years.

What sort of signal does Hamburg hope to send out by hosting the EuroPride 2020? Katharina Fegebank: The EuroPride stands for a diverse, united Europe, enabling interaction, dialogue and mutual learning, and thus making an important contribution towards a cohesive Europe. In an age where many parts of the world do not properly uphold human rights, it is particularly crucial that a clear commitment be made to asserting human and civil rights. We want to oppose

all those who question our hard-fought values and freedoms. It’s not just you personally who supports the application; the Hamburg city parliament as a state parliament has also unanimously agreed to provide its support. What does this mean exactly? Katharina Fegebank: We welcome the decision by the Hamburg city parliament to support the application to host the EuroPride 2020. It demonstrates that, along with the Hamburg Senate, the elected representatives also believe in more LGBTI acceptance and involvement. Specifically speaking, this means that Hamburg will share up to € 500,000 of the costs of the EuroPride 2020.

In May 2017, Katharina Fegebank hosted the EPOA executive board at Hamburg’s town hall.

Hamburg is considered a “gateway to the world”. How open is it to the LGBTI community? Katharina Fegebank: By passing the action plan regarding the acceptance of sexual and gender diversity in January 2017, the Senate has highlighted principles and guidelines for a modern equality policy which also takes into account the LGBTI community. We want this action plan to help create a social environment in which people can lead their own, equal life regardless of their sexual or gender identity. Together with policymakers, relevant authorities, senators and the LGBTI lobby groups, we have identified areas requiring action, and have been able to develop 90 specific measures to facilitate greater acceptance of sexual and gender diversity. Hamburg’s Second Mayor Katharina Fegebank is also the Senator for Equality Matters.

Hamburg has been a member of the Rainbow Cities network since 2016. Why did it join the network?

correctness” and “gender delusions”, and therefore automatically devalued. The Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg has always considered itself a cosmopolitan, liberal, tolerant city. By joining the network, we wanted to once again visibly demonstrate our tolerance. The Rainbow Cities in Europe share a wealth of experience when it comes to acceptance and sexual/gender diversity. They have all carried out many projects and can benefit from one another. I have no doubt that, in future, the network will be the source of numerous political and social ideas which will reinforce the notion of an equal, self-determined life in Europe.

Katharina Fegebank: I have been concerned at the way public discourse on homosexuality and transidentity has grown increasingly fierce at both a national and international level. Hard-fought values are dismissed as “political

The human rights of LGBTI communities in Hamburg’s partner cities like St Petersburg, Shanghai and Dar es Salaam are often being brutally disregarded. What is Hamburg doing to try and change this?

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Katharina Fegebank: The Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg is constantly seizing opportunities at a city-partnership level to highlight the unacceptable treatment of homosexual, transgender and intersex people in places like St Petersburg and Russia generally in various ways. Funding from an exchange project run by Germany’s gay & lesbian association (LSVD), and financed by the Senate Chancellery and social authorities, is also being put towards an information exchange between youths. This project serves to shed light and facilitate networking, and has been carried out regularly since 2010. The LGBTI community also believes the projects play a key role in supporting the assertion of human rights in partner cities. They particularly give homosexual, transsexual and intersex people access to otherwise denied information on LGBTI issues, and enable discussions on the treatment of homosexuality and transsexuality in Hamburg.

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Hamburg 2020: A Year of Pride

T

he EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg will have an impact well beyond the actual Pride Week itself. It will involve monthly events throughout the entire year – and not just for the LGBTI community. If Hamburg is chosen to host the EuroPride, the city will make every effort to hold the annual conference of the Rainbow Cities network. As a member of the International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association, it will also endeavour to bring the IGLTA annual conference to Hamburg. The aim of the EuroPride 2020 events is involve as many districts as possible in the Year of Pride – branching out from the St. Georg Gay Village and extending to areas which rarely or never come into contact with queer issues or people from the queer community. Because this is precisely where visibility is required. In co-operation with the Equality Authority (Behörde für Gleichstellung), School Authority (Schulbehörde) and Institute for Continued Teacher Training (Institut für Lehr-

erfortbildung), the plan is to hold a “Diversity day” addressing the issues of sexual orientation and gender identity at Hamburg’s schools. In addition to the close ties already existing with the LGBTI community in Hamburg’s Russian partner city St Petersburg, which include an annual exchange and discussion, the plan is also to encourage and arrange other youth meetings for LGBTIs from Hamburg’s partner cities in collaboration with Hamburg’s queer youth-work organisations. A concert at Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie, the new symbol of our city, is set to be a cultural highlight. Hamburg Pride will also ensure the city’s theatres feature productions with queer themes. Hamburg Museum is due to have an exhibition on the history of homosexuality and trans* in Hamburg, which may end up becoming a permanent fixture there. Meanwhile, an outdoor exhibition in Hamburg City will address the situation of LGBTI people in Europe during Pride Week.

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January EuroPride concert at Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie

There are plans for a European choral event in partnership with Hamburg’s queer choirs. And the EuroPride 2020 will also be accompanied by an international film programme in co-operation with the International Queer Film Festival. World Aids Day will be marked by the RedNight AIDS benefit gala, which highlights the issue of HIV and AIDS from both European and worldwide perspectives.

February European choral event March International diversity conference April Exhibition at Hamburg Museum

The major sporting events run by Hamburg’s gay and lesbian sporting association, “Startschuss”, will have a particular European focus in 2020. And in co-operation with the queer business associations “Völklinger Kreis” and “Wirtschaftsweiber”, as well as the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce and Hamburg businesses, an international diversity conference will discuss how to handle diversity in the corporate world.

May Harbour Pride, IGLTA annual conference June Promotion at Hamburg schools, Rainbow Cities Network annual conference July EuroPride 2020 August EuroPride 2020

The exact scheduling depends on a number of factors, not all of which are within our control. As such, the following calendar is based purely on the current plans, and may change before 2020. The highlights are listed in the overview:

September International youth meetings October International Queer Film Festival November European sporting event December Winter Pride, AIDS benefit gala

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EuroPride Village in the heart of the city

P

resentations, films, lectures, discussions, exhibitions and much more: Pride Week showcases the full diversity of our city’s LGBTI community. For many years, Hamburg Pride e.V. has been pooling a large number of events at Pride House to mark Christopher Street Day. The venue is provided to groups, associations and other organisers free of charge, and is used very intensively every year.

We want to build on this for EuroPride 2020 in order to make the wide range of services and events visible to the general public across the city, and also give other European Pride organisers the opportunity to present themselves and learn about the LGBTI situation in the various countries. EuroPride Village at hart-Hauptmann-Platz

Ger-

With info booths, a stage and a marquee, Pride House is opening its doors to EuroPride 2020 and will be

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moving to the middle of the city for a week. It is the central hub during Pride Week, giving groups and associations from the European LGBTI community the chance to showcase themselves to a wide audience. Entertainment is provided in the form of a free cultural programme. A marquee can host lectures, discussions and all kinds of other things. And in co-operation with the neighbouring Thalia Theater, the “Nachtasyl” bar located there can be used as another venue, while also doubling as

a night-time hangout for Hamburg locals and international guests to mingle in a relaxed party atmosphere. A public open-air (photo) exhibition on Hamburg’s largest and most popular shopping strip, Mönckebergstraße, will attract additional attention and encourage further interaction and dialogue. The exhibition will address the situations of LGBTI people in various European countries. Opening ceremony: Pride Night at the Thalia Theater

The EuroPride 2020 will officially open with Pride Night, which combines an attractive artistic programme with the event’s underlying theme and motto: United in Pride. A mix of show, discussions, interviews and welcome speeches will make for a rich, varied evening and a prestigious social event, which will feature the annual Pride Award, presented to a person or group who rendered outstanding services to the LGBTI community. While content and artistic aspect of the Hamburg Pride programme are generally geared around German is-

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sues, the opening ceremony for EuroPride 2020 will focus on artists and guests from all over Europe. It will be launched by a patron with a Europe-wide profile. Pride Night will be followed by a big opening party featuring international DJs.


Diversity at schools: A Europe-wide issue

I

n January 2015, Hamburg witnessed conflicts the likes of which it had not seen for many years: 35 years after the first Stonewall demonstration in the Hanseatic city, police were once again taking action against gays and lesbians. This time, it was during a demonstration by the “Besorgte Eltern” (“concerned parents”) group, who were campaigning against modern sexual education and diverse schooling. Hamburg Pride e.V. had organised a counter-demonstration with 1,000 participants, which went off peacefully. After it had ended, some activists obstructed the paths of the “Besorgte Eltern”, and were forcibly marched to the town hall by the police, who were using batons. A parliament representative from the Christian Democrats Union was among the people who later spoke out at the square in front of the town hall: “We don’t want any porno classes!” he shouted to the angry crowd. There are no “porno classes” at any Hamburg school. But the statement is consistent with the principles of the anti-diversity campaigners, who constantly make such claims and warn against the supposed “early sexualisation of children” at day-care centres and schools. Their reasoning is that children will be exposed to the perverse sexual practices of gays and lesbians and be led into onanism,

away from parental influence. The “Besorgte Eltern”, an evangelical splinter group, are joined in Germany by the equally active “Demo für alle” movement, which is more powerful, more professional, and well connected in even the highest political circles. Their spokesperson, Hedwig Freifrau von Beverfoerde, was until recently a member of the CDU party. Beatrix von Storch is another very active member. She represents the right-wing populist AfD party in the European Parliament, and claims, for example, that the European Union is planning “sexual education right from primary school” and calling for “masturbation study units for 0 to 4-year-olds”. There is once again no evidence to support this. But her party, which is expected to once again be represented in the next German Parliament, has also clearly spoken out against modern sexual education in a position paper signed by Hamburg parliament representatives.

the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg is to send a signal countering this development. As early as 2015, Hamburg Pride set an example, ran its CSD that year under the motto of “Acceptance is ready for school – sexual diversity on the timetable”, and advertised right across the city with a popular poster campaign.

In January 2015, Hamburg Pride e.V. had organised a counter-demonstration against the „concerned parents“ group. In the same year the CSD was under the motto “Acceptance is ready for school – sexual diversity on the timetable”.

Hamburg, Germany, Europe: The campaign by rightwing populists and many Christian groups in support of a backward family image and against the acceptance of diverse lifestyles is being carried out at all levels. The aim of

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The EuroPride 2020 is also set to focus on working with school students. In co-operation with the Equality Authority, the School Authority, the Institute for Continued Teacher Training, and the “Soorum” school education project, we want to start up a themed day addressing the issue of diversity at Hamburg’s schools.


International human rights conference during the EuroPride 2020

P

ride Week has always raised many relevant issues during the Hamburg Pride in the past: Together with a number of queer organisations, our association has for many years been organising workshops, lectures, panel discussions and screenings on LGBTI community issues at Pride House. The international human rights conference during EuroPride Week will serve as the key focus of the Eu-

roPride 2020 in Hamburg. The plan is to have a one-day conference which starts with a plenary session and then uses various forums to examine the main themes in greater detail. The results of these discussions will ultimately be incorporated into the plenum’s final session, where the groups present their work. 2020 will be the year after the 50year anniversary of the Stonewall riots and start of the modern LGBTI movement. We want the EuroPride to look ahead on this basis, and the human rights conference will address

issues relating to the future of the LGBTI community, such as: - What models will we be living in in future? - How do we successfully combat LGBTI phobia in sport? - What do we need to successfully empower LGBTI people worldwide? - How do we enter into broad pacts with straight allies? - How can we better network and support ourselves as an international community?

The plenary sessions and forums will be made accessible to the broadest possible audience via an online live stream. There are also plans to employ an editorial team to accompany the conference and subsequently compile documentation safeguarding the results for the long term. The Hamburg Convention Bureau will help Hamburg Pride e.V. organise the conference. Specific content will be arranged in close co-operation with other community organisers. Outreach programme Hamburg Price has boasted an international network for many years. So that the human rights conference at the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg can be accessible to as many people as possible, Hamburg Pride e.V. has incorporated an extensive outreach programme into its budget plans. The particular aim here is for organi-

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sations otherwise unable to afford to travel to Hamburg to be given the opportunity to participate in EuroPride 2020. The outreach programme thus ensures that they are able to discuss and celebrate with us in a bid to fight for LGBTI human rights – in Hamburg, Germany, Europe, and worldwide: United in Pride. Hamburg Pride e.V. has a long tradition in this area, having constantly been welcoming international guests to CSD for many years, particularly from our partner cities. Delegations from the Prague Pride, for example, have visited Hamburg on numerous occasions. In 2015, Hamburg Pride invited guests from our partner city Dar es Salaam to spend a week in Hamburg to engage in discussions with the Hamburg community and policymakers, and of course to draw the media’s attention to the situation of LGBTI people in Tanzania.

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An exchange with youths from Hamburg’s partner city St Petersburg has also been organised by the Lesbian and Gay Association (LSVD) for many years. Participants enjoy an extensive programme, and are part of the CDS political parade. During the G20 summit in Hamburg in 2017, we had a rally focusing on the situations of sexual minorities in many of the member states, with a representative from Istanbul Pride giving a speech. Hamburg Pride 2017 is expected to attract guests from Kiev, Prague, Vilnius and Malta, and it is important for us to be able to co-operate on equal footing. Joint discussions and events addressing successes, challenges and difficulties will all aim to encourage mutual motivation.


EuroPride parade through downtown Hamburg

T

he political parade will be the highlight of Pride Week and the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg. No other event highlights our city’s LGBTI community and its interests as visible as this demonstration, of which the local origins date back to 1980, when gays and lesbians first dared to walk the streets.

today boasts over 15,000 participants, with more than 150,000 spectators lining the streets. It is set to become even bigger and more international for the EuroPride 2020. We will be inviting delegations from all over Europe, as well as from our partner cities outside of Europe, in a bid to collectively set a prominent example for equal rights and worldwide adherence to LGBTI human rights.

Hamburg Pride e.V. not only considers itself committed to this history; it also seeks to encourage the presence and visibility of people often not afforded this opportunity. In 2016, therefore, we invited refugees from Germany to attend, and in 2015 we hosted a delegation from Hamburg’s partner city Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Guests of our co-operation partners from Prague, Copenhagen and other cities have also been a constant presence in the past. Furthermore, 2016 saw Hamburg’s Turkish community participate in the parade for the first time, setting an important example of the diverse harmony in our city, and sending out a signal noticed well beyond Hamburg’s borders. Another first was achieved in 2016, with the inaugural Hamburg Dyke March on the eve of the CDS parade further promoting lesbian visibility.

In order to cater to this larger scale event, the usual route through downtown Hamburg will have to be revised in consultation with the relevant authorities and Hamburg police, so as to ensure the particular requirements can be optimally aligned with the interests of private transport and other public life in downtown Hamburg.

We want to build on this with the EuroPride 2020. The political parade has continued to grow in recent years, and

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The EuroPride 2020 street festival

I

t’s a unique venue: The most beautiful street festival setting of any CSD event in Germany is located around Hamburg’s Inner Alster Lake. And it’s being prominently expanded for the EuroPride 2020. To duly cater to the event’s importance and the high visitor numbers expected, the Rathausmarkt in front of the town hall will serve as the focal point of the street festival, and will host the main stage with its varied programme. For three full days, the heart of downtown Hamburg will be dedicated to the EuroPride. The street festival starts at 3pm on Friday 31 July 2020 and ends at 10pm on Sunday 2 August. One of the highlights will undoubtedly be the EuroPride parade on the Saturday afternoon, followed by the official political closing rally on the main stage at Rathausmarkt. It will also be the scene of the closing ceremony on the Sunday, and serve as the venue for the official handover of the EuroPride quilt to the next host city. The street festival traditionally gives groups, associations and initiatives from the Hamburg LGBTI community the opportunity to present themselves and their work on a large public stage. During the EuroPride, this opportunity will of course also be extended to Pride organisations from all over Europe. In our guest area (the so-called Pride Island) Pride organizers from all over Europe are able to exchange and to network in a quiet atmosphere. At the same time, the festival allows the people of Hamburg to interact with the LGBTI community, learn about their work and political interests, or simply party casually with each other. Once again under the motto of the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg: United in Pride. Outside Hamburg’s town hall, where the rainbow flag will once again be flying during EuroPride 2020, there will be information and food stands, along with a large stage showcasing a varied programme, which, in co-operation with Norddeutscher Rundfunk, will feature artists from all

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over Europe. Plans include a show with participants from the Eurovision Song Contest, as well as stars from the LGBTI community. Discussions, talks, speeches and other contributions from the EuroPride 2020’s international guests will also play a central role in the stage programme. The street festival will additionally include “music islands” positioned to provide space for dancing and partying down the entire strip, while unisex toilets will cater to people of all sexual orientations and gender identity. Another component of the street festival will be the traditional minute’s silence, held on the Saturday in memory of people who have died of HIV and AIDS. In close consultation with the relevant authorities and Hamburg police, the safety measures taken even for this year’s CSD will be constantly adapted to the standards required for such major events. This will of course also be done for the EuroPride 2020.


EuroPride 2020 party highlights

H

amburg will become the European party hotspot of the LGBTI community during the EuroPride 2020. We want to join together with people from all over Europe to throw a big, vibrant party: United in Pride, including on the dance floor. And as Hamburg is one of Europe’s largest port cities, the opening of Pride Week will be marked by a procession of ships on the Elbe.

– heading into the sunset past the spectacular townscape between the Elbphilharmonie, port cranes and the idyllic Blankenese district.

Pride Ahoi: A colourful convoy of LGBTI community ships will cruise down the Elbe during the launch weekend. Pride Ahoi ensures LGBTI visibility at one of our city’s historic and economic hubs, which also happens to be a popular tourist magnet: the Hamburg port. The procession of ships will start at the St. Pauli Piers in the early evening

Rainbow Day: The Hamburger DOM is northern Germany’s largest fun fair. Rainbow Day has a long tradition there, and will also be a highlight of the EuroPride 2020: Following a one-hour parade around the entire grounds, the evening will be rounded off with an open-air party. Performers always come up with something special for Rain-

EuroPrideNight: The wild LGBTI party night following on from the official opening gala of the EuroPride 2020 at the Thalia Theater. With top international DJs, we want to create a colourful musical extravaganza to kick off Pride Week.

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bow Day: From queer gingerbread hearts to 2-for-1 tickets on the rollercoaster, they’ve got everything covered. Electro Pride: The night before the EuroPride parade is all about house, electro and techno. Electro Pride has fans of electronic dance music in their element at the spectacular bunker venue in Heiligengeistfeld. EuroPride street festival: There will be a threeday party around Hamburg’s Inner Alster Lake and the Rathausmarkt. Numerous music islands set up by the queer clubs and bars will transform Jungfernstieg street, Ballindamm street, and the square outside the town hall into the year’s largest LGBTI open-air party, where patrons can dance and rave until midnight, before moving onto other parties.

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EuroPride Dance: The official party of EuroPride 2020 will be held at a very unique venue: The Edelfettwerk is a former factory which is today used for a number of events, and also has a large outdoor area. While guests can dance over several levels and dance floors inside the building, the outdoor area transforms into a vast beach club with pool, chill-out zones, food trucks and other activities. Closing Party: Time to say goodbye: The closing party on the Sunday serves as the conclusion of Pride Week. For one final time, top DJs will get guests dancing and celebrating the grand finale of EuroPride 2020.


Timeline Year

Month

Events

Location

2017

September

EPOA AGM – Licence

Gothenburg

October

Payment of Licence Fee 1

October 17-22

International Queer Film Festival

Hamburg

November

Startschuss Masters, Int. Soccer Tournament

Hamburg

Nov / Dec

Winter Pride

Hamburg

December 1

World Aids Day

Hamburg

January 19-21

International Bears Party

Hamburg

April

International LGBT Volleyball Tournament

Hamburg

May

Harbour Pride

Hamburg

May 17

IDAHOT

Hamburg

July/August

Hamburg Pride

Hamburg

August

International Leather Party

Hamburg

September

EPOA AGM – first update

Vienna

October

Payment of Licence Fee 2

Hamburg

October

International Queer Film Festival

Hamburg

November

Startschuss Masters, Int. Soccer Tournament

Hamburg

Nov/December

Winter Pride

Hamburg

December 1

World Aids Day

Hamburg

January

International Bears Party

Hamburg

April

International LGBT Volleyball Tournament

Hamburg

May

Harbour Pride

Hamburg

May 17

IDAHOT

Hamburg

July/August

Hamburg Pride

Hamburg

July/August

International press trip to Hamburg Pride

Hamburg

August

International Leather Party

Hamburg

September

EPOA AGM – second update

Hamburg

October

Payment of Licence Fee 3

October

International Queer Film Festival

Hamburg

November

Startschuss Masters, Int. Soccer Tournament

Hamburg

Nov/December

Winter Pride

Hamburg

December 1

World Aids Day

Hamburg

January

EuroPride Concert at Elbphilharmonie

Hamburg

January

International Bears Party

Hamburg

February

International LGBT Choir Festival

Hamburg

March

International Diversity Conference

Hamburg

April

International LGBT Volleyball Tournament

Hamburg

May 17

IDAHOT

Hamburg

June

EuroPride Diversity Day at Schools

Hamburg

July/August

EuroPride Hamburg – United in Pride

Hamburg

August

International Leather Party

Hamburg

September

EPOA AGM – final report

N.N.

September

International LGBTI Youth Exchange

Hamburg

October

International Queer Film Festival

Hamburg

November

Startschuss Masters, Int. Soccer Tournament

Hamburg

Nov/December

Winter Pride

Hamburg

December 1

World Aids Day, Aids Benefit Gala

Hamburg

2018

2019

2020

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Making the EuroPride 2020 sustainable and accessible

H

amburg is known far and wide as being a green, liveable city. More than 540 square kilometres of green space make Hamburg Germany’s lushest metropolis. Apart from its vast parklands, this is also largely thanks to the many small district parks and the 245,000-odd roadside trees. Lime trees, chestnut trees and plane trees not only add a nice feel to the townscape; they also help purify the air

ro-emission buses. Hamburg’s trading history has made it a gateway to the world, and here, too, it bears responsibility, twice taking out the title of “Fair Trade City”.

Protecting the climate is also a major priority in Hamburg. It’s no coincidence that the Hanseatic City was named “Europe’s environmental capital” by the EU Commission in 2011, boasting a number of successes, as well as ambitious goals. Hamburg has for years similarly been playing a pioneering role in local public transport. 2016, for instance, saw the commencement of Europe’s first innovation line testing environmentally friendly buses. The result: Less CO2, less noise, more comfort and greater quality of life. And from 2020 onwards, the aim is to only buy ze-

Hamburg not only promises to be an environmentally friendly host of the Euro Pride 2020; it also supports accessibility: By 2020, all subway stations across the city are set to be freely accessible to people with limited mobility. The city administration particularly caters to the special needs of people with disabilities, listing a number of accessible hotels, restaurants and attractions.

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Travelling by bike around Hamburg is child’s play, as the flat landscape makes cycling easy and pleasant. You don’t even need your own bike, thanks to the “StadtRAD Hamburg” project: Over 200 stations provide more than 2,500 bikes, which can be used free of charge for half an hour.

In short, Hamburg provides the best environment to host an inclusive, sustainable Euro Pride.


EuroPride 2020 – proposed income

The budget of EuroPride 2020

H

amburg Pride has calculated a total budget of EUR 956,000 to host the EuroPride 2020. The business plan operates on the premise that EUR 456,000 of this will be financed by sources such as revenue from the events held and own contributions by the association. The remaining finance requirements will be covered by public funding totalling EUR 500,000. The support is guaranteed by virtue of an inter-party decision made by the Hamburg city parliament. Details of the business plan can be found in the adjacent general overview. We would also like to add the following information: Income The plan is that the Hamburg Pride association will run six event components by itself: The opening event

(Pride Night), the EuroPride Parade (political demonstration), the international human rights conference (LGBTI conference), a EuroPride exhibition in the city center of Hamburg, the rainbow illumination of the town hall and the so called Rainbow Day at the Hamburger DOM, a big fun fair in Hamburg. The latter three events are grouped under the section Other Events. This will see the association earn income from sources such as Pride Night tickets, parade entry fees, and registration fees for the human rights conference. The association will also spend EUR 19,000 of its own funds. The revenue from the events, the association’s own contribution, and the funding requested from the City of Hamburg will result in a total income of EUR 545,000 for the association. EUR 364,500 of this will be passed onto the AHOI Events agency to organise the other, cost-intensive and higher-risk event components.

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The calculation is based on the premise that AHOI Events will earn a further EUR 411,000 in addition to the amount passed on by Hamburg Pride. The main sources of income here will be revenue from stall rent and selling of drinks at the street festival, as well as ticket sales from the parties held as part of the EuroPride. Further, there is expected to be an additional EUR 70,000 in sponsorship income. Expenses The aforementioned income particularly serves to finance the events being held as part of the EuroPride 2020. The biggest cost pools are for the street festival, including the stage programme, as well as the event advertising. Expenses totalling EUR 285,000 have been calculated for the street festival and stage programme combined. These include public fees and the necessary security measures. To do justice to the event’s im-

1

Street festival (stall rent)

150,000.00

3

Selling of drinks

110,000.00

4

Sponsors

70,000.00

6

Various Parties (entrance fees)

7

EuroPride Magazine (advertisement revenue)

8

EuroPride Village (stall rent and selling of drinks)

10,000.00

9

Pride Night (entrance fees)

15,000.00

10

EuroPride Parade (participation fees)

8,000.00

11

LGBTI conference (participation fees)

3,000.00

12

Other (exhibition, town hall illumination etc.)

13

Own contribution by Hamburg Pride e.V.

14

Funding from the City of Hamburg

51,000.00

Total income

20,000.00

0.00 19,000.00 500,000.00 956,000.00

EuroPride 2020 – proposed expenses 1

Street festival

150,000.00

2

Stage (technical equipment and programme)

135,000.00

3

Selling of drinks (goods and staff)

42,500.00

5

Advertising

120,000.00

6

Various Parties

7

EuroPride Magazine (graphic design, printing, editing)

8

EuroPride Village (technical equipment and programme)

56,400.00

9

Pride Night (rent and programme)

45,000.00

10

EuroPride Parade (truck costs, technical inspection etc.)

24,600.00

11

LGBTI conference

48,000.00

12

Other Events (exhibition, town hall illumination etc.)

13

EPOA licence and travel expenses

14

AHOI Events agency fee

150,000.00

15

Project management

45,000.00

16

Risk reserve

27,000.00

41,000.00 19,000.00

11,500.00

Total income

portance, it is also essential to have a performance by a main act known right across Europe. EUR 45,000 have been planned for this alone. To ensure the event is publicised nationally and internationally, and achieves the desired success in terms of participating visitors, an advertising budget of an additional EUR 120,000 has been proposed. This will be used

41,000.00

956,000.00

for national and international advertising. The costs for the other events held as part of the EuroPride, as well as other necessary expenses, such as for a Pride magazine, can be found in the general overview. Along with the costs for the events themselves, the business plan also includes remuneration for AHOI

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Events, as the organising agency, totalling EUR 150,000. The association will additionally require a full-time project manager to control all the measures. The plan is to have a part-time position from April 2018 to September 2020. These costs have also been incorporated into the costing, with an amount of EUR 45,000.


Host and organiser of the EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg

T

he EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg is set to be a project run by the city’s entire LGBTI community, with a far-reaching impact. It will be hosted by the voluntary Hamburg Pride e.V. association, which will hold the event in close co-operation with the AHOI Events agency. The current plan stipulates that Hamburg Pride will also contract AHOI Events to run a large part of the events associated with the EuroPride 2020. This has been duly taken into account in the business plan. Hamburg Pride e.V. The association was founded in 2003, and has been recognised as non-profit since 2010. Its aim is to reduce public prejudice and discrimination against lesbians, gays, bisexual, trans and intersex people, and promote full, legitimate equality for these groups in all areas of life. The association hosts Christopher Street Day in Hamburg, whose history in the Hanseatic city dates back to 1980. 2020 will thus see CSD celebrate its 40th anniversary in Hamburg. Hamburg Pride e.V. has just under 500 members, giving it the largest member base of all Germany’s CSD associations. As a mouthpiece for the Hamburg LGBTI community, Hamburg Pride e.V. has extensive contacts across the city, and is involved at a regional level in northern Germany, as well as nationwide through the CSD association network. It is a member of the European Pride Organizers Association (EPOA), maintaining close ties at a European level, and co-operating with other international Gay Prides. www.hamburg-pride.de AHOI Events AHOI Events was founded in 2005, and is an events agency maintaining close ties with the Hamburg Pride. Its work revolves around planning and running public events, particularly Christopher Street Day. To ensure this is a success, Hamburg Pride e.V. co-operates with AHOI Events, especially in relation to organising the CSD components

which cannot run on volunteers alone. This has been established in a service contract, and also serves as the basis for holding a EuroPride in Hamburg. AHOI Events has all the skills necessary to host major events, which it organises entirely on its own – from the design to marketing to the stage programme. Thanks to years of trustworthy collaboration with Hamburg Pride e.V., the company has particular expertise in gay marketing. Along with CSD, this includes the WinterPride (Christmas market), Harbour Pride (harbour’s birthday) and Rainbow Day at the Hamburg DOM fair. AHOI Events also organises the street festivals and other public events.

Hamburg Pride e.V. legal entity to host EuroPride 2020

City of Hamburg

www.ahoi-events.de Involving the Hamburg community Hamburg Pride e.V. involved the Hamburg community in its plans even before applying for the EuroPride 2020, using workshops to devise numerous ideas, which were then incorporated into the application concept. We rely on the creativity and involvement of as many Hamburg locals as possible. Because we want the EuroPride 2020 to cater to as many of your requests and proposals as possible. If Hamburg is selected as the host city, we want to institutionalise this direct involvement of all interested parties: A Pride Salon will meet once a month as an open, moderated discussion forum – open to anyone wishing to contribute themselves, their ideas, their talents and skills and be involved in the work.

appoints

informs

Steering Commitee Hamburg Pride Board Members + AHOI Events project management

gives order to execute the tasks

Steering Commitee appoints … Project Groups report …

AHOI Events GmbH executing event agency

project groups working on certain issues

Steering Committee

1

In addition to this basis-oriented format, a steering committee will also be responsible for co-ordinating the EuroPride preparations. It will constitute representatives from Hamburg Pride e.V. and AHOI Events and informs the staff of the anti-discrimination authority and other municipal services. This steering committee will also meet regularly, and may add members if necessary.

2

4

gives input to … organize own side events

Hamburg LGBTI Community various groups, Hamburg Pride members

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3 1

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5


Press and marketing

A

number of different channels will be used for the EuroPride 2020 press relations and marketing. An advertising budget of 120,000 Euros has been proposed to publicise the event nationally and internationally, and is intended to be used for print advertising, online advertisements, social media and banner advertising. All content relating to the EuroPride 2020 will also be displayed on a separate, multilingual website and on Facebook. Various

giveaways (e.g. pins, stickers, USB sticks, magnets) will be handed out on different occasions to promote the event.

The press relations and marketing will be supported by “Hamburg Marketing”, the city’s official institution for marketing major international events in Hamburg. Through its Convention Bureau, Hamburg will also apply to host the 2020 IGLTA annual conference in a bid to advertise the EuroPride and Hamburg as an LGBTI destination worldwide. CSD 2019 will additionally see the city host an international press trip to give journalists from Hamburg target markets an opportunity to report in detail on Hamburg and the EuroPride beforehand.

A bilingual magazine (English/German) will be published as a programme for the EuroPride 2020, containing an events calendar, along with relevant content focusing on the EuroPride. In addition to this magazine, there will also be a programme in the form of a mini-booklet which visitors can easily carry around with them.

We are helped in our EuroPride media relations by the vast network Hamburg Pride e.V. has been able to build in recent years with numerous agencies and editorial offices through its professional press and media work. These contacts will also facilitate extensive media coverage of the EuroPride 2020.

!!!! SUPERIOR

HAMBURG

HAMBURG

einer breiten Öffentlichkeit zu präsentieren – nicht nur aus Hamburg, sondern aus ganz Europa und Hamburgs Partnerstädten. Eine internationale Menschenrechtskonferenz soll die Pride Week inhaltlich untermauern. Zu ihr sollen Aktivist_innen und Politiker_innen aus Europa und darüber hinaus eingeladen werden. Ein besonderer Fokus kann hierbei ebenfalls auf Teilnehmer_innen aus Hamburgs Partnerstädten liegen.

Hamburg Pride e.V. will similarly be present at the preceding EuroPride events in Stockholm/Gothenburg and Vienna, as well as the WorldPride in New York, where it will promote the EuroPride 2020.

Brücken bauen nach Europa Die Einbeziehung des Rathausmarktes inklusive einer großen Bühne gehört ebenso zum Konzept wie eine vergrößerte politische Parade. Im Rahmenprogramm ist sehr viel mehr denkbar als bislang, etwa die Einbeziehung der Hamburger Schulen und Kultureinrichtungen, der Sportvereine, Religionsgemeinschaften oder der Wirtschaft. Nicht zuletzt hat eine Veranstaltung mit europäischer Ausrichtung auch eine touristische Relevanz. So wie sich innerhalb Deutschlands seit vielen Jahren ein „CSD-Tourismus“ etabliert hat, der viele Besucher_innen als Übernachtungsgäste in die jeweiligen Städte bringt, ist auch der EuroPride stets ein festes Reiseziel der europäischen Gay Community; hier kann sich die Stadt mit entsprechendem Zielgruppen-Marketing Rahmen des EuroPride international positionieren.

UNITED IN PRIDE

2017 Participate and present the candidacy at the EPOA AGM Press release on the EPOA decision

HAMBURG BEWIRBT SICH UM DIE AUSRICHTUNG DES EUROPRIDE 2020.

Secure a EuroPride URL

Am 23. September wird entschieden: Hamburg Pride e.V. hat sich um die Ausrichtung des EuroPride 2020 beworben – und konkurriert dabei mit Brüssel, Bergen und Thessaloniki. Im Herbst fällt auf der Mitgliederversammlung der European Pride Organizers Association (EPOA) die Entscheidung: Deren Mitglieder stimmen darüber ab, welches Konzept sie am meisten überzeugt. Bis dahin ist es noch ein weiter Weg. Der Vorstand von Hamburg Pride e.V. arbeitet seit Monaten mit Hochdruck an der Bewerbung. Noch vor der Sommerpause soll ein fraktionsübergreifender Antrag in der Hamburgischen Bürgerschaft dafür sorgen, dass das Vorhaben des Vereins den notwendigen Rückenwind aus der Stadt bekommt und der Senat die Veranstaltung nicht nur ideell, sondern auch finanziell unterstützt.

Develop a detailed marketing campaign Develop a corporate identity for the EuroPride 2020 2018 Establish a corporate identity

Tor zur Welt für LGBTI Der EuroPride soll einerseits für Sichtbarkeit von LGBTI auch in den Ländern sorgen, in denen sie aufgrund ihrer sexuellen Orientierung oder geschlechtlichen Identität ausgegrenzt, verfolgt oder bestraft werden. Darüber hinaus soll er in Ländern, in denen LGBTI rechtlich und gesellschaftlich besser gestellt sind, auf die Menschrechtssituation in anderen Staaten aufmerksam machen und für eine vollständige Gleichstellung in Europa werben. Im vergangenen Jahr fand die Veranstaltung in Amsterdam statt, im kommenden Jahr sind Stockholm

Produce initial advertising materials Create an international mailing list Hamburg Pride 2018 Produce giveaways Participate in the EuroPride 2018 in Gothenburg & Stockholm

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und Göteborg an der Reihe, 2019 folgt Wien. In diesem Jahr findet der WorldPride in Madrid statt, deswegen gibt es keinen EuroPride. Hamburg hat die Veranstaltung schon einmal ausgerichtet, 2004 unter dem Motto „Love breaks barriers“. „Hamburg kann sich 2020 mit dem EuroPride einer europäischen Öffentlichkeit als das ‚Tor zur Welt‘ auch für LGBTI präsentieren und damit für ein freies und tolerantes Europa werben, das sich der Bewahrung der Menschenrechte verpflichtet sieht“, erklärt Stefan Mielchen, Erster Vorsitzender von Hamburg Pride e.V., die Motivation zur Bewerbung. „Wir verstehen uns als überzeugte Europäer_innen und sind als Gay Community Teil der europäischen Wertegemeinschaft, die aktuell vor großen politischen und gesellschaftlichen Herausforderungen steht. Sie zu bewältigen gelingt nur, indem Menschen sich begegnen und miteinander reden.“ Genau das soll ein EuroPride in Hamburg ermöglichen. Das Konzept von Hamburg Pride sieht vor, den CSD noch viel stärker im Bewusstsein der Stadtgesellschaft zu verankern und beispielswiese das Pride House mit einem sogenannten Pride Village in der City in die Stadt hinein zu öffnen. Es soll mit Infoständen, Bühne und Veranstaltungszelt die zentrale Anlaufstelle während der Pride Week werden und Gruppen und Vereine der LGBTI-Community die Möglichkeit geben, sich

PRIDEMAGAZIN 2017

Fotos: Martin Stiewe

2019 Participate in the ITB Berlin and at tourism fairs in Europe Participate in the EuroPride 2019 in Vienna Participate in the World Pride New York Start national and international press relations Hamburg Pride 2019 Develop media plan Build a comprehensive website Acquire media partners for print, radio, TV, online 2020 National and international print advertisements Social media campaigns Distribute flyers and posters nationally Continuous national and international press info Produce Pride magazine and programme

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„Hamburg hat mit seiner langen Tradition als Hafenstadt schon immer Brücken geschlagen: der Welt zugewandt, dem Neuen offen gegenübertretend“, sagt Stefan Mielchen. „Mit dem EuroPride 2020 wollen wir gemeinsam mit der Hamburger LGBTI-Community viele Brücken bauen: in die Stadtgesellschaft hinein, in unser Land, nach Europa und darüber hinaus. Hamburg hat zum 40. Geburtstag seines Christopher Street Days die Chance, sich Europa und der Welt als Stadt der Vielfalt und Weltoffenheit zu präsentieren und für die Werte einer offenen, solidarischen und freien Gesellschaft zu werben. Der EuroPride soll Begegnung, Austausch und gegenseitiges Lernen ermöglichen. Wir wollen Europa 2020 nach Hamburg holen: United in Pride.“

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Hamburg is a Rainbow City

I

n 2013, a number of European cities teamed up to form the Rainbow Cities Network, founded in The Hague on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. Since last year, this network has also included Hamburg. Pride Week 2016 saw Second Mayor and Equality Senator Katharina Fegebank sign the membership declaration in front of the network’s Dutch co-ordinator, Juul van den Hoof, during a senate reception. The aim of the network is to develop and exchange communal approaches and strategies as part of the efforts to ensure equality and non-discrimination of lesbians, gays, trans* and intersex people. “The City of Hamburg has for years been actively involved with championing ac-

ceptance and peaceful coexistence in diversity. Discrimination based on sexual or gender identity has no place in our city”, declared Mayor Fegebank. “Joining the Rainbow Cities Network is thus the logical progression of our diversity and anti-discrimination policy. As a Rainbow City, Hamburg also wants to set a symbolic course for tolerance, openness and a welcoming culture.” By joining the network, the Hanseatic city commits to including the interests of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, trans* and intersex people in municipal policy, and ensuring greater visibility of relevant issues. “This aim is also pursued by the action plan for the acceptance of sexual and gender diversity currently being drawn up in co-operation with the administration, civil society and legislators”,

Fegebank added (see also page 26). “We look forward to working with the other, predominantly European cities, and hope to see valuable proposals and joint, public-oriented campaigns.” Along with German cities Berlin, Hanover, Cologne, Mannheim and Munich, the network also includes international metropolises such as Amsterdam and Barcelona, as well as regions such as Dumfries and Galloway in Scotland, and Şişli, a district of Istanbul. In 2015 saw Mexico City join as the first non-European city.

Hamburg shows its colours

H

amburg’s town hall will undoubtedly be the most prominent location to fly the rainbow flag during EuroPride 2020. But Hamburg is already a veritable rainbow city for Christopher Street Day, with the symbol of the LGBTI movement flying all over the place during Pride Week as a visible sign of our Hanseatic city’s solidarity and openness. This, too, was a political battle: When the rainbow was first raised at the town hall, certain sections of the Hamburg media tried to make it a scandal. Today, it has become an event attended by the mayor, the president of Hamburg’s city parliament, and many representatives of the press, along with the Hamburg Pride directors.

Regional Court – places which have been known to persecute and convict thousands of homosexuals throughout Hamburg’s history – today fly flags for Christopher Street Day. And there’s one more plus to the campaign: The rainbow flags are sold centrally through Hamburg’s AIDS-Hilfe organisation. So anyone buying a flag of any size there will also be doing something positive, because part of the proceeds is donated to the AIDS-Hilfe Hamburg.

But the town hall is certainly not the only place Hamburg shows its colours during CSD. A private initiative has set itself the goal of encouraging authorities, businesses, cultural institutions and many others to make this colourful statement across the city. It can now also be seen on many private balconies and windows – with numbers increasing every year. The US consulate general, the Hamburg Museum of Art and other museums, the central train station, several of Hamburg’s main churches, historic hotels like the Atlantic and Four Seasons, many other hotels across the city, the shipping company Hapag Lloyd and lots of other employers – the list goes on – have all participated in the campaign. Even the Hamburg police headquarters and Higher

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13 Hamburg Convention Bureau GmbH | Hotels in prime locations

How to get to Hamburg

number of hotels

327

55,022 beds

12 hotels

82 hotels

2,395 rooms

11,979 rooms

136 hotels

61 hotels

8,152 rooms

4,380 rooms

8 hotels 1,126 rooms

Hotel projects with a planned opening until 2019

28 hotels 5,200

rooms

635 rooms

Source: Hamburg Tourism GmbH, Monitoring as of 2015

Hamburg Convention Bureau GmbH | Connectivity 10

Connected all the way

es as well as several ferry services. These who prefer individual transport can always rent a city bike (the first 30 minutes are forconnectivity free – each time you rent one) and enjoy ranking Hamburg`s splendour on two wheels. Of course, you also have the possibility to rent a360 Car with one of our mobility daily flights service providerof 450 likeairports Drive Now or Car2Go.

hotels65

Hamburg offers a great connectivity from destinations all over the word. Serving a wide range of global destinations at considerable frequency Hamburg airport welAirlineswithin city comes 37,000 passengers per day. Located limits it offers a train connection of only 20 minutes to Daily Westerland/Sylt Hamburg’s downtown area. The journey by car is nearly non stop Hotels in prime locations flights as fast, even during rush hour. If you prefer a „journey with connections Hamburg to European daily With 327 hotels offering a total of approx. 55,500 a view“ you can alsoWith reach via Train. Our central 327Hamburg hotels offering a total of approx. 55,500 beds / 28,700 rooms, hubs Hamburg can provide accommodation to suit every one’s taste and beds/28,700 rooms, Hamburg can provide accommodastation is located in the heart of the City – from here you pocket. Hamburg’s hotels include famous international brands, firstclass Munich 21 Domestic tion to suit every one’s taste and pocket. Hamburg’s hocan reach every corner of our lovely cityprivate as allpensions. Subway and establishments and small global destinations direct Frankfurt 15 reached withtels one-stop include Düsseldorf famous international brands, firstclass estabS-Bahn lines are crossing the central station. flights 12 lishments and small private pensions and aLondon bride range of Dusseldorf 11 Köln/Bonn AirBNB hosts. By 2019 the construction of further hotels Easy around town Frankfurt Paris 8 with a total of 5200 rooms is planned. Nürnberg Amsterdam 7 You don’t need a car to get around Hamburg. Apart from Karlsruhe Saarbrücken Vienna 7 a lot of walkable urban space the city has a tight, modern Stuttgart Zurich 6 München and barrier-free network of subway lines, trains and busFriedrichshafen Copenhagen 5 Memmingen minutes to city center

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in prime locations

120

900

20

Reykjavik

Helsinki Oslo

St.Petersburg Stockholm Göteborg

New York

Riga

Edinburgh

Destinations with direct flights to / from Hamburg

Moskau

Kopenhagen Dublin

Manchester Birmingham

Westerland/ Sylt

Hamburg

Warschau Amsterdam Bristol Rotterdam London Antwerpen Düsseldorf Dresden Krakau Köln/Bonn Southampton Brüssel Prag Frankfurt Luxemburg Mann- Nürnberg Saarbrücken heim Karlsruhe Paris Stuttgart München Salz- Wien burg Budapest Friedrichshafen Basel Zürich Innsbruck Bern Klagenfurt Genf Bukarest Venedig Zagreb Belgrad Bordeaux Lyon Mailand Rijeka Varna Pula Split Burgas Toulouse Pristina Nizza Zadar Istanbul Pisa Ankara Porto Ma rseille Dubrovnik Barcelona Bastia Adana Rom Bari Madrid Thessaloniki Antalya Gazipasa Lissabon Izmir Neapel Menorca Olbia Samos Bodrum Korfu Faro Palma de Dalaman Paphos Beirut Alicante Athen Kos Rhodos Cagliari Ibiza Mallorca Malaga Jerez de Santorin Catania la Frontera Tel Aviv Tunis Heraklion Enfidha Malta Djerba

Funchal Santa Cruz de la Palma Teneriffa

Hurghada

Fuerteventura Las Palmas

Marsa Alam

Kapverden

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Dubai

Marrakesch Arrecife

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Teheran


Christine Lüders

Herrn Stefan Mielchen Hamburg Pride e. V. Ernst-Merck-Straße 12-14 20099 Hamburg

Head of the Federal Anti-Discrimination Agency ADDRESS POSTAL ADDRESS PHONE FAX E-MAIL INTERNET PLACE, DATE

Dear Mr. Mielchen, I am happy to hear that Hamburg Pride e. V. will apply to host the EuroPride 2020. I gladly support your application. Since I have the great honor to be this year’s patron of the Hamburg Pride, I know that Hamburg Pride e. V. is committed to the core values of equality as well as the fight against discrimination. As Head of the German Federal Anti-Discrimination Agency it is especially important to me that Hamburg Pride is a strong voice for the LGBTI* community in Germany as well as an inclusive event that speaks up against discrimination of all kind. Hamburg is a city that welcomes people from all around the world regardless of their origin, sexual orientation or gender identity. Hamburg has a long history of supporting the rights of LGBTI*. It was, in fact, the first city in Germany that symbolically recognized same sex civil unions. In the heart of Europe and with its cultural diversity Hamburg would prove a great host for EuroPride 2020. This year was a historic year for the rights of gays and lesbians in Germany: The German parliament finally voted to void the convictions of 50.000 gay men who were wrongfully prosecuted under German law. In addition, the parliament also legalized same sex marriage. However, equality is not only a matter of legislation. Gays, Lesbians, bisexual, trans*- and intersexual people still experience discrimination; at the workplace, in school or in the public sphere. A strong civil society is vital in order to strengthen equal treatment of LGBTI* and to provide protection against discrimination of all sorts. The Federal Anti-Discrimination Agency is glad that Hamburg Pride e. V. is a strong partner in this fight for acceptance. And I am convinced you will do a great job organizing EuroPride 2020. I wish you the best of luck for your application! Sincerely,

Christine Lüders

Glinkastraße 24, 10117 Berlin 11018 Berlin +49 (0)30 18555-1800 +49 (0)30 18555-41800 christine.lueders@ads.bund.de www.antidiskriminierungsstelle.de Berlin, 14.07.2017


Hamburg Pride e.V. Ernst-Merck-Str. 12-14 20099 Hamburg Hamburg, 13.07.17

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen, we are delighted that Hamburg Pride e.V. is applying for the EuroPride 2020. Within the scope of our possibilities as the umbrella organization of the Hamburg sports clubs and sports federations, we are very happy to support the application and implementation of the event. Our sports clubs and sports federations are committed to democracy, to a tolerant and diverse society, to a respectful co-existence and to civil courage. That is why, in our statutes, we make it clear that discrimination based on sexual identity is decisively countered. The Christopher Street Day and the EuroPride are forums that are sympathetic and loud in public to make this clear. That is why we would like to welcome EuroPride in our city. Best regards

Dr. JĂźrgen Mantell President


Dykes on Bikes Hamburg

c/o mhc Borgweg 8

22303 Hamburg

Supporting Hamburg’s application to host Europride 2020

Hamburg, Juli 2nd 2017

Dear Ladies, dear Sirs, on behalf of Dykes on Bikes Hamburg I would like to express our full support for Hamburg’s application to host Europride 2020. Hamburg is a wonderful city with a long tradition of freedom and tolerance. In 1999 Hamburg was the first federal state of Germany that allowed gay couples to register their partnership. The city supports places for the LGBTI community and even Hamburg’s police has special contact persons for LGBTI people who are in trouble. Dykes on Bikes Hamburg would gladly appreciate Europride in Hamburg. Kind regards Indy President Dykes on Bikes Hamburg


Intervention e. V. Intervention e. V., Glashüttenstr. 2, 20357 Hamburg

Glashüttenstraße 2 20357 Hamburg Tel: 040/245002EPOA Fax: 040/4304624 www.lesbenverein-intervention.de E-Mail: info@lesbenverein-intervention.de

Hamburg, Datum :13.07.2017

Subject: Support for Hamburg Pride e.V. and the city of Hamburg to host the Europride 2020

JungLesbenZentrum

HAMBURG

Glashüttenstr.2 |20357 Hamburg | 040-4304624 | jlz@lesbenverein-intervention.de

Hamburg, 11th of July 2017

Subject: Support for Hamburg Pride e.V. and the city of Hamburg to host the Europride 2020 Dear Members of EPOA,

Dear Members of EPOA On behalf of Intervention e.V. I would like to express our full support to Hamburg Pride e.V. und the City of Hamburg to host the Europride 2020. Intervention is a registered association founded in 1982. We started as an advice center focused on gay and lesbian issues and AIDS because there was a lack of places and voices for LGBT Persons. In 1993 Intervention became the unique Lesbian association as a multi-generation room in Hamburg, focused mainly on feminism, equal rights, LGBTIQ- rights, antiracism, antisexism and antifascism. In 1998 the Young Lesbian Center was established as one of our projects with the focus on lesbian, bi and transgender women up to the age of 25. Our Staff in the office also gives advice and information about lesbian live and organizations in the community to those in need, like parents, teachers, professionals. In our house we also hold a lot of Meetings within the lesbian Community to work with the different associations and all are welcome into our weekly Lesbian Lounge. Momentarily we start our new Project for Queer Refugee Women. Intervention is organizing the annual Dyke March the night before the Hamburg Pride Parade. We would love to see the Europride in 2020 in Hamburg. Hamburg as a host city is a gay friendly environment with lots of venues, activities and a Community that cares about LGBTIQ People. Sincerely yours, Katrin Behrmann, Vorstand Intervention

on behalf of the YoungLesbianCenter we would like to express our full support to Hamburg Pride e.V. und the City of Hamburg to host the Europride 2020. For nearly 20 years The Young Lesbian Centre is the professional pedagogical institution for girls´ work with a lesbian-feminist focus in Hamburg, and sees itself as a political lobbying organisation for lesbian and bisexual girls and young women. We are offering activities for lesbian and bisexual girls and young women up to the ageof 25. The pedagogical team offers support to girls and young women who have questions about their sexual and gender orientation or who feel insecure about these issues. The centre is open to youth who describe themselves as transidentical or transgender and identify as lesbian/bisexual, or who think that might their orientation. Only two weeks ago the equal-gay-marriage was finally decided. It took so many years to achieve this personal goal of so many persons. But there is still so much to do. Especially for young lesbians and trans* persons. In their life in schools, families, peer groups or sports clubs they are still confronted with discrimination, abuse and violence. Hamburg Pride e.V. supports the youth work during Pride month and over CSD Weekend. With their help and our years of cooperative work it´s possible for us together with other lgbtiq* youth organizations in Hamburg to offer a special place, as safe as possible and an awareness- campaign especially for young visitors during the Pride Weekend. Every year our young women and trans*persons receive a big push for their self-confidence, when it comes to the pride date. For many of them it´s the best time in the year. It would really mean a lot for them to take part at the Europride 2020 in their hometown.

Your´s sincerely, Projectmanagement YoingLesbianCenter GLS-Gemeinschaftsbank IBAN: DE17 4306 0967 0041 1483 00 BIC: GENODEM1GLS

Träger von JungLesbenZentrum und LesbenTreff

Mitglied im DPWV und in den Vereinen Lambda, pro:fem, LAG Mädchenpolitik, Lesbenring


S.L.U.T. Club Hamburg | T. Pfizenmaier Rostocker Str. 20 | D - 20099 Hamburg

Hamburg Pride e.V. Ernst-Merck-Straße 12-14 20099 Hamburg Hamburg, 17.07.2017 Supporting Hamburg Pride e.V.’s. application to host EuroPride 2020 in Hamburg Dear Ms. Schaening, dear Mr. Mielchen, as a long lasting organizer for gay party events and operator of a gay club and bar I would like to express my full support to Hamburg Pride e.V. for hosting EuroPride 2020. In 2020 the Christopher Street Day Hamburg would have his 40. anniversary. That shows how engrained the demonstration for tolerance, acceptance and diversity in Hamburg is. As a modern, international and maritime city Hamburg always had been a national pioneer in different gay matters: if it’s the long tradition of being the city hosting the first gay fetish parties or if it’s the first city in Germany where same-sex-marriages had been possible. Hamburg was and is always a little bit up front. Bringing EuroPride to Hamburg could help to keep the discussion about social acceptance of different ways of living ongoing and of cause it would upgrade the successful annual Christopher Street Day to an international event which carries weight and could have influence on society in a social as in a cultural way. These are only some of the reasons why I think Hamburg would be the right place for EuroPride 2020. I’m strongly believe that EuroPride in Hamburg will be definite a successful event for the European LGBT scene. Kind regards Thomas Pfizenmaier S.L.U.T. Club Hamburg

S.L.U.T Club Hamburg Thomas Pfizenmaier Rostocker Str. 20 D - 20099 Hamburg

Tel: +49 (0)40 / 24 87 06 73 Fax: +49 (0)40 / 24 87 06 74 mobile: +49 (0)172 / 41 040 41 e-mail: info@slutclub.de www.slutclub.de

Commerzbank Hamburg (200 800 00) Kontonummer: 0561413200 IBAN: DE57 20080000 0561413200 SWIFT-BIC: DRES DE FF

Steuernummer: 46/183/01155

Umsatzsteuer-Ident.Nr.: DE236236869


Contacts Hamburg Pride e.V. Ernst Merck-StraĂ&#x;e 12-14 20099 Hamburg Telephone: 0049 40 2380 585 55

AHOI Events GmbH Ernst Merck-StraĂ&#x;e 12-14 20099 Hamburg Telephone: 0049 40 2380 585 50

Stefan Mielchen, Chairperson stefan.mielchen@hamburg-pride.de Mobile: 0049 172 670 26 66

Roland Rotermund, Managing Director roland.rotermund@ahoi-events.de Mobile: 0049 172 404 75 77

Nicole Schaening, Deputy Chairperson nicole.schaening@hamburg-pride.de Mobile: 0049 172 450 10 83 Patrick Orth, Director of Co-operations patrick.orth@hamburg-pride.de Mobile: 0049 176 68 30 37 48

Profile for European Pride Organisers Association

EuroPride 2020 Bid Book: Hamburg Pride, Germany  

Four cities are bidding to host EuroPride in 2020, in the most hotly contested EuroPride selection process ever.

EuroPride 2020 Bid Book: Hamburg Pride, Germany  

Four cities are bidding to host EuroPride in 2020, in the most hotly contested EuroPride selection process ever.

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