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Self-organization Sharing Process

Os Stavanger

Adapt able City 2

Bergen

Ă˜rsta

Trondheim

Europan Norway

Book of Results


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18 Trondheim 20 Team Trondheim 21 Trondheim General remarks by the jury 62 Bergen 64 Team Bergen 65 Bergen General remarks by the jury

Awarded Projects

22 Winner The False Mirror 30 Runner-up More Trondheim! 36 Special mention The Rim

Awarded Projects

40 Ørsta 42 Team Ørsta 43 Ørsta General remarks by the jury

66 Winner Our City, Our Collective 74 Runner-up Møllendal West 80 Special mention Her har eg mitt hjerte, her har eg mitt ly

Awarded Projects

44 Winner Connecting Ørsta 52 Runner-up Urban by Nature 58 Special mention Utmark

04 Introduction By Europan Norway

06 Entries per site Europan 13 statistics


84 Os 86 Team Os 87 Os - General remarks by the jury Awarded Projects

88 Winner Osurbia 96 Runner-up Preparing density 102 Special mention Limelight

106 Stavanger 108 Team Stavanger 109 Stavanger General remarks by the jury Awarded Projects

110 Winner Forus LABing 118 Runner-up Rise of nature 124 Special mention Indigo

08 The Norwegian Europan 13 jury

10 Behind the scenes National site seminar, Oslo Inter Sessions Forum, Pavia Local workshops Europan 13 launch and Europan Student Award Site visits Competition phase Jury meeting I

General information 128 About Europan 129 Europan Norway Secretariat 129 Europan Norway Board 130 About Europan Norway 132 Imprint


Norway is in a time of rapid urbanization that calls for adaptions on many levels: Adapting to densification, to urban culture, smarter use of resources and a zero emission future. Also happening at the same time is a fundamental transformation of the map of Norway; municipal borders are being redrawn, new urban connections are being made. Introduction – by Europan Norway

A string of sites along the coast of Norway, amidst mountains and fjords, constitute the Norwegian Europan 13 session. In the north, Trondheim opens the first chapter in the history of transforming Nyhavna - a gigantic harbour area with warehouses, World War 2 heritage, toxic waste, boats and beer brewing. The small town of Ørsta is struggling to establish an urban culture for its municipal centre. The municipality is using Europan as a tool for rediscovering, activating and connecting its centre along the sea. Bergen, the second largest city in Norway, is exploring the potential of sharing in housing and public space in one of the remaining undeveloped sites close to the city centre. Os, just south of Bergen, faces a doubling of its population within 2040. It needs to establish a town centre that can facilitate this growth and create added value for the citizens and the region. And finally, Stavanger – a site in the middle of Norway’s largest business area, entirely car-based and home turf to the Norwegian oil industry. Here a u-turn for the Jæren region is in the making. The five sites search for urban life in areas where this is weak or not present. The themes of the 13th session of Europan, Adaptable city 2, have searched for developing strategies with the aim of kick-starting urban culture on these sites based on opening up for creative initiatives, new processes for involvement and models of co-existing in private and public spheres. Europan has in recent years gone from being mainly a platform for presenting ideas to a platform for realizing ideas. For Europan Norway implementation has always been a constant focus. Last session brought several young talents into local planning processes, creating new possibilities and collaborations. The Norwegian Europan 13 sites present an even stronger opportunity for young spatial practitioners to make things happen.

A Coruña

Santo Tirso The 13th session of Europan has been a fantastic experience. A high number of entries, local exhibitions and events and 5 strong winning projects. We want to thank the participating cities and contenders for their Azenha do Mar Barreiro contributions, their ambitions and their ideas and look forward to continue the process towards implementation.

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Trondheim Seinäjoki Ørsta

Jyväskylä Espoo

Bergen Os Nacka

Stavanger

Lund

Leeuwarden Warszawa

Streefkerk

Marl

Charleroi

Gera Bamberg Libramonti Selb Schwäbisch Vernon Gmünd Montreuil Ingolstadt Saint-Brieuc Marne-la-Vallée Metz Landsberg Goussainville

Bondy

Feldafing

St Pölten Wien

Linz Bruck/Mur Graz

Moulins Genève La Corrèze Bordeaux

Zagreb

Irun

Gjakova Barcelona Molfetta Palma

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Entries per site

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Statistics from the Europan 13 session show that Norway was the second most popular country with a total of 167 entries, only surpassed by France with 314 entries.

Entries per site

The 167 entries divided on five sites makes an average of 33 entries per site, the highest average of all Europan 13 nations.

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r t g g er on Mu er ve sb k/ am c r nè mb nd u b e r a i a L L B G B 18 20 18 18 19 19

Bergen got the highest amount of entries of all sites in Europe with 52 entries. Trondheim is ranked as number 5, Os as number 17, Stavanger as number 24 and Ørsta as number 33 of a total of 49 sites across Europe. 9

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We are proud that so many young professional found interest in contributing to the discussion on Norwegian urbanity.

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Ellen Hellsten (NO) Leader of the jury, Architect Partner Ghilardi + Hellsten

Tatjana Schneider (DE/UK) Researcher, writer and educator School of Architecture in Sheffield

Ju Umberto Napolitano (IT/FR)

is the co-founder of LAN (Local Architecture Network). The office was established in 2002 with the intent of exploring architecture as the intersection of several disciplines. This approach has today become a working method, and it has allowed the firm to explore new territories and to develop a vision that encompasses social, urban planning, functional, and formal issues. The firm’s projects consider this universe of possibilities at all different scales and contexts, and they have been recognized on multiple occasions in France and across the world, be they sophisticated architectural objects or experimental housing developments, commercial buildings, cultural projects or urban planning projects. This prizewinning office is an active participant in international architectural debate. LAN is strongly committed to the dissemination and interrogation of the values underlying contemporary architecture, whether in an academic setting, or at major institutions and cultural events worldwide.

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Sverre Landmark (NO)

(born 1961) works in Aspelin Ramm, a property developer active in the rapid development of Oslo city. With his education and background as a lawyer (University of Oslo, 1987), and being responsible for creating financially sound projects, he has an eye for the aspects that make the projects fly. Sverre Landmark has been appointed director of Tjuvholmen since 2004, and has had different roles of responsibility for the Vulkanproject. Tjuvholmen and Vulkan are both finalized in 2014 after a period of 10-12 years of planning and construction. Sverre believes that attractive areas and cities come as a result of a magnitude of different forces, and that cooperation with good faith and balance between public sector and private developers is crucial.

Sverre Landmark (NO) Marketing Director Aspelin Ramm Eiendom AS

Ellen Hellsten (NO) (1972) graduated with a Diploma from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in 1997. After practicing as an architect in Oslo, she moved to the US where she received a post-professional Masters degree from Harvard University in 2001. A planning position brought her to New York City, but in 2003 she returned to Oslo where she taught at the Institute of Urbanism at Oslo School of Architecture while simultaneously founding, together with her partner Franco Ghilardi, the architecture practice Ghilardi+Hellsten Arkitekter 2003. One of their first projects was a winning entry for the Europan 7. Today the office has 12 employees and is engaged with Architecture, Landscape & Urbanism projects. Ellen has extensive experience with jury work and holds several committee memberships. She was a member of the Europan Scientific Committee from 20062010.

educator based at the School of Architecture in Sheffield, UK. She is also co-founder of research centre ‘Agency’ and was founder member of the workers cooperative G.L.A.S. (Glasgow Letters on Architecture and Space), which aimed to construct both a theoretical and practical critique of the capitalist production and use of the built environment. Her current work focuses on the changing role of architects and architecture in contemporary society, (architectural) pedagogy and spatial agency. She has an interest in employing and implementing theoretical, methodological and practical approaches that expand the scope of contemporary architectural debates and discourses by integrating political and economic frameworks that question normative ways of thinking, producing and consuming space. She is the (co)author of Spatial Agency. Other Ways of Doing Architecture (2011), Flexible Housing (2007), A Right to Build (2011), (co) editor of Agency. Working with Uncertain Architectures (2009) and glaspaper (2001-2007).

Umberto Napolitano (IT/FR) Architect, Partner LAN

Jury Europan Norway

Tatjana Schneider (DE/UK) is a researcher, writer and


After receiving her master degree in Architecture at the ETH Zürich in 2009, she moved to Copenhagen and has since worked intensely with all aspects of the studios work ranging from concept development to detail design and project management. In addition to her professional work, she teaches at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture in Copenhagen. JAJA Architects is a practice with great passion for the extraordinary and the everyday aspects of creating architecture and urban strategies. The studio strives to offer functional and inspirational responses to the specific circumstance of each project. JAJA has ongoing projects in Denmark, Norway and Switzerland. The portfolio covers a wide span from residential and office design, to activity landscapes, cultural buildings as well as harbour and city development.

and critic. She completed her Bachelor in Architecture at the University of Seville. As a Fulbright Fellow she was awarded an MS in Advance Architectural Design and an Advance Architectural Research Certificate by the GSAPP in Columbia University. In 2010 she was a visiting scholar at the NYU Institute of Fine Arts. She is a PhD candidate in the School of Architecture of Barcelona where she develops her dissertation about the construction of the EU Urban Imaginary. Cristina is co-founder of Fake Industries, Architectural Agonism (FKAA), an architectural practice based in Barcelona, New York and Sydney. FKAA was awarded prizes in EUROPAN competition in 2003,2005, 2009, 2012 and won in 2012 the international competition to build the New Velodrome for Medellin, currently under construction. In 2014 they were finalist in the Design Basel/Miami Pavilion contest and in MOMA PS1 Young Architects Program. FKAA is one of the 6 shortlisted teams to design the new Guggenheim Museum in Helsinki. Currently, she is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at GSAPP, Columbia University and a Senior Lecturer at Sydney UTS. Christina Goberna (ES/US) Architect, Partner Fake Industries, Architectural Agonism

Kristiaan Borret (BE) Bouwmeester of Brussels Capital Region

Cristina Goberna (ES/US) is a practitioner architect, educator

Kristiaan Borret (BE) is the

bouwmeester/maître architecte of Brussels Capital Region (Belgium). From 2006 to 2014 he was the bouwmeester of Antwerp (Belgium) and subsequently the dean of the Faculty of Design Sciences at the University of Antwerp. He is professor urban design at Ghent University since 2005. In his professional career, Kristiaan Borret has been alternating between theory and practice, between design and policy, between architecture and urbanism. He participated in interdisciplinary research on contemporary transformations of the city and public space, and contributed to various urban design projects in Belgium, Netherlands and France. Kristiaan Borret is a board member of the Flemish Architecture institute (VAi) and of the Belgian architectural review A+. He is member of the International Scientific Committee of Europan. In 2013 Kristiaan Borret was awarded the Flemish Culture Award for Architecture 2012-2013.

Miia-Liina Tommila (FI) is an architect and co-founder of Kaleidoscope, a Finnish-Norwegian architecture office exploring the boundaries between science, art and architecture. Tommila graduated from Bergen School of Architecture in 2011. She returned to Finland after graduation, and has since held a position at Tommila Architects, currently leading project planning of the Arabia Creative Campus in Helsinki. She has been visiting lecturer at Metropolia University of Applied Sciences and Bergen School of Architecture. Tommila is also actively involved in the development of the Finnish Architects Association Entrepreneur’s Chapter. Kaleidoscope, founded in 2014 after winning Europan 12 in Dikemark, Norway, has an interdisciplinary focus and a multiple perspective approach in their practice, seeking to create genuinely border-crossing Nordic architecture and pursues to challenge the conventional design methods in a deliberate manner. Their work ranges from playwriting to urban planning and product design.The office is a member of the Uusi Kaupunki -collective of eleven young practises, organizing participatory planning workshops around Finland and inviting local residents to co-design the built environment.

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Miia-Liina Tommila (FI) Substitute, Architect, Co-founder Kaleidoscope

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Jury Europan Norway

Kathrin Susanna Gimmel (CH/DK) Architect, Partner JAJA Architects

Kathrin Gimmel (CH/DK) is architect and partner at JAJA Architects.


June 2014 National Site Seminar, Oslo Mette Svanes from the municipality of Bergen presents the site Grønneviksøren to the Norwegian Europan Board.

Behind A Europan session spans over 1.5 year. This period includes planning for the competition, involving the local community through workshops and events, production phase for competition entries, jury work and finally, presenting the awarded projects. The process consists both of national and international events bringing together site representatives, jury members and young architects. The following pages provide an insight into the Europan 13 competition – Behind the scenes. September 2014 Inter sessions Forum, Pavia, Italy Gro Anita Bårdseth and Gunnar Wangen discuss the site in Ørsta with Helmut Resch, Head of Building Authority in Selb.

November 2014 Local workshop, Bergen The municipality of Bergen invited local professionals to share their ideas on the topic of sharing.

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Behind the scenes

November 2014 Local Workshop, Ørsta Local enthusiasts and property owners present their wishes for the town centre to Gunnar Wangen from the municipality of Ørsta.

the November 2014 Local workshop, Os Øystein Rø, Secretary of Europan Norway, presenting the competition to curious citizens of Os at a public meeting at Oseana cultural centre.

scenes March 2015 Europan competition launch and Student Award Aina Telhaug and Ann-Sofie Indgul received the first ever Europan Norway Student Award for their diploma project ”Inverted Beauty” at the Europan 13 launch event at Pigalle in Oslo.

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March - June 2015 Competition Phase PLAYstudio is developing post-oil strategies in Stavanger for their project Forus LABing.

March - June 2015 Competition Phase The team behind Preparing Density in Os are elaborating their concept through a physical model.

March - June 2015 Competition Phase Lala Tøyen and Kåmmån are passionate about bikes and experienced the site at Grønneviksøren on two wheels. To the right, the team is working late hours in their office.

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Behind the scenes March - June 2015 Competition Phase The team behind The False Mirror is revising the final drawings in Italy.

April 2015 Site visit, Trondheim Close to 30 participants showed up to experience Strandveikaia first hand, guided by the Harbour Authority and municipality of Trondheim.

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Behind the scenes April 2015 Site visit, Stavanger The participants experienced Forus on electric bikes. Stein Racin Grødem from Forus Business Park led the tour.

August 2015 Great interest in Europan The local newspaper in Ørsta, MøreNytt, made articles on every competition entry to engage and inform the local community.

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Behind the scenes

September 2015 First jury meeting, Ørsta Jury member Umberto Napolitano is showing his gentleman skills while Gro Anita Bårdseth from the municipality of Ørsta guides the jury through the study area.

September 2015 First jury meeting, Bergen The jury visits all the Norwegian sites and selects 15-20% of the best projects during five intense days in September.

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September 2015 First jury meeting, Trondheim The jury and site representatives are enjoying the last rays of sun before returning to discussions on the 41 projects in Trondheim.

September 2015 Evening debate Trondheim Architectural Association organized a public debate on the future development of Nyhavna with the members of the jury.

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November 2015 Second jury meeting Isabel Melo, from the municipality of Bergen, reminds the jury of the issues to be dealt with at the Europan site at Grønneviksøren while the rest of the site representatives are listening.

November 2015 Second jury meeting Intense discussion in the jury before the final decision is made.

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Behind the scenes

November 2015 Forum of Cities and Juries, Bratislava Henning Wenaas Ribe, from the municipality of Os, and jury member, Cristina Goberna, discussing the preselected projects.


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Trondheim Strandveikaia

Team Trondheim

Nadja Sahbegovic Architect, Urban Planning Office

Nyhavna, a gigantic harbour area built on a landfill, an artificial landscape of warehouses, World War II heritage, toxic waste, boats, beer and independent culture. The area is large, complex and occasionally filled with conflict. The local politicians and developers have been waiting to develop it for decades as it sits next to “Midtbyen” the city’s urban core. But lacking alternative harbour areas and long term leases have kept the area “off limit”.

Maria Meland Christensen Architect, Urban Planning Office

Now, finally a master plan has been presented by the municipality, drawing up the

Trondheim Port Authority:

The municipality of Trondheim:

Wollert Krohn-Hansen Port director

Per Arne Tefre Head of the inner city department, Urban Planning Office

Siri Merethe Rønning Property Manager Anita Veie Project Engineer

Mette Omre Architect, Urban Planning Office

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Europan competitors were asked to present a vision for Strandveikaia working on two levels; firstly, an overall idea for the site and how it works in the greater Nyhavna plan as well as in relationship to the city centre and eastwards urban development. Secondly the competitors were asked to develop an area plan for Strandveikaia including five dimensions; new programming, housing, heritage, public space and process.

General remarks by the jury Strandveikaia is part of a larger development plan for Nyhavna. Parts of the current harbor activity are due to be relocated in stages over the next three to four decades, leaving new and central areas open for urban development. Strandveikaia is the important first step in this transformation process. Naturally, “all eyes” are on this site at the moment, and the jury finds it has the potential of affecting the future image of the city as a whole. Involvement with the city and other stakeholders is crucial if the site is to function as a new local centre that also holds ambitions of experimental housing schemes. Many edifices, facilities and artists currently located on the site right

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on the waterfront are to be included in the overall vision: historic WW2 buildings, existing cultural actors, the refurbished Ringnes Beer Centre and the continuing port activity, which give the overall site function, scale and identity. The competition brief was explicit in wanting a wellconsidered framework for the integration of these complex parameters rather than a scheme that simply played into the hands of property developers. As a result many projects addressed development processes and the cultivation of Strandveikaia to be a place for all, and not only for those who can afford this privileged location in the city. Other projects kept most of the site as an open public space trying to visualize the added-value it would bring to the area and the wider urban context. Yet others focused on framing the heritage buildings by using housing structures to enclose different urban spaces with distinct characters. Further, many proposals were concerned with climate comfort providing large indoor spaces to compensate for the harsh weather conditions. Trondheim has realized a series of waterfront developments over the past twenty years. One of the lessons learnt is the amount of time it takes to establish vibrant areas. This will also be the case for the development on Strandveikaia and Nyhavna, which needs to begin the process by articulating a strong agenda and spatial framework that is robust enough to withstand time, but allows for the voices of the city’s and the site’s current inhabitants to be heard and implemented.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

map of change for the future. Two partly overlapping zones constitute the plan: to the south a zone for knowledge intensive work places, to the north a residential zone surrounding a harbour basin. In the latter, you find a sliver of land between the water and the city’s brewery, next to the landmark Dora bunker: Strandveikaia. The area is pinpointed as the first step in the greater harbour development. This is the Europan 13 site in Trondheim.


Winner WS315 | The False Mirror Trondheim Strandveikaia

From land to water

Winner The False Mirror By Andrea Anselmo, Gloria Castellini, Guya Di Bella, Filippo Fanciotti, Giovanni Glorialanza and Boris Hamzeian Europan 13 demands once again for innovative reflections on the issue of adaptability, identified as the contemporary

Urban scenario

response for the future of the city. Against the 20th century superimposed approach, the concepts of flexibility over permanence, multiplicity over uniqueness represent the new panorama of the adaptable. However, to what extent is this innovative approach often based on standardized solutions will be able to represent the optimal response to our cities without falling in neutralization of the cities specificity? Our reflection, thus, arises from the necessity for a redefinition of this approach, in something more than a collection of technological devices, sustainable glitter

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Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

and flexible structure to be dislocated indifferently in whatever city. In order to radicalise the sub-versing of such an overwhelming approach and understanding The False Mirror envisages a profound shift in paradigm. Enlarging the field of investigation from the traditional technological approach to a multi-perspective able to include

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matters such as morphology, typology and symbology, we propose a new form of adaptability, which categorically refuses the conventional approach – from local investigations to global tools – to promote the inverted process: from global tools to site specific solutions. Locally adapted rather than generally flexible is the “new” adaptability.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Urban de-fragmentation

The "Trondheim fleet"


Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

Temporariness

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Barge S/ Construction vessel

The vessel (8x16m), produced by a local ship industry, carries out all the excavations and construction activities as well as the canal maintenance procedures (H20 + basin cleaning).

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Barge S/ Lift bridge

The small sized barge (8x16m) is conceived as a temporary bridge able to overcome the hiatus the canal creates. It guarantees the pedestrian and cycling traffic depending on the particular necessity of the community.

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Barge S/ Green space

The barge consists on a floating public space characterized by gardens, benches and leisure areas. The small size vessel (8x16m) can be moved and located along the program of the canal banks.

Water

Temporariness

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The barge is characterized by a full furnished athletic circuit and different typologies of sport fields (tennis, football, volleyball, etc…). It can be placed on the Nyhavna banks as well as offshore.

Barge S/ Pavillon

The small size barge (8x16m) is equipped with a standardized covered pavillion able to operate as a public or private stand strongly combined with the canal banks’ program (market, florist shop, newsagent, etc…).

Barge L/ Tribune

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The tribune can both function independently, thanks to events such as catwalks and exhibitions, and be combined to offshore platforms in order to host events such as music concerts, sport matches etc…

Canal/ Terrraced steps

The canal banks are characterized by alternative patterns of benches, steps and stands. This new land-water synergy contributes to the creation of an innovative linear space.

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Canal/ Green slope

The use of slopes in form of gardens, trees and green fields upgrades the existing promenade with a linear public space open to programs such as picnic area, relax area, solarium etc…

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Green

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Greenhouse

Greenhouses, placed among the buildings, can create winter gardens or host vegetable gardens. In both cases a direct relationship with the urban citizen and nature is re-established.

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Urban Park

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The urban park, along with local artists monuments, exhibitions and artistic performances, solves both the green space requests and reflects the cultural soul of the contemporary Nyhavna.

Green line

Along with the definition of a linear waterfront in the form of porticos, the use of gardens, green fields and trees on slopes contributes to create an interactive linear green line under buildings.

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Green court

In order to create a stronger “greenization” of Nyhavna, neighbourhood’ parks, equipped with playground and gardens, are located in the block’s courtyards.

New

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Courtyard blocks

The typology of courtyard block (5-7 floors) is used to create urban island in those areas characterized by the absence of the waterfront proximity.

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Warehouse scenography

The re-interpretation of the traditional warehouse typology along with new solutions of ground floor, program and skin is used to create a new urban scenario: the re-invented waterfront of Nyhavna.

Living bridge

A new multi-program “bridge shaped” typology is defined in order to create an hybrid building that suits the new context of Nyhavna canalization.

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Infrastructure

Heritage

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The “whatever” box

The appearance of the building is guaranteed by the maintenance of its external façades.. The empty box becomes an active playground for autonomous structures

Climatate controlled pavillon

The use of a covered pavillion, both independently and in combination with buildings, is defined to solve the climatic extremeness of the Nordic City.

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In order to deal with the extremeness of Trondheim’s climate, a portion of streets and plazas is confined under a large scale roof.

The adoption of a number of infill buildings leads to the suppression of the urban void between the existing buildings. These artifacts work together with the

A network of cycle-pedestrian lanes, along with the relative services and equipments, is provided in order to promote a sustainable transportation system.

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Cycling lane


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Canal/ Equipped promenade

The canal bank becomes an equipped promenade thanks to the use of benches, artistic and historical monuments, open air relax areas as well as temporary events.

Barge M/ Modular structures

Similar to the temporary floating building in terms of location and program, this medium size barge (16x36m) is characterized by a grid of modular structures opened to flexible dispositions and events.

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Canal/ “Cul de sac”

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The canal aims to define water plazas characterized by a multitude of programs and events such as kayak rental service, temporary water exhibit and performances, etc…

Barge L/ Landscape

The large size vessel (24x56m) is designed to host various artificial and floating landscapes such as summer beaches, urban parks and open air pools with the relative equipments.

Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

5 Conceived to temporarily host the heritage buildings’ program during the various project construction phases, the medium size barge (16x36 m) is characterized by a floating building to place on Nyhavna waterfront.

Open air pool

The canal bank can be upgraded thanks to the juxtaposition of pools and water basins able to create a strong relationship between the citizen and the water.

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Canal excavation

The excavation of canals is conceived to subvert the landfills’ addition of the last two centuries. The canal insertion creates an archipelagos of district and insert the water infrastructure among them.

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Total demolition

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The total demolition is addressed to those buildings and artifacts characterized by a physical or cultural obsolescence. All the program previously hosted in them is moved into the temporary devices.

Partial demolition

The partial demolition is addressed to those heritage buildings whose physical structure is to be partially restored and combined with a number of new devices and buildings.

Heritage

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Circular building

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The Epyphite

The parasite

The cylinder shaped building, used as parking building, creates a typological variation in the project site and cover almost all the parking lot necessity ( along with the open air parking placed on the Dora I, II roofs).

Conceived as a programatic and morphological addition to the existing building, the epiphyte is an autonomous structure ready to integrate the program of the cultural buildings with residential and working program.

The parasite is a small structure, adherent to the building’s façade and structure. It interacts with the building integrating its program and changing its morphology.

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Tram line

The adoption of a urban tram line among the street of Strandveikaia and Nyhavna leads to an infrastructural integration of the site towards the near districts and Trondheim as a whole.

Smart street

The utilization of C02 emissive vehicles is discouraged thanks to the adoption of a limited number of smart streets characterized by particular rights of transit, speed limitation etc…

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Ferry pier

A further infrastructural connection is offered by the introduction of a ferry station able to improve the regional touristic circuit as well as to introduce a new urban transportation line.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Demolition


Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

New Strandveikaia kindergarden New Strandveikaia kindergarden

Wintergarden

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Wintergarden

Phase 1 PHASE 1

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Covered Covered promenade promenade

Phase 3

Artificial sky, indoor plaza

Phase 4

Artificial sky, indoor plaza

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This new hybrid is conceived through the re-interpretation of four different and complementary archetypes steeped in the history of Trondheim: the traditional waterfront warehouses, the urban opening process through canalization, the site manufactured sea vessels fleet, the adoption of land and water infrastructure such as ferries and new tram lines. The hybrid of past forms and future necessities is the “new” adaptability.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

From the question of architectural morphology to urban matters the means of resignification of past values turns Trondheim in a progressive déjà vu, a vision where forms of the past find in the contemporary a distorted reflection able to conjugate past and future. Toward a new way to understand adaptability, The False Mirror enlarges the spectrum of what adaptable can mean: the rejection for neutrality becomes the adapted solution

for Trondheim sustainable future. The False Mirror sets up a coherent strategy able to inform a new hybrid between the persistence of traditional forms and the flexibility of a rapid transformation process.

Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

Trondheim is a fertile ground to apply this new vision for the adaptable project: on the one hand, the necessity of a flexible solution able to intervene in the built environment and, on the other, the potential given by the cultural and urban background of the city are the premises for a new process of urban conversion.

Masterplan Phase 4

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Trondheim Strandveikaia

Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

Key plan

Section A-A’

Plan

Section B-B’

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B B’


The project reinterprets existing conditions in Trondheim in a rich and intelligent way. By introducing a canal on the site an island is created as a means to continue a “true” Trondheim identity with waterfront to all the edges of the site. This, as a consequence, allows access to the water for all. The heritage buildings and the beer centre are suddenly in the “front row” instead of in the second row, which creates a new

logic in the urban layout where the East is as important as the West, Another major consideration concerns the relocation of the major road which currently divides the project site into two parts. By moving the road to the rear of the beer centre, the project enlarges the potential for stronger intra-site and city connections. Beyond the urban scale, the project proposes interesting housing typologies, the refurbishment of heritage buildings and the smart use of local fleets for temporary uses such as the temporary relocation of stakeholders on site. The jury believes this project and the accompanying toolbox is an exciting new plan for Standveikaia – a plan that will work with time and against the generic city.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

The authors respond to the Europan 13 theme “adaptable city” by proposing a new form of adaptability that is based on an analysis of the local morphology, typology and symbolism. In the project this is exemplified with a reinterpretation of what the project defines as four local “archetypes”: the warehouses, the canals, the sea vessels as well as specific land and water infrastructure.

The False Mirror team is a collective of architects, outcome of a fortunate encounter between six professionals sharing the Genoa Polytechnic School as common background. Each member has experienced projects of all scales working in international renowned architecture Filippo Fanciotti firms, developing different perspectives filippofanciotti@gmail.com and complementary skills that reflect in + 39 392 361 1107 their work. Having elected Europan as our test ground, Giovanni Glorialanza we set our primary goal in the disclosure of gioglorialanza@gmail.com the ambiguity of the almost ubiquitous and + 39 338 756 9920 overwhelming concept of Sustainability. Boris Hamzeian This solution for Nyhavna is the result of a bhamzeian@gmail.com discussion about contemporary approach to + 41 764 728 232 historic cities, typology and social strategies.

The False Mirror team

Andrea Anselmo andrea.anse@gmail.com + 31 6 492 39 077 Gloria Castellini castellinigloria@gmail.com + 39 347 488 1312 Guya di Bella guyadibella@gmail.com + 39 348 007 3496

31

Winner WS315 | The False Mirror

Jury assessment


32

Trondheim Strandveikaia


By Studio Fountainhead The proposal concerns itself with mainly three points: 1 A spatial organisation that sees the urban development of Strandveikaia as an extension the existing urban fabric establishing a series of varied public spaces. 2 A strategy forwarchitectonic and programmatic metabolism where a varied programme of everyday life is woven into both new and existing buildings. 3 The role and potential of rethinking the welfare institutions in an urban development context Developing smart! The proposal takes into the account that urban planning today is governed by liberal

This hierarchical and strategic use of cheaper square meters, allows the creation of volume that is necessary at an urban scale, liberating those with other than maximum profit-interests of a huge amount of square meters. This keeps prices low. We call it a win-win. The problem of temporary lease as a market tool In recent years, the term of temporality has been introduced in the lingo of both urban planners and developer mastodons - the latter realizing the monitory potential of public image and reputation. CASE: The elderly as proper citizens : a catalyst for a city

33

Runner-up RU280 | More Trondheim!

market forces and economic development to a great extent. Usually sites for developers are sold as islands, ‘big chunks’ of the city, making strong spatial and urban connections almost impossible to achieve. We propose these ‘developer-sites’ broken down into smaller units, integrated with development by other economic actors. This forms an urbanity wherein their economic independency is safeguarded, whereas their spatial relationship is coherent and mutually co-dependent.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Runner-up More Trondheim!


Runner-up RU280 | More Trondheim!

A PERMEABLE INSTITUTION FOR A LIVELY CITY Dwelling

Rentet Appartments Private Appartments Shared Appartments Common indoor areas Common outdoor areas Houseboat spaces

Cultural Activities

Classrooms Divers urban spaces Disponible urban infrastructure Nautilus Studio (existing program)

Kindergarten (children)

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Children group room (15 children) Covered Fenced Playgrounds Outdoor Fenced Playgrounds Indoor Closable Play Area Informal urban activities

Private and Institituional Employees Cantina Break saloon and cafĂŠ Outdoor and covered break space Meeting area Shared professional kitchen Shared Employee Lavatories Administrative offices Storage rooms Cleaning facilities

Private offices and shops Office spaces Shared waste treatment Local Market: Indoor grocery sales Outdoor grocery sales Automats Coffee and snacks Waterpost Indoor hot lunch sales from kitchen

Insitution for the Elderly Private homes w. shared balconies Public covered garden Shared Cantina, CafĂŠ and Lounge Informal urban activities

Total public Space (accessable) Private homes w. shared balconies

Indoor Covered Outdoor

34

Programmatic diversity: The intertwining of interests


Runner-up RU280 | More Trondheim! Trondheim Strandveikaia Case: The Kindergarten at Strandveikaia

It is no longer uncommon to use shortterm leases and primarily creative class tenants to raise prices in new development areas, replacing the tenants with economically stronger clients as time passes. This accelerates gentrification and the homogenisation of the urban fabric. The problems of this mechanism is apparent; marginalizing small scale business and pushing it further and further out of the city, eliminating its livelihood or forcing emigration. Utopias for an aging society and the potential of integrating the welfare institutions in the city fabric

35

As a country with a fully developed welfare state, Norway and thus the city of Trondheim, is facing the challenges of maintaining high quality in the institutions of education and care. We argue that a spatial rethinking of the welfare institutions and embedding them in the planning of urban form can improve the existing, and create new forms of institutional life that will reduce costs, and above all – benefit the citizens.


Studio Fountainhead

the elderly population is explored – understanding them as catalysts and resources in the urban scene by atomizing the provisions of an elderly home throughout the site. The agenda, analysis and critical questions concerning gentrification are not only timely but also relevant for Strandveikaia. In particular the cultural actors currently on site gain a prominent position within this proposal. The authors argue that the temporary should be permanent when discussing the current actors at site and try to describe and visualize an anti-speculative development process and a “gradual development from within”. The jury thinks the result of the project’s thesis is successful portrayed in the case studies shown and could serve as an inspiration for further processes on the site, or could be tested in other locations in Trondheim.

Studio Fountainhead is a Copenhagen based architecture office founded by architects Dominique Hauderowicz Dominique Hauderowicz and Kristian Ly Serena in Kristian Ly Serena info@studiofountainhead.dk 2013. Through a process of www.studiofountainhead.dk experiments and critical thinking their practice develops spatial responces Frederiksborgvej 64 at the intersection 2400 København NV beween Cvr: 35499504 architecture, art + 45 608 02 087 and politics. + 45 209 79 923 Common for their diverse set of projects is the ability to work critically within the complexities of the specific context. The studio concerns itself with architectural work at every scale - taking great pleasure in finding its methodology and means of represantation anew with every project. Hereby they strive to help develop a good and playful life for the many.

37

Runner-up RU280 | More Trondheim!

The project addresses fundamental discussions for spatial production in Norway and beyond by investigating the site in relation to topics such as the future of the welfare state and the role of institutions within it, the mechanisms of the real estate market, and demographic change. As a way to open the site up for a new, anti-speculative, development, the site is broken down into smaller units, allowing for the participation of other economic actors. Elsewhere, the reconsideration of specific functions are used to illustrate a rethinking of their current status and use: a kindergarten, for example, is used as a case study to show how future welfare provision is expanded through the addition of other uses and functions. Likewise, the growing role of

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Jury assessment


Special mention MZ933 | The Rim Trondheim Strandveikaia

Special mention The Rim By Protocol Collective Following an overall analysis of the masterplan proposed for Nyhavna we detected an unbalanced distribution of dwellings and offices in the northern and southern areas. Our proposal aims to counter this programmatic zoning balancing the quantities of offices and dwellings in Nyhavna, generating an increase of mixity. Nyhavna has the capacity of accommodating 10’000 inhabitants and the same amount of jobs. Strandveikaia accounts for approximately 10% of the whole Nyhavna.

The accommodation of these beneficial quantities, together with both the need for a qualitative open space and the respectful consideration of the cluster of heritage buildings, engendered a configuration whereby the buildable area is concentrated along the edge of the site, defining a generous and continuous open space within it. The development of Strandveikaia adapts to the growth of the whole Nyhavna, constituting a centrality acting on different levels according to the phase in which it performs. One of the main features of the proposed scheme is that while the built volume increases the quantity of open space is kept constant and its quality preserved. The programmatic definition of the heritage buildings aims to implement the activities currently taking place on site in

38


Special mention MZ933 | The Rim Trondheim Strandveikaia

order to make evident and publicise their existence. Local potential is capitalised in such a way that the informal practices are reassessed into joined configurations combining public, entrepreneurial and low budget actors.

39


40

Phase 3

Phase 2

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Phase 1

Special mention MZ933 | The Rim


The jury was intrigued by the project and the fact that it adds a different landscape and identity and at the same time encloses and secures a large open space for the whole city. By isolating the heritage buildings in an urban forest they are given remarkable importance and an opening in the frame also allows for a sophisticated inclusion of the beer centre. The introduction of programs such as a mediatheque,

Protocol Collective

an art centre, a kindergarten portrayed as a castle, and the chocolate factory adds to the mysterious and special atmosphere of the project. The refurbishment and add-ons to the WW2 buildings are allowing for the current cultural actors to stay, undermined by a low-cost simple unifying climatic strategy. The jury finds the strategy appealing and the ideas rich, but is critical to the qualities of the final scale of the development and the housing units including the functions on the ground floor in the colonnade. The project is poetically presented.

Protocol Collective is an open network of young, passionate professionals in protocol.collective@gmail.com the field of architecture and urban jonathanlazar.architect@gmail.com design, all former students of TU Delft, + 39 347 76 32 1 01 wishing to provide an infrastructure for various forms of collaboration. The Collective comprises different personalities and different kinds of expertise, spanning from building construction to territorial planning and qualitative research. We know that the meaningful interpretation of physical environment is essential for human existence, and that architecture plays a crucial, irreplaceable role in this task. We also believe that every spatial intervention should arise from a profound comprehension of its context, that is, of the unique material and immaterial conditions that constitute its ground.

41

Special mention MZ933 | The Rim

The project consists of a colonnade – serving as a platform for gradual development above – that frames the heritage buildings and a new urban forest. This configuration constitutes a unique and poetic gesture in a “hard part” of the city, raising questions about the degree to which Strandveikaia can be, and needs to be, something entirely different from existing development in the city of Trondheim.

Trondheim Strandveikaia

Jury assessment


Ør

42


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43


Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Team Ørsta The municipality of Ørsta:

Møre and Romsdal County:

Gro Anita Bårdseth Planner, Planning and Environment Department

Arne Dag Gjærde City-planner

Gunnar Wangen Head of the Planning and Environment Department Matias Kårstad Planner, Planning and Environment Department

Ingvild Gjerdset Architect Ingerd Husøy Høknes Architect Trond Myrland International Advisor

Ørsta is facing a historical possibility to rethink its urban centre when the municipal plan from the 80’s is being reassessed. The old plan suggested routing E39 along the coast of Ørsta, seizing valuable land and paralyzing development in the centre of the town for over 20 years. Now the municipality of Ørsta and the county of Møre and Romsdal have joined forces in the quest of rediscovering and revitalizing the centre of Ørsta and strengthening its position in the region of Søre Sunnmøre. Ørsta, also known as «the white town», lies at the end of Ørstafjorden surrounded by the beautiful Sunnmøre Alps. Though

44


New regional road connections, Eiksundsambandet and Kvivsvegen, has allowed for a greater synergy between the populated areas in the polycentric region of Søre Sunnmøre. The roads have decreased both distance and time spent travelling, making everyday life easier for its inhabitants and changing the dynamic of the region. Being in the hinterlands of the more prosperous maritime clusters of Ulsteinvik and Fosnavåg, Ørsta, needs to reassess its strengths and weaknesses and define a new strategy for its role in the region. One of Ørsta’s regional advantages might be its urban, spatial qualities; a rare condition in rural Søre Sunnmøre. How can Ørsta use its center to create new opportunities for growth? What urban potentials lie in a revised programming of Ørsta? What type of processes can spark the developments? Ørsta municipality and Møre and Romsdal county have joined forces in order to speed up the process of rewriting the story of Ørsta using Europan 13 as a tool for rediscovering the urban centre. The two parties asked the competitors to make a vision including a physical plan, programming and strategy for realization.

45

General remarks by the jury The competitors were asked to make a vision for Ørsta´s centre including a physical plan, programming and strategy for realization. The vision should be based on the competitors’ understanding of both local and regional urban dynamics, emphasizing amongst other issues Ørsta´s role in the collaboration with the twin town Volda and a strengthened identity of the town centre. Ørsta is a divided city with a cluster of municipal programs (schools, town hall, kindergarten etc.) in the east and a historical centre and urban core (the pedestrian street, the shopping mall, the waterfront etc.) to the west. Even though the main focus of the project was limited to the urban core, the link between the two clusters became important in the jury work. How to improve the daily urban life in a car dependent society where functions are so widely spread out? The jury was looking for convincing strategies that could intensify the urban experience and increase soft mobility, independent whether the proposals were smaller or more ambitious interventions. The jury felt that only a few of the proposals for Ørsta were responding with an overall vision that embraced all the issues in the competition brief. However, the collective intelligence amongst the proposals was interesting due to their very different approaches to the task given. The proposals spanned from digital technology, new functions and buildings, retrofitting the mall, to landscape strategies and volunteering as a development strategy. The Europan process has generated great local engagement and many inhabitants of Ørsta are already volunteering in the process of renovating and reactivating the town centre. The jury believes that the winning proposal has the strength to further galvanize this process.

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

encompassed in beauty, the level of activity in the centre of Ørsta is low and concentrated around the shopping malls. Shops are closing down and a lack of maintenance is beginning to show on the built environment. In the void after the planned regional road from the 80’s lies a possibility to rediscover the waterfront as well as revitalizing urban life in the centre of Ørsta through developing the open lots.


Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

Winner Connecting Ørsta By Jens Nyboe Andersen, Maria Crammond and Karl Johan Baggins

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Ørsta has a unique location deep in the Ørstafjord; the mountains rise dramatically around the city, creating a spectacular frame. Ørsta’s city centre has a lot of potential. Earlier plans to lead the E39 highway along the fjord, has resulted in the city turning its back to its former existence. Ørsta lies where it does because of the proximity of the fjord, the sea - the old Viking graves in the city centre testify to this. The link between city, people and sea can now be re-established, as the plans for the E39 are dropped! On an overall level there is a poor correlation between Ørsta’s focal points – the lacking connection between the schools in the south and the city centre is an example. Ørsta city centre has a great atmosphere and many spatial qualities. However, the city’s urban squares and recreational areas lack hierarchy and are detached from one another. Some are too large, blurry and undefined, others are dominated by parking and some lie alone on the edge of city. This type of perplexed sprawl happens when development goes too fast and without consideration and understanding of a city’s history and scale. Amfi shopping mall, with its large introverted structure is an example of this. Though the positive thing is that the mall is not located on the edge of Ørsta, but adjoins the city centre - and this potential must be exploited! The Amfi mall must open up towards the city centre allowing a synergy and an exchange of users to flow back and forth between the two urban hubs. Ørsta’s urban development, with the right understanding of its many qualities, as well as the programming and development of the important urban hubs will result in an attractive, active and dense city centre. At the same time, Ørsta and the fjord will get the chance to meet

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Phase 01. To signal the DEVELOPING ØRSTA PHASE 01. to the transition 1:15.000 future oftheØrsta, To signal transition towe the future of Ørsta, we suggest that two kicksuggest that twoin phase 01. starters are established A Japanese inspired Sento as a new kickstarters are form of public space - an attractor in the community around Ørsta and Volda. A maritimein pavilion containestablished phase ing a small restaurant, fish market andJapanese catering is placed on the Market 01. A inspired Square. The central part of the Wooden established, Sento asPromenade a newis form introducing Ørsta to the water once of public space - an attractor in the community around Ørsta and Volda. A maritime pavilion containing a small restaurant, fish market and PHASE 01. 1:15.000 To signal the transition to the future catering is placed on the Market Square. The central of Ørsta, we suggest that two kickare established in phase 01. part of the Wooden Promenade is established, starters A Japanese inspired Sento as a new form of public space - an attractor introducing Ørsta to the water once again. in the community around Ørsta and Promenade part 01.

Sento Market Pavilion

Promenad

Volda. A maritime pavilion containing a small restaurant, fish market and catering is placed on the Market Square. The central part of the Wooden Promenade is established, introducing Ørsta to the water once again.

Promenade part 03.

Culture Square

Market Square

Phase 02. In phase 02. two new squares are establised as anchors in the Urban HASE 02. center, furthermore a 1:15.000 n phase 02. two new squares are esconnection between tablised as anchors in the Urban center, furthermore a connection between the Amfi mall and the Amfi mall and the historical city is created bycity adding new plots and exhistorical is created panding the Amfi mall with stores and housing units. The promenade by adding new plots started and in phase 01. is expanded further. expanding the Amfi mall with stores and housing units. The promenade started in phase 01. is expanded further. Promenade part 02.

Promenade part 03.

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Phase 03. In phase 03 The Educational Connection is established as a HASE 03. recreational string 1:15.000 phase 03 The Educational ConwithInnection playgrounds, is established as a recreational string with playgrounds, schools, institutions schools, institutions and community houses. Furthermore, The Park Conand nection community houses. is created with the renewal of the Hamneparken, parking in the green, new buildingThe plots and a Furthermore, Park variety of wooden decks and structures connectedis to the Vikaelva. Connection created with the renewal of the Hamneparken, parking in the green, new building plots and a variety of wooden decks and structures connected to the Vikaelva.

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PHASE 02. 1:15.000 In phase 02. two new squares are establised as anchors in the Urban center, furthermore a connection between the Amfi mall and the historical city is created by adding new plots and expanding the Amfi mall with stores and housing units. The promenade started in phase 01. is expanded further.

Park Connection

46

Educational Connection Park Connection

PHASE 03. 1:15.000 In phase 03 The Educational Connection is established as a recreational string with playgrounds, schools, institutions and community houses. Furthermore, The Park Connection is created with the renewal of the Hamneparken, parking in the green, new building plots and a variety of wooden decks and structures connected to the Vikaelva.


ON

Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

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Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

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47


Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

Ålesund

Ulsteinvik

Fosnavåg

Hovden airport

Ørsta Volda

Søre Sunnmøre Oslo

Ørsta has the potential of being an ideal commuter town. Major cities with work opportunities are within driving range and Oslo is a short airplane ride away. The city is sorrounded by magnificent nature with mountains and ocean right at its doorstep. The inhabitants of Ørsta has several posibilites when it comes to shopping for grosseries and the unique spatial qualities of the city center draws parallels to major European cities. But the city is divided and its qualities do not benefit from each other.

Urban Cemetery Housing

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Big box

Analysis Ørsta consist of many ‘islands’, with different programs and qualities but they do not crossconnect or benefit from each other.

Marina

Educational

ANALYSIS 1:15.000 Ørsta consist of many ‘islands’, with different programs and qualities but they do not crossconnect or benefit from each other.

The Urban Connection

The Park Connection

CONCEPT 1:15.000 Defining and strengthening the ‘islands’, tying them together and turning them into connections through the city.

The Educational Connection

48

Concept Defining and strengthening the ‘islands’, tying them together and turning them into connections through the city.


Culture square

Market Square Exiting buildings structure

Amfi shopping mall

New building structure

Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

Mall and City Center Introducing the Amfi shopping mall to the city center by densifying with new low-rise buildings, conveying the scale of the mall.

>>

Exiting buildings structure New building structure

The Cultural Square

The Market Square Nekken

Anchors Upgrating and concentrating meetingpoints and exchanges in the city.

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

The Park Plaza The Marina Plaza The Educational Plaza

ANCHORS1:15.000

Promenade

Add-on and crossconnect The promenade is adding a recreational route on the edge of the habour, and thereby connecting the city center with the water. The promenade is made by a wooden deck which turnes into a platform every time there is a crossconnection. This connects to the city center and further to the housing units. These passages are strengthened by a safe path over E39, and a green structure along the pedestrian connection. E39

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1:500 STUDY AREA

1:500 STUDY AREA

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apartments

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

entrance park

shop

apartments

Vision We believe that Ørsta not only has the opportunity of becoming a strong destination in the Søre Sunnmøre region, but the city also has great potential as a strong commuter city. Eiksundsambandet connects Ørsta to the West Coast by a 45-minute drive, where great economic growth is happening. The airport connects to Oslo and the world.

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Reminiscence square cold

in situ brushed concrete

existing tree

D2. Building lot Information and turisthouse

bridge

Kyrkjevoren

existing structure

Offices

Sauna

stairs

entrance

Turist office entrance

platform

wooden deck

Temporary rehearsel space (empty space)

Meeting point “Under the tree”

Kaihuset

Under the gate

40 parking lots

Recessed square Culture square

natural stone pavement mikro climate outdoor service Pavilion café

Ørsta town - fruit ga

Ørsta Torg Shopping mall

dorm

Ice skating (winter) bike parking

5 parking lots

C1. Building lot

scene

outdoor canteen

Sj øb ra ut a

Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

St

JYSK

urban structure should be a powerful experience. It must be possible to get close to it – so close that you can touch it and even swim in it! A more vibrant city centre with residential and commercial services, mixed with strong social services across

Because of its qualities, the unique scenic location and the urban scale, Ørsta should be the obvious choice for visitors and people who want to settle down. The city holds great possibilities for the perfect family life; Ørsta has schools with adjacent sports areas for children of all ages, it has retail facilities and it has a twin city only 15 minutes away, but Ørsta’s anchor points need to be connected to strengthen the city’s coherence. The goal is to create secure connections within the city: between the schools and the city centre, between the city centre and the harbour and between the important urban squares. The city must be connected to the water, and the contrast between the water and the

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Ørsta consists of many small and unconnected ‘islands’, that function internally, but not as a whole, inhibiting the city‘s flow. In our proposal, Ørsta city centre consists of three main connections that all branch off from the square by Nekken. The three main connections are: The Urban Connection, The Park Connection and The Educational Connection.

Twin City What Ørsta doesn’t have, Volda has. Ørsta and the neighbouring city of Volda are strong together and should be thought of as a unit, developing their individual potentials so that they complement each other and strengthen the idea of the concept of the Twin City. The synergy between the two cities makes it possible to shop in Ørsta, 15 minutes after you leave Volda and Ørsta’s new urban development, with its many varied programs, will hopefully attract people of all ages to use Ørsta in different ways.

The Urban Connection links together The Culture Square - Vikegata, The Market Square - Nekken, and the administrative centre at Ørsta City Hall. The connection with its squares, the dense city scale and commercial and cultural facilities gives it a clear urban character. The Park Connection runs from Hamneparken and The Marina alongside Vikeelva to The Lagoon Park, all the way to Nekken. Here the park-typology is the structuring element, so car parking and infrastructure is designed with a green park character.

Proposal Main concept – Connecting Ørsta The main concept of the project is to establish clear connections and identities in Ørsta. Today

The Educational Connection runs from Nekken, along the park blockhouses, Ørsta Hotel, the House of Culture, the secondary school, the middle school and Ørsta

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Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

generations, residents and visitors. Ørsta city centre should create a frame with content and atmosphere in strong synergy with the Amfi shopping mall. Therefore, the city’s super structure in the form of the Amfi mall also needs to be connected to the city centre! With this as a starting point, we have chosen to call this project: Connecting Ørsta.


Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

P

P

Promenade

P

P

P

P P

Urban Connection

Parking and infrastructure parking lots are designed within the typology and identity of their location. All 1:15.000 Parking and infrastructure parking are lots are designed within parking areas the typology and identity of their All parking areas are spread outlocation. in smaller spread out in smaller points along the city, rather than staying large points along the city, surfaces in town center - they are easy to acces from E39. rather than staying large surfaces in town center - they are easy to acces from E39.

Re-use of empty stores. Park Connection We support the idear that local enthusiasts can use emty 1:15.000 stores The pedestrian connection. for their projects – this results in a more lively city center.

P P P P

Educational Connection

Rehearsal Pop up store

Urban Connection

Social meetingpoint

D1 D2 A3 A2

The pedestrian connection.

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Educational Connection

1:15.000 Re-use of empty stores. We support the idear that local enthusiasts can use emty stores for their projects - this results in a more lively city center.

Plots. Park Connection Densifying with new low-rise buildings in the city 1:15.000 center, conveying the Plots. Densifying with new low-rise scale and making Ørsta buildings in the city center, conveying the scale and making Ørstato morestroll attractive to stroll more attractive around in. around in.

Temporary office community

B1

B2

Classroom

Re-use of empty stores Local city = Robust city

Stadium. Here education is the structuring element, with playgrounds, institutions, schools, stadiums and community houses. The connection ties the institutions together and provides the opportunity to

A1 B3 B4

B6 B5 F1

B7 F2

F4

F3 F5

Educational Connection F6

meet across ages and gather around sports and games. The connection also creates a safe path from the different institutions to the city centre and back home.

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Connecting Ørsta team Jens Nyboe Andersen jensnyboe@hotmail.com + 45 405 04 948

The project shows sound strategies for how to link the different inherent urban, natural and scenic conditions of Ørsta with the aim of increasing the town’s position as a destination and regional centre in Søre Sunnmøre. This focus on strengthening the connection between the educational institutions and the centre is vital to activate the town at daytime. The proposed design of these spaces is also operative as it is making a clearer distinction between the front and the back of the mixed-use blocks in Ørsta’s centre, and turning many grey asphalt zones into recreational areas optimized for new and green mobility. The phased development of implementation includes ideas on how micro-scale interventions can improve existing conditions. The jury believes that the project can become an effective planning tool for the municipality of Ørsta, both in a short- and long-term perspective.

Our team consists of Jens, Maria and Karl, all from Copenhagen, Denmark. We know each other from the University of Copenhagen and the School of Architecture, and also through professional work, where we have all been engaged in the field between large scale planning and detailing.

Maria Crammond mariacrammond@gmail.com + 45 505 88 363

Our background in landscape architecture and urban planning has created a platform for a diverse design process that we believe results in strong ideas.

Karl Johan Baggins karljohanbaggins@gmail.com + 45 618 52 681

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Winner OG257 | Connecting Ørsta

Connecting Ørsta presents an overall plan for both the site and study area, showing a good understanding of the local challenges and the scale of the town. The project proposes to create a new spatial hierarchy in Ørsta by establishing three, new main connections across the central areas: the urban connection, the park connection and the educational connection. While the urban and the park connection propose structural interventions, the educational connection proposes a new programmatic rearrangement strengthening the relations between the schools, the cultural house and the town centre. The strategic locations of these connections are based on an intelligent analysis of the place, and the proposed physical interventions are transforming the whole logic of the site with credible means. Furthermore, the project takes on Ørsta’s car based culture by introducing a strategy on how to integrate parking within the proposed green and urban structures.

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Jury assessment


Runner-up IJ476 | Urban by Nature

Runner-up Urban by Nature By STUEN Ørsta has the potential to become an urban centre in the region of Søre Sunnmøre. Ørsta has a strong retail position and a natural surrounding that is attractive to families. It is in the combination of these qualities that the Urban by Nature-project envisions Ørsta in the future: an intensified natural setting that creates urbanity, enhances the shopping conditions and will attract new inhabitants to the urban core. When we discuss ‘urbanity’ in Ørsta, we do not aim for a ‘Manhattan’-style urbanity, but instead strengthen a unique town core

that acquires its main urban quality from its proximity to the green, the mountains and the water. The green-urban structure of Ørsta will be optimized by three strategic interventions: a A high-quality residential area along the waterfront b A variety of green urban spaces and shopping experiences c Connected public spaces that are adapted to the climate and make the natural surroundings accessible in all seasons. The project envisions these new physical connections on two levels. Firstly, a series of green corridors are designed, flowing into the urban core of Ørsta, connecting city and periphery and allowing for nature and urban life to merge. At this level, the project introduces a new landscape path

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Runner-up IJ476 | Urban by Nature

The Twin Town The Ørsta Europan competition provides a unique opportunity for the town to rethink its position in the region. We strongly believe that the project’s implications transcend the scope of the inner, urban area and affect a large part of Søre Sunnmøre. Therefore, a wider territory has to be considered, inviting all urban actors and participants to engage in this project to discuss the future of not only the inner city, but the entire region. In order to remain competitive and to create an effective counterpart to Volda, Ørsta will have to vitalize its individual potentials and boost its characteristics, but at the same time take advantage of the proximity to its twin city Volda. In our opinion, Ørsta features a large quantity of ‘soft skills’. The practical education, shopping, as well as the city’s numerous cultural resources. Volda on the other hand has a potential to strengthen its position as location for higher education, technology and knowledge clusters. This project focusses on three main topics: 1. a need for an overall identity, 2. a special focus developing a polycentric commercial area, and 3. the importance of complete rather than compete. Shared values and identity The theme “Urban by Nature” will be the twin towns overall strategy and identity. Ørsta and Volda share the proximity to nature, fjords and mountains, and they should equally develop this potential within their green urban centres. We envision

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Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

“landskapsstien” binding the city centre and the surrounding nature together. Secondly, in the core of Ørsta, an urban surface is shaped as a place of densification, strengthened by a series of intense green public spaces and a waterfront promenade.


Runner-up IJ476 | Urban by Nature Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

that the two existing centres both focus on a strategy based on densification of existing urban areas rather than expansion. In order to create new urban situations, we recommend a strong focus on densifying the centres as well as implementing green urban spaces. Together this will be the key to achieve a strong urban identity based on site-specific characteristics and values. Besides the proximity to nature, to succeed as a new regional centre, the twin town should have an overall focus on attractive housing. While the students of Høgskolen have the perfect student house in Volda, Ørsta will focus on the families. While Volda continues to strengthen its position as a knowledge society and student friendly town, Ørsta will focus on children’s education. Ørsta-Volda: a polycentric commercial area We suggest to focus on complimentary retail functions in Ørsta-Volda. To avoid competition and counteraction, an overall systematic and strategic planning is needed. A thorough analysis of existing retail functions combined with potentially needed functions should be conducted in order to create a rich variety of shopping facilities. In the centres, we suggest to focus on specialised retail, local niche retail, and grocery stores. Larger functions, such as building materials, appliances and furniture shops are suggested to be established in the areas around Hovedbygden and Furene. Besides releasing valuable square meters in the town centres, the relocation of functions to Hovedbygden and Furene is also part of a strategy to strengthen the connection between Ørsta and Volda, both physically and mentally. This area in particular can help strengthen the position of Ørsta Volda in a regional perspective; the area around the airport is of special value as it can be further developed as a national connector. Complete, not compete at a local and regional level The two twin towns should reinforce and complement each other rather than compete. The synergy effect they possess will strengthen their position in the regional

competition. The region is characterized by a lack of one clearly defined centre, with many towns of approximately equal size. It is therefore important to find opportunities for collaborate on shared interests, and simultaneously clarify potential conflict areas. Following this strategy, we are leaving the traditional regional hierarchy behind, and opening up for a network based regional strategy. The Landscape Ørsta is nestled by the foot of the Sunnmøre Alps at the edge of the Ørstafjord, surrounded by wild nature in a dramatic landscape. From the steep white mountaintops, streams gather into rivers and make their ways down through mystic

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Runner-up IJ476 | Urban by Nature Ørsta Ørsta sentrum green and blue corridors running towards the centre of Ørsta, mak-

When the corridors meet the urban surface / town

Green and blue corridors running towards the centre of Ørsta, making new ways of connecting with the wild sorrounding nature.

When the corridors meet the urban surface / town core, they create differient uniqe spots and plazas.

Landscape path connecting core, campus and livingareas with nature.

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New functions in Ørsta centre.


Runner-up IJ476 | Urban by Nature Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

forests and green grass fields, flowing through the city before entering the dark blue fjord. Ørsta is a city with a strong connection to the surrounding landscape as it traditionally was supporting agriculture and furniture manufacturing as the main livelihood of the inhabitants of Ørsta. Urban by Nature reintroduces the strong connection between Ørsta and its surrounding nature as the main driver of further development of the city. The diversity of nature within close proximity of the city offers great possibilities for a

variety of outdoor activities in both summer and winter with cross-country skiing, mountain biking, hiking, fishing, kayaking, sailing and bathing in the lakes and fjord. For many people living in Ørsta, this is the main reason for settling here. The landscape qualities and nature diversity form a great potential for future branding of Ørsta. Urban by Nature sets out to extend or find again the identity of the city’s structural elements in which the landscape will be supporting the main livelihood of the city again.

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The landscaping strategy, visualized in a beautiful and poetic yet site-specific atmosphere, would strengthen Ørsta’s identity both on a local and regional level as well as beyond. The jury believes that the three main places of town centre intensification is a believable strategy, but is less enthusiastic about the scattered spatial interventions between the corridors, especially along the waterfront. The jury also questions whether landscaping is enough to reactivate the centre. The highly detailed landscape appears to be mainly motivated by aesthetics and the jury believes that the project would benefit from including further considerations on possible operative qualities of the green corridors.

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Urban by Nature proposes to strengthen Ørsta´s identity through landscaping. By creating intensified natural settings within the town’s core, the project seeks to build on Ørsta’s status as a destination for mountaineering, climbing and fishing. The project’s strength derives from its way of using nature as a tool to achieve new civic qualities by defining a set of ecological corridors based on existing riverscapes and green structures, connecting the outer Ørsta landscape to the town centre and the waterfront. Where the corridors meet, new public spaces are proposed, which contribute to intensify the scale of the town by activating and densifying vacant sites with and through nature.

Runner-up IJ476 | Urban by Nature

Jury assessment

STUEN stuen@stuenarchitects.com Rosenborggade 19, 1130 København K, Denmark + 45 261 45 838

STUEN is a social and creative network within the field of architecture. We work from Copenhagen where we meet to develop projects, share ideas and host events. Currently STUEN counts eleven people who know each other from the School of Architecture in Copenhagen. We also do collaborations with Kopenhagen Collective, another creative collective located next door in Rosenborggade.

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Ă˜rsta Ă˜rsta sentrum

Special Mention ZG651 | Utmark


Special Mention ZG651 | Utmark Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Special mention Utmark

no building could occur within 100 metres of the shore to allow unfettered access to the sea. However, exemptions to this rule are frequently granted and in the case of Ørsta have transformed the waterfront from a place of truly universal access to a derelict space of private interest.

By Leonard Ma This project proposes to consider allemannsrett- the freedom to roam, as a deliberate interpretation of self-organization that maintains at the core of the welfare state. The future development of Ørsta’s waterfront is addressed as an explicit strategy for re-establishing concept of Utmark as it was once applied to the shorelines and beaches, which stipulated that

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The proposal establishes a 100m long pier that serves as the index for all future development, with each new development sharing responsibility for filling in and reestablishing the natural shoreline. This project proposes to explicitly reverse the haphazard way that exemptions to the freedom to roam have been granted in the name of development and re-establish the importance of the natural shoreline to the quality of life in Ørsta.


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Ă˜rsta Ă˜rsta sentrum

Special Mention ZG651 | Utmark


The project idea is interesting in the way it changes the local focus on programs based on shopping to one that is based on recreational qualities. The beach represents a non-productive, democratic space accessible for all, naturally changing through the seasons. The jury believes such a concept could serve as an emblematic asset for Ørsta and become a regional landmark. Whilst the illustrations are alluring, the project fails to convince on a structural level, especially when it comes to the traffic flow and the introduction of a new parking pattern.

Ørsta Ørsta sentrum

Utmark proposes a radical intervention in the centre of Ørsta by introducing a new pier, which establishes a shoreline and, over time, a beach, which – as the project suggests – would fundamentally change the dynamic and the identity of Ørsta. Furthermore, the project suggests a new traffic flow through the town centre that separates hard and soft mobilities by consolidating pedestrian flows to a main boulevard along the beach. Car traffic is reintroduced to Vikegata and parking areas to Webjørn Svendsensgate. Existing buildings along Webjørn Svendsensgate are replaced by a combination of three new building typologies, the block, the tower and the barn.

Special Mention ZG651 | Utmark

Jury assessment

Leonard Ma www.publicoffice.co Leonard Ma is a Canadian and architect based in Helsinki. He is a teacher at the New Academy.

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B er 64


Grønneviksøren

g

en

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Team Bergen Bergen Grønneviksøren

The municipality of Bergen The City Planning Office: Mette Svanes Head of City Planning Office Kristin Frellumstad Eitrheim Chief Adviser/ Dip.Arch. MNAL Isabel Melo Senior Architect Arne Matthiessen Senior Adviser Knut Andreas Knutsen Urban planner Gyda Strømmen Urban Planner

Christine Hvidsten Graphic designer and photographer Office for development agreements Geir Haveraaen Head of Office Elisabeth Totland Special Adviser and Lawyer Hordaland County Sigrid Næsheim Bjercke Special Adviser, Regional Departement Anne Katrine Vabø Special Adviser, Regional Departement

The Europan 13 site in Bergen has a unique location on the south side of Lungegårdsvannet by the Møllendal River outlet. Located just outside the historic city centre, the site has a long history as an industrial area, including milling back to the Middle Ages, and storage for the city’s technical department in recent times. Much of the Møllendal area has for decades been inaccessible and unsuited for public use. Now, however, a transformation is on its way. Bergen municipality wants to explore new ways of urban living through developing a pilot project for housing at

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Sharing is the governing theme when developing Grønneviksøren. The Europan competitors was invited to explore to the fullest what positive effects sharing can have when developing housing, a kindergarten, commercial spaces, public spaces and infrastructure. What does the new “sharingarchitecture” look like when Bergen is developing housing, and inviting families of all kinds and stages in life to live in an urban environment? The site is also an important piece in the city’s initiative to develop the shore along Store Lungegårdsvann into a continuous promenade connecting the project site to the city of Bergen. Located next to the river mouth the site called for exploring transitions between land and water with activities for all ages throughout the year.

General remarks by the jury The site in Bergen represents one of the more direct tasks in Europan Norway 13 with a site that has a municipal zoning plan, including many specific guidelines for the area already approved by politicians. Here, the task at hand was to propose a diverse urban neighbourhood but

67

with a focus on housing for families with children within the given framework. The competition brief also stated that the housing scheme should be a pilot project where new forms of property development and ways of living as well as concepts such as sharing on an urban scale were to be explored. Included in the task was also the design of the public green zone along Store Lungegårdsvann and the Møllendal River. Whilst the site was popular among the competitors, few projects managed to visualize a convincing housing pilot with enough critical mass and in an appropriate scale of the city and the immediate context. Many proposals were either extremely low dense or extra-large megastructures, which were considered by the jury as non-sustainable solutions as the housing pilot accompanying them often fell short of surviving on another scale or density. Other projects proposed interesting participatory processes as the key model for substantial long-lived sharing among house owners, but failed to demonstrate how those processes could be integrated with the overarching urban design challenges. Other recurrent themes discussed by the jury were the programming of the ground floor, the relationship between private and public spaces, caruse, parking and ground conditions. Few proposals were discussing flood and tide problematics which the jury think should have a prominent role in the further design work, linking the intelligence of the green zone with the housing project in one holistic design approach.

Bergen Grønneviksøren

Grønneviksøren. The region of Bergen is growing fast and densification around existing centres is happening rapidly. Plans for introducing new urban development in the district of Møllendal are already being implemented with the newly finished student housing, a promenade park leading to the city centre, the new art academy by Snøhetta scheduled to be finished by 2017 and a future stop for the light rail. The Europan site represents one of the last possibilities for developing publicly owned land this close to the city core.


Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective

Winner Our City, Our Collective

more diverse way to organize housing, to offer a real alternative to the single family house – and today’s apartment typologies – with a starting point in shared functions. A very basic manifesto for a cooperative housing pilot

By Lala Tøyen & Kåmmån Our city, our collective The production of housing in the cities of Norway is homogenous and dictated by market forces and what the developer can profit from rather than the inhabitants wants. For many Norwegians the dream is to realize their own house with an adjacent garden. Today the most obvious answer to this is the detached house: eneboligen. We want people to have real choices when they choose how to live, and this project is an investigation of a

1 Housing projects of the future are more diverse! We want the wishes and needs of the inhabitants to direct our building typologies, not the market driven developers 2 Our streets are also a space we share! In a dense city, they should be looked at as an extension of our living rooms. Hierarchy puts pedestrians and bicyclists first, public transport second and motorized vehicles last 3 The future city citizens ride bikes! Not cars, within the city. Not only to transport themselves, but also to transport lighter goods

Bergen Grønneviksøren

4 Densification with quality! The main quality of the city is social interaction. Good cities have high social interaction at a low cost 5 Sustainability is not an add-on! It is a part of how we plan, how we build, how we live. The most climate-friendly square meter is perhaps the one that we do not build so we have to consider carefully

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Bergen Grønneviksøren


Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective

SUSTAINABLE NATURE, SUSTAINABLE NETWORKS NORDNES

KOENGEN

VÅGEN RUNDEMANNEN SKOMAKERDIKET

FLØIEN

BYPARKEN

LILLE LUNGEGÅRDSVANN

NONNESETEREN VIDDEN

BYSTASJONEN BUS TERMINAL

PUDDEFJORDEN AMALIE SKRAM VGS.

SVARTEDIKET

TO CITY CENTRE

NYGÅRDSPARKEN

NYGÅRD

NEW LIGHTRAIL FLORIDA

STORE LUNGEGÅRDSVANN MØLLENDALSELVEN

STRANDPARKEN

STRØMMEN

MØLLENDAL

NEW BUS STOP “STRANDPARKEN”

HAUKELAND NORD

MØLLENDALSV.

ULRIKEN

EXISTING LIGTHRAIL DANMARKSPLASS

TO LANDÅS KVINNEKLINIKKEN

LØVSTAKKEN

KRONSTAD

BRANN STADION

Lush nature connections

Public transport glory

BRYGGEN: 10 min

FJELLVEIEN, EASY TO BIKE, ALMOST NO CARS! NICE PEBBLE ROAD FOR BICYCLE TOURING!

BERGEN`S FIRST HIGH CLASS BICYCLE ROAD

EDUCATION

SUNDAY BIKING!

FISH WATCHING

INMENT ENTERTA

SPORTS

NG SAILI SWIMMING

DAMSGÅRD: 10 min

ALLOTMENTS

FISHING

GRØNNEVIKSØREN

MULTISPORT MILLING HISTORY CYCLE ALONG MØLLENDALSELVEN! (MORE COMFORTABLE WITH EL-BIKE!)

HØGSKOLEN: 10 MIN

Socio-cultural waterscape

Bergen Grønneviksøren

Bicycle prioritized

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Bergen Grønneviksøren

Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective


Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective

COMMUNITY KITCHEN DINNER FOR 900 is only once FOR THE HOUSING FOUNDATION PARTY ONCE a year, puh! Normally 50 PERSONS is OK!

OUTDOOR QUALITIES

THE FLOWER OF ACTORS

REMIXING PUBLIC-PRIVATE EFFECTIVE BIKE COM MUTE ROADS AND REFRESHINGEXERCISI NG AT THE DOOR STEP!

ARCHITECT/ LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

PRIVATE

CONTRACTOR BIR

PUBLIC

HOUSING FOUNDATION

COLLECTIVE

PRIVATE COLLECTIVE

PUBLIC

BERGEN KOMMUNE

SOCIAL WORKSHOP

BUILDING GROUP

2. LAYERING

1. GRADIENT

AREA NUMBERS 28.000 m2 housing 10.000 m2 community functions on site 2500 m2 culture hall in the park (all gross numbers) Floor Area Ratio (FAR) is 2,25 An average of 30 m2 housing per person, approximately 750 people can live here in the future!

STUDENT HOUSING KiB STUDENTS DUPLEX 70 m2 2 couples, students 11,2m2 kitchen

12m

4,5m2 livingroom

9,8m2

5th floor

Bergen Grønneviksøren

balcony

6,6m

17,5m2 per person

MULTI PURPOSE HALL OFFICE COMMUNITY COMMON KITCHEN BIKE PARKING BERGEN BIKE CENTRE

CHILLING IN THE WINTERGARDEN

BAR LE VELO VEGETABLE ROOF GARDEN FAMILY APARTMENT THE LARSENS 140 m2 Parents, 3 kids + rental unit balcony 11,2m2 one room rental 30 m2

12,2m2

12m

4,5m2 livingroom

4,5m2

tv room 9,8m2

9,8m2

3rd floor balcony

6,6m

28 m2 per person

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11,2m2

kitchen

4th floor


PTICAL, DAD?

ARE YOU STILL SCE

2nd FLOOR UPWARDS

35 m2 per person

Ap. C 70 m2

COLLECTIVE 1st FLOOR

4th floor

3. MIXING

12m

PUBLIC GROUND FLOOR

Ap.B 70 m2 2nd floor 6,6m

3rd floor

GUEST APARTMENT 70 m2 for visiting guests

11,2 m2

GUEST APARTMENT

shared winter garden 60m2

12m

4,5m2

GALLERY ATELIER

9,8 m2

OFFICES COMMERCIAL

terrace 20m2

2nd floor bridge

6,6m

GREENHOUSE KINDERGARDEN/ PLAYGROUND

6,6m

THE HUSEKLEPPS EXTENDED FAMILY 280 m2 + winter garden 60 m2 Family of 5, grandma and granddad + great grandma

GENERATION APARTMENT SENIOR HOUSING COMMUNITY AFTER SCHOOL CENTRE HOMEWORK ASSISTANCE & LIBRARY

PARK PLAYING FIELD BEACH

BATHING SAUNAS

CULTURE LEGEND PUBLIC: RUN BY THE MUNICIPALITY OR PRIVATE ACTORS COLLECTIVE: SHARED FUNCTIONS OF THE INHABITANTS PRIVATE: FLATS (BUT THEY COULD ALSO BE SHARED FLATS (!)

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Bergen Grønneviksøren

PRIVATE

ed.. I nvinc list am co g say i he waitin ts! o t on t have rtmen Well, ut myself enior apa p s Have e shared h for t

Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective

ENJOYING THE WATERFRONT


Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective

Public + collective ground floor

1st floor terraces + housing

6 Diversity = a thriving city life! By offering a wide variety of housing units and typologies we can also attract a wide variety of people, old, young, families, singles, students – with different daily routines, needs and economies

Phases

What is public and what is private? We think some of the magic of the city happens when we are not quite sure. The project explores this meeting between the public, the private and something inbetween: the collective.

Bergen Grønneviksøren

7 Sharing is caring! We can share on different levels and for different reasons: inside a housing unit, among several units in a cluster, in the neighborhood, in the district, in Bergen as a city. For economic, sustainable, social reasons, for our personal gains and the common good.

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In this project, the urban structure corresponds well to the scale of the lake and is making a clear and appropriate distinction between the public park and the project. The private and public functions on ground floor level are attractive and intriguing,

Lala Tøyen & Kåmmån LALA TØYEN AS, Urtegata 32 A, 1087 Oslo Pernille Heilmann Lien pernille@lala.no + 47 952 04 945 Iwan Thomson iwan@lala.no + 47 400 46 659 Kari Tønseth kari.tonseth@stud.aho.no + 47 932 19 258

providing room for a variety of shared spaces while the two larger housing perimeter blocks add a positive critical mass to Grønneviksøren as a whole. The proposal shows a variety of different apartments for all generations, not only the ”young family”, adding a series of shared facilities such as community kitchens, homework communities, after school centres, senior housing community and gardens; however, apartment sizes and layouts should be elaborated further to reflect these common facilities. The proposed city scale of the public space along the lake is workable and supports the strategic vision of envisaged socio-cultural connections. The jury sees a need for elaborating the architecture and the physical expression of the development as a whole, but are optimistic about the further realization of this proposal since the scheme seems robust enough to withhold the coming development process.

The members of the team met through their common interest in urban housing combined with social infrastructure and nature qualities, and searched for an opportunity to work together. With Europan 13 that opportunity came! The team has their roots in two offices, Lala Tøyen and Kåmmån, situated on the same address in Urtegata 32, Oslo. Lala was founded in 2012 and has since then worked with public urban spaces as a generator for architecture. Lala believes in a closer relationship between buildings and landscape and that there is a lot of potential in this relationship to improve the quality of housing and daily life in cities. Kåmmån was founded in 2015 as an architecture office with a belief in the value of what we all share, the commons in society. The interest in architecture as one of many pieces in the wider context of life and nature is the basis of the work the office pursues.

KÅMMÅN AS, Urtegata 32A, 0187 Oslo Tomas Aassved Hjort tomas@kamman.no + 47 934 59 108

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Winner QA664 | Our City, Our Collective

The project Our City, Our Collective shows a clear idea and strategy on all scales. On the larger scale, the project recognizes the water promenade and the water body of Store Lungegårdsvann as a garden for the city – a central park – with an importance for Bergen as a whole. Through continuing and reinterpreting the neighbouring urban fabric of the student housing, the project proposes two hybrid city blocks consisting of a common porous ground floor that responds to urban connections in its surroundings, while the upper floors resemble two larger perimeter blocks. The proposal shows a richness in ideas and guidelines for a cooperative housing pilot and how to active the use of the waterfront.

Bergen Grønneviksøren

Jury assessment


Runner-up BS147 | Møllendal West Bergen Grønneviksøren

57% Couples with children 19% Couples with children who are not living at home 18% Singles 3% Multi-family households with children 2% Multi-family households without children 1% Other

44% 28% 18% 8% 2%

Housing block Detached houses Town-houses Semi-detached houses Co-operative housing

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By Paul Motley, Chris Scaplehorn, Arne Bassoe-Eriksen and Robin Sondergaard

Runner-up BS147 | Møllendal West

Runner-up Møllendal West Introduction There had been mill operation in the Møllendal area along the Aarstad-river (now the Møllendals-river) since the late 1200s. The mills where initially established with the purpose of grinding grain, some of the mills where later used as sawmills and in the late 1800s they were used to generate hydropower.

The project site’s industrial character is prominent, and its immediate context is characterised by the private car which has brought congestion to the streets contributing to high local pollution levels and uninviting external spaces. It is a stated political ambition to densify areas in and around the city centre, and Møllendal has been identified as an ideal area for urban regeneration and densification to take place. Our intention is that the legacy of Møllendal West will be a building co-op capable of coordinating building groups on sites throughout the city, where the commercial developer is left out of the equation in order to provide custom made homes, reduce cost and offer an opportunity for residents to bond through the process both with each other and with local professionals capable of instigating resolved advances for the future of Bergen.

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Bergen Grønneviksøren

The mill industry was economically viable and was important for the development of Aarstad as an area and Bergen as a city. Today, the site is a brownfield site with high levels of ground contamination, dominated by large warehouses and industrial facilities.


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Bergen Grønneviksøren

Runner-up BS147 | Møllendal West


WHAT When Møllendal West has attracted sufficient interest from potential prospective residents, they are organised into co-operatives.

From pilot project to regional Implementation The community land trust model differs from the traditional Housing Association in the sense that the Land Trust only owns and manages sites, while letting the cooperatives take on the responsibility of the

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HOW The housing model facilitates for partial financial input from Husbanken in order to obtain the 15% equity capital needed in order to take out a loan from a local bank. MW will be the managing financial party. WHEN Once a co-op is formed the collaborative process initiates in a symbiotic relationship with industry professional and MW. The co-operative structure allows for phased development of the site dependant on interest and participation. This harnesses ongoing knowledge and financial transfer throughout the course of the project.

developer. Consequently, if the self build concept proves to be popular with homebuyers in Bergen, a geographic expansion of the Land Trust’s operations is feasible.

Bergen Grønneviksøren

WHO Møllendal West (MW) exists as a nonprofit umbrella organisation typically represented by members from affiliated coops (residents and commercial actors), experts and stakeholders as well as other community residents. The co-operatives are sole owners of the buildings they build, while leasing the land the buildings sit on from MW. A co-operative can consist of 3-30 families in addition to independent businesses and commercial actors who are deemed appropriate in the context of the co-operatives social image.


Runner-up BS147 | Møllendal West


The urban scheme suggests a density somewhere between the city and suburbia by mixing two typologies. While neither the typology nor the urban plan is remarkable,

Møllendal West team Paul Motley Chris Scaplehorn Arne Bassoe-Eriksen Robin Sondergaard Contact: Robin Søndergaard + 47 476 00 431

the project is seen as a strong comment on how to build a neighbourhood in a fast growing city. In this sense, the proposal is complimentary to the winning proposal that pinpoints important aspects to consider for the municipality when developing Grønneviksøren as a pilot project. The aspects of landownership and the possibility of public leasing of the land to private housing co-operatives to achieve more affordable housing near the city centre has not been discussed in the municipal plan. In this sense, the project raises a relevant political discussion that could inform the process of developing the Europan site or other municipally owned sites in the city.

Robin, Arne and Chris met at Kingston University and immediately connected over a mutual interest in the theorising and discussion of architecture. Through these conversations, we developed an appreciation for the social responsibility of an architect in today’s populous world – to provide effective and economical proposals for quality dwelling spaces in urban environments. Our variety of backgrounds provided unique insights into life in the city, suburbs and countryside; three perspectives that, combined, drove an interest in the opportunity of Europan 13: Bergen. Work on the competition was undertaken parallel to professional work in London with support of London-based architect Paul Motley, providing an immediate account of the housing problem that directly informed our project work.

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Runner-up BS147 | Møllendal West

The project Møllendal West gains distinction with its proposal on developing a non-profit housing strategy in Bergen that challenges the traditional property development in Norway. The premise of the proposal is the conviction that the current housing shortage and rise in prices is partly due to lack of innovation. The project studies the desire of the population as well as existing economic, financial and political models of development and counteracts the current situation by suggesting implementation of a cooperative housing model.

Bergen Grønneviksøren

Jury assessment


The pilot project at Grønneviksøren will take aim to establish an affordable alternative to the common housing developments . With the municipality’s ownership of the lot, the responsibility is truly in the hands of the elected politicians and the city council to ensure that the development will be pursued with the aim of breaking fresh ground. We propose the Pilot project to be founded on values of ownership and community feeling, taking up qualities from both the dense urban scene and the countryside. The Pilot project will pursuit social diversity and identity by setting the scene for sharing, self build, and inviting the future inhabitants into the project in an early stage. In this way Grønneviksøren will truly be like the song; ‘a place for my heart, a place for my shelter’.

Bergen Grønneviksøren

By Bjørneseth + Lønning

Special mention BA524 | Her har eg mitt hjerte, her har eg mitt ly

Special mention Her har eg mitt hjerte, her har eg mitt ly

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4

4

440 m3

+ Breathing Hygroscopic Easily standardised Renewable

CLT

Robust

Tactil surface Short construction period

Low weight

Low maintenance 12 00

Construction

Roof and slabs: 3 160 mm 23 m

Outer walls: 100 mm

3

8m

Inner walls: 70 mm

3

3m

80 m3

+

- 1 home on a small truck

- 2-3 homes on a large semi truck

- the driver of the truck mounts the panels with the help of the new home owner

- Getting your roof sealed takes just a couple of days

- no need for building under tent

- you're Left with a raw shell ready to customize

- clt allows for a great variety of housing

- creativity with Predictability

ground rules 4

4,2 m

85%

4

Special mention BA524 | Her har eg mitt hjerte, her har eg mitt ly

4

4

3 4 m3

10 m

arrangement

BYA %

The plot

height regulation

100%

25,2 m

10 m

row of six

The Big plot

BYA %

height reulation

when strangers become friends

Bergen Grønneviksøren

The first house

Rikke, Thomas and Janne met through the social community established by the municipality, and now they live mith 20 others in a young collective.

FInally, the Bostad’s found what they were looking for. With a second child on the way, their new house is the perfect fit.

the big family The Olsen’s and the Hanevik’s have always been good friends. So they decided to build a home together. The climbing wall was made for all the children in the area.

flexible development A dynamic plot structure makes room for a more flexible housing development . Mr. Friele seems happy about that.

As the children grow up When their two children moved out, Truls and Signe decided to rent the first floor to Espen, a student from BI.

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Her har eg mitt hjerte, her har eg mitt ly challenges the usual methods of construction related to affordability and typology. The project emphasises the concept of do it yourself and develops a construction system illustrated in a housing catalogue with a set of basic rules for how to put together your own housing modules. The raw housing module, easily transported to the site, allows for “creativity with predictability” and the inhabitants develop a sense of community and a set of shared functions through the process. The first step of preparing the site for development is cleaning the polluted ground

Elgeseter gate 21 B 7030 Trondheim Norway + 47 481 86 342 office@bjo-lo.com Contributors: Eline Moe Eidvin, Christopher Wilkens

Bjørneseth + Lønning is a young critical collaboration developed in the company of low dimmed lights and cold brews in the afterhours of interning in Trondheim. With curiosity and rigour, we create spaces for the fearless, for the hopeful, and the yearning. Spaces to be happy, and for those with hearts burning. Spaces for the cherished, for the misfits and the flunks. Spaces for the flawless in their pink swimming trunks. Spaces to be loved when the winter gets cold. Spaces for the young, for the needy, and the old. Spaces to be alone, spaces to be seen. A space for caring, a space for the obscene. We create spaces for people.

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Bergen Grønneviksøren

Bjørneseth + Lønning

with the use of Phytoremediation. The goal of “leaving the site in better conditions than we found it” intrigued the jury who could imagine this process going parallel to the planning processes. The project was discussed as an interesting method with a strong focus on self-initiated processes and communal city living. The plan however, shows a lack of density and hierarchy of urban spaces despite of many good intentions and analysis. The jury believes the strength of the project lies in addressing and pushing models of housing developments in Norway, and that a do it yourself strategy on a large site as Møllendall would be an interesting experiment.

Special mention BA524 | Her har eg mitt hjerte, her har eg mitt ly

Jury assessment


O 86


s

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Osøyro


Team Os Os Municipality

Hordaland County

Henning Wenaas Ribe Architect, planning department

Anne Katrine Vabø Special Adviser, Regional Departement

Os Osøyro

Aina Tjosås Head of planning departement Fredrik Seliussen Head of development & Project manager «Liv på Øyro» Terje Søviknes Mayor

Os is known in Norway as a different thinking municipality. Something of a maverick in the world of municipalities, one could say. It has for the last couple of decades challenged and reinterpreted what it means to offer public services, run local politics and perform urban planning. Now, the municipality, located some 50 minutes by bus south of Bergen, faces some fundamental changes that force the community to rethink the role of its urban centre. The change is driven by an unprecedented

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The municipality of Os wanted to engage young, international architects and landscape architects to help explore the urban ramifications of this OsX2 scenario through Europan 13. A prime location in Osøyro, the centre of Os, is at disposal with the aim of manifesting a new urban strategy in the municipality. Europan participants was asked to develop a plan, containing both a physical design as well as ideas for new content that bridges Os from being a village into becoming a town. The site have the potential for working as a connecting element in the fragmented centre Osøyro, divided by natural elements, such as the river and substantial height differences, and manmade barriers such as infrastructure and roads. The site can become a mediator between the old and new, water and land, locals and visitors. The site must act as an urban energizer that position Osøyro as the undisputed centre of Os for the future. The municipality wants the site to be a showcase for both Os and Europan as well as to create added value for the centre, municipality and region.

General remarks by the jury Os is facing rapid change due to population growth and the opening of new infrastructure that increases connectivity in the region. The county has identified Osøyro as one out of five regional centres around the city of Bergen that will have

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to accommodate this change. Forecasts predict a doubling of the population in Os by 2040, which will put into question Osøyro’s identity as a village. The Europan project site, right in the centre of Os, is supposed to cater for this growth – providing at the same time a new or extended centre with additional civic and commercial facilities as well as housing. In a municipality, however, were 70% of the inhabitants live in single family houses, who might want to move to this new centre of Osøyro? What is the right scale? And, what are the markers of this aspiration for a new urbanity? The task for the competition, therefore, was not about developing specific buildings, but to develop an area plan that could illustrate answers to these questions for future inhabitants, the municipality and the region. The municipality also sought responses to the city’s perceived fragmentation. Whilst somewhat charming (also because of its clear framing by the surrounding hills, the river and the sea) the fragmentation of facilities and in particular the disconnection between the two main anchors of the city centre, the cultural house and the main street, were of interest in this discussion. Questions revolved around the type and functionality of this connection, whether it could be achieved by the implementation of a new road, a park, a series of installations or, indeed, a dense waterfront development. And how could future infrastructure and planned parking facilities be part of the plan without creating new barriers? Whilst curious about many of the proposals, it was those which provided strong but varied visions and strategic answers which caught the attention of the jury.

Os Osøyro

regional growth, new infrastructure that brings Os closer to the world as well as its new role as regional centre. These factors are anticipated to lead to doubling of the Os population within 25 years.


Winner TD428 | Osurbia

Winner Osurbia By KnitKnot Architecture The municipality of Os is currently facing a major challenge in its history: how to become a new regional and urban centre, while maintaining its own identity. This identity is mainly defined by its suburbia character (70% of households are singlefamily), in contrast to the nearby urban Bergen, the second most populated city in Norway.

Learning from Os Our proposal explores the ideas behind the so-called ‘suburbia’ to understand the characteristics that underpin such a distinctive identity and unique way of living. To do so, five elements or types customarily associated with ‘traditional suburbia’ have been identified on the site: 1. The single dwelling 2. The parking lot 3. The mall 4. The filling station 5. ‘Suburbia beyond the dwelling’

Os Osøyro

Our proposal for Europan 13 stands up for the idea that this identity should be preserved and enhanced, while it advocates a redefinition of the concept of “suburbia” in the context of a new scenario where its traditional meaning is no valid anymore. The foreseen population growth or the construction of new infrastructures in the area, coupled with the need to conceive our cities in more sustainable terms, urges the exploration of new physical and socioeconomic ways of development. Through

our proposal, we attempt to provide an answer to those emergent conditions by suggesting a shift from ‘SUBURBIA’ to ‘OSURBIA’.

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By exploring the characteristics traditionally associated to these elements, the project aims at understanding the complex symbolism behind the simple forms that form those types. Thereafter, the project seeks re-appropriating these complexities to produce new meanings, while maintaining its associated symbolism.

Existing elements in Os, such as the old train station and the hall for wagons, have been preserved and redefined to adapt to new uses (i.e. art gallery, workshop and exhibition spaces); as a consequence, they have become a fundamental part of Os’ history, landscape and identity. Likewise, our proposal considers the six elements identified above as an asset rather than constrain; in order to generate unusual meaning within a recognizable architecture.

Winner TD428 | Osurbia

A sixth type, ‘THE STRIP’, has been defined as the element providing unity and coherence to all the rest.

Os Osøyro

Those elements are re-appropriated and re-defined within the frame of an overall urban strategy that provides unity, not only among these elements, but to the whole urban set (i.e. the existing commercial centre, the area around the Oseana culture house, existing areas of singlefamily houses, etc.)

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es

Bik

50 km/h

km

15 km/h

rks

wo

hop

Os Osøyro

30

/h

km

15 km/h

P

ESSO

Ho

t

5km

/h - 1

EAT

92

5 km

/h

Winner TD428 | Osurbia


Os Osøyro

tel

93

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Re

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tai

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Winner TD428 | Osurbia

Traditional suburban parking lot

Appropiated characteristics Suburban parking lot

CAR ORIENTED

Redefined suburban parking lot [Osurbia parking lot] Vast open area at ground floor level, where the public means of transport are prioritized

Traditional suburban mall SYMBOLS

atmosphere]

front and at the back

TRANSPORT INTERCHANGE [car, bus, bikes, etc.]

Appropiated characteristics Suburban mall

$

POLIT

POLIT

IET

IET

MIX

DOLLY

DOLLY

[OSURBIA MALL] ACCESSIBLE BY

Redefined suburban mall [Promote views to the surrounding con[Osurbia mall] text]

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Facade – words + symbols [Dynamic, media façade associated with cultural and social activities in the city - e.g. Local cinema, local theatre and bands, etc.]

Th ea Wo tre r

ØS

ks

h

NeMuos ps w ic s A

rt

FACADE– WORDS + SYMBOLS

Os Osøyro

with cultural and social activities in the city - e.g. local cinema, local theatre and bands, etc.]

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TOWARDS URBAN SPRAWL

ROOF

PRIVATE GARDEN

silhouette

[e.g. garage, outdoor storage shelter, etc.]

Appropiated characteristics Suburban dwelling Adaptable City 2

Winner TD428 | Osurbia

[e.g. garage, outdoor storage shelter,

Traditional suburban dwelling

TD428 Os [OSURBIA DWELLING] TENDENCY MULTI FAMILY TOWARDS COMPACT DWELLING CITY [Heterogenous popu-

SHARED GARDEN

-

PUBLIC - PRIVATE OWNERSHIP

etc.]

/ /

/

Redefined suburban dwelling [Osurbia dwelling] Tendency towards compact City Shared bike parking Multi family dwelling [Heterogenous population: Families, Young Seniors, Singles, Professionals, Students, etc.]

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Os Osøyro

SHARED BIKE PARKING


Winner TD428 | Osurbia

Traditional suburban filling station

Appropiated characteristics Suburban filling station

uses] through this element]

events - theatre plays, concerts, etc.

O

O

ESS

ESS

PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED

O

ESS

CAR ORIENTED

ØS

Observatory

STING FILLING

Redefined suburban filling station [osurbia CED IN HEIGHT filling station]

Maritime Museum

ØS Maritime Museum

Bridge connection Bar / Cafeteria Terrace

REPLICATION FILLING STATION

Flexible space (e.g. market, events, etc.) OSURBIA FILLING STATION - POSSIBLE USES

Os Osøyro

Redefined suburban filling station [Osurbia filling station] The lightweight steel structure / canopy – is retained [elementary framework] Complex program [multi-functional and flexible] Local market, space for different events - theatre plays, concerts, etc. The elementary structure is replicated next to the existing filling station and reproduced in height [Increase density of activity on the site]

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Public piazza / Outdoor exhibition centre ORIGINAL FILLING STATION


The winning project provides Os with an identity, not by romanticizing, but by enhancing the Os suburban lifestyle in a contemporary way. The project is “learning from Os” and the existing suburban context by identifying elements in the existing built structure of Osøyro and transforms them by creating hybrids that become drivers of change for the town centre. The Osurbia concept works with five elements from suburbia: the single dwelling, the parking lot, the mall, the gas station and “suburbia beyond the dwelling”. A sixth element, “The strip”, organizes these elements and connects them to the surrounding town, from north to south. The project proposes to expand and transform an existing roundabout to house a public transport terminal on ground floor and parking on top, solving many current issues in a simple but sophisticated manner. The onsite petrol station is recognized as an integral part of Osøyro and is merged with new public program (museum, gallery, library functions) in an 8-storey building. The traditional suburban dwelling is replaced by housing based on mixed groups of residents and shared gardens.

The winning project points at important issues at stake in the town centre and illustrates an effortless, but appropriate area plan addressing questions about disconnections and fragmentation. The historic buildings are given new importance, a new pedestrian bridge includes a public park and the shopping mall is integrated as an important activator of the river front. The project further illustrates a credible solution for private dwellings along the quay. The jury appreciated the way the gas station is transformed by adding public and cultural programs, since the gas station is one of the major meeting points in the city today and also how the traffic and parking challenge is solved by placing a hybrid of parking house and public transport hub within a round-about, hence reducing inactive car space in the city centre. In general all the re-appropriations and redefinitions show an in-depth understanding of Os and its future potential in a surprising and refreshing way.

Winner TD428 | Osurbia

Jury assessment

Knitknot Architecture is an international team@knitknotarchitecture.com collective of architects, urban planners, artists and thinkers. Our work aims to explore new ways to approach the architectural practice in a more open and critical way. We defend that the aim of architecture goes beyond the built project, and different itineraries such as research, critical writing or development of projects that address social, cultural and economic issues is required to re-conceptualize the role of the architect as social agent. Additionally, our team aims to explore new ways of professional association. Taking advantage of new communication and digital systems, Knitknot brings together members with different academic and professional backgrounds, working collaboratively from cities such as London, New York and Los Angeles.

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Os Osøyro

Knitknot Architecture


Runner-up KR926 | Preparing density

Runner-up Preparing density By Bogdan Demetrescu, Oana Simionescu, Ada Oprea, Alex Voica, Bogdan Tudor, Denis Poloca and Dragoș Nistor

City vs. Village The debate over the urban character of OS is not one of administrative order or regional influence. The quality of the residential area is one of the settlement’s biggest assets. The close contact with nature and its position near the sea make OS a prime location for people seeking a retreat or a place to raise a family. It is important to maintain the character of this area so that it matches the desire of the people living here. In this respect, we argue that more buildings to accommodate density would harm the community. At the same time, the community lacks a vibrant and active centre specific to many other urban areas. This can only be achieved by increasing the number and diversity of functions in an architecture, which is flexible enough to adapt over time. Our project exploits the resources of the site to revive the centre into a space teeming with activity and reasons to take part in communal life. The site will end up with a strong urban character provided mostly by local resources, strengthening the places’ individuality. Urban potential The theoretical criteria used to measure how urban a settlement is, account for

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Judging a city by its size, the entire population of OS would fit in 0.9 square kilometres in Paris. Does this mean that OS does not have what it takes to become a city? From an administrative point of view, OS municipality seems to be eager and capable to assume a more important role in the region. We consider the city has all the good premises to become the centre of an economically thriving area in the future. But will this be enough? Our theoretical claim for the situation of OS, is that urbanity is not represented by number of buildings or political importance, but rather a high density in the number of social, cultural and economic interactions, for which the built environment has only the role of support. We argue that, in order for this rural type community to offer a complete living experience, we must plan for a vibrant and lively space for people to meet, buy, cycle, debate, relax, admire, create or any other activity that places them in contact with each other. Research shows* that urban places for which people care about most, are active and engaging streets, offering many different functions with permeable and flexible architecture, which can satisfy a large spectrum of requirements.

Os Osøyro

three main aspects: physical size of the city, administrative influence and functional diversity coverage. Using these three indicators, we will shape the prospects the municipality has in the future.


Runner-up KR926 | Preparing density Os Osøyro

Status Quo At a scale closer to our site, one can see the privileged position it owns in relation to the most important administrative and cultural functions in the community. Judging by this factor alone we can make the assumption that, as the importance of

the community grows in the future, so will the value of the land on our site, making it a great business opportunity. Other factors must also be taken into account though. The site is man-made, as a result of the community needing more

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Runner-up KR926 | Preparing density Os Osøyro

space in the 1950s. Although there was plenty of unoccupied land in the vicinity, people choose to make the effort to extend the landmass because of its great position in the centre of the village. The topography of the nearby hills creates a natural scene with the new available land

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in the centre. Economic regression in OS spoiled the site’s initial purpose, leaving it, as it is right now, a strictly functional area for vehicle parking and maintenance. The centre stage of OS attracts no one of the spectator’s attention.


Runner-up KR926 | Preparing density

A democratic approach We consider that the centre of OS should remain dedicated to the public. Planning the site should start by changing the priorities towards placing the pedestrian on the first level. Because its function is of no interest to people, it is likely that most citizens have never experienced it. For us this is of great concern because of the importance of the spot and its underlying potential. A democratic space should take into account the needs and desires of the people in an equal amount. We believe in the involvement of the citizens in the design and evolution of the project, by using interactive methods of debate and enquiry. This inclusive approach is meant to replace a top down solution and results in an architecture, which is very adaptable and merely serves the role of support for people’s activities. Shared space and private businesses must be present on site, allowing for gatherings, cultural events and leisure, but also the area must be able to sustain itself economically. Our proposal offers multiple possibilities for small local entrepreneurs and farmers to start their own businesses with the help of the municipality.

Os Osøyro

Our part in this project is to reveal the inherent potential of the site and developing an architectural language that can help the people unlock and enjoy the opportunities they already have. Approach By thinking foremost of the needs and movement patterns of pedestrians, the urban regeneration process will start by discarding most of the present vehicle related functions on site. As the area is man-made, we propose to cover its surface with a flat stone pavement to establish an empty mineral platform as support for the upcoming development. This will remove any circulation restrictions for people and bikes. Our first goal for the assignment is to reactivate the site by using “location events”. These are strategic architectural interventions meant to create spaces in strong relation to the places listed above, for different activities to happen. As there are so many factors, which constitute the

beautiful complexity of the site, the architectural language we use to construct the spaces will be equally complex and diverse. Aside from the location events, we propose wood pavilions as a space definition tool of the site, where there are no naturally occurring ones. These are necessary in order to sustain civic activity on the blank flat surface of the site. The pavilion structures are very flexible. These can stand open, serving the public; closed, for private businesses (cafes, shops, etc.); stacked for higher density; closed with windows (during winter season) and other forms. In parallel, a well-defined set of rules are meant to keep the growth and density of the pavilion areas in check with development strategies on a larger scale. These rules take into account our decisions regarding the density, function; architectural feeling that certain areas must have; but people will have a great influence over the final shape of the space they occupy. The speed, at which citizens will start to convert empty pavilions into businesses or social events and fill the available spaces, will vary according to the desire of the people to use the site. If all the available spots are taken faster than the natural increase in density of the community, it means the people were hungry to use the site and are happy they can. In this case, we expect other community centres to start developing in the same manner, closer to other high-density poles of occupancy. If the people choose not to use the site, it can stagnate in its empty, mineral form, as a resource of space for the community to develop other projects. Either of these options are the end result of a multi staged process. We feel that a first stage is necessary to gather ideas from the people and guide them to experience the site as it is. A layer of infrastructure must be added on the site to sustain future development. Buildings and other installations that enhance the space for location events must be built. The first empty pavilions will be placed as a sign of something waiting to happen, waiting for the people to transform it into the lively and vibrant space it can be.

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The jury appreciated that the project promotes a political act and at the same time creates an unique identity to the place that

Preparing density team Bogdan Demetrescu Oana Simionescu Ada Oprea Alex Voica Bogdan Tudor Denis Poloca Dragoș Nistor

could become an attraction in itself. The vast open socio-cultural space is a strong urban gesture, although somehow a “tabula rasa” approach as it does not consider existing buildings or public space. The jury finds the idea of placing new buildings aside of the site –west of the main road – an interesting and feasible strategy that could relieve the waterfront from some of the privat housing development and the challenges linked to the demand for private outdoor spaces etc. The jury also appreciated the idea that external main roads change character as soon as they meet the centre transforms into a large shared space. The jury believes that this could redefine and diminish some of the traffic barriers in the centre and think this is an alternative that the city should consider. The pavilions suggested are less interesting and the jury is critical to the less original and operative participatory strategies in the scheme.

This team is an experiment. One that explored the border between practice and education. It has started with two architects – Bogdan Demetrescu and Oana Simionescu. They are leading one of the 4th year’s design units at The Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism. They collaborate as educators and build together processes, not buildings. So it has begun as an educational process in partnership with Bogdan’s office(D Proiect), which was bringing constant feedback from the outside at first. Then Ada Oprea, Alex Voica, Bogdan Tudor, Denis Poloca and Dragoș Nistor finalised the team. They are all students, colleagues and friends from the same faculty. Their project was brought to its final form in D Proiect, where we switched from education to practice, and other requirements were brought to the table. So this team was ephemerous – a spark dedicated to this process | project.

Contact Arch. Bogdan Demetrescu D PROIECT Unirii Square 5, 300085 Timisoara, Romania dproiect@gmail.com +04 0722 540 448

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Runner-up KR926 | Preparing density

This project was much discussed in the jury as it challenges a conventional type of development and the planned densification in the municipality of Os. It argues that a traditional densification would harm the Os community and instead it proposes a strategy of densifying social, cultural and economic interactions. They do this by introducing a pavilion structure on site to promote temporary activity in the centre of Osøyro, ensuring large parts of Os city centre to become dedicated to the public, and not to private market forces. As a result, a generous urban space with “unrestricted mobilily” is created. The project promotes a system of empowerment where the inhabitants can participate directly in developing the town centre.

Os Osøyro

Jury assessment


Special mention PG406 | Limelight

Special mention Limelight By ULTRA Architettura When you look at the shape of the Scandinavian peninsula and in particular at the Atlantic coast of Norway, the powerful first impression you get is to be confronted with fragments of territory imbued with meaning and identity characteristics. These fragments can be read as a story, a symbolic narrative of the territory, a concise report of a physical situation and temporal rather wide. This situation gives the place a poetic condition, and therefore constitutes the essential rhetoric moment with which we must confront immediately.

The multicore planning policy that assigns the task to several regional centers to perform certain functions to serve the entire region of Bergen, is the first important step to bring together all the fragments of an incredible land and to operate it as a single large system. The importance of this multicore planning policy lies in generating a mutual relationship of interdependence between the various centers, through the generation of complementary and not overlapping actions. As Os is the gate to the northern Europe, it has many stories to tell. From this point, it’s necessary to give it the tools to do it. The insertion of a creative industry such as film industry in the strategic site is the starter for activating new synergies and opportunities, cultural and economic, the flywheel through which activate the territorial network of relationships and initiatives necessary for the growth of the town.

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Os Osøyro

Special mention PG406 | Limelight


lysekloster

gallery oz town hall

waterfront

waterfront

oselvar rental

archeological finds

os church

os river

wagon hall/ old station

archeological cinema finds

film academy

nast oselvar workshop

temporary market

restaurants

oselvar rental panoramic path

Natural path

oseana oseana culture culture center center

Cultural Path

Commercial path

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cinema

oselvar workshop shopping


This project works on two levels: an infrastructural system of paths and a new set of programs. Cultural, natural and commercial paths highlight the most important aspects of the town. The project recognizes that Os already has an identity – the shoreline – and proposes 5 projects along the shore: An outdoor swimming pool, a canopy bridge – a public space above the water, a cinema house in the existing centre, three housing projects on site, a film academy and a waterfront. The project proposes the implementation of something new in the existing context to generate a desire for a new generation wanting to live in Os. Plans are rational, and the project is beautifully presented.

The project suggests a transformation of Osøyro into a hub for the film industry by introducing a film academy and organizing an annual film festival. The jury believes connecting Os to an emerging creative industry through a new educational institution and events could have relevance, but find the particular choice of film not fully convincing. Still, the project plays with the notion of bringing a somewhat alien object into the town of Osøyro, which could act as a positive attractor. This move distinguishes this project from other entries. The jury also appreciates the plan that shows a series of additional surgical approaches across the town centre: small scale interventions which build upon readings of the existing spatial fabric, identity and other qualities, such as a proposal for a commercial bridge and the retrofitting of an existing old building into a cinema complex.

Special mention PG406 | Limelight

Jury assessment

ULTRA Architettura is a Rome based firm arising from the partnership of Emanuela Ortolani, Michela Via Giulio Bernaschi 22 Romano and David Vecchi. Frascati, Roma 00044 In 2014 Emilia Rosmini joins t: + 39 06 942 40 15 the team as a partner. m: + 39 349 64 79 854 The studio have been info@ultraarchitettura.com participating in several competitions, gaining awards and mentions, such the first prize in Europan 12, taking part in national and international exhibitions. Also collaborations with some international architectural firms – such as Bak Gordon Arquitectos in Lisbon and Guillermo Vazquez Consuegra in Seville - have led to several working periods abroad. In the end, the studio supports the design process also with intensive academic research through two PhD at Sapienza University of Rome on issues related to the architectural and urban composition. Collaborators: Elisa Cecchini and Nicola Donati

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Os Osøyro

ULTRA Architettura


St a 108


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Forus

van ger


Team Stavanger The municipality of Stavanger

The municipality of Sola

Grete Kvinnesland Head of Development

Ståle Undheim, Head of City Planning

Fieke Verschueren Project manager and Urban Designer

Eli Aarskog Monsen Head of Planning Section

Anne Skare Head of City Planning Ingrid Lerang Fossåskaret Architect, City Planning Marit Sletteberg Storli Municipal planning

Stavanger Forus

Ottar Vedelden Architect

The municipality of Sandnes Ole Tonning Architect Forus Næringspark Stein Racin Grødem Managing Director Rogaland County Tom Gyran Adviser, Regional Planning Department

In the heart of the Norwegian petroleum industry, and at the intersection between the municipalities of Stavanger, Sola and Sandnes, lies Forus; Norway’s oil and gas capital and one of the strongest energy clusters in the world. Home to over 3000 companies, mostly from the global energy sector, Forus is the most international place in Norway. Fuelled by the postmillennial expansions of the fossil fuel industry, Forus has been subject to immense growth and is now representing 1/5 of the total Norwegian gross domestic product. This growth, however, has been based on an industry that is facing highly uncertain prospects. The region must therefore prepare for a less oil and gas dependent future and use its knowledge and knowhow as its main commodity. Stavanger municipality owns a site at the

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very epicenter of the new developments at Forus and is currently collaborating with its neighboring municipalities, Sola and Sandnes, on a common municipal plan including a new, public transportation axis across Jæren. With the Europan competition Stavanger wants ideas for how to use their strategic site, as well as the planned, new axis, to pilot a new prototype for urban development in the area. The new east- west connection across Jæren can give way for a less car-based mobility in the region and possibilities for an increased mix of functions and new urban qualities along its public transportation lines. The project site, given its strategic location, should in this respect serve as a case study for how to pilot the new urban developments and thus introduce a new narrative for the region. The task at hand involves working in different scales and with a diverse set of mechanisms blending urban planning, programming, operative and recreational landscapes, infrastructure and communication. We welcome you to participate in shaping the future of Jæren and Forus!

General remarks by the jury

Stavanger Forus

Stavanger was one of the most challenging project sites in Europan 13 in Norway. The different scales of the project, on both regional and local level, combined with the uncertain functions and future of the post-oil society made this task especially loaded. The competitors were asked to envision a new type of urbanity in a vast field of low dense, monofunctional, nonperformative suburban fabric. A new public transport connection in the east west axis of the site is the generator for these new explorations and, together with the decline in the oil sector, the fundament for change. Furthermore, Stavanger municipality wanted ideas on how to use the

project site to pilot a new prototype for urban development in the area. Some competitors proposed large new cities without discussing what to do with the existing context others that suggested more specific functions became uninteresting or weak due to lack of flexibility or were missing a nerve that could create a new start for a new type of urban development. Most housing schemes were not convincing and fell into the trap of becoming social experiments, never responding to questions about whom the first Forus dwellers might be. Other competitors proposed large new cities without discussing what to do with the existing one and proposals that suggested more specific functions became uninteresting or at least weak due to lack of flexibility or were missing a nerve that could create a new start for a new type of city. For the project site, many proposals were introducing laboratories, incubators or other types of business centres, but without a clear operative strategy on a local level. The jury focused on proposals on the project site that were working with flexibility in programs, but also being ambitious on behalf of the publicness, while on the larger, urban scale, landscape strategies and interventions embedded in networks, seemed more appealing and appropriate. In general, bold ideas were considered most useful to bring into the process of further development. The jury was disappointed in the fact that very few participants discussed water as a resource, specifically given the drained lake that used to cover large parts of Forus. Finally, the jury is left with more questions unanswered than answered when it comes to the Forus site. However, we are optimistic about further work for the architects since many more questions needs to be asked and confronted, and many more ideas need to be introduced in the post-oil landscape of Jæren.

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Winner FD970 | Forus LABing

Winner Forus LABing By PLAYstudio Economic innovation cannot be an end in itself but a means to the urban and social innovation. Our goal is to propose a new model of society linked to a new urban model and promoted by a new economic model.

Stavanger Forus

As F. Ascher raises in his Les nouveaux principes de l’urbanisme (2004) we do not propose the construction of a result but a kind of “middle-out” experimental

process, which we call FORUS LAB, where Top-Down and Bottom-Up strategies intermingle. This suggests a horizontal approach, by means of networks, with a wide range of actors-mediators where processes are constantly renegotiated in an exercise that can be more inclusive and diverse in order to make conflicts visible. It is conceived as a comprehensive urban strategy -social, cultural, economic, and environmental- that will run in parallel to the process of change of the economic model in the region (20-30 years). It is structured into three groups of operations linked to 3 phases in time: Phase 1/ Forus Hub -> Phase 2/ Cluster_0 -> Phase 3/ Innovation Axis The production model chosen to encourage innovation is the laboratory, since it allows the intersection between public participation and executive decision.


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Stavanger Forus

Winner FD970 | Forus LABing


Winner FD970 | Forus LABing

LIVE+ WORK TOWER

Hotels

Job-training Company

Research Centers

Established Company

Technology Institutes

Ordinary people

PODS BUILDING

Proof-of-concept Centers

Startups & Entrepreneurs

Coworking Spaces THE FACTORY

Accelerators of Ideas

Incubator of Ideas

LOUNGE HALL

COMBINED ASSEMBLY

Design Centers

Cultural Programs

FOOD COURT + KITCHEN GARDEN

Gastronomy

LIVE+ WORK BLOCK

Pharmacies

Retailers

Grocery Shops

Stavanger Symphony Orchestra

Rogaland Music Stavanger School Organizations of Music and Arts in Norway

-

Urban Sjofront

Bjergsted Culture Park

BandOrg

Rogaland Training and Education Centre

Absinthen Stavanger's cultural centre

1B1 Studio 17 Erfjordgt.8

Kunsthall Stavanger

DNB Arena CENSE Sustainable Energy Solutions

Stavanger Forum

Centre for IP-based E-Clic Rogaland Service Innovation National IOR Centre of Norway

Stavanger Forus

François Ascher´s New Principles of Urbanism: 1_Developping and managing projects in an uncertain context. Strategic Urban Stavanger Management: heuristic,Schlumberger iterative, incremental and recurrent.Research Center 2_Putting the goals against media, encouraging public and private stakeholders by means of new types of project formulations and regulations. 3_Integrating new models of results. Solutions are no longer unique nor monofunctional but integrate the new models of productivity and management, contributions by the Quality Airport organizational sciences and ICTs. Stavanger Scandic Stavanger Airport

Innovation Dock

Mess & Order

The edible Stavanger east

Rogaland Kunstsenter Opdahl Gallery Max Gouchan

Stavanger Stavanger Helseforskning Art Museum Christopher Jonassen John Øivind Eggesbø, Innovation Park Stavanger Power Cluster Rogaland Research

Skretting Aquaculture Research Centre

International Research Institute of Stavanger

Jatta Sports

Norengros Kjosavik F12 Gallery

Well Innovation

Ditt Pharmacy Scandic Stavanger Forus Teknologisk Institutt

Boots apotek Sola

Forus Leilighetshotell

Economic innovation can not be an end in itself but a means to the urban and social innovation. Our Kvadrat goal is to propose a new model of society linked to a new urban model and promoted by a new economic model. Thon Hotel Sandness

we do not propose the construction of a result but a kind of "middle-out" experimental process, which we call FORUS LAB, where Top-Down and

As F. Ascher raises in his Les nouveaux principes de l'urbanisme (2004)

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Innovation Assets

Physical Assets

Networking Assets

Innovation Ecosystem

Phase 1 / Forus Hub / Project Site


Winner FD970 | Forus LABing vel kommen

Matadero (Madrid)

Lincoln Center Plaza (New York)

Rockefeller Center’s Rink (New York)

1/750 10m

25m

50m

Reappropriation of existing facilities:

New constructions:

Current main building becomes… the main building where BIG ideas are tested THE and scrutinized. FACTORY PODS BUILDING

Bryan Park (New York)

working, meeting, presenting, learning, getting to know… let’s say warming up.

Current main storage + shelter + sand and salt stock become… COMBINED an enormous and partitionable space for art, design and culture able to host events, ASSEMBLY exhibitions, performances… Current garage and waste management building become… FOOD COURT organic and ecologic restaurants that conceive food as an identity generator particularly + KITCHEN within this region’s context. The GARDEN kitchen-garden on its roof contributes to transparentize the food management process and to raise awareness on it.

LOUNGE HALL LIVE+ WORK TOWER

LIVE+ WORK BLOCK

Management strategy (economic assets)_phase 1.1.

an “in-between” space where to move around, meet, chat, enjoy unexpected activities, having a coffee, relax, have a nap… and to play and work. workshops, apartments… Access corridors are all facing south and are wide enough to promote encounters and exchanges. These become the places where playing or working together becomes a daily fact. a necessary urban piece to create urbanity and bring at the same time neighborhood amenities that provide important support services to residents and workers.

We propose a pictogram of different innovation drivers, innovation cultivators and neighborhood-building

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Stavanger Forus

0


Winner FD970 | Forus LABing

Phase 1 Forus Hub / Project Site

PHYSICAL ASSETS: Design Strategy I_Innovation Palaces (phase 1.2.1):

Innovation Hub The Project Site is conceived as an Innovation Hub where suitable conditions are set for the various actors, institutions, companies, associations, etc. (local, national or international) to exchange information and knowledge, generating creative and innovative synergies. In this regard, we reference Pete Engardio’s triplet in his definition of an Innovation Ecosystem: physical assets / economic assets / networking assets. In short, it is essential for the creation of these synergies (networking assets) to work simultaneously on both the design of private and public spaces of architectural quality and the management of programs and agencies operating in the environment as well as new policies that encourage these dynamics. For this reason, we propose two strategies: a design strategy (physical assets) and a management strategy (economic assets).

available space: 12180 m3

available space: 17228 m3 available space: 18258 m3

available space: 6730 m3

1961-63_Fun Palace - Cedric Price

Reappropriation

III_Plug-In Towers (phase 1.2.3): Towers III_Plug-In

IV_Well-tempered Environment (phase 1.2.4): (phase 1.2.4):

(phase 1.2.3):

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21

20 19

18 17

16

45 dwellings/ha (Hammarby)

m² 2

Du/Ha= 0

2

Du/Ha= 45 1965_The environment bubble - F. Dallegret

1964_Plug-In City - Peter Cook

Climatic Comfort

Stavanger Forus

Density & Compactness

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Sustainability Repr


BOULEVARD

PASSAGE

Urban laboratory: ECONOMIC INNOVATION -> URBAN INNOVATION -> SOCIAL INNOVATION

GROVE

SQUARE

MAIN STREET

PLAZA

BIKE PARKING

POND 1972_A Journey from A to B - Superstudio

Flexibility

The “supersurface” is conceived as a continuous surface on the

Management strategy (economic assets)_phase 1.1. We propose a pictogram of different innovation drivers, innovation cultivators and neighbourhood-building amenities with ability to operate in the area. The types of actions and partnerships can and should vary in time and be coordinated by the Forus Hub Agency, whose mission will be to communicate, mediate, connect, provide, program and design. It will be a space where intertwining visions and efforts will converge to create an urban fabric more alive than ever before. On the other hand, the municipalities of Sandnes, Sola and particularly Stavanger shall establish a series of incentives and favourable conditions for the introduction of all these agents in the early years. In this regard and as a first step in this phase, we propose to initiate a process of participation among the agents shown in the pictogram to determine potential future situations for the Forus Hub.

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The results of the Forus Hub test in a first phase define not only the exporting guidelines of an economic model but above all, of an urban model. Its design allows, on the other hand, not only testing programs and initiatives but also spatial and building typologies as well as public spaces (the street, the square, the park, the pond ...) Indeed in this new scale the previous triplet can become another one using the following logic: urban innovation / economic innovation / social innovation. We are interested, therefore, in a new economic model that relies on a new urban model with a new, more inclusive social fabric and not strictly linked to a typical innovation district. For this reason, we propose that other groups such as immigrants, students, families with children, etc. are represented here. The Cluster_0 (strategic site) will be the pilot area where to complete the experiment of a new urban identity associated with Forus Lab. In a second phase, this experiment is used (+1)_“Post-Oil” Structure (phase (phase 1.2.5): 1.2.5):

1963 - Schattenberg Castle - H. Hollein

Sustainability Representativeness

Stavanger Forus

CORNER

TERRACES HALL

CORNER

Winner FD970 | Forus LABing

Phase 2 Cluster_0 / Strategic site

II_“Supersurface” (phase 1.2.2):


Winner FD970 | Forus LABing Stavanger Forus

to determine the patterns of progressive colonization of the territory. The only condition is that each and every one of the interventions over time consists of 3 parts that happen together: a characteristic public space, a building that is a catalyst of activity and a set of associated initiatives, uses and programmes. The number of possible combinations of these three parts exceeds our understanding. For this reason, we prefer to visualize a more strategic situation where Forus Lab is an open model rather than a predetermined urbanism. Phase 3 Innovation Axis / Conurbation

in the urban context in consolidating the Forus_Hub and Cluster_0 should serve as a valid knowledge to establish the basis of the progressive development of the conurbation from the determination of different clusters with their respective hubs, facilities, public spaces, residential buildings ... as well as with their “post-oil” new structures capable of expressing future values through images of their own historical me¬mory. Thus, this new “indirect” and undetermined urbanism becomes a model for the consolidation of the entire conurbation while its productive model changes and the sea dismantles its structures to make way for “Another city for another life.”

The last phase is seen as a logical consequence of the LABORATIZATION process in previous phases. The lessons learned

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The project brings forward ideas that are appropriate for the discussion of the project site, the larger Forus area and the region. The competitors are not proposing a final result, but a process linked to a comprehensive new urban model based on participation of many actors, considering social, cultural, economic and environmental development. The process is referred to as a “middle-out” experimental process where public participation and executive decisions intermingle in the laboratory – the Foruslab. The pilot plot as a testing ground is described in a multilayered design strategy that illustrates both reappropriation of existing structures, the use of the plot as a supersurface, and implementation of new structures. On a conurban level the project proposes clusters along an innovation axis, visually linked throughout the landscape with the use of large identifiable post-oil structures.

The jury believes that the Laboratory is an interesting process-based design management approach, whether it is a physical laboratory as shown, or not. The architects show great understanding of the complexity of the task, and all the three levels of the project – the project site, the area and the region – are interesting and thoughtfully represented. The jury is impressed with the amount of ideas and richness in the proposal, the references in relation to the academic framework and the analysis of the Forus site. The strategy on area level focuses on nodes, identified in crossings and corners, and propose reuse of vacant spaces along the new east–west axis. The jury believes this could become an operative principle for Forus. The idea that each node is marked with large-scale infrastructural icons taken from disused oil rigs makes the project also a territorial strategy that operates on the level of the landscape.

Winner FD970 | Forus LABing

Jury assessment

PLAYstudio

PLAYstudio’s team for this project: Principals of PLAYstudio: Iván Capdevila + Vicente Iborra (architects) Collaborators: Jose Antonio Gras Íñigo (architect) Simona Miron (architect)

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Stavanger Forus

Ivan Capdevila and Vicente Iborra, www.playstudio.es professors at to@playstudio.es the University of + 34 965 923 392 Alicante today, Plaza Calvo Sotelo 3 8A since 2003 live, 03001 Alicante work, study, research and teach in places as Spain, UK, Austria, Norway, Korea, Mexico, Belarus … Since 2005 they have summed up a dozen of international awards in architecture competitions. They understand professional practice, teaching and research as a put into action of design as a political tool, driven by a cheerful and playful thinking, describing the ”as found” Reality as its context and understanding culture as its main source of inspiration. This approach defines the concept of urban sustainability behind their research project ‘More Than Green’ (www.morethangreen.es/en) as well as other collective educational experiences aimed at children.


Stavanger Forus

Runner-up ER756 | Rise of Nature


Runner-up ER756 | Rise of Nature

Runner-up Rise of Nature By Dace Gurecka

Urban axis and green axis The Urban Axis (North-South) is man-made with highway and railway, The Green Axis (West-East) is based in nature with walkable and bike-able local network, canals and forests. The first one is the commercial backbone, the second is responsible for recreational, environmental programs of the region. The project intents to strengthen these two identities of the axis

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as unique and attractive elements, basing their characters on the resources these structures embodies. Urban axis Until the recent years, Stavanger region has been developing as a 13 km long linear city in-between two poles - Stavanger centre and Sandnes centre. One can see that settlements with a density above 1000 inhabitants per km2 are located only within this relatively coherent NorthSouth urban axis. Within the future plans of development this axis is planned to be further densified and integrated with High Speed bike lane, “BusWay 2020” frequent bus network and railway line. Moreover, this corridor is location of majority of regions commercial clusters and shopping malls, museums and biggest schools.

Stavanger Forus

Jæren region is not a structured by centres and peripheries but by axis or lines. Similarly as a classical roman city which was structured by two main axis – “Decumanus Maximus” and “Cardo Maximus”, also Jæren regions key structure is its two axis which forms the main potential for structure’s integration with surroundings and future developments and transformations.


Runner-up ER756 | Rise of Nature

SL

CULTURAL LANDSCAPE HERI

AGRICULTURAL FIELDS

SOLA CITY CENTER BELT OF GARDENS

SKANDBERG CHECKERBOA LANDSCAPE SOLA AIRPORT FIELD LANDSCAPE

Stavanger Forus

North-South urban corridor clearly embodies infrastructural and morphological resources for a dense settlement structure with fast mobility – it is the “Urban Axis” of the region. Green axis By establishing a new regional mobility project BusWay 2020, a new 9 km long West-East spatial structure is introduced in the region. This West-East axis is slower in its speed of mobility, its structure is dominated by landscapes and agricultural fields, low density housing communities, forming a completely different experience than the North-South Urban Axis. The identity of East-West vector is embedded in its resource as a conurban structure, marked by agricultural fields, rural network, green infrastructure, local facilities, farmers markets, basic amenities and

services, walkable network, agro based production, clean technologies, historical landscape and housing with high landscape qualities. West-East line carries ingredients to be the “Green Axis” of the region. Six parks, fifty forests and fields The new protagonists The project proposal for the Green Axis consists of Six Park structures, Fifty Forests & Fields that are both bound together by new regional mobility axis of BusWay 2020. Together they form a basis for the future of the Green Axis based in nature, clean technologies, agriculture, rural tourism and recreation.

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Runner-up ER756 | Rise of Nature

LOW PATHWAY NETWORK

ITAGE

FORUS - INTEGRATED LANDSCAPE

FORUS HIPPODROME - CARPET OF SPORT LANDSCAPES

GAUSEL - NETWORK LANDSCAPE

RURAL SETTLEMENTS

GARD E

Each of the six park settlements is structured around a unique organization of landscape as its central element:

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1. Gausel - Network Landscape Consists of eight green streets leading to the Gands Fjord and 3 perpendicular streets as recreational platforms. The added built program consists of orangeries, which support local flora and fauna. Streets activate the main transport points of Gausel station. 2. Forus Hippodrome Carpet of Sport Landscapes Following the programmatic hippodrome legacy, the park consists of green landscape carpet plateau where multiple sport and recreation functions can find its location. 3. Forus - Integrated Landscape Landscape is created through one big dominant element, the central park of the extremely high trees. As the industrial

Stavanger Forus

Six parks Six Parks creates artificial iconographic landscape types, which form basis for multipolar settlement structure, and offers platform for a different ways how densities are structures. Parks outline various development areas, each with their unique programmatic and spatial identities, public spaces, relationship to the new mobility, potential for housing development and their own local sub centralities. The proposal refuses an idea of a continuous linear peri-urbanity. The park systems is a tool to re-densify specific fragments that show urban potential but are in a need of a more clear settlement definition.


Runner-up ER756 | Rise of Nature Ground Level Plan Introverted core buildings and contextural open spaces with pavilions.

territory is experienced as series of vast open spaces, large distances between buildings, then the landscape offers an enclosed, intimate spatial experience. 4. Skandberg Checkerboard Landscape Open patches forms diverse landscape types for different uses and typologies of housing.

Stavanger Forus

5. Sola city centre - Belt of Gardens Historical core of the city is densified and reconstructed forming urban structure with squares and streets, while a ring of gardens hosting schools, hospital, town hall and other social and civic infrastructure objects, composes the border of the dense zone. 6. Sola Airport - Field Landscape Airport forms a composition field of lights and trees that act as a landscape art object. Diverse park structures offers multiplicity of options for habitation. Sola - living one leg in dense city and one leg in gardens. Sandbergs – community living around

different patches of small parks. Forus Hippodrome - living within a close proximity to sport facilities, etc. Regional level landscape strategy Fifty Forests and Agriculture Fields are responsible for a regional level landscape strategy. They form an interconnected and interweaved regional landscape connecting Sola Bay with the Gand Fjord and Hafrsfjorden. The regional level landscape strategy preserves and connects existing agricultural fields, small rural settlement structures, specific cultural landscape heritage sites (like Domsteinane), the slow network of local green pathways, the existing scenery of the landscape and the main mountains and forests. Intervention in this level of landscape in proposed only though extremely small design or architecture gestures - a set of circular swings as a perfect viewpoint for mountain landscape or extension of the small local pathway to connect with one of the park settlement structures. The extremely big is supported by extremely small.

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Rise of Nature puts emphasis on the regional scale and how to position Forus in this context. The project proposes to articulate a clear distinction between the north-south axis and the east-west axis. The north-south axis, called the urban axis, is to be densified and planned as such, while development along the east-west or green axis is dominated by slow processes, agriculture and greenery. The two axes have different experiential qualities which are expressed through the introduction of six parks with distinct identities and regional importance using smaller, ephemeral elements and interventions. The strength of the proposal lies in its extension of the territory of the site and its understanding of the plot as a part of a larger

regional strategy which seems viable independent of any other future development of the Forus site. ‘Rise of Nature’ shifts the focus away from traditional development towards careful cultivation and definitions of existing qualities. Whilst suggestions for regional and urban scale pose interesting and critical questions for the overall development of Forus, the illustrated solution for the project site comes across as formalistic and almost contradictory to the rest of the overall ideas discussed in the project. The jury finds the idea of defining multipolar existing settlements in parks interesting, but is not convinced this will lead to a better or more sustainable future for Forus. An intriguing aspect of the project is that it is extremely realistic and utopian at the same time.

Runner-up ER756 | Rise of Nature

Jury assessment

Dace Gurecka is a Latvian architect. A graduate of dacegurecka@gmail.com architecture with distinction from Delft University of Technologies (2011) and Megacity post-graduate research program at the Strelka Institute (2012). In her career, Dace worked on architectural and urbanism projects as well as editorial and research projects. She is particularly interest in architectural production processes through their underpinning political dimensions. For the last 2 years Dace works at Sleth architecture and planning office in Aarhus, Denmark.

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Stavanger Forus

Dace Gurecka


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Stavanger Forus

Special mention EY767 | Indigo


Special mention EY767 | Indigo

By Acha Zaballa Arquitectos / Miguel Zaballa

compatible uses. This provocative vision is related with the force of identity. With the possibilities that recycling brings. With the return time of investments and the dimension of the ecological footprint of buildings. With the collective intelligence and social resilience capable to adapt to deep changes. It brings together the identity, the building technology and the logic of stacking up (foundation / soil occupation).

The aim is to build a grid of spaces where promote the “something to do� and limit the kilometres of falsely urbanized streets that only serve for car circulation use.

The introduction of nature component facilitates the recovery by the community of the spaces from where it was excluded by the predominance of the non-human scale.

Draw back urban sprawl Retract urbanized surfaces in Forus Restore natural landscape in the crossing of the municipalities Preserve surrounding farmland Establish partnerships to share resources and facilities in new hybrid models Preserve local identity The oil platform is seen as the symbol of identity that deserves to be recycled under a different way, as a hybrid model with

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The Central Plant occupation will bring the ideas, the community engagement and will refresh the simple concepts that make a city development well oriented to obtain an inclusive and equitable outcome. Some of the objective parameters are density, compactness and complexity of uses = opportunities to meet. Other subjective parameters must be defined

Stavanger Forus

Special mention Indigo


Special mention EY767 | Indigo Stavanger Forus

Jury assessment The jury describes Indigo as a manifesto project that deals with the reuse of existing landscape and resources. The resources are defined both as technology / knowhow, and natural and human resources. The project is concerned with a development strategy where reducing and redefining are tools to create a sustainable environment and less urban sprawl. The authors believe in a diversification of industries and functions, but suggest that they be clustered in high density nodes leaving more landscape

undeveloped. This creates an opportunity to re-naturalize larger landscapes such as the drained lake upon parts of which Forus was initially built. Key to the project, and suggested as a first step in the reconsidering of Forus, is the set-up of a ‘Central plant’ meant to function as an open forum for discussions on future urbanism through participatory processes. Indigo tells its story through a narrative where natural resources are being

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www.achazaballa.com achazaballa.blogspot.com @achazaballa estudio@achazaballa.com + 34 944 725 734 c/Sotera de la Mier nº8 48920 Portugalete (Bizkaia) Spain

Miguel Zaballa (Architect from ETSASS in 2005) is principal architect in ACHA ZABALLA ARQUITECTOS in association with Cristina Acha since 2006. Some of their notable projects are the Hotel in Herrera del Duque; Mine Tunnels in Castro; Fronton in Armintza; a 70 dwellings building in Huesca; the MORE-house. They have won several awards in diverse international/national ideas competition:

Mention Square in Orkoien; 3rd prize Baltic Sea Art Park in Pärnu, Estonia; SHORTLISTED Liesma Hotel, Latvia; 1rst prize Hotel in Herrera del Duque, Spain; 2nd prize Square in Urretxu; 3rd prize BCC San Sebastian; 1rst prize Ocharan area in Castro; 2nd PRIZE Bake-Eder in Getxo; MENTION Hotel in Olivenza; 1rst prize 58 vpo in Huesca; 2nd prize Square in Arnedo; 2nd prize INTECO Spain; 2nd PRIZE Armintza area

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Stavanger Forus

Acha Zaballa Arquitectos

Special mention EY767 | Indigo

recovered. This is emblematic in the powerfully illustrated story about “the lost lake” which is potentially a very strong driver of change but could have been brought into focus and discussed more rigorously since its imagery presents a much more interesting proposition than many of the more literal reuses of post-petroleum-age. The jury also believes that the image of the lost lake is a much more interesting provocation than the images of the literal reuse of post-petroleum structure or the less attractive central plant. The jury believes that “the lost lake” can create a landscape of change in Jæren.


Europan is an idea competition bringing together European cities and young urban and architectural design professionals. The competition spans over a two-year period in which over 50 European cities and over 2000 teams are involved. The entries are judged by national juries composed of specialists in the field of architecture and urbanism.

About Europan

The competition serves a dual purpose: it offers cities and developers new and innovative solutions to local urban planning and development, and provides an opportunity for young architects to get commissions by presenting new ideas. These two functions combined create a platform for ongoing debate and research on the spatial framework of the European society. For further information, please visit www.europan-europe.eu or www.europan.no

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Europan Norway Secretariat Øystein Rø M.Arch.MNAL Espen Røyseland M.Arch.MNAL

Europan Norway Board Knut Eirik Dahl President of the Board Marianne Skjulhaug Vice President of the Board

Fredrikke Frølich M.Arch.MNAL, Secretary assistant Margrethe Bjone Engelien Stud.Arch, Secretary Assistant

Markus Schwai Representative for Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art Tor Inge Hjemdal Representative for National Association of Norwegian Architects

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Morten Ednes Representative for Norwegian Centre for Design, Architecture and Built Environment Elisabeth Ulrika Sjødahl Representative for Oslo School of Architecture and Design Héctor Piña Barrios Representative for Bergen School of Architecture Ola Bettum Representative of Norwegian University of Life Sciences


Europan Norway is a non-profit foundation organising the Europan competition in Norway.

About Europan Norway

The Europan Norway board consists of representatives from Bergen School of Architecture, Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norwegian Centre for Design, Architecture and Built Environment, National Association of Norwegian Architects and Norwegian University of Life Sciences. The secretariat is managed by Transborder Studio.

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y wa o r by N n p a r te d ro o Eu u p p s is

y s/ er d b r t n r te a o P pp su

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Imprint Production Europan Norway Gøteborggata 27 b 0566 Oslo Norway post@europan.no +47 24 20 11 47

www.europan-europe.eu www.europan.no

Editors Øystein Rø Espen Røyseland Fredrikke Frølich

Design arianespanier.com Ariane Spanier Stephie Becker

Printing Zoom Grafisk AS

ISBN 978-82-92960-06-6

© 2015 Europan Norway


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Europan 13 - Book of results - Norway  
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