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euroberge :: issue 3

In This Issue: -Driving the new Audi Q5 -Spring Cleaning Tips -Tire Buying Guide -Look into NASA ...and MUCH more!

Euroberge


euroberge :: issue 3

Vehicle: 2007 Audi RS4 Owner: Pearl Mattox and Matt Collins Professionally Maintained by: 3Zero3 Motorsports Detail Work: M&M Auto Reconditioning Photos: Mike Selander


Issue 3

euroberge :: issue 3

Spring 2009

Inside: Racing: Colorado Style page 4

Staff and contributers While he might be a self-proclaimed car nut, Richardʼs true passion includes under-water basket weaving and making glasses for the blind. On his spare time, he can be found at local coffee shops sampling the many different drinks.

Summer shoes page 7

Mike Selander is a man of few words. This is not because of shyness, but merely the fact that he was raised by a group of traveling mimes. When not taking pictures of random cars, Mike is sleeping.

Volvo XC60 unveiling page 11

Starting his writing career with “Home and Garden,” the resident hippie known as Aaron Crooks found his true calling when he stumbled into the EB offices and never left. With his cot set up in the corner, he is still not on payroll.

Taking off with NASA page 19

This local ginger child, known for terrorizing the local streets in his “Turbo Tomato,” can usually be found behind the lens of his camera. When not playing photographer, Erik Melander can found sampling the local water

Spring cleaning page 21

With his wasabi-powered GTI race car, Ian Coleʼs past times include car aerobatics and running over Miatas in his RV. When not found on the track or on his way to the track, Ian can be found planning his next trip to the track.

First Look: Audi Q5 page 25

Obsessive can not describe Justin Blackburn when it comes to the detail work done on vehicles. Known for starting a detail over because of dust, this local detailer will soon be the proud owner of the first clean-room-garage.

playing with light page 29

What more can be said about Aaron Blair than what has been said so far. Jump Pants as he is known has only been spotted in slacks once in his life. A man of few words, one will always know when he is around by the “swish swish”

Bio Photo Credits In order: Richard Melick, Erik Melander, Robin Gardner, Richard Melick, Ian Cole, Ronnie Renaldi, Erik Melander EuroBerge, LLC. in no way is associated with outside companies we discuss. We have no affiliation or contract with any of the companies mentioned. EuroBerge, LLC. is a self sustained company by its members, not by an outside source.


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Spring Awakening It始s finally spring time in our fair state and its time for all of our beloved projects to rise from the proverbial dead. Dust off those summer wheels, clean up those engine bays, and get those suspensions ready. Once CDOT finally cleans up the sand box that we all use as streets, the time will be right to hit the road, go to shows, and make some rounds on the track. But I can始t say the pace is going to be any different than the winter with all the events that are out there. That is that amazing thing about the European automotive scene in Colorado. Even with the cold weather and snowy parking lots, we all still found some way to get together and have some fun. Be it with a local club at a small weekly, ice racing in the mountains, or the large multi-club get together, there were countless activities to partake in over the winter. So what exactly do we have to look forward to this summer? Well, looking at the calendar for the upcoming months, I can only promise there will be something new to do almost every weekend. What makes this summer anymore special than last? Well, for the racers in all of us, the opening of High Planes Raceway is pretty big. With a full schedule mixed between NASA and SCCA, HPR promises to have some great races for all who attend. Then there are the local autocross events and schools for everyone to come out and learn new driving techniques.

These race events also give you that chance to go out and push your car to the limits legally. Then there are the numerous shows in and around our state. Starting it off right is the CU Car Show on April 18th, and from there it just gets busy for the VW fans in all of us with Volkswagens on the Green on May 17th. For those of us who love to cruise at night, there is the Summer Solstice Mid-Night Drive, which has always proven to be a great time. In surrounding states, we have WusteFest in Las Vegas from June 5th to the 7th, and the weekend following Nebraska is hosting its show DubCenter on June 14th. And for all the Porsche lover in us all, the Porsche Club of America is hosting its 54th annual drive in Keystone from June 29th to July 4th. And all those events are just the scratching the surface. We will also be releasing an interactive calendar on our website in the next month to help you plan out all your future weekends. So, with that information in mind, I hope to see you all out at these events. These events are all family friendly and provide a great opportunity for everyone to have a fun, inexpensive weekend out with old and new friends. Be sure to look for the EuroBerge staff wandering around, and come up to us and let us know what you think.

Richard Melick Editor-in-Chief richard.melick@euroberge.com


Racing:

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Colorado Style

Article and Photography by Erik Melander Many who make it up the I-70 interstate corridor during the winter season, admit theyʼll run into some harsh weather conditions that could be extremely difficult to keep their vehicle on the road. Snow packed roads and frozen ice patches are common on any given day in Coloradoʼs high country, and could have drivers completely white-knuckled, desperately clasping to the steering wheel. To remove the anxiety and prayers to miss the guard rail, experience shows to be the best solution. But where is a good controlled area to practice? And whereʼs a location that will have snow and ice untouched by CDOTʼs finest snow plows? Enter in Georgetown Lake; some 40 miles west of Denver right off I-70. At 8,512 feet of elevation, this snow-melt reservoir freezes over as early as November. Solid ice thickness can range from 14” – 24”+; enough strength to hold up several vehicles in the same confined space without

cracking. The lake makes a perfect ʻfrozen skid padʼ which allows the Rocky Mountain BMW Club to set-up a technical ice course for 25 participants. To begin the day, participants were warmed with a classic egg breakfast buffet at Raven Hill Mining Restaurant in historic Georgetown for registration. Paul Schultz, chairman of the event, went over rules for the day, introduced fellow coordinating staff, and fielded safety questions from the group. On site at the shore bank, the cone course was described and pointed out on the northern half of the lake. The objective of the course is similar to auto-crossing where the fastest time takes home bragging rights, however there are some provisions. Drivers pass through the marked course with cone gates; if a cone is hit or knocked over, driver must stop the vehicle get out and reset. If the cone is not reset, the run is disqualified. At the end of the course, the driver must stop in a designated stop-box; if


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the vehicle comes to rest outside the stop-box, a 5second penalty is added. Practice was allowed through the morning to ramp up for the scored and time runs during the early afternoon. A rotation of three cars, two on-course and one in the start gate, was observed to allow instructors or experienced drivers to provide assistance and tips to newcomers. While awaiting course test runs, the other drivers were allowed to tackle the skid pad and the snow drag strip that ran parallel to the embankment. Drivers were encouraged to test limits with and without their vehicles traction control / stability program to know how their specific vehicle reacts. The field of vehicles included several different BMW models and generations, spanning from the E30 / E36 / E46 3-series coupes and sedans, E34 / E39 5series sedans, to the even larger X5. The BMW club was very respectful and welcomed members who brought outside vehicles; an Audi All-Road and a few Japanese FWD sedans / wagons made their way around course. Similar with the variety of entries, tire packages ranged from standard OEM supplied all-seasons to freshly installed studded snow tires. For scoring and timing on the course, classes were broken down based on tire choice: non-stud, studded, 4WD non-studded, and 4WD studded. The RM BMW club started the ice races several years back, and has been running on the lake consecutively every year since the mid 1980始s. The only thing that stops this event is the weather; not by excessive snow or sub-zero cold, but warmth. In 2006, city officials of Georgetown forced cancellation of the event due to unseasonably warm weather in the high country; ice core samples showed the minimum thickness was not present due to the late winter sun and non-freezing temperatures. H ow ever, th i s y e a r 始 s e v e n t definitely had enough ice and snow to share, but only for five handfuls of participants. A waiting list for this event starts in early winter every year, just showing how much driving on Georgetown Lake is anticipated when the chilly weather moves in. -EB


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Contact us at:


Summer Shoes

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Article by Aaron Blair Photography by Aaron Crooks and Mike Selander

Spring is just around the corner, and running snow tires in the heat will eat them up quickly; so it is time to get into some new summer shoes. The question is; where do I start? Tread wear ratings, traction ratings, temperature ratings, consumer ratings, mileage warranties, price, tread compounds, designs, there are too many things to consider! I've been in the tire business a few years now, and I will try to help guide you through the tire buying decision. There are three primary considerations when purchasing new tires: intent, price, and technology. Let's start off with intent. So what do you intend to use the tire for? Doing some road racing or autocross this year? Maybe some spirited canyon driving? Or do you just want a tire that will do fine for everyday driving? Is it going to be used in poor weather? Pure track tires provide optimal dry grip. Minimal or no grooves in the tread maximize lateral traction and grip. They are typically made of a softer compound and designed to stick to dry or warm pavement better than any other tire. In doing so, they sacrifice most or all of any sort of wet, snow, or cold weather

driving capabilities. They also wear extremely quickly when compared to a typical street tire; a by-product of design and use. They are not very useful for any other type of driving. Most track tire users know what they have and what they are looking for, so we'll move on. The other extreme (outside of a snow tire) is an all-season tire. A good all season tire will have 3-5 deep, connected grooves in the tread with countless sipes or slits to provide traction on all types of surfaces in all weather and driving conditions. Most companies utilize directional or asymmetrical tread designs to maximize the tire's ability to evacuate water and navigate snow and slush while maintaining high performance levels on dry pavement. Non-directional tires benefit from being able to be rotated to any position on the car without remounting or flipping the tire. If longevity is a primary concern for your tires, non-directional and non-asymmetrical tires are something to consider despite a shrinking supply of them.


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A tire始s life depends on several factors. First is tire maintenance. Check your air pressure at least once a month. Fluctuating temperatures leads to fluctuating air pressure. Over-inflated and under-inflated tires wear out more quickly and sacrifice performance when compared to properly inflated tires. Rotating your tires every 3-5000 miles is also key to keeping your tires around for as long as possible. Having them rebalanced every 2-4 rotations also helps keep vibrations down, which leads to a more comfortable ride and therefore reduces abnormal tread wear. Secondly, proper vehicle maintenance also extends tire life. When's the last time your car was aligned? Many of us have altered suspensions, and there is only so much we can do to keep the suspension angles at the proper specifications, but at least getting it close can go a long way to keeping your tires from wearing out prematurely. How are your shocks and/or struts? If they are worn out then they are not keeping the tire planted on the road they can cause your tire to cup or feather which results in a bumpy ride, worn out tires, and decreased performance from your tires and vehicle. Another consideration is how long the tire was designed to last from the factory. Every passenger car tire comes with 3 ratings stamped on the sidewall: tread wear, traction, and temperature. One thing to note; these ratings are independent to each tire manufacturer despite being tested on the same track; meaning that a rating of 300 for Bridgestone is not likely be the same as a 300 rating for Michelin. Nonetheless, it will help give a general idea of longevity however, and the higher the number the longer the tire is intended to last. A tire's traction rating is judged on its capability to grip on wet surfaces in a straight line. It does not factor in any sort of cornering or dry performance of any kind. The


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traction test is performed by locking up the tires in a straight line on wet surfaces and measuring their ability to grip at that time. Tires with a higher traction rating generally have a better compound for wet grip, and not necessarily a better tread design. It is measured on an AA, A, B and C scale, with AA being the best result and C the worst. Temperature ratings are the last thing you will see. This indicates the tire's ability to dissipate heat, which is a cause for a tire's demise. Since building speed builds heat, tires are tested to see at what speeds they can still operate at without failing. A is the best, followed by B, and then C. Every tire must have at least a "C" rating, meaning it can handle at least 85 mph. Don't let these ratings be the only factor in what you decide, these numbers do not mean everything; they are just another part to consider. The last main consideration of tire life is how you drive the car. If you hit every corner at high speeds, do e-brake slides and burnouts then you are obviously going to wear tires down. Lets move on to what most of us enthusiasts use our summer tires for: everyday driving with some spirited driving mixed in. These tires may see minimal amounts rain and cooler weather, but not snow (on purpose anyways). This type of tire is a growing category and many manufacturers are expanding their lineups in this area. Here is where one must factor in the other primary considerations: price and technology. There are many different ways that companies get performance out of a tire. Some do it with tread design, some with advanced compounds, and others with a combination of both. But at what price? Do $80 tires really perform as well as $200 tires? Based on my experience, they can for a short while. The first 3-5000 miles of most summer tires give out very good dry performance. The more expensive ones will grip a little better, but most drivers won't notice. Things start to change after that initial period and the expensive tires with more technology separate themselves from the off-brand and cheaper lines. The main differences I personally notice in dealing with tires is how they wear and grip as they age. The $80 tire you might be looking at sure grabs fine initially, but after 7000 miles you can usually notice how the grip is decreasing and the tire isn't wearing very well despite rotations and proper alignment. They tend to show cupping and accelerated wear on the inside and outside edges of the tread. The expensive tires are typically able to maintain the same or similar grip throughout the tread life while wearing much more evenly. The higher-end tires are often made with a silica-based tread compound which provides better water traction and more resistant to losing grip with age and wear. Some


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tires even feature dual-layer tread, in which a second layer of tread is exposed as the first layer peels away to give virtually the same performance throughout the tire's life. Silica-based treads are becoming more mainstream however, so looking for additional technologies is key. LL(long-linked) Carbon, micro-flex tread, and variable contact patch technologies are also being incorporated to enhance certain aspects of how a tire grips, handles, and wears. Bridgestone is incorporating the same technologies used for Formula 1 tires into their highestperforming summer tires. Michelin uses their rally racing technology to help their tires as well. Of course, obtaining tires that are on the leading edge of technology isn't cheap, so you feel it in your wallet, not just on the road. Many of us with modified suspensions wonder if buying better tires is worth the extra cost if we are going to wear them out quicker. To this I answer: of all the modifications you've done to help your car stick to the road, there is still only one thing that touches it, and that is your tires. You've spent thousands on your suspension, so why not maximize your car's capabilities? That is where the price factor comes in. We all have budgets, but keep in mind there is a reason that certain tires do cost more than others. Look around, ask around, and consider all factors first before jumping on a set of tires that might "look like a good deal." Do some research, call some tire sources and talk to experts about what would best suit your requirements. The $80 tire might be all you need. The $200 tire might be worth the extra cost. The last way you want to find out is when your $80 just wasn't enough to make that last corner when the extra money probably would've saved you. Either way, enjoy your new summer rubber! -EB


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elick M d r a h y Ric Ar ticle b ander l e M k i r yE Photos b

In February, word leaked out from a local Volvo enthusiast that Pedersen Volvo in Fort Collins was going to be the location of the first unveiling of the XC60 in Colorado.

When we received the invitation to come to the event, we honestly had no idea what to expect. After doing some in-depth research into the new Volvo, we found out that the vehicle was the newest model to come from the Swedish automaker and promised to be the safest standard-equipped vehicle on the road. We walked into this event, eyeing the two cloth mounds that hid the soon to be unveiled vehicles, not really knowing what to expect when the covers were pulled.


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The event itself was an amazing host of information and fun. With the “Summer of LOV” tour, Volvo was heading across the country to unveil its new pride and joy. Armed with a big rig and crew of dedicated engineers and staff, Pedersen Volvo became the place to be that night. All vehicles were out for display, and the displays inside had the very obvious theme of safety among them. Volvo has taken great pride in its safety records, and with such innovations as the 3-point seat harness, it isn’t surprising to me that Volvo continues to push this image to the public. But, the center of attention was the cloth that covered the vehicles. With the slight breeze blowing in the door, the cloth would lift up ever so slightly, giving a little peak into what was to come. As the night carried on, we all gathered around the vehicle inside for the unveiling. The speakers spoke of the safety innovations promised on this newest Volvo and how they were pushing the boundaries of what was to become standard safety for most cars. They both spoke of the dynamic breaking system called “City Safety”, which uses a closing velocity sensor to initiate breaking if coming upon another object, such as a car or wall. The technology itself is not new to the automotive world. Instead, it is the “standard” that is next to this feature that makes it innovative. One only had to glance around the room at all the anxious faces from the crowd. There were all types of people at the event; from a retired CSU football coach to young couples looking to keep their new family safe. Everyone had the same look of excitement on their face, and each person began to glow as the covers were finally pulled back. At the peak of the


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excitement, the covers were finally pulled back, unveiling the brand new XC60. The bold lines and elegant curves immediately showed that this was not just a miniature XC90. The grille itself has a large prominent badge in the front, almost yelling to all those around a reminder that it was a Volvo. And right next to that badge was the closing velocity sensor, ever so slightly popping through the massive grille. The lights flanking the grill had a dominant feel about them, giving off enough light to ensure that nothing on the road ahead was missed. As the lines continue down the body, one might notice that the car has the feel of elegance. Keeping with the general shape of Volvo, the XC60 quickly distinguishes itself from the rest of the lines with bold curves and dominant edges throughout the exterior. The tail end features massive LED powered brake lights that continue the elegant curves all the way up the body. To miss these big bright lights would be a very difficult task in any sort of conditions. Heading inside the vehicle, the prominent center console helped merge the bold lines of the exterior with the subtle features inside. The dash flowed in elegant, natural lines that were designed to give comfort to all the occupants. The layout of all the controls conveyed simplicity while ensuring that they were all within arms reach at all times. The modern features that were implemented throughout worked well with the classic features common in all Volvos. Amazingly enough, with the title of Volvo’s safest vehicle, the ever-present safety features were well hidden among the various dash and trim. With an amazingly open feel about it, the interior of the new Volvo XC60 is a step in the right direction for the Swedish car manufacturer, implementing modern and classic design into one fluid model.


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Aside from the ability for attendees to climb in and out of the two standing models, Volvo had set up a small demonstration track for everyone to take a stab at testing out the new braking system. When it came to be our turn, hesitation took over as the dominant feeling. One can never be truly comfortable driving towards an obstacle at any rate of speed, but when told not to brake as the vehicle approached the object, any heart rate would shoot up. As the object neared, the vehicle did exactly what was advertised and took control of the brakes, bringing the XC60 to a stop a good foot away from the object in my way. Now, this technology is designed for the average day to day driving on the city streets, hence the name. At speeds less than 19 miles per hour, the XC60 will initiate braking if the vehicle is coming upon an object too fast. At higher rates of speed, the City Safety system is designed as more preemptive than preventive as it will prepare the car to be braked by the driver. While the opportunity was not there to take the vehicle around the block for a good test drive, the team at Pedersen Volvo and from Volvo Group helped to ensure that every attendee had a true feel and understanding of the new XC60. With all the new features of the new XC60, Volvo has presented a great new vehicle to the city driving enthusiasts. -EB


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Article by Ian Cole Photos by Mike Selander

Taking Off with NASA The National Auto Sport Association (NASA) was formed in 1991 to deliver high quality motorsport events to enthusiasts at major racing venues throughout the nation.

NASA has created programs that allow owners of both racecars and high-performance street-driven vehicles to enjoy the full performance capabilities of their cars in a safe and controlled environment. NASA offers many different programs that will allow you to enjoy motorsports on a number of different levels, including our High Performance Driving Events (HPDE), Rally Sport, Time Trial, NASA-X and Competition Racing programs. At the regional level, NASA Rocky Mountain offers HPDE1-4, Time Trials, and the nationally sanctioned Competition Racing programs. The HPDE programs are the starting point for most drivers, beginning with HPDE 1, where only a car (which meets basic safety requirements – good brakes, tires, seat belts, not leaking, etc.) and a helmet are required to participate. At this beginning level, an instructor rides in the passenger seat during all track sessions, which can total anywhere from 120 minutes to 160 minutes over the course of the weekend (depending on location, other run groups, and registrant participation level). In these initial experiences, passing zones are limited to one or two locations on the track and requiring a point-by from the car being overtaken to assure all drivers are aware of their surroundings, minimizing risk. HPDE participants have the opportunity to review the track and rules, driving lines, braking zones, and general car control techniques with instructor-lead group classrooms sessions first thing in the morning. Then, to reinforce the learning experience, drivers attend a “download” session following each on track session to discuss any issues identified by instructors or drivers, review any thoughts, and answer any questions. As experience grows, with instructor sign-off, a driver will progress through the HPDE levels. Starting with HPDE 2 an instructor is no longer required to be present in the car, but the download sessions continue to provide an


euroberge :: issue 3 opportunity to review driving concepts. For those who just want the experience of driving their car on the track, HPDE provides a great opportunity. For those with a more competitive nature, HPDE participation can lead to either Time Trials or Competition Racing.

Time Trials is a competitive form of driving where cars, classed by the type and number of modifications, and drivers compete against others of the same class to run the fastest lap. While the concept is time/driver vs. time/driver, it is just as much about driver/car vs. the track and their ability. Any car is eligible to compete, and in the Rocky Mountain region we have a wide menagerie of vehicles ranging from stock to full-on, race-prepped race cars vying for their class title. For the true adrenaline junky, NASA offers wheel-to-wheel racing! The Rocky Mountain region offers competition in all of the National Classes. For those who do not want to follow a specific rule set, yet want to race in a wheel-to-wheel format, Performance Touring is similar to Time Trials in that your car is classed based on the type and number of modification performed to the car. Unlike Time Trials, however, it is the first to cross the start/finish line that gets the crown! American manufacture enthusiasts can compete in either American Iron or Camaro-Mustang challenge. These series pit popular “ponycars� from Ford, Chevrolet, and Pontiac against one another to compete for the big-bore title. Spec-Miata provides a venue for the Miata lover to compete in a series that employs a thorough rule set to provide a level playing field.


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“For the true adrenaline junky, NASA offers wheel-to-wheel racing!” While not as fast as some of the other series, the ability to “toss” these lighter, nimbler cars around the track provides just as much of an adrenaline rush! For the European car enthusiast, along with the Performance Touring race series, the Rocky Mountain region has Spec-944 and German Touring Sportscar Challenge (GTS). Spec-944 is comprised of the venerable Porsche 944 with the normally aspirated motor. These cars can now be found relatively inexpensive – and a fully prepped, race ready, front running 944 can be built for $6-8K. The Spec rules help keep the competition close, with the regional title being decided in the last race of the last two seasons. In the Rocky Mountain region, Spec-944 is the largest attended series, with over 30 registered competitors. Finally, the GTS Challenge pits the finest cars in the world, those manufactured in Germany, against one another for track supremacy. Any German based platform is eligible, and in the Rocky Mountain region BMWs, Porsches, and VWs compete. Next season promises to debut a couple of Audis as well. These cars can be the fastest on the track – at Nationals only the Super Unlimited class had faster track times. Truly racing at its finest! The 2009 season for NASA Rocky Mountain promises to be one of the finest. In addition to events scheduled at Pueblo, Pikes Peak International Raceway, Motorsports Park Hastings (Nebraska), Hallet (Texas), and newly constructed High Plains Raceway, the region is also playing host to the National Championship, which will be held at the world class facilities at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah in September. Keep track of all the happenings at http://www.nasarockymountain.com. -EB


Spring Cleaning

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Article by Justin Blackburn

Photos by Mike Selander

Finally! If you are like me, you have been waiting all winter for the first opportunity to take your garage queen or daily driver out and get it cleaned for the summer, without fear of it snowing right after you get it finished. This is a common feeling among the Colorado car community, and one I personally look forward to every spring. There is nothing like that first cool spring evening drive when you can actually put your windows down and enjoy the fresh air. I personally love driving past large buildings with reflective windows that provide a moving mirror, allowing me to bask in the beauty of my freshly cleaned car. Colorado's everlasting winters provide our cars with some hurdles that must be jumped to keep our cars looking their best and protected. All too often we deal with rather difficult issues as a result of an owner not taking a little time and simple steps that can prevent costly and annoying damage. I wanted to share with you some of the most common issues and what you can do to avoid being bitten by them:


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Mag Chloride: A chloride (salt) based chemical used to prevent ice formation on roadways. The problem is, if you drive your car in the winter in Colorado, mag chloride will be on your wheels, undercarriage, wheel wells, and exhaust. It can literally eat the paint off of surfaces if not removed in a timely manner, as well as pit wheels due to its high PH level. Washing your car off regularly in the winter, paying special attention to the underside and wheels, will help a lot. But in spring, it is time to clean a little deeper. Remove your wheels and thoroughly clean the wheel wells, suspension, and inside of the wheels with your favorite auto wash. Taking the wheels off also allows you to get the area around the lug bolts. Rinse off everything. We recommend then using a high temperature wax to seal and protect the inside and outside of the wheels as well as the suspension components. This will not only make it look better, but will add to the ease of future summer cleanings and help prevent brake dust build up. Wheel Wax is a great option for this application. Mineral Deposits: When your car gets wet, mineral deposits usually collect in all of the nooks and crannies of the car. Trunk and hood seals, doorjambs, and roof seals are the places that can really drive you crazy. Leaving these rubber and plastic seals untreated can decrease their life expectancy and just looks terrible on an otherwise clean car. When you are washing your car, take your microfiber towel and clean out all of the mineral deposits from all of the sills on your car. Pay special attention to the hard to reach areas like the cowl, door hinge area, fuel door, and trunk. If necessary, use a little auto wash, and then rinse off with a damp towel. If you can, always dry you car with air. A leaf blower works well for those without compressors. Air allows you to really get in those tight areas and prevent the water from leaving behind new mineral deposits. Once everything is dry, treat all of the rubber, plastic, and vinyl seals with water based rubber treatment like Prima's Nero. Not only will they look great, but they will be moisturized and regain their intended pliability.


Interior Care: Even in winter, your interior is subject to extreme UV degradation. Extreme changes in temperature also contribute to cracking and fading of interior finishes. When euroberge :: issue 3 preparing for summer, make sure you moisturize all of your interior finishes with an appropriate leather or vinyl treatment that also has UV protectants. If you are using a water-based product like Prima's Nourish, allow it to sit on the leather for a few minutes before wiping away, and never scrub the surface. You do not want to remove the color from the top of the surface. Paint Protection: The hot and direct Colorado sunlight can really do a number on paint, especially dark colors. After cleaning your car paint, make sure to protect it. Using a wax or sealer will not only make the paint look better, but will provide a layer of protection from light scratching and UV dulling. Read about the product you are using and understand its protection timeframe. Most people think they can actually use a sealer (synthetic) once a year and get good protection from it all year long. I disagree. Most great sealers will usually last about 5-7 months with regular washing. Most natural waxes, like P21S will be consumed by the sun in as little as a month. A good way to test how well your protection is working is to take a glass of water and pour it on your hood immediately after you finish waxing your car in spring. Pay attention to how the water beads. Every few weeks thereafter, do the same thing, and note the difference in how the water beads. When you do not get the same results as the first time after waxing, it is time to wax it again. Sealers and waxes will always give the best look if horizontal surfaces are applied using a hood to trunk motion, and vertical surfaces are applied using an up and down motion. Finally, don't forget about the glass and engine compartments. A good engine degreaser in spring will help remove a winters worth of build up and deposits. Just remember to spray it down while running and slightly warm. Taking these few simple steps will help you get your car looking great for summer and help protect it from the Colorado sun. With your rejuvenated car, I’m sure you will also be looking for that long building with glass windows to check it out in while driving by. -EB


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Article by Richard Melick Photo by Aaron Crooks

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First Look:

Audi Q5 DRIVER

I received a call one evening concerning the arrival of the new Audi Q5 at a Ed Carrol Audi in Fort Collins. Now, I personally have been looking forward to this new Audi since hearing of its development because I knew there would be some potential in it. To say that I walked away from this drive thinking any less would be a lie. Now, let us look at this whole dynamic. I had the keys to the brand new, barely on sale, Audi Q5. My passenger seat was not occupied by the sales manager, but my assistant editor. The look on both our faces was priceless to say the least. As we got pulled out of the dealership, we both knew we were about to have a good time. What can I say about my first impressions other than that I was in a state of shock and awe. I will not deny being a lover of comforts of an Audi, but this new vehicle has taken those comforts to an extreme. With just about two hours to take the baby SUV for a spin, we headed right out onto the busy streets of Friday night Fort Collins. Any of you that have driven in the fair college town will agree when I say the roads could have used some improvement five years ago. Driving down the main street in the Q5 though, those bumps and craters were simply ignored. That is the best way to describe the feeling. It wasn’t an overactive suspension that I have felt in other domestic and import small SUVs, but the vehicle seemed to glide over the road. Instead of having a feeling of driving a small SUV, I felt more as if I was driving a larger sport sedan. This little SUV almost got me in trouble though. As I headed to our first destination above Old Town, I hit some curves on a back road a little more vigorously than I probably should have, but the Q5 just kept begging to be driven like a smaller car. The police officer that we passed probably would not have thought the same, but luckily, he was preoccupied with another driver. With each turn of the wheel, the vehicle changed direction with ease and comfort.


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As we approached the five story parking garage that would become the setting of our impromptu photo shoot, I knew that I was going to have a little fun heading to the top. Rolling around the concrete structure, we could barely hear a whisper of sound from the engine as I gunned it up the ramps. Only when I lowered my windows did we hear the surprisingly powerful V-6 growl. And as with the curvy road, the Q5 handled magnificently going all the way to the top. It was not until we were able to get the vehicle to the top, away from other cars, that the Q5’s real beauty showed. As we set the car up for the shoot, the curves reflected the surrounding buildings and walls with elegance. From front to back, the whole vehicle just had a look of confidence and comfort. I can honestly say that I was immediately in love with this new design from Audi. What really caught my eye was that at every angle, you caught a glimpse of the elegant smooth curves. This is no miniature Q7; this is a whole new beast with its own elements of beauty. I am realizing this has become a love letter of sorts for this new ride, but that is not my goal. When I was given the opportunity to take the Q5 for a spin, I was more interested in seeing its potential. Being compared by some to the new Audi A4 with a taller suspension, I wanted to see if there was going to be a new player in the aftermarket community, or if we would be stuck with stock. In all honesty, the potential is there. With some nice power modifications, such as exhaust and forced induction, and a good suspension upgrade, the Q5 would be transformed from the grocery into a canyon-eating small SUV. -EB


First Look:

euroberge :: issue 3

Audi Q5

PASSENGER


Article and Photo by Aaron Crooks

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When I received my call about the Q5, it was not from a dealership, but from an extremely excited Richard Melick. So amazed at this wonderful opportunity I quickly rearranged my schedule and made myself available for the all-new Audi Q5. When we arrived at Ed Carrol Audi for our test drive, the first thing I remember thinking was “Wow, that’s what a luxury SUV should look like.” It really has a perfect balance of class and rugged power with real ability. Brand new cars seem to have a way of having too much, that it can be a little overwhelming and different for the first drive. Fortunately, the Q5 had all the new toys, but was comforting, its seats held me and gently warmed as I caressed and explored what it had to offer. The interior was simple yet in every way it had “German engineering” written all over it. I could tell this car was packed with intelligent features, as if the Q5 was teasing us with its simple yet sophisticated design. Most of the features are hidden in its main double din LCD screen for ease of use. It felt like I was only able to use a fraction of the whole car in the 2 hours we had to get a feel for it. As we cruised through Old Town I noticed what I was not noticing; I was in an oversized sport sedan and did not feel a single bump, and even with a little spirited driving the suspension held firm and was not as soft as a Buicks trademark marshmallow feel. I also noticed the amount of attention our Deap Sea Blue Pearl Audi was getting from the crowd in Fort Collins. It will clearly be a favorite of the Euro Scene here in Colorado. It’s already aggressive stance begs for classy modifications. I believe that with a few small changes, this SUV would put many an X5 in its place. This new Audi really does have potential to be an all out fire breathing, snow melting SUV, but already comes as the perfect commuter s car for the winter months in Colorado. -EB


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Playing With Light Article and Photography by Mike Selander

There are many characteristics to a good photograph. A well designed image will have proper composition, exposure, depth of field, and most importantly, good lighting. Even the photos with all other aspects in perfect arrangement can be ruined by poor lighting. The most important thing to remember when considering lighting for an automotive photograph is that a car is basically a giant mirror. Everything around you will be reflected in the paint of the car. Some people think that this is a good photographic quality while others prefer the simplistic approach. Either way, keep this in mind. With that out of the way, lighting for your photograph should generally be diffused. This means that the light is spread out in an even pattern as it hits the vehicle. If your light source is really small, such as a single light bulb or the sun, it creates a spot on the car of very bright reflection of the light while the rest of the car is less lit. This creates a specular highlight. For example, reference the two photos on this page. One photo was taken at noon on a bright sunny day. Notice the very bright reflection on the hood. This is very distracting and destroys all of the data that would have been the color of the hood and over-exposes the hood. The next photo was taken in the shadow of a large building. Notice how evenly and aesthetically the light is spread out. Imagine taking a light bulb and putting a sheet of wax paper in front of it. The light is still there, but it is even and the photo retains the color of the paint better. This principle also applies to street or parking garage lights at night. Most parking garages have a lot of small, bright individual lights spread out through the garage. This might be good for finding your car at night, but it does not lend itself to good lighting. The lights cast tons of shadows, specular highlights, and bright spots on the car and make it extremely difficult to retain the color of the paint, lines of the vehicle, or any of the background. -EB


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Daylight: Daylight is one of the hardest times to shoot in. The best time to shoot is the what nature photographers call the “Golden Hour� which is the hour after sunrise and hour before sunset. Remember to shoot with the sun at your back to avoid uneven shadows and an over exposed background. Shade: Shade is one of the best places to shoot in. The lighting is even and the conditions are prime. Just remember to make sure the whole car and sometimes the background is also in shade. If your background is out of the shade, you will most likely end up with an underexposed car and or a blown out (overexposed) background. Cloudy: This is a tough condition because your image can turn out excellent or it can turn out horribly. With thin, entire sky covering clouds the images turn the lighting is very similar to noontime sun, but worse. High contrast and specular highlights are an issue. However, thick clouds covering the sun that leave the rest of the sky open create prime conditions similar to parking the car in shade. Night: Night is the hardest time to make a good image of a car in my opinion. The key is finding a spot without light-post-type lights. Sunset/Sunrise: Sunrise is my favorite time of day to take photos. The sun lights the whole sky, but without any specular highlights. Basically, the whole sky becomes a perfect, even light source. You can setup with any background, any place, right before the sun rises or right after the sun stets behind the mountains and get perfect lighting with some excellent color in the sky. The same holds for sunsets. Look for some cloud patterns and a clear horizon for some good color in the sky. Strobes/Flash: If you look around, everyone has a flash on top of their camera. Flash can be an extremely effective tool when lighting cars if done right. To achieve the right effect, find or make a diffuser to go on your flash. This works best with off-camera flash, but can be done with on-camera systems. I would not recommend using flash without a diffuser as you will get really bad highlights.


Contest Winner: Alex Martinez

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Location: Downtown Denver, Colorado, USA, Earth

Kodak Z712 6mm ISO 64 f2.8 10 Second Exposure


euroberge :: issue 3


euroberge :: issue 3


euroberge :: issue 3

EuroBerge Staff Richard Melick Editor in Chief richard.melick@euroberge.com Mike Selander Photography Editor mike.selander@euroberge.com Aaron Crooks Assistant Editor aaron.crooks@euroberge.com EuroBerge Magazine 1220 15th St. Greeley, CO 80631 www.EuroBerge.com

We at EuroBerge believe that to be successful in the market, we need to be for the people and by the people. We are not out to provide yet another publication telling you what the hottest trends are, who runs the best shop, or what the best mod is for your vehicle. All of that information can be found in the mass produced corporate-owned publications on the shelves of your local book store or supermarket. We will be diligently providing a much more in depth look at all aspects of the Colorado European automotive scene while not focusing on one specific owner, vehicle, club or shop. As we are only a small crew, finding out about all the upcoming events can be difficult, so we ask that you let us know what is coming up. This way, we can get out there and cover it in the best way possible. We have set up an email address for you to send any information you have on these events: events@euroberge.com. If you have an event that you would like to get out the masses, drop us an email as we are willing to work with anyone and helping advertise their events in EuroBerge.

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EuroBerge Issue 3!