Page 1


JOIN THE JUDGEMENT FREE ZONE®

$I0 A MONTH 3333 lorain ave • cleveland, OH 44113 (216) 713-1623 join today in-club or at planetfitness.com

2

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

fully staffed


DISCOUNT T

ON INJECTA ABLES IF SCHEDUL LED BEFORE 4-3 30-1 19 (ne ew pa atie ents s only)

| clevescene.com cclleveessceenee.ccom m | February Feb e ru ruar a y 27 ar 27 - M March arch ar cchh 55,, 20 22019 199

3


&%" -!2 s6/,.O 35

Only at Dedicated to Free Times founder Richard H. Siegel (1935-1993) and Scene founder Richard Kabat

CONTENTS Upfront

Group Publisher Chris Keating

5

Publisher Andrew Zelman

The ACLU targets Bedford’s nuisance ordinance, plus RTA’s big question

Associate Publisher Angela Nagal Editor Vince Grzegorek

Tiffany & Co Roberto Coin

SHOP OUR ONLINE STORE 24/7 tradesy.com/closet/dewittsjewelry and dewittsjewelry.com

Editorial Music Editor Jeff Niesel Senior Writer Sam Allard Staff Writer Brett Zelman Web Editor Laura Morrison Dining Editor Douglas Trattner Visual Arts Writer Dott von Schneider Copy Editor Elaine Cicora Interns Preeya Shankar, Alana Whelan

Feature

Adult nights are keeping Cleveland’s black roller skating culture alive

Advertising Senior Multimedia Account Executive John Crobar, Shayne Rose Multimedia Account Executive Kiara Davis

'ET/UT

Stephan Webster

Business Sales Assistant/Receptionist Megan Stimac Controller Kristy Dotson

Stage

Circulation Circulation Director Don Kriss Euclid Media Group Chief Executive OfďŹ cer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating OfďŹ cers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner VP Digital Services Stacy Volhein Digital Operations Coordinator Jaime Monzon www.euclidmediagroup.com

CLEVELAND’S FINEST SMOKE & VAPE SHOP!

!RT Talking studio chairs

Cleveland Scene 737 Bolivar Rd., #4100 Cleveland, OH 44115 www.clevescene.com Phone 216-241-7550 Retail & ClassiďŹ ed Fax 216-241-6275 Editorial Fax 216-802-7212 E-mail scene@clevescene.com

Film Eat

Cleveland Scene Magazine is published every week by Euclid Media Group.

Copyright The entire contents of Cleveland Scene Magazine are copyright 2018 by Euclid Media Group. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions $150 (1 yr); $80 (6 mos.) Send name, address and zip code with check or money order to the address listed above with the title ‘Attn: Subscription Department’

25 27

How much do restaurants really make on a dish? There’s more than food costs in the equation

Music

33

Talking with Spacehog’s Royston Langdon and Ours’ Jimmy Gnecco in advance of their Beachland show, plus all the concerts you shouldn’t miss

3AVAGE,OVE 248-620-2990

Printed By



Don’t look away from Never Look Away

Cleveland Distribution Scene is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader

Detox Products | Vape Juices Vape Devices | Cigars Hand Painted Creation Rolling Trays Rolling Papers | Wraps Hookah Supplies

23

Witness for the Prosecution ain’t bad, but it sure isn’t shocking anymore

National Advertising Voice Media Group 1-800-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com

VeriďŹ ed Audit Member

AMAZING SELECTION OF GLASS PIPES & ACCESSORIES!



All the best things to do in Cleveland this week

Creative Services Production Manager Steve Miluch Staff Photographer Emanuel Wallace

David Yurman

10



Outer limits

...The story continues at clevescene.com 12120 MADISON AVE.LAKEWOOD 216.801.4343 | ohiopipedreams.com

Talented Touch Studio CLEVELAND’S BEST MASSAGE

Take

SCENE with you with the Issuu app! “Cleveland Scene Magazine�

216-298-4099

www.clevelandsden.com

$10 OFF MASSAGE WITH AD! 5107 DETROIT AVE. | CLEVELAND

4

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

COVER PHOTO BY EMANUEL WALLACE


UPFRONT PLAIN DEALER UNION CONTRACT EXTENDED, BUT LAYOFFS AND OUTSOURCING COULD BEGIN SOON Photo from Scene archives

AS THE PLAIN DEALER NEWS Guild decides how to most effectively pursue a grievance on behalf of 24 copy editors, page designers and illustrators whose jobs may be outsourced, the union contract itself has been extended by one year. Because the Plain Dealer failed to properly and timely notify the union of its intent to bargain, the current contract will now expire on Feb. 28, 2020. Layoffs, nevertheless, may not end with the 24 employees in the Pub Hub, if indeed those positions are outsourced. As of Feb. 28, 2019 — Thursday — a “no layoff” clause in the Guild contract expires. That means that individual job guarantees for union employees, which were part of a 2012 Memorandum of Agreement, will no longer protect them. “We’re definitely worried about what the company will do next,” reporter and News Guild chair Ginger Christ told Scene. “During our most recent bargaining session, we asked the company to guarantee the jobs of a certain number of our members for another year. The company refused.” Christ said that the staff is “very tense” and echoed comments from her colleagues regarding the mood of grim uncertainty at the paper. She reiterated the Guild’s refrain that the paper won’t be able to “cut its way to profitability.” Rachel Dissell, another reporter and Guild member, said it’s possible that the Plain Dealer will attempt to do to reporters and photographers what they’re actively doing to designers and editors: “outsource” them to a company also owned by Advance — cleveland.com, for example. Dissell said that at last week’s bargaining meeting, during which the two sides failed to reach an agreement, the Guild asked for company information so that they’d be able to determine a course of action related to their grievance. She said the Guild feels it has a strong position — their contention is that “outsourcing” the Pub Hub positions to a company that Advance also owns violates their contract — but that taking

the grievance to an arbitrator is a gamble. She said she hoped that if the PD truly felt a need to further reduce the number of local journalists, they would do so by offering voluntary buyouts to people closer to retirement age. The Guild will fight, in any case, to preserve as many jobs as possible and to enhance the benefits packages of those who are laid off, especially those with sizable gaps between now and their expected retirement age. The PD is required to provide two weeks’ notice before layoffs, and no notices have yet been given, but it’s possible that layoffs could be announced before the grievance is resolved one way or another. Dissell said the entire process has been frustrating. The staff hasn’t been invited to participate in conversations about how to make the newsroom stronger. And the Guild’s

opportunity to make an official bid for keeping the Pub Hub positions, in her view, was never a genuine one. “It was always about dragging down the union,” she said. If the Guild does ultimately agree to drop the grievance, the PD will have to agree to “quite a number of things,” Dissell said, including enhanced severance packages, a certain minimum number of positions, and a commitment to staffing the newsroom with reporters who reflect the diversity of the region. Last week, union delegates to the AFL-CIO signed a letter delivered to the owners and editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, signaling that they and their members (as many as 100,000 workers in more than 146 affiliated unions in Northeast Ohio), would stand behind the Plain Dealer News Guild in its efforts to keep

journalism jobs local. Their pledge could include, if necessary, a circulation boycott of the newspaper, a refusal to click on cleveland.com links and picketing at both the Plain Dealer and cleveland. com locations. “We think it is ridiculous for the newspaper that claims to serve the community to be sending the work of putting that newspaper together to workers who don’t live in the community, who don’t buy goods and services in the community, and who don’t pay taxes in the community,” the letter from the union delegates read. Dissell told Scene that she and her Guild colleagues don’t take that pledge lightly. “We believe that both entities [the Plain Dealer and cleveland.com] are stronger with community support,” she said. “If we have to go down that

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

5


UPFRONT road we will, but we don’t really want to. We’d much rather just do our jobs, but it’s not like we have a whole lot of options.” The Plain Dealer editor, George Rodrigue, confirmed that the Guild contract had been extended one year, but told Scene in an email that it would be inappropriate to predict the outcome of negotiations. “The Guild and I share the goal of preserving high-quality local journalism at the Plain Dealer,” he said. — Sam Allard

Legal Aid and ACLU File Federal Lawsuit To Strike Down Bedford’s Horrible Nuisance Law The Legal Aid Society of Cleveland and the ACLU of Ohio last week filed a federal lawsuit that alleges the suburb of Bedford’s nuisance ordinance is unconstitutional and discriminatory. The suit specifically says the city used its ordinance to label the apartment of a black woman named

6

Beverly Somai a nuisance after she had called the city to complain about a loud neighbor who intimidated her. Once that happened, her landlord evicted her. Via the ACLU: “Co-counseled with ACLU Ohio, Legal Aid’s client is a single mom who has an adult son with disabilities. She has not engaged in any criminal activity, but Bedford still determined that by calling the police for help to deal with a noisy neighbor who also engaged in intimidating conduct, the premises were labeled a “criminal nuisance.” Rather than provide assistance in response to her requests for help, Bedford has pressured her landlord to evict her, as it has done numerous times with other similarly situated residents. Though it is the property that is technically determined to be the criminal nuisance, the client is essentially being labeled a nuisance since she is suffering the devastating consequences.” Bedford is one of 21 Northeast Ohio cities with Criminal Activity Nuisance Ordinances on the books, and one of just four that includes domestic violence in the statutes. Nuisance laws came into vogue in the early 2000s, with cities enacting them to protect some vague sense of

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

decency and community standards. They are, by definition and practice, pretty broad, which means that for every intention of, say, shutting down a drug house, they also became a magnet for barely veiled racism, as well as a tool cities can use to force out renters and those with subsidized housing vouchers. Studies have routinely found they unfairly harm minorities and those with mental health issues, among others. Most include a specific set of offenses that can be cited, resulting in warning letters, fines and eviction. In some cases, unpaid fines can also result in criminal proceedings. Domestic violence is already an underreported crime, but for those who do call 911 to report domestic violence in Bedford, it counts as a nuisance activity, logged by the city’s law department, which can lead to fines and evictions. “People should be able to pick up the phone and call police for help. Laws should not be used to penalize, deter, and harass ordinary residents for exercising rights under the United States and Ohio Constitutions to speak about their concerns, ask for police assistance, and petition the government for redress of grievances,” said Legal Aid attorney Jennifer Sheehe.

If it all sounds like a recipe for discrimination, that’s not surprising, given how these laws were born and how some, including Bedford’s, were triumphantly announced without even trying to hide their racist origins. When its CANO was passed in 2005, the mayor explained: “One of the things that we take pride in is middle-class values. We believe in neighborhoods, not hoods. That is one of the reasons we passed that nuisance law tonight. I have made mention of the students walking down the streets and those are predominantly African American kids who bring in that mentality from the inner city.” For 14 years now, as recent public records show, the city has used the law to punish victims of crime. The lawsuit asks that Bedford’s entire ordinance be struck down. — Vince Grzegorek

RTA Can Improve Ridership or Expand Geographic Coverage. It Can’t Do Both. Transit consultant Jarrett Walker presented the outline for his RTA redesign study last week,


30GPVT[HQT(PVJWUKCUV0GODGTUCPF(CTN[(PVT[7KEMGV+QNFGTU

60 Ohio Craft Breweries serving winter seasonals, big brews, rare releases, limited edition and other awesome beer Plus live music, food trucks and more!

*GPGTCNCFOKUUKQPKPENWFGUUQWXGPKTINCUUVCUVKPIVKEMGVUq(CTN[CFOKUUKQPCFOKUUKQPKPENWFGUCDQXGRNWUGCTN[CFOKUUKQPCV30 &JGGTUVQQWT:KPVGT:CTOGT)GUV6RQPUQTU

%TKEM %CTTGNq%QQMJQWUG%TGYKPIq%WVEJGT VJG%TGYGTq0CF7TGG%TGYKPIq3NCVHQTO%GGT&Qq7JG3JQGPKZ%TGYKPI&QORCP[q5Q[CN'QEMU%TGYKPIq:QNHnU5KFIG%TGYKPIq7JG%TGY%TQVJGTUq7JG%TGY.GVVNGq&CVCYDC,UNCPF%TGYKPI &QTPGTUVQPG%TGYKPIq*TCKPYQTMU%TGYKPIq+CPUC%TGYGT[q+K+2%TGYKPI&Qq+QHDTCWJCWU&NGXGNCPFq+QRRKPn)TQI%TGYGT[q-CEMKG2nU%TGYGT[q/WEM[2YN%TGYKPIq0CTMGV*CTFGP%TGYGT[q0KNNGTUDWTI%TGYKPI 1QDNG%GCUV%TGYKPIq3CTCFKIO6JKHV%TGYKPIq5JKPGIGKUV%TGYGT[q6GXGPVJ6QP%TGYKPIq6KDNKPI5GXGNT[%TGYKPIq6VTGGVUKFG%TGYGT[q7GTTGUVTKCN%TGYKPIq7JKTUV['QI%TGYKPIq:QTMKPI&NCUU%TGYGT[ YYYQJKQETCHVDGGTQTIYKPVGTYCTOGTHGUV | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

7


UPFRONT GET YOUR GREEN HERE! Fresh Fashion Earrings, Green Wigs, Bows, Green Strip Eyelashes See our Facebook for some accessories ideas.

Call Us For Your Appointment... Full Service Salon For Females

Mention This Ad & Receive

10% OFF Your Purchase Of $10 or More!

Jewelry, Art, Antiques, Furniture, Books, Vintage Clothing, Modernism, Curiosities, and More!

3000 Sq. Ft. on 2 Levels 1771 Coventry Road

Cleveland Heights Open 11:30-5:30 Mon thru Sat. 216-321-2515

PSYCHIC FAIR & MINI-EXPO Sunday, March 3rd at 11:00 am - 5:00 pm Yorktown Lanes 6218 Pearl Rd., Parma Hts., OH

Psychics, Mediums & Astrologers Shop for Crystals, Jewelry, Oils, Candles, Tarot & More!

FREE ADMISSION www.psychicmelinda.webs.com

clevescene.com

Wˆ…„P>IIF?MOJCMNKL©GFOG[Djw‚‚ƒwz}{WŒ{D cw¢{‚z^{}~Š‰>JJF?LNICJHON©KNOFcw¢{‚zhzD c{„Š…ˆP>JJF?KMGCJIGF©MJNNc{„Š…ˆWŒ{Di‹Š{[ fwˆƒw^{}~Š‰P>JJF?IJKCKOOG©LHMGf{wˆ‚hzD 8

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

suggesting that his role was not to make recommendations for RTA’s board of trustees and Cuyahoga County residents, but to help the region understand the system’s problems more clearly. As it turns out, there is one central problem: “RTA is spread really thin,” Walker said. “It covers an enormous area ... and, due to serious austerity, there’s not much ‘waste’ left to cut.” Walker presented a map which showed that only 18 percent of Cuyahoga County residents live within half a mile of a highfrequency transit route, where a bus comes every 15 minutes or less. RTA fares have increased. Routes have been slashed. And the system has hemorrhaged riders as a result. A system redesign has been sought specifically as an antidote to the ridership problem. Walker, though, who has led successful studies in Houston, Columbus, Anchorage, Fresno, San Jose and elsewhere, said that his mission is not to increase ridership. Rather, he wants to present a set of clear options so that RTA can make an informed decision, fueled by public priorities, about how best to allocate its resources. There are two directions RTA can go, Walker said: designing an alternative transit map to increase ridership (by increasing frequency along popular routes in dense, walkable areas); or designing a map to increase geographic coverage (by spreading even further out). Like RTA, most transit agencies have hired Walker to increase ridership. Board member Rev. Charles Lucas said explicitly that ridership was the “bottom line” at last week’s meeting. Walker uses a percentage scale to represent a city’s transit priorities (55 percent ridership / 45 percent coverage, say) and residents can voice their opinions about how they’d like the scale to shift. Walker warned board members that once alternative maps are proposed, they are likely to generate controversy. People naturally are resistant to losing routes that they depend on. “My job is not to make this easy,” he said. “My job is to make this clear.” Cleveland’s central problem — being spread too thin — Walker described as “universal” in modern American cities, driven both by budgetary issues and historical patterns of suburbanization. Unlike

other cities he has worked in, though — he cited both Houston and Auckland, New Zealand — Cleveland has made significant cuts already. “There’s no obvious waste to trim,” he said. So increasing ridership will necessarily come at the expense of other routes. Clevelanders for Public Transit is aware of the difficult conversations ahead. But as it calls for additional reforms — the implementation of its Fair Fares proposals, notably — the transit advocacy organization has celebrated the potential of the study. “If done well, the rewards are plentiful, resulting in faster trips to more destinations on transit and making transit a viable option instead of being forced to drive a car and sit in traffic,” CPT said, “not to mention all the additional costs that come with car ownership — especially for those who can least afford to own, maintain, insure and finance a car.” — Allard

DIGIT WIDGET 69 Suicide attempts by inmates in Cuyahoga County jail in 2018, a 64-percent increase over 2017, according to numbers released by the county.

10 Stories of proposed timberframe office tower in Ohio City that could be completed by 2021, which would be the tallest timber-frame building in the country.

9 Flu-related deaths in Cuyahoga County so far this season.

$7.3 MILLION Final cost of new City of Cleveland kennel, which has a grand opening on March 7.

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene


| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

9


FEATURE

O

N A FRIGID SATURDAY NIGHT in February, a typical evening out on the town might include dinner, maybe a movie, or a stop by a club or bar. Here, though, at Mig’s Pla-Mor in Euclid, hundreds have gathered for a latenight adult skate organized by SI Currency, a local promotion and events company headed by Chrishaw Clarke. It’s the fifth such night SI Currency has put on and has already been welcomed and celebrated for continuing to keep black roller skating culture alive in a city that has a proud, long and troubled history in that area. “We did one in 2017, just to try it out,” Clarke says. “People loved it so much, but then Pla-Mor closed. My guy Miguel [Sanders] opened it back up, and the feedback that I got, and that fact that it was something fun and different, made me want to keep doing it.” Talk to local skaters and they’ll talk about the freedom of skating, the style and art, the sense of community and tradition, the intergenerational ties. Those are all driving forces behind tonight’s turnout, and they’re also in line with the sentiments given national focus this month with the release of the documentary United Skates on HBO. Produced by Tina Brown and Dyana Winkler, with John Legend as executive producer, the film examines the

10

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

rich and complicated layers of black skating culture in America, from segregation that drove black skaters away from white rinks to the resultant underground that became instrumental to ’80s hip-hop, from the popularity and intense community connections of black roller rinks to the accelerated disappearance of those rinks across the country. Cleveland is no exception. After the first wave of roller skating popularity in the early and mid 20th century began to fade — an era that birthed the Rollercade on West 68th and Denison, which was at one point the largest unobstructed roller rink in America — Cleveland was left in 1978 with about 15 rinks, which rode the disco wave to a bit of a renaissance during that decade. Today, there are three (Zelma Watson George, United Skates Wickliffe and PlaMor), and only the last two offer adult night. That term — adult night — has come to be known as a coded way of saying Black Night. It’s the term that stuck around after a previous roster of labels — R&B Night, Urban Night, Soul Night, Soul Skate — largely came and went, all of which were used by rinks and promoters as a way to integrate white skating rinks but only on specific nights. Now, however, it’s a way to keep a tradition alive. That tradition is intricately tied to the Pla-Mor name, and to understand black

skating in Cleveland today one needs to understand its whole history.

***

Mig’s Pla-Mor is actually the third iteration of the Pla-Mor, whose origins date back to 1942 when a man named Elmer “Al” Collins opened the original Pla-Mor Roller Rink on Cedar Avenue and East 107th. There, at the city’s only black-owned rink, Collins hosted roller skate vanities, offered lessons, trained students, organized teams to compete in official competitions, and generally strove to use skating to better his community and his neighbors. Besides being black-owned, the Pla-Mor was also the only Cleveland rink for years where black people could skate during de facto segregation. “They didn’t put up signs for blacks and whites, you just knew,” a man named Russell J. Toppin Sr. told Cleveland Historical in an interview. “You just knew black folks didn’t go to Skateland and white folks didn’t come to Pla-Mor. I didn’t think it was a good thing, but at the same time it was the status quo.” Skateland, on Euclid Avene and East 90th, and other rinks routinely and openly discriminated against black skaters, using any and every excuse to get them out the door: “Your wheels are too small and will scuff the floor.” “You need to be part of a


Photos by Emanuel Wallace

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

11


FEATURE church or recreation group to skate here.” So black skaters largely stayed at the PlaMor, where Collins built a thriving community and an essential outlet. Its various events and personalities were captured with vigor and frequency by the Call & Post, the city’s African-American newspaper while, save for ads, it was largely ignored by the Plain Dealer. (A 1947 Call & Post article even covered the expansion of the monthly Pla-Mor Skater Scoop, the Pla-Mor’s own newspaper staffed and written by Cleveland high school students, into a weekly publication.) As demographics on the east side changed in the 1950s and racial tensions simmered in the 1960s, the Pla-Mor was a refuge for the black community. “It was Thursday nights we’d go to the PlaMor,” a woman named Eleanor Cannady said in a Cleveland Historical interview. “There was organ music and it was a lot of fun. You’d get together and go as a group.” Those racial tensions hit conflagration mode in 1966, and months after it had been remodeled and renamed the University Party Center — though everyone still called it by its original name — the Pla-Mor burned to the ground during the Hough Riots. Other rinks popped up over the years and decades — the Blue Goose, Seven Bells, Southgate in Maple Heights, Golden Gate in Mayfield Heights — but none laid claim to the kind of community that the Pla-Mor had, and the undercurrents of race were never far away as “soul skates” and related nights came into vogue. In 1988, for instance, United Skates in Wickliffe faced vociferous backlash from

12

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

residents for hosting all-night skates geared toward blacks and was forced to suspend them for two months because neighbors complained the events attracted “inner-city teen-agers” “These are kids that are from problem areas in Cleveland, and it’s nothing for them to have baseball bats and crowbars in their car,” one resident told the Plain Dealer. “When they’ve grown up in an area where there are lots of problems, they bring those problems with them.” “It is (racially motivated),” United Skates managing partner Bruce Aster told the PD. “[The Soul Skates] attract a predominantly black crowd from outside of Lake County because they feature black-oriented music and are advertised on WZAK, an urban contemporary station.” Then-Wickliffe-mayor Robert Aufuldish preferred to pretend it was about something else. “We’d like to keep the racial overtones out of this,” he told the paper. “I suppose they’re there.” As the United Skates documentary deftly illustrates, the segregation and racism behind adult nights and soul skates were painful; but it also gave birth to a rich culture with national influence — N.W.A., Dr. Dre, Queen Latifah, Naughty by Nature and Salt-N-Pepa all found inspiration and accommodation in skating rinks when they were ostracized by traditional venues. And while rinks continue to disappear thanks to development and rising rents, the culture is still very much alive.

*** On that chilly February Saturday night, the bass from tunes being played by special


guest DJ Ryan Wolf reverberate through the rink of Mig’s Pla-Mor as skaters of all skill levels show off. Mig is Miguel Sanders, who reopened the place last year. It had previously been owned and operated by a group who snatched up the place after the Euclid Rollerdome closed in 2008 and rechristened it the Pla-Mor after the legendary venue most of them had enjoyed growing up. “The tradition of the Pla-Mor is what we’re remembering,” co-owner Cliff Murray told the Plain Dealer in 2009. “It’s the only place blacks were allowed to skate at the time, up until 1964.” Some up years, some down years, and no small mountain of financial and maintenance problems later, it closed in January 2018 before Sanders came calling. A lifelong skater himself and former director of the Upward Bound Program at Case Western Reserve University, Sanders knows that attaining success won’t be easy and that times have changed, but that doesn’t mean he won’t put up a fight. “We haven’t been open long, but it’s a challenge,” Sanders says. “It’s a lot of work, but at the same time it’s doing something that I love so it’s rewarding.”

Even with the biggest of emotional attachments to local skating rinks, the bottom line remains that they need support from the community to thrive. The rinks often tinker with their prices, straddling the line between being affordable and trying to turn a profit. As the owner of the now-closed Rich City in Chicago says in the documentary, “It takes a lot of $5 to fill up this rink.” Patrons and friends who’ve shuffled between rinks in Northeast Ohio are probably familiar with the routine financial pressures that owners face. Sanders also understands that it can be difficult to reach a generation who literally has the world in the palm of its hand, but he also believes that skating is on its way to being hip once again. “I think that because young people have so many options like video games, cell phones and computers, there’s not such a big emphasis on skating like there used to be,” he says. “At the same time, I think that it’s trendy. I think it’s coming back around. People are able to find skill in it.” And skill there is. Unique regional trends and styles have emerged and evolved over the years. In Chicago, the style is called JB, as they mostly skate to music

by James Brown. In New York and New Jersey, skaters link their arms together in trains. In Philadelphia, the style is called Fast Backwards. In Kentucky, skaters often pull each other in between their legs. In Detroit, there’s a smooth rolling motion that can be traced directly back to the Motown sound. In Cleveland, the two predominant styles are known as Shuffling and Freestyle. With shuffling, skaters move with a smooth two-step with a bit of a bounce. Freestyling is when skaters jump up into the air and do 360-degree (and sometimes 720-degree) spins before landing. One skater described it as “hittin’ moves.” As there are many styles, there are many crews. Take a quick glance at the patrons at any skate night and you’re bound to see a number of these crews represented. They wear shirts that bear names such as Elite Squad and Midwest Skaters Community. One group formed through their love of Marvel comics and dubbed themselves The Avengers of Cleveland. Group member Stephen Phillips, aka Blaq Panther, recalls how an exgirlfriend and a buddy first got him into skating. “I was just inside doing my own projects and some music here and

there,” Phillips says. “My girlfriend at the time said I needed to find something to do. I had a friend and talked to him about it. He told me skating was a great way to get active and I fell in love with it from the first time I came out.” Fellow Avenger Kristen Bradford wondered where her friend was going during the week and found herself falling in love with the world of skating soon thereafter. “So he started skating and I’m trying to figure out where he’s at when it’s 11 o’clock on a Tuesday,” Bradford says. “Then I started coming and you fall in love with it. You always want to learn more. You see something you want to do. It’s a certain vibe here.” Altogether there are about 10 members in the crew. The current roster also includes Deadpool (Brian Atlas) and Captain America (Eric Tate), who both sit at a table eager to share their experiences, as well as Gamora, Scarlet Witch, War Machine, Rogue, Dark Phoenix, Wasp and Quicksilver. Leylani Wilson of the TrendSettas crew has been skating since she was 5 years old. The crew originated in Cleveland, but when one of the founders moved to Columbus, a chapter was started there. She says

MEDICAL MARIJUANA CARDS

BE FREE FROM

UÊœÀÊi`ˆV>Ê>ÀˆÕ>˜>Ê >À`à EÊ/Ài>̓i˜ÌÊ*>˜Ã ÊUÊ >À`ÃÊ>Û>ˆ>LiÊÃ>“iÊ`>ÞtÊ

"*--" / Ê ", Ê ,/ Ê



 1,Ê /-

DRUG ADDICTION Suboxone Clinic

WELLNESS CENTER 440-580-4998

“ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER HAS BROADWAY ROCKING!” – REUTERS

MARCH 5 - 24 216-241-6000 • PLAYHOUSESQUARE.ORG GROUP SALES 216-640-8600

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

13


BREAKING NEWS. HOT OFFTHE INTERNET PRESS.

Only at clevescene.com

FEATURE the group now has members as far away as London and has been active for 12 years. “You don’t want to skate in rentals because you can’t really get the feel of how you skate,” she says. “So you get skates, that’s the beginning of it. Once you get skates, then you want to start coming every week. Once you come every week, then you’ll want to start traveling. It’s an amazing thing.”

***

SCENE

OHIO'S PREMIER

SMOKE SHOP & TATTOO SUPPLY HEADQUARTERS

NEEDLES: Combos  Singles Cartridge Bug Pins Piercing INK: Specialty Sets Also MACHINES Coil  Rotary Cartridge TATTOO KITS GLOVES FOOT PEDALS POWER SUPPLIES CLIP CORDS CHAIRS ARM RESTS AFTERCARE poizon_ _ink MADACIDE Tattoo SHARPS CONTAINERS Background GLASS PIPES BUTANE TORCHES INCENSE DIGITAL SCALES DETOX GRINDERS COLLECTABLES & MORE!

CLEVELAND

STRONGSVILLE

4264 Pearl Rd. 216.749.3440

19097 Drake Rd. 440.572.8287

EASTLAKE

GIRARD

32888 Vine St. 440.942.8668

16 N. State St. 330.545.8131

LORAIN

BARBERTON

832 Broadway 440.242.4080

536 W. Tuscarawas 330.753.0500

AKRON

MANSFIELD

1004 Kenmore Blvd. 532 Park Ave. W 419.522.1695 330.753.3600

SEE OUR AD ON THE BACK COVER

14

The following evening, snow showers that would have derailed plans for the vast majority of Clevelanders are seen as only a minor inconvenience for the skaters at United Skates Wickliffe’s adult night. The DJ for the evening’s session sits in a booth above the rink watching people shuffle in groups that seem to multiply with each turn. Occasionally, skaters jump up and hit that freestyle perfectly in time with the music. In the center of the rink, many skaters opt to dance in place on their wheels until they get the notion (or opening) to begin rolling once again. The crowd has a greater mixture of ages, with some beginners pensively taking to the floor and some veterans who have been hitting the wood for years. One of those revered veterans is Joel Smith. Everyone calls him Smitty, and he has an undeniable coolness about him. His thin gold chain drapes onto a shirt embroidered with the Cadillac logo. A fellow skater describes him as the Michael Jordan of the Cleveland skate world. He began skating when he was 5 years old and will be 53 this year. “This here is a whole new regime,” Smith says of the flood of new skaters. “You can see all the people with rental skates and it changes every couple of years. You have people that really want to skate and then you have people that just want to kick it and then you don’t see them anymore.” With that said, Smith does have love for the younger generations and does feel a connection with them. “We’re a big community,” Smith insists. “We’ve got so much skate love in here. All these people love to skate. They are wear the same T-shirts, they just started that within the past 10 or 15 years with

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

people having their own clubs and everything. I like to see the younger guys because they have a lot of different styles. It’s really a melting pot now because of all the places we go.” For newcomers, the typical adult night can be a scary place. T. Shelby Clay decided to put together a crew to combat some of those fears. “I saw a lot of people who were watching me doing steps in the middle, like line dancing,” Clay says. “A lot of people flocked to me on that, so I put them all together. None of them knew each other and in my mind I was giving them the gift of each other so they can feed off of each other’s growth and have that confidence and safe space in what can be a crazy environment.” The Sk8Life crew has been together since November, and Clay, the son of a former skating rink manager, says that none of the other members have been skating for more than two years. He, on the other hand, has been skating for 23. Ultimately, his goal is for each member of his crew to go off and do the same thing for another group as he did for them. It brings him a sense of peace. “I took them to their first state jam which was Icy Hot in Columbus,” Clay continues. “They absolutely loved it. It’s about showing them the positive aspects of the culture and teaching them how to deal with the negative aspects.” That explicit and implicit focus on positivity dates back decades, to the earliest days of the original PlaMor and articles in the Call & Post vouching for skating’s ability to get kids off the streets and away from danger.

Oftentimes when there’s an adult skate, the security concerns are heightened, but SI Currency’s Chrishaw Clarke feels that it all boils down to having fun. “At the end of the day, there’s no drama and no violence,” Clarke says. “We’re just skating.” The TrendSetta’s Leylani Wilson agrees. “It’s one of those things where we use it as an outlet instead of being in the street,” she says. “You have so many kids who don’t have anything to do and are out there, but with this culture it’s more like, “Naw, I want to go skating” instead. When you come to the rink, you want to be on your best behavior because if you mess up there, you can’t come back.” Miguel Sanders has a 25-year background in education, and like Elmer Collins did 80 years ago, he envisions the Pla-Mor as more than a rink. He’s determined to launch additional programming that connects to the community on a larger level, using the art and freedom of a sport that has served as a safe space and escape for so many young black people. After all, skating is a beautiful, beautiful thing. “You know we go through our work week, day in and day out, and sometimes you just feel so heavy; but when you get out here on the skate floor and hear your jams, you’re just free,” Avengers’ skater Christen Bradford says. “You can zone out and just go. You shut your brain down and your body moves and it’s just free.”

ewallace@clevescene.com t@mannywallace


Downtown Willoughby’s

ST. PRACTICE DAY ~ Bar Crawl ~ Saturday, March 9 2:00 - 6:00PM SPONSORED BY

Tickets: $20 Pre-Sale Guests Receive 2 drinks, light apps, and a Suprise St. Practice Day Gift. SceneStPracticeDay.com

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

15


16

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019


GET OUT everything you should do this week Photo courtesy of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

WED

02/27

FAMILY FUN

Cleveland Auto Show Featuring concept, pre-production and production vehicles from many of the world’s top auto manufacturers, the Cleveland Auto Show returns to the I-X Center. The massive event occupies nearly 1.2-million square feet and features exhibits, vehicle giveaways and a classic car competition. Today’s hours are 5 to 10 p.m., and the show continues through Sunday. Consult the website for a complete schedule. Tickets cost $14 for adults. Parking is free. (Jeff Niesel) 1 I-X Center Dr., 216-676-6000, clevelandautoshow.com. MUSIC

Disney’s DCappella A new a cappella group that features seven world-class vocalists, DCappella comes to Connor Palace tonight on its first North American tour. Created by Disney and contemporary a cappella icon Deke Sharon (Pitch Perfect, The Sing Off), the tour is designed to appeal to fans of both Disney and the a cappella art form. Expect to hear a cappella versions of Disney hits. The show starts at 7:30, and tickets cost $35 to $55. (Niesel) 1615 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org. THEATER

Hay Fever Hay Fever, a popular play from British playwright Noël Coward, focuses on a retired actress, her novelist husband and their family. A relaxing weekend retreat goes south when the family and their guests get tangled up in theatrical games that “bring out the worst in this dysfunctional team of players.” The Cleveland Play House offers its take on the play tonight at 7:30 at the Helen Rosenfeld Lewis Bialosky Lab Theatre. Performances continue through March 10. Tickets cost $15. (Niesel) 1407 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, clevelandplayhouse.com.

Bootsy Collins will appear at the Rock Hall Library & Archives. See: Thursday.

to the police and elude an evil crime syndicate. The movie screens tonight at 7 at the Capitol Theatre as part of the theater’s Happy Hour Classic Film Series. Admission includes a complimentary cocktail or soft drink and light appetizers an hour prior to the film’s start time. Tickets cost $10. (Niesel) 1390 West 65th St., 216-651-7295, clevelandcinemas.com. MUSIC

A Place For Me: Cleveland’s Music Industry Panelists including Angelita “DJ Misses” Owens (an on-air mixer for Cleveland’s Z.107.9 and Cincinnati’s 101.1 the Wiz), R Rohnesha M. Horne (marketing director for Radio One) and Quincy “Big Heff” Taylor (Def Jam Records & VP of Nerve DJs) will be at the Rock Hall for tonight’s program, dubbed A Place For Me: Cleveland’s Music Industry. It’s yet another special Rock Hall program that’s part of the annual Black History Month celebration. It starts at 5 p.m. Admission is free with a RSVP. (Niesel) 1100 Rock and Roll Blvd., 216-515-8444, rockhall.com. COMEDY

FILM

North By Northwest A classic Alfred Hitchcock thriller, North by Northwest centers on a New York advertising executive who finds himself caught in a “web of intrigue and murder.” He must travel across the country to prove his innocence

Jim Tews A former Clevelander, comedian and writer Jim Tews, the man behind The New York Times’ best-selling Felines of New York, is a rising star in the comedy world. He made his standup television debut on Last Comic Standing and was one of 2011’s

“New Faces” at the Just For Laughs Montreal comedy fest. Tews also recently created, co-wrote and starred in a web series about “a sociophobic Weezer cover band.” As if that weren’t enough for his resume, the prolific Tews also created the HBO Labs’ web series The Opener and has directed a feature-length documentary about Cleveland’s independent comedy scene. Tews performs tonight at 8 at Hilarities, as well as on Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets are $18. (Niesel) 2035 East Fourth St., 216-241-7425, pickwickandfrolic.com.

The Great Lakes Theatre offers its take on the suspenseful thriller tonight at 7:30 at the Hanna Theatre. Performances continue through March 10. Tickets are $15 to $75. (Niesel) 2067 East 14th St., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org.

THU COMEDY

FILM

Wings of Desire Earlier this month, Swiss actor Bruno Ganz, who stars in Wings of Desire, Wim Wenders’ beautiful 1987 film about an angel who wants to become human, died in Switzerland at age 78. To pay tribute, the Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque hosts a special screening of the film at 7 tonight. The film, which co-stars Peter Falk and has English subtitles, will be shown in a new 4-K digital restoration. Tickets cost $11, or $8 for Cinematheque members and students. (Niesel) 11610 Euclid Ave., 216-421-7450, cia.edu. THEATER

Witness for the Prosecution In Agatha Christie’s Witness for the Prosecution, Leonard Vole is accused of murdering a widow to inherit her wealth. The play centers on the attempt to untangle the truth.

02/28

Dominique Comedian Dominique thinks about the weighty things in life: what her funeral will be like and what Jesus would want her to do in certain situations. She learned in church to pray about things that bothered her her and then let them go — so that’s exactly what she did when she got that big credit card bill in the mail! Dominique tells it like it is, and that’s why she’s funny. She performs tonight at 7:30 at the Improv, where she has shows scheduled through Sunday. Tickets are $17 to $20. (Liz Trenholme) 1148 Main Ave., 216-696-IMPROV, clevelandimprov.com. THEATER

The Importance of Being Earnest The CSU Department of Theatre & Dance offers its take on Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, “a trivial comedy for serious people.” The play uses humor to address issues of identity and relationships and employs mistaken identities, | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

17


GET OUT plot twists and “madcap action.” Tonight’s performance takes place at 7:30 at the Outcalt Theatre. Performances continue through March 3. Tickets start at $15. (Niesel) 1407 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org.

for “1-2-3 Friday”: enjoy $1 Pepsi products, $2 Sugardale hot dogs and $3 select beer specials. Those tickets start at $10. (Niesel) 1 Center Court, 216-420-2000, theqarena.com. MUSIC

Open Mic Night/Live Band Karaoke Every Thursday, Stella’s Music Club hosts a night of music, poetry and

MUSIC

Stravinsky’s Petrushka Tonight at 7:30 at Severance Hall, the Cleveland Orchestra takes on Stravinsky’s ballet score Petrushka. Set at a winter’s town fair, the piece centers on a puppet who tries to find true love. Tonight’s concert will also feature Eötvös’ Seven, composed as a memorial for the astronauts who died in NASA’s Space Shuttle

COMEDY

Moshe Kasher & Natasha Leggero Once a frequent guest on Chelsea Lately, comic Natasha Leggero is famous for hilariously mocking hip-hop culture and has had roles in a variety of films, including He’s Just Not That Into You. “Here’s my problem with hip-hop,” she jokes. “Everything about the song that’s catchy has been stolen from somewhere.” Born in Rockford, Illinois, she received her B.A. in theater criticism and then moved to Hollywood. Along with fellow comic and hubby Moshe Kasher, she performs tonight at 8 at Hilarities, where she has shows scheduled through Saturday. Tickets are $20 to $25. (Niesel) 2035 East Fourth St., 216-241-7425, pickwickandfrolic.com. MUSIC

King Records Exhibit Opening Bassist extraordinaire Bootsy Collins will appear at an event tonight that celebrates the opening of King Records: Thirty Years That Changed American Music 1943-1973, a new exhibit on display at the Rock Hall Library & Archives on the Tri-C main campus. Collins got his start as a session player at King Records. R&B icon James Brown first heard him and then recruited him into his backing band, the J.B.s. From 1943 to 1971, King Records and its subsidiaries revolutionized the ways popular music was recorded, manufactured, distributed and promoted. The exhibit chronicles that history, and tonight’s event begins at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $15. (Niesel) 2809 Woodland Ave., 216-515-1956, library.rockhall.com. SPORTS

Monsters vs. Laval Rocket Tonight at 7 at the Q, the Monsters kick off a two-game series against the Laval Rocket. The $11 Monsters Hockey Hoppy Hour ticket for tonight’s game includes a lowerlevel ticket and a beverage. The two teams play again tomorrow at 7 p.m.,

18

FRI

03/01

MUSIC + FILM

At the Movies: Rebel Without a Cause The Library of Congress declares the James Dean flick Rebel Without a Cause to be “culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant,” and the 1955 American drama gave Dean one of his best roles. Tonight at 8, the Cleveland Orchestra will play Leonard Rosenman’s angst-ridden score live, to accompany the film. Consult the orchestra website for ticket prices. (Niesel) 11001 Euclid Ave., 216-231-1111, clevelandorchestra.com. FOOD

3/20 3/27 4/17 4/24 5/22 5/29 6/5

Joni Mitchell: Both Sides Now: Live at the Isle of Wight Festival 2017 • R • 106 minutes • Courtesy of Eagle Rock Entertainment

Miss Sharon Jones! 2015 • not rated • 93 minutes

Horn from the Heart: The Paul Butterfield Story 2017 • not rated • 104 minutes • DCP Format

Turn It Around: The Story Of East Bay Punk 2017 • not rated • 155 minutes • DCP Format

Tommy 1975 • PG • 111 minutes • DCP Format

Boy Howdy!: The Story of Creem Magazine 2019 • not rated • 75 minutes • DCP format

THEATER

Gimme Shelter 1970 • R • 91 minutes Criterion Collection Edition • DCP Format

FILMS FREE for Members

Non-Members: $5.50

BECOME A MEMBER OR GET TICKETS AT ROCKHALL.COM 1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio 44114 • 888 .764 .ROCK (7625 )

comedy. The club’s doors open at 5 p.m., and performances begin at 8 p.m. Artists can sign up at stellasmusic.com/open-mic to secure a 15-minute time slot. Signups will be available at the club as well. Meanwhile, happy hour takes place from 5 to 7 p.m. Admission is free. (Niesel) 2217 East Ninth St., 216-272-3377, stellasmusic.com.

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

Fish Fry Fridays Now in its 13th year, Prosperity Social Club’s Lenten fish fry takes place today and every Friday through April 18. Chef Ed Kubitz will prep more than 2,000 fried fish meals for the event. To meet the demand, the kitchen will open at 11 a.m. on Fridays and serve the fish specials until midnight. Lunch-only specials include the Minnow (two pieces of beer-battered haddock and slaw) and a fish sandwich (with lettuce and tomato on a toasted bun). The most popular menu item features flaky haddock, homemade slaw, house tartar sauce and mac ’n’ cheese. There’s even a supersized version that adds a cup of chowder and two potato pierogi with caramelized onions and a dollop of sour cream. Dubbed Gotta Haddock, the ultimate fish fry can be paired with a beer from Sibling Revelry Brewing that goes by the same name. (Niesel) 1109 Starkweather Ave., 216-937-1938, prosperitysocialclub.com.

Columbia disaster, which happened Feb. 1, 2003. Eric Charnofsky, a music instructor at Case Western Reserve University, gives the preconcert talk at 6:30 p.m. There’s a repeat performance at 8 p.m. on Saturday. Ticket prices are on the website. (Niesel) 11001 Euclid Ave., 216-231-1111, clevelandorchestra.com.

Flanagan’s Wake Flanagan’s Wake transports the audience to an Irish wake where villagers tell tales and sing songs for their dearly departed Flanagan. Finding the humor in life and death, the wake acts as a dark backdrop to an otherwise hilarious show in which alcohol fuels the humorous reminiscing. Sort of like a tragic Tony ’n’ Tina’s Wedding, the interactive and improvised show engages the entire audience. Tonight’s show starts at 8 and repeats tomorrow night at 8 at Kennedy’s Theatre. Performances continue weekends through April 27. Tickets are $26. (Patrick Stoops) 1501 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org.


FILM

Hochelaga, Land of Souls Hochelaga, Land of Souls, the new movie from François Girard, the director of The Red Violin and Thirty Two Short Films about Glenn Gould, was Canada’s official entry for the 2018 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. A lavish, multi-episode historical drama, it dramatizes the centuries-long struggle for the land that would become Montreal by excavating under a football stadium to show recreations of the battles that were fought there. The movie features a score by Gyan and Terry Riley; it screens at 7 tonight at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Tickets cost $10, or $7 for CMA members. (Niesel) 11150 East Blvd., 216-421-7350, clevelandart.org. COMEDY

Demetri Martin A guy with a dry sense of humor who caught a big break when he nailed down a regular slot on The Daily Show, Demetri Martin has worked as a standup comic for more than 20 years now. On The Daily Show, he served as a the “senior youth correspondent” and hosted a segment called “Trendsetting.” He’s released a handful of albums and has appeared

in a number of films. Last year, he put out the Netflix special Demetri Martin: The Overthinker. Martin performs tonight at 8 at the Agora Theatre. Tickets start at $39.50. (Niesel) 5000 Euclid Ave., 216-881-2221, agoracleveland.com. DANCE PARTY

Mix: Bailemos Tonight at Mix, the party that takes place the first Friday of every month at the Cleveland Museum of Art, we dance! Forms such as salsa and merengue evolved from the “blending of vibrant and intricate dances of indigenous peoples across Latin America with African and European dance traditions.” DJ Flaco Flash, Papo Ruiz y la Dulzura de la Salsa, Viva Dance Studio, Tony Fresh, and Tropical Cleveland will be on hand to show how those traditions have evolved. It all starts at 6. Tickets cost $10 in advance, or $15 at the door. Admission is free for art museum members. (Niesel) 11150 East Blvd., 216-421-7350, clevelandart.org. FILM

Short.Sweet.Film Fest A few years ago, local film aficionado Michael Suglio was watching a

few bands play at Now That’s Class when he realized that hosting a film festival in an informal, clublike atmosphere was a good idea. In 2012, he successfully launched his Short.Sweet.Film Fest at Ohio City’s Market Garden Brewery. It has since migrated to the Alex Theatre, where it returns this weekend. A slew of shorts will screen over the three-day period (you can find a complete schedule online). Many of the directors will be on hand to answer questions during short sessions that’ll be held after their films’ screenings. Doors open tonight at 6:30. Tickets are $25 to $150. (Niesel) 2017 East Ninth Street, 216-239-1200, alextheatercleveland.com.

SAT

03/02

SPORTS

Cavaliers vs. Detroit Pistons Right before the All-Star break, the Cavs played two really good games. They hung on to beat the New York Knicks and then lost to a really good Brooklyn Nets team in triple overtime. Perhaps after all the trades, the team has started to gel. It goes up against the Detroit Pistons today at 5 p.m. at the Q and then takes on the Orlando

Magic tomorrow at 6 p.m. Consult the arena’s website for ticket prices. (Niesel) 1 Center Court, 216-420-2000, theqarena.com. SPRING CARNIVAL

Cleveland Kurentovanje Kurentovanje (koo-rahn-toh-VAHNyay) is evidently the most popular carnival in Slovenia. The central figure, the Kurent, is believed to chase away winter and usher in spring with its supernatural powers. (The Kurent, by the way, is like something freakish and mammalian out of Parade the Circle: a massive sheepskin creature with bells and beads and all sorts of birdlike, pagan-inspired ornamentation.) The Slovenian National Home, St. Clair Superior Development Corp. and Sterle’s Country House partnered with local businesses and institutions to bring a piece of this cultural festival to the St. Clair Avenue neighborhood. It starts today with a 5-K run at 10 a.m. at East 64th Street and St. Clair Avenue. A parade follows at noon. It’s free. (Sam Allard) clevelandkurentovanje.com. MUSIC

Cleveland’s 2019 Brazilian Carnaval Tropical Cleveland’s annual Brazilian

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

19


GET OUT Carnaval is reportedly one of the largest and most authentic carnaval celebrations in the Great Lakes area. The group aims to “bring together Brazilians and people from all over the world as one to experience this electrifying yearly event.” It all goes down at 9:30 tonight at the Music Box Supper Club. Tickets start at $15. (Niesel) 1148 Main Ave., 216-242-1250, musicboxcle.com. FILM

Clue A box office dud when it was originally released, Clue, a movie based upon the board game of the same name, has become a cult classic. It centers on a group of oddball characters who gather at an old Victorian mansion to play a good old-fashioned game of “whodunit.” It screens at 9:30 and midnight tonight, and tomorrow night at 7, at the Cedar Lee Theatre. It’s part of the Late Shift series that features cult classics. Tonight’s 9:30 screening will also feature a live floor show courtesy of Simply His Servants.

20

Tickets cost $6. (Niesel) 2163 Lee Rd., Cleveland Heights, 440-528-0355, clevelandcinemas.com. COMEDY

The Festival of Laughs A comedy tour featuring featuring Sommore, George Wallace, Tommy Davidson, Earthquake, Tony Rock and Guy Torry, the Festival of Laughs offers some of today’s best comics. The tour comes to Connor Palace tonight. Sommore will host, and Earthquake will close the show. It all starts at 8 p.m., and tickets cost $55.50 to $104.50. (Niesel) 1615 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org. DRINK

Mardi Gras Bar Crawl Today at 2 p.m., the Warehouse District hosts what it’s calling Cleveland’s “official Mardi Gras Bar Crawl.” Patrons will receive custom beads at every bar, a special Hurricane cup they can use for drink specials and a Mardi Gras mask. Tickets cost $20 in advance, or $30 at the door; register through the website. (Niesel) whd.wheedleapp.com/event/ barcardigras.

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

ARTY PARTY

FILM

Mardi Gras Party BayArts celebrates Mardi Gras tonight at 7 p.m., with a special party that features New Orleansinspired food and libations, music by the Zydeco Kings, a Second-Line parade, and masks — all in the new Hearth Room of the BayArts’ Playhouse. Your $55 tickets help benefit the Playhouse renovation. Purchase them on the website. (Niesel) 28795 Lake Rd., Bay Village, 440-871-6543, bayarts.net.

Rocky Horror Picture Show It’s the first Saturday of the month again, so tonight the Cedar Lee Theatre hosts its usual midnight screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, the 1975 cult classic that still draws an exuberant, costumed crowd that likes to throw rice and dry toast and sing along to the songs in the movie. In addition, locals act out a floor show that mimics the movie, turning the event into a veritable party. Tickets are $9.75. (Niesel) 2163 Lee Rd., Cleveland Heights, 440-528-0355, clevelandcinemas.com.

FOOD

North Union Indoor Farmers Market Until March 30, the North Union Indoor Farmers Market takes place on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon at Crocker Park. Local farmers, makers and bakers will be on hand to sell seasonal greens and vegetables, fruits, meats, cheeses and bakery items. The market is held at 228 Market St., between the Gap and Cyclebar. Afterward, check out Comet Alley, which sits between Yard House and Hyatt Place Hotel: You’ll find locally owned businesses and shops that’ll appeal to a “shop local” mentality. (Niesel) 189 Crocker Park Blvd., Westlake, crockerpark.com.

THEATER

Shen Yun The visually dazzling Shen Yun is a truly unique performance troupe that brings to life 5,000 years of Chinese civilization through classical folk and story-based dance. Shen Yun was founded in 2006 to revive ancient Chinese culture, which had been nearly destroyed by the Chinese communist government. Now with six companies, Shen Yun has given more than 500 performances in over 150 cities around the world. Expect beautiful, vibrant costumes and exotic music you won’t hear


anywhere else. Performances take place at 2 and 7 p.m. today and at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the State Theatre. Tickets are $80 to $180. (Niesel) 1519 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org. WRESTLING

WWE Next Live WWE Live Wrestling tours the globe with brands such as Raw, Smackdown and WWE NXT. Tonight, WWE NXT comes to the Agora. Expect to see upand-coming wrestlers strut their stuff. It all begins at 7:30 and tickets start at $25. (Niesel) 5000 Euclid Ave., 216-881-2221, agoracleveland.com.

SUN

03/03

MUSIC

Ed Caner with Members of Hey Mavis Violinist/fiddler and founding member of Hey Mavis, Ed Caner often invites guest musicians to perform with him, and tonight he’ll share the stage with other members of Hey Mavis. Part of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park concert series, the performance starts at 8:30 p.m. at the Hines Hill Conference Center. Check the Conservancy website for more info. (Niesel) 1403 West Hines Hill Rd., Peninsula, 216-479-8611, conservancyforcvnp.org. COMEDY

John Crist Over the course of his career, comedian John Crist’s videos have amassed more than 150 million views. Epics such as “Millenial International,” “Road Rage in the Church Parking Lot” and “Signs You Grew Up Christian” have all gone viral. In one bit, he suggests using “racially neutral” baby names just to keep people from making assumptions. “My name is John and I asked my parents about why they named me John. They said it was because it was a Bible name, and they thought that would make me a good kid. That’s not true. I’m pretty sure that in sixth grade a kid named Jesus stole my bike.” Crist performs tonight at 7:30 at Connor Palace. Tickets start at $28.50. (Niesel) 1615 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org. FILM

Salvador Dalí: In Search of Immortality Directed by David Pujol, Salvador Dalí: In Search of Immortality traces the life and work of visionary painter Salvador Dali. The film covers the years 1929 — when Dali joins the Surrealists — to his death in 1989. The doc includes

interviews with the man as well as rare videos. Presented by the Cleveland Museum of Art, it screens at 1:30 p.m. at the Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque. Tickets cost $12, or $9 for CMA members. (Niesel) 11610 Euclid Ave., 216-421-7450, cia.edu.

MON

03/04

RAMEAU’S

Hippolyte et Aricie Wednesday, February 27-Friday, March 1, 2019 l 7:30pm l Kulas Hall Saturday, March 2, 2019 l 3pm l Kulas Hall

NIGHTLIFE

Shit Show Karaoke Local rapper/promoter Dirty Jones and Scene’s own Manny Wallace host Shit Show Karaoke, a weekly event at the B-Side Liquor Lounge wherein patrons choose from “an unlimited selection of jams from hip-hop to hard rock,” and are encouraged to “be as bad as you want.” Fueled by drink and shot specials, it all goes down tonight at 10 p.m. (Niesel) 2785 Euclid Hts. Blvd., Cleveland Heights, 216-932-1966, bsideliquorlounge.com.

TUE

OPERA THEATER

03/05

FILM

Marquise Directed by Vera Belmont, Marquise stars Sophie Marceau as an impoverished but attractive dancer and actress who rises from obscurity to become the favorite of King Louis XIV, Molière and Racine. Jordi Savall did the music for this French comedy-drama that’s set during the 17th century. Today at 1:45 p.m., the Cleveland Museum of Art shows the revival premiere of the movie. Tickets are $10, or $7 for CMA members. (Niesel) 11150 East Blvd., 216-421-7350, clevelandart.org.

Co-produced by CIM and CWRU, and staged in period style with Baroque dance and a Baroque orchestra, Hippolyte et Aricie takes us into a magical world of heroes and lovers, goddesses and monsters, forest creatures, sailors and hunters.

TICKETS: $20 adults | $15 seniors and groups | $10 for students cim.edu/hippolyte or 216.795.3211

WE WENT OUT WHEN YOU COULDN’T. EVENT SLIDESHOWS. ONLY AT CLEVESCENE.COM

THEATER

School of Rock A popular musical based on the comedic film that starred Jack Black as a rock ’n’ roll-obsessed music instructor, School of Rock comes to Connor Palace after a successful run on Broadway. The plot centers on Dewey Finn and his attempts to train his students to play together in a “guitar-shredding, bass-slapping, mind-blowing rock band.” Tonight’s performance takes place at 7:30; shows continue through March 24. Tickets start at $10. (Niesel) 1615 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org.

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

21


MAR 23 – APR 14 • OUTCALT THEATRE

APR 27 – MAY 19 • ALLEN THEATRE

written by CHELSEA MARCANTEL | directed by LAURA KEPLEY

written by KAREN ZACARÍAS | directed by ROBERT BARRY FLEMING

TICKETS START AT $25 | STUDENT AND GROUP DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE

216.241.6000 • clevelandplayhouse.com

Manicures/Pedicures Hair & Makeup Massages

Facials Body Wraps Eucalyptus Steam Room

Located on the 3rd Floor Cleveland Marriott Downtown at Key Tower 216.302.7426 | trilogycle.com 22

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019


STAGE A WELL-WORN WHODUNNIT Great Lakes’ Witness for the Prosecution is a lovely production, even if the story’s twists feel dated By Gwendolyn Kochur Photo by Roger Mastroianni

WHEN YOU THINK OF AGATHA Christie, you think clever murders, engaging mystery and questionable characters. When you think about modern-day courtroom dramas, you think about intense questioning, contradictory witness statements and linguistic lawyer dynamos. A combination of these two elements is now being performed at Great Lakes Theater in Agatha Christie’s Witness for the Prosecution, which she first published as a short story in 1925 and adapted for the stage in 1953. It has since been given film and TV treatments as well. Witness for the Prosecution’s stage opening received critical raves at the time, with reviewers praising the depiction of the courtroom and guffawing over the show’s “unforeseen twist of the cards” ending. So why didn’t this show, which had both fine performances and direction by Charles Fee, have the same jaw-dropping effect today? Because it merely meets our expectations. Lawyers, courtrooms and murder trials are so commonplace on TV that what once felt ground-breaking is now on perpetual reruns on about 30 channels at any given moment. Our modern-day familiarity with the dramatized courtroom surely lessens the impact of the shock and wonder the show prodded from audiences over 65 years ago. Still, it’s a lovely production. The young Leonard Vole has formed an unlikely friendship with Emily French, an older, and much wealthier, woman. He visits her often, despite the disdain he encounters from the woman’s housekeeper, Janet MacKenzie. Suddenly, French is found murdered, with Vole visiting her only the night before. The penniless man is also inheriting her fortune. Vole seeks the counsel of solicitor Sir Wilfrid Robarts. He has been questioned by the police and now his wife fears he will be accused of the murder of his friend. What follows is a murder trial of whirlwind questioning, lies and even a few twists and turns.

The show unfolds on Gage Williams’ relatively realistic courtroom set design. The judge sits just a few feet above the rest of the proceedings under a wooden arch, complete with ridged columns and carved symbols representing the U.K. Before him is a witness stand, tables for the wig-wearing solicitors and a small stool for the defendant. Bookending the stage are two jury boxes, which not only provides the audience with seating, but also provides the show a jury. Defending himself from this

by Jodi Dominick. She adorns herself in an accent and a seeming cold-bloodedness. Romaine’s moral character and intentions remain a mystery throughout the show, which is a great testament to Dominick. Also taking the stand is Jillian Kates as the adamant housekeeper Janet MacKenzie, Alex Syiek as the confident Inspector Hearne, Laura Walsh Berg as the laboratory assistant, Clegg, and M.A. Taylor as the police surgeon, Dr. Wyatt. They all swear their oaths in

WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION THROUGH MARCH 10 AT THE HANNA THEATRE, 2067 EAST 14TH ST. 216-241-6000. GREATLAKESTHEATER.ORG

“jury” is Taha Mandviwala as Leonard Vole. Mandviwala’s character is likable, young, innocent and very naïve. He is hoping for the very best from the justice system, assuring himself that an innocent man can not be put away for a crime he didn’t commit. Taking the stand as Vole’s only alibi is his wife, Romaine, embodied

front of Mr. Justice Wainwright. David Anthony Smith presides over the court in this role, asking both silly, yet reasonable questions, and reining in the lawyers when they step out of line. Vole’s representation lies in the hands of Mr. Mayhew and Sir Wilfrid Robarts, played by Lynn Robert Berg and Aled Davies,

respectively. Robarts leads the case for the defense and is portrayed by Davies with gumption and conviction. His moral character is one of the most trustworthy of the show, despite making misogynistic comments. Rounding out the major players is Nick Steen as Mr. Myers, the Crown’s prosecutor. Steen is stern, challenging and quick on his feet, exemplifying the token characteristics of a good lawyer. While Great Lakes Theater usually seizes any opportunity to give Steen a sleeveless costume, no such chance presented itself in this show, where suits and traditional black robes by designer Esther M. Haberlen are dress code. Ambiance is added to the courtroom by warm sconce lighting provided by designer Rick Martin and the sound designer Josh Schmidt’s supplemental sounds of a court room audience’s “oohs” and “ahhs” at the right moments.

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

23


ART TOOLS OF THE TRADE What’s in a chair? An artist’s butt, that’s what. Northeast Ohio artists dish on their studio chairs By Dott von Schneider DECADES AGO, I HAD THE PERFECT studio chair. I’m not certain how I acquired the yellow Herculon and wood monstrosity, but I probably garbage-picked it from someone’s lawn. Anyway, it was comfortable despite its terrible fabric and square arms. It had the perfect lean — just enough to bend back and stretch, but not enough to fall backward. It set upon four casters with which I could roll myself across the loft, from a painting to my tool area to pick up a brush or drawing instrument, and back to the painting. Man, I loved that thing. My hunt for its replacement prompted me to ask area artists about their studio chairs. Here’s what they said: FRANK ORITI: I do currently have a great chair in my studio. It was handed down to me from my mother. I had just moved into my studio a few years ago and she was getting rid of it. My studio was close to empty — other than my painting supplies, some books and the paintings I was working on. I think a good studio chair should be comfortable, but not too comfortable — as you should be working and not spending too much time sitting! It should be easy to move around and free from any clutter. My actual painting chair is not very comfortable. It should be, for as much time as I spend in it. DANA OLDFATHER: I have a couple of studio chairs with stories. My red one I’ve had since I moved out of my parents’ house. It was part of a dining room set of chairs my parents had before I was born. My dad uses one of them in his studio and has my whole life — only he painted his yellow. He is an easel painter and sits in his every day. I mostly stand when I paint, so I use mine for when I sketch or think. I like that we have the same studio chairs. It makes me feel closer to him (even though we don’t speak often since he doesn’t have a phone) and closer to painting, knowing there is some remote sort of solidarity there. MATTHEW GALLAGHER: Okay, my chair: It’s a fuzzy pink and light grey wheeled monstrosity. Sometimes it allows for height adjustment, but other days it’s cranky. I inherited it from Dan Corrigan, who commandeered this studio before me.

24

Photo courtesy Dawn Tekler

Dawn Tekler’s spectacular orange studio chair.

It’s the worst studio chair of all time, but I love it, and have farted into it in times of great focus for five years now. No need to replace it. It does its job. Worst chair ever. Our cats love the shit out of it though. They climb all over it. AMBER N. FORD: I’ve only owned one studio chair and I definitely don’t think it’s the perfect chair by far. I could definitely have a better chair if I searched. If we are speaking aesthetically, it is a light grey sleek design. I tend to gravitate toward the more simple things and neutral colors. When I get another studio, I will probably be on the search for a better chair again! JOHN CARLSON: About 10 years ago, I was driving through Madison, Ohio, on Route 20 and I saw these newly made Adirondack chairs in the front yard of a house. I stopped and this guy, about 80 years old, came

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

out. He told me he builds them to have something to do. I bought one for $75. It’s the perfect studio chair. It has wide flat arms you can put a sketch pad on, or a cup of coffee. It’s really comfortable and durable. It’s great. EILEEN DORSEY: If you work on your feet, you can’t have an overly comfortable chair and it most certainly can’t be low to the ground. You need to be able to quickly move in and out of the seat with ease. My perfect studio chair is actually a 3-foot stepstool. I spend a lot of my day perched on the top stair, staring at my work and waiting for it to tell me what the next move will be. It is also helpful for reaching the top of the larger paintings. ANGELA OSTER: My husband Tom is a collector of strange furniture. I’m not sure which thrift store my chair came from. It’s ideal for me because it swivels and is on wheels

so I am free to spin around. It’s kind of home base in my workshop, because whenever I open the door it’s a race between my cat and me who gets there first. I suppose it’s like the heart of my control center, a perch from where I make creative decisions. DAWN TEKLER: My studio chair functions as a chair, dining table, stepladder and bed. If I told you what else, I’d have to burn it. It’s orange and it’s spectacular! SARAH CURRY: My orange studio chair was rescued from my neighbor’s tree lawn eight years ago. It’s one of over 60 chairs in my house, many of which have also been rescued from imminent death. My husband thinks there is a problem, but I can’t bear to leave them all alone. In my house, they are residents of the island of misfit toys! Now this special chair is a perch for my cats and watched over my muse (Pooh in drag) and his friend the rocking horse. HERB ASCHERMAN: Yes, I have a tall stool in use since 1975 for headshots and a gorgeous corner chair since 1995 for more portrait poses. Treasure #1 was bought at Sears when I opened my first studio in 1975. It is the consummate allperson reliable stool for just about any headshot. Because of its height and wooden back, it is multifunctional when shooting couples or standing groups. The corner chair was purchased sometime in the early ’90s from an antique store. I am an inveterate antique shopper. Over the years, when I see a chair with character, I pick it up for use in the studio. TODD HOAK: I have an old white leather chair, circa late ’70s, very deep and comfortable, great for hours of artwork scrutiny. I have dragged it from Cleveland Heights to Florida, Lyndhurst to Shaker. It’s more of a contemplation/studio nap chair. Currently I don’t have a studio, so it sits in a corner of my attic, soon to be my studio chair once again. During my last move it sat on the tree lawn of my old house for a few hours, but I came back for it. Couldn’t let it go. It’s far from perfect, but it’s family.

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene


MOVIES NEVER LOOK AWAY (At least not for three hours) By Sam Allard Photo courtesy of Walt Disney Studios

THE THREE-PLUS HOUR NEVER Look Away, directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, was the German entry in the Best Foreign Language Film category at Sunday night’s Oscars. Though Roma took the statue, the category was as strong as it has ever been in recent memory. Donnersmarck’s expansive story of an artist in Germany, like the other nominees, should serve as crystalline evidence in support of director Alfonso Cuaron’s statement, during his acceptance speech, that “there are no [cinematic] waves, only the ocean.” Foreign language films may only arrive intermittently in the U.S., but audiences should embrace these rich and masterfully composed films, whether at the Cedar Lee or on streaming services. Never Look Away opens Friday at the Cedar Lee. Its lush period-piece production design and cinematography are enhanced on the big screen. We begin in a museum in 1930s Dresden, where a young Kurt Barnert — modeled after the German artist Gerhardt Richter — escorted by his radiant Aunt Elisabeth (Saskia Rosendahl), visits an exhibition of “degenerate art.” A disdainful Nazi condemns abstract art, or anything other than pure socialist realism, as an aberration, proof of artists’ sickness and derangement. Kurt’s artistic talent blossoms as a boy, but Elisabeth suffers from severe psychotic episodes, and she is carted

off by Nazis after her family seeks medical treatment. Per the Nazi eugenics program, the feeble and disabled must be wiped from the gene pool. The film’s prologue-y first act concludes with the fire-bombing of Dresden intercut with Elizabeth’s processing through the eugenics program, a harrowing sequence. Kurt goes to art school, becomes an East German celebrity for his popular murals. He falls in love with fashion student Ellie Seeband (Paula Beer) who, we soon learn, is the daughter of Professor Carl Seeband (Sebastian Koch), a top lieutenant and doctor from the Nazi eugenics program. Professor Seeband has avoided exposure and prosecution for his pre-war crimes, but his past haunts and stalks him still. He disapproves of his daughter’s relationship with Kurt — the artist is “not a good match,” he tells his wife — and is so committed to his own bloodline that he performs an abortion on his daughter to tear them part. Undeterred, Kurt and Ellie flee to the West. At the famous avant-garde art academy in Dusseldorf, Kurt attempts to find his artistic style under the tutelage of one Antonius van Verten (Oliver Masucci). The film’s length, during these late scenes, asserts itself. And while Kurt ultimately perfects a photorealistic style, our butts are likely to have grown weary in their seats. These scenes of artistic composition, however, when Kurt harvests photos

Tom Schilling as Kurt Barnert in Never Look Away.

from his youth and images from newspaper clippings and then copies them meticulously in gray and black paint, are as mesmerizing to watch as the best Bob Ross tutorials. He is mindful of what his Aunt Elisabeth told him as a boy: Never look away, because all that is true holds beauty in it. Despite its length, the film is difficult to look away from as well. There is beauty in vast quantities here, and despair and grief and joy as well. The film’s episodic quality — the prewar Aunt Elisabeth sequence, the East German love story, the postwar Dusseldorf maturation — lends itself well to miniseries treatment, but there’s something almost radical about spending extended time with a

single subject in this way. The film’s restraint, its unhurriedness, is a daring directorial move in this era of 90-minute comedies and two-hour superhero movies. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, who previously directed the Oscar-winning The Lives of Others and the 2010 action film The Tourist, and also wrote the script for Never Look Away, has crafted a thematically interlocked narrative such that by the conclusion, we are intimately aware of how Kurt’s youth has influenced his art, how art has influenced life, and how little “realism” has influenced truth.

lonely. Frances has lost her mother and sees Greta as someone who can help fill that void. A friendship blossoms, and Frances helps Greta adopt a dog and stops by for dinner too. All is well and good until Frances discovers a stash of purses and realizes Greta employs the trick to befriend young women. She subsequently distances herself from the woman, but ditching her proves to be rather difficult. Greta begins stalking Frances, showing up outside the restaurant where

she works and calling her cell phone constantly. It’s only a matter of time before things escalate, and the film’s second half resorts to horror cliches as Greta reveals herself to be a real psycho. Huppert plays the part perfectly, but this artfully crafted film is too flawed for even a veteran actress of Huppert’s caliber to redeem. — Jeff Niesel

sallard@clevescene.com t@scenesallard

SPOTLIGHT: GRETA “THIS CITY IS GOING TO EAT you alive,” Erica (Maika Monroe) tells her roommate Frances (Chloe Grace Moretz) at the beginning of Greta, the new psychological thriller from director Neil Jordan (The Crying Game). It’s a good example of the poorly written dialogue in this ill-conceived movie, and Erica basically telegraphs the horrors to come in this preposterous film that’s destined to make a quick exit from theaters. It opens area-wide on Friday.

The flimsy premise is this: Frances decides to return a purse she found on the subway to its rightful owner, a woman named Greta (Isabelle Huppert). Since she found the woman’s address on her driver’s license, she’s easy enough to track down. Extremely grateful, Greta invites Frances in for coffee when she arrives at her home. Frances likes the matronly French woman who plays the piano for her and speaks fondly of her own daughter, a pianist who has moved to Paris. The woman is clearly

jniesel@clevescene.com t@jniesel

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

25


26

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019


EAT ON THE MARGINS How much do local restaurants really make on a dish? There’s a lot more than food costs in the equation By Douglas Trattner Photo by Karin McKenna

“I’VE GOT TO TELL YOU, I’M SO happy you’re writing this story because it’s a struggle to get these points across to people who don’t understand what goes into the cost of a menu item,” says Hunter Toth, chef and owner of Hook and Hoof restaurant in Willoughby. “I don’t think a lot of people realize that they’re paying for so much more than just the food.” It’s easy to stare a meatball in the eye and decry its cost. After all, what is a meatball other than a handful of ground beef, and we all know what ground beef goes for down at the Piggly Wiggly. What should be (but oddly is not) obvious is that the cost of ingredients is only a fraction of where the money collected for a dish ends up. There’s labor, rent, buildout, property taxes, insurance, utilities, linen service, glassware, cleaning supplies, payroll taxes, credit card fees … you get the idea. “When we wrote our business plan, we knew that we’d be servicing Willoughby in a finer-dining setting with good wine service, good cocktails and all the things that come with it,” Toth explains. “That means you have to buy good glassware, certain ice cubes, nicer uniforms for the staff to wear. You pay for all these things to create a comfortable, more high-end experience for your guests.” One of the most popular starters at Hook and Hoof is the braised beef cheek toasts, a delightful dish consisting of toasted baguettes capped with supple shredded beef set atop a thin schmear of tangy goat cheese and gilded with poblano and cranberry compote. At first blush, $15 might sound like a lot of dough for beef cheeks, a so-called “off cut.” “Most people know that filet, caviar and truffles are expensive, but people look at beef cheeks as cheap peasant food,” the chef explains. “What they don’t understand is that to make that meat tender and delicious requires a six- to eight-hour braise and results in 25 percent loss in fat, sinew and other trimmings.” Chef Brian Okin fields similar lamentations about the price of food over at his Rocky River meatball emporium Polpetta. A popular gripe

on Yelp goes something like, “ $14 for three little meatballs?!” “I think it’s a perception issue,” he says. “Because the Sunday Supper is something they can make at home, people assume that it should be less expensive. What they don’t realize is that we’re buying quality meats from independent local farmers. This is not boxed meat coming off the back of a Sysco truck.” Those “three little meatballs” add up to more than a half pound of fresh, local beef. They also come atop a bed of spaghetti topped with pomodoro sauce. By way of comparison, a similarly sized hamburger and fries at Cheesecake Factory costs $13. In addition to the cost of ingredients, that $14 gets spread across all of the aforementioned costs of doing business, as well as to cover losses from waste, comps, mistakes, theft, broken glassware, inefficient labor and spoilage. “This is a very unpredictable business,” Okin notes. “If we have big dips in business, we could lose product to spoilage.” Combined, the restaurants of Momocho and El Carnicero fly through approximately 2,500

avocados per week, which is not at all surprising if you’ve ever dined at either restaurant. Even the casual observer can see that nearly every diner begins his or her meal with one or more of the guacamole dishes. “By far our guacamoles are the best sellers on the menu,” say owner Eric Williams. “We built the entire dynamic of the restaurant around our atmosphere, craft margaritas and gourmet, unique guacamoles.” Depending on the price of avocados, the popularity of guacamole can be very good news to Williams’ bottom line or not-so-good news. That dish’s food cost percentage (cost of ingredients divided by the menu price) generally fluctuates between 40 percent, when perfect-but-pricy avocados from Northern California are in season, down to 29 percent in peak Mexican Hass season. But external factors can send that percentage soaring to as high as 50 percent, reports the chef. “As a matter of fact, I just received notice today that avocado prices will rise and possibly become out of stock as a result of a labor strike and cartels in Mexico causing big problems,” he says.

Ninja City in Gordon Square is Bac Nguyen’s third bite at the restaurant apple, so he fully grasps the importance of scrutinizing every penny that goes to food costs, labor costs and every other expenditure. Given that the most popular item on the appetizer section is the gyoza, one would expect him to try and boost his profit margins by trimming his labor costs. One of the simplest ways to accomplish that is by utilizing a premade product. “Labor is the bigger cost,” he says. “Plenty of restaurants sell premade dumplings, which cost a little more but will save you money on labor. There’s a fine line between efficiency and taking shortcuts. You try to do things as efficiently as you can, but I think people can taste the difference. I have not found a premade product out there that tastes the way I want it to.” Instead, Nguyen’s prep cooks fill hundreds of wrappers by hand with ground pork, minced vegetables and aromatics before steaming and searing them. “The gyoza dumplings are now our top sellers among the ‘little bites’ at Ninja City,” Nguyen reports. “They recently surpassed the spring rolls as the most popular.” Most diners know that the easiest way for a restaurant to boost razorthin profit margins is by selling booze. Every beer, wine and cocktail that is ordered goes a long way toward making a restaurant successful. But even those places that look by all outward appearances to be thriving financially are very likely simply affording a modest living for the principals. “I think that when we’re busy, people assume we’re killing it,” says Toth. “We’re probably driving Mercedes and have huge homes in high-class areas, when it’s literally the opposite. We’re not a sinking ship by any means, but there is such a perpetual loss of money that you have to keep guests coming in, know the costs of goods, and charge people properly.”

dtrattner@clevescene.com t@dougtrattner

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

27


EAT BITES 1261 W 76th St. | CLEVELAND | 216.999.7074

HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 4-7PM

$7 Shot & Beer $1 OFF=kZ_ml$3 Margaritas

LATE NIGHT FOOD MENU CATERING & PRIVATE PARTIES DINE-IN, TAKE-OUT & DELIVERY

HOURS of operation: MON - SAT 12pm - 2am

13603 Madison Ave. Lakewood, Ohio. 440.799.8343

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

JOIN US FOR

BRUNCH Every Saturday & Sunday 10:00am - 12:30pm

BLOODY MARY & MIMOSA SPECIALS

CAVS WATCHPARTY HEADQUARTERS!

$5.7h5ers Pitc g CAVS in mes DurG a 28

ALL SEASON LONG...

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

Ohio City Pizzeria to reopen in new partnership with West Side Catholic Center and Brandon Chrostowski By Vince Grzegorek OHIO CITY PIZZERIA IS COMING back, and it’s doing so with a new menu and mission. Come spring, it’ll reopen as a nonprofit with a revamped menu and full bar service in partnership with Brandon Chrostowski of Edwins and the West Side Catholic Center, which owns the building at 3223 Lorain Ave. where it’ll operate. Chrostowski will lead the charge on expanding and fine-tuning the pizzeria’s offerings, including calzones, pasta, sandwiches, vegetables and soups. He’ll also lead hiring, training and interior design. Meanwhile, the West Side Catholic Center will benefit with Ohio City Pizzeria assisting in serving its community and hiring clients, which is right in line with Edwins’ philosophy. “We recognized that we had a unique opportunity to reopen a popular eatery that will feed the local community, while supporting economic growth initiatives. In addition, Ohio City Pizzeria will help the West Side Catholic Center serve people in need of food, clothing, shelter, advocacy and a path to self-sufficiency,” said John Litten, executive director of the center, in a statement. “We plan to serve up an exceptional and fun experience, with an enhanced environment, engaging service and a robust but balanced menu. At the same time, Ohio City Pizzeria will train and employ clients of the WSCC and will support the mission through future profits.” “It will contribute to and sustain the community in an even more important way, by supporting the mission of the West Side Catholic Center, which benefits the entire Northeast Ohio community, regardless of residence, race or religion,” added Chrostowski. Expect full lunch and dinner service, and delivery, once Ohio City Pizzeria opens in a few months.

Cleveland Bagel Company’s New Eastside Shop Now Open Just about a year after plans were announced, Cleveland Bagel’s new eastside location on Carnegie

and East 77th Street is open (or was slated to be, on Tuesday or Wednesday, depending on final health inspection). Dan Herbst and his partner Geoff Hardman have enjoyed steady growth in the nearly six years since they first sold their homemade bagels at a farmers market. They graduated from Herbst’s apartment to a spot in the Cleveland Culinary Launch and Kitchen, then to space at Ohio City Pasta, and then their home on Detroit Avenue. The eastside shop’s offerings will be exactly like that of its westside sibling, with bagels, schmears, breakfast sandwiches, hummus, coffee and juices. The production facility and store occupies about 2,800 square feet of a facility that is also home to Souper Market and Produce Packaging. “The westside shop was basically as-is when we moved in,” said Herbst. “With this one, while it’s a little smaller, it was a blank space we could build out to be a little more efficient.” Fifteen new employees were hired, and Cleveland Bagel has been paying $15 an hour for awhile now and leading the charge on that front. Herbst said there will probably be a few more employees added soon and the possibility exists, with the proximity to the Cleveland Clinic, to add a second shift. On a related front, the new location will be open 7 days a week and will open at 6 a.m. rather than 6:30 a.m. to accommodate the Clinic’s 7 a.m. shift change. Once all the training is done, the kinks are worked out, and they get the lay of the land, expect Cleveland Bagel to use the space to explore expanding into frozen bagels retailing and wholesaling. “And now we’ll start looking for our third location,” said Herbst.

vgrzegorek@clevescene.com t@vincethepolack


Bringing

LOUISIANA-STYLE SEAFOOD BOILS & VIETNAMESE PHO NOODLES to Independence, Ohio

HAPPY HOUR

DINE IN or CARRY OUT

$

2.00 OFF

MONDAY- FRIDAY 3-8PM

APPS

Featuring...

w/Purchase of

HOUSE WINE....$5 Glass or $15 Bottles Any Flavored Vodka Lemonade....$6

HAPPY HOUR DRINK

6901 Rockside Road | Independence | 216-525-0028 | lobsternpho.com

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

29


ORDER ONLINE LUNCH, DINNER, BRUNCH, HAPPY HOUR. FRESH & LOCAL MENU CHANGES DAILY. 1104 Rowley Ave Cleveland, Ohio 44109 216.795.5345 | therowleyinn.com • Open Daily at 5:30am •

FOOD DRIVEN NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

6706 DETROIT AVE. CLEVELAND, OH 44102 216.862.7200 /NINJACITYKITCHENBAR 30

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

/NINJACITYCLE

TWT ..........................................11A - 10P FRIDAY .............................. 11A - 10:30P SATURDAY ....... 10A - 10:30P (Brunch) SUNDAY ................... 10A - 2P (Brunch)

16 N.Main Chagrin Falls James Balchak, Executive Chef 440.600.7770 | aurelabistro.com


| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

31


+/;: 3,=,3(:5 *  + .: = 3 / ) : +/; .96. 67 0+ 3 * < ,     

2875 EUCLID HEIGHTS BLVD CLEVELAND HEIGHTS WWW.BSIDELIQUORLOUNGE.COM

3!400-

3!4000 0-

CARLOS CA ARLO AR RLO JONES NES E ES

WHO? W WH HO? WEEKLY W LY & THE TH P.L. P.P.L.U.S. BA BAND AN AND ,)6 ,)6%0/$#! ,) ) 6% 6% 34 4

WED 2/27 (%)'(43-53)#(/0

WED 3/20

!,933!"/9$

$*#//,%9()'(s0/,!2)3 ./4().'-!*/2

4(504!34%-9-/6%-%.4WITH

FRI 3/22

"2/.$!6)$s0425

25.!7!9"2/4(%2

SUN 3/3

SUN 3/24

*/(.+!,-!.

TUE 3/5 4(%6)"%%80%2)%.#%

SAT 4/13

MCSTARKATZ

-%-"%23/&%+//34)+(//+!(

# ,%6%,

-/.

(/34%$"9

LADY LAMB 2%.!4!:%)'5%2

6)#%3/5,%42)#$*.5%2!

"%.*!-).,!:!2$!6)3

-/.

TUE 4/16

LAURA JANE GRACE

BIT BRIGADE 0%2&/2-).'-%'!-!.)))

ZELL *!::

& THE DEVOURING MOTHERS

DOUBLE FERRARI 9%,,/734/.%!0/#!,903%

# 45#+

4( 4(%-6)"%3s'2%4#(%.%0, 4(

8!..934!23

TORAE .53%80%2)%.#%

MR CARNIVORE REIGINLEIF

-%2#95.)/. #/.42/,4/0

SAT 3/9

THE EXPENDABLES

THU 3/28

THE MESSTHETICS &5'!:)

SUN 4/21

JOCELYN & CHRIS ARNDT 4(%-/2.).'")2$

-%-"%23/&

(%,%.-/.%9 RELAXER

HEALTH 9/54(#/$%

-/2'!.-%#!3+%9

FRI 3/29

THU 3/14

ALL THEM WITCHES PLAGUE VENDOR

YOB VOIVOD !-%.2!

FRI 3/15

SAT 3/30

VHS COLLECTION #!04!).+)$$

FRIDAY 3.1 THE GROOVE (10pm) DJ ESO +SAN.WAV SATURDAY 3.2 THE THOUSANDS (10pm) The best throwback jam in the land Presented by THE VARSITY SQUAD SUNDAY 3.3 OPEN STAGE SOUND SYSTEM (7pm) Full Band Open Mic Night Hosted by XELA

FRI 4/5

THE ARK BAND $!6%3-%,4:02/*%#4

J MASCIS WED 4/10

-/.

EMO NITE 02%3%.4%$"9

KYLE KINANE

%-/.)4%,!

THU 4/11

TUE 3/19

SCARFACE /.,9.!4)6%3/5.$3

MAX FROST -)+%9-)+%

-!.. -9.!-%)3"2!6/

UFOMAMMUT +).'3$%342/9

THE GROG SHOP PRESENTS AT

AGORA

-/.

",!#+30)2)4#2/7.

"%44%2/",)6)/.#/--5.)49#%.4%2

TUE 4/30

BLESSED 2/9!,"%!343 JAITE TUE 3/5 WED 3/6 35. 7%$ 3!4 3!4 3!4 4(5 &2) SAT 5/4 -/. 45% &2) 45% WED 5/15 &2) 35. 45% 45% 7%$

SET IT OFFâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SOLD OUT! PINEGROVEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SOLD OUT! "*/.%3s#ALLME#HRIS' '2!.$3/.s$ES2OCKSs"ARLOW,. 4(%!2+"!.$s4HE$AVE3MELTZ0ROJECT #,%6%,!.$+).'3!#4)/.0!#+%ARLY3HOW @S$!.#%.)'(4FEAT+%94/4(%-).4 &!-),9/&4(%9%!2s,9$)! 4(%3,!#+%23s'REEN2OOM2OCKERS ETANA ,%-/.(%!$3s4OMMY3TINSON2EPLACEMENTS +).'3+!,%)$/3#/0% -%7)4(/54 9/5s#523)6%s!00,%3%%$#!34 )2/.2%!'!.s3!#2%$2%)#(s,EEWAYs%NFORCED 4(%&5.+9"/.'/3-USICOF&RANK:APPA !*-)4#(%,,s-ARTEEN %9%(!4%'/$s.%'!4)6%!002/!#( 4(%&!).4s2ITUAL(OWLSs#LOSENESS "/5.#).'3/5,3Â&#x2C6;3/,$/54 -5$(/.%9s+ID#ONGO0OWERS

;PJRL[ZJHUILW\YJOHZLKMVYHSSZOV^ZH[[OLJS\I^P[OV\[HZLY]PJLMLLI`WOVULMVYH Z\YJOHYNLVYH[HU`VM[OLMVSSV^PUNSVJH[PVUZ!

)90;;(5@»:9,*69+:/67*SL]LSHUK,90,:;9,,;.<0;(9:>PSSV\NOI`3667;YLTVU[4@405+»:,@,9,*69+:3HRL^VVK 9,*69+9,=63<;065*SL]LSHUK/LPNO[Z9,*69+:/67>PSSV^PJR:8<(9,9,*69+:(RYVU;/,=05@3.966=,)LKMVYK

| clevescene.com clev cl eves esce cene ne.com com m | February Febr Fe brua uary ry 27 27 - March Marc Ma rchh 5, 5, 22019 0199 01

TUESDAY 3.5 LYRICAL RHYTHMS (9pm) Live Band Open Mic Poetry Hip Hop Soul Experience

SUN 4/28

FRESH PRODUCE PHASESS!,"5-2%,%!3%

SAT 3/16

^^^[PJRL[Ã&#x2026;`JVT

THURSDAY 2.28 THE HOOKUP (10pm) College ID night with DJ MIKE FILLY

MONDAY 3.4 SHITSHOW KARAOKE (9pm)

-/.

32

MURDER BY DEATH

TOBE NWIGWE

"!,,9(// +!3($/54

;0*2,;:;6.96.:/67,=,5;:(9,(=(03()3,;/96<./

THU 4/18

WED 3/27

7).4%2",!#+/544/52

Twitter & Instagram @BSIDECOVENTRY

THE COATHANGERS BIG BITE

TOKYO POLICE CLUB $)::9

R/+!9#(%s+9,%-!#+ THE CZAR

MAGGIE MA AAGGGGIE ROSE AGGIE

FRI 4/12

CHIP THA RIPPER #%,s0?&2-$!42)"%

A.J. & THE WOODS 2!#(%,3(/244

FFRI 3/8

Happy Hour Every Day 6â&#x20AC;&#x201D;9 PM

TUE 9/17

*%..9,%7)3

THE GROG SHOP PRESENTS AT

HOUSE OF BLUES

()00/#!-053

-/. 

FRI 7/19

WITH 3!-)!

BELLE & SEBASTIAN THE GROG SHOP PRESENTS AT

"%!#(,!.$

J.I.D. FRI 5/17 *!-%34/7.2%6)6!, TUE 5/7


Photo by Michael Maxxis

Photo by Marc Scrivo

A FEW YEARS AGO, FANS BEGAN to tell singer and multiinstrumentalist Royston Langdon (former lead singer of British rock band Spacehog) and Jimmy Gnecco (songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and frontman for alt-rock band Ours) that they should tour together. Earlier this year, the two finally hit the road on a co-headlining tour. They’ll perform at 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 27, at the Beachland Tavern. Langdon is touring in support of his debut solo LP, Everything’s Dandy, which he released under his new moniker Leeds (a nod to his U.K.

hometown), and Gnecco will play an all-acoustic set featuring tracks from Ours’ fifth studio album, New Age Heroine II. Langdon’s album features Bowie-inspired vocals and somber melodies, and the Ours album is cut from the same musical cloth as anthemic rock acts such as Radiohead. In a recent conference call, the two spoke about their respective careers. Can you each talk about your backgrounds a bit and specifically discuss what kind of music you listened to early on? Gnecco: I grew up listening to a lot of Motown stuff and a lot of John Lennon

and a lot of Bowie. Into my teenage years, I got into Michael Jackson and some of that dance stuff. I loved Run DMC, and I loved early rap. Toward the end of high school, I got obsessed with the Doors and with a lot of the English bands like the Cure and Depeche Mode and Suede and Morrissey and Roy’s band [Spacehog]. Langdon: I suppose the Beatles and the Kinks and that kind of thing influenced me. I liked Queen and Bowie too, and got into Brian Eno and Roxy Music records and all that. From there, Talking Heads and the stuff that was on Sire Records. I was also into Run DMC and the Beastie Boys,

who were a big thing in England for a while. Talk about how you first met and how this tour came together? Gnecco: We just met a few weeks ago when we started the tour. I have been a fan of Roy’s for years. I would always tell people who didn’t know about Spacehog that they should hear them. As the years went on and I did my thing, people started to tell me that it would be great for us to tour together. Fans started to even write to me saying they would love to see that show. Our agents were able to help bring us together.

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

33


Can you each talk about what it was like to make the transition from frontman of a band to solo artist? Gnecco: We’re both pretty much up there naked. This time around, I have someone playing some keyboards with me. I’m accustomed to it. I started doing it in tandem this way years ago. I’m as used to it as I am with the band. It’s often liberating for me because I don’t have to stick to any set or any time. It’s freeing this way. I miss the big sound on occasion. After about an hour-plus, there’s only so many ways you can play the guitar. I do miss the drums and the electric guitar and the rhythm section. Langdon: I really enjoy it. I haven’t done it as much as Jimmy has in the past. It’s been great watching him do it and see him lead the way. We follow a similar path. We start off somewhere and then see where it goes. The machine of the rock band can be great, and it’s a very visceral experience, but this feels like we can go where the heart leads. You’re both touring in support of new albums. Can you each talk about those releases a bit? Langdon: My record came out quite a while ago now. For me, it’s a whole new language of making music. It all

thinking about it, but I just jumped in so much that I didn’t get the place situated or treated for sound. I was like an irresponsible kid in a messy room. Because it was so intense, I just started out and didn’t know necessarily where the songs would go or if I would call it an Ours record or a solo record, which is kind of the same thing. I engineered and mixed it all. I played a lot of instruments. It was a long process, and I’m still in it. I recorded about 50 songs, but I just released 10. There’s another 20 ready for a big Ours record. Talk about what your sets will be like on this tour and how you think they’ll complement each other? Langdon: I like that thing where — sometimes it happens, and sometimes it doesn’t — there’s an audience connection. I like watching Jimmy, who has an incredible voice and a way of holding the audience, but more than that, [I like] the way he handles himself. Everyone’s ego comes to another place. That’s what I’m aiming for. In terms of how I get there, I don’t really know. I try not to think about it too much. It’s easy to fall back on what feels familiar. What I love about doing this is that there’s no safety net and sometimes with the audience, I can’t do anything wrong. I can play the new songs and Spacehog songs and go into other people’s songs. I can go into wherever I feel is the right place

LEEDS (ROYSTON LANGDON) & JIMMY GNECCO (OURS) 8:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27 BEACHLAND TAVERN, 15711 WATERLOO RD. 216-383-1124. TICKETS: $20, beachlandballroom.com

34

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

started with the song “Someone.” I wanted to make songs that felt more literal. Some of the songs are older and I put them together for the album. I did it with [producer] Bryce Goggin, who I have worked with for 25 years. He did all the Spacehog stuff. It was a lot more downbeat than anything I’ve done before. It’s just sort of where I felt comfortable. It’s an honest reflection of where I am now and holds that up as a mirror to the listener too. If you know what I’ve done previously and you get to this, it makes sense, I think. I think Jimmy’s record is more current. Gnecco: I love Roy’s record. It’s great hearing him do the songs this way each night too. For me, there’s so much behind this record. A few years ago, I jumped into this studio where I’ve been working since 16. The building was rented out for a few years, but it became available and I jumped back in and had 200 songs that I was looking at. It was daunting

at the right time. I sort of have a place where I start the show, but not even that. I just hope for the connection. The thing that’s great for me is that it doesn’t matter whether it’s a couple of people or a couple of thousand people in the same room, it’s the beauty of that connection. Gnecco: I agree with all that. I do my best to be present with everyone and not force any moments that happen. It’s just that thing where you’re able to connect with people. It’s a calm space, but it can be really exciting. You give in to the moment. That’s what I’m shooting for as well. I’m playing songs from all of my records and pull out a cover as well. Roy and I have been playing a Bowie song together each night, which has been a highlight for me.

jniesel@clevescene.com t@jniesel


@masoniccle @hobcleveland

@masoniccleveland

J U S T A N N O U N C E D - O N S A L E F R I DAY

BUY TICKETS AT

TO MASONIC CLEVELAND

COMING SOON

COMING SOON

LIVE AT MASONIC CLEVEL AND

Buy tickets at Ticketmaster.com or 216-523-BLUE

MASONIC CLEVELAND: 3615 Euclid Ave, Cleveland OH 44115 HOUSE OF BLUES: 308 Euclid Ave, Cleveland OH 44114 masoniccleveland.com / houseofblues.com | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

35


36

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019


LIVEWIRE

all the live music you should see this week Photo courtesy of Red Light Management

WED

02/27

Yelena Eckemoff: 7 p.m., $15. Bop Stop. Elvis Depressedly/Niights/The Cordial Sins/Bare Walls: 7 p.m., $13 ADV, $15 DOS. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Eric Everett Jazz Quintet featuring Charlene Smythe: 7 p.m., $10. Nighttown. Excision/Squnto/Sullivan King/ HE$H: 8 p.m., $40-$50. Masonic Auditorium. Heights Music Hop Acoustic Series Featuring Aj & The Wood/Rachel Shorrt/Alyssa Boyd: 8:30 p.m., $5. Grog Shop. Leeds (Royston Langdon) & Jimmy Gnecco (Ours): 8:30 p.m., $20. Beachland Tavern. Scythian/West Awake: 7:30 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. Sheck Wes: 8 p.m., $29.50 ADV, $34 DOS. House of Blues. Thelma and the Sleeze/Biitchseat/ Time Cat/Joey Nix and His Band: 8:30 p.m., $7. Happy Dog.

THU

02/28

Blues All-Stars with Crazy Marvin & the Blues Express: 8 p.m., free. Beachland Ballroom. Gaelic Storm: 9 p.m., $25 ADV, $28 DOS. House of Blues. Grant Green Jr. featuring Mike Clark: 8 p.m., $25. Nighttown. GS Harper/Kate Kooser: 8 p.m., $8 ADV, $10 DOS. Beachland Tavern. Mat Kerekes/Jetty Bones/Jacob Sigman/Salt Creek/Dark Spring: 8 p.m., $13 ADV, $15 DOS. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Reginleif/Soleo/Yuck Puddle: 8 p.m., $5. CODA. Taste My Movement/Okay’che/Kyle Mack/Bron David/PTru: 8 p.m., $10 ADV$, $12 DOS. Grog Shop. Tri-C’s JazzFest Academy: 7 p.m., free. Bop Stop. Loudon Wainwright III: 8 p.m., $30-$40. The Kent Stage.

FRI

03/01

Adrian Belew/Saul Zonana: 8 p.m., $25-$48. Beachland Ballroom. Blue Lunch Featuring Billy Seward: 8 p.m., $20. Bop Stop. DJ LDC’s Soul Music & Other Music for the Soul: 6 p.m., free. Happy Dog.

Los Lobos returns to the Music Box. See: Friday.

Amy Grant: 8 p.m. 8 p.m. Hard Rock Rocksino. Grant Green Jr. featuring Mike Clark: 8:30 p.m., $25. Nighttown. Joey Harkum/personsplacesthings: 8:30 p.m., $8 ADV, $10 DOS. Beachland Tavern. Hiram-Maxim/The Cowbody/ Deche/Evil Deacon: 9 p.m., $6. Happy Dog. Infera Bruo/Incoluation/Genocide Order: 8 p.m., $8 ADV, $10 DOS. Now That’s Class. It Looks Sad/Pollen Eyes/Tunnel Songs/Slow Burn (in the Locker Room): 7 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. J Boog/Earth Kry/Eddy Dyno: 9 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. Grog Shop. Los Lobos/Colin Dussault & Jim Tigue: With the mantle of TexMex zydeco rock ’n’ roll gracing their legacy, Los Lobos have been infusing the American scene with a south-of-the-border flair for more than four decades. They’ve dropped many albums, including 2015’s Gates of Gold, which keeps pace with David Hidalgo’s headnodding, rhythmic songwriting and the all-hands-on-deck knack for getting listeners dancing and thinking. Everything from the upbeat “Made to Break Your Heart” to the downtrodden “There I Go” is of a piece on this one, and one would do well to rewind a bit and revisit the band’s classics, as well. For my money, their best tune is the haunting “When the

Circus Comes,” which details the pain and agony of a relationship fading into the ether. (Eric Sandy) 8 p.m. Music Box Supper Club. Ma Holos/Jivviden/The Venus Flytraps: 8 p.m., $10. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Rachel & the Beatnik Playboys (in the Supper Club): 8 p.m., $10. Music Box Supper Club. Lev Snowe/Yellow Paper Planes/ The Rosies: 8 p.m., $5 ADV, $8 DOS. CODA. Switchfoot/Tyson Motsenbocker/ Colony House: 7:15 p.m., $33.50 ADV, $37.50 DOS. House of Blues. Tri-C JazzFest Jam Session: 11 p.m., free. Bop Stop. Jackie Warren: 10:30 p.m., free. Nighttown.

SAT

03/02

Dublin City Ramblers (in the Supper Club): 7 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. Erotic City: All Vinyl Prince Night: 9 p.m., $5. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Carlos Jones and the P.L.U.S. Band: 9:30 p.m., $12 ADV,$15 DOS. Grog Shop. Jason Kaminski/Sure, Machine/ Leonard Baum: 8 p.m., $5. CODA. Oblivion Project: 8 p.m., $20. Bop Stop. Pleasure Leftists/Bad Noids/ Perverts Again: 8 p.m., $7. Now That’s Class. Quinn XCII/Ashe/Christian French: 8 p.m., $28.50 ADV,

$32.50 DOS. House of Blues. Ty Segall and White Fence/ AXIS:SOVA: It’s hard to keep up with L.A. singer-songwriter Ty Segall. At 31, the prolific artist has already amassed 10 studio albums to his name. Last year, he teamed up with White Fence (aka Tim Presley) once again for a record called Joy, which they’re now touring behind. The jaunt includes tonight’s sold-out stop at the Beachland Ballroom. Each Segall album differs musically, but this second effort for the pair offers up sweet little nuggets of rock, with most tunes rarely making the two-minute mark. None of it’s super memorable, but you’ll find yourself enjoying the ideas nonetheless. Tonight’s show is part of the Beachland Ballroom’s Anniversary Weekend. (Laura Morrison) 8:30 p.m., $22 ADV, $24 DOS. Beachland Ballroom. Special EFX Featuring Chieli Minucci: 7 p.m. Nighttown. Jackie Warren: 10:30 p.m., free. Nighttown. When Particles Collide/Album/ Back Talk: 9 p.m., $5. Happy Dog.

SUN

03/03

Honey Cutt/Xanny Stars/Self Taught No Lessons: 8:30 p.m., $5. Happy Dog. Hot Flash Heat Wave/Field Medic/ Field Trip: 7 p.m., $13 ADV, $15 DOS. Mahall’s 20 Lanes.

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

37


KentStage =HGÍMFBLLMA>L>@K>:MLAHPLMB<D>MLHGL:E>GHP

Loudon Wainwright III The Earls Of Leicester

Lonestar

Tue. Mar 5

Thur Feb 28

The Prince Project Sat. Mar. 9

Tab Benoit

Fri. Mar 8

Graham Nash

Wed Mar 13

Sat Mar 16 @ Akron Civic

LIVEWIRE Lunasa/Andrew McManus: 7 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. March Noise Lunch with All Data Transmitted/A Rabbit Starvation/Arms & Armour/ bbob drake + Kristen Ban Drake/ Bovine Centurion/8 Cylinder/ Guns n’ Rosenbergs/Incite Joke/ Max Hyde-Perry/Modular Moose/ Sam Harmon/Sean Holt: 4 p.m., free. Now That’s Class. Mr. Carnivore/Reginleif/John Kalman: 8:30 p.m., $5. Grog Shop. Matt Nathanson: 8 p.m., $39.50 ADV, $43 DOS. Beachland Ballroom. Rambling House: 7 p.m., $20. Bop Stop. Webster, Carr & Custy: 7 p.m., $15. Nighttown.

MON T SOLD OU Blackberry Smoke Break It Down Tour Sun Mar. 17

Pat Metheny SIde Eye Sat. Mar 23

Lonesome Traveler w/Peter Yarrow

Skerryvore Thu Mar. 21

Fri Mar. 22

Swamp Pop Legends Tour

David WIlcox Beth Nielsen Chapman Fri Mar 29

Jimmy Hall, C.J Chenier, Roddie Romero & The Rockin’ Cajuns Sat Mar 30

JUST ANNOUNCED

Pat Travers

Tue May 14 & Wed May 15

& Vanilla Fudge

Nil Lofgren Thu May 16 Thu Sept 5

ALL SHOWS AT THE KENT STAGE UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED 38

Tickets available at thekentstage.com or 877-987-6487 GMK[w‰Šcw„iŠˆ{{Š©a{„ŠBe~…JJHJF | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

03/04

Abjects/Shagg/Ruckzuck: 8 p.m., $8. Now That’s Class. Reggie Bowens: 7 p.m., $12. Bop Stop. Psychedelic Porn Crumpets/ Frankie & the Witch Fingers/ Oregon Space Trail of Doom: 8 p.m., $15 ADV, $18 DOS. Beachland Tavern. Thursday: 8:30 p.m., $35 ADV, $38 DOS. Agora Theatre. Bob Weir and the Wolf Brothers: 7 p.m., $39.50-$69.50. Masonic Auditorium.

TUE

03/05

The Beths + Bad Bad Hats/The Village Bicycle: 8 p.m., $15 ADV, $17 DOS. Beachland Ballroom. The Earls of Leicester: 8 p.m., $30$45. The Kent Stage. Fat Tuesday Party with Blue Lunch: 7 p.m., $10-$28. Music Box Supper Club. Kings Destroy/Forming the Void/ After the Sun: 8 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Now That’s Class. Ella Mai/Kiana Lede/Lucky Daye: 8 p.m., $27.50 ADV, $33 DOS. House of Blues. Set It Off: 6:30 p.m., $18 ADV, $20 DOS. Grog Shop. Thursday: 8:30 p.m., $35 ADV, $38 DOS. Agora Theatre. University Jazz Night: 7 p.m., $5. Bop Stop.

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene

532 W. MARKET ST. AKRON, OH 330-376-7171

SAT. MARCH 9

PUT-IN-BAY ISLAND PARTY

Feat. MIKE MAD DOG ADAMS

THURS. MARCH 14

Y&T SAT. MARCH 16

NELSON RANGELL & ADAM HAWLEY FRI. MARCH 22

ERIC DARIUS FRI. MAR 29

PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE FRI. APRIL 19

DAVID ALLAN COE FRI. APRIL 26

FOGHAT

SAT. APRIL 27

ASBURY ALL-STARS SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY TRIBUTE

FRI. MAY 3 & SAT. MAY 4

PEABO BRYSON SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE! www.thetangier.com BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE FOR EVENTS


| clevescene.com m | February 27 - March 5, 2019

39


BREAKING NEWS... MURDER MYSTERY DINNER

We have some exciting events coming up at Stella’s Music Club!

FEB 28/MAR 7, 14, 21, 28 FRIDAY, MARCH 8

ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

Enjoy a show on us… Cut this ad out for FREE ADMISSION to one of our rockin’ FEBRUARY events!

#WalkInRockOut with us this month! www.stellasmusic.com @stellasmusicclub

(John Lennon Tribute)

ST. PATRICK’S DAY WEEKEND! \h_BcWhY^GK©NPIFfc

MARY’S LANE

...HOT OFF THE INTERNET PRESS. O N LY AT C L E V E S C E N E . C O M

iWjBcWhY^GL©MfcCZeehiLPFFfc

THE BURKE IRISH DANCE ACADEMY FOLLOWED BY

KENNEDY & JIM RILEY IRISH MUSIC

ikdBcWhY^GM©ZeehiGFPFFWc

ST. PATRICK’S DAY! XW]f_f[hi7

JAMESON, BEER & Yehd[ZX[[\if[Y_Wbi7 fecfekiWiiP 10:30AM-5:30PM ^WhfY_joP 6:30PM-10:30PM Z`P 10:30PM-CLOSE GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & DRINK Book Your Special Events With Us! 1414 RIVERSIDE DRIVE LAKEWOOD HGLCHHGCIKFF©l…‰~y‚‹xDy…ƒ

40

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019


$5 mules HAPPY HOUR

till 8p

m DAI

LY

SLASH

BOOK YOUR PARTY TODAY FOR FREE.

LOVES OUR GAMEROOM!

GO TO TIMEWARPBAR.COM FOR RESERVATIONS

• BIG BALL BOWLING • BILLIARDS • SHUFFLE PUCK • GOLDEN TEE • POWER PUTT • NBA JAM

BACHELORETTE, CORPORATE, BIRTHDAY OR ANY OCCASION.

FRIDAY, MARCH 1

“Coolest local live band venue I’ve seen in a long time” - Slash

SATURDAY, MARCH 2

DISCO INFERNO

ACE MOLAR

FRIDAY, MARCH 8

SATURDAY, MARCH 9

TC & THE VISITORS

SPAZMATICS

Happy Hour!

POWER HOUR!

KARAOKE

Every Day

sun-Thurs 8-9p

THURSDAY & SUNDAY

Until 8pm!

$2.00 Drinks!

9pm-1am

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

41


UPCOMING ENTERTAINMENT!

BAND OF THE WEEK ADRIAN BELEW By Jeff Niesel Photo courtesy of Glass Onyon PR

MEET THE BAND: Adrian Belew (guitars,

vocals), Jordan Perlson (drums), Saul Zonana (keyboards, guitar and vocals) and Julie Slick (bass) LIFEHOUSE MAR 7

MICHAEL CARBONARO LIVE! MAR 8

LARRY THE CABLE GUY APR 6

JIM JEFFERIES MAR 9

4/13 The Four Horsemen

3/14 An Evening With Marie & The Osmonds 3/16 Clint Black

The Ultimate Tribute to Metallica

4/19 Countess Luann And Friends

Killin’ Time 30th Anniversary Tour

4/26 Tyler Henry

4/11 Robin Trower 4/12 Jo Koy

The Hollywood Medium

5/16 Carrot Top

Break The Mold Tour

UPCOMING ENTERTAINMENT! ED PRESENT

STILL REINVENTING AFTER ALL THESE YEARS : The late Frank Zappa once

famously declared, “Adrian Belew reinvented the guitar.” Belew says the pronouncement means a lot to him, even if he’s not sure it’s entirely true. “That’s a heavy mantle to have,” says Belew, who’s played with acts such as King Crimson and David Bowie over the course of his career. “I don’t know if I reinvented the guitar, but I’m always reinventing what I do, period. I’m always designing new sounds and checking out new gear. Creativity is the whole reason I do all of this stuff. I’m not trying to be a rock star. Whether it’s a new drum part or a guitar sound or a new song or whatever it may be, it’s a good thing.”

BY

TIME TRAVELLER

THE JERSEY BEAT BAND

A Tribute To The Moody Blues

A Magical Tribute To The Four Seasons

MAR 1

MAR 8

THE NEW QUARTET: For 13 years, Julie

Slick has played bass with Belew, so she’s not new to his reconfigured quartet, but the shift from a power trio to a quartet gives Belew more flexibility. “We imported a new drummer who lives in Nashville and another Nashville fellow named Saul Zonana, who has been our opening act and traveled with us,” he says. “We finally got the bright idea to have him play in the band. He plays guitar and keyboards and sings. Some of the set is still a power trio.” A GOOD RUN WITH KING CRIMSON: Belew says he “cherishes”

ROCK OF AGES

WARD ANDERSON

Def Leppard Tribute

Featuring Larry XL

MAR 9

MAR 15 & 16

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM AND THE ROCKSINO BOX OFFICE, OPEN DAILY FROM 1PM - 9PM. ALL TICKET SALES FINAL.

VEGAS EXPERIENCE. OHIO ADDRESS. HRRNP.COM • 330.908.7625

FIND YOUR RHYTHM

MUST BE 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER. FOR FREE, CONFIDENTIAL HELP 24/7, CALL THE OHIO RESPONSIBLE GAMBLING HELPLINE AT 1.800.589.9966 OR VISIT WWW.ORG.OHIO.GOV.

42

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

the time he spent with the prog rock act. He recorded several albums with the band and toured the world with it too. “The period in which the lyrics were written by me and the songs were co-written by me and [guitarist] Robert Fripp defined a certain era,” he says. “The band was always considered dark and outside, and women might not have liked it, but I felt that as the frontman and singer that I should be the link between the audience and the band and show people that it was okay to like the band. That was the role I took on.” INFATUATED WITH ANIMALS: Belew has a handful of songs about animals and says he’s loved animals since he was a

kid. “I grew up with a fascination for elephants and rhinos and birds and fish, and everything else,” he says. “At one point in my song-writing growth, I realized you could talk about those things metaphorically. You could talk about a rhino being the last one in the world and make it an emotion that human beings could understand and relate to. I also realized I could mimic the sounds and get good bird and animal sounds. It’s a way of having my own corner of the universe that no one else seems too interested in.” WHY YOU SHOULD HEAR HIM:

His latest album, Pop-Sided, finds Belew channeling his various influences. He wrote about 30 songs that he whittled down to the 11 that appear on the album. “Ten of them are pop songs,” he says. “They’re my kind of pop songs, which means they’re a cross between the Beatles and King Crimson. The eleventh song is a beautiful guitar piece. It’s one of those situations where I’m touring internationally so much, I just have a few weeks home here and there. I finally had a little time to carve out for the new record, so I’m really happy about that.” WHERE YOU CAN HEAR HIM:

adrianbelew.net. WHERE YOU CAN SEE HIM:

Adrian Belew performs with Saul Zonana at 8 p.m. on Friday, March 1, at the Beachland Ballroom.

jniesel@clevescene.com t@jniesel


' ;

BA

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

43


TWO BUSTY BABES

OFF ONE FREE ANY10% DVD, GAME OR VHS

ADULT MOVIE RENTAL with 2 or more paid. Expires 3/13/19

purchase of $25 or more. Expires 3/13/19

YOUR FANTASY COME TRUE! NUDE FULL BODY MASSAGE WITH TWO GORGEOUS BUSTY BI-FRIENDLY BEAUTIES 45 Min for only $120

Call Today at 216-359-1169 NEW TIME CLOSINGM 10P

44

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

Available Monday - Saturday 11am-10pm | Closed Sunday

CASH PAYMENT ONLY!


SAVAGE LOVE OUTER LIMITS By Dan Savage I’m a gay guy in my late 40s with a straight sister in her early 50s. She’s been married for a bit over two decades to guy who always registered as a “possible” on my average-togood gaydar. But I put “BIL,” aka my brother-in-law, in the “improbable” bucket because he actively wooed my sister, was clearly in love with her, and fathered four boys with her, all in their late teens now. I’m sure you already saw this coming: It turns out BIL has been far more “probable” than I thought. He has a boyfriend but is still very much closeted and denies he is gay. My sister has apparently known about this arrangement for four years, but has kept it a secret for the kids’ sake. But she recently filed for divorce and told our parents and me what’s been going on. Their kids have been informed about the divorce, but not about their father’s boyfriend. BIL needs to gay-man-up and admit the truth to himself and the rest of his family and start the healing process. That’s obvious. Unfortunately, we’re not close, and my sister is left holding this terrible secret while her bewildered kids watch their parents’ marriage crumble with no clue why. I think the kids deserve the truth, and that neither my sister nor the kids can start to heal until that happens. If BIL won’t do the right thing, my sister is going to have to tell them the truth. What can I do to help her with this? I don’t want to pressure her and I can’t tell the kids without causing a big stink. But dammit, Dan, someone needs to start speaking some truth in that house. — Dishonest Gay Brother-In-Law Secret second families — and a secret boyfriend of four years counts — aren’t secrets that keep. So your nephews are gonna find out about dad’s boyfriend sooner or later, DGBIL, and sooner is definitely better. Because in the absence of the truth, they’re likely to come up with alternate explanations that are far worse. And when they inevitably discover the real reason, your nephews’ anger at having been lied to or left in the dark will reopen the wounds. Backing way the hell up: Seeing as BIL “was clearly in love with” your sister and remained married to her for two decades, DGBIL, I don’t think BIL is a closeted gay man. My money’s on closeted bisexual man.

I shall now say something that will delight my bisexual readers: I’m sure you’d like to live in a world where everyone is out, DGBIL, or, even better, a world where no one ever had to be in. But in the world we live in now, bisexuals are far less likely to be out than gays and lesbians, DGBIL, and the belief that a guy is either gay or straight keeps many bisexual guys closeted. Because if a bisexual guy who’s married to a woman knows he’s going to be seen as gay if he tells the truth — if no one will ever believe he loved his wife or wanted all those kids — he’s unlikely to ever come out. So you can’t fault BIL for not being out, DGBIL, when it’s attitudes like yours that keep bi guys closeted in the first place. I shall now say something that will piss off my bisexual readers: A family-minded bi guy can have almost everything he wants — spouse, house, kids — without ever having to come out so long as that bi guy winds up with an opposite-sex partner. Coming out is a difficult conversation and it’s one many bi people choose to avoid. And who can blame them? Back to your nephews, DGBIL: They should be told the truth but you shouldn’t be the one to tell them. Their parents should. Sit down with your sister and make the argument I did above: Yes, your kids are upset about the divorce and it will add to their upset to learn their father is in a relationship with a man. But they’re going to be angry about being lied to when they inevitably find out. And if she’s keeping this secret solely at BIL’s request, well, he can’t ask that of her if doing so will damage her relationship with her kids. You should have a conversation with BIL. Open it by telling him that life is long, marriages are complicated, and that you know he loved your sister. But to stick the dismount here — to end his marriage without destroying his relationship with his kids — he can’t hide from them. If he doesn’t want to tell his boys about his boyfriend because he fears he might lose them, DGBIL, then he’ll have to cut his kids out of his life — and that means losing them for sure. And then butt the fuck out.

mail@savagelove.net t@fakedansavage

HALF HOUR FREE

Real Singles, Real Fun...

1-216-377-6292 More Numbers: 1-800-926-6000 Livelinks.com, 18+ | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

45


+++++

FIVE STAR MASSAGE by Vanessa

PHONE LINES 100’s OF SEXY LATINO SINGLES Meet Hot Latin Locals! Get your FREE trial! 18+ 216.626.7777 440.325.7777 www.questchat.com

ALL KINDS OF SINGLES Straight 216-912-2222 Curious 216-912-6000 FREE Code 3227, 18+

CALL NOW, MEET TONIGHT!

5’6 long blonde hair with blue eyes. I specalize in deep tissue massage. Call me to schedule @

216-273-5802 +++++

FREE to try! 18+ 216.626.7777 / 440.325.7777 Other Cities: 1.888.257.5757 www.questchat.com

EXPLICIT CHAT WITH SEXY LOCALS

Get your FREE TRIAL! 18+ CALL The Night Exchange NOW! 216.502.4388 / 440.499.6400 www.nightexchange.com

HOT LOCAL URBAN SINGLES!

Are looking to hook up now! Try it FREE! 18+ 216.367.1010 / 440.424.0303 www.metrovibechatline.com

Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 216-377-6292 or 800-926-6000 www.livelinks.com 18+

MEET GAY & BI LOCALS

Browse & Respond FREE! 216-912-6000 Use FREE Code 2642, 18+

Where Local Girls Go Wild!

Call 216-377-6290 or 800-700-6666 Try FREE! www.redhotdateline.com

WHERE SINGLES MEET

Listen to Ads & Reply FREE! 216-912-2222 FREE Code 3228, 18+

FUN SEXY SINGLES

Send Message FREE! 216-912-2222 Use FREE Code 3229, 18+

BREAKING NEWS...

...HOT OFF THE INTERNET PRESS. O N LY AT C L E V E S C E N E . C O M

Playmates Playmatesand and soul soulmates... mates...

Your premier choice for classy & fun entertainment providing firstrate entertainment for all occasion, including a wet & wild bachelor parties, divorce parties, birthday celebrations & retirement parties! Whatever the reason is that you request our services, rest assured that we have what you’re looking for! Our carefully selected adorable playmates cater to any occasion! We offer a diverse selection of exotic, classy, sophisticated & gorgeous ladies for you to choose from.

FEEL FREE TO TEXT US!

MISSED ANhiring. EVENT? We’re CATCH UP WITH SLIDESHOWS. CHECK OUT OPENINGS ONLYCLEVESCENE.COM AT CLEVESCENE.COM AT

SIT DOWN WITH YOUR GUESTS.

Cleveland:

216-377-6336 18+ MegaMates.com

46

| clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

WISH YOU WERE HERE.

ADVERTISE

WITH SCENE. Call 216-241-7550 for more information.


Massage - Certified CARING MASSAGE Days & Evenings, weekends. Warm candlelight atmosphere. Lakewood/West Suburbs Linda 216-221-5935

VANESSA’S FIVE STAR MASSAGE Long blond hair, blue eyes & strong hands for deep tissue appointments. 216-273-5802 Please do not text message.

Who are you after dark? FREE TRIAL

Massage - Licensced Relaxation Limited 3834 west 140 st Cleveland Ohio 44111 The Relaxation In Town Walk Ins Welcome 216-671-3813 Relaxationlimited.com 12pm -9 pm Mon -Sat

Bulletin Board WANTS TO PURCHASE minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201

Help Wanted NOW HIRING Seeking Massage Specialist. Call 216-298-4098 for details

NOW HIRING for BRASSICA at the Van Aken District in Shaker Heights! Come and join our busy Sandwich & Salad Shop, known for its exceptional food, nutritious ingredients and remarkably friendly people. Full and part-time hours available. $12+/ hour + Free Meals. Please Apply Online: www.brassicas.com/sh

• WALK-INS WELCOME •

Relaxation has never been better! Low rates, great friendly staff. Cleveland

(216)671-3813

1-216-377-6290

3834 W. 140 ST. | Cleveland, OH 44111

HOURS:

Mon ~ Fri : 12PM ~ 10 PM Sat : 12 PM ~ 8 PM | Sun 1pm - 7pm

More Numbers: 1-800-700-6666 Redhotdateline.com 18+

FREE TRIAL

Discreet Chat Guy to Guy

216.626.0320

clevescene.com

Escape into a world of total comfort, relaxation and rejuvenation!

LUXURIOUS EXPERIENCE. AFFORDABLE PRICING (440)545-1213

7043 Pearl Rd | Middleburg Heights | 44130 allendeshaunwleeness.com

HOME BUYERS!!!

FREE MONEY!!! DOWN PAYMENT PROGRAM* BUY YOUR DREAM HOME!!! Plus Get Up To $100k + More* (for new kitchen, new roof, new carpet, appliances, paint, basement waterproofing, windows, heating & cooling)*

NEVER EVER EVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO BUY A HOME!!! Great Low Fixed Interest Rates* When YOUR dreams come true... OUR dreams come true!!!

440.342.7355 (SELL) To Buy...or Sell

Call Grizzell *Some restrictions will apply *for those who qualify... we consider... Se Habla Espanol

'//$ #2%$)4 s "!$ #2%$)4 s "!.+2504#9 | clevescene.com | February 27 - March 5, 2019

47


OHIO’S PREMIER

SMOKE SHOP & TATTOO SUPPLY

OHIO BLOWN GLASS!

At Each Location

HEADQUARTERS! ɞVAPORIZERSɞ The Flintstones! GLASS HOUSE EASTLAKE

Ohio’s Own!

FULL LINE OF CLEANSING PRODUCTS

COLLECTABLES!

Large Selection!

MASKS

Full Line of

SILICONE PRODUCTS

CANVAS ART

NOW HIRING! Trays iŠˆ…„}‰Œ‚‚{©b…ˆw„©Wˆ…„ T-Shirts BandanasɞSocks iŠ…†„w„z¢ ‚‚…‹Šw„w††‚ywŠ…„…ˆ Lanyards ‰{„zˆ{‰‹ƒ{Š…P Dog Toys & Collars y‚{Œ{‚w„z}‚w‰‰~…‹‰{V}ƒw‚Dy…ƒ CONES TIPS WRAPS TRAYS

CLEVELAND LARGE SELECTION

CARTRIDGE VAPE BATTERIES

4264 Pearl Rd. 216.749.3440

BARBERTON GIRARD STRONGSVILLE 19097 Drake Rd. 536 W. Tuscarawas 16 N. State St. 440.572.8287 330.753.0500 330.545.8131

EASTLAKE AKRON 32888 Vine St. 1004 Kenmore Blvd. 330.753.3600 440.942.8668

LORAIN

832 Broadway 440.242.4080

AUTHORIZED DEALER

TATTOO SUPPLIES BUTANE TORCHES GRINDERS DIGITAL SCALES ROLLING PAPERS

www.glasshouseohio.com

MANSFIELD

532 Park Ave. West 419.522.1695

America’s #1 Incense

Profile for Euclid Media Group

Scene february 27, 2019  

Scene february 27, 2019