Page 1

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

1


THE BEST ISSUE OF THE YEAR COMES OUT NEXT WEEK!

A METRO MATCH-UP NE FOR THE AGES!

BEST

CLEVELAND

WEST SIDE VS EAST SIDE

BARS & CLUBS | FOOD & DRINK | PEOPLE & PLACES

APRIL 25, 2018

clevescene.com/bestof 2

| clevescene.com m | April 18 - 24, 2018

DON’T MISS IT!


| clev clevescene.com evescene.com m | April Apri Ap ril 188 - 24, 24, 201 2018 0 8

3


APRIL 18-24, 2018 • VOLUME 48 NO 42 Dedicated to Free Times founder Richard H. Siegel (1935-1993) and Scene founder Richard Kabat Group Publisher Chris Keating Publisher Andrew Zelman

CONTENTS Upfront

Associate Publisher Angela Nagal Editor Vince Grzegorek

7

Dennis Kucinich lands a surprising endorsement from Cleveland.com, plus a new co-working spot to open in Ohio City

Editorial Music Editor Jeff Niesel Senior Writer Sam Allard Staff Writer BJ Colangelo Staff Writer Brett Zelman Web Editor Laura Morrison Dining Editor Douglas Trattner Stage Editor Christine Howey Visual Arts Writers Dott von Schneider Copy Editor Elaine Cicora Interns Michael Wu, Matt Poshedley

Feature

11

The legacy of Cleveland hell-raiser Roldo Bartimole

Advertising Senior Multimedia Account Executive John Crobar, Shayne Rose Multimedia Account Executive Kiara Davis

Get Out!

Creative Services Production Manager Steve Miluch Staff Photographer Emanuel Wallace

21

All the best things to do in Cleveland this week

Business Sales Assistant/Receptionist Megan Stimac Controller Kristy Dotson Circulation Circulation Director Don Kriss

Stage

Euclid Media Group Chief Executive Officer Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers Chris Keating, Michael Wagner VP Digital Services Stacy Volhein Digital Operations Coordinator Jaime Monzon

26

In The Humans, laughter mixes with melancholy in fascinating ways

Film

www.euclidmediagroup.com National Advertising Voice Media Group 1-800-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com

33

Rick Astley is never gonna give us up.

27

Tarantino-esque Lowlife is ultra-violent and ultra-fun

Cleveland Scene 737 Bolivar Rd, #4100 Cleveland, OH 44115 www.clevescene.com Phone 216-241-7550 Retail & Classified Fax 216-241-6275 Editoral Fax 216-802-7212 E-mail scene@clevescene.com

Eat

29

A new location but the same tired food at Cafe Sausalito, plus saying adieu to Coquette Patisserie

Cleveland Scene Magazine is published every week by Euclid Media Group. Verified Audit Member Cleveland Distribution Scene is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader

Music

Copyright The entire contents of Cleveland Scene Magazine are copyright 2018 by Euclid Media Group. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above.

Rick Astley embraces his past and looks to the future, plus a look at Chris Barron’s upcoming acoustic gig and all the shows to see this week

Subscriptions $150 (1 yr); $80 (6 mos.) Send name, address and zip code with check or money order to the address listed above with the title ‘Attn: Subscription Department’

33

Savage Love

45

...The story continues at clevescene.com Take

SCENE with you with the Issuu app! “Cleveland Scene Magazine”

Down there

COVER BY ERIC MILLIKIN Printed By

248-620-2990

THE 25TH ANNUAL

PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE APR 4 – MAY 6 | ALLEN THEATRE

F-U-N!

music and lyrics by WILLIAM FINN | book by RACHEL SHEINKIN conceived by REBECCA FELDMAN | additional material by JAY REISS directed by MARCIA MILGROM DODGE

“GOLD STARS ALL AROUND!”

The New York Times

TICKETS START AT $25 | ON SALE NOW!

216.241.6000 | clevelandplayhouse.com 4

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018


Nikon DEMO DAY with Nikon Rep Jeff Penn

4UESDAY !PRILs PM

(ANDS/N$EMOSTRATIONSs&2%%#LASS %XCLUSIVE3AVINGSs&INACING!VAILABLE 2100 Center Road, Avon, Ohio 44011 440.934.1544

www.thepixelconnection.com Open 7 Days a Week

0% Financing Available for 6 months FREE class with the purchase of DSLR

Learn more at www.clevelandcamerastore.com

All Nikon products include Nikon Inc. USA limited warranty. ©2018 Nikon Inc. | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

5


6

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018


UPFRONT LOCAL MEDIA CONTINUES TO DIE Photo from Scene archives

WE DON’T YET KNOW WHO among the veteran Cleveland.com staffers and Plain Dealer managers took the voluntary buyout offered by owner Advance Media last week. But 29 employees were reportedly eligible on the Cleveland.com side. We’ve heard that those eligible were urged to take the deal. Cleveland.com editor Chris Quinn, on the WCPN Friday morning news roundup, discussed the buyouts but said the situation at the region’s biggest media outlet was “not dire.” “It’s just the falling circulation numbers in print, they continue to hamper us,” he said. “So we’ll — you hate to see them go, they’re veteran people, it’s a lot of experience. Nothing matters more. But if it fits for where they are in their lives, and we can save some money, we’re going to do it.” Joe Frolik, a former Plain Dealer journalist himself and current managing news producer at Ideastream, pushed back a bit, arguing that senior reporters are the most valuable to a news operation. He cited the example of Rachel Dissell. (As a PD reporter and part of the union, she was not offered a buyout.) Frolik argued that her reporting on rape kits has proven of immense value to the region and that younger reporters don’t have the institutional wisdom of veterans who have been in the trenches for 15 years or more. Dissell, a vice president of the News Guild, provided a statement to Ideastream on the buyouts. She said the guild was sad for the loss “of any journalists, especially ones with institutional knowledge and experience who have done what we view as a public service for Cleveland. “But we also are baffled,” she wrote, “how print circulation can be blamed for buyouts at a digital company that we’ve been told again and again over five years is a separate entity from The Plain Dealer.” Union employees at the Akron Beacon Journal got bad news last week as well. Akron’s paper has been sold to Gatehouse Media, the largest publisher of daily newspapers in the United States and the owner of the Columbus

The pain continues in area media.

Dispatch, Canton’s Repository and a preponderance of smaller-town dailies. But in the staff meeting announcing the $16 million sale, union employees — about 50 reporters, photographers and editors — were told that their existing contract would not be honored by Gatehouse. The staff members would have to reapply for their (now non-union) positions. Interviews are expected to conclude by the end of this week. The ABJ’s former owner, Black Press Ltd., is a Canadian company with papers in Alberta, British Columbia, California, Hawaii and Washington state. Its president and CEO said that while Black Press was proud of the ABJ’s work over the past 11 years, the paper was located too far from the company’s other publications. Black Press was unable, he said, to provide “the kind of leadership the paper needs and the community deserves.” Gatehouse, a holding company for the New Media Investment Group, naturally is already gushing about the advertising possibilities as they commandeer

the state’s eyeballs. Like other hedge funds, investment companies and billionaire prospectors, Gatehouse is viewing its publications as fi nancial properties. It is concerned exclusively with the bottom line. The Gatehouse incursion is advancing ever northward: Gatehouse now owns The Independent in Massillon, the Times-Reporter in New Philadelphia, and the former Dix Communications publications, which include more than 30 daily and weekly newspapers, including the Record-Courier in Kent, The Daily Record in Wooster, The Ashland Times-Gazette, The Alliance Review, and The Daily Jeffersonian in Cambridge. Gatehouse Media is headquartered in suburban Rochester, New York, and has become the largest publisher of daily newspapers in the U.S., with more than 650 publications, including 145 dailies, in 38 states. It probably goes without saying, but the Akron Beacon Journal sale includes the paper’s affi liated website, Ohio.com. — Sam Allard

PD Endorses Dennis! In Governor’s Race In a shockingly unexpected endorsement Sunday, the PD / Cleveland.com editorial board threw their weight behind former Cleveland mayor and U.S. Congressman Dennis Kucinich in the Democratic gubernatorial primary. “The choice should come down to passion, vision and an ability to grasp the bully pulpit to inspire Ohioans about the need for change,” the editorial read. “Of the major Democratic candidates, Kucinich is the one most likely to challenge statehouse inertia.” The decision for most Democratic voters on May 8 will be between Kucinich and Richard Cordray, the former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and long the presumed front-runner in the race. But the board waved Cordray away, citing a lack of evident passion and vision. Most surprisingly of all, they gave Cordray only a few more lines than Youngstown-area state senator Joe Schiavoni in their write-up, | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

7


UPFRONT Photo courtesy Cleveland Press Collection

Dennis Kucinich’s secret plan to woo the PD.

8

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

and fewer than former justice Bill O’Neill, who ought to be disregarded. Both Cordray and Kucinich have much to recommend them. Both also have critical fl aws. The PD editorial mentioned Kucinich’s past defenses of Syrian president Bashar Al-Assad, for example, and said that Kucinich must “never again make nice” with him. (Kucinich has been active on social media for the past several days, condemning the recent military strike in Syria.) But the endorsement did not mention his volatile mayoralty, though board director Elizabeth Sullivan suggested in the endorsement interview that while Kucinich has always been a gifted campaigner, implementing his ideas has proven to be a challenge in the past. On the Cordray front, the editorial alluded to his lack of charisma, which has been a significant vulnerability on the campaign trail, though Cordray has been more animated in recent weeks. But it neglected to mention his past support for gun rights, support that, despite recent modulations and calls for common sense regulation, may be a hang-up for voters galvanized by national protests in the wake of the Parkland shooting. Ultimately, the editorial board argued that a Democrat occupying the governor’s seat with Republicans controlling the general assembly (both house and senate) will have an arduous battle ahead of him. Kucinich, the board argued, is more suited to serve as a “megaphone spurring citizens to demand legislative action.” On the Republican side, the editorial board endorsed Mike

DeWine, the epitome of the statehouse inertia they’ve endorsed Kucinich to challenge. — Allard

DIGIT WIDGET $10,000,000 Gift from the KeyBank Foundation to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the largest single gift in the Rock Hall’s history. It’ll be used for an “ongoing and expanding series of improvements.”

14 Number of sex crime detectives in the Cleveland police department. The budget allows for 23 this year. A national police group assessment says the department needs at least 30.

$2 Cost increase at all Cleveland Hopkins International Airport parking lots, effective May 1.

27,377 Number of overdoses treated in Ohio hospitals in 2016, a 500-percent increase from 2008.


Beauty Shoppe Co-working Space Comes to Ohio City in May The co-working company Beauty Shoppe got its start in the East Liberty neighborhood of Pittsburgh, a place that partner and founder Zach Ciccone considers the “home of the creative class.” Now the coworking space (not a hair salon) is coming to heart of Ohio City at the corner of West 25th and Detroit. The 12,000-square-foot street-level space will include three types of memberships, a “Kaffe,” an events space, and pop-up retail opportunities for Cleveland-based creators and artisans. Ciccone says they were drawn to Cleveland because, like Pittsburgh, the city is “revitalizing and resurging in new and exciting ways. Our goal is to transform historic buildings into beautiful and vibrant co-working spaces.” As part of the Snavely Group’s construction of The Quarter, Beauty Shoppe will be moving into the newly rehabilitated Forest City Bank Building. By definition, co-working is the use of an office or other working environment by individuals who are self-employed or working for

different employers, typically so as to share equipment, ideas and knowledge. Co-working spaces allow freelancers a working environment outside of their home or internet cafes and allows other established professionals a change of scenery. Beauty Shoppe doesn’t intend to be an exclusive club, because “co-working is for anyone that needs access to well-managed, beautiful office space,” Ciccone says. Beauty Shoppe’s expansion into Cleveland is a welcome resource for the growing numbers of young professionals in the area. Beauty Shoppe was initially going to call the Health-Tech Corridor in Midtown its Cleveland home, but the Ohio City opportunity was too exciting to pass up. “We’re building from a position of strength because the neighborhood is already vibrant,” Ciccone says. “We’re not trying to fill a void, we’re here to add to the neighborhood and offer a place to be their professional home.” The entrance to Beauty Shoppe will include a space they call “The Foyer,” a coffee shop and localartist gallery space for public use by members and non-members alike. — BJ Colangelo

Survivors of Garden Valley Fire Still In Desperate Need of Help On March 26, 30 families (including 45 children) lost everything in a tragic fire that completely destroyed the Rainbow Terrace apartments in the Kinsman neighborhood. In addition to the emergency housing provided by the Red Cross, many of the families were relocated to different units within Rainbow Terrace but are living without furniture and are sleeping on floors. With the help of volunteers, Bridgette Smith, director of Rainbow Terrace programs, immediately began collecting money and donations to support these families; in addition, fundraisers were set up on GoFundMe and with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Cleveland. The goal is to raise $5,000 for each family, for a total of $150,000. While this seems like a small amount for families that lost everything they owned, it’s a step toward a new lease on life for those affected. To date, the GoFundMe has raised a little more than $16,000. These stories often lose public attention once they’ve fallen out of the headlines. We were reminded of this when Cleveland.com last week

released personal and heartbreaking essays from the survivors of the tragic fire. “It’s not just me, my neighbors lost everything too, we [have] all been living at our homes for a long time. Then to see people [and] kids outside, wearing nothing, when we had to leave really hurts me. We all lost everything,” said one resident named Anna. The money collected through this Friday via GoFundMe and the Boys & Girls Clubs will be used to purchase furniture. The families are in need of 25 full-sized beds, 14 twin beds and 13 cribs and mattresses, in addition to bedroom furniture, sofas, kitchen tables and chairs, coffee tables and any other available furniture. Rainbow Terrace is also accepting donations of housewares, clothing, bedding, toys and toiletries. (Rainbow Terrace asks that donors also send photos to show the item’s condition.) To schedule a furniture donation pickup, or for volunteer opportunities, call the Rainbow Terrace’s Learning Center at 216271-5373. — Colangelo

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene

©o…‹yw„„…Š}{Š^_l|ˆ…ƒŠ~{‰{Œwyy„{‰D ©o…‹z…„…Š„{{zŠ…x{wŠˆ‰|…ˆ^_lŠ…€…„D ©Y…ƒ†{„‰wŠ…„†ˆ…Œz{zD

SHOPPING SPREE!

RAFFLES ON 4/20

AKRON

1091 E. Tallmadge Ave (330) 794-7856

MAYFIELD HEIGHTS 5890 Mayfield Rd (440) 683-4298

Earn a RAFFLE TICKET with each $50 purchase between now and 4/20

MENTOR

7488 Mentor Ave. Suite E (440) 571-4310

PARMA HEIGHTS 6271 Pearl Rd (440) 345-5991

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

9


10

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018


Photo courtesy Cleveland Memory Project

FEATURE

The 1981 photo shows Roldo being muscled out of a city council meeting by council president George Forbes

ROLDO’S POINT OF VIEW The legacy of a Cleveland hell-raiser By Sam Allard ONE OF THE MOST STRIKING and oft-cited photos in the annals of Cleveland journalism is a 1981 shot, snapped by Cleveland Press photographer Tim Culek, of city council president George Forbes grabbing maverick journalist Roldo Bartimole by the jacket and muscling him out of a city council meeting. The photo was taken not at city hall but at the Bond Court Hotel (later the Sheraton, now the Westin), where Forbes had assembled his council colleagues for a kind of publicity stunt. He’d summoned

the press as well, so that they might observe members of council learning about the proposed Sohio Building (later the BP Tower, now the Huntington Bank Building). Roldo warned at the time that the skyscraper on Public Square could be the “most expensive, ill-planned and secrecy-shrouded project since the days when Urban Renewal proved to be Cleveland’s disaster.” There was a public portion of the morning meeting, after which Forbes asked the press to leave. But both Roldo, then 47, and newly minted Plain Dealer city hall

reporter Gary Clark, refused. In his account of the incident, Roldo wrote that he’d been expecting a security guard to escort them out, but that Forbes “blew his public relations game when he personally tried to evict” them. Forbes later justified his actions more or less on the grounds that he’d asked nicely. “I asked him to leave and he wouldn’t leave,” Forbes told the Free Times in 2000. “I said, ‘Roldo, you gotta leave. You can’t sit here and eat my grits and then not leave when I ask you to leave.’”

In any case, the physical confrontation captured in the photo — not the meeting itself — is what has accompanied headlines and stories about Roldo Bartimole years after the fact. And it sure accompanied Forbes in 1989, when he unsuccessfully ran for mayor. But Roldo’s analysis of the Bond Court proceedings is worth revisiting, as it’s representative of the style and tenor of Point of View, the newsletter he self-published for 32 years (1968 to 2000), railing against what his supporters, in 1993, called “Cleveland’s bigwig | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

11


blocking back of big business ... . “Thus the work of dictatorship is usually portrayed as Democratic. This time it didn’t quite work out that way.�

FEATURE triad: business, politicians and the news media.� The Bond Court Hotel meeting had all three. “The meeting was advertised as one in which council members would be informed about the Sohio project. In fact, of course, Forbes’ intention was nothing of the sort ... . “Council members instead were at the meeting as props. Forbes needed a forum to make it appear that the council — the elected legislative body of the people of Cleveland — was being informed. And that members were truly being consulted. Ceremonial democracy prevailed instead. “The media role in such instances is to wait like good little girls and boys for the council members to come out of the meeting, usually one or two at a time as the meeting winds down, and report what they are told. Usually just about all the information had already been leaked to the media by Forbes,

As the demagogue atop city council, Forbes was long one of Roldo’s arch-nemeses. Only a year before the Bond Court kerfufe, an issue of Point of View was emblazoned with the headline “Resign Now.â€? It called Forbes “a racist, the worst kind,â€? and delineated the ways in which he had manipulated black voters and black council colleagues to his advantage. Its ďŹ rst page concluded in all caps: “THE MAN IS DISGUSTING.â€? In 1988 and 1989, as Forbes ramped up his failed mayoral campaign, Point of View attacked him regularly, noting Forbes’ cozy relationship with the corporate community and the questionable actions of his legal practice. On Oct. 14, 1989, less than a month before the election that Forbes lost to Mike White, Roldo upbraided him once again: “Forbes apparently believes that he can run on his record as a kick-ass politician. His campaign and demeanor say, ‘Fuck you, vote for me.’â€? So it’s no surprise that Forbes,

Melt the Fat Away!

years later, wasn’t as laudatory of Point of View as many other local leaders when retrospectives were penned on the occasion of the newsletter’s ďŹ nal issue, in 2000. “[Roldo’s] like a broken clock,â€? Forbes told Cleveland Magazine at the time. “He’s right twice a day. He didn’t do anything but raise hell with those of us who were trying to do something for this city. I’m telling you, he leaves nothing.â€? In an interview with the Free Times that year, Forbes elaborated, arguing that Roldo’s central aw was his inexibility. “A whole lot of this business is compromise,â€? Forbes said. “And I think that if he had been just a little bit exible in some of the things he believed in, he would have had a lasting impact.â€? Roldo is now 85 years old. Since 2015, his work has been published on the local blog, “Have Coffee Will Write,â€? where his readership is vastly diminished from the volatile Kucinich years in the late ’70s. Back then, Point of View was distributed to 1,750 subscribers and copied and circulated covertly at many downtown ofďŹ ces. Earlier this year, Roldo wrote a lengthy two-part story chronicling his 50-year career in Cleveland journalism. He did not

ofďŹ cially declare his retirement, but the piece was framed as a “summing up,â€? and he admitted his fatigue in multiple conversations with Scene, conversations that left the impression that he’d be producing little new material. Chris Quinn, editor of Cleveland. com, told Scene that it was hard to believe Roldo was capping his pen. “I’ve always felt a comfort knowing Roldo was out there tilting at his windmills,â€? he wrote in an email, “and I think we’ll all be the worse for his absence. I don’t know that we’ll see anyone like him again.â€? Quinn said he’d always admired Roldo for his zeal and his motives, and had high praise for the way he went after the media, reserving his harshest criticisms for those at the top, not “fellow working journalists.â€? But he tempered that praise with an acknowledgement of Roldo’s polemical style. “The kind of ranting Roldo did, while entertaining and provocative, harms credibility,â€? Quinn said. “That’s ďŹ ne for someone working for the alternative media, which by its nature attacks the mainstream and the status quo, but reporters seeking to make long-term

Bling and Braids Festival Concert Styling Hair Accessories & Mani’s Call Us For Your Appointment... Carabel Beauty Salon-Store | 15309 Madison Ave. Full Service Salon For Females

Say goodbye to the bulge—for good. TruSculpt 3D is a revolutionary way to permanently eliminate fat and tighten skin without surgery. No pain. No downtime.

ĂŽ"?*/-?Ă€$&?-0$ ??? *?Ă€? 3?*-?!''?*/???Ă€$&$)?!0)"/-. ĂŽ*".??Ă€$&.E?'*" $) >?!..*-$.?ON SALE

Available now at Dr. Laurel’s PRP Bar Call 216-245-6682 to schedule a free consultation 3439 W. Brainard Rd., Woodmere DrLaurelsPRPBar.com 12

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

SALES, SERVICE, REPAIRS FAT & MOUNTAIN BIKE RENTALS. #30"%8":"7& #&%'03%rŲųŏ#*,&Ų

Located less than one mile from the Bedford Reservation singletrack bike trail


improvements to the community would not have much success using Roldo’s tactics.” That’s an echo of former county commissioner Tim Hagan, who, in 2000, compared Roldo unfavorably to the great American muckraker I.F. Stone. “[Roldo] really wasn’t a member of the press. He was an advocate of his point of view,” Hagan said. “I don’t know that any of Roldo’s diatribes ended up with anybody being indicted the way Stone’s did.” Maybe not. Although the indictments Roldo pursued were seldom criminal.

AS A JOURNALIST, ROLDO’S mission was always one of demythology. He has been portrayed as an iconoclast, someone who not only attacked but reveled in the attack of regional sacred cows:

the foundations, the museums, the “civic leaders,” the sports team owners, the press. And though Roldo lately admitted that his unwillingness to compromise made for a more fun and more rewarding career, his reporting was driven by core beliefs about society, namely that institutions are accorded too much reverence, in fact automatic reverence, and that reverence impedes honest reporting. In late 1968, during a tense talk he gave at the City Club, he said almost exactly that: “When was the last time you saw anywhere a critique of such Cleveland institutions as the Businessmen’s Interracial Committee, the Cleveland Development Foundation, the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, the Greater Cleveland Associated Foundations, the PACE Association, the PATH Association,

LOOK THE PART BE THE WHOLE ALL PRODUCTS Buy 2 Get 1 FREE

TANNING SPECIAL Buy 1 Month Get 2 Weeks FREE

A copy of a 1980 Point of View

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

13


DIAMOND DAVE’S

Join us on Facebook @CLE New Wave Connection

FLASHBACK

80’s NewaWratvye Dance P With

DJ’S DIAMOND DAVE AND JASON BURCHASKI

Saturday April 21st 10 PM - 2:30 AM

THE CHAMBER

11814 Detroit Ave. Lakewood

HALF PRICE HAIRCUTS AND $1.00 FACIALS EVERY THURSDAY 11AM TO 3 PM

Expires 5/31/18©c‹‰Š†ˆ{‰{„Šy…‹†…„

VAPORIZERS

DAILY SPECIALS

MANY VARITIES

Tuesday – $1 Hot Lather Shave/Beard Trim Day with a purchase of a any haircut Wednesday – “Ladies Day” Buy a basic haircut at $6 and receive a Shampoo, Eyebrows or Facial for $1

TOUCH SCREEN

Thursday - $1 Facial Day with the purchase of a any haircut.

The School that Barbers Recommend!

REGULAR MEN’S HAIRCUTS $5 HAIRCUT WITH LINE-UP $6 FADES $8

NOW HIRING!

EASTLAKE  LORAIN  CLEVELAND GLASS PIPESBUTANETORCHESINCENSE DIGITAL SCALESDETOXGRINDERS

Your One Stop Shops for All of Your

TATTOO SUPPLY NEEDS STRONGSVILLE CLEVELAND

4264 Pearl Rd. 216.749.3440

EASTLAKE

GIRARD

32888 Vine St. 440.942.8668

16 N. State St. 330.545.8131

STORE HOURS:

LORAIN

BARBERTON

Tuesday-Saturday: 9am-5pm

832 Broadway 440.242.4080

536 W. Tuscarawas 330.753.0500

AKRON

MANSFIELD

2546 Lorain Avenue, Ohio City One block west of the Westside Market

216-241-6684

allstatehairstyling.com 14

19097 Drake Rd. 440.572.8287

1004 Kenmore Blvd. 532 Park Ave. W 419.522.1695 330.753.3600

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

SEE OUR AD ON THE BACK COVER

FEATURE the Cleveland Board of Education, the Citizens League, the United Appeal, University Circle Foundation, Group 66?” Roldo asked a sneering lunch crowd. “Some of these organizations have immense power over what happens in Cleveland. And they themselves claim to be heavily involved in the life of the city. These institutions have to be demythologized. They are not basically and inherently good. And their motives don’t necessarily have to be good, and certainly they must be open to question. Are we afraid to ask those questions publicly?” Roldo wasn’t. After short stints at both the Plain Dealer and the Cleveland bureau of the Wall Street Journal, in whose employ he covered poverty and the city’s blundering urban renewal efforts (and with whose image-conscious editors he consistently clashed) he began Point of View, his life’s great crusade. His City Club invitation, in fact, was in direct response to a piece he had published in Point of View’s 11th issue: “City Club Forum Freedom of Prattle.” In it, he excoriated the City Club for its “debasement of free speech.” He insulted its members for “planted and stupid” questions. He wondered how the City Club could consider itself a “bastion of free speech” when, among other things, women were barred from membership. “As an institution that is revered in the mass media here, it sets a tone for the city,” Roldo argued. “Free expression becomes measured by it. Thus, the tone of expression in Cleveland is dull, pretentious and stifl ing. At a time when issues of great importance threaten to engulf this and other communities, the City Club forums deal in personalities, not issues … . The City Club has exchanged free speech for free propaganda.” Propaganda is a word that appears repeatedly in Roldo’s work, in the pages of Point of View and later, in local alternative weeklies and online blogs. Some of his most venomous screeds exposed the lengths to which the mainstream media — especially Roldo’s great nemesis, the “Pee Dee” — shaped discourse via overwhelmingly positive coverage, superficial coverage, or what he regarded as trivial fluff: sports and rock and roll. “I have watched this past

summer, fall and into winter one of the most disgusting displays of slanted, biased, propagandistic, chauvinistic and down-right bad journalism I’d ever expect from a newspaper that I already have the lowest expectations,” Roldo wrote in 1996, in the aftermath of the Browns’ announced move to Baltimore. “It’s a mindfucking perpetrated by those supposed objective informers of a community who are really so tightly connected to the powers that be … that they become the public relations apparatus for private interests.” Raging over propaganda has been a constant. In 2004, when inducted into the Cleveland Press Club Hall of Fame, Roldo explained why he felt the act of identifying and criticizing the prevailing orthodoxies was so important. He said, fi rst of all, that he picked on the Plain Dealer so often because “it’s the biggest and it’s the media leader.” “I believe more effort is devoted by the Plain Dealer to its food pages, its sports pages and its social pages than its coverage of who is doing what to whom in our real world,” he said. “The community needs dissent. It must be nurtured. I think it’s the responsibility of the news media to foster debate. But there needs to be critical reporting on big institutions for that to happen.” Roldo’s unrelenting criticism led leaders to wave him off: He was regarded by many as a contrarian blinded by his world view, and who therefore only saw the negative. As if to prove a point, in 1968, a City Club member asked whether or not Roldo could name anything that the media or the government was doing that met his approval. Roldo denied that he should have to. “You can always fi nd something going on that’s good,” he said. “And I don’t think we ought to spend our time saying what’s good when there’s so much that’s wrong. I don’t care whether the media does something nice ... I don’t think there’s any meaning in pointing out what’s good about the media because if they’re doing their job, they’re supposed to do it.” Fifty years later, this February, when Ideastream reporter Nick Castele asked Roldo if there was anything in Cleveland about which he was hopeful, Roldo’s opinion hadn’t much changed. “That’s not my job,” he said. “My job is to point out, in my opinion, what’s wrong. Because that’s not being done enough.”


PRESENTED BY

E A S T

B A N K

&

TASTE OF SUMMER OFFICIALLY KICKING OFF SUMMER WITH FOOD, DRINKS AND FUN

(4'''8'06Å“/#; scenetasteofsummer.com

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

15


IN ASSESSING ROLDO’S “lasting impact”, downplayed by those he covered critically, one must consider a vital factor. It’s something that’s seldom mentioned in local profiles and commentaries on his singular career: his role as a mentor to young journalists. In Michael Roberts’ 2000 profile of Roldo for Cleveland Magazine, former Wall Street Journal reporter Greg Stricharchuk said that the example Roldo set was one of his most significant contributions. “Roldo lifted the consciousness of the reporters in Cleveland about the role of foundations, charities and other organizations that no one paid any attention to,” he said. “And he shared information and his experience. Most people in this business don’t do that.” Many current local journalists agree. Already, the length of his career and the persistence of his ardor have made him something of a folk hero — even among millennials who would have been too young to read him in his heyday. But more than that, his accessibility and his active engagement with the region’s news reporters is unique. Ideastream’s Nick Castele told Scene that he was “late to Roldo,” having first encountered his work

in an essay that appeared in the Rust Belt Chic anthology. But in 2013, Roldo emailed him with a list of public subsidies that had been awarded to downtown projects and asked if he’d like to have a cup of coffee. “When we met,” Castele said, “he gave me a manila envelope. Inside were a photocopy of an old sin tax ad and two issues of Point of View. One was headlined, “Who Really Governs?” The other, “Don’t read all about it!”, was a critique of local media. “Because of Roldo, I’ve made a point of paying close attention to the ins and outs of Northeast Ohio’s public financing arrangements for stadiums. I’ve also tried my best to keep an eye on campaign contributions.” Eric Sandy worked for Scene for five years before his departure earlier this year. He, too, said that Roldo reached out to him with old copies of Point of View, which he read with relish. “His style was the forebear of alternative news media,” Sandy said. “He used visceral prose and hard, well-researched data to tell a detailed story of what was happening in Cleveland … Roldo evinced, to me, the grand edict of

journalism: Afflict the comfortable. Comfort the afflicted.” Sandy’s appreciation was an echo of others’: that Roldo’s printed rage was earned by his reporting. He wasn’t merely serving up hot takes like a later generation of bloggers; his opinions were supported by the documents he obtained, by the alliances he unearthed at the county recorder’s office, by the conversations he overheard hanging around city hall. As to Roldo’s long-term impact, Sandy said it’s difficult to measure. “I think city leaders are content to keep his reporting out of sight and out of mind. He’s made fools of anyone willing to hold public office in Cleveland by shedding light on decades of corrupt deal-making, myopic policy-making and wanton greed. Will those who write the history books look kindly on Roldo? I don’t know. Will I keep his example in mind when I duck into the voting booth, or when I write a story, or when I hire a writer? Of course. And I know I’m not alone.” Another Scene alum, Kyle Swenson, now a reporter at the Washington Post , said that Cleveland ought to erect a statue of Roldo on Lakeside Avenue, “so city hall always remembers

AFTER 27 YEARS BIG FUN WILL BE

Volunteers Needed! Healthy, Psoriasis, Atopic Dermatitis and Eczema



• WALK-INS WELCOME • Relaxation has never been better! Low rates, great friendly staff.



The Department of Dermatology at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University is conducting a research study on skin disease.

Cleveland

(216)671-3813 3834 W. 140 ST. | Cleveland, OH 44111

HOURS: Mon ~ Fri : 12PM ~ 10 PM Sat : 12 PM ~ 8 PM | Sun 1pm - 7pm

Volunteers must be over 18 years of age and must be in good general health or must have been diagnosed with conditions such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, or a cutaneous malignancy such as cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) or squamous or basal cell carcinoma. For more information, please call:

The Skin Study Center at (216)844-SKIN (7546) or email us at SkinStudyCenter@uhhospitals.org Escape into a world of total comfort, relaxation and rejuvenation!

Volunteers will be compensated for their time. There is no cost to participate.

LUXURIOUS EXPERIENCE. AFFORDABLE PRICING (440)545-1213 

16

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

someone is watching.” “This is a tough job,” Swenson said. “Bad pay. Long hours. And then there’s the relentless sense you are working uphill against people — better pay, less hours — who hate what you do and wish you weren’t there. That’s hard enough when you have a newspaper or station behind you. Roldo pushed against all of them — the city hall flunkies and lazy cops and greedy biz folk — all on his own. For decades. That’s true faith in the importance of muckraking.” Michelle Jarboe has been a reporter at the PD for more than a decade. Not originally from Cleveland, she had been unfamiliar with Roldo’s work at first. But like many of her colleagues, she received messages from him — by email and snail mail — that were often in sharp contrast to his published hostility toward her employer. “Though he frequently unleashed scathing criticisms of The Plain Dealer in public forums, his emails to me have been very measured and, often, encouraging,” Jarboe wrote Scene in an email. “I’ve appreciated his critiques of my work. And it brightens my day to open my inbox and find an approving email from Roldo about



7043 Pearl Rd | Middleburg Heights | 44130 allendeshaunwleeness.com

CLOSING 50%OFF EVERYTHI N G THANKS FOR YOUR PATRONAGE

BIG FUN |1814 COVENTRY RD


something I’ve written ‌ He riled people up, made readers think and — at least in my experience — pushed younger journalists to do their jobs better. We all should hope to accomplish so much.â€? Henry Gomez thought so too. He was a business and city hall reporter for the Plain Dealer (2005 to 2009) and then the senior political writer at Cleveland.com until last year when he joined BuzzFeed. He said Roldo was “like that source you have who tells you that you’re missing the real story — dig deeper.â€? “My reporting wouldn’t always lead me to the same conclusions that Roldo drew,â€? Gomez said, “but I think it’s fair to say that the attention he gave certain issues challenged me to learn new things and ask more questions.â€? Gomez said that “many timesâ€? he’d get calls and notes from Roldo about his coverage at city hall. “I always enjoyed these conversations,â€? he said. “I value Roldo’s institutional memory. He was kind enough over my years at the PD to send me back issues of Point of View that he thought would be a resource — and I just devoured them.â€? Gomez said that many of the institutions Roldo wrote most passionately against really haven’t changed much, certainly not in ways he would have preferred. “I’m not sure if this is the only measure of impact, though,â€? Gomez said. “I think those of us who have taken away something positive from Roldo speak to the fact that what he did has lasting value.â€? Cleveland.com’s Metro columnist Mark Naymik, a Free Times alum, said the “obvious takeawayâ€? from his personal interactions with Roldo, and from Roldo’s work generally, “is the importance of poking those in power.â€? The PD’s Rachel Dissell knows a thing or two about poking the powerful. She told Scene that Roldo has reached out to her periodically with links to his past work, often to provide context and history to issues she was tackling. And while she confessed she didn’t know him well personally, she felt “his instinct to share what he knows speaks to the depths to which he cares about the topics he’s raised.â€? Responding to Forbes’ quote, that all Roldo did was “raise hell,â€? Dissell rejoined that we’re still talking about him — stories are being written about him — which ought to serve as testimony. “The motto I live by is ‘Question Authority,’ so I like to think of myself in the mold of a hell raiser,â€?

she said, “even if the way I go about journalism involves less fullthroated criticism of elected ofďŹ cials and business leaders and more a hard look at broken systems as a way to spur change.â€? Gary Clark was the Plain Dealer reporter sitting next to Roldo at the Bond Court Hotel in 1981. He went on to serve as the paper’s managing editor before being axed in 2000 and moving to Denver. He highlighted another critical aspect of Roldo’s worldview. In addition to his shoe-leather reporting — following the money, checking records, developing sources — “his stories were steeped in a concern for the powerless and contempt of the powerful.â€? He said Forbes was wrong to trivialize Roldo’s impact. “[He] introduced Cleveland reporters to how things got done in Cleveland, and they went on to better inform the public,â€? Clark said. “He taught them to follow the money and to explore those interlocking relationships. In doing so, Roldo improved the depth and quality of journalism in Cleveland, especially how the powerful use city hall to advance their interests.â€? That Roldo sacriďŹ ced much to retain his editorial independence throughout his career is well known. Other stories have described his sometimes precarious ďŹ nancial position, and a succession of health problems, during Point of View’s run. Despite the occasional hardship, Roldo was famously paranoid about accepting gifts that might be perceived as compromising his ethics. He once refused to accept $1,600 that had been raised to support him after a heart attack because he didn’t know who’d all contributed to the fund. It goes without saying that he would never eat a meal paid for by a public ofďŹ cial. And so when asked about his legacy, and those who believed his tactics undercut his impact, Roldo merely referenced the stubbornness of his Italian ancestors. He was eager, however, to correct a misrepresentation. When George Forbes defended throwing Roldo out of the Bond Court Hotel in 1981, he insinuated to the Free Times that Roldo had been freeloading. “You can’t sit here and eat my grits and then not leave when I ask you to leave,â€? Forbes said he told Roldo. “He’s wrong,â€? Roldo said. “The breakfast hadn’t started.â€?

sallard@clevescene.com t@scenesallard

4HYLUNV3\_\Y`:WHPZ[OLWYLTPLYM\SSZLY]PJLS\_\Y`KH`ZWH HUKZHSVUPUKV^U[V^U*SL]LSHUK>LHYLSVJH[LKPUThe Arcade JVU]LUPLU[[VHSSKV^U[V^UOV[LSZHUKLHZ`[VYLHJOMYVTHSSMYLL^H`Z >e offer -HJPHSZMassages)VK`>YHWZ)VK`:JY\IZHUK>H_PUN (SZVSVJH[LK^P[OPU[OLZWHPZV\Y^VYSKJSHZZ/HPY4HRL\W 5HPS:HSVU >OL[OLY`V\^V\SKSPRLHM\SSKH`VMWHTWLYPUNVYQ\Z[HML^OV\YZ V\YL_WLY[Z[HMM^PSSZWVPSWHTWLYHUKZ\YWHZZ`V\YL]LY`L_WLJ[H[PVU

3VJH[LKPUZPKL;OL(YJHKL‹+V^U[V^U*SL]LSHUK ‹^^^THYLUNVZWHJVT | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

17


Wednesday

Darts and $1 Sliders

Upcoming Events:

Thursday

04/21

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC

5 Star Dive Bar Art Show

Hosted by Gary Graham Sign-up at 7:30pm Show Starts at 8:00pm

4/23

Friday AYCE FISH FRY

Halfway to Halloween party with Mia & Mariah

38107 Second Street Willoughby, OH 44094

(440) 602-9780 Monday:

Jamo, Pizza Mug Specials after 7PM Tuesday

Guest Bartending Tuesdays 4/24-Party for holiDAZE with Angela & Summer Wednesday:

20¢ Wing Night

Thursday:

Lyric Master

Please join us for Happy Hour with a front row seat to the city on our new patio on East 9th Street. Enjoy a handcrafted cocktail, a cold beer or a smooth glass of wine.

ANDERSON’S

We’ll hang the sun out for you!

6082 Andrews Rd., Mentor-on-the-Lake, Ohio | 440-290-7805 visit us at: www.Andersons.pub

sausalitoCLE.com

Sports Pub & Eatery

TUESDAY HOPPY HOUR- $2 TACOS, TALLS, & JAMO, $1 OFF CRAFT 4/26 - NFL DRAFT PARTY (Tickets available for $25 - includes bottomless Summer Shandy & appetizers) Now booking special events! Bring the office for a complimentary after work party 18

It’s Patio Season!

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

@SausalitoCLE

1360 E 9th Street • 216.696.2233


PRESENT:

The 7th Annual

DOWNTOWN WILLOUGHBY

RIB BURN OFF Saturday May 19, Noon-10p

SUNDAY May 20, Noon-8p

FREE EVENT three stages OF live local and national bands, plus vendors and a complete kid’s zone. Look for beer & craft cocktails on Erie Street, and, of course, ribs from local, regional and national vendors.

FRANK & TONY’S STAGE ŭ4"563%":ŭ

12:30 p.m. | Sunset Harmony 2 p.m. | Dan McCoy 3:30 p.m. | The Stone Crowes 5 p.m. | AJ & The Woods 7:00 p.m. | Myth & Company

ŭ46/%":ŭ

Noon | The Fifth House 1:30 p.m. | Bad JuJu 3 p.m. | Dear Jimmy Band 4:30 p.m. | We Are The Radio

L I V E M U S i C

WILD GOOSE STAGE ŭ4"563%":ŭ

Noon | The Goods 1:30 p.m. | The Escape Plan 3 p.m. | Phil 'n The Blanks 4:30 p.m. [ t h i r t y | t h r e e ] 6:30 p.m. | Mega Nemesis

ŭ46/%":ŭ

12:30 p.m. | Smack the Frog 2 p.m. | Thrill Ride 3:30 p.m. | Jester's Revenge 5 p.m. | Forgotten Astronaut

dtwribburnoff.com | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

19


powered by: E A S T

eeds ben c o

it ef

SAVE THE GREAT LAKES!

Pr

superhero bar crawl B A N K

Media Sponsors:

Saturday, April 21st

z

12-5PM

z

Flats East Bank

Tickets on sale now!!!! flatseastbank.com 20

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018


GET OUT everything you should do this week Photo by Emanuel Wallace

WED

Joe Shuster worked on the fi rst Superman sketches while living in Glenville. The screening takes place at 7:30 tonight. Following the screening, the Siegel and Shuster Society’s Mike Olszewski will lead a discussion. As a Superman birthday present to those in attendance, patrons will receive a special edition print by local artist Gary Dumm. Tickets are $6. (Niesel) 1390 West 65th St., 216-651-7295, clevelandcinemas.com.

04/18

THEATER

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee All hell breaks loose when six middle school students (played by adults) compete in a spelling bee, all in the hopes of getting their shot at the “nationals,” in the Tony Awardwinning musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. The Cleveland Play House production opens tonight at 7:30 at the Allen Theatre, where it runs through May 6. Tickets start at $25. (Jeff Niesel) 1407 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, clevelandplayhouse.com.

THU FILM

24 Frames Tonight at 6:45 and tomorrow night at 8:25, the Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque shows 24 Frames, the final fi lm from Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. The movie features “frames” that start as static landscapes and then come to life after Kiarostami animates them with animals and people. Tonight’s screening represents the movie’s local debut. Tickets are $10, or $7 for Cinematheque members and students. (Niesel) 11610 Euclid Ave., 216-421-7450, cia.edu.

SPOKEN WORD

Cleveland Stories Dinner Parties Cleveland Stories Dinner Party is a weekly series that pairs fi ne food with storytelling. Through it, the folks at Music Box Supper Club hope to raise awareness of the mission of the Western Reserve Historical Society’s new Cleveland History Center. The goal of the Cleveland Stories Dinner Party is to “bring to life some of the fun, interesting stories about Cleveland’s past — from sports, to rock ’n’ roll, to Millionaires’ Row,” as it’s put in a press release. Admission is free, with no cover charge, although a prix fi xe dinner, designed to complement the night’s theme, is $20. Doors open at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 6, and the storytelling starts at 7. Tonight, journalist, author and former Scene staff writer James Renner discusses “unsolved murders.” Dinner includes Fugitive Fungi, Sheppard’s Pie, and a chocolate sundae. (Niesel) 1148 Main Ave., 216-242-1250, musicboxcle.com. SPOKEN WORD

Hall of Fame Series with Bill Bruford of Yes The Rock Hall Inductions have come and gone, but the festivities continue tonight as Yes drummer Bill Bruford, a 2017 inductee, speaks about his history with the prog rock band. Jason Hanley, the Rock Hall vicep resident of education and visitor engagement, will lead the discussion that’ll include a Q&A with the audience. The event takes place tonight at 7 at the Rock Hall’s Foster Theater. Tickets are $10. (Niesel) 1100 Rock and Roll Blvd., 216-515-8444, rockhall.com.

04/19

The Suicide Girls return to town to perform at the Agora. See: Wednesday. THEATER

The Humans Part of this year’s KeyBank Broadway Series, Stephen Karam’s The Humans takes place over the course of a Thanksgiving family dinner in a ramshackle lower Manhattan duplex. Typically, the family get-together turns into a serious meditation on values and tradition, mostly focused on religion. The play won the 2016 Tony Award for Best Play. Tonight’s performance takes place at 7:30 at Connor Palace. Tickets are $10 to $80, and the play’s run continues until April 29. (Niesel) 1615 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org. BURLESQUE

Suicide Girls Blackheart Burlesque There’s burlesque, and then there’s the Suicide Girls’ burlesque. A group of “badass bombshells and geek goddesses,” the troupe takes the art form to another level. Consider, for example, their current Blackheart Burlesque Tour that they’ve re-launched after a six-year

hiatus. Instructor/dancer Manwe Sauls-Addison, who’s worked with world famous performers such as Beyonce, Jennifer Lopez and Lady Gaga, did the choreography and picked seven of the troupe’s best dancers for the tour. The show parodies contemporary pop culture and makes fun of fi lms and TV shows such as Star Wars, Orange is the New Black , Donnie Darko and Clockwork Orange. Tickets are $25 to $75. The show starts at 9 tonight at the Agora Theatre. (Niesel) 5000 Euclid Ave., 216-881-2221, agoracleveland.com. FILM

Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut In honor of the 80th anniversary of the fi rst appearance of Superman in a comic book, the Capitol Theatre has teamed up with the local Siegel and Shuster Society to present a special screening of Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut. The new cut restores footage that Donner fi lmed before he was taken off the project. Superman has roots in Cleveland: Jerry Siegel and

DRINK

Grapes Under Glass Beneath the glorious stained glass rotunda of its downtown store, Heinen’s has once again teamed up with Metropolitan at the 9 for Grapes Under Glass, a four-days celebration of wines. Now in its second year, Grapes Under Glass, extending from today through Sunday, has become a popular way to learn about and taste scores of wines in nine separate wine-centric events. The fun kicks off tonight with a four-course dinner featuring wines from four California vintners. On Saturday, there’s the CaliforniaBlueChipWineExperience, featuring big, beautiful California reds paired with tapas. And later that day comes the Main Event, featuring pours from 40 wineries from around the world. The rest of the weekend includes seminars, guided tastings and talks by some of California’s top winemakers. All three floors of Heinen’s are being pressed into service, so expect to see a bevy of rare and unique wines. Tickets run from $40 to $1,399. Buy them on the website. (Michael Wu) 900 Euclid Ave., 216-302-3020, grapesunderglass.com. | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

21


GET OUT

2035 East Fourth St., 216-241-7425, pickwickandfrolic.com.

COMEDY

Steve Hoffstetter Known as much for his writing as for his standup, Steve Hofstetter is more articulate than your typical comic. At one point, he was even a weekly humor columnist for Sports Illustrated. “I started doing standup to pass the time,” he has said. “I’m in the small percentage of people who started doing what they love accidentally.” A dorky guy who maintains he looks a bit like actor Michael Rapaport with glasses, Hofstetter tours “perpetually.” He performs tonight at 8 at the Improv. Tickets are $20. (Niesel) 1148 Main Ave., 216-696-IMPROV, clevelandimprov.com.

FRI

04/20

ART

78th Street Studios Third Friday Art Walk Time again for the Third Friday Art

COMEDY

Michael Blackson Known as the “African King of Comedy,” Michael Blackson developed his comedic skills with original humor and being fearless on stage. He jokes about current affairs and takes aim at celebs such as Kim Kardashian and Michael Jordan; however, he also focuses on more serious topics such as race,

SCHEDULE

FILM

Imitation Girl Tonight at 7:30 at the Capitol Theatre, Sickening Pictures’ BJ Colangelo (who’s also a staff writer at Scene) and Zach Shildwachter host a screening of the sci-fi flick, Imitation Girl. The movie centers on a mysterious being that appears in the desert and assumes the identity of the first person she sees, a magazine cover girl. Event organizers will give away 11-by-17-inch film posters autographed by director Natasha Kermani and star Lauren Ashley Carter, and lead actor Neimah Djourabchi will be in attendance. The screening is part of a monthly series featuring the best of new, independent and unique genres in film. Tickets are $9.75. (Niesel) 1390 West 65th St., 216-651-7295, clevelandcinemas.com.

ALL FILMS START AT 7 PM | ROCK HALL’S FOSTER THEATER

3/7 3/21 5/2 5/16 5/30 6/6

WED.

WED.

WED.

WED.

WED.

WED.

Lady Gaga: Five Foot Two 2017 • 1 hour, 40 minutes • TV-MA

What Happened, Miss Simone? 2015 • 1 hour, 41 minutes • Not Rated, Courtesy of Eagle Rock Entertainment

Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World 2017 • 1 hour, 43 minutes • Not Rated Who the F**k is That Guy? The Fabulous Journey of Michael Alago 2017 • 1 hr, 25 minutes • TV-MA

Head 1968 • 1 hour, 26 minutes • G

Purple Rain 1984 • 1 hour, 51 minutes • R

COMEDY

Drew Thomas and Mia Jackson Currently the host of Phat Comedy Tuesdays at Twisted Taco, comedian Drew Thomas likes to joke that men and women don’t talk about marriage in the same way. Women sound happy about it; men not so much. Thomas regularly draws on everyday life for his routines. A few years back, he caught a good break when he was featured on The Craig Ferguson Show. He’s shared the stage with wise-asses such as Ron White, Jake Johansen, Bill Burr, Jim Norton and Craig Robinson. Be warned, he likes to harass the patrons in the front row of the club, often making fun of their outfits. He teams up with fellow comic Mia Jackson for tonight’s show that takes place at 8 at Hilarities. The two have shows scheduled at the club through Sunday. Tickets start at $18. (Niesel)

22

Members FREE w/RSVP • Non-Members $5.50 1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard, Cleveland, OH 44114 | rockhall.com | 216.781.ROCK

Walk at the cavernous 78th Street Studios. More than 50 studios and galleries will participate in this popular indoor art walk; be sure to check out spots like the Derek Hess Gallery, Tregoning & Company and Hilary Gent Studio. Look for food trucks out front and live music on the fi rst floor. Hours are 5 to 9 p.m. (Niesel) 1300 West 78th St., 78thstreetstudios.com.

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

his love for America and his African descent. He performs tonight at 7:30 and 10 at the Improv, where he has shows scheduled through Sunday. Tickets cost $35. (Niesel) 1148 Main Ave., 216-696-IMPROV, clevelandimprov.com. WORDS & MUSIC

Forensics, Crime and Charming Disaster The Brooklyn-based folk-noir duo

Charming Disaster will come to Cleveland for the fi rst time tonight to present a unique evening of music and forensic science lectures at the Euclid Tavern, with local author Brandy Schillace. A historian and author, Schillace, who works at the Dittrick Medical History Center and has appeared on the Travel Channel’s Mysteries at the Museum, will discuss forensics during Cleveland’s pre- and postProhibition years. Given the subject of the lecture, it makes sense that Charming Disaster would also be on the bill. The band’s songs address themes like love, death, crime, ancient mythology and the occult. The band cites the gothic humor of Edward Gorey and Tim Burton, the noir fiction of Raymond Chandler, American murder ballads and the “dramatic flair” of the cabaret as inspirations. Its paranormal love song, “Ghost Story,” was even featured on podcast “Welcome to Night Vale.” The event will also include a “guess the murderer” game. It all starts at 7 p.m., and admission is free. (Niesel) 11625 Euclid Ave., 216-231-5400, happydogcleveland.com. MUSIC

Earlybird Music Festival Festival season at the Nelson Ledges Quarry Park kicks off this weekend with the Earlybird Music Festival, which takes place today through Sunday. There will be camping, hiking, biking, swimming, cliff diving, basketball and volleyball. Jam acts such as the Werks, Keller Williams, the John Kadlecik Band, Broccoli Samurai, Zach Deputy, John Welton & the Awakening, Sultans of Bing, Derek Woods Band, Khemocean and the Quasi Kings are slated to perform. Tickets are $70 for a weekend pass that includes both music and camping. (Niesel) 12001 State Route 282, Garrettsville, 440-548-2716, nlqp.com. THEATER

Flanagan’s Wake Now in its eighth year in Cleveland, Flanagan’s Wake transports the audience to an Irish wake where villagers tell tales and sing songs for their dearly departed Flanagan. Finding the humor in life and death, the wake acts as a dark backdrop to an otherwise hilarious show in which alcohol fuels the humorous reminiscing. Sort of like a tragic Tony ’n’ Tina’s Wedding, the interactive and improvised show engages the entire audience as the guests are treated as the friends and family of the deceased. Tonight’s show starts at 8 and


repeats tomorrow night at 8 at Kennedy’s Theatre. Performances continue weekends through April 28. Tickets are $26. (Patrick Stoops) 1501 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org. MUSIC

Kucinich Fundraiser At 8 tonight at the Agora Theatre, singer-guitarist Dave Matthews will perform a special acoustic set in support of Ohio gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich. Matthews and Kucinich first met back in 2003 at Farm Aid and have collaborated on farmer-friendly initiatives including regenerative agriculture and “carbon farming” as a climate change solution. They also travelled together to Standing Rock to support indigenous rights and water protection. Tickets have been going fast. See the website for details. (Niesel) 5000 Euclid Ave., 216-881-2221, agoracleveland.com. COMEDY

Whose Live Anyway? Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops, Jeff B. Davis, and Joel Murray, the cast members of the Emmy-winning show Whose Line Is It Anyway?, bring their live version of the show to town tonight for a performance at the State Theatre. In Whose Live Anyway? the comedians will engage in the same kind of improvisational shenanigans that have turned the TV show into such a huge hit. The performance begins at 8. Tickets start at $35. (Niesel) 1519 Euclid Ave., 216-241-6000, playhousesquare.org.

SAT

04/21

SHOPPING

The Cleveland Flea After a long, cold winter (and crummy spring), Cleveland Flea kicks off its sixth season today. A self-described “small business incubator” that draws thousands of local shoppers to Tyler Village, the Cleveland Flea features a range of items you won’t find at the typical retail store. The flea offers “curated vintage,” “culinary all-stars” and “the most talented makers in the region.” As much a social gathering as a shopping experience, the Flea serves as an excellent hang, a place to meet and make friends while supporting your local creatives. It runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and continues monthly through Sept. 8. Admission is free. (Niesel) 3615 Superior Ave., theclevelandflea.com.

MUSIC

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in Concert The Harry Potter Film Concert Series returns to EJ Thomas Hall with Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in Concert. Today at 1 and 7:30 p.m., the Akron Symphony Orchestra will perform John Williams’ score from the flick, the second entry in the popular film series. During the orchestra’s performance, the film will screen in high-definition on a 40-foot screen. Film concert series creator and producer Justin Freer will conduct. Tickets start at $45. (Niesel) 198 Hill St., Akron, 330-972-7570, uaevents.com. FUNDRAISER

Superhero Bar Crawl Today from noon to 5 p.m., Flats East Bank will host its first annual Superhero Bar Crawl. Tickets are $10 (plus a small processing fee), and proceeds will benefit the nonprofit organization Drink Local, Drink Tap. Each participating establishment will have its own specials and bar games; look for giveaways and entertainment throughout the event. Participating venues include Alley Cat Oyster Bar, Backyard Bocce, Beerhead Bar & Eatery, Bold Food and Drink, Coastal Taco, Dante’s Inferno, Lago, Margaritaville, Magnolia, the Big Bang, Thirsty Dog Brewing Company and WXYZ. Each attendee will be given a “mission.” Once the mission is completed, superheros will assemble by 5:30 p.m. at Dante’s Inferno/Backyard Bocce to be entered to win an Avengers movie prize package. The first 500 superheroes will receive a gift, courtesy of Great Lakes Brewing Company. Check-in is noon to 2 p.m. at the Aloft Cleveland Downtown lobby. (Niesel) 1111 West 10th St., flatseastbank.com. MUSIC

Tristan and Isolde Franz Welser-Möst conducts the Cleveland Orchestra tonight as it presents the romanticera opera Tristan and Isolde. Dramatic soprano Nina Stemme will be on hand as will a “cast of internationally acclaimed singers.” The concert begins at 6 at Severance Hall. The opera is presented in three acts with two intermissions, so be prepared for an epic performance. Consult the orchestra’s website for ticket prices, parking info and other details. (Niesel) 11001 Euclid Ave., 216-231-1111, clevelandorchestra.com.

101 Bottles Of Beer On The Wall 115 N. Willow St. 8-10p Cody J. Martin

Last Exit Books and Cafe 124 E. Main St. 8-10p Amanda Morrison and Dale Galgozy

157 Lounge 157 S. Water St. 8-10p Gretchen Pleuss with Christine Petersilge

Laziza 195 E. Erie St. 6-9p Jon Mosey

Belleria Pizza & Italian Restaurant 135 E. Erie St. #202 8-10p Tom Evanchuck Bricco 210 S. Depeyster St. 7-9:30p Thieves Of Joy Buffalo Wild Wings 176 E. Main St. 6:30-9:30p Box Of Squirrels Burnside Barbecue 154 E. Main St. Suite B 7-9p The Fabulous Brothers Steele Dominick's Pub 147 Franklin Ave. 8-11p Ray Flanagan & The Authorities Franklin Hotel Bar 176 E. Main St. 7-10p Crooked River Stompers Duo

Taco Tonto’s 123 Franklin Ave. 4:30-6p Brent Kirby Tree City Coffee & Pastry 135 E. Erie St. 6-8p Up ‘Til 4 8:30-10:30p Emily Keener

The Loft 112 W. Main St. 8-11p Thor Platter Band McKay Bricker Gallery & Framing 141 E. Main St. 5-7p Hey Mavis Duo Newdle Bar 295 S. Water St. 8-10p The Cave Twins The Pub 401 Franklin Ave. 6-8p My Buddy Josh’s Band Ray's Place 135 Franklin Ave. 9:30p-12:30a Rachel Brown and the Beatnik Playboys

Treno Ristorante 152 Franklin Ave. 6-9p Bonnis and The King Venice Cafe 163 W. Erie St. 7-10p Monica Robins and The Ninja Cowboys 10:30p-1a Roger Hoover & David Mayfield’s Hootenanny Water Street Tavern 132 S. Water St. 7-9p Shooter Sharp & The Shootouts 9:30p-12:30a Southern Cross Band Zephyr Pub 106 W. Main St. 8-11p Cory Grinder Band

Scribbles Coffee Company 237 N. Water St. 7-9p Iris Isadora

april 27, 2018

kentamericanroots.com OFFICIAL BEER SPONSOR

OFFICIAL SPONSORS

OFFICIAL MEDIA SPONSORS

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

23


WE WENT OUT WHEN YOU COULDN’T. EVENT SLIDESHOWS. ONLY AT CLEVESCENE.COM

OPERA THEATER PRESENTS

SPRING SCENES from operas – grand and light from some of the most beloved operas, including: The Magic Flute Carmen The Gondoliers La traviata Der Rosenkavalier

Friday, April 20 & Saturday, April 21 at 7:30pm Matinee on Sunday, April 22 at 3pm TICKETS ON SALE NOW $20 adults | $10 students | $15 seniors and groups of 10+ cim.edu CIM Box Office at 216.795.3211 or cim.edu/events

GET OUT SUN

04/22

MUSIC

Rob Kovacs in Residence After forming 15 years ago, the local indie pop band Return of Simple released a couple of records and became a fixture on the local scene before eventually relocating to New York in 2009. A few years ago, after getting “burned out” in New York, the band’s frontman, singer-pianist Rob Kovacs, moved back to Cleveland. He just recently relaunched Return of Simple. Now Kovacs has announced a Euclid Tavern residency. He’ll perform at the venue at 8 tonight and every Sunday through May 13; each week’s program will be unique. Admission is free. (Niesel) 11625 Euclid Ave., 216-231-5400, happydogcleveland.com. BOOKS

Sunday Beat As part of a Sunday Beat promotion at Visible Voice Books, if you purchase a New York Times at the store, you’ll receive a free cup of coffee or tea and a Jim Alesci’s Place pastry. An added bonus: A jazz, Americana, samba or bossa nova band will perform from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Anyone who shows a Sunday receipt from Music Box, Prosperity Social Club or any of the Tremont restaurants that offer brunch can enter a same-day drawing for a chance to win a $30 Visible Voice gift certificate and a $25 Visible Voice loyalty card. They’ll also receive 10 percent off any Visible Voice book purchase. The bookstore is open today from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Niesel) 2258 Professor Ave., 216-961-0084, visiblevoicebooks.com.

MON 04/23 FUNDRAISER

24

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

Break the Silence: A Concert to Benefit the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center The Baldwin Wallace University arts management and entrepreneurship program and the Bop Stop at the Music Settlement have teamed up to host Break the Silence: A Concert to Benefit the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center. The concert will feature local acts Becky Boyd, the Sonder Bombs and more. There will also be a basket raffle and a 50/50 raffle. Seniors

from the Baldwin Wallace program worked with Bop Stop director Gabe Pollack to plan the event. The concert takes place from 7 to 10 tonight at the Bop Stop. Tickets are $15, or $10 for students. The price of admission includes one complimentary drink. (Niesel) 2920 Detroit Ave., 216-771-6551, themusicsettlement.org. NIGHTLIFE

Shit Show Karaoke Local rapper/promoter Dirty Jones and Scene’s own Manny Wallace host Shit Show Karaoke, a weekly event at the B-Side Liquor Lounge that allows patrons to choose from “an unlimited selection of jams from hip-hop to hard rock.” Participants are encouraged to “be as bad as you want.” Fueled by drink and shot specials, it all goes down tonight at 10 p.m. (Niesel) 2785 Euclid Hts. Blvd., Cleveland Heights, 216-932-1966, bsideliquorlounge.com.

TUE

04/24

SPORTS

Indians vs. Chicago Cubs Many Indians fans are probably still sore after the Chicago Cubs came back from a 3-1 deficit to beat the Indians and win the 2016 World Series. Many of the players involved in that terrific series still play for both teams, so the rivalry will be reignited tonight at 6:10 as the teams face each other at Progressive Field. Tickets start at $15. (Niesel) 2401 Ontario St., 216-420-4487, clevelandindians.com. MUSIC

Open Turntable Tuesday Tonight from 6 to 9, the Winchester hosts its weekly Open Turntable Tuesday. DJ Kris Koch offers 20-minute slots to people who want to bring their own vinyl and spin their favorite songs or deep tracks. Turntables are provided; you can play three to five songs during your time slot; and a mic is available to talk about the selections. (Niesel) 12112 Madison Ave., Lakewood, 216-600-5338, facebook.com/ thewinchestermusictavern.

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene


KentStage The

DON’T MISS THESE GREAT SHOWS • TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

THE BEST ISSUE OF THE YEAR COMES OUT NEXT WEEK!

Brian Henke & Michael Kelsey Fri., Apr. 20

Michael Stanley & Friends

Mothman of Point Pleasant

Dweezil Zappa:

Tom Rush

Fri., Apr. 27

Sat., Apr. 21

A METRO MATCH-UP ONE FOR THE AGES!

2018

BESTof

CLEVELAND

WEST SIDE VS EAST SIDE

BARS & CLUBS | FOOD & DRINK | PEOPLE & PLACES

APRIL 25, 2018

clevescene.com/bestof

DON’T MISS IT!

Kent Paranormal Weekend Sat.-Sun, Apr. 28-29

Choice Cuts! World Tour 2018 Tue., May 1

Mary Bridget Davies & Mia Dyson

John Popper Live

Sat., May 5

Fri., May 4

Naturally 7 Fri., May 11

Tue., May 8

JUST ANNOUNCED

JJ Grey & Mofro Thu., May 31

Son Volt Tue., Aug. 7

ALL SHOWS AT THE KENT STAGE UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED Tickets available at www.kentstage.org or 877-987-6487 175 East Main Street • Kent, Ohio 44240 | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

25


STAGE HUMANITY ON THE HOOF In The Humans, laughter mixes with melancholy in fascinating ways By Christine Howey EXPERIENCING THE HUMANS, now at Playhouse Square, is like falling into an Edward Hopper painting for 100 minutes. Hopper, the American realist painter, is known for works such as “Nighthawks,” where people occupy the same space in a late-night diner but are still perceptively and permanently alone. Hopper’s paintings can give you chills just from their very ordinariness. And in a similar way, playwright Stephen Karam has constructed his deftly titled play The Humans to reflect how all of us inhabit a world that is often worrisome and hostile — even when we’re together with family. You see, the Blake family has gathered for a Thanksgiving dinner at the Manhattan duplex apartment of Brigid and her boyfriend Rich. But this residence in Chinatown is no flashy Fifth Avenue suite. The living space is composed of a basement unit, in a flood-prone area no less, with no windows. That dank space is connected to a couple rooms upstairs by a less-than-grand winding staircase. In addition, there are thunderous noises emanating from the apartment immediately above theirs, and now and then a person walking around in the airshaft space they amusingly refer to as an interior courtyard. The rooms themselves are spare, static and a bit depressing. Indeed, the scenic design by David Zinn looks like a Hopper painting, even including the narrow, horizontal cross-section strip of regularly-spaced joists that connect the floor of the upper area to the ceiling of the room below. Into this setting come the holiday visitors including Brigid’s sister Aimee, a lawyer from Philadelphia, along with their parents Erik and Dierdre, and Erik’s mother Momo who are visiting from Scranton, PA. Momo is mostly confined to a wheelchair and is submerged in dementia. Initially, it seems like a traditional setup for family drama, full of revealed secrets and all the sturm and drang we associate with family get-togethers. And there is some of that. But in actuality, Karam is after something

26

Photo courtesy of Playhouse Square

more subtle and substantial in this fi nely crafted piece. For the bulk of the play, the relatives (and boyfriend) get along quite well. But as they talk, we get a fine-tuned sense of who they are, how they relate to each other, and the very specific stresses that each are dealing with. This conversation is so realistic and often so funny — thanks to the exceptional actors and the direction by Joe Mantello — that you almost feel the characters might turn to you and wait for you to join in. You’re in this painting with them, and there’s no easy escape. The pater familias, Erik, is portrayed by Richard Thomas in a sublimely well-controlled

scientific websites. Brigid (a relentlessly optimistic Daisy Eagan) is a fledgling composer trying to manage fi nancially with Rich (Luis Vega), who is a 38-year-old student working toward a social work degree. But he has a substantial trust fund waiting for him in two years, a fact that Erik notes with a degree of envy. Aimee, given a spoton rendering by Therese Plaehn, is quite a mess. She’s battling ulcerative colitis and recovering from a breakup with her girlfriend. As the afternoon darkens, in more ways than one, the tension also rises, sometimes almost imperceptibly. We learn that Erik

THE HUMANS THROUGH APRIL 29 AT PLAYHOUSE SQUARE, CONNOR PALACE, 1615 EUCLID AVE., 216-241-6000. PLAYHOUSESQUARE.COM

performance. This hard-working but not-so-successful man has some well-earned, wry observations to share (“Don’t you think it should cost less to be alive?”). But he is also haunted by dreams of a faceless woman. As his wife Dierdre, Pamela Reed is a spark plug of selfassurance fueled by her Catholic faith and a cursory reading of

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

and Brigid had a narrow brush with the 9/11 tragedy, and the destruction of Hurricane Sandy lurks in the background. It would be easy to criticize the playwright for over-reaching, since he attempts to weave in so many disparate issues that touch on the personal, political, natural and even supernatural. What saves The

Humans from being a tired catchall of dysfunction is that it is played in a minor key, without bombast or overstatement. There are no obvious villains or heroes. Perhaps the most mysterious element of the play is Momo, played with admirable consistency by Lauren Klein. Her unintelligible mutterings and screams seem to speak as much truth as the others’ words. In short, these are just human beings, victims of both the actions they have taken and the inertia that keeps them from working things out together. Like the joists inside the cross-section, they stay in their established positions to keep everything in place. But there are dark spaces between those joists that have yet to be explored. Those are the places this play illuminates, briefl y and tantalizingly. As amusing as the play often is, there is a forlorn melancholy at its heart that Edward Hopper would recognize. And it’s why The Humans will stay with you long after you leave the theater.

scene@clevescene.com t@christinehowey


MOVIES CONTROLLED CHAOS Tarantino-esque Lowlife is ultra-violent and ultra-fun By BJ Colangelo QUENTIN TARANTINO IS A modern filmmaking auteur, and his work has absolutely inspired a new generation of filmmakers. Unfortunately, this has led to a wave of filmmakers insisting on aping his style of storytelling and ultra-violence without bringing anything new or interesting to the table. Lowlife is a perfect example of this practice put to screen, and it somehow delivers a highly entertaining final product. The movie screens at midnight on Saturday at the Capitol Theatre. First things first, Lowlife isn’t a bad movie. Feelings about the trend of people trying to recreate Tarantino films aside, this melodramatic and darkly comedic crime film is actually a lot of fun to watch. Following the lives of a surprisingly endearing fresh-outof-prison ex-convict with a giant swastika tattooed across his face, a recovering junkie motel owner in search of a kidney, a luchador failing to live up to his father’s legacy and the taco-shop-owning crime boss who brings them together, Lowlife is a barbaric and absolutely bananas look at the state of contemporary America. The violent underbelly of Los Angeles plays home to this eclectic cast of characters, offering stunning backdrops to their bloody and

Photo courtesy of IFC

bizarre misadventures. As the debut feature from Ryan Prows, Lowlife was written by a Los Angeles comedy collective composed of Tim Cairo, Jake Gibson, Shaye Ogbonna, Maxwell Towson and Prows. Writing by committee can be pretty disastrous; and there are moments of Lowlife that feel incredibly disjointed and could have benefitted from a few less cooks in the kitchen. Luckily, Lowlife is a fun enough adventure to look past some of its flaws. Every moment of the film is an adrenaline rush, but one that

also offers an unflinching look at sociopolitical issues like poverty, immigration, drug addiction and the abhorrent American healthcare system at the same time. The nonlinear narrative can be a bit difficult to follow at times as the film is sectioned into sequences that allow for varying perspectives of the same situation from each character. As such, there are wild tonal shifts that can feel a bit exhausting, but the underlying excitement nicely holds it all together. These down-and-out characters have no reason for their lives to

everintersect, but the insanity presented once they all align is something to be grateful for. As the stories converge toward the end of the film, however, the chaos becomes controlled and allows for a totally satisfying conclusion. With its bloody moments of brutality, sharp humor and gorgeous cinematography, Lowlife is a sureto-be favorite for fans of midnight movies and cult cinema.

bcolangelo@clevescene.com t@bjcolangelo

SPOTLIGHT: WITCHTOWN LOCAL FILMMAKER STEPHEN Biggin, who says he’s dabbled in fi lm in the past and has done “industrial videos” for various businesses, originally planned to make a few short fi lms; then he realized the short movies had enough in common that he could merge them into one feature. Those shorts became his directorial debut, Witchtown. “While we were working on those shorts, just to see what happened, we decided to do a Kickstarter campaign,” he says, adding that he raised close to $1,000 for Witchtown, which cost a mere

$8,000 to make. The movie screens at 7 p.m. on Friday at Visible Voice Books. Admission is free. “We were shocked to see that strangers were giving us money. That made us get our act together and fi nish the script and move forward from there.” Biggin says the plot centers on two bumbling occultists who “attempt to introduce an evil to the world that it has not seen in thousands of years.” “There’s social and political commentary in the fi lm mixed with old-school goofy horror,” he says. “We really wanted to not just make

it a fun watch but also put some kind of message in there without being too preachy.” Mostly shot in the Toledo/ Perrysburg area, the movie includes drone footage of downtown Toledo. Biggen also cast the movie with friends and family. “They were mostly people who hadn’t acted before, so that was kind of a challenge in itself,” he says. “We had to convince them that they could do it.” Biggin has submitted the movie to several festivals and says it was recently accepted to a horror festival in Detroit.

“We just want to get it out there as much as we can,” he says, adding that he’s been working with a “prominent local band” on a video treatment and has written a script for a documentary about water pollution. He says a Witchtown 2 is even a possibility. “We’ll go to anyplace that will allow us to set up a table at a convention and share this. We just want to keep getting the word out and see what happens.” — Jeff Niesel

jniesel@clevescene.com t@jniesel

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

27


BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

CAVS PLAYOFF BASKETBALL

WATCH EVERY MINUTE AT MA! $5.75 Pitchers During During Games!

THE TRIBE IS BACK!

Sit down with your guests. Advertise with SCENE. Call 216-241-7550 for more information.

Catch Every Pitch this Season at MA!

$5.75 PITCHER SPECIAL DURING EVERY GAME FRIDAY - STEVE ROBERTS | SATURDAY - NATHAN HENRY

New Space  New Menu  New Vibe Come enjoy locally sourced food, beer, wine and handcrafted cocktails at lunch, dinner and Happy Hour!

1360 E 9th Street * the IMG Building sausalitoCLE.com @SausalitoCLE

28

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018


EAT SAME OLD TUNE Cafe Sausalito might have a new address, but the food remains the same By Douglas Trattner Photo by Emanuel Walla

THE PICTURE HAD ALL THE hallmarks of a winning Instagram post: The lighting was natural and flattering, the angle coyly inviting, and the food blooming with justmade vitality. But when I read the caption — “pan-seared walleye with lobster gnocchi and saffron butter sauce” — I was genuinely perplexed. Just one night earlier we had eaten at Sausalito, ordered that very dish and even snapped a photo. After comparing the two pictures, all I could conclude was that our meal had been tipped into a paper bag, shaken like fried chicken, and poured onto a plate. All the elements were there, but they were rearranged into an abstract version of the original. Perhaps the very thing that has kept Sausalito chugging along all these years at a nearly dead shopping mall, namely private events, was precisely the thing that torpedoed our dinner. While the main dining room was sparsely populated on a recent weekday evening, a large group was gathered above our heads on the mezzanine, commanding more of the kitchen’s attention than it likely could provide. An overtaxed kitchen might also explain why the calamari ($8) was pulled from the deep fryer while the rings were still pale. Given the popularity of the dish city-wide, this version also seems to be a missed opportunity in its aggressive austerity — all rings and a smattering of jarred banana peppers. Heck, if those peppers had simply been battered and fried like the squid, the dish would have been twice as good. A lack of originality also prevented a fried goat cheese appetizer ($8) from rising above its three-word moniker. Three blobs of “fried goat cheese” are laid to rest on a bed of greens without so much as a slice of bread or cracker. Had the cheese not been so metallic tasting, it might not have been such a glaring absence. This winter, after 30 years at the Galleria, Cafe Sausalito made a major play by relocating to a highprofile location across the street. The contemporary new restaurant at the corner of East Ninth and St.

Clair will likely charm longtime customers, but in order to wow new fans, everything from the food to the service will need to improve. I recently spent two painstaking hours peeling fava beans for a Spanish bean salad recipe, so the moment our server set down our crab cake appetizer ($10) and accompanying bean salad, I knew

in pork chop,” for example, that’s what you expect to see on the plate. What arrived ($18) was a tasty, but much trimmer, single-bone chop. Predictably, the meat was paired with mashed potatoes and grilled asparagus. For three decades, lunch has been the wind beneath Sausalito’s wings, so to speak, so we expected much

SAUSALITO ON NINTH 1360 EAST NINTH ST., 216-696-2233 SAUSALITOCLE.COM

what we were in for. On each and every bean is a tiny leather jacket standing between the diner and the tender core. How that detail is overlooked by the kitchen I’ll never know. As far as the crab cakes go, they taste fi ne, but there isn’t a lump of crab meat in the lot. It wasn’t just that food-porn shot that left us disenchanted; we managed to experience another instance of bait and switch during the same meal. Any seasoned diner knows to take flowery menu descriptions with a grain of salt, but others are nearly contractual in nature. When you read “double bone-

better results during a midweek, midday visit. It didn’t take long to see how the restaurant has managed to survive all these years as every chair was occupied both downstairs and up, where we were seated. Suits fi lled the seats and CNBC ruled the flat-screens as servers hoofed it up and down the open stairwell to keep up. Ours dropped a cold, thick bowl of seafood bisque ($5.50) and literally did not return until she brought our mains 25 minutes later and noticed that it went untouched. “Cold?” she asked. A flank steak salad ($10.50) fl irted with success, but was

hampered by poorly trimmed beef that was surprisingly fatty for the typically lean cut. Also, the meat wasn’t sliced all the way through in spots, leaving ungainly pieces. If you expect a meatloaf patty melt ($10) to be built around a nice thic slice of meatloaf that holds it shap this version will confound you. Th fi lling is so loose that the sandwic sheds pieces from every side as on attempts to eat it. As a knife-andfork dish, however, it’s not all that bad. If you’re in the area and looking for a place to grab a cocktail, you could do worse than Sausalito. Th glassy two-level space has great ci views and the drinks are creative and well crafted. We enjoyed the London is Calling ($11), a gin martini dosed with grappa, and th Despacito ($11), a smoky mescalfueled drink with a bitter amaro backbone. That is, until a staffer dropped a bowl of guacamole that bounced onto a companion’s jacke and soured the mood.

dtrattner@clevescene.com t@dougtrattner | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

29


EAT

Serving Up... Southern Comfort Fusion Food BURGERS PULLED PORK BRISKET CORNED BEEF HOMEMADE PIES & COOKIES

Nominated For

BEST BURGER BEST LUNCH SPOT

COQUETTE PATISSERIE TO CALL IT QUITS By Douglas Trattner

16700 Lorain Ave Cleveland, Oh 44111 | 216.417.1056 | hatfieldsgoodegrub.com

NOW IN THREE LOCATIONS! Delivery Now Available

18405 Detroit Ave. Lakewood 216.221.0676

To See Our Other Locations Check Out indiagardencleveland.com

TOP RATED VEGAN & VEGETARIAN CUISINE

5.00

$

OFF Your Next Meal Sign Up On indiagardencleveland.com

LUNCH BUFFET 7 DAYS A WEEK

Thanking Our Wonderful Customers For Continuously Making Us The #1 Indian Cuisine Restaurant In Northeast Ohio!

HOURS: Mon- Fri 11:30am- 2:30pm / 5:00pm- 10:00pm Sat & Sun 12:00pm- 3:00pm / 5:00pm- 10:00pm

HARRY’S is a Casual Steakhouse serving Great Steaks, Chops & Seafood at a Reasonable Price Over 15 Different Cuts Of Steak!

HAPPY HOUR 2 DINNERS IN HARRY’S BAR EVERYDAY!

$

5.00 Burger Specials

Bar Top only 3:30-7pm

FOR

$

16.99

Select items M-F 3:30-6:00 Sat 3-5 and Sun 12-4

ELIVER!

WE NOW D

nt $15.00/ Order Amou fee amt.) *On Minimum $4.99 (Call ahead for e Fe y er DE: nimum Deliv

Mi

DELIVERY

AREAS IN

CLU

bcij[Z ©dehj^e d h je ©iebe [d c © ^ji W eWZl_[m ©fWhc eeZ ©Xh ©bWa[m

10% OFF DINE IN ONLY Expires Aug. 2, 2018

DAILY LUNCH BUFFET 5507 DETROIT AVE. CLEVELAND www.classicindianfood.com

(216) 651-4007

Hours: MON 11:30A-3:00P/ 5:30P-10:00P TUES CLOSED WED-SAT 11:30A-3:00P/ 5:30P-10:00P SUN 12:00P- 3:00P/ 5:00P- 10:00P

FREE STREET PARKING Both Sides of Detroit Ave.

30

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

bites

Mother’s Day SUNDAY, MAY 13 SERVING OUR MOTHER’S DAY BUFFET & REGULAR MENU Now Taking Reservations.

WHEN COQUETTE PATISSERIE opened its brick-and-mortar store in 2014, it immediately became the darling of the Cleveland pastry scene. Already people had come to know and appreciate chef Britt-Marie Culey and her authentic French pastries from her six or so years at the North Union Farmers Market at Shaker Square, where her weekly appearances were the highlight for many sweets shoppers. The shop (11607 Euclid Ave., 216-331-2841), however, became so much more, thanks in equal parts to husband and partner Shane, who paired those pitch-perfect sweet and savory items with a killer beer, wine and cocktail program. Hours spent at the intimate University Circle boîte seemed to slip right by thanks to bottomless glasses of Champagne, just-shucked oysters, dreamy French pastries and the kind of conversation that has been replaced by droning televisions. Sadly, all that comes to an end this month when the Culeys lower the curtain on the shop and say “au revoir.” After long deliberation, the owners have decided to pull the plug after four good, but trying, years. Coquette will close its doors on April 28 — not with a whimper but with a bang, thanks to Un Fête d’Adieu, a day-long celebration. “The time and sacrifice required to nurture and grow a hospitality business are hard to quantify,” the Culeys explain. “We’ve given everything we had to Coquette to help make the up-and-coming Uptown District a destination all while raising two small children. Over the last four years, we remained committed to our concept: to offer the highest quality product, unparalleled craftsmanship, and the most remarkable experience possible. “We couldn’t be prouder of what we accomplished, but after careful evaluation, it’s time to end this chapter.” The goodbye bash will run from 10 a.m. until midnight on the last day of business. Customers are invited to enjoy one last taste of chef Culey’s sweet treats and savory creations at the shop and, of course, to say farewell.

“Coquette was my flower,” Britt laments. “I planted her seed, nourished her, watched her grow and be appreciated by many. I will remember her beauty and happiness that she instilled in our community. She gave me the platform to dream and create. I thank all of our loving community for embracing Coquette and sharing a wonderful four years with us.” Culey recently accepted a position as pastry chef for Levy Restaurants, the company that handles all food service operations at the Huntington Convention Center. Management says that all custom orders for future events placed before April 28 will be fulfilled. Gift cards must be redeemed by close of business on April 28.

Lilly Handmade Chocolates Moving From Tremont to Old Brooklyn After exactly 10 years in Tremont, Lilly Handmade Chocolates (761 Starkweather Ave., 216-771-3333) is relocating to Old Brooklyn. The shop’s last day will be May 25, followed by an anticipated July opening for the new home. “It’s wonderful,” owner Joshua Montague says of the move. “We’re super excited.” Along with wife and partner Amanda, the team will be moving into a former accountant’s office in a 1930s building. The South Hills neighborhood of Old Brooklyn also happens to be home for the Montagues. The space (2032 West Schaaf Rd.) will be smaller than the Tremont shop, with no seating. Also, the owners are doing away beer, wine and spirits so that they can focus solely on chocolates and confections. But candy making will remain front and center at the new shop. “When you walk in you’re going to be in our chocolate lab, so you’re going to be even closer to the action than you were here in Tremont,” says Joshua. We’ll keep you posted on opening day.

dtrattner@clevescene.com t@dougtrattner


GRAND OPENING!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MON-FRI 7AM-3PM | SAT & SUN 7AM-4PM

NICK’S DINER

on! Coming So rs ou Open 24 H . Fri. & Sat

4116 Lorain Ave. Ohio City, 44113 216-631-7757 PATIO SEASON

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

31


32

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018


Photo courtesy of the Bloom Effect

MUSIC

A SOUL/R&B POP PHENOMENA Rick Astley embraces his past and looks to the future By Annie Zaleski IN 1993, RICK ASTLEY LANDED a U.S. Top 40 hit called “Hopelessly.” The soulful adult contemporary ballad peaked at No. 28 on the Billboard Hot 100, and spent a total of 20 weeks on the charts. But instead of the song serving as the start of a new chapter, it became an ending: Disenchanted with the music industry, Astley stepped away from the spotlight and all but retired from music. He eventually released a new single in 2001 but didn’t return to the stage until the mid-2000s — a decision he says came about thanks to the urging of his family. “I used to get offers to come to different places and sing my old songs, and my stock answer was, ‘Look, I just don’t do that anymore, thanks,” Astley says, calling from his home in England. He performs at 8 p.m. on Sunday at House of Blues. “’Thanks for remembering me, but I don’t really do it.’ Then, we — I say we, the royal we, family we — we got an offer to go to Japan. And my wife was, like, straightaway, ‘That’s happening. We’re going.’ And

our daughter — we’ve got one child, our daughter, Emilie — she said, ‘We’re going. That’s happening.’ “That was kind of, sort of, how I got into singing the old songs again, to be honest,” he continues. “It’s hard to explain, really … It wasn’t like I was negative about it. I just felt it was a different time in my life. It felt a bit weird to go back and do it. But I also think that the fact that we went on a family holiday [made it] a very different experience. It wasn’t like I was just going to do gigs and I had to put that jacket on again and be that guy again. It was like, ‘We’re on a family holiday. I’m going to do, like, really big karaoke

small part because he says he’s just returned from the pub after having a pint with a friend. But the musician is also clearly enjoying life, and the second chance he’s getting to be in the musical spotlight — on his own terms. “There isn’t the pressure that there used to be,” Astley says. “It doesn’t feel the same anymore. It feels a lot more comfortable, to be honest.” Stakes were much higher when the Lancashire, England, native emerged in the latter half of the ’80s. A charismatic protege of the gleaming production powerhouse Stock Aitken Waterman, he was a soul/R&B-pop phenomenon with a

RICK ASTLEY 8 P.M. SUNDAY, APRIL 22, HOUSE OF BLUES, 308 EUCLID AVE., 216-523-2583. TICKETS: $32 ADV, $37 DOS. HOUSEOFBLUES.COM

for a few nights.’” Astley laughs, something he does often during the half-hour interview. He’s in a good mood, likely in no

velvet-trimmed voice — resonant and pure — fond of wearing snappy blazers. His 1987 debut, Whenever You Need Somebody, spawned three

U.S. hits — including two charttoppers, the glamorous dance-pop baubles “Never Gonna Give You Up” and “Together Forever”— while 1988’s Hold Me in Your Arms launched two Top 40 hits. (Incidentally, he also had a Top 10 Billboard hit in 1991 with “Cry For Help.”) Astley says it was “very, very daunting” coming to America for the fi rst time when he was breaking big. The sheer size of the country was intimidating — as was the fact that so many of his favorite artists hailed from here. Pressure from the powers-that-be also didn’t help. “When I got there, we’d already had quite a few hits in Europe and different places around the world,” he says. “The label in America was just kind of like, ‘Right. We’ve got to make this work. We’re even being told we’ve got to make this work.’ And I was a young guy. I was still only 21, I think. You kind of think, ‘Right. Okay. We’re going to make this work, are we?’” He laughs. “And it’s just a bit weird, I think. You get used to it, | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

33


MUSIC UPCOMING ENTERTAINMENT!

BILLY CURRINGTON SPECIAL GUEST LOCASH • APR 19

TERRY FATOR APR 20

A TRIBUTE TO SHANIA TWAIN & TIM MCGRAW • APR 29

QUEENSRŸCHE MAY 4

5/11 DANE COOK (2ND SHOW ADDED) 5/18 BIG & RICH WITH SPECIAL GUESTS COWBOY TROY & DJ SINISTER 6/14 GIN BLOSSOMS WITH VERY SPECIAL GUESTS TONIC & VERTICAL HORIZON 6/15 TRACY LAWRENCE

7/20 RON WHITE 7/27 GEORGE LOPEZ: THE WALL LIVE IN CONCERT! 8/4 ARSENIO HALL 8/17 PURPLE REIGN THE PRINCE TRIBUTE SHOW! TED BY PRESEN

UPCOMING ENTERTAINMENT! brian laakso SCOTTY K feat J Jay Boyd APR 20 & 21

Matt johnson

MATT JOHNSON’S DUELING PIANO FIASCO! APR 27 & 28

live music presented by

every friday and saturday

4/20 BLUE TAXI DUO 4/21 JOHN CHAPMAN 4/27 AUSTIN WALKIN CANE 4/28 CHRIS HATTON’S MUSICAL CIRCUS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM AND THE ROCKSINO BOX OFFICE, OPEN DAILY FROM 1PM - 9PM. ALL TICKET SALES FINAL.

VEGAS EXPERIENCE. OHIO ADDRESS. HRRNP.COM • 330.908.7625

FIND YOUR RHYTHM

MUST BE 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER. FOR FREE, CONFIDENTIAL HELP 24/7, CALL THE OHIO RESPONSIBLE GAMBLING HELPLINE AT 1.800.589.9966 OR VISIT WWW.ORG.OHIO.GOV.

34

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

and I did get used to it. But I still think that coming to the home of, basically, what is rock ’n’ roll and R&B and the rest of it, and saying, ‘We’re going to get this English guy. And we’re going to make these songs hits,’ I still think that is a bit of an odd thing to do, to be honest.” These days, Astley is more content to follow his muse in more personal directions. In 2016, he released 50, a record hewing toward contemporary-meets-classic soul, pop and R&B. The album, which he wrote, performed and produced himself, landed at No. 1 on the U.K. charts. But despite such commercial success, Astley is realistic about where his career stands in music’s current landscape. “If we do gigs here [in the U.K.], I might end up playing to 10,000 people,” he says. “Don’t get me wrong — that, in its own way, is where every artist wants to be. You want to be playing in an arena, and it’ll all be amazing, and fi reworks, and all the rest of it. But the truth of the matter is, you’ve just got to be realistic about where you are in your career at any moment, and where you are in any territory. “To me, America is still like me putting a toe in the water. No one’s got a clue, I don’t think, that I made a record,” he continues, and laughs. “And that’s fine. It really is. It’s okay. It’s kind of how it was all those years ago, to be honest, where, like I said, I had all these hits around the world in different places. I’d have, like, three or four Top 10 — if not No. 1, records, blah, blah — in the U.K. Came to America and everyone’s like, ‘Who are you? We don’t really care. Get to the back of the line.’” Astley is also savvy about the pitfalls of stardom, including the fact that when musicians start generating money for other people, they’re often treated “like a commodity,” as he puts it. In hindsight, he looks back at his own pop fame and realizes how lucky he was to step away from his career and emerge relatively unscathed. “I had a bit of money, so I’ve been comfortable and everything, and also I have my sanity,” he says. “I never got into drink and drugs and all of that and everything. I had good people around me who cared about me. But that’s not a normal story, I don’t think. And I think that a lot of the time, people are kind of pushed through a funnel just to kind of make the maximum amount

of cash that can possibly be made.” He laughs. “You have to have somebody who really cares about you around you to make sure that you get through that. Because that’s just the way the business is. It’s a very here-today-gone-tomorrow kind of business, isn’t it?” Astley does admit that “the internet’s changed everything,” namely that if fans want to hunt down his music, it’s much easier now. (The “Rickrolling” phenomenon that brought “Never Gonna Give You Up” back into the public eye also helped.) But Astley is now able to tour all over the world, and visit countries he never did back in the ’80s and early ’90s. “Back [then], it was about videos,” he explains. “It was about the radio. It was about the CD. It was about promotion. [For certain artists] it wasn’t so much about playing live — certainly not pop artists. You could have a big hit album and never even go there. “I’m doing the absolute opposite of that,” he says. “I’m not having bighit albums, but I’m playing in places a lot more now. It’s nice.” In fact, Astley is rather surprised that he’s now making a living from touring. “It’s bizarre and weird, to be honest,” he says. “When I quit in my late 20s, I thought I was letting the door close, to a great degree. I thought, ‘Well, I won’t be getting on the stage ever again. That’s not going to happen.’ I just didn’t think that would ever happen. But live music now is stronger than it’s ever been.” Astley has a followup to 50 nearly done — he says they’re working in fi nal mixes at the moment, and it is going to be released this year — and he recently released a new song, the majestic soul-pop “Walk Like A Panther,” from the movie of the same name. And he’s still determined to enjoy his concert tours like little vacations. For example, Astley fondly recalls a visit to NASA when he swung through Texas a few years ago, and he (of course) has the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame on his Cleveland wish list. “I think that’s the thing — I’ve never really fallen out of love with music,” he says. “I know at one point I just fell out of love with the business side of the music thing, because like I was saying earlier, you become a bit of a commodity. I wouldn’t swap places with anybody. I’m really glad of what happened — and grateful for what happened.”

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene


308 EUCLID AVE. CLEVELAND, OH 44114 216.523.BLUE Complete listing at houseofblues.com/cleveland

FOLLOW US:

@HOBCLEVELAND

J U S T

A N N O U N C E D CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD

SIR THE BAPTIST JUNE 16 ON SALE FRI. 10AM

JUNE 20 ON SALE FRI. 10AM

In Association With Beachland Ballroom JULY 20 ON SALE FRI. 10AM

In Association with the Grog Shop

RICK ASTLEY

APRIL 22

AFGHAN WHIGS BUILT TO SPILL w/ Rituals of Mine APRIL 25

MAY 5

TROPIDELIC w/ Carlos Jones & The PLUS Band, Wanyama, Persons Places Things

JONATHAN DAVIS OF KORN w/ Palisades

w/ Glorious Sons, Spirit Animal

MAY 9

MAY 11

MAY 12

KALI UCHIS

HAYLEY KIYOKO

JUNE 4

JUNE 5

SAVED BY THE 90’S

MAY 18

JOHN BUTLER TRIO+ w/ Mama Kin Spender

OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW COMING SOON

JUNE 13

April 17 April 18 April 19 April 20 May 1 May 4 May 5 May 7 May 10 May 15

BUY TICKETS AT

JULY 8

Trey Anastasio Trio SOLD OUT AJR: The Click Tour w/ MAX, Hundred Handed SOLD OUT Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness ft. Allen Stone, Zac Clark, Bob Oxblood SOLD OUT Echosmith w/ The Score, Jena Rose Vinyl Theatre w/ The Catching Cambridge Room Trixie Mattel PJ Morton w/ Brik.Liam Cambridge Room Smallpools & Great Good Fine Ok w/ Half The Animal Cambridge Room Madison Beer Cambridge Room Sons of Apollo w/ Felix Martin

JULY 13

May 26 May 31 June 4 June 6 June 7 June 8 June 10 June 12 June 19 June 20

Rumourz (Tribute to Fleetwood Mac) & Out of Eden (Tribute to Eagles) w/ June One Look (Tribute to Linda Ronstadt BROCKHAMPTON SOLD OUT Tash Sultana - Moved to Jacobs Pavilion Billie Eilish - In Association with the Beachland Ballroom SOLD OUT TECH N9NE w/ Krizz Kaliko, Just Juice, Joey Cool, King Iso Ledisi w/ Melanie Fiona, Tweet Magic Men Live! Chon w/ Polyphia, TTING, Tricot Pouya Lake Street Dive w/ River Whyless - In Association with Beachland Ballroom

Buy tickets at HOUSEOFBLUES.COM/CLEVELAND Order By Phone: 800.745.3000 • House of Blues Box Office

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

35


Photo courtesy of Conqueroo Media

MUSIC A THROWBACK OF SORTS Chris Barron’s acoustic tour provides a look behind the curtain By Matt Wardlaw CHRIS BARRON, THE SCRAGGLY, wiry longtime frontman of the Spin Doctors is headed to Cleveland armed with only his songs and an acoustic guitar — and he’s the first to admit that might sound pretty weird. “You know, if I saw the guy from the Spin Doctors was coming to town and just playing a solo acoustic set, I wouldn’t really know what to expect,” he says with a laugh during a phone conversation in advance of the Beachland Tavern show that takes place at 8 p.m. on Thursday. “I imagine there’d be some guy in a silly hat singing a bunch of silly tunes.” While he doesn’t reveal whether or not he’ll be wearing the silly hat, he does promise that the staple Spin Doctors hits “Little Miss Can’t Be Wrong” and “Two Princes” will be present and accounted for in the setlist, alongside some deeper cuts from the band’s catalog. He’ll also be sharing a hefty sampling of material from Angels and One-Armed Jugglers, his latest solo album which was released last fall. For those who have followed Barron throughout his career, he’s been playing acoustic shows for many years, going back to his early days in New York City in the late ’80s when he would play at the Nightingale Bar, mixing blues, country and folk covers with future Spin Doctors originals. The acoustic nature of the current tour is a throwback of sorts to the spirit of that time, while also offering a look behind the curtain at Barron’s life’s work from a different angle. “If you’re interested in the Spin Doctors, and you’re interested in me as a figure in the Spin Doctors, my solo shows are pretty insightful because it can kind of take you back to some of the original impetus of a lot of these tunes, because I’m the principal songwriter,” he explains. “You can see my approach and how some of these songs that you know well originally sounded before the band. So if you’re one of those kooky people who likes to look under rocks artistically, there’s some archaeological interests in the show as well.” Whether you’re a casual fan or a hardcore devotee, Barron promises the experience will satisfy; he says you’re going to get your money’s

36

worth and then some. “I call it the holy covenant of the ticket. If you buy a ticket to see me, I’m going to be ready to play. I’m going to be prepared. I’m not going to be hammered,” he says. “If I can’t make it, there will be a good reason. It’s going to be a weather thing where nobody went anywhere in that region of the country. You know, there’s going to be a damn good reason.” His new album has a diversely introspective thread that runs throughout, alternating between songs like “April and May” and “Saving Grace,” which are more upbeat in tone, at least on the surface, and “Till The Cows Come Home,” which finds Barron delivering an old-school croon of a vocal against a waltz-y musical bed. “Too Young to Fade,” which closes out the record, is one of the oldest songs on the album, with the seeds of the track first developing nearly 20 years ago after Blues Traveler bassist Bobby Sheehan passed away in 1999 at the age of 31. Barron began writing the song as a tribute to his old friend, but found that he had to step back because of his emotions. “It took me a really long time to get back to that tune,” he says now. “You know, I had it in my back pocket for a really long time. But I was just too sad to finish it.” “The World Accordion to Garp” does indeed feature accordion, and Barron is really happy with some of the more subtle moments that found their way into the songs on this album.

that is like, ‘Yes!’ There’s so much wonderful musical interpretation on this record.” Working on the album with a cast of first-call New York musicians, including Saturday Night Live drummer Shawn Pelton, Barron was delighted with the results. “I hear the playing that these guys did on my tunes. I can hear how much thought they put into their parts and the raw interpretation of the song, which is just really fucking cool,” he says. “You know, when people come in and you’re like, ‘Oh, my god, yes, of course!’ Because I come at it like a writer, but a drummer comes at it like a drummer. When Shawn comes at it, he brings all of that skill and interpretation into it as well as just his ability to hold down a groove; it’s just great.” As Barron recalls now, Cleveland was one of the early markets that latched onto the music that he was making with the Spin Doctors in the early ’90s. He mentions Joe Carroll, a longtime promotions veteran who was working for Epic Records, the band’s label. “Joe was one of the first guys. We were going around the country and we would meet up with people from the label and they were all enthusiastic. They were all really nice and very cool. But Joe was the first one who was like, ‘You guys have some serious traction here in Cleveland and people really like you guys.’ So I just remember Joe being one of the first people who

CHRIS BARRON, CHRIS ALLEN 8 P.M. THURSDAY, APRIL 19, BEACHLAND TAVERN, 15711 WATERLOO RD., 216-383-1124. TICKETS: $15. BEACHLANDBALLROOM.COM

“I think in terms of writing that tune, I got really lucky with that lyric. It just expresses a lot to me, about show business and a lifetime of living among the guitars and the microphones and the amplifiers and the backstages,” he says. “The second verse is ‘The tuba has been drinking/ The evening has been torn/Too late to get an inkling when the sheep have all been shorn.’ With ‘the tuba has been drinking,’ the tuba player does this little run in the background

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

we ran into out of town who wasn’t tempering our expectations. It wasn’t like, ‘Oh yeah, you guys are obviously a great band, but not everybody gets it. I mean, I get it, I think you guys are great.’ He was the first one who was like, ‘You guys really have something going on.’” “It was a very tough record to work at the time, but belief and persistence paid off,” Carroll recalls in a separate interview. “I remember the first time they came to Cleveland.

I can’t recall the bar they played but it was in a basement. There were three people there, plus myself and my branch manager Rich Kudolla. They played like the place was packed. It was very impressive and is still one of my favorite stories.” The eventual success of “Two Princes,” Barron says, “seems in hindsight like a fait accompli,” but at the time they sent it out, that wasn’t the case. “When we first released it, radio was just like, ‘What the fuck is this?’ And they didn’t get it at all. It wasn’t just a rock and roll tune, it wasn’t an R&B tune,” Barron says. “They really didn’t know what to do with us. What ended up happening was we put out ‘Little Miss Can’t Be Wrong,’ which had a bit more of a rock ’n’ roll kind of reference that radio could wrap its head around. That tune blew up and we released ‘Two Princes,’ and it ended up being the tune that everybody knows so well. “You’re lucky to be known for something in this business,” he tells us. For Barron, even if that’s only a couple of songs, it’s all good. “[Some] people mostly know me for ‘Two Princes’ and ‘Little Miss Can’t Be Wrong’ and I’m grateful for that,” he says. “You know, those tunes are huge. [But] people who take the time to check out my new record, they’ll see that there’s this guy who embraces where he comes from but also has developed over time, and there’s more to me than ‘Little Miss Can’t Be Wrong’ and ‘Two Princes.’”

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene


| clevescene.com m | April 18 - 24, 2018

37


D HTS LEVELASN C , D P.GS V L B H S ID HT 21.5588 GROG O ID L C U E 5 8 7 2 3 216.3

FRI 4/ FRI 4/20 /20 /2 20

TH THU HU U 4/19 4/ 4

CARLOS JONESS

*/2$$!.'2 */ */2 / /2 !(-s*%9'2 ! 4

*)-$/./6!.4(%35.+).'7!22)/23

NICK SA SAMPS AM AM

& THE P.L.U.S. BANDD

TUE 4/ 4/24 /24 /2 24

AMORA ORA AMORAMORA AMO RAA

WED 4/188

MAX XO KREAAM CUZ LII G HTYEAR

MON 6/ 6/44

THU 5/1 TH 5/17

WERK KHOUS SNE LIIVE 6 ONLY NATIVE SOU OUNDS

SMOKE DZZA & BODDEGA BAAMZ

WOULF BK A WATTS

7 $s&2%% 7%

THU 4/226

WEDNESDAY 4.18 HUMP DAY HAPPY HOUR DJ ESO & JAMZ DAVIS $3/$4/$5 specials all night MAXO KREAM AFTERPARTY THURSDAY 4.19 THE HOOKUP—COLLEGE ID NIGHT with DJ MIKE FILLY (10pm) FRIDAY 4.20 AFTER GLOW 90’S DANCE PARTY with SCOTT HEISEL SATURDAY 4.21 S.I. CURRENCY presents DANCEHALL ON COVENTRY Food & Drink Specials All Night 9pm-2am

THU U 6/7

SUNDAY 4.22 OPEN STAGE SOUND SYSTEM Hosted by XELA 7pm

SAT 6//9

MONDAY 4.23 SHITSHOW KARAOKE NO COVER! TUESDAY 4.24 LYRICAL RHYTHMS Open Mic Night 9PM-2AM CANVAS & COCKTAILS 8-10pm Tickets Online

STEPHEEN MALM MKUS &LITHIC THCHE JICKSS HIC HICS

M ELVINS S ALL SOUL UL ULS

Happy Hour Every Day until 9 PM Twitter & Instagram @BSIDECOVENTRY

INTER RNNGGARMA EARTHLING BRUCE L AMONT

FRI 5/18 FR

Z 107..9 P022%-%s2/ OP-U/U/4!"!. P S.'s-!2 HOW 2+4/// 3(!20 3( ! 3( THURRSDAY NIGHT MASH UP $*9/-)9/-

SAT 5/199

FRI 4//27

SUN 5/20

WED 6/13

SURVIVAL KIT GALLERY ATT74(3435$)/3

SHISHO SHO H HO

THU 5/3 &%!4 "2%.$!.#!.49*/%,!,,9/&FUGAZI WITH TERMINAL LOVERS

2%42/! ! 24)34299$)249*/.%302%3%%.43

PROJ JECTT MOOONLL/%4IGHHT 24(%##:!2s44/.% 4(%0/

THAMILTON HEM EHAN VAND ILSAK ANDSH AKE

"*/.%%3s6/. . 37!' ''%2 -/2 - 2%

DARK WAT ATER REBE BEELLION N

SUN 4/29

THU U 5/ 5 24

MAYOR WERTZ

MAPAC ACH AC C E

MC CHRIS BITFORCE

THE GROG SHOP PRESENTS AT

THE MESSTHETICS THE GROG SHOP PRESENTS AT

AGORA

SLOOAN FRI 6/ 6/ 6/22

CHRO OME ( !()2 - -!8)-

LP GIOBB BBI

ALL B-SIDE EVENTS AGES 21+ ONLY

TUE 6/19 TU AN N EVENING WITH

SUN 5/277

SOF FI/ TUUKKERR +!( ,/

PRIEESTS

THE DECEMBERISTS THU 5/3 PROTEST THE HERO

TUE 4/24

WITH GOOD

WED 5/30

FR RI 5/4

SUN 6/24

LARA HOOPE

TRETURN HE CLARKS OF SIMPLE

& THE ARRK-TTONES

M APS & ATTLASESS PRIISM S TATS

THU 5/331

FRI 7//27 FR 2

45 SPIDER

WED 5/9

FR RI 6/1

SAVAGE E MASTERR BEWITCHER

BEA AR VS SHAR RK SIGNALS MIDWEST ST

HAMMR VULGAR DEVILS

RUNAWA RUN A Y BROTHER

SAT 6/2

SUN 5//13 1

C7%$.%3$!9 OMBICHRIS S(4T#,5" s.) s.)'( '(

THE SW WOPLERD SHELTER PEOP

02)3/.s$%!4(6!,,%% 9()'(

SAT 4/21 MON 4/23 TUE 5/1 7%$ 4(5 3!4 35. 45% 3!4 45% 7%$ FRI 5/25 3!4 3!4 4(5  4(5 FRI 8/3 SUN 8/12 TUE 8/14 FRI FRI 9/14

GUIDED BY VO VOICES—SOLLD OUT! MAKEE ‘‘EM LAUGH MONDA MAK AYS VIBEZ Showcase w37!. w !.+sUnknownphrazes p 4(%7/2.&,).43s"A s"ALLIK!LISTANEs2OID2AGE G 4(%(!009&)43s 43s-OON2OCKSs3TRANGE-ESSENGER G G ! 2#()% '2 '2%% %%.s$OM$ESHAWNs&EED4HE0EOPLE P 4//"% 4// "%&2%3#/s5PTOWNE"UD P UDDHAs*UL"IG'REEN G 4HE7RITERS"LOCK!,%8:). :)..)s .)s(!..!34!+/,)#( 4(%-!3/.$)342)#44s4H s4HE7HHISKEY(OLLOW Y &5-!.#(5s-O -OSS'ENERATORs2 ' 2ED 'IANT /2!.'%% !. !.))-!,s7ILDCARD,EAADERs-IKEY3ILAS REG EGGA GAE WOMAN ROCK AGAINSTT CANCER 0-4##s/KAY#s4 &ONZs2I Y 2IO,O IO RDIs"RI 00-3),%.4$)3#/W$*#OREY REYY 'RAN ANDs#HRIS7RIGHT AN .)' '(42)/43s#OURTSHIP HIPs3 s3ILENT2IV IVAL IV !,%% 8#!-%2/. BOM MBA ESTTERE EREO O SPA A RTA GUITTAR LEGEND DICK DALE 0%$ $2/4(%,)/.s(#-C%NTIRE SALEES

;PJRL[ZJHUILW\YJOHZLKMVYHSSZOV^ZH[[OLJS\I^P[OV\[HZLY]PJLMLLI`WOVULMVYH Z\YJOHYNLVYH[HU`VM[OLMVSSV^PUNSVJH[PVUZ! *3,=,3(5+)9,(29664*SL]LSHUK,90,:;9,,;.<0;(9:>PSSV\NOI`/,0./;:4<:0*:/67*SL]LSHUK/LPNO[Z3667;YLTVU[ 4<:0*:(=,:*SL]LSHUK4@405+»:,@,9,*69+:3HRL^VVK9,*69+9,=63<;065*SL]LSHUK/LPNO[Z9,*69+:/67>PSSV^PJR :8<(9,9,*69+:(RYVU;/,=05@3.966=,)LKMVYK>(?)6+,.(3HRL^VVK@6<5.205.:*SL]LSHUK

| cleves clevescene.com e cene.com es m | April 18 - 24, 2018

THE WAR ON DRUGS MON 7/23 &,%%4&/8%3

FRI 7/13

WITH NILÃ&#x153;FER

YANYA

THE GROG SHOP PRESENTS AT

HOUSE OF BLUES

!8)/-!

$*:/ /% /%

FRI 5/11

TIGER AND DESTRAGE

PEL LICOAN CLOAKRO CL OM

PRE-P PRIDE ON THEOCKEAKATHSHTE GROG SIDE CLEVEL ELAND QUEEENS ROC EL

JOYNE ER LUCASS ELI

^^^[PJRL[Ã&#x2026;`JVT

SPOT KATING POLLY PO T Y MOUTH

PPAUL OSTCHEHEHERARYNIM MAL

MON N 4/30

TICKETS TO GROG SHOP EVENTS ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH

T40TH HEADIC CKIES NN NI VERSARY TOUR! THE QUEERS

GYOSEMIGHT HOSTT LIGHT

WITH

38

EVE ERYTHHING EVEERYTHING SEG GO

HINDDS

SUN 4/ 4/22 2

SILENT NTT DDISCO SUN 6/ 6/3

MO ON 5/144

ZELL PRIN N CE ISH

SAT 4/28 SA

2875 EUCLID HEIGHTS BLVD CLEVELAND HEIGHTS WWW.BSIDELIQUORLOUNGE.COM

AFGHAN WHIGS AND BUILT TO SPILL

WED 4/25

WITH RITUALS

OF MINE


LIVEWIRE

all the live music you should see this week Photo by Rene Radke

WED

Tommy Castro and the Painkillers: 7:30 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. Fortunate Youth/Ballyhoo!/ Tatanka: 8 p.m., $15 ADV, $20 DOS. Beachland Ballroom. Impiety/Divine Eye/Gravehill: 8 p.m., $15. Now That’s Class. Layne/Selfish Things/Chil/The Skies Above Us: 7 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Maxo Kream/Cuz Lightyear/Zell/ Prince Ish/DJ Eso: 9 p.m., $18 ADV, $20 DOS. Grog Shop. Stacked Like Pancakes: 8 p.m., $10 ADV, $13 DOS. The Winchester. Stuyedeyed/Bummed Out: 8:30 p.m., $10. Beachland Tavern. YMusic Youth Music Awareness All Star Concert: 7 p.m., $10. Bop Stop.

THU

Time Gone: 8 p.m., $12 ADV, $15 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. ProgNation Salutes The Moody Blues: 8 p.m., $12. Bop Stop. Public Squares Record Release Show/Obnox/Lords of the Highway/Charlie Dams: 9 p.m., $5. Now That’s Class. The Sadies/Herzog: 8:30 p.m., $18. Beachland Ballroom. Whitney Woerz/Hey Monea!: 9 p.m., $10. Musica.

04/18

04/19

4/20 Eve Ft. Nick Samps/Jorddan Grahm/Naz$hee/Lord Setty/ SWANK/E.Smallz: 8:30 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Grog Shop. Always and Forever, An Evening of Luther Vandross Starring Ruben Studdard: 7:30 p.m., $50$65. The Kent Stage. Eric Andersen: Veteran singersongwriter Eric Andersen, who lives in Norway, doesn’t tour the States much anymore. But he’s now got good reason to come to town as Sony/Legacy has just issued The Esssential Eric Andersen, a 42-track digital release, 33-track double CD release and 20-track double LP retrospective release covering 50 years of his recorded history. Born in Pittsburgh, Andersen grew up in upstate New York and then moved to Boston, San Francisco (where he met singersongwriter Tom Paxton at the famous bar, the Coffee Gallery) and New York, where he became part of the Greenwich Village folk scene. Andersen didn’t write explicitly about those troubled times. While he did write the civil-rights anthem, “Thirsty Boots,” he also wrote “Violets of Dawn,” a gentle folk number that features wispy vocals. And he penned precious ballads such as “Close the Door Lightly When You Go” too. The Esssential Eric Andersen provides a great

SAT The synth-pop band Echosmith performs at House of Blues. See: Friday.

overview of Andersen’s music; it will undoubtedly help raise his profi le once again. Expect to hear songs from his entire catalog at tonight’s show, including some of the tunes he recorded in Germany for Cologne-based Meyer Records. (Jeff Niesel) 8 p.m., $20. Nighttown. Automated Terror Machine/ Minus9/Abraded/Flesh Warfare: 9 p.m., $5. Now That’s Class. Backstreet Blues Band (in the Supper Club): 7:30 p.m., $5. Music Box Supper Club. Chris Barron/Chris Allen: 8 p.m., $15. Beachland Ballroom. Billy Currington/LOCASH: 7:30 p.m. House of Blues. Todrick Hall: 6:30 p.m., $29.99 ADV, $35 DOS. The Agora Theatre. Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness/Allen Stone/Zac Clark/Bob Oxblood: 7:30 p.m., $29.50 ADV, $34.50 DOS. House of Blues. Mountain Heart/Thor Platter: 8 p.m., $13-$25. The Winchester. Northeast Ohio Drum & Music Jam: 9 p.m., free. Beachland Ballroom. Chris Potter Quartet: 7 p.m., $30. Bop Stop. Resurrecting Id/Return of Simple/ And Then Came Humans: 7:30 p.m., $4 ADV, $7 DOS. CODA. Triathlon/L. Martin/Beach Stav: 9 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Mahall’s 20 Lanes.

FRI

04/20

4/20 Bash with Sunshine Daydream/Gato’s Gullah Gumbo/ Ras Gato: 8 p.m., $8 ADV, $12

DOS. The Winchester. Echosmith/The Score/Jena Rose: Because their father instilled a love for ’80s music in them, Echosmith singer Sydney Sierota and her two brothers, who play in the band with her, grew up listening to acts such as U2, the Smiths and the Cure. The band’s 2013 debut, Talking Dreams, yielded a hit with the synthpop number “Cool Kids.” At the moment, a release date for the followup album is still to be determined. But last year, the band offered a preview of sorts with the EP Inside a Dream. Songs such as the soaring pop anthems “Future Me” and “Goodbye” feature percolating synths and soulful vocals and suggest the band has embraced ’80s pop even more adamantly. (Niesel) 8 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. House of Blues. Candi Fresca & Friends: 8 p.m., $5 ADV, $8 DOS. CODA. Brian Henke & Michael Kelsey: 8 p.m., $25. The Kent Stage. Jazz Jam Session: 11 p.m., free. Bop Stop. Carlos Jones and the P.L.U.S. Band/ Jim Donovan and the Sun King Warriors: 9 p.m., $10 ADV, $14 DOS. Grog Shop. Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio/The Katy: 8 p.m., $10. Beachland Tavern. Marina City/The Whiskey Hollow/ Phangs/The Wldlfe/Heyohwell/ An Ongoing Story: 6:30 p.m., $12. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Motown and More with Nitebridge (in the Supper Club): 7:30 p.m., $10. Music Box Supper Club. Tom Petty and CSNY Tributes by Shadow of a Doubt and Long

04/21

David Ake HUMANITIES Quintet: 8:30 p.m., $20. Nighttown. Stephan Crump’s Rhombal Quartet: 8 p.m., $20. Bop Stop. Brian Fallon & the Howling Weather/Caitlin Rose: 8 p.m. Beachland Ballroom. Lillingtons/Makewar/Heart & Lung/Future Bummer/Old Souls: 7 p.m., $12 ADV, $14 DOS. Now That’s Class. Papa Roach/Nothing More/Escape the Fate: 6 p.m., $37.50 ADV, $42.50 DOS. The Agora Theatre. Michael Stanley & Friends: 8 p.m., $50-$70. The Kent Stage. The Stolen Faces: In the late ’80s and early ’90s, guitarist Jack Silverman played with local acts such as the Janglers, ACO (AfroCleveland Orchestra), Joe Bell and the Swing Lizards, and the Sky Dogs before relocating to Nashville. He currently plays with the Grateful Dead cover band, the Stolen Faces. The band, which Silverman says features some of Nashville’s fi nest musicians, plays steadily throughout the Southeast, and Silverman, who was once a “steady fi xture” on the local music scene, is particularly excited to return to town for tonight’s show. (Niesel) 9 p.m. A.J. Rocco’s. The Temptations and the Four Tops: 8 p.m. Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park. Vinyl Wings/Proles/Kurt Reifler: 8 p.m., $4 ADV, $7 DOS. CODA. Worship This!/Signals Midwest/ Timeshares/Sincere Engineer/ Kali Masi: 8 p.m., $10. Mahall’s 20 Lanes.

SUN

04/22

Amplified Heat/Burning Loins/ Dead East Garden: 9 p.m., $8. Now That’s Class. | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

39


LIVEWIRE Rick Astley: 8 p.m., $32 ADV, $37 DOS. House of Blues. Carnifex/Oceano/Winds of Plague/ Archspire/Spite/Buried Above Ground/Shadow of Intent: 3 p.m., $20 ADV, $25 DOS. The Agora Theatre. Cash Basket/Deep Sigh/Forage & Wander/Maybe Later/ Bewarewolves (in the Locker Room): 7 p.m., $10. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Tom Foster Celebration of Abbey Rodeo with the Dagg Rabbit Country Band/One-Eyed Jacks/ Mary Taylor Brooks/Ted Riser/ Rolly Brown/the Grateful Fred: 12 p.m., $5 donation. Beachland Ballroom. Nicole Henry: 7 p.m., $25. Nighttown. TriHearn (in the Supper Club): 7 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. Tyrone G.: 7 p.m., $15. Bop Stop. Werkhouse Live 6 - Native Sound/ Woulf/Watts/Don Mansa/Londyn Marie/Forever Luck: 7:30 p.m., $10 ADV, $15 DOS. Grog Shop.

MON

04/23

2 Chefs & A Beat: 9 p.m., $10. CODA. Benefit Concert For Cleveland Rape Crisis Center: 7 p.m., $10. Bop Stop. Indigo Girls/Lucy Wainwright Roche: 7:30 p.m. Music Box Supper Club. Mati/Yambag/Steve’s Lunch R.I.P.: 9 p.m., $5. Now That’s Class.

TUE

04/24

Amoramora/Coup De Grace: 8:30 p.m., $8 ADV, $10 DOS. Grog Shop. Brad Cooper: Kabarett: 7 p.m., $15. Bop Stop. The Decemberists/Tennis: 7 p.m., $39.50 ADV, $45 DOS. The Agora Theatre. Indigo Girls/Lucy Wainwright Roche: 7:30 p.m. Music Box Supper Club. Jeff Rosenstock/Martha/Bad Moves: 8 p.m., $15. Mahall’s 20 Lanes. Wild Ones: 8 p.m., $12 ADV, $14 DOS. Beachland Tavern.

40

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

scene@clevescene.com t@clevelandscene

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18

ALISABETH VON PRESLEY From American Idol

DOORS OPEN AT 7PM SHOW STARTS AT 8PM FRIDAY, APRIL 20 8:00PM

SHOUT!

THURSDAY, APRIL 26 7:30PM

SIRENS OF SPRINGS TOUR FEATURING..

MAMA’S BLACK SHEEP & CHRISTINE HAVRILLA VISIT WEBSITE FOR DETAILS.

THURDAY, APRIL 26 7:30PM

MURDER MYSTERY DINNER

VISIT WEBSITE FOR DETAILS.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 9:30PM

CARLOS JONES

& THE P.L.U.S. BAND GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & DRINK Book Your Special Events With Us! 1414 RIVERSIDE DRIVE LAKEWOOD HGLCMLMCKHFH©l…‰~y‚‹xDy…ƒ


$1 pints $5 mules HAPPY HOUR

till 8p

m DAI

LY

SLASH

BOOK YOUR PARTY TODAY FOR FREE.

LOVES OUR GAMEROOM!

GO TO TIMEWARPBAR.COM FOR RESERVATIONS

• BIG BALL BOWLING • BILLIARDS • SHUFFLE PUCK • GOLDEN TEE • POWER PUTT • NBA JAM

BACHELORETTE, CORPORATE, BIRTHDAY OR ANY OCCASION.

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

“Coolest local live band venue I’ve seen in a long time” - Slash

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

OLD SKOOL

GRUNGE DNA

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 ....................................TRICKY DICK & THE COVER-UPS

FRIDAY, JUNE 1 ............................................................................... SHOUT

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 ...............................................................ACE MOLAR

SATURDAY, JUNE 2 ........................................................ BREAKFAST CLUB

FRIDAY, MAY 4................................................................ BRONX COUNTRY

FRIDAY, JUNE 8 ......................................................................POP FICTION

SATURDAY, MAY 5..................................................................SPAZMATICS

SATURDAY, JUNE 9 ................................................................WORLD ZEND

FRIDAY, MAY 11 .............................................................. BILLY LIKES SODA

FRIDAY, JUNE 15 ........................................................................... GRIZZLY

SATURDAY, MAY 12 ......................................................... THAT 80’S BAND

SATURDAY, JUNE 16 ..........................................THUNDER GUN EXPRESS

FRIDAY, MAY 18 ................................. TRICKY DICK AND THE COVER UPS

FRIDAY, JUNE 22 ..................................................................GRUNGE DNA

SATURDAY, MAY 19 ....................................................... BREAKFAST CLUB

SATURDAY, 23 ............................................................................... CHEERS

FRIDAY, MAY 25 .................................................................. BILLY MORRIS

FRIDAY, JUNE 29 ........................................................... BILLY LIKES SODA

SATURDAY, MAY 26 ...................................................................... CHEERS

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 ...............................................................ACE MOLAR

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

41


Photo by Joe Fortunato

BAND OF THE WEEK

PUBLIC SQUARES MEET THE BAND: Thuck Apton (via

human vessel Brandon M. Abate, drums, vocals), Regulus Nine (via human vessel Steven Manko, bass), Dr. Rex Reezin (via human vessel Bill Kowalcic, guitar, additional vocals) IT STARTED AS A SOLO PROJECT: Drawing from new wave and punk, Public Squares formed in 2014. “I started it as a project by myself,” says Abate, who previously played in the local group Living Stereo. “I tried to start something with other people, but the bands kept sputtering. It was driving me crazy that I couldn’t get it together.” He cut a couple of EPs himself and, about a year ago, he put together a new lineup that featured guys from his ’90s band Sidecar. “They’re incredibly talented musicians, and they were interested in what I was writing,” he says. “I knew exactly how I wanted it to sound and had even bought the guitar amps I wanted them to use.” ALIEN ALIASES: The band members all have alien alter egos, and Abate says that’s because he decided to listen to the “voice in his head” that tells him to pursue his passion no matter how wacky it might be. “I’m not trying to please outside forces or appease a certain fan base,” he says. “I just wanted to do something conceptual. I grew up on bands that seemed otherworldly. I grew up on Queen and Devo. Devo never even called themselves a band. They called it an art project. That was so cool to me.” WHY YOU SHOULD HEAR THEM: Recorded

42

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

and mixed at their own Chateau Du Mal Voisin studio and mastered

by Jason Livermore at the Blasting Room studio — which is owned by friend and fan Bill Stevenson of the Descendents/All/Black Flag — the band’s new album, NWR&P, features six blistering songs. Pressed on a custom-cut, square 8-inch record, the album will have a limited run of only 500. “We’ve always recorded at home since I started doing it,” says Abate. “I don’t run a studio commercially. I only record my own stuff. I never had a lesson on any instrument, let alone recording.” The album’s spastic opening tune, “Your Mental Illness is Bumming Me Out,” features quivering vocals and angular guitar riffs. “Every time I start a session, I learn from the last one and what I liked about the previous one,” Abate says when asked about the band’s approach on the album. “We single track the guitars, and I record the drums as simply as possible. I tune them, so they sound like drum machine drums. There are no triggers. I like that slow, slash-y snare sound. I love late ’70s recordings. That’s where recording technology peaked, in my opinion. I’m always trying to make a record that sounds as good as those.” WHERE YOU CAN HEAR THEM:

publicsquaresband.com. WHERE YOU CAN SEE THEM: Public Squares perform with Obnox and Lords of the Highway at 9 p.m. on Friday, April 20, at Now That’s Class. — Jeff Niesel

jniesel@clevescene.com t@jniesel


| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

43


MENTION SCENE RECEIVE

10% OFF

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Time to Break that Bond!

DID YOU KNOW YOU CAN QUIT SMOKING WITH A SIMPLE LASER TREATMENT?!

BECOME NICOTINE FREE!! Painless & Relaxing Smoking Cessation Treatments. Quit smoking with one treatment. No drugs, no nicotine replacements. Safe, effective, no chemicals, no side effects. Appetite suppression. Stress Relief. THE OFFICE ATRIUM (CONVENIENTLY LOCATED OFF I-77) | 440.740.1020 | aculasetreatment.com

HAPPY HOUR

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 3-7PM

$1 OFF DRINKS

.0/'3*1.1. SUN. All Day

HAPPY HOUR

KITCHEN FEATURES .PO'SJ4VO1.1.

STAGE 

8&%t

WINE BAR NOW EARLY/LATE SHOWS FRI/SAT '3*

BLUEWATER KINGS BAND

JIM CROMPTON  BRENT KIRBY 

&7&3:5)634%":t

BAD BOYS OF BLUES JAM NIGHT



'3*t

MOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MOJO

SAT. 4/21

THE ELDERLY BROTHERS  FRONT PORCH 

Zydeco

4"5t

5)"5As BAND

&7&3:46/%":t

MIKE PETRONE

46/t

EVERY MONDAY +";;t

&7&3:.0/%":t

RAY FLANAGAN

VELVET VOYAGE

SCHOOL OF ROCK

56&4t

SKATCH ANDERSSEN ORCHESTRA

8&%/&4%":t

9 SINGER-SONGWRITER SHOWCASE W/BRENT KIRBY

56&t

contact: the10x3@gmail.com

&7&3:5)634%":t

Celtic Rock 8&%t

CHRIS HATTONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MUSICAL CIRCUS

M2B2 BIG BAND

"--(&/3&4t"--45:-&4

$308/30:"-4)05:6&/(-*/(1*/5

TUES

7:00PM-2:30AM ."35*/*4t8*/&t$)".1"(/&

8&%t 0''"--8)*4,&:4

FRI & SAT 8&&,-:%3*/,'&"563&4

THUR. LADIES NIGHT

.0/t#6%-*()5%3"'54

44

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

C-NOTES HIGH TIMES In advance of a 4/20 show at the Grog Shop, Carlos Jones reďŹ&#x201A;ects on his love of music By Laura Morrison Photo by Emanuel Wallace

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOON ON A GRAY DAY IN Cleveland and Carlos Jones is on the east side about to head out for a studio session. He says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nally â&#x20AC;&#x153;upright and ready to talk.â&#x20AC;? As one of the hardest working full-time musicians in Cleveland â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jones has been crafting heartfelt reggae music for 40 years â&#x20AC;&#x201D; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the easiest to pin down. Still, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eager to discuss his bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans for its upcoming 4/20 show at the Grog Shop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So many people advocate and celebrate the herb, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m deďŹ nitely for that,â&#x20AC;? Jones says. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happy that marijuana legalization is closer to becoming a reality in this country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; medical marijuana shops open in Ohio this fall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the 4/20 celebration at the Grog Shop to be thought of in stereotypical fashion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think everybody sees 4/20 as a big party day,â&#x20AC;? Jones says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want to smoke freely and have a big party, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay; but it would be great if people would look deeper into it and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You know, we want to celebrate cannabis as something that will be a beneďŹ t to people and not as much as a big free-for-all.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The medicinal and the spiritual element of it needs to be brought more to the light,â&#x20AC;? he continues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Herb has been used down through the ages, long before it ever took on any connotation about being a party thing and long before political reasons were used to keep people down.â&#x20AC;? The Grog Shop, which has hosted 4/20 celebration shows for years now, is a spot to which Jones says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always happy to return. He says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the walls there have soaked up so much music that you can feel the vibrations as you walk in the door. And playing his brand of infused reggae is everything to Jones. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how he prefers to celebrate the 4/20 holiday: playing. (In this instance with the group Jim Donovan and the Sun King Warriors.) Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how he ďŹ nds hope when the world seemingly turns to shit. As with his ďŹ rst band, First Light, and now the P.L.U.S. Band, Jones puts together shows that feel like celebrations of life. People of all backgrounds show

Carlos Jones will play a 4/20 party the Grog Shop.

up and dance together for a couple of hours, basking in the sweat and the smoke. Jones says it all melds together because reggae music is based on the heartbeat, something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all intrinsically familiar with. No matter how many gigs his band tackles, he says he never tires of the experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time it feels special. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the amazing thing to me; it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get old,â&#x20AC;? he says. When he plays his guitar or bongo on stage, he often closes his eyes. He says in those moments itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not even inside his body anymore. His band knows to follow; he says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like riding a wave. Sometimes, Jones recalls the time he heard Bob Marley play back in the 1970s; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when he was originally compelled to play reggae. Jones says he wants to keep the spirit of that music alive. Now, with new songs in tow, Jones and the P.L.U.S. Band plan to hit the studio before the summer season heats up and the performance schedule gets too hectic. In the meantime, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re readying for next Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much division between humans on the planet, and anytime weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to feel that oneness, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can all have that ďŹ&#x201A;eeting moment, like an acid trip; we can have that thing where everything comes together. But here, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to take acid; we can get this for free.â&#x20AC;? Jim Donovan and the Sun King Warriors open the concert, which takes place at 9 p.m. on Friday. Tickets are $10 in advance, or $14 at the door.

lmorrison@clevescene.com t@lowesays


SAVAGE LOVE DOWN THERE By Dan Savage Background: I, a 21-year-old male, enjoy receptive fisting. I’ve also had constipation problems all my life. Question: I saw my doctor recently, and he tried to link my enjoyment of anal sex to my constipation. (Granted, I didn’t tell him EVERYTHING I do down there.) My understanding was that there was no causal relationship. Is there something I don’t know? Was my doctor just trying to be helpful? — Fearing Inner Sanctum Tarnished “There are many myths about anal sex, but this is the first time I’ve heard this one,” said Dr. Peter Shalit, a physician in Seattle and a member of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. It’s also the first time I’ve heard anyone associate fisting with constipation — typically when fisting is mentioned in the same sentence as constipation, FIST, it’s as a cure. But it’s a myth that fisting cures constipation, of course, along with anal sex being inherently dangerous. “Fisting is a safe activity, provided that both the top and bottom are sober,” said Dr. Shalit. “It does not cause damage or constipation or any other type of bowel problem. The same applies to other anal sexual activities — assuming this is voluntary on the part of the bottom and that both partners are not under the influence of mind-altering drugs.” (For safety’s sake, of course, buttfuckers should use condoms and gay and bi men should get on PrEP.) While many people engage in anal play while under the influence, and most emerge unscathed, getting fucked up before fisting is not a butt sex best practice. A fucked-up top can quickly become an out-of-control top, and a fucked-up bottom can be numb to feelings of discomfort that mean “slow down,” “stop and add more lube,” or “stop altogether.” Despite the fact that millions of people safely engage in anal play, many people believe that anal play does irreparable harm to the anus and that sadly includes many doctors. “There is a misconception that these activities can cause damage by stretching or tearing the tissue, when actually the anus is very elastic and much of the ‘permission to enter’ actuallyinvolvesintentionalrelaxation

of the muscles by the bottom” and not force applied by the top, Dr. Shalit affirmed. (The top applies gentle pressure, the bottom breathes, relaxes, and opens up.) “If a person suffers from constipation, that should be addressed as its own problem and not blamed on any type of anal sexual activity,” said Dr. Shalit. “For obvious reasons, it’s not fun to bottom if you’re constipated, so it would be good to have this problem evaluated and treated by a nonjudgmental health-care provider who understands that anal penetration — by fist, penis, or dildo — does not cause constipation.” Finally, FIST, if you don’t feel comfortable telling your doctor EVERYTHING you’re doing “down there,” you can find a new doctor — one you can breathe, relax, and open up to (in a different way) — under “find a provider” at GLMA.org.

HALF HOUR FREE

Real Singles, Real Fun...

1-216-377-6292 More Numbers: 1-800-926-6000 Livelinks.com, 18+

My boyfriend and I just got back from Berlin, and we had a great time — until the last night. There was a dark room in the basement of this gay bar, and my boyfriend wanted to check it out and I did not. We are monogamous for now — I’m open to opening things up down the road — and I didn’t see the point of going down there. I told him that drunk in a gay bar at 3 a.m. wasn’t the right time to open up our relationship, and he angrily insisted he wasn’t trying to do that. But if we’re monogamous and want to stay monogamous, why go into a dark room at all? — Dude Into Monogamy If it was your boyfriend’s intent to reopen negotiations about monogamy while horny men circled you in a dark room, DIM, that wouldn’t be okay. But it is possible for monogamous couples to enter sexually charged environments and emerge with their monogamous commitments intact. It’s advisable even — or at least I’ve advised monogamous couples who want to keep things hot to visit those kinds of spaces. Go in for the erotic charge, soak it up, and plow that energy into each other. So next time, go down there.

mail@savagelove.net t@fakedansavage

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

45


CALL NOW, MEET TONIGHT!

ADULT

FREE to try! 18+ 216.626.7777 / 440.325.7777 Other Cities: 1.888.257.5757 www.questchat.com

EXPLICIT CHAT WITH SEXY LOCALS

Get your FREE TRIAL! 18+ CALL The Night Exchange NOW! 216.502.4388 / 440.499.6400 www.nightexchange.com

Sit down with your guests.

FUN SEXY SINGLES

Advertise with SCENE. Call 216-241-7550 for more information.

London

Visiting-New to town! Give me a call. 918-408-4002. Incall. Outcall, www.londonslane2u.tumblr.com

ADULT SERVICES A MOUNTED “MAN TO MAN” MASSAGE *HOTEL DISCOUNTS*

BREAKING NEWS. HOT OFFTHE INTERNET PRESS.

Only at clevescene.com SCENE

Let a man rub you down like only a man can! Full Body/ Full Service “Man to Man” Massage given by hot naked masculine white dude. 24 HRS Hotel & house calls welcome or stop by my Massage Studio. Versatile any scene. 2 guys also available. Low Rates. Well equipped and ready to play... Call 216-491-4501

PHONE LINES 100’s OF SEXY LATINO SINGLES Meet Hot Latin Locals! Get your FREE trial! 18+ 216.626.7777 440.325.7777 www.questchat.com

Send Message FREE! 216-912-2222 Use FREE Code 3229, 18+

HOT LOCAL URBAN SINGLES!

Are looking to hook up now! Try it FREE! 18+ 216.367.1010 / 440.424.0303 www.metrovibechatline.com

Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 216-377-6292 or 800-926-6000 www.livelinks.com 18+

MEET GAY & BI LOCALS

Browse & Respond FREE! 216-912-6000 Use FREE Code 2642, 18+

Where Local Girls Go Wild!

Call 216-377-6290 or 800-700-6666 Try FREE! www.redhotdateline.com

WHERE SINGLES MEET

Listen to Ads & Reply FREE! 216-912-2222 FREE Code 3228, 18+

ALL KINDS OF SINGLES Straight 216-912-2222 Curious 216-912-6000 FREE Code 3227, 18+

clevescene.com

Your premier choice for classy & fun entertainment providing firstrate entertainment for all occasion, including a wet & wild bachelor parties, divorce parties, birthday celebrations & retirement parties! Whatever the reason is that you request our services, rest assured that we have what you’re looking for! Our carefully selected adorable playmates cater to any occasion! We offer a diverse selection of exotic, classy, sophisticated & gorgeous ladies for you to choose from.

Playmates and soul mates...

Cleveland:

216-377-6336 18+ MegaMates.com 46

| clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

Find your happy hour. 'RZQORDG6&(1(·VRԀFLDO happy hour app today! clevescene.com/happyhours

WISH YOU WERE HERE. MISSED EVENT? We’reANhiring. CATCH UP WITH SLIDESHOWS. CHECK OUT OPENINGS ONLY AT CLEVESCENE.COM AT CLEVESCENE.COM


Massage - Licensced Allen Deshaun Spa

WINDSOR

Real Estate Services

1 BR suites. Backs up to Cleveland Metroparks. Heat Included. Secured Entry. Off-Street Parking Available. 216-392-5384

Be Touched 7043 Pearl Road Middleburg Heights Ohio 44130 Suite 240 Walk ins welcome 440-545-1213 Allendeshaunwellness.com Mon -Sat 12pm -9 pm

Relaxation Limited

3834 west 140 st Cleveland Ohio 44111 The Relaxation In Town Walk Ins Welcome 216-671-3813 Relaxationlimited.com 12pm -9 pm Mon -Sat

)URP&OHYHODQGWDNHHDVWto W. Market. WXUQOHIWDQGWXUQOHIWDJDLQDWVHFRQGOLJKW

EDGECLIFF

Large, upgraded suites. Heat included. Overlooking the metro parks. Free off-street parking available. 216-392-5384

330-373-0303 DPDP'D\VD:HHN BRING 7+,6 $'

Bulletin Board WANTS TO PURCHASE

minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201

Rentals: West/Suburbs

ELBUR

FIND YOUR

Located on a private tree lined street, 1BR and 2BR suites available. Off-street parking available. Heat included. 216-392-5384.

HAPPY HOUR!

BROOKSIDE OVAL APARTMENT Located on Park Fulton Oval near the Cleveland Metroparks! 216-351-6936 Choose from any of our newly remodeled 1 & 2 bdrm apartments, all w/ modern kitchens & bathrooms. All feature air-conditioning & Garage parking also available. Brookside is located close to I-480, I-71, and I-90, just minutes from downtown Cleveland. Come home to the beautiful park-like setting of Brookside Apartments! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be happy to call Brookside home.

PARK PLACE

Spacious 1BR and 2BR suites available. Steps from Edgewater Park. Heat included. Off-street parking available. 216-392-5384

DOWNLOAD SCENEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OFFICIAL HAPPY HOUR APP TODAY!

AFTER 27 YEARS BIG FUN WILL BE

CLOSING 50%OFF EVERYTHING THANKS FOR YOUR PATRONAGE

BIG FUN |1814 COVENTRY RD

FREE MONEY!!! DOWN PAYMENT PROGRAM*

LAKEWOOD CLIFFS APARTMENTS

BUY YOUR DREAM HOME!!! Plus Get Up To $100k + More* (for new kitchen, new roof, new carpet, appliances, paint, basement waterprooďŹ ng, windows, heating & cooling)*

WATERBURY

Large, remodeled 1br and 2 BR suites. Heat included. Off-street parking available. 216-392-5384.

Who are you after dark? FREE TRIAL

METRO LOFTS APARTMENT Located at 3307 Scranton Rd., in Cleveland. 216-351-6936. 21 Loft Style Apartments Secured Entry Off-Street Parking Available Pets welcome w/ fee Central A/C

Hedgewood Manor Spacious updated 1 bedroom and 2 bedroom suite, Secured entry, laundry on site. Air conditioning. 440-829-8444.

)25$ SPECIAL TREAT!

HOME BUYERS!!!

PARKSIDE

Real Estate: West/Suburbs

$OO0DMRU&UHGLW&DUGV $FFHSWHG

clevescene.com/happyhours

Spacious 1BR and 2BR suites available. Steps from Lakewood Park. Heat included. 216-392-5384

18900 Detroit Extension Newly Renovated 1-2 Bedroom Apts Heat & Water Included Updated Laundry on Site Off Street Parking Air Conditioning Secure Entry Lake and Park Views Call for our Specials 216-392-5384 *****some restrictions apply*****

TIGER SPA

:HVW0DUNHW6WUHHWÂ&#x2021;:DUUHQ2+

NEVER EVER EVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO BUY A HOME!!! Great Low Fixed Interest Rates* When YOUR dreams come true... OUR dreams come true!!!

440.342.7355 (SELL) To Buy...or Sell

1-216-377-6290 More Numbers: 1-800-700-6666 Redhotdateline.com 18+

FREE TRIAL

Discreet Chat Guy to Guy

216.626.0320

Call Grizzell *Some restrictions may apply *for those who qualify... we consider...

'//$ #2%$)4 s "!$ #2%$)4 s "!.+2504#9 | clevescene.com | April 18 - 24, 2018

47


OHIO’S PREMIER

SMOKE SHOP & TATTOO SUPPLY HEADQUARTERS! Serving Ohio for 15 Years and Counting!

ɞVAPORIZERSɞ Huge Selection GLASS PIPES! Indians-Cavaliers Browns

FULL LINE OF CLEANSING PRODUCT

Full Line of

SILICONE Products!

Pipes ɞ Bubblers Nectar Collectors Skull Containers Ashtrays

TWISTY GLASS BLUNTS!

America’s #1 Incense

BUTANE & TORCHES

NEW & UNIQUE COLLECTABLES! AKRON STRONGSVILLE 1004 Kenmore Blvd. 330.753.3600 NOWG! N HIRI

EASTLAKE 32888 Vine St. 440.942.8668

19097 Drake Rd. 440.572.8287

CLEVELAND

BARBERTON 536 W. Tuscarawas 330.753.0500

MANSFIELD 532 Park Ave. West 419.522.1695

LORAIN

832 Broadway 4264 Pearl Rd. 216.749.3440 440.242.4080 AUTHORIZED DEALER

GIRARD 16 N. State St. 330.545.8131

www.glasshouseohio.com

BATS PIPE POUCHES MULTI PIPE TOOL POLLEN BOXES

Scene april 18, 2018  
Scene april 18, 2018