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Fall Guide 2018


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in this issue San Antonio Current

Issue 18_39 /// September 26-October 2, 2018

Musicals & More

Publisher: Michael Wagner Editor-in-Chief: Greg Jefferson

Fall happenings to keep on your radar

Forbidden Books

Editorial

Senior Editors: Bryan Rindfuss, Jessica Elizarraras Art Director: Carlos Aguilar Food & Nightlife Editor: Jessica Elizarraras Staff Writers: Chris Conde, Sanford Nowlin Digital Content Editor: Sarah Martinez Contributors: Alexis Alvarez , Ron Bechtol, Erik Casarez, James Courtney, Callie Enlow, Jose Garza, Dan R. Goddard, Alejandra Lopez Gonzalez, Lance Higdon, Steven G. Kellman, Hannah Lorence, Michelle C. Lorentzen, Abby Mangel, Kiko Martínez, Jeremy Martin, Kelly Merka Nelson, M. Solis, Gary Sweeney, J.D. Swerzenski, Kelsey Valadez, Erin Winch Editorial Interns: Clarence Beal, Lori Salazar, Victoria Wilson

San Antonio’s Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing has grown into a one of the most original voices in horror fiction

27 Screens

Justice Denied

Advertising

The Children Act poses difficult moral questions while trying to balance an uneven narrative

Sales Director: Mallory Jochen Senior Multimedia Account Executive: Sarah Estrada Account Executive: Krystal Little, April Miller Sales + Events Coordinator: Tarah Martinez

Marketing and Events

America’s Next Top Mongrel

Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni Events Manager: Chelsea Bourque Sales + Events Coordinator: Tarah Martinez Marketing and Events Interns: Alec Salazar

Pick of the Litter plays like a competitive reality show on Animal Planet — and that’s a good thing

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Creative Services Manager: Tina Corbeil Graphic Designer: Samantha Serna Graphic Design Interns: Michelle Moreno, Shelby Pinto, Noemi Solis

For Your Consideration

20 fall films everyone should add to their cinematic schedule

Circulation

Circulation Manager: Justin Giles

Business

Operations Manager: Sarah Estrada Business Support Specialist: Samantha Lopez

Euclid Media Group

Chief Executive Officer: Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers: Chris Keating, Michael Wagner VP of Digital Services: Stacy Volhein Creative Director: Tom Carlson Digital Operations Coordinator: Jaime Monzon Senior Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni www.euclidmediagroup.com

Head of the Class

XX Feature

Fall Guide BY S TA F F

The Big Spoon: Casual Racism

07 News

San Antonio Current 915 Dallas San Antonio, Texas 78215 sacurrent.com

A different reason for that queasy feeling

What’s Really at Stake

Last week’s District 19 loss hurt Democrats, but the sting will be even worse if the Republicans keep a senate supermajority

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Churning out some Better Butter

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On Tap for the Fall: Politics, Even Louder and Angrier

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Our Fall Guide 2018 tells you what’s coming up this fall in the arts, music, movies and politics, and where to find good pumpkin-flavored pastries and beers. Art direction by Carlos Aguilar

Comedian Kevin Hart talks Night School and the Spurs’ no-fun coach Gregg Popovich

37 Food

What to see and do this fall

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Copyright - The entire contents of the San Antonio Current are copyright 2018 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions - Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Current offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125.

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From Beto vs. Ted to Will vs. Gina to the fire union’s charter amendments, the midterm elections will dominate the news

16 Calendar

Our top picks for the week

22 Arts

Fests, Fairy Tales,

Que Pasa, Calabaza

We assembled a pumpkin panel

Pretzels and Things

We taste-test Oktoberfest brews

47 Music

Of Proper Bars, Dissident Noise and Righteous Representation

Queers & Beers 4 does it right

Chill Out, Brah

Festivals to look forward to as the weather cools down

Music Top Picks

62 Etc

Savage Love, Crossword Puzzle, Astrology, This Modern World

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


news

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick has relied on a supermajority in the Texas Senate to move the state’s agenda further to the right.

\

be in play, but observers say not to count on it. And it’s slim pickings elsewhere. “I go to Houston a lot, and I’m not feeling that one,” veteran lobbyist Bill Miller said. “But those other two races, you feel. They’re just pulsating right now.”

High Stakes Game

What’s Really at Stake

Gage Skidmore

Last week’s District 19 loss hurt Democrats, but the sting will be even worse if the Republicans keep a senate supermajority BY SANFORD NOWLIN

R

epublican Pete Flores’ recent upset victory in a Democrat-friendly state senate district wasn’t the kind of news Democrats wanted in advance of their much-anticipated blue wave. Beyond showing that the party’s still capable of screwing up a sure thing, it also dims hopes the Dems can disrupt the so-called Senate supermajority that’s enabled Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick to shove the legislative agenda further and further right. Anybody remember last session’s fight over the anti-transgender bathroom bill? Under current rules, the party that holds three-fifths of the Senate — or 21 seats — can bring bills to debate without support from the other side of the aisle. Democrats had hoped a victory in dependably blue District 19 would be one of the three victories needed to break the GOP lock. Now, things look far less certain. “I don’t think it can be overstated how

bad that loss is,” said Democratic strategist Colin Strother. “I think we’re most definitely going to pick up two senate seats in November, but we’ve got to look hard and find another seat somewhere.” The two seats to which Strother is referring are those of Don Huffines in Dallas and Konni Burton in Fort Worth, both Republicans. Huffines is running in a district where Clinton blew past Trump by nearly 5 points, and Burton is in a swing district that frequently changes hands. The Dallas Morning News recently endorsed Huffines’ Democratic opponent Nathan Johnson, citing the incumbent’s willingness to support divisive legislation such as Patrick’s bathroom bill. And Burton faces an energetic and well-funded fight from Beverly Powell, a Democrat who’s served on public school and college boards. The district of Houston’s Joan Huffman, where Trump barely eked out a win, also could

Republicans gained their operational upper hand in the Senate when Patrick became lieutenant governor in 2015 and muscled through a rule that dropped the supermajority from 21 senators to the current 19. There it’s stayed for two sessions, enabling Patrick to keep ramming through a social conservative agenda. To be sure, if any time looks right for Democrats to chip away at Patrick’s control, now would be it. Voters in urban and suburban districts are seething at Trump and Republicans in general. What’s more, they expect the lege to move on pressing issues like public education and property taxes next session instead of engaging in ideological pissing matches. Chuck Smith, CEO of LGBT advocates Equality Texas, said those issues have become a mobilizing tool. For the first time in his group’s almost 30-year history, it’s kicking off a major get-out-the-vote effort. “The bottom line is people want solutions to real problems,” Smith said. “They’re not interested in laws that discriminate against LGBT people or serve no other purpose than to stigmatize people. That’s not a winning message.”

Reality Check Without District 19, though, Miller wouldn’t lay money on Democrats shattering the supermajority in November. However, the current political climate may not allow Patrick to go as far as he did last session. Voters’ backlash is only compounded by anger from business interests — many of which opposed the bathroom bill. Too many GOP elected officials, Miller maintains, felt the pain from both their electorate and financial backers by following Patrick. “The Republicans are absolutely on notice,” Miller said. “It’s a new game, and it will probably never go back to what it was.” Strother’s not convinced. If Republicans hold their supermajority, he expects them to knuckle down, no matter how bad the blowback. That means Democrats will need to learn from last week’s loss and take another swing at the senate wall in 2020. “They’ll have to look at what they did wrong in District 19, find a district where they can win and start doing it right,” he said.

Find more newsmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


news | glitter political

Aw, Snap! Churning Out Some Better Butter BY JADE ESTEBAN ESTRADA

A

bout a minute into Sarah Tijerina’s My 7-Year Long Anti-Mexicana Remedy, one of the 28 short plays showcased in Better Butter, I start to wonder why the multidisciplinary artist didn’t give herself any lines. Instead, to the haunting rhythm of Taylor Swift’s This Love, she meticulously shaves her forearms. She then spreads a foundation, noticeably lighter than her natural skin color, onto her glowing brown face, then straightens her black curls with a flat iron. As the steam rises to Jump-Start Theater’s high ceiling from her vertically pulled strands of hair, I come to the conclusion that a lot has already been said. By the end of the evening, I realize this collection of plays, a seamless union of theatre and political activism, can best be understood and appreci-

8

ated by those who live, or have deep roots, in San Antonio. It’s a month later, and I’m sitting in a circle across from five of the seven cast members at Jump-Start, a more modest space than its former location at the Blue Star Arts Complex. Lilith Tijerina, Sarah’s fraternal twin, is the first to respond to the possibility of the show being viewed through a political filter. Copper locks of curly hair cascade along the sides of her young face. “What we did on stage was not a political show so much as a show that showcased the things that we care about – which just happened to be political,” she says. Artistically and ideologically, the performers seem to be in sync with one another. They all met at SAY Sí, the youth arts education organization, about five years ago. Joyous Windrider, 44, is

CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

Jade Esteban Estrada

sitting to my right. Clint Taylor, 37, the show’s creator, is sitting across from me sipping a Big Red, his signature drink. Gio Lugo, 19, is also in attendance. “Our dream is to tell stories and relate to our community – the community that raised me,” Sarah says. “We’re telling stories to San Antonio, [and to] mostly brown people.” Snap, snap, snap. I attempt to locate the sudden snapping sound. It’s coming from Taylor’s fingers. It’s vaguely Orwellian. Gleaned from the poetry community, the actors explain that snapping “means that the listeners agree with the person speaking.” I’m up to speed. The self-described “teatristas” explain the show’s inspiration. Taylor caught a performance of the New York Neo-Futurists’ hit show, Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind, and their more recent work The Infinite Wrench. A couple of years ago, I saw a performance of Too Much Light at the Perth International Fringe Festival. Comparing the original concept with such titles as Tony Parker Lived Long Enough to See Himself Become the Villain,

Ya Parale and Conchas Aren’t Even That Great, the show’s unique SA flavor is evident. In the coming months, Taylor plans to revive the show with a rotating cast so that the production always stays fresh and in the moment. In I’m Gonna Have the Same Conversations Over and Over Again Until Shit Gets Done, Lilith hands out photocopies of the Current’s cover story “San Antonio Schools are Still Separated by Income as Much as Race” by Bekah McNeel. Lilith says that the story legitimized what she always knew. “It’s like [McNeel was saying], ‘What you went through is true and there’s definitely an issue,’” she says. “It’s like sipping the tea of truth,” says Lugo, who, like the twins, is a theater major at Texas State University. His experience as a devout Catholic inspired his play, My Homo Struggle, a piece about how a Catholic priest told him that “people who are gay are mentally ill [and/or] lacked a strong male role model.” Lugo, who was raised in a “male-dominated, Mexican household” by both of his parents, disagrees with this theory. “Catholic Mexicans are very judgmental about someone being gay, especially [within] the church, in my opinion.” He says he’s been told by his church leaders not to come back if he gets a boyfriend. The writing in almost every scene is honest, certainly authentic and, at times, can get a little uncomfortable. My attention returns to Sarah. What would you say about, or what could be perceived as, the possible demonization of white people in your play? I ask. I’m referring to West Side Wizard of Oz, another one of her pieces, where the use of the word gringo made me to wonder if the white audience members were made to feel uneasy by the undercurrent of outrage that came across regarding the privileges of some white people. Sarah locks eyes with me, and responds. “If I could just be honest... I, as a brown woman who went to school on the South Side [and] on the West Side, who has, all her life, been associated with the word ghetto and with such ugly words because of where I come from… I’ve lived with these words all my life,” she says. “Because of this culture of high-class people who look down on predominately brown and black students who go to economically disadvantaged schools. I feel like, honestly, man – y’all can live with 11 6


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news 6 8 me saying gringo. You can live with me saying, ‘Fuck Reagan [High School].’” These days, some folks find gringo offensive while others simply think that it distracts the listener from the intended message. Though her words are fiery, her mannerisms are graceful and her voice is calm. “I’m not saying I hate white people,” she says, using her hands to help make a clarification. “I’m saying I hate the culture of oppression and, specifically, San Antonio’s economic segregation. I hate the benefits and resources that all these different districts have. I hate what that stands for.” Lilith, whose piece Fuck Eurocentric Beauty Standards talks about “catering to white comfort,” expands on the subject. “We had this mindset growing up [that] I didn’t want to associate with my culture,” she says. “I was very much into whiteness. I grew up glorifying white people. If you were Hispanic, you more than likely grew up glorifying white people, too. The power of oppression that whiteness has over marginalized people will never be overcome by just everyone saying ‘Gringo!’ all at once.” Snap, snap, snap from her colleagues. “There’s no such thing as the demonization of white people.” Sarah adds: “If you feel personally offended after somebody says gringo, then the fight was never with you. My piece was not about people who live on the North Side. It isn’t about Reagan. It’s about me. It’s about people who went to school on the West Side. If you’re taking it so personally, you’re not listening.” There’s a pause. “I would even say stop talking so much,” she says of those she views as privileged. “Stop taking up spaces that brown people, and me, could be using to talk about the stuff that we need to talk about. Stop talking over me. Stop not letting me speak. When you do talk, use your privilege [and] talk about something that’s important. Don’t use your privilege to ask why I used the word gringo. Do more listening.” I’m totally listening. Conchas do suck. Can I get a snap?!

On Tap for the Fall: Politics, Even Louder and Angrier From Beto vs. Ted to Will vs. Gina to the fire union’s charter amendments, the midterm elections will dominate the news BY GREG JEFFERSON

A

ll eyes are on the ballot box this fall – or at least all the eyes belonging to people who are either horrified or thrilled by President Trump. The November 6 elections will determine whether the GOP keeps control of Congress or loses it to Democrats, which would likely mean impeach proceedings against Trump. Dems have a stronger shot at taking the House of Representatives, but winning a majority in Senate isn’t entirely out of the question. Along that line, will Beto O’Rouke, the lanky El Paso congressman who’s given new life to beaten-down Texas progressives, unseat

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz? Don’t look to the polls for much guidance. Over the last two weeks, we’ve seen one poll showing Cruz will win it in a blowout, and another that had O’Rouke beating Cruz in a squeaker but still within the margin of error. As we reported earlier this week on sacurrent.com, the closely watched Cook Political Report changed the status of this race to “toss-up” from “Republican-leaning.” These don’t fit into the toss-up category, but they’re two of Texas’ other big races: Republican Gov. Greg Abbott is fending off a challenge from Lupe Valdez, the Democratic nominee and former sheriff of Dallas County, and Democrat Mike Collier is taking on Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick. With Trump casting his rotund shadow over every competitive race, Republican U.S. Rep. Will Hurd, a onetime CIA spook, is looking to defend his seat in Congressional District 23 against Democrat Gina Ortiz Jones, a retired Air Force intelligence officer. They’re both well-funded and have been trading swipes in television ads for weeks now. District 23 stretches from San Antonio nearly to El Paso. And then there’s the three propositions pushed by the San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association to amend the city charter. Frustrated and angry over the city’s lawsuit to strip the so-called evergreen clause from the firefighters’ labor agreement – a gambit that a string of judges has rejected – the union collected enough residents’ signatures to force the proposed amendments

From left: Beto O’Rourke, Gina Ortiz-Jones, Dan Patrick, Ted Cruz onto the November 6 ballot. One would cap future city managers’ compensation at no more than 10 times the annual pay of city government’s lowest-paid worker. The charter amendment would also limit the city’s top non-elected official to no more than eight years on the job. Another would require city officials to take contract disputes to binding arbitration, not the courthouse. Finally, one of the amendments would lower the bar for putting proposed ordinances – approving utility rate increases, for example – to a referendum. As you can imagine, City Hall, chambers of commerce and some community and neighborhood organizations think these are terrible, city-damaging ideas. The Current will be reporting on the pros and cons of these charter amendments in the weeks ahead. In the meantime, check here to see if you’re still registered to vote: www.bexar.org/2229/Voter-Registration-Check-Polling-Locatio For information on registering to vote, go here: www.bexar.org/1701/Voter-Registration Early voting for the general election will be October 22 through November 2. Election Day is November 6.

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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WED | 9/26 - TUE | 10/2

Rialto Pictures

Joan Marcus THEATER

WICKED

It ain’t easy being green – that’s the gimmick, in a sense, behind the blockbuster musical re-telling of The Wizard of Oz, one that refracts L. Frank Baum’s world through the sensibility of the green among us. Adapted from Gregory Maguire’s novel, Wicked features a tuneful – and dare I say pop-u-u-lar? – score by Stephen Schwartz, and gives us the fraught backstory between two young witches: Elphaba (talented, socially-awkward, green) and Galinda (charismatic, fashionable, non-green). Their unusual, frenemy relationship sets up the world of Oz in surprising and occasionally touching ways, and helps account for the show’s impressive longevity in New York: 15 years now on Broadway, and with a movie (apparently) still in the works. In San Antonio, Wicked boasts an unusually long stop – three weeks, and stars Mary Kate Morrisey and Ginna Claire Mason. Grab a ticket and make your friends green with envy. $53.50-$353, 7:30pm Wed, 2pm & 7:30pm Thu, 8pm Fri, 2pm & 8pm Sat, 2pm & 7:30pm Sun, 7:30pm Tue (through Oct. 14), The Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., (210) 226-3333, majesticempire.com. — Thomas Jenkins

WED | 9/26 SAT | 9/29 THEATER

HAMLET

Representing such prestigious institutions as the Royal Shakespeare Company, Shakespeare’s Globe and the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain, Actors From the London Stage (AFTLS) is both a long-running touring troupe and an “intensive residency program” that champions, explores and unpacks the Bard’s work via readings, workshops and performances. Formed in 1975 and co-founded by veteran actor Sir Patrick Stewart — who got his start in the Royal Shakespeare Company in the 1960s but is better recognized for his roles in the sci-fi franchises Star Trek and X-Men — the UK-based organization maintains a stateside presence at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana and sets up shop in more than a dozen other colleges each year. Reg16

ulars on the San Antonio and Austin campuses of the University of Texas, AFTLS has most recently impressed local crowds with stark, five-person, gender-bending interpretations of Measure for Measure (2017) and Richard III (2016) and returns this year with a revisitation of Hamlet. Falling under a dramatic fog of mystery, madness and death, the early 17th century work follows the Prince of Denmark as he battles demons in the forms of his father’s ghost, widowed mother and vulturous, throne-hungry uncle. $10-$18, 7:30pm Wed, 7:30pm FriSat, UTSA Recital Hall, One UTSA Circle, (210) 458-4374, colfa.utsa.edu/english/ shakespeare.html. — Bryan Rindfuss

January 6, 2019 – and as something of an unofficial warmup for “American History Does Not Begin with the White Man” (which opens at 6pm on Saturday at Bihl Haus Arts, 2803 Fredericksburg

Road), Dr. Ruben Cordova (who curated the latter exhibit) will deliver a lecture on the life and work of late, great San Antonio artist Mel Casas. Much of the talk, like much of the prolific artist’s colorful and impactful work, will focus on the construction of identity within the bicultural experience. An esteemed scholar of Chicano art, Cordova is particularly well-suited to bringing the knotty, code-switching and deeply personal work (and the man behind it) into our contemporary context. Free, 6pm, McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart. org. — James Courtney

THU | 9/27 FI LM

THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS L

Situated on the Mediterranean coast, the North African country of Algeria boasts a rich and complex history

THU | 9/27 ART

GALLERY TALK: ‘MEL CASAS: THE MAN’ 5

As a supplement to the small but splendid ongoing exhibition “Mel Casas: Human” — showing at the McNay until

CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

McNay Art Museum


FRI | 9/28 FI LM

IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT q

Where to begin? Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night ended one era and began another. It was the last hurrah for saucy shenanigans that Hollywood’s Production Code cracked down on in 1934, and its success triggered the next decade’s worth of screwball comedies where strong, competitive women and men argued through wacky plots until the final

calendar

that encompasses ancient dynasties, pirate raids, slave trading and Spanish and French occupations. In 1830, the territory was captured by France, which killed hundreds of thousands of indigenous Algerians during colonization. In 1945, a Muslim uprising led to riots, demonstrations and killings collectively known as the Sétif and Guelma massacre – which eventually led to the Algerian War (1954-1962) that restored Algeria’s independence. Only four years after the war had ended, Italian filmmaker Gillo Pontecorvo (1919–2006) set out to tell the story of marginalized Algerians with his gritty, “fictionalized documentary” The Battle of Algiers. Considered among the most important political movies in the history of cinema, the film employed non-actors, newsreel-style footage and other hallmarks of Italian neorealism. The Criterion Collection sums up its stark depiction of warfare concisely: “As violence escalates on both sides, children shoot soldiers at point-blank range, women plant bombs in cafés, and French soldiers resort to torture to break the will of the insurgents.” As relevant and arresting as ever, the classic comes to light at the McNay as part of a quartet of political/revolutionary films curated by local filmmaker AJ Edwards. Free, 7pm, McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart.org. — BR

Ballet Folklórico de Mexico

clinch. It was the first movie to “sweep” the Oscars — Best Picture, Actor, Actress, Director and Writer — and one of the rare examples to prove that comedies can indeed win, especially if they’re funny and sexy enough. Its famous scenes include the beginning where a bride (Claudette Colbert) walks out of her wedding, her competition with Clark Gable over the best hitch-hiking techniques, their sharing of sleeping quarters separated only by a hanging sheet and the revelation that Gable didn’t wear undershirts. More than 80 years later, it’s still got sass and class. The San Antonio Botanical Garden and Slab Cinema team up for an outdoor screening of the classic as part of the Starlight Movies in the Garden series — picnics, blankets and lawn chairs welcome.

Columbia Pictures

Free, gates at 6:30pm, film at dusk, San Antonio Botanical Garden, 555 Funston Pl., (210) 5361400, sabot.org. — Michael Barrett

FRI | 9/28 SAT | 9/29 DANCE

BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE MEXICO L

Growing up in Mexico City in the 1920s, Amalia Hernández (1917-2000) was drawn to the world of dance but felt uninspired by the Eurocentric styles of the era. After studying modern dance at the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes and working as an instructor and choreographer, her fascination with indigenous culture and the traditional styles of Mexico led her to launch her own company in 1952. From humble beginnings as an eight-member troupe, her pioneering Ballet Folklórico de Mexico has grown to a 76-member ensemble that’s embedded in the cultural tapestry of her birthplace. In addition to Sunday morning shows in front of the historic Palacio de Bellas Artes, the troupe has performed in 60 countries and spent 2016 touring the U.S. with Latin fusion rockers Los Lobos. The colorful vision of Hernández — who was honored here last year with a Día de los Muertos ofrenda displayed at the Mexican Cultural Institute — returns to the Alamo City this weekend courtesy of Arts San Antonio with a festively costumed showcase spanning from “primitive pre-Columbian rites to the sweeping choreography of the Regency, Colonial, Revolutionary and Modern eras.” $29$99, 7:30pm Fri-Sat, Lila Cockrell Theatre, 900 E. Market St., (210) 226-2891, artssa.org. — BR


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FRI | 9/28 SAT | 9/29 FI LM

MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL L

Movie lovers in New York City, San Antonio and other cities around the world will share their love for cinema simultaneously when approximately 100,000 of them will convene in front of a movie screen for the 2018 Manhattan Short Film Festival. During the evenings of September 28 and 29, and October 5 and 6, cinephiles from six continents will watch nine finalists and vote on their favorite short film, performance and screenplay. Once all the votes are tallied, winners will be announced October 8. Finalists were chosen from over 1,500 entries from 73 countries. This year, the short with the most star power is Home Shopper, a film that marks the directorial debut of Academy Award-nominated actor Dev Patel (Lion). It follows Penny Turner (Sophie Kargman), an unhappy wife in a loveless marriage who finds comfort in watching the Home Shopping Network on TV. Also starring in the film is San Antonio business owner Armie Hammer (Call Me by Your Name). Other finalists for the 2018 festival are: Baghead (dir. Alberto Corredor Marina),

Maureen Penders

Fire in Cardboard City (dir. Phil Brough), Her (dir. More Raca), Two Strangers Who Meet Five Times (dir. Marcus Markou), Someone (dir. Marco Gadge), Chuchotage (dir. Barnabás Tóth), Fauve (dir. Jérémy Comte) and Lacrimosa (dir. Tanja Mairitsch). $10-$15, 8pm, URBAN-15, 2500 S. Presa St., (210) 736-1500, urban15.org. — Kiko Martinez

SAT 9/29 ART + MUSIC

ARTS ‘N’ CRAFTS/EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC FEST L

Not content to rest on its laurels as one of the hottest art galleries in town right now, Presa House is now on a roll in the category of live music curation as well. Following up on a fine concert a few weeks back by Andrew Weathers, the little gallery doing big things is putting on an eclectic, one-day music festival. Fit for all ages, this fest (which is technically kinda two separate things in one place) will feature indoor and outdoor music as well as a gallery exhibit featuring work by artists Tere Garcia, Xavier Gilmore, and Maureen Penders. Fans of the more adventurous end of the musical spectrum will find local experimental acts Marco & Antonio, Shift99, Sensitive Boys and Xavier Gilmore indoors. Meanwhile, San Marcos indie acts Youngsville, Water On Mars, Moon Dunes and Rusty Dusty will play outside. For those of us who have trouble choosing between our love of music and our love of art – here’s an event that makes things easy. Free, 7pm2am, Presa House Gallery, 725 S. Presa St., (210) 973-8947, presahouse.com. — JC sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

19


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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


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SPOKEN WORD

100 THOUSAND POETS FOR CHANGE PRESENTS: ‘WOMEN SPEAK!’

Founded in 2011 by the inimitable Viktoria Valenzuela, a local poet and activist, 100 Thousand Poets for Change is a community project that brings together poets (and other artists) in solidarity with various causes. As a loose and amorphous entity, 100 Thousand Poets for Change represents the potent and intentional fusing of the artistic with the political — calling for justice, understanding and sanity. This Saturday’s special reading, which will also feature live music and dramatic performance, is specifically a space for women and non-binary individuals to share their work and raise their voices. The slate of scheduled readers is stacked, boasting Dr. Norma Cantu, Anel Flores, Wendy Barker, Andrea “Vocab” Sanderson, Natasha Hernandez and many more – but there will also be an open mic portion of the event. The organizers of “Women Speak!” have specified that men and others are welcome as a listening audience, but will not be allowed to take the open mic stage. You hear that, dudes – especially dude artists? Don’t shy away. This is precisely the event you need. Bring an open mind and closed lips, because it is time to learn. Oh, and a journal. You’ll want to take notes. Free, 11am-6pm, Centro de Artes, 101 S. Santa Rosa Ave., facebook.com/100tpcsatx. — JC

LISA FISCHER

N OV E M B E R 1 6

SUN | 9/30 FI LM

JANE EYRE L

Unless you have lived a troubled life, the words “spooky” and “romantic” don’t usually go together. But that’s the mood director Cary Fukunaga perfectly evokes in his 2011 interpretation of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. Fukanaga directed every stylish episode of the first (some say only) season of True Detective and his new Netflix series Maniac premiered on September 21. He was also just announced as the director of the next James Bond film, so it’s a good time to revisit this earlier work. Screening as part of Alamo Drafthouse’s Afternoon Tea series, Jane Eyre delivers the romance goods (Glorious vistas! Buttoned-up passions breaking free!), but also has a weirder, scarier vibe than your average period drama. At times (especially during the first half), you might think you’re watching a straight-up ghost movie. Mia Wasikowska plays the titular “Plain” Jane and conveys both the terror of her childhood and the resilience she gained as a result. Michael Fassbender as her HR nightmare of an employer, Mr. Rochester, hints at pained vulnerability under his character’s cruel surface. He is also, let’s just be honest, a dreamy jerk. Who can resist a man who preys on his much-younger employees by insulting them and has certain … ideas of how to handle women when they become … inconvenient? Especially when he looks like Fassbender? Swoon! Jamie Bell and Judi Dench round out the cast as frenemies Jane encounters as she navigates her way to a mostly happy ending. Perhaps not the ending we want for her (Jane! Run away from the terrible men once and for all!), but one that satisfies the rules of the genre. $21.65, 1pm, Alamo Drafthouse Park North (618 NW Loop 410) & Stone Oak (22806 Hwy. 281 N.), (210) 677-8500, drafthouse.com. — Teresa Rendon

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ALL PERFORMANCES BEGIN AT 8PM Jo Long Theatre, Carver Cultural Center

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

21


Fests, Fairy Tales, Musicals & More Fall happenings to keep on your radar BY KELLY MERKA NELSON

J

ust because the year is coming to a close doesn’t mean things are winding down. Whether you want to catch a performance, fill your stomach, kick off a party or all of the above, it’s gonna be a piece of cake to fill your planner this season.

FALL FESTS OKTOBERBEST

If you want an authentic Munich experience but can’t afford the international travel, get yourself over to the Beethoven for their annual two-weekend celebration of Oktoberfest. Nosh on schnitzel, sip a German brew and enjoy a slate of German music that features performances by the old-school singing society’s own choral ensembles – all while mingling with friends old and new in the biergarten’s communal seating area. $5, 5pm-midnight Fri, Oct. 5, Sat, Oct. 6, Fri, Oct. 12, Sat, Oct. 13, Beethoven Maennerchor Halle und Garten, 422 Pereida St., (210) 222-1521, beethovenmaennerchor.com.

CHALK IT UP

For Artpace’s Chalk It Up festival, locally selected artists put their pastels to the pavement of Houston Street and North Main to create vivid murals, and attendees can also flex their creative muscles in designated “Freestyle Zones.” Whether or not you want to get your hands dusty, you can check out the art, grab some snacks from food trucks, hear live music by local performers and take part in various hands-on demonstrations. Free, 10am-4pm Sat, Oct. 13, downtown Houston St., (210) 212-4900, artpace.org. 22

ALAMO CITY COMIC CON

ACCC’s meteoric growth since its debut in 2013 has finally pushed it to a bigger venue — the Alamodome. Despite its short tenure, the con has become one of the largest events of its kind nationally, and lovers of all things geek will find plenty to enjoy. This year’s celebrity guests include beefcake-turned-politician Arnold Schwarzenegger, “Suddenly Seymour” himself, Rick Moranis, O.G. Captain Kirk William Shatner, and the kooky and magnetic Jeff Goldblum. $10-$90, 3-8pm Fri, Oct. 26, 10am-8pm Sat, Oct. 27, 10am-6pm Sun, Oct. 28, Alamodome, 100 Montana St., (210) 2073663, alamocitycomiccon.com.

DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS

To say that San Anto goes all out for Día de los Muertos is certainly an understatement. With events running from Oct.

CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

20 through Nov. 3, highlights include Muertos Fest at La Villita (Oct. 27-28), SAY Sí’s Muertitos Fest (Nov. 2-3), URBAN-15’s Carnaval de Los Muertos (Nov. 1-2), and more. Join the community to build ceremonial altars, witness processions of muertos characters, and venerate our ancestors in this vibrant Mexican holiday.

DIWALI

Celebrate the annual Hindu Festival of Lights with a fete featuring authentic Indian cuisine, culture and color. The fest includes a river parade, a showcase of Indian dance and the traditional Diya Ceremony, in which candles are lit and floated in water, all capped off with a brilliant fireworks display. If you want to kick it off and really party, you can jump into some Bollywood Zumba or a Bhangra dance-


along! Free, 5pm-midnight Sat, Nov. 3, Hemisfair (434 S. Alamo St.) & Arneson River Theater (418 Villita St.), diwalisa.com.

LUMINARIA

Luminaria curates a collection of artists and performers to light up the night downtown. For its 10th anniversary, which coincides with the city’s Tricentennial, the after-dark contemporary arts festival brings together 50 artists of all disciplines to exhibit new works and activate Hemisfair as a creative space. Art installations remain on display all night, accompanied by a slate of musicians, poets and performers. Free, 7pm-midnight Sat, Nov. 10, Hemisfair, 434 S. Alamo St., (210) 721-1670, luminariasa.org.

LOCAL TALENT AVENUE Q

It may be harsh to hear that “everyone’s a little bit racist, sometimes,” but the bitter pill is certainly easy to swallow when it comes wrapped in a catchy tune. If you’re aching to hear hits like “What Do You Do with a B.A. in English” and “Schadenfreude,” head to the Woodlawn this October for their take on the cult smash, puppet-populated satire Avenue Q. $18-$30, Fri, Oct. 12 - Sun, Nov. 4, Woodlawn Theatre, 1920 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 2678388, woodlawntheatre.org

FUN HOME

Adapted from Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel/memoir of the same name, Fun Home chronicles Bechdel’s attempt to navigate her sexuality and her father’s untimely death while also grappling with the revelation that the man she thought she knew had troubling secrets roiling just under the surface. The heady material doesn’t pull its punches, and it’s hard to imagine it could, but it translates to the stage as a poignant rumination on family and self. $20-$35, Thu, Oct. 18 - Sun, Nov. 18, The Public Theater of San Antonio, 800 W. Ashby Pl., (210) 733-7258, thepublicsa.org.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

To kick off its 2018-2019 season, Ballet San Antonio retells a tale as old as time. Featuring a new prequel to the story choreographed by Bruce Wells, the ballet recounts the unlikely romance between Belle and her Beast in two acts with a series of Divertissement, Pas de Deux and solos that will be sure to

arts

Clockwise from bottom left: Alamo City Comic Con, Luminaria, Flying Bach, Chalk It Up, School of Rock: The Musical, Beauty and the Beast, New Chinese Acrobats, Diwali, Día de los Muertos

a

captivate fairy tale fans of all ages. $35-$114, Fri, Oct. 19 - Sun, Oct. 21, Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, (210) 404-9641, balletsanantonio.org.

CATCH THEM WHILE THEY’RE HERE NEW CHINESE ACROBATS

The internationally acclaimed New Chinese Acrobats preserve the art of ancient Chinese traditions of performance alongside modern acrobatic acts, tied together by virtuosic performers and innovative staging. Arts San Antonio brings the troupe to the perfect setting — the gilded proscenium of the Majestic Theater — for a performance featuring a series of ensemble and solo acts that showcase epic feats of balance, flexibility and artistry. $29-$99, 7:30pm Thu, Oct. 18, The Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., (210) 2262891, artssa.org.

FLYING BACH

Four-time world champion dancing troupe Flying Steps has put a new twist on something baroque in their latest touring performance. In Flying Bach, they breakdance to the music of “The Well Tempered Clavier,” and let me tell you, regardless of your opinion on our man JSB, this will certainly be a show to remember! $29.50-$85, 8pm Sat, Nov. 3, Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, (210) 223-8624, tobincenter.org.

SCHOOL OF ROCK: THE MUSICAL

Mom and Dad still won’t let your band practice in the garage? Well, try telling them that this musical is an educational tale about geology, and hope that the show’s real lesson about the importance of making room in your life for fun and performance sinks in. For better or worse, you’ll all at least get to enjoy this rockin’ stage adaptation of a hit comedic flick. $40-$150, Tue, Nov. 6 - Sun, Nov. 11, The Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., (210) 226-3333, majesticempire.com

NAPOLEON DYNAMITE – A CONVERSATION WITH JON HEDER, EFREN RAMIREZ AND TINA MAJORINO

Throw some tots in your pockets, and don’t forget to feed your llama, because Napoleon Dynamite is coming to town! After a screening of the film, actors Jon Heder (Napoleon), Efren Ramirez (Pedro), and Tina Majorino (Deb) will sit down for a panel discussion, followed by a meet-and-greet with the fans who nabbed VIP tickets. $29.50-$135, 8pm Thu, Nov. 15, Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, (210) 223-8624, tobincenter.org

Find more artsmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


arts

Lori Michelle (left) and Max Booth III own Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing, which releases horror fiction such as The Writing Skies (above) and Lost Films (right).

Forbidden Books

San Antonio’s Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing has grown into a one of the most original voices in horror fiction BY SANFORD NOWLIN

M

ax Booth III and Lori Michelle harbor a deep, dark secret. From a quiet neighborhood in Schertz, the couple operate one of the most prolific small presses specializing in horror and dark fiction. Since setting up shop in 2012, Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing has emerged as one of the key publishers keeping horror fiction alive at a time when the shrinking New York houses largely lost interest in the genre — except, of course, when penned by Stephen King. “What we want to publish is anything we like that we’re not seeing anywhere else, but our tastes tend to run to the strange and spooky,” said Booth, who like Michelle, works another job on top of running the press. “We don’t pretend to be a huge company. It’s a punk rock, DIY kind of thing.” There’s no magic formula for success either. They publish authors who they like reading and try not to

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

overextend themselves — which for now means putting out five to eight books a year and issues of the fiction magazine Dark Moon Digest. Of course, helping matters is a rekindled interest in horror — once thought to have had its heyday in the ’80s. “Netflix and Hulu, shows like Stranger Things, are opening people up to stuff that would never have been mainstream before,” Michelle said. Even so, PMMP’s not interested in repeating familiar horror tropes, whether drawn from a Netflix or the 1980s horror glut. Its work goes darker, sometimes drifting into black humor or crime stories. And, recently, its freewheeling approach has won critical notice. PMMP’s last two anthologies — Lost Films and Lost Signals — grabbed reviews in Publisher’s Weekly and include some of the best-regarded authors in contemporary horror. And Tales from the Holy Land, a short story collection from Rafael Alvarez, a writer for HBO’s The Wire, was recently included in the Pen/ Faulkner Foundation’s Writers in Schools program. “They’re attracting really good writers,” said Brooklyn author John Foster, who’s published two novels and a short story collection with PMMP. “People want to work with them.”

Carnivorous Lunar Activities Canadian author Betty Rocksteady, whose illustrated work The Writing Skies is coming out soon with PMMP, said she’s been impressed with its hands-on dedication to quality. While some small presses view

the look of the book almost as an afterthought, Michelle’s design focus helps set them apart. “I feel like they get what I’m going for in my work and push me in all the right directions,” Rocksteady said. That could be because PMMP’s owners came from the writing life themselves. Both are published authors, although Michelle’s attention lately has been more on the design side. Booth has four novels out and a fifth, Carnivorous Lunar Activities, coming soon from Cinestate, a Dallas publisher and film company that’s resurrecting the venerable horror magazine Fangoria. Booth’s new book, touted as a combination of American Werewolf in London and frat comedy Old School, is focused on two old friends, one of whom is called on to kill the other with a silver bullet before he can turn into a werewolf. “It’s a long conversation full of childhood memories and dick jokes,” he explains.

It’s Alive! The advent of e-books and print-on-demand technology — which lets publishers produce copies of books as they’re ordered instead of in mass quantities — have lowered production costs for small presses like PMMP. That means they can break-even selling a few hundred copies of a title rather than needing to ship units to every Walmart in America. But without a big house’s marketing department, Booth and Michelle are forced to do the marketing legwork themselves. That involves guerilla efforts like touting PMMP authors during Castle Rock Radio, a Stephen King-related podcast Booth hosts, and leveraging his snarky social-media presence. It also requires old-fashioned retail skills. The couple still hawks books one-at-a-time at horror conventions, library events and street fairs. They’ve even had luck at craft fairs and community events, where the dark imagery on the covers lures teens and tweens dragged there by parents. “At those smaller festivals, we may be one of the few publishers and everyone else is selling meat,” Booth said. “We do pretty well at those.”


sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


The Children Act poses difficult moral questions while trying to balance an uneven narrative BY KIKO MARTINEZ

F

ilms where characters are presented with a moral dilemma usually give rise to thought-provoking conversations. In the 2015 war thriller Eye in the Sky, the decency of the U.S. military is examined when they must decide if they should bomb a group of terrorists if it also means killing a young girl near the targeted site. In 2007’s Gone Baby Gone, the question posed at the end of the film is whether the wellbeing of a child should be risked in favor of a neglectful mother’s rights. The complicated, life-altering situations continue in The Children Act, a polarizing and ultimately erratic drama starring two-time Academy Award-winning actress Emma Thompson (Sense and Sensibility) as an English judge assessing a controversial case. Although Thompson is a gem, The Children Act minimizes its most interesting courtroom narrative with insignificant storylines during the first half before transforming into an entirely different — and less absorbing — picture in the second.

A24

Thompson stars as Fiona Maye, a High Court justice living in London with her American professor husband Jack (Stanley Tucci), who confesses to her that he has become dissatisfied with their passionless marriage. Besides placing added stress on Fiona, who is obviously a workaholic, the revelation doesn’t add much to the screenplay adapted by Ian McEwan (On Chesil Beach) from his own 2014 novel of the same name. Still, McEwan and director Richard Eyre (Notes on a Scandal) milk the relationship problems for all they’re worth, which hurts the impact of the film’s main moral issue. The case that comes across Fiona’s desk is of Adam Henry (Fionn Whitehead), a devout 17-year-old Jehovah’s Witness and leukemia patient who sites his religious beliefs and refuses a life-saving blood transfusion. Despite having little time to weigh the circumstances fully (Adam will die soon without the procedure), Fiona makes an unprecedented move and chooses to meet Adam at the hospital

America’s Next Top Mongrel Pick of the Litter plays like a competitive reality show on Animal Planet — and that’s a good thing

I

f Animal Planet was as smart as a Border Collie, it would figure out a way to adapt the crowd-pleasing and educational documentary Pick of the Litter into a reality show. Sure, the cable network already has plenty of programs that fill the category like Pit Bulls and Parolees and My Cat from Hell, but none currently feature the pets going fluffy head to fluffy head in a thrilling competition (the hit TV show Puppy Bowl doesn’t count because puppies, contrary to popular belief, can’t really play football). In Pick of the Litter, five newborn Labradors — Patriot, Potomac, Primrose, Poppet and Phil — are placed in a training program with the California-based nonprofit Guide Dogs for the Blind (GDB) to become guide dogs for the visually impaired. While the training program isn’t a competition, directors Don Hardy Jr. and Dana Nachman have a little fun in the doc by arranging the 20-month-long process into a tail-wag-

screens

Justice Denied

Sundance Selects

ging battle royale where the five pups put their skills to the test in order to make it to graduation day and be placed with a new owner. The idea works surprisingly well since becoming a guide dog for GDB is incredibly difficult. According to the organization, only 300 of the 800 dogs bred annually will complete the training program as guide dogs. And demand is high. Each year, GDB receives 1,100 applications from potential dog owners. By setting up the film as a friendly contest, Pick

before she makes a final ruling. Until the encounter takes place, The Children Act, named after a law in the United Kingdom that requires the protection of a child’s welfare, is a well-developed and smart story in spite of the overplayed and hollow marital spat. Where the film comes apart is when we step out of the courtroom and into an awkward scenario where Fiona’s personal life collides with her work life in a way she’s never experienced before. As the pragmatic Fiona, Thompson gives a brilliantly direct performance — one that will probably be overshadowed by showier characters once awards season starts getting serious — and stands out as one of her best since 2013’s Saving Mr. Banks. A major opportunity is missed, however, when the script chooses to take a clumsy route rather than a compelling one when it hits the homestretch.

of the Litter is more enjoyable for moviegoers who are interested in rooting for their favorite pooch — from Phil and his easygoing lease on life to Patriot who is a bit of a biter. Like any gripping reality show competition, Pick of the Litter also comes with other heartwarming stories about the men and women who are working together to get each dog to meet its goals. This includes the volunteer “puppy raisers” who care for the pups for a few months before they transition to more experienced trainers called “puppy club leaders.” Most of the trainers have uplifting stories to tell about why they enjoy raising and training dogs. The narrative gets emotional during the more touching scenes when some of the pups are cut from the program (GDB labels these dogs “career changed”). As cheerful and affectionate as the humans are in the story, the dogs, of course, are the true stars of Pick of the Litter. Watching the five showcased here — from their entry into the world as yappy little fuzzballs to these incredibly intelligent animals — is a wonderful testament to the services provided by GDB, which have changed thousands of lives since its inception in 1942. For that, Pick of the Litter certainly deserves its fair share of tummy rubs.

Find more news Find more every day at film stories sacurrent.com


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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


screens | fall guide

For Your Consideration 20 fall films everyone should add to their cinematic schedule BY KIKO MARTINEZ

Universal Pictures

A

wards season is finally here, and the fall schedule is looking mighty impressive. Here are 20 films opening at theaters to consider from now until late December.

REBOOTS, REMAKES & SEQUELS

Amazon Studios

Walt Disney Pictures

From top: Halloween, Suspiria, Mary Poppins Returns, Ralph Breaks the Internet

a Walt Disney Animation Studios

After a string of forgettable sequels and a botched reboot by Rob Zombie a decade ago, an 11th film in the Halloween (Oct. 19) franchise attempts to capture the thrills of the 1978 original. This time, director David Gordon Green (Stronger) steps in to set up the “final” showdown between iconic heroine Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and masked, knife-wielding killer Michael Myers. Horror movie fans will get a second dose of the genre with the remake of Dario Argento’s 1977 Suspiria (Nov. 2). The film stars Dakota Johnson (Fifty Shades of Grey) and Oscar winner Tilda Swinton (Michael Clayton) as a young dancer and artistic director who find themselves face to face with evil. In the sequel Creed II (Nov. 21), Michael B. Jordan (Black Panther) returns to the boxing ring, this time to fight the son of Ivan Drago, the Russian who killed his father Apollo Creed in 1985’s Rocky IV. In the sequel Ralph Breaks the Internet (Nov. 21), the animated title character voiced by Oscar nominee John C. Reilly ((Chicago)

journeys to the world wide web via a wi-fi router. More than half a century after the 1964 original film Mary Poppins, Mary Poppins Returns (Dec. 19) hits theaters and stars Emily Blunt (Sicario) as the enchanted English nanny.

BIG-SCREEN BIOGRAPHIES Oscar-winning director Damien Chazelle (La La Land) explores the final frontier in First Man (Oct. 12), a drama starring two-time Oscar nominee Ryan Gosling (Half Nelson) as NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong. Rami Malek (TV’s Mr. Robot) portrays Freddie Mercury, lead singer of the British rock band Queen, in Bohemian Rhapsody (Nov. 2). Politics get scandalous in The Front Runner (Nov. 21) when Senator and 1988 U.S. presidential hopeful Gary Hart (Hugh Jackman) runs his campaign off a cliff when he is caught having an affair. Two other films prove politics have always had a dramatic history: The Favourite (Nov. 23, limited) about two bickering royal cousins (Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz) vying for the attention of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) in the early 18th century; and Mary Queen of Scots (Dec. 7, limited) about the reign of Mary Stuart (Saoirse Ronan), the Queen of Scotland, during the 16th century. Then, Vice (Dec. 14) brings the political world closer to present time when Oscar winner Christian Bale (The Fighter) portrays former Vice President Dick Cheney during his rise to power. 31 6

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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screens | fall guide

Universal Pictures

Twentieth Century Fox

Warner Bros

Clockwise from bottom left: Boy Erased, The Favourite, Bohemian Rhapsody, First Man, A Star is Born, Mid90s

A24

a 6 29 Fox Searchlight Pictures

Focus Features

ACTORS BEHIND THE CAMERA Three-time Oscar-nominated actor Bradley Cooper (American Sniper) makes his directorial debut with A Star is Born (Oct. 5), the fourth version of the musical to be released since the 1937 original. The most recent remake stars Cooper and Lady Gaga as an alcoholic musician and the aspiring singer he takes under his wing. In Mid90s (Oct. 19, limited), twotime Oscar-nominated actor Jonah Hill (Money(

ball) makes his directorial debut with the story of a 13-year-old skater living life in Los Angeles. Also making his directorial debut is actor Paul Dano (There Will Be Blood) with Wildlife (Oct. 19, limited), which stars Oscar nominees Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain) and Cary Mulligan (An Education) as a husband and wife whose marriage is falling apart in front of their young son. Directing only his second feature, actor Joel Edgerton (The Gift) goes behind the camera for Boy Erased (Nov. 2, limited) about a teenager (Lucas Hedges) sent to a gay-conversion program by his Baptist preacher father (Russell Crowe) and mother (Nicole Kidman). 33 6

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screens | fall guide Head of the Class

Comedian Kevin Hart talks Night School and the Spurs’ no-fun coach Gregg Popovich BY KIKO MARTINEZ

Annapurna Pictures

Universal Pictures

I IFC Films

From top: If Beale Street Could Talk, Wildlife, Widows Roma

a Twentieth Century Fox

Netflix

6 31

PERSONAL PICKS I’ll end up seeing every film on this list — plus a ton more — before the end of the year, but these next five are the ones I am anticipating the most: Oscar-winning director Steve McQueen (12 12 Years a Slave)) takes the heist flick to another level with Widows (Nov. 16) about four

women who put their fate in their own hands after the deaths of their criminal husbands. In Beautiful Boy (Oct. 12, limited), Oscar-nominees Steve Carell (Foxcatcher) and Timothée Chalamet (Call Me by Your Name) star as a father and son facing the realities of drug addiction. Oscar nominee Melissa McCarthy (Bridesmaids) gets dramatic in Can You Ever Forgive Me? (Oct. 19, limited) as Lee Israel, an author who earned her notoriety by becoming a literary forger. In If Beale Street Could Talk (Nov. 30, limited), Oscar-winning screenwriter and nominated director Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) tells the story of a pregnant woman in Harlem looking to clear the name of her husband who has been wrongly convicted of a crime. Finally, Oscar-winning director Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity) chronicles ( the life of a middle-class family in Mexico City during the 1970s in Roma (Dec. 14), which will be released simultaneously on Netflix and selected theaters.

n Night School, comedian Kevin Hart stars as Teddy Walker, a high-school dropout who returns to school to earn his GED with the help of a ragtag group of classmates and a teacher (Tiffany Haddish) who refuses to allow him to breeze through the semester. The Current caught up with Hart last week in Dallas to talk about his new movie, working with Haddish, and the San Antonio Spurs. How does Tiffany stack up when compared to other actors you’ve teamed up with, like The Rock, Ice Cube and Will Ferrell? You gotta put Tiffany at the top. I would put Will Ferrell after that. Then Cube. The Rock is last. That’s how I would rank it. Tiffany is unbelievable. She did an amazing job in this film. We were very lucky to get her fresh off of Girl’s Trip with all the success she had with that movie. So, when you heard there was potential for a Hart-Haddish movie, was that an automatic yes for you? It’s an automatic yes. [Fans] have literally stepped up to the plate by simply saying, “We want that. We would love to see it.” The response I’m seeing on social media is, “We can’t wait to see the movie,” which is a great thing for us, especially in a world where comedy has kind of been on a backslide.

We have a great opportunity to give comedy a spike up. If you had to do high school again, what would you do differently? I would do it exactly the same. We should do a segment where we get all of my teachers from high school just to talk about the type of student I was. I think it would help other kids understand how to really embrace that moment and take full advantage. I graduated (purposefully mispronounces) magnum cum laudum. You should just say you were valedictorian. I could’ve said that, but it sounds better when I say magnum cum laudum. I know you’re a fan of the NBA. How do you think the Spurs will do this season? Well, you got younger. The worst thing for you guys is that you’re losing Ginobili. For years, Ginobili has been your glue. But DeMar DeRozan is no slouch. He can definitely bring a new sense of energy to your town. You guys will be in the playoffs. You got the best coach in basketball. The one thing that you’re not is an exciting program. I don’t know what it is about [Coach] Pop and fun. Pop just doesn’t like to have fun. [Imitating Pop] Pick and roll, pick and pop, all right now. Done.

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


N E P O NOW

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


food

Shutterstock

THE BIG SPOON

Casual Racism

A different reason for that queasy feeling BY JESS ELIZARRARAS

I

hate restaurant inspection reports. OK, that’s not all the way true, because we need the reports, but I do hate what it means for society as a whole. I liken it to watching a train wreck. I don’t know of many people who seek out the public knowledge found on Metro Health’s website on a weekly basis, but the results ooze into conversation. Did you hear about X? They had a cat food in the kitchen! Did you see what their score was? It’s like watching Dr. Sandra Lee (aka Dr. Pimple Popper) pop pimples and extract massive cysts on her Instagram account. It’s the same reason Queer Eye’s food and wine expert Antoni Porowski takes a whiff of every moldy food container he finds in each makeover recipient’s home. We can’t look away. The use of inspection data in media reports has drawn viewers to nightly broadcasts ever since broadcaster Marvin Zindler popularized “slime in the ice machine,” and it attracts readers to slideshows of restaurants with

scores below 89. We click the link, gasp in horror, nod if our suspicions are confirmed and share the news. We keep watching the pimple. We take a whiff of the container. But with the onset of the Internet and its comment sections, the reactions are shared in a moment’s notice, without a pause. The reactions, though, require at least some introspection on the commenter’s part. Introspection could have helped in February 2017 when MySA shared a slideshow with the headline “Inspectors find dogs in San Antonio Chinese restaurant” emblazoned with a buffet line as imagery. Introspection could have helped in online forums as innocuous as the San Antonio Restaurants Group, where members recently shared their opinion on what caused Pasha Mediterranean Grill’s outbreak: “They buy all their meat products at La Michoacana and La Michoacana Meat Market will never tell you where they get their meat and are not clean at all behind the counter” And the reply was somehow more cringe-worthy: “That’s because La Michoacana sells road kill and Chihuahua, Dalmatian and Labrador! Just kidding, but yuck, I would not shop at that place.” The casual racism evidenced here shows diners and commenters who aren’t using slurs. They’re not using any epithets, but still tie in a Mexican supermarket with the sale of

Chihuahua meat, a practice that’s illegal. La Michoacana’s (let’s take the North Flores Street location for our example) last four scores were all in the 90s. I called up a sociologist in town, Daniel Delgado of Texas A & M University – San Antonio, who studies race, ethnicity and cyber racism. “There is no overt racism there,” Delgado said. “If someone else had said that to your face, and said, ‘I’m not actually racist. I’m just saying they sell dogs. I’m just joking … Can’t you take a joke?’” The comments, though, serve to denigrate, and the comment sections, devoid of any decorum, allow us to be, as Delgado puts it, “more Trumpian than anywhere else.” Reports serve a solid role in how we find food that’s made well in sanitary conditions. But when presented with inherent biases, the reports morph into something ugly. This column isn’t going to fix that casual or so-called “colorblind” racism found in the comment section of those articles and slideshows. But maybe it’ll help the content producers think a little harder at the role we play when creating them – and when sharing them with salacious images and headlines. Maybe it means we take a whiff, and leave it in the trash where it belongs.

Contact the author: flavor@sacurrent.com

,

Find more food & drink news at sacurrent.com

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

37


food | fall guide

Que Pasa, Calabaza

We assembled a pumpkin panel BY JESS ELIZARRARAS

T

he high for August 28 was 100. The low was 79. Neither of those digits digits hinted at an impending fall, but it didn’t matter: Starbucks released its Pumpkin Spice Latte, and it was all downhill from there. Nationally, the pumpkin craze is all over our cereals, our dish soaps, our deodorants. Locally, restaurants are waiting to roll out fall menu items for at least a few more weeks. But the Great Pumpkin still lingers like a rotund elephant in the room (or, in this case, pastry case). But are any of the products worth the buzz? Does pumpkin actually have its own unique flavor? Or are we enamored by the cloves and ginger and cardamom that is most often paired with it? Or because it teases cooler temperatures – reasons to wear boots and an excuse to bring out all those sweaters and scarves tucked in the back of our closets? We scoured the city for pumpkin-flavored treats and assembled a panel that spans pumpkin eaters from fanatical to skeptical, including social-media influencer Candice Trevino (@ smilesandpearlss), music writer Chris Conde and food critic Ron Bechtol. Here are their thoughts:

Locally Sourced PUMPKIN EMPANADAS // The “baby food” texture was a turn-off for one of our panelist who tasted H-E-B’s pumpkin empanada. It was enough to start a conversation

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

on whether people can discern the differences between pumpkin and sweet potato or camote. Still, it’s good with a cafecito. Ron Bechtol: [No rating] Chris Conde: 3/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 5/10 pumpkins

SNOOZE SMASHING PUMPKIN PANCAKE // The Smashing Pumpkin Pancakes, part of

Snooze’s fall menu, are billed as “homemade pumpkin pancakes with cream cheese filling, topped with bourbon-infused maple syrup, sweet cream drizzle & maple-spiced pepitas.” It’s a sweet breakfast, but it won most of our panelists over. Ron Bechtol: 8/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 5/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 9/10 pumpkins

PUMPKIN SPICE WHITE CHOCOLATE SNICKERDOODLES // Lily’s Cookies shared fall-inspired items such as

pecan pie bars and pumpkin bars with a rich cream cheese frosting, but the clear winner of the batch was the pumpkin spice white chocolate snickerdoodle, which was crumbly, moist and didn’t pack in a ton of sweetness. One panelist squirreled some away for later. Ron Bechtol: 8/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 8/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 9/10 pumpkins

PUMPKIN SPICE UP YOUR LIFE COOKIE // What’s not to love about a cookie frosted to look like a coffee mug? At $4, the Bread Box creation is perfect for teacher gifts or that perfect Instagram photo. Ron Bechtol: 7/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 8/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 8/10 pumpkins PUMPKIN SPICE MILK TEA // A pumpkin caramel swirl and a hearty shake of starting and finishing touches for Brew’s Lee Tea Station’s fall-flavored drink

pumpkin spice are the


food | fall guide available as of this Monday. Though our panelists missed the flavors of pumpkin, the chai tea was a solid offering. Ron Bechtol: 4/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 8/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 7/10 pumpkins

PUMPKIN MACARONS // Andrew Gonzalez, a father and baker, has been mac-ing it up since 2016 with his madeto-order macarons. His fall offering: pumpkin macarons that added enough hints of pumpkin AND spice to keep our panelists happy. Ron Bechtol: 7/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 8/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 10/10 pumpkins

Trader Joe’s Haul By far, TJ’s packed the most gourd-flavored goodies out of any store we visited, especially given their relative size. But not all the pumpkin goods were great.

PUMPKIN GREEK YOGURT // If

you’re going to promise pumpkin, it better taste like pumpkin. Our panelists were not impressed. Ron Bechtol: 5/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 4/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 7/10 pumpkins

PUMPKIN BISCOTTI // A winner.

Crisp without calling for a trip to the dentist, and spice-laden enough to go

with your drink of choice. Ron Bechtol: 7/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 8/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 10/10 pumpkins

PUMPKIN MADELEINE // Though buttery and moist, the pastry lacked in actual pumpkin taste. No matter – two panelists would dunk it in their PSLs any day. Ron Bechtol: 7/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 5/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 9/10 pumpkins PUMPKIN SPICE MUFFIN WITH CREAM CHEESE AND WALNUT STREUSEL // Middle of the road re-

action. The muffin, it seems, had more bark than bite. Ron Bechtol: 6/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 5/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 7/10 pumpkins

PUMPKIN TORTILLA CHIPS //

Though pumpkin puree was listed as a prominent ingredient, the tortilla chips were less gourd, more corn. We wouldn’t kick them out of bed, and they’d actually pair well with a chili or lentil daal. Ron Bechtol: 5/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 7/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 8/10 pumpkins Pumpkin Chai Spice Loaf // A noble loaf that packed in flavors of clove, cardamom and black pepper. Try it instead of coffee cake. Ron Bechtol: 7/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 9/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 5/10 pumpkins

FROSTED TOASTER PASTRIES // Hard pass. Ron Bechtol: 3/10 pumpkins Chris Conde: 2/10 pumpkins Candice Trevino: 3/10 pumpkins

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or the first time in recent memory, Oktoberfest celebrations came early this year: Ranger Creek unleashed their canned Oktoberfest on September 15, and our fall issue landed less than a week after the Munich-based celebration of all things beer got started. But no matter. We tasted Oktoberfest brews out now for you to pair with your favorite lederhosen.

REAL ALE OKTOBERFEST // A per-

sonal favorite, Real Ale’s Bavarian-style lager is perfect for sipping alongside a thick bratwurst and bright sauerkraut. Using Munich and Vienna malts, Real Ale has delivered a copper, medium-bodied beer with few hops and lots of breadiness on the palate that can be enjoyed way past Oktoberfest.

SHINER OKTOBERFEST // This Marzen-style take from the Spoetzl Brewery has

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honored tradition since 1996 when the Oktoberfest was first brewing in Shiner, Texas. And it’s a winner — it took gold in 2012’s Great American Beer Festival — with its low IBUs and is sessionable with a relatively low ABV. Drink it with or without the dirndl but definitely with a hot pretzel.

SOUTHERN STAR OKTOBERFEST // The Conroe-based brewery delivered

an early favorite that takes Weyermann Munich, Weyerman Vienna and Rahr Two Row malts, pairs them with Perle Hallertau Mittlefrueh hops and delivers a slightly nutty Festbier with a crisp and smooth sourdough aftertaste.

GHOST COW OKTOBERFEST // Listen, they’re not

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6 41 desolate back road in South Texas, the ghost cow comes out to graze and make its stand smack dab in the middle of the road – a full-blown apparition on the center stripe.” But the Marzen-style description fell flat with a sour cream and onion chips taste that missed any of the rich maltiness we were expecting. I hit a cow with my car once, but still couldn’t connect to this beer.

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RANGER CREEK OKTOBERFEST // The brewery’s answer to a Vienna Lager

tastes like a locally made Negra Modelo. Now available in cans, the Oktoberfest is a dark amber hue, with a smooth and thick malt to it. Drink it with a Reuben or warm potato salad.

OktoberFiesta, described as a “working class brew with a strong malt backbone … a noble hop finish … [for] backyard barbecues, rowdy tailgates and swanky soirees.” Its Belgian yeast strain deviates from tradition but produces a bright and fruity flavor that pairs nicely with the malts and hops. Drink it through the rest of the year.

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More Oktoberfest Celebrations SEPTEMBER 27-30 // Alamo Beer will bring out the tent for a tapping of the keg by Mayor Ron Nirenberg, music and food vendors Thursday through Sunday. Free admission, 3-9pm Thursday, 3pm-midnight Friday, noon-midnight Saturday, noon9pm Sunday, 202 Lamar St., (210) 872-5589, alamobeer.com. SEPTEMBER 29 // Busted Sandal Brewing Co. will release its European-style Oktoberfest and limited edition Das Boot glassware. Stop in for German music and good eats. Free admission, 5-10pm, 7114 Oaklawn Drive, (210) 872-1486, bustedsandalbrewing.com. OCTOBER 6-7 // Kunstler Brewing will celebrate Bavarian culture with food for purchase from Swine House and lots of beer pints. Free admission, 11am-midnight, 302 E. LaChapelle, (210) 688-4519, kuenstlerbrewing.com.

OCTOBER 13-14 // Con Safos Cocina y Cantina will add a Mexican twist to its Oktoberfest celebration with German food an a little bit of San Anto flare. Stop in for beer, brats and dancing. Free admission, noon-6pm Saturday and Sunday, 607 Hemisfair Blvd., (210) 514-5006, consafos-sa.com.

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music

Chris Martinez AKA Kdeath, rapper of Moodie Black

a

some, Conde offered something of a disclaimer. “While some folks might be upset that there are non-LGBTQ folk on a showcase that has been predominately LGBTQ , I want to stress that this still is a queer event and that allies are our guests in our world and should feel welcome. Allies are an important part of erasing the stigma surrounding LGBTQs. “At the end of the day,” Conde said, “the new normal will be a space without labels – just people, love and art. Since we’re a little bit away from that, we need unity with supporters of our community more than ever.” The lineup for Queers & Beers 4, heavy on the hip-hop and noise fronts, is, in a word: legit. For starters, Moodie Black has been a seminal act on the ground floor of the noise-rap movement. The harsh yet frequently epiphanic creative vehicle for rapper Chris Martinez AKA Kdeath, a non-binary trans femme individual, Moodie Black has increasingly made a good name in the broader world of alternative hip-hop as well. Ever since their start in the mid-aughts, Martinez has poured the blood from fresh wounds and the residues of old struggles into this project. And, for my money, the best thing they’ve released yet is their most recent album, dropped in April, Lucas Acid. Coolzey, also from LA, makes genre-straddling hip-hop that incorporates seemingly every disparate influence of its creator. A little bit of comedy, a little bit of horror, a little bit of alt-rock and a little bit of lounge rap, plus the kitchen sink, seems to be the singular (and highly enjoyable) formula here. Other local performers, aside from Conde, include singer-songwriter and relative newcomer on the music scene, Beers 2 took on a gravity that Natalia Glenn, industrial/ Conde couldn’t have anticiQueers & Beers 4 noise experimentalist Mupated, steeling his resolve to w/ Moodie Black, tant (stylized MVTANT), pop continue his commitment to HVXVN, Coolzey, star/treasure Wayne Holtz, the series. Natalia Glenn, and and rapper D.R.O. Conde said the show “hapThe whole shebang will pened to land on the day of more. be hosted by the notorious, the Pulse nightclub massacre Free uproarious and luxxxurious and it sort of solidified what 9pm, Thurs., Sept. 27 Miss Taint, a drag queen we were doing: building a who showed up on the community for queer folk The Mix cover of the Current for our and our friends to gather 2423 N. St. Mary’s St. pride issue last year when and support each other (210) 735-1313 we showcased the alternawhile putting a spotlight tive drag community in The on art and music produced themixsa.com Alamo City. and performed by LGBTQ For Conde, the purpose of people.” this show series is simple and hopeful. Past performers have included Pink Leche, “The ultimate guiding value in this whole Alyson Alonzo, House of KENZO and other prominent local LGBTQ acts. This installment thing is to communicate that LGBTQs exist in so many different spaces and genres of music: is special in a few ways. It’s the biggest bill in rappers, experimental noise artists, pop stars, terms of number of acts, the first to feature electronic producers and so much more. The an out-of-town headliner (Moodie Black, more the world can see us as humans, the more on them in a moment), and the first to quicker they’ll start treating us as such and include LGBTQ allies on the bill. giving us the rights other humans have.” Knowing that last part might give pause to

Of Proper Bars, Dissident Noise, and Righteous Representation Queers & Beers 4 Does it Right BY JAMES COURTNEY Full disclosure: Chris Conde, who organizes and performs at this event and whom I quote in this article, is a staff writer for the San Antonio Current. But we were covering Queers & Beers before he came aboard and will continue to do so. ueers & Beers is a roving, irregularly occurring, independent music event that exists to promote community and visibility for LGBTQ acts across genres. It also aims to combat rampant stigmas surrounding the widespread perception that music by members of the LGBTQ community all sounds one particular way. In 2015, when the first edition of Queers & Beers went down, it wasn’t nearly as common (though it’s still not common enough) to see shows/music events dedicated to showcasing LGBTQ artists specifically. Show organizer and local rapper Chris Conde said the loose idea for the first Queers & Beers was just to gather together diverse local LGBTQ performers and put on an event that they could feel was for them and by them. After a successful first event, Queers &

Find more music coverage Find more news every day at sacurrent.com


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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


y a d r u t a this s• SEPTEMBER 29 ST. MARYS STRIP+BEYOND

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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1 city. 1 night. 20 stages. 60+ local bands & artists. #SAMUSICSHOWCASE

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$10 all-access wristbands @ sanantoniomusicshowcase.com

CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

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. . . s s i m dont LOCAL MUSIC, DRINK SPECIALS, GIVEAWAYS, FOOD AND VENDORS ACROSS DOZENS OF THE CITY’S HOTTEST BARS! FREE PEDICABS COURTESY

In addition to the convergence of dope local music, expect ambassadors from:

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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p u e n i l the AMP ROOM (21+) DARKWAVE / GOTH / INDUSTRIAL 10 • PHANTOM 11:15 • Spell 27 12:30 • Shadow Fashion LA BOTANICA (ALL AGES UNTIL 11 P.M., THEN 21+) DANCE / ELECTRONICA 10 • Lightwithin 11:15 • Voodoo Boogaloo 12:30 • Rivers Want THE MIX (21+) COUNTRY 10 • Michael J. & The Foxes 11:15 • Marcy Grace 12:30 • Band of Bandits VENTURA (21+) POP-ROCK 10 • Bad Heart 11:15 • The Please Help 12:30 • Nova Lux SOCIAL SPOT (21+) ALT-ROCK 10 • Fox Motel 11:15 • Razor Doves 12:30 • Celestial Descent PAPER TIGER (ALL AGES) MAIN ROOM LATIN ALTERNATIVE/CUMBIA 10 • Pochos Chidos 11:15 • Los Nahuatlatos 12:30 • Grupo Frackaso PAPER TIGER (ALL AGES) COURTYARD BEATMAKER 10 • JKNODIC 11 • Arodbeats 12 • Jonah Conrad

LIMELIGHT (21+) INDIE 10 • Optic Arrest 11:15 • Vintage Pictures 12:30 • We Leave at Midnight ATTAGIRL (ALL AGES) SINGER-SONGWRITER 10 • Rainbow Chilton 11:15 • George Garza Jr. 12:30 • Jordan Moonz GUILLOTINE (21+) METAL 10 • Pigweed 11:15 • Aeternal Requiem 12:30 • Hotzi

THE GALLERY CLUB (21+) DOORS AT 10 HIP-HOP 10:30 • The Kid Bootz 11:15 • SpyMC 12 • Chris Conde 12:45 • MAD-ONE DJ Dark Knight LA ROCA (21+) FOLK / FOLK-ROCK 10 • Yosh & Yimmy 11:15 • Sweet ‘Shine & Honey 12:30 • Jaik Yanez & The High Road

ST. MARY ST. MUSIC (ALL AGES) BEXAR PUB (21+) JAZZ/JAZZ FUSION AMERICANA / SOUTHERN ROCK 10 • Jose Amador & Terra Nova / ALT-COUNTRY 11:15 • The O-Mojica Affair 10 • Winsome Losers 12:30 • MADD WOLF 11:15 • Snowbyrd 12:30 • Claudine Meinhardt SANCHOS (21+) UPSTAIRS STAGE, JANDRO’S (21+) TEJANO / CONJUNTO INDOOR STAGE, 9 • LA 45 SURF / GARAGE / PSYCH 10 • Santiago Jimenez Jr. 10 • Flower Jesus Quartet 11:15 • Junkie SANCHOS (21+) 12:30 • Saigon Sinners DOWNSTAIRS STAGE BLUES JANDRO’S (21+) 10 • Favorite Son OUTDOOR STAGE 11:15 • Catherine Denise PUNK 12:30 • Jake Castillo Trio 10 • Lemmings 11:15 • Lloronas HI-TONES (21+) 12:30 • Yo Existo PUNK 10:30 • No Time RUMBLE (21+) 11:15 • Knockin’ Chucks SOUL / FUNK / R&B 12 • Pinata Protest 10 • The Shiny Knights (acoustic duo) 11:15 • StereoFiend 12:45 • Viet-Ruse 12:30 • Cadillac Muzik

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | fall guide

Courtesy of Rivers Want

RCA Records

Chill Out, Brah

Courtesy of Voodo Boogaloo

Festivals to look forward to as the weather cools down BY CHRIS CONDE

O

MG, y’all – what the fuck was up with summer? Can’t a bish just go for a bike ride around Southtown without fear of being asphyxiated by the hellfire that is San Antonio in the summer? There is something to say about standing outside in 90-degree heat compared to 105 whilst watching our favorite bands tear up a stage. With that in mind, we’ve put together a list of festivals to look forward to as we enter Texas’s cooler months. So stay hydrated, eat some tacos, and we’ll see y’all at these live-music gatherings.

SAN ANTONIO MUSIC SHOWCASE Friday, September 28

In its sixth year, the San Antonio Music Showcase returns to the St. Mary’s Strip (as well as a handful of venues not far from our live-music district) for a night of some of the best local talent the city has to offer. (Full disclosure: the Current is a sponsor.) From Tejano Orchestras to dreamy garage-pop to folk singer-songwriters and hip-hop, the ever-blossoming landscape of our music scene continues to impress

Clockwise from left: Childish Gambino performing at ACL; RIvers Want and Voodo Boogaloo, both performing at the San Antonio Music Showcase the hell out of us, and we’re excited to show y’all some of the dopest artists who have been in the game for a minute or have been recently making a buzz in the Alamo City. It’s hard not to be more than a little stoked to have one locals-only blowout night, and with 75+ bands slated to slay 19 venues, there’s plenty to be excited about. All you’ll need to set off on an epic exploration of the local music scene is $5 at the door or a $10 wristband, which grants you access to all 19 venues (some of which

allow minors). $5-$10, 7pm, various locations, Friday, September 28. For more information and to purchase wristbands, visit sanantoniomusicshowcase.com. Here’s the full lineup: AETERNAL REQUIEM • ARODBEATS • BAD HEART • BAND OF BANDITS • CADILLAC MUZIK • CARLY GARZA • CATHERINE DENISE • CELESTIAL DESCENT • CHRIS CONDE • DT BUFFKIN • FAVORITE SON • FLOWER JESUS QUARTET • FOX MOTEL • GEORGE GARZA JR. • GRUPO FRACKASO 55 6

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | fall guide

Courtesy of Metallica

From Left: ACL headliners Metallica, Cardi B performer at Mala Luna, Grandmaster Flash performing at UTOPiAFest Down in The Oaks 6 53 • HOTZI • JAIK YANEZ’ BAND • JAKE CASTILLO TRIO • JKNODIC • JONAH CONRAD • JORDAN MOONZ • JOSE AMADOR & TERRA NOVA • JUNKIE • KNOCKIN’ CHUCKS • LA 45 • LEMMINGS • LIGHTWITHIN • LLORONAS • LOS NAHUATLATOS • MAD-ONE • MADD WOLF • MARCY GRACE • MICHAEL J. & THE FOXES • NO TIME • NOVA LUX • OPTIC ARREST • PHANTOM • PIGWEED • PINATA PROTEST (ACOUSTIC DUO) • PM SOUL • POCHOS CHIDOS • RAZOR DOVES • RIVERS WANT • SAIGON SINNERS • SANTIAGO JIMENEZ JR. • SHADOW FASHION • SNOWBYRD • SPELL 27 • SPYMC • STEREOFIEND • SWEET ‘SHINE & HONEY • THE KID BOOTZ • THE PLEASE HELP • THE SHINY KNIGHTS • VIET-RUSE • VINTAGE PICTURES • VOODOO BOOGALOO • WE LEAVE AT MIDNIGHT • WINSOME LOSERS • YO EXISTO • YOSH & YIMMY

ACL

October 5-7, 12-14

Metallica is headed back to Texas to headline ACL, which is sort of weird and awesome since most of ACL’s headliners recently have been the likes of Radiohead, Jay-Z and Willie Nelson – not gigantic metal acts. If you’ve seen Metallica in recent

Jora Frantzis

years, you’d probably be stoked, too, since they usually play very few new songs and a shit ton of their old work, which rules if don’t really listen to anything past the Black album. Besides Metallica, the rest of the headliners include Paul McCartney, “Redbone” singer Childish Gambino, Arctic Monkeys, Travis Scott and Odesza. The full lineup is shaping up to be pretty fantastic, too, with St. Vincent, Janelle Monáe and David Byrne slated for appearances. Tickets can be purchased at aclfestival.com.

MALA LUNA October 27-28

Well, damn, Mala Luna, y’all stepped up your game pretty high. Y’all have been holding it down for a few years, bringing in acts like Travis Scott and Steve Aoki in 2016, then Lil Wayne and Future in 2017. So it’s not like super duper surprising that y’all continue to bring in higher caliber acts but... Cardi B, tho. The third annual Mala Luna returns Saturday, October 27, and Sunday, October 28 of Halloween weekend, to the Nelson Wolff Stadium parking lot with none other than

Courtesy of Grandmaster Flash

Offset’s better half, Cardi B. Alongside fellow headliners Nicky Jam, Dillon Francis and Tyler, the Creator, this is set to be (as of now) the “Bodak Yellow” singer’s first post-pregnancy performance, and we’re more than just a little stoked if you can’t tell. Tickets can be purchased at malalunamusicfestival.com.

UTOPIAFEST DOWN IN THE OAKS November 2-4

Last fall, UTOPiAfest (now called UTOPiAfest Down in The Oaks) founder Travis Sutherland bid adieu to his family’s Four Sisters Ranch at the southern tip of the Texas Hill Country in Uvalde County where the festival had been held for nine years. Organizers later revealed that the event will take up residence on a sprawling private ranch near Burnet. “Saying goodbye to our festival’s original home, Four Sister’s Ranch, never felt like an ending, but a new beginning,” Sutherland said in a press release. “To be able to expand our UTOPiAn dream and be accessible to more people is an honor. We can’t wait to create an unforgettable weekend in the Texas Hill Country.” Headliners include Grandmaster Flash, singer-songwriter Patty Griffin and Lukas Nelson, son of Willie Nelson. Tickets can be purchased at utopiafest.com.

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com

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music | music Picks of 2013’s Trill OG: The Epilogue, which was more a collection of unreleased odds and ends than a new album proper, for new work. But you can do that when you’ve reached legend status in hip-hop, something Bun B achieved way back in the 1990s as one half of the iconic duo UGK (with The late Pimp C). Last month, Bun ended the wait with the release of Return of the Trill, an excellent album that features assists from some of the brightest stars in hip-hop and beyond. Now he is back out on the road, and you have a chance to catch the OG in downtown SA. Heads and initiates alike are advised to take heed. $21, 8pm, The Rock Box, 1223 E. Houston St., (210) 677-9453, therockboxsa.com. — JC

TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE q Thursday, September 27, Friday September 28

Samantha Marble

UNIFORM, STREET SECTS, MUTANT M

BUN B j

Here’s a tasty dish for local fans of experimental/ industrial punk music. New York’s Uniform, at the top of the bill, is a duo that makes post-industrial rock with synths and programmed beats in place of a live rhythm section. The project, from two of Brooklyn’s contemporary punk masters, has what we might call a bedroom-industrial kind of vibe. Meanwhile, ATX outfit Streets Sects will be on hand to deliver delicious punishment via its harsh and noise-ensconced brand of industrial punk, complete with requisite nihilism. Rounding out the bill by way of local support, the shapeshifting act Mutant, one of our current favorites, will ply its eclectic and brash style of art punk. $10-$12, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. — James Courtney

Houston-based, Port Arthur-born rapper Bun B has been taking the slow road in terms of musical output since 2010’s Trill OG, the third installment in a tight trilogy (see what he did there?) of solo albums. Since then, the influential Southern Rap stalwart has kept fans waiting, with the exception

Wednesday, September 26

Courtesy of Bun B

Thursday, September 27

Ever since he was a child in New Orleans, Troy Andrews, better known by his stage name Trombone Shorty, has been surrounded by jazz music. Dude began playing trombone at the age of four and has hardly looked back. It’s no wonder, given this long history, that Andrews has a reputation as one of the finest young jazzmen around, with the kind of ear for the style that you might expect from someone who has lived it all his life. Despite the fact that he’s only 31 years old, Andrews has released and/ or been a part of a ton of albums, has earned the respect of old and new jazz heads alike, has garnered a reputation as a beacon of New Orleans culture and has often dedicated his talents to his philanthropic interests. As with all great jazz players, no two Trombone Shorty shows are alike. So don’t miss your chance to experience a one-of-a-kind concert this Thursday. $35, 7pm, Gruene Hall, 1281 Gruene Rd, New Braunfels, (830) 606-1281 – JC

Mathieu Bitton

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | music Picks

Courtesy of Abhi The Nomad

ABHI THE NOMAD L

Thursday, September Austin-based rapper Abhi The Nomad is a refreshing sound in the greater sphere of hip-hop. While he definitely has an indie vibe, the production level combined with his high-caliber lyricism, songwriting and, well, dope-ass beats kinda feel like a new J. Cole in the making. Not that they have similar sounds – more like, the rapper has a unique sound that very well could be commercial and reach a lot of people. It’ll be surprising if this dude doesn’t reach J. Cole status in the next few years. Also on the bill is indie R&B act Harrison Sands. $12-$14,

8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – Chris Conde

SWIMMING WITH BEARS q Friday, September 28

With well-written, soulful and eclectic tracks, and influences such as Kings of Leon and Phoenix, Swimming with Bears is an optimistic outfit that’s brimming with indie ambition. Inching out of Austin’s sprawl, the rock band managed to recruit Blue October’s Matt Noveskey to produce their debut album Paws. Shifting moods between the playfulness of Two Door Cinema Club and the twangy tendencies of Mumford

Courtesy of ADULT.

and Sons, Swimming with Bears harbors the promise of mainstream success on many fronts. $10, 6pm, Alamo City Music Hall, 1305 E. Houston St., alamocitymusichall.com. – CC

ADULT L

Friday, September 28 No one writes the soundtrack for dancing into a dark dystopian future better than Adam Lee Miller and Nicola Kuperus, better known as Adult. Since 1998, the Detroit duo has meshed drum machines, analog synthesizers and electronic/punk elements in a fashion that gained them international recognition, especially in the early 2000s. Pro tip: Wear black. $12-$14, 9pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – CC Courtesy of Demitasse

DEMITASSE 5

Saturday, September 29

Jody Domingue

If you’re not already familiar with the depressingly elegant songs of Demitasse, have you actually ever been sad before? Probably not. A side project of Buttercup’s Erik Sanden and Joe Reyes, Demitasse harnesses the somber tones of Elliott Smith while blending a mix of contemporary folk rock. The result sounds like the quieter songs on Alanis Morissette’s Jagged Little Pill. While their debut album Blue Medicine certainly had a touch more poppier elements (don’t get me wrong that album was sad as fuck, too), their latest record, Power-

couple, has tracks that show the level and depth of emotion articulated by few singer-songwriter projects we’ve heard come out of the Alamo City. Reyes and Sanden pull the listener through a “happier” melody before returning to a sad chord progression or riff. Seriously, this record has raised the bar. Powercouple drops a day before their album release show, and from what the duo have told us, the concert at the Tobin is going to be cray. $20, 8pm, The Tobin Center for the Performing Arts - Caros Alvarez Studio Theater, 100 Auditorium Circle, tobincenter.org. – CC

sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | September 26-October 2, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | calendar WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 Chris Cuevas Project Adriel Cuevas, Zeke Galvan and Chris Villanuev of the Chris Cuevas Project will perform blues, soul and jazz. Free. Sancho’s Cantina, 6:308:30pm. Daikaiju Kaiju-themed surf rock revival band from Huntsville, Alabama, now based out of Houston, usually consisting of two guitarists, a bassist, and a drummer.[1] The band formed in the winter of 1999 and first performed in January of 2000. The band has played shows across Europe, eastern Asia, and North America. As of 2018, the band is still actively touring. $5-$8. Limelight, 9pm. Frankie Roots Award-winning singer/ songwriter with a penchant for painting vivid images of late nights, lost love and the grittier side of life. Frankie plays a mix of country, rock, blues, gospel and bluegrass. Free. The Rustic, 8:30pm.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 Jazz in The Garden with Paula Maya Join us for Jazz in the Garden under the gazebo in the Japanese Tea Garden. Guests are welcomed to bring portable lawn chairs to the event. No outside food or beverages are permitted. Free. Japanese Tea Garden, 6:30-9:30pm. Landon Bullard Landon Bullard & The Mostly Sober is a country/western and Americana group based in Austin. They have provided direct support and cobilled with some of the highest-charting Texas country, Americana and Red-dirt acts including Randy Rogers, Reckless Kelly, Josh Abbott, Cody Johnson and many more. Free. The Rustic, 8:30pm. Tootie Heath Drummer Tootie Heath and his trio perform during this special event. Tootie Heath is an American jazz hard bop drummer, the brother of tenor saxophonist Jimmy Heath and the double-bassist Percy Heath. He first recorded in 1957 with John Coltrane. $35. Jazz, TX, 8:30-11:30pm.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 Austin Meade Americana blues musician Austin Meade is performing live at Floore’s. Free. John T. Floores, 9pm. Dirty River Boys Alternative Americana band the Dirty River Boys is performing live at the Tejas Rodeo Company. $12$15. Tejas Rodeo Company, 8-11:30pm. Jerry David DeCicca Jerry David DeCicca’s new album, Burning Daylight, is being released on Sept. 28 by Super Secret records. His previous album, Time the Teacher, was named Americana Album

of the Month (March, 2018) by Uncut magazine. Jerry will be touring with the support of Will Courtney for his most recent album release. Lowcountry, 10pm. Joshua Myles This local pianist, singer-songwriter will release his new EP with the support of indie rock group Noise Quota, indie rock ’n’ roll four-piece Vintage Pictures, Optic Arrest and Any Color You Like. $5. Imagine Books and Records, 8pm. The Mammoths Forming in Austin in their middle school days, David Kapsner (lead vocals/guitar/piano), Michael Jekot (lead guitar/vocals) and Tyler Rush (bass/ vocals) cross the barrier of blues-rock into funky psych-soul through their various music ventures. Free. The Rustic, 9:30pm. Micah Shalom & The Babylonians Micah Shalom & The Babylonians plays a mix of Traditional ska, roots reggae, rocksteady, and Afro-beat grooves. Lead by a full horn section, with occasional vocals by Micah Shalom and guest artists. $10. Luna, 8pm. Sam Riggs Country singer-songwriter Sam Riggs from St. Cloud, Florida, performs with the support of Chad on drums, A.D on bass and Beau on guitar. $12-$25. Cowboys Dancehall, 7pm. Skyrocket In a city known for its obsession with original music, Skyrocket is one of the most creative and inimitable cover bands ever to emerge from Austin. $15$100. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8pm.

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 Cooper Greenberg Guitarist and singer-songwriter based out of San Antonio and Austin. Influenced by a wide array of artists including Townes Van Zandt, Jeff Tweedy, Elvis Costello, Radiohead, Sturgill Simpson and more, his writing style combines intricate, guitar-driven melodies with personal, storytelling lyrics. Free. The Rustic, 12:30-2pm. The Dirty Dozen Brass Band Celebrating 40 years since their founding in 1977, New Orleans-based Dirty Dozen Brass Band has taken the traditional foundation of brass band music and incorporated it into a blend of genres including Bebop Jazz, Funk and R&B/Soul. $20$100. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8pm. Hoedown Throwdown Alamo City Music Hall is hosting a Hoedown Throwdown with an assortment of alternative rock bands. Performers will include Terrestrium, Dreamlight, Send Help and more. $10. Alamo City Music Hall & Club, 5pm-midnight. sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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I’m a 62-year-old woman. I was married for 33 years and left five years ago. We hadn’t gotten along for years, but he never stopped wanting or valuing me for sex – in spite of treating me like a household appliance and cheating on me regularly. Not long after the marriage ended, I met a guy online (my same age) who ticked nearly every box on my partner checklist – one of which was an ongoing interest in maintaining sexual relations. In the beginning, things were hot and crazy – but they cooled after a few months (going from once or twice a day to maybe once a month). Other than that, the relationship continued to grow and we enjoyed being together. I tried to carefully broach the subject, but he was not forthcoming. I’m not proud of it, but I checked his Internet history. Big surprise: LOTS OF PORN. No animals or children, but pretty much everything else, with an accent on trans. Eventually, I admitted my sleuthing and asked if his viewing habits were an indicator of his interests or the reason he had turned away from me. After the anger subsided, he explained that he had been single most of his life and had more or less gotten used to taking care of business solo. Also that the women he had been with who floated his boat sexually had been bad (crazy/unstable) in the partner department, and the good partners (me) had been less than satisfying for him in bed. The bottom line is that we are compatible in most every other area and have built a comfortable life together. We have intercourse every four to six weeks, and maybe once in between he will pleasure me. I enjoy both, and also take care of myself once a week. The struggle for me is more ego-driven. I’m no raving beauty, but I am reasonably fit and attractive for my age, and (used to) enjoy feeling desired and valued sexually. Can I get to the place of letting go of that and enjoy the rare occasions of physical congress? Sex Advice Please “Good for her for getting out of a marriage where she was treated like a ‘household appliance’ and getting back in the dating game,” said Joan Price, author of the books Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex and The Ultimate Guide to Sex After 50. “But her new relationship, while it sounds comfortable and affectionate, doesn’t sound sexually fulfilling.” This relationship doesn’t just sound unfulfilling sexually, SAP, it sounds infuriating generally. You entered into this relationship under false pretenses. You let your partner know that “an ongoing interest in maintaining sexual relations” was a priority for you, and he allowed you to believe it was a priority for him. In fairness to him, SAP, he may not have known himself to be incapable of sustaining a strong

sexual connection, seeing as he’s been single for most of his life. But even if he wasn’t aware he couldn’t meet your needs then, that doesn’t change the fact that you aren’t valued/fucked the way you want to be valued/fucked now. “I think her best option is to stay friends with this guy but start dating and having sex with others,” said Price. “She could continue to have occasional sex with this man if they both agree to a nonexclusive, friends-with-benefits arrangement. Or they could become platonic pals, if that’s better for them. But it’s imperative that she talk candidly with him.” You write that you tried to “carefully broach the subject, but he was not forthcoming,” but Price wonders whether you were forthcoming yourself. “‘Carefully broach’ usually means ‘I was vague,’” said Price. “Suppose, instead, she said, ‘I really value you, but I don’t think we’re well-matched sexually. How can we adjust our relationship so we’re not putting sexual pressure on each other and we’re both free to find other sexual outlets?’” Your partner has an outlet that works for him and pretty much meets all his needs – porn and his own hand – but you don’t have an outlet that provides you with the feeling of being desired and valued sexually. Watching porn and/or “taking care of yourself” isn’t going to meet your needs. So the question is this: Do you have to exit this loving relationship to get your needs met, or can you stay with your current partner, a man who meets your emotional and social needs, while getting your sexual needs met elsewhere? “SAP deserves a partner who matches her sexually,” said Price. And I agree. If you’re telling yourself that you’ll have to settle for someone who claims he can’t perform for you because you’re not unstable enough to turn him on – you do realize that compliment he paid you (you’re so good!) was actually a dishonest bit of blame-shifting/ responsibility-dodging, right? – then you’re selling yourself short. “I know from personal experience and from the swelling of my inbox that many of us find hot, fabulous sexual partners in our 60s, 70s, and beyond,” said Price. “It’s never too late. She shouldn’t settle for sex that’s less than satisfying, and neither should he. If that means she looks for new partners and he returns to his solo pleasure with the porn he prefers and the hand that knows him best, they might both be happier.” Follow Joan Price on Twitter @JoanPrice. She blogs about sex and aging at NakedAtOurAge.com.

mail@savagelove.net @FakeDanSavage on Twitter www.ITMFA.org

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“Starch Search”– carbitrarily speaking. ACROSS 1 Address for a general, sometimes 5 Mythical flyer 11 Zig’s counterpart 14 Both, at the beginning 15 EGOT winner Rita 16 Part of SUV, for short 17 Internet addict, slangily 19 Christmas tree sale site 20 Quirkily creative 21 Mess up 22 Bellybutton lint 23 “___, about that ...” 26 It’s picked in Maui 28 Pacific salmon 31 Irish singer with the albums “O” and “9” 37 Isaac’s older son 38 “I ___ the opinion ...” 39 Email receptacle 40 ___ Soundsystem 41 Publisher within a publisher 43 Martinique, par exemple 44 Weird Al song that states “I don’t care if you’re full” 46 ___ & Roy (2018 HBO kids’ show from Sesame Workshop) 47 Kingpin 48 Ate (together) 50 E, on a map 51 Cassowary’s kin 52 WWI battle river through Flanders

54 Bluish green 57 Man-made (abbr.) 60 Hidden loot 64 Vehicle where the driver gets thanked 65 Short horror tales shared on the Internet 68 Mason jar’s topper 69 Petting zoo noise 70 Leaning type (abbr.) 71 Letter from Greece? 72 Atomizer amount 73 The Godfather composer ___ Rota DOWN 1 The middle-sized bear 2 Love, in Latin 3 Border (on) 4 Text to an s.o. while away on a trip, maybe 5 Mischievous one 6 Pigeon sound 7 “Laugh-In” comedian Johnson 8 Hitchcock’s ___ Window 9 Trumped-up 10 Great Lakes’ ___ Canals 11 One of South Africa’s official languages 12 The whole thing 13 “The Girl From Ipanema” saxophonist 18 Evil ___ 22 Frond-bearing plant 24 Devine of Pitch Perfect

25 Laundry container 27 Like a brow, at times 28 Talk show guest, often 29 November follower? 30 Was forced 32 Colin Dexter’s crossword-solving inspector 33 “Excuse me, but ...” 34 Majorca’s neighbor 35 Fizzy drinks 36 Go all out 41 Couple, to tabloids 42 “Grey Cell Green” band ___ Atomic Dustbin 45 Furniture store to meander through 47 Sure 49 False accusation 53 Zener cards test for it 54 Up to it 55 Back out 56 Abbr. on meat packages 58 Coulrophobia, e.g. 59 Mazar of Entourage 61 ___ spumante (sparkling wine) 62 Obsessive fan 63 Xbox series since 2001 65 Network that’s now Les-less 66 Wheel of Fortune host Sajak 67 Nickname of a Red Sox Hall-ofFamer ANSWER ON PAGE 19

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etc FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZNY Editor’s Note: We inadvertently published this week’s Free Will Astrology column in the September 19 issue. We’re re-running it in this issue – the correct one.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you have any skills at living on the edge between the light and the dark? Are you curious about what the world might look like and how people would treat you if you refused to divide everything up into that which helps you and that which doesn’t help you? Can you imagine how it would feel if you loved your life just the way it is and not wish it were different from what it is? Please note: people less courageous than you might prefer you to be less courageous. But I hope you’ll stay true to the experiment of living on the edge between the light and the dark. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to Popbitch.com, most top-charting pop songs are in a minor key. In light of this fact, I encourage you to avoid listening to pop songs for the next three weeks. In my astrological opinion, it’s essential that you surround yourself with stimuli that don’t tend to make you sad and blue, that don’t influence you to interpret your experience through a melancholic, mournful filter. To accomplish the assignments that life will be sending you, you need to at least temporarily cultivate a mood of crafty optimism. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini regent Queen Victoria (1819–1901) wore crotchless underwear made of linen. A few years ago, Britain’s Museums, Libraries, and Archives Council accorded them “national designated status,” an official notice that means they are a national treasure. If I had the power, I would give your undergarments an equivalent acknowledgment. The only evidence I would need to make this bold move would be the intelligence and expressiveness with which you are going to wield your erotic sensibilities in the coming weeks. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’ve taken a break from socializing, my fellow Cancerian. In fact, I’m on sabbatical from my regular rhythm. My goal for the coming days is to commune with my past and review the story of my life. Rather than fill my brain up with the latest news and celebrity gossip, I am meditating on my own deep dark mysteries. I’m mining for secrets that I might be concealing from myself. In accordance with the astrological omens, I suggest that you follow my lead. You might want to delve into boxes of old mementoes or reread emails from years ago. You could get in touch with people who are no longer part of your life even though they were once important to you. How else could you get into intimate contact with your eternal self?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here’s a quote from A Map of Misreading, a book by renowned literary critic, Harold Bloom: “Where the synecdoche of tessera made a totality, however illusive, the metonymy of kenosis breaks this up into discontinuous fragments.” What the cluck did Harold Bloom just say?! I’m not being anti-intellectual when I declare this passage to be pretentious drivel. In the coming days, I urge you Leos to draw inspiration from my response to Bloom. Tell the truth about nonsense. Don’t pretend to appreciate jumbled or over-complicated ideas. Expose bunk and bombast. Be kind, if you can, but be firm. You’re primed to be a champion of down-toearth communication. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A data research company, Priceonomics, suggests that Monday is the most productive day of the week and that October is the most productive month of the year. My research suggests that while Capricorns tend to be the most consistently productive of all the signs in the zodiac, Virgos often outstrip them for a six-week period during the end of each September and throughout October. Furthermore, my intuition tells me that you Virgos now have an extraordinary capacity to turn good ideas into practical action. I conclude, therefore, that you are about to embark on a surge of industrious and high-quality work. (P.S.: This October has five Mondays.) LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Biologists are constantly unearthing new species, although not new in the sense of having just appeared on our planet. In fact, they’re animals and plants that have existed for millennia. But they’ve never before been noticed and identified by science. Among recent additions to our ever-growing knowledge are an orchid in Madagascar that smells like champagne, an electric blue tarantula in the Guyana rain forest, and a Western Australian grass that has a flavor resembling salt and vinegar potato chips. I suspect you’ll be making metaphorically comparable discoveries in the coming weeks, Libra: evocative beauty that you’ve been blind to and interesting phenomena that have been hiding in plain sight.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you were ever going to win a contest that awarded you a free vacation to an exotic sanctuary, it would probably happen during the next three weeks. If a toy company would ever approach you about developing a line of action figures and kids’ books based on your life, it might also be sometime soon. And if you have ever had hopes of converting your adversaries into allies, or getting support and backing for your good original ideas, or finding unexpected inspiration to fix one of your not-so-good habits, those opportunities are now more likely than they have been for some time. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): An 81-year-old Capricorn man named James Harrison has donated his unique blood on 1,173 occasions. Scientists have used it to make medicine that prevents Rhesus disease in unborn babies, thereby healing more than 2.4 million kids and literally saving thousands of lives. I don’t expect you to do anything nearly as remarkable. But I do want to let you know that the coming weeks will be a favorable time to lift your generosity and compassion to the next level. Harrison would serve well as your patron saint. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): On a spring morning some years ago, a smoky aroma woke me from a deep sleep. Peering out my bedroom win-

dow into the backyard, I saw that my trickster girlfriend Anastasia had built a bonfire. When I stumbled to my closet to get dressed, I found my clothes missing. There were no garments in my dresser, either. In my groggy haze, I realized that my entire wardrobe had become fuel for Anastasia’s conflagration. It was too late to intervene, and I was still quite drowsy, so I crawled back in bed to resume snoozing. A while later, I woke to find her standing next to the bed bearing a luxurious breakfast she said she’d cooked over the flames of my burning clothes. After our meal, we stayed in bed all day, indulging in a variety of riotous fun. I’m not predicting that similar events will unfold in your life, Aquarius. But you may experience adventures that are almost equally boisterous, hilarious, and mysterious. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’ve got three teachings for you. 1. Was there a time in your past when bad romance wounded your talent for love? Yes, but you now have more power to heal that wound than you’ve ever had before. 2. Is it possible you’re ready to shed a semi-delicious addiction to a chaotic magic? Yes. Clarity is poised to trump melodrama. Joyous decisiveness is primed to vanquish ingrained sadness. 3. Has there ever been a better time than now to resolve and graduate from past events that have bothered and drained you for a long time? No. This is the best time ever.

THIS MODERN WORLD BY TOM TOMORROW

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There is no such thing as a plant that blooms continuously. Phases of withering and dormancy are just as natural as phases of growth. I bring this fact to your attention to help you remain poised as you go through your own period of withering followed by dormancy. You should accept life’s demand that you slow down and explore the mysteries of fallowness. You should surrender sweetly to stasis and enjoy your time of rest and recharging. That’s the best way to prepare for the new cycle of growth that will begin in a few weeks. sacurrent.com | September 26-October 2, 2018 | CURRENT

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Go Orange To Fight Hunger! WHAT IS HUNGER ACTION MONTH? Food insecurity is a reality for many in Southwest Texas. To combat this issue, the San Antonio Food Bank is participating in Feeding America’s nationwide Hunger Action Month campaign designed to mobilize the public to take action on the issue of hunger.

It’s a month to spread the word and dedicate ourselves to a solution. Without awareness of a problem, people can not take action to remedy it. Any action – big or small – makes a real difference in the lives of food insecure neighbors in our community. Together, we are solving hunger!

WILL YOU TAKE ACTION?

GIVE FOOD

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Profile for Euclid Media Group

San Antonio Current – September 26, 2018  

Fall Guide 2018

San Antonio Current – September 26, 2018  

Fall Guide 2018