Page 1

S P U R S 2 0 1 9 2 0S C H E D U L E

U N V E ILE D

T I C K E T SO NS A L EN O W


we buy games we pay cash for your cds,dvds, blu-rays, games & game hardware

803 sw military | 928-3471 13486 us 281 | 545-3472

3 Room Packages See our current packages online on our website! Starting at $597+ | Multiple styles & sets to choose from

6997 bandera rd | 509-3472 5253 walzem | 650-3472

order today at

bigdansfurniture.com

Ton’s of Furniture & Mattresses In STOCK NOW! Monday - Saturday 10A-7P | Sunday - 12P-6P

Veteran and Active Military Discounts in Store Daily

9861 ih-10 west | 641-1600 6900 san pedro | 826-2662

6 SAN ANTONIO LOCATIONS | CDEXCHANGE-SA.COM

BUY SELL TRADE

8118 Interchange Pkwy San Antonio, TX 78218 - (210) 540-6874

CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLURAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLURAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLURAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLURAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES ACCESSORIES V I D E O G A MVINYL E S | H RECORDS A R D W A R E CDS | A C CDVDS E S S O RBLU-RAYS I E S | V I N Y4K L R VIDEO E C O R D SGAMES | C D S HARDWARE | DVDS 6 S A N A N T O N I O L O C A T I O N S | C D E X C H A N G E S A . C O M VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K VIDEO GAMES HARDWARE ACCESSORIES VINYL RECORDS CDS DVDS BLU-RAYS 4K

4

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


in this issue San Antonio Current

Issue 19_17 /// August 14-27, 2019

Now’s the Time

Publisher: Michael Wagner Editor-in-Chief: Sanford Nowlin

The near East Side offers drinking options, but visit before gentrification changes its character

Editorial

Food & Nightlife Editor: Lea Thompson Calendar Editor: Kelly Merka Nelson Contributing Arts Editor: Bryan Rindfuss Art Director: Carlos Aguilar Staff Writer: Chris Conde Digital Content Editor: Sarah Martinez Contributors: Ron Bechtol, Daniel Conrad, James Courtney, Jade Esteban Estrada, Dan R. Goddard, Lance Higdon, Steven G. Kellman, Hannah Lorence, Kiko Martinez, M. Solis, Gary Sweeney Editorial Interns: Diana Amaya, Brian Holmes, Georgie Riggs

The Take Away: 10 Minutes with Cocktail Blogger Erin Winch Stir Up Super Summer Spritzes: No Aperol Required

Advertising

Sales Manager: Joseph Allen Account Manager: Mallory Jochen Account Executives: April Miller, Mike Valdelamar Digital Sales Specialist: Mike Valdelamar

47 Music

Marketing and Events

Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni Events Manager: Chelsea Bourque Event Coordinator: Mallory Jochen

Panic Division’s Synth-Soaked New Album Lands at No. 1 on iTunes’ Electronic Charts

Creative Services

Creative Services Manager: Tina Corbeil Graphic Designer: Samantha Serna Graphic Design Interns: Ernesto Guajardo, Pedro Macias, Michelle Moreno, Shelby Pintor

Circulation

Circulation Manager: Justin Giles

Business

Vinyl Haven

Business Manager: Sonia Acosta

Euclid Media Group

Chief Executive Officer: Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers: Chris Keating, Michael Wagner VP of Digital Services: Stacy Volhein Creative Director: Tom Carlson Digital Operations Coordinator: Jaime Monzon Senior Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni Director of Digital Sales: Fran DiCarlo www.euclidmediagroup.com National Advertising: Voice Media Group (888) 278-9866, vmgadvertising.com San Antonio Current 915 Dallas San Antonio, Texas 78215 sacurrent.com Editorial: (210) 227-0044 / Fax - (210) 227-7755 Display Advertising: (210) 227-0044 Fax: (210) 227-7733 Classified: (210) 227-CLAS / Fax - (210) 227-7733 The San Antonio Current is published by Euclid Media Group Verified Audit Member San Antonio Distribution – The Current is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Get listed 1. Visit sacurrent.com 2. Click “Calendar” and then “Submit an Event” 3. Follow the steps to submit your event details Please allow 48 hours for review and approval. Event submissions are not accepted by phone. Copyright: The entire contents of the San Antonio Current are copyright 2019 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions: Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Current offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125.

Bryan Wheeler

23 Feature

Creative Catalyst

Music Listings

New arrival Jeff Wheeler is firing up the San Antonio art scene

BY K E L LY M E R K A N E L SO N

09 News

Homegrown Hate

The number of hate groups in Texas has doubled since 2014

Crossword Puzzl

From the Projects to the Runway

Rasquache-inspired designer Agosto Cuellar takes his next leap

33 Screens

Paid Sick Time Delay Is the City’s Latest Grand Bargain with Business Groups

Snake Pulpit

Our top picks for the week, This Modern World

56 Etc

27 Arts

Liz Wahl, the Cable News Anchor Who Resigned On-Air, Wants to Bring a Global Perspective to District 23

14 Calendar

East Coast brothers’ Crazy Rhythms Records trades on their eclectic tastes

Take Shelter

Post-apocalyptic drama Light of My Life benefits from a genuine father-daughter relationship Them That Follow is plenty somber, but the story of religious zealotry lacks bite

35 Food

Old World Charm

Long-awaited neighborhood bar Pastiche bringing Europe flair to the East Side

On The Cover: This week’s cover features an original collage piece by Jeff Wheeler, the visual artist who recently took over as creative director of The South Side development. Art Direction: Tracie Louck


NORRIS CONFERENCE CENTER | 11 AM - 6 PM A day long cannabis + CBD event featuring industry Q+A’s, expert speakers and panels, interactive wellness and fitness classes, CBD-infused food and drinks, a canna-curated marketplace and so much more.

Buy Flash Sale Tickets Now at greenseedtexas.com

6

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


sacurrent.com  |  August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT  7 


2019

Tour de Las Misiones Bike Ride - Walk - Run

Saturday, September 7 - 8 a.m. Mission Park Pavilion - 6030 Padre Dr. The Tour de Las Misiones is a one of a kind opportunity to visit and learn about the historic San Antonio Missions. The first 600 par�cipants are guaranteed to receive a commemora�ve finishers medal, bib, passport and T-shirt.

Narrated Bike Ride Tour: • 22-mile op�on visits the 5 missions • 14-mile op�on visits Mission Concepcion, The Alamo and Mission San Jose • 7-mile family ride op�on visits Mission San Jose and Mission San Juan 5K and 10K Walk: Enjoy a walk through the scenic River Walk: Mission Reach and Mission San Jose. Mission Pachanga Immediately following the Tour de Las Misiones Bike Ride Tour, Walk, and Run, par�cipants and the surrounding community can enjoy music, food and refreshments.

Register now at www.WorldHeritageFes�val.org

8

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


news

Marek Peters

Homegrown Hate

The number of hate groups in Texas has doubled since 2014 BY SANFORD NOWLIN The suspected gunman in the recent El Paso mass shooting is reported to have written in an online manifesto that his action was a response to a “Hispanic invasion of Texas.” And research suggests the alleged shooter, who resided in a Dallas suburb, isn’t the only Texan holding extreme and potentially violent views on race and ethnicity.  The number of hate groups in the Lone Star State reached 73 last year, more than double the total just four years earlier, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist organizations.  Virtually all of Texas’ major cities are home to at least one hate group, and 14 operate statewide, according to SPLC’s online “hate map.” The groups on the list range from those with anti-Muslim and anti-LGBTQ views to white nationalists and Holocaust deniers.  At least two of those groups are headquartered in San Antonio, according to SPLC, and others have chapters here. Extremist organizations also operate in nearby communities such as Pleasanton, Boerne and Kerrville.  The growth of hate groups in the Lone Star State mirrors a nationwide trend — and one that tracks with Donald Trump’s appearance

as a presidential candidate, SPLC officials said. “These extremist ideas aren’t new, but Trump gives credence to them,” said Heidi Beirich, who heads the SPLC’s Intelligence Project. “When people who hold these views hear the president repeating them, they feel like they’re in the right.” As a candidate, Trump used derogatory language to describe Mexicans and threatened to ban Muslims from entering the United States. As president, he’s frequently used terms such as “invasion” and “infestation” to describe the arrival of immigrants, emboldening Americans with extremist views, SPLC officials say. In 2018, the number of hate groups SPLC is tracking countrywide rose for the fourth consecutive year — a cumulative 30% increase that coincides with the start of the last presidential campaign. Hate crimes also have risen by roughly the same amount during that period, reversing three years of declines, according to the group.   However, the emergence of Trump and other far-right figures in mainstream politics aren’t the sole reasons for the rise, Beirich said. The spread of extremist messages on

the internet has also coincided with law enforcement’s post-9/11 shift away from focusing on domestic terrorism. In perhaps the clearest sign of that trend, Trump’s Department of Homeland Security in April shut down its Right-Wing Intelligence Unit, which investigates homegrown terror groups. Texas rates as one of the states with the largest number of hate groups. Its count of hate groups exceeds that of its neighbors, including Louisiana, which has 21 such groups, and New Mexico, which has none. Even so, Beirich cautions not to read too much into those numbers. Texas isn’t among the states with the most groups per capita. Sparsely populated Idaho, Montana and South Dakota, for example, have a higher concentration. And the proliferation of hate on the internet has given people access to hate groups no matter where they live. “Whether or not there’s a hate group in your community, they’re littered all over the web,” she said. Indeed, the internet has allowed hate groups to appear larger than they actually are, said Aaron Delwiche, a Trinity University professor who’s studied propaganda in the digital age. He points to the groups’ use of online tools like bots and fake Twitter accounts to make themselves appear ubiquitous. After the deadly right-wing demonstration in Charlottesville, Virginia, two years ago, tech companies took steps to rein in extremist content, a move applauded by SPLC and other groups. However, hate speech still lives on in places such as Gab and 8chan. What’s more, as last week’s attempted mosque shooting in Norway illustrates, white supremacist violence isn’t limited to the United States. According to Delwiche, the global nature of the right-wing hate movement gives U.S. extremists access to propaganda that need not originate in their community, much less in their country. “We’re looking at a resurgent, racist white internationalist movement that’s active throughout the world,” Delwiche said. “It’s terrifying because it transcends national boundaries.” Ultimately, the only way to counter hate groups’ spread is to develop counternarratives that steer disaffected young people away from their messages, Delwiche said. Schools, cities and community groups also must do a better job of teaching media literacy to young people. The El Paso incident, coupled with recent mass shootings at a Pittsburgh synagogue and a New Zealand mosque point out the urgency for prioritizing both efforts, Delwiche said. “There may have been a time when someone could argue that these violent incidents were disconnected,” he said. “But, in 2019, after these massacres in Texas, Pittsburgh and New Zealand, we’ve passed that moment. That argument is no longer persuasive.”

Find more newsmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


news

Jade Esteban Estrada

GLITTER POLITICAL

Liz Wahl, the Cable News Anchor Who Resigned On-Air, Wants to Bring a Global Perspective to District 23 BY JADE ESTEBAN ESTRADA

F

ormer cable news anchor and current congressional candidate Liz Wahl argues that the internet has ushered out an uninformed age but replaced it with an era of misinfor-

mation. As a Democrat vying to represent Texas’ 23rd District, Wahl hopes that speaking out against Russian disinformation, which she believes has sewn “chaos and division within our country,” will resonate with the voters of the sprawling district that runs from San Antonio along two-thirds of the U.S.-Mexico border. It’s a quiet Thursday afternoon when I sit down with Wahl in a conference room at talk radio station KTSA 550. With a rich and clear voice, the first-time political candidate speaks about her primary challenge to Gina Ortiz Jones, who narrowly lost a 2018 race against Republican incumbent Will Hurd. Wahl, 34, a San Antonio resident, was born into a military family at Subic Naval Base in the Philippines and grew up in Connecticut. Her adolescent interest in hearing other people’s stories blossomed into a career in broadcast journalism. That led to a job at a 10

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

television station in Saipan, the largest of the Northern Mariana Islands, where she covered local government and regional news. In 2011, she accepted a job at the RT Television Network, a U.S.-based cable news outlet funded by the Russian government. After about two years on the job, war erupted in Ukraine and Russia intervened. “We were told to skew the story,” she says. “That’s when it was like, ‘OK, this is not another point of view, this is propaganda.’”  To take a stand, Wahl resigned on air. Over the next 24 hours, the video went viral and guest requests from cable news shows poured in. The demand was overwhelming. “I mean, I turned down the Today Show,” she says. “I just couldn’t do everything.” Wahl’s dramatic departure was both celebrated and criticized. Abby Martin, a former RT colleague, has blasted Wahl’s on-air resignation as a publicity stunt engineered by Bill Kristol’s Foreign Policy Initiative think tank, for example. The View’s Barbara Walters also had choice words:

“Don’t make [Wahl] a hero for protesting. She [was] working for the [Russian] government.” However, after interviewing Wahl, Walters gave her a winning on-air endorsement for her future job search. Citing the 2016 presidential election, Wahl says Russian disinformation has become an even greater threat. After watching this “assault on truth,” she says she could no longer be a neutral observer, so she decided to run for office. “I have the newcomer disadvantage,” Wahl says, acknowledging that Jones’ high name ecognition will be a hurdle for any competing campaign. I tell Wahl about the time I asked Judge Karen Crouch why she thought law was important. Her answer — “because it prevents chaos” — still echoes in my mind. I ask Wahl why she thinks truth is important.  “Truth is the foundation for thriving democracies,” she says after a thoughtful pause. “Agreeing on essential facts [is] how we’ve been able to make progress as a civilization — scientifically, socially, medically — in every important area of life. We now live in an age where people create their own truths. And that’s scary.” If Wahl brings a global perspective to the District 23 race, she won’t be the first. Hurd, who recently announced he wouldn’t seek reelection in 2020, is a former CIA operative who served on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. While Wahl’s outlook could be advantageous in the general election, her current task is to defeat frontrunner Jones — a former Air Force intelligence officer — in the March primary.  To distinguish herself in a divided party, Wahl describes herself as a “pragmatic Democrat.” “I would love to be able to work with Republicans,” she explains. “I’m a strong anti-Trumpist, because I don’t think he’s representative of conservative values for the Republican Party. Right now, the GOP has made its transition to the far right, and I don’t think swinging to the far, far left is going to be the answer.” Wahl says the federal government needs to address pressing issues such as healthcare and immigration reform. However, she says she will push for policies that are politically feasible. When I ask her what three issues people have told her they’re most concerned about, she counters by asking me if I mean the people in District 23 or the people she’s met during her international travels. And this is where Wahl, not unlike like Hurd and Jones, demonstrates a global mindset towards political affairs and policy — a view that’s given her an audience wider than just the district she’s vying to represent. This summer, for instance, Wahl spoke at a peace conference in The Hague in the Netherlands. She also addressed members of Canada’s Parliament on foreign interference in the digital era. Her focus now, though, is on the people of District 23. If Wahl can use the Barbara Walters endorsement to help defeat Jones in the upcoming primary, she’ll have the opportunity to be the one thing Texas Democrats love more than raspas, cumbia music and one-time YouTube celebs.


MOSWOS-current-9.75x10.6875-updateAd-PRINT.pdf

1

8/8/19

12:50 PM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

CATCH THEM BEFORE THEY FLY AWAY

Only through September 1, 2019 Men of Steel, Women of Wonder is organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas., This exhibition is is generously funded by The Brown Foundation, Inc. and, The Elizabeth Huth Coates Charitable Foundation of 1992., This exhibition is supported by the City of San Antonio’s Department of Arts & Culture. Mel Ramos, Wonder Woman (detail), 1962, Oil on canvas, 50 x 44 in., Rochelle and Darren Leininger Family Collection; Fahamu Pecou, Nunna My Heros: After Barkley Hendricks’ ‘Icon for My Man Superman,’ 1969 (detail), 2011, Acrylic, gold leaf, and oil stick on canvas, 63 x 49 1/2 in. (160 x 125.7 cm), Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University., Gift of Marjorie and Michael Levine, 2012.8.1. © Fahamu Pecou., Photo by Peter Paul Geoffrion.

200 West Jones Avenue | samuseum.org sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

11


VOTED BEST CBD STORE IN SAN ANTONIO PLANT BASED HEALTH & WELLNESS VISIT OUR TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 645 FLORAL AVE. STE.A, NEW BRAUNFELS, TX 78130 | 19141 STONE OAK PKWY #301, SA, TX 7825

12

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


news

City Scrapes

Paid Sick Time Delay Is the City’s Latest of Grand Bargain with Business Groups BY HEYWOOD SANDERS Editor’s Note: The following is City Scrapes, a column of opinion and analysis.  San Antonio is waiting on the sick leave ordinance. Yet again. Just to replay the story: in June 2018, the Texas Organizing Project and MOVE Texas presented city council with almost 145,000 signatures on petitions to put a mandatory paid sick leave proposal on the ballot last November. That was, of course, the same election where the charter changes pressed by the city’s fire union would be on the ballot. So rather than put the sick leave measure on the ballot, where it might attract support from voters who would also back the firefighters’ charter revisions, Mayor Ron Nirenberg and council cynically adopted the sick leave measure by ordinance last August. The council’s vote on paid sick leave neatly kept the issue off the ballot. But our elected officials also recognized the substantial opposition to the sick leave proposal from local business interests and chambers of commerce. They assumed, as did many observers, that the state legislature would pass legislation blocking the sick leave requirement, or that the courts would find it in violation of state law on the minimum wage. A year ago, we were supposed to get paid sick leave. The state legislature never intervened. But now, the city has stalled once again, with the argument from the city attorney that the ordinance needs to be negotiated and improved. Nirenberg has professed his backing for paid sick leave. Yet he effectively did nothing to halt the delay. For some observers, it’s a failure of mayoral leadership. And Nirenberg often appears to come up short compared to predecessors Henry Cisneros (Sea World! Alamodome!), Phil Hardberger (Main Plaza! Hardberger Park!) and Julian Castro (Pre-K4SA!). Nirenberg’s climate action effort increasingly resembles a plan for climate inaction, with lots of nice-sounding rhetoric and no real effort to deal with the continuing development sprawl that leads to more driving and greater emissions. Indeed, just a few months ago, our mayor was in Washington, pleading for federal dollars to widen I-35 with the argument that without more highway funds, growth might be stifled in “America’s next great metropolis.” So, let’s be real about what’s going on. For decades, this community has operated on the basis of a grand bargain. There could be modest improvements in some local public policies — think Pre-K — as long as two central tenets demanded by San Antonio’s business leadership were sustained: continuing support

Twitter / @MOVE_texas

for outlying growth (and the land speculation and development that has made some locals wealthy) and low wages (and poor benefits) for the working population. There have been some occasional advances. The COPS/Metro organization has successfully pressed for higher base wages for city and county employees. And on the environmental front, we do have a loophole-filled tree ordinance and a very nice creekway system. Yet all too often, local business appears to dictate the limits of public policy, whether it’s over bargaining with the police and fire unions, the content of the city’s capital improvement program, spending on the Alamodome (and the persistent search for an

NFL team) or neatly shifting the city’s property tax revenues to favor public building projects over basic city services. What we really need now is a city council with some backbone and recognition of basic fairness to working people — and the ability to actually hear what almost 150,000 residents have asked for. We are not going to be “America’s next great metropolis” with a low-wage and low-benefits workforce and mile after mile of spread-out, low-density subdivisions, nearly identical strip shopping centers and convenience stores. Heywood Sanders is a professor of public policy at the University of Texas at San Antonio. sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

13


THEATER

FRI | 8/16 – SUN | 8/18

DREAMERS, PAYASAS, Y LA FRONTERA FRONTIER

A direct response to the crisis on the US-Mexico border and its ripple effect throughout America, Marisela Barrera’s two-act play interprets the lives of immigrants who have escaped north into San Antonio and those who are still struggling in detention centers. The first act, “PAYASA USA,” tells the story of a mother from Mexico City and her 14 yearold Dreamer daughter — played by Barrera’s own daughter — who prepare for a pivotal performance at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center as clowns, accompanied by music from Jaime Ramirez, who happens to be a former music director for Barnum & Bailey Circus. The second act, “FRONTERA FRONTIER,” goes south to the Rio Grande Valley, drawing inspiration from Barrera’s time interviewing refugees and ICE agents alike. She performs an interpretive commentary gathered from the various characters she met at the border, such as nuns, public defenders, water station replenishers and refugees. Attendees may choose their ticket price for the 70-minute show, which has no intermission. $10-$20, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 5 p.m. Sunday, Jump-Start Performance Co., 710 Fredericksburg Rd., (210) 227-5867, jump-start.org. — BW Siggi Ragnar

THU | 8/15 FILM

LAND OF MILK AND FUNNY

Jewish comedian Avi Liberman’s documentary film Land of Milk and Funny follows his crusade to bring quality stand-up shows to Israel. Featuring comedians like Craig Robinson, Gary Gulman and Dan Naturman, the film chronicles their time navigating

the Middle Eastern country and performing to raise money for the Koby Mandell Foundation, which assists families who have lost loved ones to terror and other tragedies. Alternating between footage of the comedians fumbling through sandy ruins and delivering witty one-liners onstage, Land of Milk and Funny interprets the complicated existence of Israel through a comedic lens. $8-$10, 7 p.m., Barshop Jewish Community Center, 12500 N.W. Military Highway, (210) 302-6820, jccsanantonio.org. — BW

Paramount Pictures

THU | 8/15 FILM

GREASE L

Grab your poodle skirts and saddle shoes, because Grease is coming back to the big screen. Slab Cinema is playing America’s most beloved musical in the perfect setting: the former Mission Marquee Drive-In Theatre. The 1978 boy-meets-girl story unfolds at a ’50s high school, where Sandy, a wholesome transfer student from Australia, and Danny, the leader of the T-Birds greaser gang, fall in love after engaging in a casual summer fling. Their story becomes more complicated when Sandy’s family decides to stay in America and she enrolls at Danny’s school. Danny’s bad-boy attitude and habits clash with Sandy’s good-girl persona, and the star-crossed lovers must find a way to defy high school-fabricated social boundaries. Summer days are drifting away, so it might feel right to spend a summer night with the T-Birds and the Pink Ladies. Free, 8-11 p.m., Mission Marquee Plaza, 3100 Roosevelt Ave, (210) 212-9373, slabcinema.com. — Brittany Wagner 14

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

Michael Garcia / Nervys Photos


‘YOUR SLIPPERY BODY; FROM BETWEEN MY FINGERS’ @ MANTLE ART SPACE

In “Your Slippery Body; from between my fingers,” Ghislane Fremaux foregrounds the traditional relationship of artist and model with an emphasis on consent and individual agency. Rather than instruct or pose her subjects, Fremaux captures them candidly, from the natural bends and folds of each body to a gentle smile playing across a woman’s lips. The massive drawings draw viewers in with gestural strokes enhanced by brightly colored chalk, fixed into place with glossy resin. They neither gloss over perceived flaws nor exaggerate any features, instead celebrating the natural lines, folds and curves that make human bodies what they are. Free, 6-9 p.m., Mantle Art Space, 714 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 971-4740, mantleartspace. com. — Kelly Merka Nelson

calendar

ART

Courtesy of Tobin Center for the Performing Arts

SAT | 8/17 Ghislaine Fremaux

THU | 8/22

SAT | 8/17

COMEDY

KRISTINA KUZMIČ L

SPECIAL EVENT

BRICKADELIC VINTAGE MARKET: END THE BACKLOG VINTAGE MARKET a

A recurring staple at Brick, the Brickadelic Vintage Market is back for more this month with a special event supporting the San Antonio Rape Crisis Center and the Joyful Foundation’s End the Backlog initiative, which seeks to eliminate the massive number of untested rape kits nationwide. More than 30 vendors will participate, including familiar faces such as the Mermaid Farm and Foxx Boxx Vintage, as well as special pop-ups including podcast and “thrift box” subscription service Thrift Therapy. Check out a retro arcade area dreamed up by Diamond Eyes Printing and Ramsey Island, snack on treats from Cereal Killer Sweets and enjoy music by Alyson Alonzo, the Shores of Orion and more. Plus, you can help bust open a giant piñata donated by Feliz Modern or take your chance at winning rad prizes from the night’s raffle. Full disclosure: San Antonio Current music writer Chris Conde will also be performing at this event. $5 suggested donation, 6-11:30 p.m., Brick at Blue Star, 108 Blue Star, (210) 2628653, facebook.com/brickadelic. — KMN

Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, she’s also been doing the late-night rounds for years now, popping up on Conan O’Brien, Jay Leno and Stephen Colbert’s talk shows as well as making regular appearances on the Chelsea Lately roundtable. Later this month, Kirkman is bringing her sarcastic style and lengthy anecdotes to the Tobin Center. Unlike her two Netflix specials — 2015’s I’m Gonna Die Alone (And I Feel Fine) and 2017’s Just Keep Livin’? — this latest hour isn’t yet streaming, which means the Alamo City performance will be unspoiled, spontaneous and all the more memorable for it. $25, 7:30 p.m., Carlos Alvarez Studio Theater, Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, (210) 223-8624, tobincenter.org. — Daniel Conrad

Courtesy of Tobin Center for the Performing Arts

WED | 8/21 COMEDY

JEN KIRKMAN L

You might not realize it, but there’s a good chance that more than a few of your TV laughs are thanks to Jen Kirkman. A writer for Amazon Prime’s Golden Globe-winning show The

Wearing a tiara, hiding in the pantry, wolfing down Cheetos covered in whipped cream and complaining about the realities of motherhood was how comedian Kristina Kuzmič won over her fans, who are mostly other bedraggled moms. Kuzmič delivers palatable bits like, “There is a sink downstairs full of dirty, filthy dishes, and it’s just going to have to wait,” while soaking in a bubble bath and sipping on red wine, rewarding herself as if she just climbed out of the trenches. Graduating from YouTube to stand-up, she takes the stage at the Tobin Center to drag laughs out of San Antonio parents via the universally relatable struggles of raising children, while also playing cheerleader and motivational speaker to the audience. A Croatian immigrant who has lived through poverty and divorce, Kuzmič is no stranger to true hardship, which gives her a wealth of material to work with. But, rather than turn her experiences into hard-hitting bits that strike at something deeper, she sticks to the familiarity of the daily burdens of life, leaning on archetypes and stereotypes that, while enjoyable, are pacifying as an old rerun of Friends. $33$78, 7:30 p.m., H-E-B Performance Hall, Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Cir, (210) 223-8624, tobincenter.org. — BW


16  CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


PARTIAL PLANS 2019-20 TICKET PACKAGES

FEATURES AND PERKS Receive savings over individual ticket prices

Take advantage of flexible payment plans

Cheer from the same great seat location every game

Unlock exclusive discounts on merchandise, additional game tickets and other experiences

STARTING AT

$29 PER GAME

HALF SEASON PLAN • 24 Games • Includes every Western Conference Team • Playoff Seat Priority- Receive Access to the same seat location for playoffs

WEEKEND PLAN • 10 Games • Friday, Saturday and Sunday Games • Best available playoff priority

TEXAS SHOWDOWN • 10 Games • Includes a T-shirt • Best available playoff priority

C A L L O R T E X T 210 . 4 4 4 . 5 0 5 0 F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

17


AAA GARCIA

BAIL BONDSII OPEN 24/7 LIC NO. 206

EASY PROCESSING FREE WARRANT CHECKS OUT OF COUNTY BONDS SATELLITE BONDS TEXAS WIDE BONDS ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

210.465.7777 5714 NW LOOP 410 STE. 500 SA, TX 78238 | WWW.AAAGARCIABAILBONDS.COM

Check out fresh daily content at sacurrent.com

calendar FRI | 8/23 FILM

ONE CHANCE

San Antonio boxing champion Robert “Pikin” Quiroga will always be remembered as a great fighter. His legacy only continued to grow after he was murdered on August 16, 2004. Fifteen years later, filmmakers Raymond Ramos and Jason Rivera, with the blessing of the Quiroga family, co-directed One Chance, a feature-length documentary on the life and career of the Memorial High School graduate who many consider one of the greatest flyweight boxers to ever step into the ring. “Robert’s story and his hard work and dedication to boxing represents the Mexican American culture here in San Antonio,” said Ramos. “Doing research for this film, I found more about his death than his life. In One Chance, I wanted to talk more about his life and legacy.” Quiroga’s legacy as a boxer includes becoming the first fighter from San Antonio

R2FX and Long Shot Productions

to win the International Boxing Federation Super Flyweight world title and his induction into the San Antonio Sports Hall of Fame in 2002. Through interviews with Quiroga’s family, friends, fellow fighters and San Antonians who watched him perform in his prime, One Chance is a puro San Anto story. “I hope Robert’s legacy is cemented in sports lore throughout the world,” Rivera said. Free, 8 p.m., Woodlawn Lake Park, 1103 Cincinnati Ave., (210) 619-3551, facebook.com/onechancefeaturefilm. — Kiko Martinez

THIS MODERN WORLD BY TOM TOMORROW

Your CBD Store North Central San Antonio Features The Highest Quality, 100% Organic CBD Products. CBD Products may benefit those suffering from: • Anxiety • Inflammation • Insomnia

• Stress • Chronic Pain

*20% Off on online purchases. Limited time offer. Some restrictions may apply. See store for details.

Univer sal Cit y & North Central San Antonio

www.YourCBDStoreTX.com • 13402 West Avenue • 726.444.0073

617 Pat Booker Rd, Universal City • 210.467.5347

18

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


calendar | art pick

your WITH PENFED’S PREMIUM ONLINE SAVINGS Sarah Fox

SAT | 8/24 ART PICK

‘AND THEN I MET YOU’

W

hether working in collage, animation, painting, drawing or sculpture, San Antonio artist Sarah Fox conjures bizarre dreams, fairy tales, myths and allegories. A near constant is the presence of animal-human hybrids — women and children either blessed or afflicted by squid tentacles, horse heads, beaks, wings or hooves. Femininity, including colors and materials stereotypically labeled as feminine, also informs her multimedia work, which has been shown fairly extensively on the local level (Artpace, Hello Studio, Blue Star Contemporary, Southwest School of Art, FL!GHT Gallery, the list goes on) as well as in Germany, Austria and Mexico. A New Jersey native who grew up in Houston and counts authors Joseph Campbell and Rudyard Kipling among her influences, Fox recently adopted a son. This “amazing, exhausting, life-changing event” has deeply impacted her latest body of work. Beyond inspiring her to create “serious, engaging, meaningful work about love,” motherhood has led her to investigate masculinity along with “the pressures and constraints

gender norms place on little boys so early in their life.” A creative response to everything from onesies emblazoned with footballs and dinosaurs to flower-sniffing Ferdinand the Bull and Ponyboy Curtis, the sensitive “greaser” who narrates S.E. Hinton’s coming-of-age novel The Outsiders, “And Then I Met You” employs playful young centaurs as protagonists in an artful creation story that challenges toughguy narratives. When quizzed about her affection for Aesop’s Fables and whether there are parallels to be drawn, Fox replied, “I am very interested in stories we sort of tell ourselves (as human beings) again and again and cross-culturally. … Maybe with the adoption story I was trying to tell an essential fable of love and sort of finding a home.” Summed up by the artist as “an exhibition about the nature of little boys and the men that they become,” “And Then I Met You” comprises animation, cyanotypes, a self-published children’s book, a quilt and a music box incorporating fetal heart-monitor records from her son’s birth. During the opening reception, Fox will be joined by fellow artists Brittany Ham and Hilary Rochow for a fitting complement in the form of a shadow puppet performance. Free, 7-10 p.m., Sat., Aug. 24, Sala Diaz, 517 Stieren St., (972) 900-0047, saladiazart.org. — Bryan Rindfuss

EARN OVER

THE NATIONAL AVERAGE1

PenFed.org® Federally Insured by NCUA. To receive any advertised product, you must become a member of PenFed Credit Union. © 2019 Pentagon Federal Credit Union 1. Sourced directly from: www.fdic.gov/regulations/resources/rates/, as of August 6, 2019. APY (Annual Percentage Yield) is accurate as of August 1, 2019 and is subject to change at any time. Fees may reduce earnings. Government regulations restrict certain types of withdrawals from your Pentagon Federal Savings Account up to six times per monthly dividend cycle. If you exceed the permitted number of withdrawals, a fee will be assessed which may affect your earnings. Earn dividends on a daily balance of up to $250,000 per statement cycle. $5 minimum to open the account. Premium Online Savings account holders must agree to electronic delivery of account opening disclosures and monthly statements.

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

19


Tito’s Lemonade & Tea 1½ oz Tito’s Handmade Vodka 3 oz lemonade 3 oz iced tea 5 raspberries, optional Just add Tito’s Handmade Vodka, lemonade, and tea to a collins glass over ice. Stir and garnish with a lemon slice. Pro-Tip: Muddle in a few raspberries or try your favorite summer berry!

AMERICA’S ORIGINAL CRAFT VODKA

®

20

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

TR-2695_Seasonal-Cocktail_Full-Ad_SA-Current-Aug.indd 1

7/24/19 8:53 AM


calendar SUN | 8/25

Courtesy of American Indians in Texas FILM

TALŌM APTZĀI INDIGENOUS FILM FESTIVAL

Native American stereotypes have permeated Hollywood for decades, from the tomahawk-wielding “savages” in cowboy-and-Indian Westerns to animated Disney classics like Peter Pan and Pocahontas. The inaugural Talōm Aptzāi Indigenous Film Festival aims to “highlight the experiences, resiliency, creativity and contributions” of the Native American community through cinema created by indigenous filmmakers. “Not only is it important to refute negative portrayals of underrepresented people, but giving these artists a platform will show the breadth of talent among indigenous artists,” said Scott Pewenofkit, a festival director and programmer, San Antonio-based filmmaker and member of the Kiowa tribe in Oklahoma. “I hope that people get to see the diverse types of films that Native American filmmakers are creating.” During Talōm Aptzāi, which means “ancient fire” in Pajalate (a Coahuiltecan language), host nonprofit American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions will screen nine straight hours of shorts, documentaries and feature films. Included in the lineup are films on cultural appropriation, addiction, gender issues, forced family separation and spirituality. “There is a mini-renaissance of indigenous filmmaking going on right now,” Pewenofkit said. “There are quite a few immensely talented indigenous filmmakers making some great films about contemporary indigenous life.” Free, noon-9p.m., Guadalupe Theater, 1301 Guadalupe St, (210) 271-3151, aitscm.org. — KM

FRI | 8/23 FILM

LU OVER THE WALL 5

Outdoor films aren’t what usually come to mind when you think of a relaxing late August outing to keep you cool. But what if the movie is set in a small Japanese fishing village filled with animated mermaids? Lu Over the Wall follows a teenage boy whose passion for making music leads him to a surrealist island populated by merfolk. Though inspired by the anime standard bearer Ponyo, the film deviates from Studio Ghibli’s finessed animation, skewing toward a scrappier art style to deliver its off-the-wall (or should that be over-thewall?) story. Lu Over the Wall is sure to please the juice-box demographic but promises to be weird enough to capture the interest of older viewers too. And more importantly, who would

turn down a trip to an oceanic fantasy-land at this time of the year? Free, 8:30-10:30 p.m., San Antonio Museum of Art, 200 W. Jones Ave., (210) 978-8100, samuseum.org. — Georgie Riggs

FRI | 8/23 – SUN | 8/25 THEATER

DREAMGIRLS y

Voted “Best Community Theatre” in the Current from 2014-2018, the Woodlawn Theatre has established itself as, well, one of the city’s best. Boasting a historic 1945 venue with art deco trimmings, the Woodlawn has been hosting showstoppers year-round since 2012. The Tony Award-winning 1981 Broadway hit Dreamgirls will close out this year’s summer programming with its tale of three young black women from Chicago who chase their dreams of music stardom in the ’60s and ’70s. Along the way, they must navigate the glittery but rocky path to fame, littered with obstacles like broken friendships, a surprise pregnancy and competition from other performers. Although not based on any one group, the show draws inspiration from R&B acts like the Supremes, the Shirelles and Jackie Wilson, and it’s supported by a soundtrack of show-stoppers — “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” even topped Billboard’s R&B charts in 1982. $18-$30, 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through September 15, Woodlawn Theatre, 1920 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 267- 8388, woodlawntheatre.org. — BW

GKIDS

Courtesy of Woodlawn Theatre

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

21


22  CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


arts Jaime Monzon

New arrival Jeff Wheeler is firing up the San Antonio art scene BY KELLY MERKA NELSON

In defiance of the mid-June heatwave, the former warehouse at the junction of Roosevelt and Riverside was abuzz with a mix of art scene regulars and nametagged young professionals. The South Side Living & Maker Spaces, the brainchild of Blue Star developer and local arts patron James Lifschutz, were being christened with a pop-up exhibition dreamed up, in part, by recently transplanted San Antonio artist Jeff Wheeler. The doors of the unfinished gallery space lacked knobs, but the walls were bedecked with a selection of works

by local artists as well as some surprises, including a few pieces by Texas music folk hero Daniel Johnston — one of Wheeler’s collaborators. Little did Wheeler know as he mingled with visitors and local artists, the show was planting an important flag in his adopted hometown. The pop-up opened the door for him to become The South Side’s creative director, where he’ll elevate it from just another set of condos to a community art hub. Between his role at The South Side, a bevy of current and upcoming exhibitions in and out of San Antonio and two forthcoming books, he’s already making his mark on the Alamo City arts scene. Wheeler’s arrival in San Anto was no mere happenstance. Instead, it was the result of a years-long campaign by FL!GHT Gallery’s Justin Parr and fellow artist and gallerist Hills Snyder to lure him to the Alamo City. Even if it took a while for the move to happen, the difficult part wasn’t convincing him this was the place to be. “For many years I’ve wanted to move here, just to be a part of the amazing artist scene,”

Find more artsmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


Other light beers use bikini models & dragons to get your attention. We decided to give flavor a shot. This is what happens when a brewer focuses on what to leave in a light beer, rather than what to take out. Introducing Firemans Light. The Real Light Beer for All Y’all.

AUGUST 19 MAJESTIC THEATRE For Tickets: ticketmaster.com 800.982.2787 Theatre Box Office

24

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

AUGUST 21 MAJESTIC THEATRE Sign up for ExcluSivE prESalES & announcEmEntS! tExt maJESticEmpirE to 22828

AUGUST 24 MAJESTIC THEATRE


arts Washington state, Wheeler decided to return to his roots, settling in Lubbock with his brother Bryan. Soon, the dynamic duo emerged as the Wheeler Brothers, producing a bevy of collaborative paintings that debuted across Texas, including at the show “Low Tech Innovations (Done at a Leisurely Pace),” curated by Snyder at Sala Diaz. Unlike most artists, Wheeler doesn’t just rely on old friends and networking tactics. Instead, he continuously reaches out to the people he admires, forging his way into new partnerships through sheer force of will. “He always fascinated me,” says Parr, “because if he’s a fan of an artist he will go out — and even if that person’s three states away — he will drive to that state, somehow figure out a way to meet that artist, give them a piece of his art and tell them how much they’re important to him. And then make contacts with them and make art with them!”

said Wheeler, 51. “Not only are they really good, but they treat each other amazingly, you know? You don’t see that anywhere else.”

‘Fun & Cool’ If you don’t know Lifschutz’s name, you know his work. He’s behind the revitalization of the Blue Star Complex and also donated the Hot Wells ruins to the county for transformation into a public park. For his latest trick, Lifschutz has converted an abandoned warehouse — formerly the site of an Earl Campbell food-packing plant — into a series of affordable one-bedroom apartments and artist studios that he hopes will transform the industrial area into a thriving arts community. As the complex took shape, one thing remained missing: someone to steer the ship. When Lifschutz met Wheeler in June, he realized the artist’s potential. “After that event, we both felt that it would be fun and cool were he to continue to curate things there,” Lifschutz said. Thin and tall, but not too tall, and with a tan earned by a life spent outdoors on the panhandle’s flatlands, Wheeler engages everyone he speaks to — artists, real estate investors and random people off the street — with a warm, yet piercing gaze. In a husky drawl, he offers up an endless stream of energy and ideas. He flits effortlessly from subject to subject without losing the throughline of a conversation, looping back to finish a story whenever a tangent takes things off course. You could say Wheeler’s a Lubbock transplant, but that would leave out a long detour that included a year spent curating James Surl’s Splendora Gardens outside of Houston, a self-made residency in Croatia (where he traded art for rent in a picturesque village off the Adriatic Sea) and a couch-surfing itinerancy across America during which he caught up with old friends and made lots of new work. Although reluctant to settle in a new city without concrete prospects

Bryan Wheeler and Jeff Wheeler

lined up, he moved into Snyder’s Castle Hills home in late March, caring for the property while Snyder undertook a move to Magdalena, New Mexico, to run a new art space. Wheeler set to work without delay, scheduling exhibitions both in San Antonio and across Texas, including the June pop-up at The South Side and multiple iterations of “On Their Way to Heaven or Hell,” a recurring exhibition of his and Johnston’s collaborative art.

When people talk about Wheeler, they don’t wax poetic about his artistic genius. Instead, his work ethic and infectious collaborative spirit are more likely to come up. “If you spend any time at all with

Jeff you find this out — he never quits working,” Snyder says. “It’s inspiring to be around. We spent a day together in late December 2014, drawing the entire day in his Lubbock studio. I have not stopped drawing since.” Early on in their friendship, Parr joined both Wheeler on a West Texas camping trip organized by Snyder. “We’d be sitting there — everybody’s having dinner or whatever — and Jeff’s drawing,” Parr recalls. “He’s giving everybody else a pad of paper, a pencil, whatever and he’s like, ‘Here, come on everybody, draw! Let’s go! Come on, let’s make something.’” Wheeler’s penchant for collaboration took off in grad school, when he began making art with James Porter — now the exhibition designer and production manager for Wichita State University’s Ulrich Museum of Art — under the nom de guerre Franklin Ackerley. The pairing was so successful that Ackerley began to develop more of a reputation than the artists behind him. He even has a film credit to his name. After completing his master’s in

One such collaboration is Wheeler’s ongoing work with Johnston, the outsider singer-songwriter and folk artist many recognize from Austin’s “Hi, How Are You?” mural. A fan of Johnston’s since the ’90s, Wheeler reached out five years ago and got the O.K. from the reclusive artist’s brother and sister to mail pieces for him to finish. “The first series I gave him, I never saw finished, because when [Johnston] did them, his dad said that they were all so nasty that he didn’t want anybody to see them,” Wheeler said. “He destroyed them, so I’ll never know. Which is weird, because all of his stuff is kind of weird, so there’s no telling what that could’ve been.” Wheeler didn’t let that failure stop him. He sent a second series to Johnston’s sister, not knowing whether he’d see those in the end, either. As it turned out, he soon received the finished works in the mail. Populated sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

25


THANK YOU SAN ANTONIO FOR VOTING US THE #1 MOTORCYCLE DEALERSHIP IN SAN ANTONIO

7230 NORTHWEST LOOP 410 (210) 681-2254 WWW.CALIENTEHARLEY.COM

26

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


arts ‘Buckle up’

Daniel Johnston and Jeff Wheeler

by brightly colored torsos, humanoid ducks, eyeball monsters and the inner thoughts of trees, it can be hard to discern who contributed what to each piece, despite each artist’s distinct style. Wheeler considers them the best of his collaborations with Johnston. The partnership between the two has since flourished, and Johnston even performed at a few of their exhibition openings.

‘A Little Bit Important Again’ While Wheeler is loath to spend time speaking on the conceptual underpinnings of his work, certain things about his art are clear. His collaborative spirit even extends into many of his solo pieces, in which he merges found objects, from old family photos to vintage ceramics, into new assemblages. He reacts to their original shapes while transform-

ing them into something more. Believe it or not, collage and assemblage art — which make up a hefty portion of Wheeler’s current output— weren’t always his style. “I’d always just made fun of collage artists to tell you the truth,” he admits. But, whether it be sketching bare legs on top of a child’s portrait, reassembling candid photos into new action or epoxying thrift store ceramics into new configurations and transmuting them with painted designs, Wheeler has found joy in “bringing back to life things that were forgotten, polishing them up and making them maybe a little bit important again.” That description doesn’t even scratch the surface of the artist’s recent output, however. Among his smorgasbord of new work is a series of abstract murals painted in Croatia, landscape illustrations with clever twists and gestural paintings that include a playful reimagining of American Gothic recast with the Mona Lisa and Gaugin’s Yellow Christ. “I really don’t know what I’m going to do every time I go into the studio, and that’s what keeps it fresh for me,” he says.

Wheeler’s first summer in San Antonio culminated with simultaneous First Friday openings at two Blue Star galleries in August. “Low Tech Innovations (Done at a Leisurely Pace) #2” at FL!GHT Gallery served as a sequel to the show that first introduced him to San Antonio, featuring greatest hits from his and his brother’s past few years of work plus new collaborations. In nearby DAMAS Gallery, he premiered the Warhol-inspired assemblages of “now even better!!” Many of those pieces were made from ceramics found at San Antonio thrift stores. If that weren’t enough, Wheeler also has two books coming down the pike. He’s teamed up with Cattywampus Press — the Austin publisher behind King of the Commode, a monograph preserving the work of Barney Smith, San Antonio’s late toilet-seat artist — on two wildly different projects, a coloring and activity book of Wheeler’s and Johnston’s collaborations and a long-overdue catalog of the Wheeler Brothers’ output. While the latter of the two books may be a long time coming, the coloring book is expected out by Christmas. That will let buyers spend their holidays adding their own artistic flourishes to Johnston’s and Wheeler’s illustrations. Those who want to go for the gold can even send the finished pieces to Wheeler, who plans to feature some of them in a future exhibition. As the creative director of The South Side, Wheeler will begin curating regular exhibitions in the building’s in-house gallery once it opens to residents. He also plans to host special events such as movie nights and Spurs playoff watch parties. Apartments and studios are currently available for pre-lease, with move-ins anticipated in September. Lifschutz is confident that Wheeler’s energy, work ethic and collaborative spirit will make him the perfect person to realize his vision for The South Side. “The character and vibrancy of this stretch of Roosevelt and the River is being transformed from vacant and blighted to something super cool,” Lifschutz says. “It’s a blank canvas, so to speak, and [Wheeler] is a very talented and creative guy. So, buckle up!”

Jeff Wheeler Exhibitions CURRENTLY ON VIEW: Low Tech Innovations (Done at a Leisurely Pace) #2 FL!GHT Gallery 112R Blue Star facebook.com/flightSA 5-8 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays; noon-8 p.m., Saturdays; 12-5 p.m. Sundays and by appointment through September 1

now even better!! DAMAS Gallery

1414 S. Alamo St. #202 (207) 653-7608 facebook.com/damas.space By appointment through August 31

SOMETHING TO LOOK FORWARD TO: Experimental Drawing Workshop FL!GHT Gallery,

112R Blue Star facebook.com/flightSA Bring your favorite drawing supplies and join the fun. Free, 1-4 p.m. Sunday, August 18

Bryan Wheeler

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

27


P E A C E

O F

M I N D

W E L L N E S S

LO CAT E D I N S O U T H TOWN | 7 19 S . SAI NT MA R Y S S T . SAN ANTO N I O , T X 78 2 05 C LOT H I N G • O I LS • CAP S U L E S • C O F F E E • T EAS • E D I B L E S BAT H + B O DY • P E T F R I E N D LY • TO P I CALS • H E M P S E E D S

POMwellnesstx.com |

EVENTS are FREE

peace_of_mind_satx_

PARKING only $4

9333 Southwest Loop 410 @ Old Pearsall Road • 210-623-8383 • TradersVillage.com 28

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


arts

Bryan Rindfuss

From the Projects to the Runway Rasquache-inspired designer Agosto Cuellar takes his next leap BY BRYAN RINDFUSS

S

itting at a small desk in Beacon Hill’s Clamp Light Artist Studios and Gallery, beloved San Antonio creator Agosto Cuellar scans the sunlit room he’s decorated with the final relics of Jive Refried, the Southtown vintage emporium he ran from 1999 to 2011. Intentionally blurring boundaries between gallery and boutique, art installation and retail merchandising, the exhibition — curated by Clamp Light resident artist Sarah Castillo and simply

titled “Jive Refried” — commemorates the bygone shop’s 20th anniversary. Amid a visual memoir of oddly dressed mannequins, fashion photographs and reconfigured accessories, a placemat-sized panel covered in fake blue flowers catches his eye. Untacking it from the wall, he folds it in half and clutches it, modeling the item as if it’s a statement-making handbag. His purpose is to illustrate his lifelong love affair with rasquache — an artistic practice that involves celebrating,

repurposing and transforming whatever materials might be at hand. An increasingly cited “underdog” aesthetic closely tied to Chicano art, rasquache is embedded in the cultural fabric of San Antonio — present in everything from mosaics fashioned from broken mirrors and shards of pottery to the mismatched, collage-like sensibility that informs yards and porches across the city. “I’ve always been a thrifter for my art because it was affordable,” Cuellar says. “I was able to take stuff that was inexpensive and, in a very rasquache way, make something beautiful out of it.” Cuellar’s earliest crafting skills were passed down from his grandmother, who taught him the basics of sewing. “I was probably seven, maybe even younger, and I would help her with her dolls,” he says. “I have her sewing machine now. It’s funny that it’s kind of come full circle.” In Cuellar’s eyes, rasquache is some-

thing of an inherited trait. “It goes back not just to my grandparents but also my ancestors — like tribes of back, back, back ancestors — who were creating things with whatever was available. And, so, I think I have that sensibility from the bloodlines. I don’t know, it’s just natural! Like, that was meant to be what? No, it was meant to be that!” A proud West Side native, Cuellar grew up in the Mirasol Projects and vividly remembers views of an imposing cement wall ringed with barbed wire. “I always wondered what was on the other side of that wall, [and] it was Our Lady of the Lake University,” he says. “It was interesting how that barrier created a lot of things in my mind. Like why are we being kept out of this place of higher learning? I was very inquisitive at as young age, and I wanted to see what my city had to offer.” By Cuellar’s teenage years, his family had relocated to a ranch in Helotes and he was attending Marshall High School. While at Marshall, he got his first taste of fashion retail through a work-study program that led to jobs at trendy Ingram Park Mall stores — Judy’s, Le Shoe and a Merry-Go-Round offshoot among them. This was during the onset of the over-thetop ’80s. Music and fashion were becoming increasingly intertwined, and malls set the stage not just for shopping but gatherings of the alternative sets — gays, punks, new wavers, skaters and others who came to watch the social circus and be seen themselves. “It was really cool,” Cuellar recalls. “Especially the people who would come in. They would be buying all the latest stuff. They would walk out, and we’d be like, ‘Where are they gonna wear that in San Antonio?’ I have some cassettes from that era, and the music really was ahead of its time.” Upon graduation, Cuellar wasted no time in moving to the heart of San Antonio. “I felt that I had to really get away from that structure,” he says. “Of being in the country … and people wanting me to be part of the Future Farmers of America. That just wasn’t me. So, I darted back when I was 18.” After several years downtown, he began collaborating with flamboyant San Antonio artist and fellow rasquache enthusiast David Zamora Casas. In 1990, he helped Zamora Casas open his countercultural art space, the Anti-Oppression Church of Hardcore Folk Art. “That was kind of the beginning of my art career and my fashion career — without really realizing that it was a fashion career at the time,” Cuellar says. 31 6 sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

29


J.B. WOOLFSHEDS CUSTOM WOOD STORAGE BUILDINGS & GARAGES

(210) 681-SHED (7433) STORAGE SHEDS GARAGES CARPORTS/PATIOS CONCRETE WORK SIDEWALKS | DRIVEWAYS CUSTOM BUILT WOOD STORAGE B U I L D I N G S & G A R AG E S , B U I LT O N YO U R LOT !

6018 EXCHANGE PARKWAY | WOOLFSHEDS.COM 30

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


arts

Around that time, two of his passions began to intertwine: scouring the city for vintage treasures and creating “wearable art.” After a debut show facilitated by Zamora Casas, Cuellar landed in “Texas Dialogues,” a full-fledged exhibition curated by Lawrence Miller at Blue Star Art Space, now known as Blue Star Contemporary. “After that, people started taking my art a little more — I guess not seriously, but maybe wanting to see what else I was working on,” he says. As Cueller’s fans will attest, keeping up with the artist and his work has often been as easy as stopping by one of the shops he’s brought to life over the years, beginning with the eclectic Planeta Mixteca on Barrera Street and continuing with late local treasure Pilar Correa Davis’ The Shop on Blanco Road. He finally landed at Jive Refried on South Alamo Street, which began as Jai in the hands of Liza Martinez. Initially supplying Martinez with items he plucked from flea markets, thrift stores, estate sales and auctions, Cuellar eventually moved into the space and started paying half the rent. “And before you knew it, [Martinez] didn’t want to do it anymore,” he says. “And it was my prime.” That was in 2001, when the bustling corner of South Alamo and St. Mary’s Street now occupied by Rosario’s was home to Babylon, a hip restaurant directly across from Jive Refried. Cuellar wisely saw an opportunity for self-expression in the storefront windows — big blank canvases in an area with heavy foot traffic. “That energy from Babylon was really funky,” he remembers. “So, we wanted those popping eyes. We wanted those eyes to pop over to us. So, I would be the window guy. And we would do some great stuff, and that’s what kind of got attention.” The aforementioned “great stuff” evolved from unexpected juxtapositions to the remixes Cuellar’s known for today — vintage garments transformed with folkloric flourishes, aprons, crocheted doilies, scraps of knitwear — you name it. At its peak, Jive was far more than a shop. It was a scene unto itself, one inhabited by unusually dressed characters of all stripes. During the shop’s heyday, Cuellar developed considerably, fusing his love of vintage clothing with his knack for experimentation and DIY fashion design. Among the notable highlights in this stylistic progression were auditions for seasons four, five and six of the reality TV competition Project Runway — fashion guru Tim Gunn rightfully pegged him as a “wildcard.” Cuellar also played pivotal roles in both the Art of Fashion, a multi-designer runway show held at Blue Star with proceeds benefiting neighborhood improvements in Southtown, and Runway en la Calle, the alternative fashion-show component of the multimedia West Side festival Una Noche en la Gloria. When Jive shuttered in 2011, the Current ran a cover story titled “Fear and Loathing in Southtown.” In the piece, writer Natalia Ciolko described the infectious creative energy that surrounded Jive, especially on First Fridays, and nailed its beyond-retail importance with a quote from then-19-year-old shop regular Amber Martinez: “I love that Agosto gives young people a place to figure out who they are, and where they’re going.” In his first few post-Jive years, Cuellar continued to work as both a producer and designer for Runway en la Calle — a program he plans to relaunch now that Una

6 29

Agosto Cuellar

Noche en la Gloria has reached the end of its original 10year commitment — and started focusing on another apt aspect of his work life: DJ gigs at bars, clubs and parties. Cuellar’s “next chapter” began somewhat unexpectedly in 2015, when the Center City Development and Operations Department insightfully paired him with Goodwill for an early iteration of OPEN, an initiative that connects entrepreneurs and building owners as a means to activate vacant spaces downtown. In what one might liken to the mothership recalling one of its own, Cuellar was invited to sift through Goodwill stores across San Antonio and pull clothes to reinvent for a fashion show staged in a vacant convenience store. His response? “Perfect, bring it on!” Rising to the occasion, he set out on a scavenger hunt for the building blocks of the show. “I’m gonna show them what I can really do with this stuff,” he remembers thinking. “This really sweet lady [took me around and] said, ‘OK, pick out what you want to use in the show.’ And I remember her face [laughs] when she saw the stuff I was picking out,” Cuellar said. “She was like, ‘That?’ And I was like, ‘Yes.’ And she said, ‘OK, you’re taking that too? I don’t know what you’re going to do but I hope I don’t get fired.’” Drawing inspiration from the outlandish styles that bubble up from Tokyo’s Harajuku neighborhood, Cuellar showcased his refried Goodwill finds on models with ghostly white makeup and white hair to match. Not only was the event a success, it marked the beginning of a professional relationship between Cuellar and Goodwill that has progressed from him staging a pop-up boutique in the nonprofit’s downtown store in tandem with Fashion Week San Antonio to blogging on its behalf and signing on as a full-time merchandising manager — a position that’s morphed into his current post as customer experience manager. More than a day job, Goodwill has given Cuellar a support system that’s inspired him to take the next leap in his career: showing his work on a much larger stage.

Made possible by a partnership with New Yorkbased retailer and producer Flying Solo, Cuellar will be exporting his rasquache take on fashion design to the runways of New York and Paris during their respective fashion weeks in September. Evident from the title “Barrio Folk Baroque,” the tight collection of eight looks represents a stylistic departure in that entailed using vintage garments only as patterns for new pieces created with unused fabric he inherited from late local designer Kathleen Sommers. “When she passed away, her family gave me rolls and rolls of this vintage fabric from the ’50s to the ’80s,” he explains. “I got some beautiful linen. So, I made these linen tunic dresses with zippers down the middle.” The abundance of fabric he was given inspired him to tinker with volume and proportion, evidenced by dresses he describes as “free and big.” He’s also been experimenting with transparency, as seen in sheer sleeves and unexpected layering of fabrics. “I’m doing a lot of lace over patchwork, which I think is looking amazing,” he says. “I’ve never seen that done before. It’s this little patchwork that reminds me of my grandma.” As one might expect, this international adventure won’t come cheap, and Cuellar has launched a GoFundMe campaign to offset the costs of travel and his Flying Solo membership. While in New York and Paris, he’ll be one of 50 designers from around the world who have partnered with Flying Solo. “I’ve always told myself that I cannot try to compete with other designers that are at other levels,” he says. “Because the only level I know is the level that I was at last. And, so, I can go from there. I can go from the last thing I did to the next thing I’m doing. That’s an easy evolution. And that’s how I have to think of this collection: That it’s not this huge leap because I’m going to Paris and New York. No. It’s just the next leap.” Save the date for October 3, when Cuellar will present “Barrio Folk Baroque” as part of Fashion Week San Antonio. sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

31


3 Day

DOLLAR SALE CO M I N G LATE

AU G U ST U N B E L I E VAB L E S AVI N G S O N E VE RY B OT TL E *

TWINLIQUORS.COM *Includes wine and spirits 750ml or larger at all Twin Liquors locations. Some exclusions apply. No further discount. No rain checks. Please drink responsibly.

32

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


Post-apocalyptic drama Light of My Life benefits from a genuine father-daughter relationship BY KIKO MARTINEZ

I

n the post-apocalyptic drama Light of My Life, Oscar winner Casey Affleck (as an actor in Manchester by the Sea) steps behind the camera for the first time since teaming up with Joaquin Phoenix a decade ago to make the music mockumentary I’m Still Here. His second film is a minimalist take that hangs firmly on the natural connection of its two main characters and its effectively bleak atmosphere. Reminiscent of director John Hillcoat’s depressing 2009 drama The Road — although it’s doubtful any scene can be as grim as watching a father teach his son how to commit suicide — and last year’s powerful and emotionally complex drama Leave No Trace, Light of My Life is a slow-burning film that packs a similar punch. Affleck stars as Caleb, a father surviving in the solitude of the wilderness with his young daughter Rag (Anna Pniowsky), whom he disguises as a boy. His actions come after a global plague has decimated the majority of

the female population, including his wife (Elizabeth Moss), who dies when Rag is an infant. He refers to Rag as his son whenever they stumble across someone amid their directionless journey. Hoping to stay invisible on the fringes of the dystopic society, Caleb is conscious of the danger Rag is in if anyone discovers her true identity, although Affleck, who also wrote the screenplay, steers clear of spelling it out. While he navigates some familiar territory, that takes nothing away from the father-daughter rapport he and Pniowsky share — a bond viewers will likely feel invested in as the narrative moves forward and the risk that they will be discovered increases. Light of My Life feels the most alive during the seemingly calm scenes where we understand the intense reality that Caleb and Rag face. He’s willing to do whatever he must to prevent anything bad from happening to his daughter. The sense of dread that permeates

Snake Pulpit

Them That Follow is plenty somber, but the story of religious zealotry lacks bite BY KIKO MARTINEZ The Bible verse Mark 16:18 reads, “They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them.” It’s scripture some isolated Pentecostal churches understand as literal directives for worship services designed to show their true conviction for Christ. In Them That Follow, screenwriters and first-time directors Britt Poulton and Daniel Savage explore the religious practice of snake handling, but they do so via a less-than-intriguing narrative featuring a backwoods love triangle. Set deep in Appalachia, the story centers on the life of Mara Childs (Alice Englert), the daughter of a local pastor (Walton Goggins) who ministers to his devout followers with the gospel in one hand and a writhing rattlesnake in the other. Conflict doesn’t come in the form of Mara pushing back on her father’s serpentine sermons, however. She is a believer, which creates an interesting composition for the film’s lead character. While she is uncon-

cerned with the venomous snakes, she does find herself at an impasse with two young men — Augie (Thomas Mann), her secret lover and spiritual dissenter, and Garret (Lewis Pullman), one of her father’s disciples the church has coerced her to marry. With a cult leader and reptile enthusiast for a father, viewers might wonder why the sense of danger that should be pulsating through Them That Follow feels more like a stumbling block than it does a catastrophic event that could seal Mara’s fate. She’s a formidable female character, which is notable on its own, but when matched against weaker men, there is never really a moment in the film where she doesn’t appear in control — even when she’s following orders or simply sulking. Only in the

screens

Take Shelter

Saban Films

the film never lets up, much as in Hillcoat’s The Road. Affleck’s ability to keep the nervous, albeit silent, energy consistent is an impressive feat. Along with Affleck’s compassionate performance, what Pniowsky delivers as a curious 11-year-old is just as incredible. Like actors Ben Foster and Thomasin McKenzie in Leave No Trace, Caleb and Rag’s loving relationship is one of the most convincing pairings to hit theaters this year. Affleck has created an intimate film — one that speak on parental responsibility and the great lengths to which a father would go to protect his child. Light of My Life is currently playing exclusively at the Santikos Bijou Cinema Bistro.

final act are her stakes raised, but by then, Poulton and Savage don’t seem confident where to take the picture. Academy Award winner Olivia Colman (The Favourite) portrays Mara’s only real adversary, the unfortunately named Hope Slaughter, a loyal member of the church and Augie’s no-nonsense mother. She exhudes authority throughout the film. Them That Follow also stars Kaitlyn Dever (Booksmart) as Dilly, a friend of Mara’s who comes 1091 Media to live with her after she is abandoned by her mother — and, ultimately, by Poulton and Savage’s script, which treats her character like an afterthought. It’s evident Poulton and Savage wanted to delve into the concept of blind faith and how that affects someone like Mara who — like many people worldwide — has adopted the religious beliefs of her parents. The filmmakers are unable to find the emotional hook needed to express the extremely personal issues Mara is forced to confront. Poulton and Savage do a fine job setting the somber tone, but the melodrama lacks significant bite. Them That Follow is currently playing exclusively at the Santikos Bijou Cinema Bistro.

Find more news Find more every day at film stories sacurrent.com


69 1 5 BAND ER A R D. # 1 04 , LEON VALLEY, TX 78238 | 210 -781-417 5 | T H EO R I G I N A LI C EFAC TO RY.CO M

CU STA R D

S LU SH I E I TA L I A N I C E

34

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

S H AV E D I C E

SOF T S E R V E M I N I D O N U T S & F R OZ E N CU STA R D


food

Pastiche’s Benjamin Krick takes a break in the bar’s backyard, which will be open for tastings and other events.

a

Old World Charm

Budapest, he realized he’d found the ideal hands-on partner. When Juniper Tar closed in 2018, Krick took the lead on the East Side project. The Mettes were saddened to move away from the city, but as Pastiche’s investors and building owners, they’re looking forward to having an excuse to visit San Antonio, JeanLuc Mette said. “San Antonio has a really special place in both of our hearts. The city is a cool mix of the old and new,” he added. “I really think the business is going to fit well in an existing neighborhood with a fabric that is changing Lea Thompson so dramatically.” The East Side, home to San Antonio’s first African American neighborhoods, suffered from years of divestment before new development spread east from downtown. Though Pastiche was expected to open in 2018, a slew of ever-changing city permit requirements forced Krick to take another year before opening. “I’ve been ready to open Pastiche for a while, but it makes sense that we’ve had to wait,” he said, adding that he’s stayed in contact with neighbors throughout the process. the idea for Pastiche has been years in the “I’m not a native, so the last thing I want to making.” do is show up to a historic neighborhood and Pastiche investors Jean-Luc Mette and his just announce ‘I’m here.’” wife Lindsey were living in Dignowity Hill Krick hopes to make Pastiche a place for when they discovered the building and saw its potential. German-born Mette and his brother people to learn, connect and support the Maxim grew up in different parts of the world, creative community. Aside from the bar and sitting areas, the location features a small but the idea for a shared passion project in working kitchen and a separate room to San Antonio brought them together. showcase work by local artists. The space will The Mettes purchased the space in 2016 host up to four artists a year, providing 68 and approached the Dignowity Hill Neighdays for each to install, exhibit and sell work. borhood Association to discuss rezoning the Pastiche’s backyard fence is lined with former residence. The Current reached out to found residential doors, which will remain members of the association but didn’t hear part of the decor. Krick will soon add string back by press time. lights and outdoor seating to “They were on board right allow for special tastings and away,” Jean-Luc Mette said. events with a view of the city. “The building had been Pastiche As he did with Jet-Setter, vacant for years, and the small 1506 E. Houston St. Krick will take a zero-waste house didn’t fit in with the Hours TBD approach to Pastiche’s daily rest of the businesses that facebook.com/pastiche.sa operations. The bar will wash were opening on Houston linens on-site rather than send Street.” them out, squeeze fresh citrus Then plans changed. Immias needed and work with San gration officials denied Maxim Antonio-based green business the Compost Mette’s visa application, and Jean-Luc and his Queens to turn its organic trash into nutriwife decided to relocate to St. Paul, Minnesoent-rich compost for local farms and gardens. ta, to be closer to family and raise their two Krick has ambitious plans for the new space, young children. but at the end of the day, Pastiche is uncharted Jean-Luc Mette approached Krick, then bar territory both for him and for San Antonio. manager of downtown craft-cocktail outpost “There’s no way to say what’s going to hapJuniper Tar, about joining the project. After pen here; I’m just going to keep listening,” he learning about Krick’s shared passions for said. “Like most good things, we have to start great wine and food, sustainability and some small and let it build.” of the same bars in cities like Hamburg and

Long-awaited neighborhood bar Pastiche bringing Europe flair to the East Side BY LEA THOMPSON Soon-to-open neighborhood bar Pastiche’s name is inspired by the French term for creations that borrow or imitate past works. But its owners aren’t looking to replicate anything already done in San Antonio. Pastiche Manager and Partner Benjamin Krick, the barman behind downtown craft-cocktail bar Jet-Setter, has taken Old World inspiration from European drinking spots to create a unique space with drinks, bites and a relaxed and quirky style. The spot — located near landmarks such as St. Paul’s Square and Tucker’s — is expected to open in late August. Plenty of bars and restaurants have gone into the revitalized East Side recently, but none with quite the twist Pastiche hopes to bring to the area. A former cottage, Pastiche is filled with a mix of refined and quirky features including plush and inviting armchairs, a vintage wall-sized Swatch timepiece and stacks of hardcover books Krick found when he opened Jet-Setter. The small bar also includes an open-faced refrigeration case for champagnes, ciders and wines, while a second case holds European wines and spirits such as cognacs, absinthes and brandies. With a price-point similar to Jet-Setter, Pastiche will serve premium cocktails for about $10 each plus hot organic teas from Blüm and small bites from local French bakery La Boulangerie. “The idea is to replicate what you’d find in Old World Europe. It feels like you’ve stumbled into someone’s house,” Krick said. “But

Find more food & drink news at sacurrent.com


MON- FRI 5:30AM-4PM | SAT 6:30AM-4PM • SUN 7:30AM-3PM

521 E Woodlawn Ave. • 210.737.8646

Hungry For More?

HOURS

MON-SUN 4PM-2AM

LATE NIGHT MENU + DAILY HAPPY HOUR

LIVE MUSIC EVERY SATURDAY | OPEN MIC EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT

VISIT SACURRENT.COM

210.369.9192 | FRANCISBOGSIDE.COM | 803 S ST. MARY’S STREET |

FOR NOMINATING US FOR BEST TACOS! 3 3 07 F R E D E R I C K S B U R G R D • 2 1 0 -7 34-5661

36

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


1 epic day | 125+ breweries | 450+ Beers

SATURDAY

OCT. 19, 2019 DIGNOWITY & LOCKWOOD PARKS

VIP ENTRY 12 PM GA ENTRY 1:30 PM event ENDs 6:30 PM

VIP SOLD OUT! LIMITED TICKETS on sale now at

benefiting

sanantoniobeerfestival.com

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019

| CURRENT

37


H APPY

Your Favorite Neighborhood Bar,

HOUR

! Now Openn!

A L L D AY SUN-MON

C O L D D R A F T & H A N D C R A F T E D C O C K TA I L S .

1160 E Commerce St, San Antonio, TX 78205 Open Daily 'Til 2 am • Happy Hour All Day Sun + Mon, 4-8 PM Tues-Sat

38

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

LOCATED IN THE PEARL.

312 PEARL PARKWAY | BLUEBOXBAR.COM | HOURS: MONDAY - SUNDAY, 4PM - 2AM

HAPPY HOURS: MONDAY - SUNDAY, 4PM - 8PM


food

LILLY’S GREENVILLE

1160 E. Commerce St., Unit 100 Open daily, 4 p.m.-2 a.m. I started my booze cruise at Lilly’s Greenville, the latest concept from Steve Mahoney of local spots like George’s Keep and Francis Bogside, and one of the newest bars to open within the Historic St. Paul’s Square. Let’s be clear: this isn’t a dive. This is an East Side bar where you’ll find affordable, delicious libations, good conversation and a quiet place to unwind. All four bartenders — Eddie, Orlando, Miguel and Barbara — are knowledgeable about spirits and can create a cocktail from practically anything. “Stop right there,” Eddie said, as I ramble off my spirits of choice. He grabbed a shaker and served me one of his house specialties, fittingly called A Rose for Amanda. A mixture of rose-hips, vodka and lemonade, it was perfectly blended and refreshing on a hot summer day. Happy Hour runs Tuesday through Saturday from 4-8 p.m. and all day Sunday and Monday, offering classics such as Fitzgeralds and Old Fashioneds for $5.50. Only a handful of people came through Lilly’s while I was there, but rest assured, once the words gets out about this bar, it’s going to take off.

ALIBIS

1141 E. Commerce St. Open daily, 3 p.m.-2 a.m.

Amanda Lozano

Now’s the Time

The near East Side offers drinking options, but visit before gentrification changes its character BY AMANDA LOZANO Downtown San Antonio may be where tourists dive into margaritas big enough to swim laps in, but some of the city’s best watering holes lie minutes away, within the near East Side. Home to some of the city’s first African-American neighborhoods, this quadrant boasts historic homes, cultural landmarks and, more recently, gentrifica-

tion. Despite its proximity to downtown, some well-intentioned residents still avoid the area. Politics and gentrification aside, there are plenty of new and established near East Side bars that are unlike those anywhere else in San Antonio. And now is the perfect time to explore, before the area’s rapid changes erase some of its charm.

Alibis has been quenching local thirsts (in every sense of the word) for more than 15 years. Unlike the glitzy Lilly’s, Alibis is found inside a former home that’s been converted into a dark, gritty, comfy and low-key bar. Everything at Alibis, from the worn leather couches to the wall photo of Tim Duncan creates a judgement-free place to imbibe in peace. It’s not fancy or expensive, it’s just a watering hole serving its neighborhood. Friendly bartenders and prompt service bring in everyone from young women throwing down Melon Carts to the older couples sipping Miller Lites, and the bar is a smoker’s delight, offering cigarette-friendly spaces at the side and outdoor patio. Happy hour, from 3-9 p.m. daily, offers an excellent selection of regional spirits, including Rebecca Creek and Alamo Craft, as well as beers. Don’t be surprised if a patron spots you a drink, and expect to overhear some outlandish conversations. You may even find yourself suckered into one. Good times.

THE DAKOTA

433 S. Hackberry St. Open daily, noon to midnight

Never judge a book — ahem, bar — by its cover. From the outside, the Dakota looks like an icehouse, but inside lies a hip, pleasant joint the neighborhood apparently adores. Though it’s not a full bar, the place offers a decent selection of beer and wine, also available to go. The real prizewinner, however, is the delicious food: queso, wings, salad, pizza and more. Prices range from $6$15. Happy hour, which runs Monday through Friday from 3-7 p.m., includes $1 off not only drinks but also the vittles. In terms of atmosphere, the Dakota is a step above a dive — a clean, comfy space full of good vibes and supportive folks. Almost like an East Side Cheers. The staff is relaxed, and nobody vomits or gets anything but delightfully quirky after their ninth beer. There seems to be no tragedy in the place. Also worth noting: Wednesday is karaoke night, and on my visit folks sang and danced along to anything from country to rock. I had to smile when the dad seated next to me started dancing with his little daughter. Definitely worth a return visit.

NAIROBI BAR AND GRILL

514 N. Hackberry St. Open Monday-Saturday, 2 p.m.-2 a.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.

Some of the greatest works of fiction and cinema take place with a boozy backdrop, where a life-altering events unfold, for better or worse. Nairobi feels like that place. Just parking outside of the joint seemed to set the scene for an enthralling storyline. As the bartender told me during my visit, “We never know who or what will come through those doors.” Now we’re talking. Set to a soundtrack of soul and R&B, the confines of this smoky, groovy lounge take one back to forgotten kitsch of yesteryear — a trip to a disco and polyester era some may want to forget. Nairobi isn’t for a younger crowd, so put on your adult helmet while delving into the weekly drink specials available during its Friday happy hour, which runs from 2-8 p.m. Smoking is approved on the back patio. There’s also pool room with a single table and dartboard. During my visit, the game got intense. The dark, no-gimmicks, take-it-or-leave-it vibe of the place made it my favorite of the stop. Like any dive, Nairobi merits further investigation. Within the walls of such place lies a feel that anything can happen. sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019

| CURRENT

39


CULTURE

tickets

L O C A L C U LT U R E T I C K E T S . C O M

Thank you San Antonio

for voting us 2019 Finalist in

“Best Snack,” & “Best Locally Made Food Product.”

WHISKEY BUSINESS 2019 FRI, AUG 23 • 7PM WITTE MUSEUM

SAN ANTONIO BEER FESTIVAL 2019 SAT, OCT 19

VISIT!

15069 IH 35 STE. # 206 SELMA, TX 78154 www.popcornpiccadilly.com

VIP ENTRY 12PM • GA ENTRY 1:30 PM

Dignowity & Lockwood

GREEN SEED

SAT OCT 26 • 11AM NORRIS CONFERENCE CENTER

The exclusive food service provider of the

SAVOR and the Alamodome, is home to UTSA Roadrunner football, Monster Jam, Valero Alamo Bowl, concerts, and many more. NPOs partnered with SAVOR have the opportunity to share in the profits of the concessions stands while gaining exposure for their organization. Rather than putting together car washes or bake sales, SAVOR’s NPO program allows maximize volunteer time and effort by working directly with our Coordinator.

SAN ANTONIO MUSIC SHOWCASE SAT, SEPT 28 ST. MARY’S STRIP

Sell Your Event Tickets On Localculturetickets.com And Get Free Promotion In The Current | Call 210-388-0606 For More Info

40

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

SAVOR is looking to create partnerships with local organizations in the San Antonio area, holding 501C3 designation. Volunteers must be 18+ and will receive orientation and training. In our facility, all groups’ volunteers are required to be certified with the Food Safety Training and Certification and TABC permit. If you are interested in learning more please contact our HR Coordinator: Holly Tag, at 210-704-6351 or htag@savorbt.com We look forward to connecting and working together to help your organization reach your financial goals!


food

HAPPY HOUR

MON - SAT 2 - 7 PM SUN 7 PM- C LOSE

Charlie Brown’s Neighborhood Bar & Grill

415 Milam Sa, Texas 78202

- upcoming shows -

KARAOKE + TRIVIA

august 3

Courtesy photo / Erin Winch

The Take Away: 10 Minutes with Cocktail Blogger Erin Winch BY LEA THOMPSON Name: Erin Winch Job/Title: Manager @drinking.in.sa since 2016 Birthplace: San Antonio Impact: Founded one of San Antonio’s first cocktail blogs for bar hoppers and home mixologists Industry Experience: Several years working in the fast-casual dining industry and a veteran of the San Antonio Cocktail Conference Money Quote: “Is that really tiki, or is that just a Cosmo in a different glass?”

longer to arrive in San Antonio. During Tales, there were a lot of brands that explored connections between spirits and food, and how all your senses — even the music you listen to — can influence your drink experience. I took a class with several bartenders and brands that showed us the parallels between music and cocktails — it’s what you add to it, simple beats or ingredients, that allow you to make it your own.

Tell us about your background and how you got where you are. When I moved downtown in 2016 and was surrounded by craft cocktail bars, I decided to learn more about cocktail culture. I started writing lists of all the happy hours with interesting craft drinks, but no one knew about it. I started @drinking.in.sa to get the word out about it.

What are the biggest trends or changes you’ve seen in local bars? At Tales, I saw a real focus on mental health in the industry, and in San Antonio, we’re seeing more organizations like HEARD, that work with bars and restaurants to provide resources and classes to bartenders who work long, demanding hours. I’ve also seen two extremes emerge: there’s fewer sugary shots and drinks like Cosmos these days. We’re seeing more classic cocktails like the Highball. On the other hand, there’s a lot of places that are replacing those drinks with new sugary cocktails and try to call them “tiki-style.” I love tiki, but is that really tiki or is that just a Cosmo in a different glass? There’s been a real shift here and throughout the U.S., as more bars turn toward local spirits and products. The way people drink has changed, but I think bars and what they’re producing have stayed the same.

How did you learn about local beer culture? I didn’t always love beer but visiting Künstler Brewing really helped me learn to appreciate San Antonio beer. Now I love trying brews from Künstler, Ranger Creek and Highwheel BeerWorks at Dorcol Distilling + Brewing Co. What’s your best recent cocktail experience: Tales of the Cocktail 2019 in New Orleans. The event offers more diverse liquors, brands, trends that might take

THURSDAY • AUG 15

THE CHRIS CUEVAS PROJECT

DENNIS DIETZ DUO

august 10

RIGHT ON RED

august 17

AUSTIN FORREST 11888 STARCREST | 210 496-7092 CHARLIE-BROWNS.COM

FRIDAY • AUG 16

THE INFIDELS

FRIDAY • AUG 23

Brian & the Blackouts

SUNDAY • SEPT 1

DALE WATSON & HIS LONE STARS

open daily 4p-2a highhorselounge.com sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019

| CURRENT

41


local

laolcal l o c c loloclcaolalo a c a l l loc

YOUR HOMETOWN

aacllal l o l o c lolo caclal

SPICE COMPANY SINCE 1985.

l

o loloc ca cal al l

FFI

IN ND US A FIN D U AT T T US D U SFIND 999 BASSE RD, #193 THE SHOPS SHOPS AT ATLINCOLN LINCOLNHEIGHTS HEIGHTS 999 EE BASSE RD, #193 AT THE T H US AT SFIND AT H EE SSHH O #193 RD, BASSE E 999 #193 RD, TS @ BASSE HEIGH E LN 999 O PP LINCO AT TS S T HEIGH SHOP O LN THE AT LINCO 999 E BASSE RD, #19 US AT FIND US AT THE SHOPS AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS R FIND H S SHOPS R THE 999 E BASSE RD, #193 S AT FIND THE SHOPS AT ATLINCOLN LINCOLN HEIGHTS DEEUS FIND US D 999 EORDERUP-SA.COM BASSE RD, #193 E ATTHE FIND US AT AT HEIGHTS AORDERUPSA (210)824-9600 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.COM ORDERUPSA (210) MENU: TLL SHOPS @ RD, # I E I @ O R RRUUSPPH BASS N E O N 999 SSAA P S HTS C C HEIG OLN LINC O O AT S A.COM SHOP RUP-S E BASSE RD, #193 THE ATORDERUPSA THE AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS ORDE A.COM AT :999 L US RUP-S MENU D US E BASSE RD, #193 FIND FIND ORDE 600 FIND AT THE SHOPS AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS :999 NSHOPS A 824-9 MENU NHH (210) 600 (210) E999 BASSE RD, #193 824-9 FIND US AT THE AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS (RUPSA RUPSA (210) 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.COM ORDERUPSA (2 T0 L LSHOPS ORDE (210) 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.COM 21 0 RU @ ORDE (210) 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.CO ORDERUPSA E 1 E @EUS I2N C I GI G ) )88 P HT H 2 A 44 999 E BASSE RD, # - 9-O FIND US SAT THE AT LINCOLN HEIGHTS L N STS 9 99(210) 9 RUP- SA.C 6SHOPS : ORDE 6 MENU 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.COM ORDERUPSA 600 (210) 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.COM ORDERUPSA ( 2RUPS 824-9 (210) 824-9600 MENU: ORDERUP-SA.COM (210) 99 9 @ ORDERUPSA 0H ORDE 1 0 ) 00A EB E E AB MM I G E E N NH 824 SASSES S :R - 9 6 U :UOT REDR 824-9600 O MENU: ORDERUP-SA.C ORDERUPSA DRED9(210) ,D 00 #1, 9# REU9 RP9 3193 U- S ME PEA B A S NU .C AO SS E . CM :O OM R RD D, ER #19 UP 3 -SA .CO M

@

@

@ @ @

JAPANESE STYLE GASTROPUB

All DAY HAPPY HOUR SUNDAY & MONDAY

SOUTH TEXAS SPICE CO. Retail - Institutional - Specialty Blends 8oz. - 300lbs. or more

210.436.2280 • 2106 Castroville Rd • 78237 42

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

h a n z o b a r . c o m | M O N D A Y - S U N D A Y: 4 P M - 2 A M

H A P P Y H O U R S U N D A Y & M O N D A Y A l l D A Y | T U E S D A Y - F R I D A Y : 4 - 7 P M | R E V E R S E H A P P Y H O U R E V E R Y D A Y: 1 1 P M - 2 A M


food

l Plate l a m S

Ma

Monday

HAPPY HOUR A LL DAY

+ L iv e Music By C hris Cr uz | 10 P - 2A

Tuesday

me o H t a t ke i

HAPPY HOUR TIL MIDNIGHT

17803 La Cantera terrace #1200 Sa, TX 78256 | (210) 310-3733

+ Op en Mic | 9:30 P - 2A

Wednesday

Music by C lif f Crawford

Stir Up Super Summer Spritzes: No Aperol Required BY RON BECHTOL

B

irthed in the land of the Negroni, the sunset-hued and Instagrammable Aperol spritz has been eagerly embraced by Americans thanks to ad campaigns and social media. But familiarity often breeds contempt, or at least indifference. Despite the Internet outrage following a New York Times article proclaiming the combination of lightly bitter Aperol, Prosecco and sparkling water as “not a good drink,” it’s clear that that the spritz is here to stay. Aperol isn’t obligatory and other amaros, or amari — bitter liqueurs made with barks and roots, herbs, spices and flowers — are perfectly happy to volunteer their services. Amari alone can be an acquired taste, but as a cocktail cast member, they’re useful. To prove the point, we stirred up some Aperol-adjacent alternatives. Yes, you may need to buy a bottle or two of something unfamiliar, but the drink-making process is simple. Here’s how it goes: First, fill a wine glass with ice. Next, add three ounces of bubbles, two of amaro and top it all with the ounce of fizzy water. For bubbles, use Italian Prosecco or Spanish Cava. For fizzy water, look to Topo Chico or soda brands like Schweppes. No need to give the drink more than a perfunctory swirl.

Thursday

VAMO S A TEQUILA! ME NU + DJ Biig Mike

Shutterstock

Friday

Drop in a thin slice of orange or lime. Add a sprig of mint if feeling frisky. Here are the versions we tried:

Music by DJ T herap y

Sunday

BRUTO AMERICANO — Made by St.

George, a California distiller famed for gin, the Bruto wins the beauty contest, but the drink was unabashedly barky with a bitter medicinal quality not for the faint of heart. Use an orange slice to complement the California-grown Seville oranges that are part of the mix.

HAPPY HOUR A LL DAY Music By C3 Tri o Tri o

CAPPELLETTI — Alone, this wine-

based aperitif is the opposite of a Bruto. Tasters found it syrupy, only slightly bitter, and with flavors and aromas of cinnamon, tangerine and cola. The aperitif can be chilled and served on its own, or you can skip the sparkling wine and add a splash of soda.

CYNAR — This Italian liqueur is said to

contain 13 herbs, but artichoke is its calling card. A solo sip proves only moderately bitter with no real spikes of flavor. The group called it “balanced” and “pleasant” in the spritz, not necessarily faint praise. We suggest it for newbies.

BIGALLET CHINA-CHINA — The

spritz using this French “amer” was our second favorite. Orange, both bitter and sweet, is front and center, but clove and cinchona bark give a root beer quality — in a good way. Unfortunately, while many amaros are reasonably priced, this isn’t one of them.

AVERNA — This Sicilian-made amaro was the group favorite — a little unfair as the flavors are perhaps the closest to Aperol. Averna is mid-bitter, a little sweeter and herbal (think juniper and anise). We liked its deepness of flavor, an asset when mixing with two, less aggressive components.

Y T I N U M COM HOUSE CE

DAN ALL THINGS

SAT

UR ST 2 DAY 4•

AUG U

9PM DJ

Y DB

E QU S A EL TE

HOS

V GQ

Z

s! l a i c e nk sp ’s St

+ dri2423 N St M-a1r3y13 735 (210)

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019

| CURRENT

43


r o v S a es! the

AUG. SEPT

t a D

10 24

S a n An t o n i o Restaurant Week

26 T H RU 29

WINE + FOOD F E S T I VA L

T H RU

See participating restaurants at culinariasa.org

BECKER VINEYARDS+ LA CANTERA RESORT & SPA

It’s the place to see San Antonio’s best chefs all in one place and all you pay is the price of admission to rub elbows with some of the brightest stars in our city. Not to mention, taste, taste and taste some more of the culinary creations they’ve designed. Add to the flavors your choice of wine, beer or cocktail and the setting of the Texas Hill Country and your weekend is complete at this year’s Culinaria Festival.

Cheers to 20 Years Tickets + Details At Culinariasa.org

44

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


! EMAI T U R

N

OCKETS

L DOF O S IRS

BENEFITING

TI

P 1 0 0 PA I V

LE

TH SS

AN

AUGUST 23RD AT T H E WI T T E M U S E U M

WHISKEY + WINE + BEER + MUSIC + BITES + CHEER

PU R C H A S E YO U R 2 0 1 9 T I C K E T S N OW AT S AWH I S K E Y B U S I N E S S .CO M

ENJOY INTERACTIVE DEMOS + WHISKEY WORKSHOPS ON THE BJORN'S STAGE BEGINNING AT 7:30PM

featured

Distillers

featured

Restaurants

BASIL HAYDENS | BULLEIT BOURBON | DEVIL’S RIVER WHISKEY | FOUR ROSES BOURBON | REAL ALE DRIPPING SPRINGS DISTILLERY | MAVERICK WHISKEY | RANGER CREEK BREWING & DISTILLING | SHINER SWEET AMBER DISTILLING | REBECCA CREEK DISTILLERY | RAMBLER SPARKLING WATER | WILD HORSE DISTILLERY GARRISON BROTHER’S DISTILLERY

AL AMO BBQ CO. | CATCH THE WAVE | DORREGO’ S | EASTSIDE KITCHENET TE | LUCY COOPER’ S | GRAYZE FONTAINE’S SOUTHERN DINER & BAR | MAKO’S ON THE CREEK | PAESANOS LINCOLN HEIGHTS | SHAKE SHACK R U S S O’ S I TA L I A N K I TC H E N & PI Z Z E R I A | S M O K E B B Q | S M O K E S H A C K M E AT M A R K E T | S O H I L L CA F E SARI SARI FILIPINO RESTAURANT, MARKET & BAKERY | SPROUTS FARMERS MARKET | SUSHI ZUSHI THE JERK SHACK | THE RUSTIC | THE GOOD KIND | TOPGOLF

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019

| CURRENT

45


1 city. 1 night. 10 venues. 50+ local bands & artists. all-access wristbands on sale now @ sanantoniomusicshowcase.com 46

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


music Panic Division’s Synth-Soaked New Album Lands at No. 1 on iTunes’ Electronic Charts BY CHRIS CONDE

S

an Antonio electronic outfit Panic Division not only charted with its latest album, it beat out some major industry names in the process.   Passing up legendary producer Moby, heavyweight DJ Marshmello and electronic duo Odesza, Panic Division’s Touch last month soared to the highest position on the genre’s charts on iTunes and remained there for two days. The album also peaked at an impressive No. 13 on Billboard’s electronic charts.   “I’m really, really fucking proud of Touch,” Panic Division frontman and producer Colton Holliday said. “There’s nothing on the album that I’m embarrassed of, whereas in the past I was just keeping the same [aesthetic] because that’s what I thought what the fans wanted.” To point, Holliday’s band hasn’t always been known for its synth-forward pop vibes. On past releases, it felt more like the Panic Division was merely dipping its toe into the

cool waters of synth melodies. This time, however, Holliday dove headfirst into colossal waves of juicy keyboard-produced sounds. Panic Division formed in the early 2000s, originally as a post-hardcore band mixing metalcore and indie rock. After signing with indie label the Militia Group — home to heavy-hitting indie artists like Copeland, the Appleseed Cast and the Rocket Summer — the band eventually broke up. With Holliday already writing the majority of the music, he assumed total control of the project and kept releasing albums as a solo artist while still using the Panic Divi sion moniker. On June 14, Holliday released Touch, which can be summed up in two words: ’80s realness. The album is reminiscent of the era when malls were social epicenters, keytars were as commonplace as fingerless leather gloves and the height of one’s hair was determined by how close one was to God. “I wanted to write an album of music

Art Credit

that I wanted to listen to,” Holliday explained.   Holliday said he appreciates fans’ support of his previous work. However, he’s enjoyed the artistic freedom of being able to write a pop record without having to balance it out with the heavier post-hardcore sounds many listeners expect of him. “It was risky, and I’m sure I did lose some fans,” said Holliday. “[But] I wanted to make an album where you almost take an old school Madonna song or a Janet Jackson song and just beef the fuck out of it with modern production and fatter bass.” From the vintage electronic drum sounds and moving bass lines to the catchy vocal melodies and shimmery synth, Touch weaves in everything amazing about ’80s pop but delivers it with a modern thickness and clarity. With audiences craving things nineteen-eighty-something — Netflix’s Stranger Things and FX’s Pose, for example — the record’s 11 songs seem perfectly tailored for the zeitgeist. “This is the first time that I was like, ‘You know what? I’m changing everything, I’m going full on pop,’” said Holliday, who said he isn’t going to tour or even holding an album release show to promote the record. Instead, he hopes to get the music licensed for commercials, TV shows and films. Touch is available most streaming platforms and available for download at panicdivision.bandcamp.com.

Find more musicmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


FRI • AUGUST 16 AARON LEWIS, STATE I’M IN TOUR W/ BEN DANAHER

S AT • A U G U S T 1 7 JAKE PENROD

FRI • AUGUST 23 LOGAN SAMFORD (OF SHOTGUN RIDER) TRISTON MAREZ

S AT • A U G U S T 2 4 AUGIE MEYERS COUNTRY DANCE GEORGE CHAMBERS & THE COUNTRY GENTLEMEN

FRI • AUGUST 30 CHRIS KNIGHT

GIOVANNIE AND THE HIRED GUNS

S AT • A U G U S T 3 1 KIN FAUX JESSEE LEE

L I V E AT F L O O R E S . C O M

14492 OLD BANDERA RD. HELOTES, TX 78023 48

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com


Art Credit

Vinyl Haven

East Coast brothers’ Crazy Rhythms Records trades on their eclectic tastes BY CHRIS CONDE

A

record by Nigerian guitarist King Sunny Ade played in the background at San Antonio’s Crazy Rhythms Records as a handful of people browsed its racks last week. Though there were

already hundreds of records its shelves, the open room had that still-unpacking vibe. Little art or decoration hung on its walls. Crazy Rhythms Records opened a month ago at 3617 Broadway Suite 402 in a cluster of shops along Avenue B

near Brackenridge Park. “Even before we moved here, we knew that this was a good city to try this thing out,” said Zeke Baker, a New York City transplant who opened the store with his twin brother Zach. “Corpus felt too small. Here, most people in the record community have been pretty friendly to us. It feels like a big enough city that we can carve out a niche and feel like we’re not stepping on anyone’s toes.” The Bakers’ parents retired a decade ago in Corpus Christi, and since San Antonio was a nearby city the twins were familiar with — thanks to extended family located here — they chose it for

MAJESTIC THEATRE

Spend an evening going behind the scenes at the historic Majestic Theatre!

their fledgling business venture. Though the brothers’ primary goal is to provide a wide selection of DIY and punk vinyl, they’re still figuring out what else San Antonians wants from them. After moving from Houston to NYC in the early-’90s, the Bakers fell in love with hip-hop, including Houston’s Geto Boys, and hardcore punk such as that released by DC’s Dischord Records. They began collecting vinyl and selling it at punk gigs and record shows on the East Coast. During that era, CDs were the dominant medium, and few artists outside of hip-hop and punk were releasing vinyl. Eventually, the Bakers’ love for discovering led to them programming for radio stations such as East Strasburg University’s 90.3 WESS and WMUH 91.7 FM in Allentown, Pennsylvania. “We would play King Sunny Ade next to punk rock next to dub reggae next to soul next to hip-hop. It didn’t matter,” Zeke Baker said. Being able to play whatever they wanted kept up the brothers’ interest in digging for old vinyl since they could share their finds with a larger audience. Spending a few minutes in the shop, it’s almost impossible not to find something of interest. Among its inventory were early Fugees vinyl, a black metal tape and an LP from indie singer-songwriter Amen Dunes. Beyond the diversity, the store was stocked with classic albums any appreciator of music would want in their collection — David Bowie, Madonna and Wu-Tang Clan, for example. Rather than dumping bad country and mediocre gospel music into its racks — you know, the shit you sift through at vintage shops — it seemed like the brothers were actively curating their collection. Indeed, the Bakers said they put new vinyl in the bins every day with an eye on keeping the inventory fresh — and something customers will actually want to make part of their own collections. “We’re pricing every day,” Zach Baker said. “So, our stock is never going to be stale.”

JULY 22 & AUGUST 12 5PM & 6PM

800.982.2787 sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

49


Open 3p-2a Everyday • Happy Hour 3-7pm Daily

MONDAYS: $5 COMBOS TUESDAYS: SHOT SPECIALS ALL DAY:

POOL • DARTS • PING PONG

$2.75 WELLS • $2 ZIEGENBOCK DRAFT

ENJOY OUR PATIO AREA

“RIVER RAT SPECIAL” ALWAYS!

PSYCHIC HAPPY HOUR EVERY TUESDAY • FROM 6:30 - 8:30PM DJ and No Cover Saturday Nights

N. Presa St.

E. Houston St.

College St.

50

RIVERTINI AWARD WINNER 600 N. Presa St. Inside the Maverick Building 210.267.9885 THELOCALBARSA.COM LIKE US ON FB: THELOCALBARSA

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

200 10141 Wurzbach, San Antonio, Texas 78230 • (210) 877-2100 wurzbachicehouse.com • Corner of Ironside and Wurzbach


music | calendar

Friday, August 16

top pick

STICK TO YOUR GUNS

While this veteran California band’s name may have aged poorly, the sheer release offered by its melodic brand of hardcore punk music may be just what you need to press on through these difficult times. $20-$22, 6 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – James Courtney

RUFF WIZARD, SHIVERY SHAKES, FAUXSTER

The impeccably named Ruff Wizard headlines a diverse bill of eclectic rock. Ruff Wizard aspires to invoked Steely Dan — and succeeds — while Shivery Snakes serves up surf-flavored indie-pop sounds. Free, 10 p.m., The Mix, 2423 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 735-1313, themixsa.com. — Mike McMahan

Saturday, August 17

ANITRA JAY Nadev Benjamin

Y LA BAMBA

Wednesday, August 14 The artist known as Y La Bamba doesn’t exactly fit into one genre. Yet, in a strangely cohesive way, she manages to weave together elements of indie rock and experimental music to create a sound similar to early St. Vincent, only more Latin sounding. Y La Bamba is heading to San Antonio in support of her newly released record Mujeres, and if you dig experimental and unexpected elements with your indie rock, this may be a show to mark on the calendar. San Antonio R&B-rock outfit Idyll Green opens the night. $12-$15, 8 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 841-3771, papertigersatx.com. — Chris Conde

Anitra Jay, a Houston-based acoustic soul artist, excels at crafting and performing music that incorporates elements of gospel and soul, while also achieving the sensuality of R&B. In the live setting, with or without her backing band, this young performer demonstrates an uncommon ability to capture an audience. Free, 9:30 p.m., Bar 301, 23567 W. Interstate 10 Frontage Road, (210) 455-9576, bar301.com. — JC

JAKE PENROD

A new school honky-tonk purveyor from East Texas, Jake

top pick

SISTER HAZEL

Known for their harmony-heavy, ’90s rock radio mainstay “All for You”, Sister Hazel is the epitome of the slightly melancholy alternative rock sound prevalent in that decade. And they’re still around to keep serving it up. $20-$100, 7:45 p.m., Sam’s Burger Joint, 330 E. Grayson St., (210) 223-2830, samsburgerjoint.com. — CC

ELECTRIC FEELS: INDIE ROCK + INDIE DANCE PARTY

If your eclectic musical palette rejects the Billboard Hot 100 hits that haunt the club scene, but you still want to dance your ass off, Electric Feels may be your kind of party. Soundtracked by cool — and Pitchfork-approved — bangers from not-super-mainstream bands such as MGMT, Vampire Weekend and Neon Indian, here’s one dance party you don’t have to excuse as “my one ironic guilty pleasure.” $10-$15, 9 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. — SS

Thursday, August 22 Japanese three-piece Boris is unique in the post-rock genre. The band manages to walk a fine line between droning metal and boundary-stretching experimental music while continuing to innovate over the course of a career that’s spanned 20-plus albums. It’s been lauded by the press, composed an avant-metal soundtrack to Jim Jarmusch’s film The Limits of Control and collaborated with artists ranging from Sunn O))) to the Cult’s Ian Astbury. New York’s abrasive noise rockers Uniform round out the bill. $17-$19, 8 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 841-3771, papertigersatx.com. — CC

SKATENIGS

Thursday, August 15 Alaska’s endless stretches of barren isolation and frigid darkness have nothing on tundra goth duo Cliff and Ivy. Hailing from the glumly nicknamed “Last Frontier” — literally, America’s darkest state — the married duo perfectly channels the eerie mysticism their homeland. Free, 10 p.m., The Mix, 2423 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 735-1313, themixsa.com. — Shannon Sweet

BORIS, UNIFORM

Sargent House

Penrod has all the right moves and all the right twang you’ll need to give your dusty boots a workout. Think Ernest Tubb or Bob Wills, but with some slight, and mostly pleasant, updates. Free, 9 p.m., John T. Floore Country Store, 14492 Old Bandera Road, Helotes, liveatfloores.com. — Jay Nanda

Wednesday, August 14

CLIFF AND IVY

top pick

THE B-52S, OMD

Joseph Cultice

Wednesday, August 21

Pioneering new wave and art-pop band the B-52s is marking its 40th anniversary with a big tour that includes a stop in SA. From Athens, Georgia, and formed in the mid-1970s, the band took the rock and art-rock innovations of previous decades and melded them with elements of the burgeoning punk scene. In so doing, they helped shape what popular music would become in the 1980s. And, while it may not be common to hear your favorite artists list the B-52s among their direct influences, the band’s legacy paved the way for much of the electronic/rock/dance hybrids so common today. The B-52s appreciation for quirk and kitsch also helped shape the aesthetics of punk in its many permutations. Whether or not the B-52s are part of your nostalgia trip, it’s not every day that you get to catch such an influential — if underrated — band in action. $69.50-

$149.50, 7 p.m., Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., (210) 2263333, majesticempire.com. — JC

Formed after Ministry needed an opening band for a Texas date, Austin’s Skatenigs went on to pioneer a party-boy take on industrial rock that pulled in audiences until its breakup in the mid ’90s. However, over the past couple years, the band has made surprise Alamo City appearances for folks who still dig grinding electronic sounds mixed with heavy guitars. $7-$15, 8 p.m., Limelight, 2718 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 735-7775, thelimelightsa.com. — CC

VOODOO BOOGALOO

Returning from a performance sabbatical, indie duo Voodoo Boogaloo are back to share new music that pushes the boundaries of trip-hop, psychedelia, rap and electronic music. Free, 10 p.m., Dorćol Distilling + Brewing Co., 1902 S. Flores St., (210) 229-0607, dorcolspirits.com. — CC

JAKOB OGAWA

The bedroom pop Renaissance is here, and Norway’s Jakob Ogawa here to make fans, one dreamy soundscape at a time. Mellow guitar work, minimalistic synths and lo-fi production paired with Ogawa’s soulful-yet-airy voice evoke memories of quiet time with a lover in cozy apartment cooled by an evening breeze. $15-$18, 8 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. Saint Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. — SS sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

51


music | calendar top pick

Friday, August 23

LOS LONELY BOYS, LISA MORALES

San Angelo’s Garza brothers have come a long way from their 2005 Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Duo/Group. Which, in turn, was a long way since being discovered by Wille Nelson’s nephew and recording a 2003 debut album at the studios of Willie himself and having him appear on the record. Who knows? If they keep building, their “Texican” blues rock might one day approach legendary status of another band with a drummer named Ringo. $35, 7 p.m., Gruene Hall, 1281 Gruene Road, New Braunfels, (830) 606-1281, gruenehall.com. — JN

ZOSO: THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE

The music of Plant, Page, Jones and Bonham comes alive with a bell-bottomed, unbuttoned-shirt tribute band that has played more than 2,400 shows as a touring act over 18 years, including Bonnaroo. $22.75-$37.75, 8 p.m., Charline McCombs Empire Theatre, 226 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 226-5700, majesticempire.com. — JN

MOBLEY

Punctuated by percussive pops and clicks, Mobley’s sly bass rhythms and pop vocal melodies make it hard not to move your hips. Hey, was that a rhyme? Oh, well. Close enough. $10-$45, 8 p.m., Sam’s Burger Joint, 330 E. Grayson St., (210) 223-2830, samsburgerjoint.com. — CC

William Thoren

GEORGE CLINTON, FISHBONE, DUMPSTAPHUNK, MISS VELVET AND THE BLUE WOLF

Friday, August 23 This tour celebrating George Clinton’s 50 years on the road is being billed as his last. Yep, the mastermind behind Parliament and Funkadelic — two of the most influential acts of the ’70s — is retiring, but not before throwing a massive party before he gets the funk out of here. For those who need a little history, Funkadelic brought black music to white audiences by adding a syncopated beat to psychedelic rock, while Parliament infused science fiction into black culture by blending space-age theatrics with grooves even James Brown and Sly Stone could envy. Clinton’s support acts on this tour are testament to just how many generations have felt his influence. The only surprise here is that there’s no hip-hop on the bill, given how often rappers have sampled the big man over the decades. $39.50-$203, 7 p.m., Aztec Theatre, 104 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 812-4355, theaztectheatre.com. — Sanford Nowlin

Saturday, August 17

Sunday, August 18

WEEZHUR

HIKES, KINGS OF HECK, GRANITE HANS

Five months ago, the real singers of “Beverly Hills” and “The Sweater Song” were scheduled to be one of the main attractions at the since-canceled 2019 River City Rockfest. But no need to look far for the next-best thing. This aptly named tribute act hails from Houston, has opened for 3 Doors Down and Theory of a Deadman (the real versions) and figures to play all the hits including Toto’s “Africa.” Because what’s better than a band covering a band, than a band covering a band covering another band? $15-$25, 8 p.m., Aztec Theatre,104 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 812-4355, theaztectheatre.com. — JN

WIZZERD, WARLUNG, BURN RITUAL

Wizzerd creates soundtracks that are equally appropriate for Dungeons & Dragons tournaments and green-hazed bong sessions. That’s to say, the band’s complex album concepts are on par with Tolkien’s worldbuilding, yet it can keep chest-beating rock fans happy with sludgy, booming vocals and melting guitar solos. Free, 10 p.m., Faust Tavern, 517 E. Woodlawn Ave., facebook.com/ thefausttavern, (210) 257-0628. — SS

What better way to spend a Sunday night and pretend Monday isn’t right around the corner than enjoying a diverse, high-caliber bill of local indie rock? $7-$12, 9 p.m., Limelight, 2718 N. St. Mary’s St., thelimelightsa.com. — JN

Monday, August 19

LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND

The Houston-area native and master of blending country, Americana and big band sounds is once again bringing his all-star outfit to town. $45-$85, 7:30 p.m., Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., (210) 226-3333, majesticempire. com. — JC

Wednesday, August 21

ABBARAMA

If you guessed that Abb— Oh, I just can’t. The name serves as a dead giveaway of what to expect from this tribute act: classic Abba material, live band, great clothes, good times. $21-$25, 9 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. — MM

top pick AUGIE MEYERS’ COUNTRY DANCE

Courtesy of Augie Meyers

Saturday, August 24 Augie Meyers, who any music fan should know as a founding member of wildly influential bands the Sir Douglas Quintet and the Texas Tornadoes, is a Texas music icon. Hell, he’s an American treasure at this point — at least to the extent that Texas is willing to share him. The San Antonio-born and -based songwriter, accordionist and keyboard whiz has played on albums with the likes of Bob Dylan and Tom Waits, just to name a few. He’s also released a steady stream of solo material since the early ’70s that blends rock with soul, Tejano, country and more. Suffice to say, we owe a great deal of what we call the Tex-Mex sound to Meyers. Any chance to see the legend is a no-brainer. As such, we’d highly recommend you make it out to Floore’s as Meyers and band, as well as George Chambers and the Texas Gentleman, offer up something in the vein of an old-fashioned back-to-school dance. $20-$40, 8:30 p.m., John T. Floore Country Store, 14492 Old Bandera Road, Helotes, liveatfloores.com. — JC


music | calendar PEPE AGUILAR

Saturday, August 24 Pepe Aguilar is a multiple Grammy and Latin Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter who has sold more than 12 million albums worldwide. That makes him a bonafide Mexican-American icon, beloved on both sides of the border. The San Antonio-born Aguilar — by chance, his parents happened to be on tour here on his day of birth — is also an actor and belongs to a family of popular singers and actors. Excelling at everything from mariachi and ranchera music to Latin rock and pop, the 50-yearold performer can blend or switch styles song to song in a way that makes him a touchstone for other artists seeking larger audiences via a fusion of American and Latin styles. Calling Aguilar — who’s been onstage since he was 3  — a consummate, can’t-miss performer would actually be an understatement. $42-$182.50, 8 p.m., AT&T Center, One AT&T Center, (210) 444-5000, attcenter.com. — JC

Friday, August 23

SLEEPING PILLS, DEAD OF NIGHT, SHEER FORMAT

A clash of styles hits the St. Mary’s Strip with the Sleeping Pills, a punk-surf act from Tampa, Florida, hitting the stage at 12:30 a.m. Middle-billed Dead of Night bring a darker style of punk at to the stage, while openers Sheer Format specialize in darkwave and electronic punk. In other words, there’s no shortage of punk to get your punk on. We’re talking to you, punk! Free, 10 p.m., The Mix, 2423 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 735-1313, themixsa.com. — JN

“TURNED THE TREND OF TYPICAL VAPING AND SMOKE SHOPS TO THE MODERN ERA...” -A. M . , GOOGLE REVIEW

“NICE STOCK AND EXCELLENT CUSTOMER SERVICE THAT VIBES WITH THE HOME FEELING...” -N. T., GOOGLE REVIEW

“QUALITY PRODUCTS AND HAVE EVERYTHING FROM VAPING GEAR TO GLASS PIPES AND CIGARS...” -M. D. , GOOGLE REVIEW

“I GIVE THIS PLACE 10 STARS OUT OF 5! BEST SMOKE SHOP I’VE BEEN TO...” -R. M . , GOOGLE REVIEW

HAPPY HOUR PRICING!

top pick

Art Credit

PEARL CHARLES, MOCKINGBIRD EXPRESS

This bill offers both an early start and a low cover. LA’s Pearl Charles brings a roots rock sound with a maturity beyond her years, while Mockingbird Express serves up a sizzling take on psychedelic blues. $4, 4 p.m., Lonesome Rose, 2114 N. St. Mary’s, 210-455-0233, thelonesomerose.com. — MM

Saturday, August 24

SHAKEY GRAVES, DR. DOG

Honored with an official day in his Austin hometown, Shakey Graves has done it all. After landing bit acting parts in Spy Kids 3D: Game Over and Friday Night Lights, he became an Americana singer-songwriter, strumming his guitar while keeping rhythm with a foot-powered cymbal and bass drum. Lately, he’s been touring with fellow musicians, so he doesn’t have to cover all the parts. Dr. Dog is sing-along psych-pop that sounds like what the Flaming Lips might sound like if they came back to Earth. $26.33 - $875.75, 7 p.m., Whitewater Amphitheater, 11860 FM 306, (830) 964-3800, whitewaterrocks.com. — SS

1964 THE TRIBUTE

Tribute acts may be all the rage these days, but Beatles tributes were the trailblazers and still remain the gold standard. This show focuses on the Fab Four’s earlier material and the band strives to create a concert that the audience might have experienced in… wait for it… 1964. $34-$49, 7 p.m., Charline McCombs Empire Theater, 224 E Houston St, (210) 226-5700, majesticempire.com. — MM

top pick LIL BOOTY CALL

Claire Marie Vogel

Saturday, August 24 San Antonio’s Lil Booty Call, whose debut LP Jesus Said Run It Back dropped this summer on Warner Records, performs a form of sad-boy trap that’s won an enormous following across the country. After his track “Sailor Moon” blew up via Soundcloud, Call grabbed the attention of several record labels. A sold-out performance at the Roxy in Los Angeles landed him a deal with one of the majors. His success may confirm the notion that in hip-hop today you only need to have one song blow up on the internet to launch a career. $15-$17, 9 p.m., Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 841-3771, papertigersatx.com.

— CC

TUESDAY + WEDNESDAY FROM 4-7PM! 10% OFF ALL MERCHANDISE EXCLUDING TOBACCO PRODUCTS. 201

3 CONVENIENT SAN ANTONIO LOCATIONS

9 f in

ali

st

9822 Potranco Rd #115 • 210.684.2285 19422 U.S. Highway 281 N. #105 • 210.251.4058 7325 N Loop 1604 W STE 101 • 210.988.3720


3 3 0 e g r ay s o n s t SISTER HAZEL WED. AUG14 | DOORS: 7:00 P | SHOW: 7:45 P

DUBBEST + BUM LUCKY WITH SALTWATER SLIDE THU. AUG 15 | DOORS: 7 P | SHOW: 8 P THUR, AUG 15TH

CLIFF AND IVY

Spook San Antonio W/ DJ Ely Bat

SCOTT H. BIRAM FRI. AUG 16 | DOORS: 8 P | SHOW: 9 P

VIBES EVENT CENTER 8/30 - MOLOTOV 9/25 - MARINAS TRENCH - SUSPENDING GRAVITY TOUR 9/27 - STARSET 10/15 - MOTIONLESS IN WHITE 10/19 - SKILLET & ALTER BRIDGE VICTORIOUS SKY TOUR

TERRI HENDRIX WITH LLOYD MAINES + ADAM & CHRIS CARROLL SAT. AUG 17 | DOORS: 7 P | SHOW: 8 P

FRI, AUG 16TH

CHRIS TAYLOR

THE HAYRIDE HOP WITH SOPHIA JOHNSON

SUN. AUG 18 | DOORS: 5:30 P | SHOW: 6:15 P

MON. AUG 19 | DOORS: 7:30 P | SHOW: 8 P

TEXAS SUMMER SPICE

Ruff Wizard, Shivery Shakes, & Fauxster

THE ROCKBOX: LIVE MUSIC & BAR STORYTIME WITH JAMIE LIN WILSON AND DALTON DOMINO WED. AUG 21 | DOORS: 7 P | SHOW: 8 P

THE ARISTOCRATS THU. AUG 22 | DOORS: 7 P | SHOW: 8 P

FRI, AUG 23TH

SLEEPING PILLS

Dead of Night, & The Cramp

MOBLEY

BRASS IN POCKET + FIRE & ICE

FRI. AUG 23 | DOORS: 8 P | SHOW: 9 P

SAT. AUG 24 | DOORS: 8 P | SHOW: 9 P

9/5 - LIL GOTIT 9/11 - GIRL ULTRA & CLUBZ: THE FINESSE RECORDS WORLD TOUR 9/29 - NONPOINT 9/21 - JINGER 9/22 - GEOFF TATE'S-OPERATION: MINDCRIME

FRI, AUG 24TH

COMMUNITY HOUSE: ALL THINGS DANCE

KEN SLAVIN’S SWINGING BIRTHDAY BASH SUN. AUG 25| DOORS: 5 P | SHOW: 6 P

THE HAYRIDE HOP WITH DEVAN JONES AND THE UPTOWN STOMP

TBA

MON. AUG 26 | DOORS: 7:30 P | SHOW: 8 P

FRI, OCT 25TH

MY EDUCATION

samsburgerjoint. com 54

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019 | sacurrent.com

VIBES UNDERGROUND

MON–FRI | 4pm – 2am SAT–SUN | 5pm – 2am 2423 N St Mary’s St | TheMixSA.com

TO PURCHASE TICKETS AT ANY OF OUR OUTLETS: Box Office at The Rock Box | Mon-Sat:10am-5pm www.ticketfly.com 1223 E Houston St. SA, TX 78205 www.therockboxsa.com


CHECK-IN ON

FOR 20% OFF

OPEN DAILY: 7AM - 2AM | 9405 IH-35 @ THOUSAND OAKS | 11827 HWY 281 N @ NAKOMA | 404-0011

MEGAPLEXSA.COM | MILITARY 20% OFF EVERY DAY WITH VALID I.D.

25%

OFF ANY PURCHASE W I T H T H I S A D | E X P I RE S S E P T. 30 T H , 2 0 1 9 . VALID AT EITHER SAN ANTONIO LOCATION. EXCLUDING SALE ITEMS.

FOLLOW US FOR THE LATEST ON CLASSES, EVENTS, SPECIALS & MORE sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019 | CURRENT

55


etc J O N E S I N ’ C R OS S W O R D BY M AT T J O N E S

Playmates and soul mates...

San Antonio:

210-320-5825 18+ MegaMates.com

The hottest place for latin chat.

“Inseparable”— almost always one with the other.

HALF HOUR FREE TRIAL

210-447-1103 fonochatlatino.com

FREE TRIAL

Discreet Chat Guy to Guy

210.320.6103 18+

Real Singles, Real Fun... 30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

1-210-933-1103 Real hot chat now. 56

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019

| sacurrent.com

More Numbers: 1-800-926-6000 Livelinks.com 18+

30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

210-933-1113

ACROSS 1 Take quickly 5 Jackson who was a guest judge on “RuPaul’s Drag Race” 11 IRA type 14 Senator’s assistant 15 Words after bump or ants 16 Dr. Zaius, e.g. 17 Classic role-playing game designed by Gary Gygax 20 Fourth letter of two alphabets 21 Drag around 22 “All right, I get it” 23 Humanities major 24 Ladder rung 26 Lost in thought 28 Barnyard noise 29 San Francisco Bay structure 30 Team behind “The Mikado” 38 Muscat’s location 39 Highland Games gear 40 “The Andy Griffith Show” boy 41 2000s series with Sally Field and Calista Flockhart 44 1/2/34, for instance 45 Part of UNLV 46 “The Lorax” voice actor 49 “Go ___” (Pet Shop Boys song) 51 BB___ (English pop group behind “Back Here”) 54 MLB Triple Crown stat 55 It may go for a long swim

56 Mirror reflection 58 Subject of some educational museums 62 Queen ___ (pop music nickname) 63 “Just a Friend” rapper Biz ___ 64 Skin breakout 65 Show with a cold open, for short 66 Organizer’s area of focus, maybe 67 Alternative to fries, in some restaurants DOWN 1 “In-A-___-Da-Vida” 2 Motorcyclist 3 Ticket price category 4 Muppet who turned 50 in 2019 5 Mauna ___ (macadamia nut brand) 6 Geometry calculation 7 Prepare to score on a fly ball 8 Couturier Cassini 9 ___-hoo (drink brand) 10 “... long, long ___” 11 Decaf brand that once sponsored “I Love Lucy” 12 Type of bath salts 13 Annoying, like tiny insects 18 Like Ray Romano’s voice quality 19 Flawless solving result? 25 Converses with

26 Some trains in the Thomas the Tank Engine universe 27 Hit the gas pedal 28 Small ‘90s-era storage medium 29 Type of helmet 30 Emote on stage, say 31 Ball club VIPs 32 Egypt’s org., once 33 Lo-cal, in ads 34 Simple sandwich 35 May preceder (abbr.) 36 “___ the season to be jolly” 37 “Castlevania” gaming platform 42 Cookie bit 43 First Top 40 hit for “Weird” Al 46 In ___ and drabs (sporadically) 47 “The Beverly Hillbillies” star Buddy 48 LPs 49 Best-seller list heading 50 “Westworld” character Hughes 51 First name heard at pools? 52 Hollywood power player 53 Alan who lost to Obama in 2004 55 100 cents, for some 57 Aspiring MD’s hurdle 59 Hip-hop’s Run-___ 60 Suffix for senator or president 61 Volleyball divider ANSWERS ON PAGE 18


Get a Better, Healthy Career! Train in Massage Therapy & Integrative Medicine, 650 hrs, in the Hill Country near Garner State Park, Sat. & Sun. 10-6 pm 9/14/19 to 5/24/20. Full Info: integrativehealingtx.com

sacurrent.com/slideshows

Playmates and soul mates...

E M P LOY M E N T

San Antonio:

18+ MegaMates.com

210-320-5825 Financial Analyst needed for Quest Fuel, San Antonio, TX; Anlyz’g fin’l status & dvlpg fin’l

The hottest place for latin chat.

plans based on analysis of data & discussing fin’l options w/ the mgmt; Conduct’g quantitative analyses of info affect’g investment progs of the co; Revising plans based on modified needs or changes in investmnt mrkt; Using SAP

HALF HOUR FREE TRIAL

210-447-1103

Fonochatlatino.com

FREE TRIAL

Discreet Chat Guy to Guy

ERP, PDI Ascend & BizInsight

18+

210.320.6103

to dvlp systs that enable better understand’g of bus activities & improve cash flow; assist in bus investmnts & long-term fin’l plann’g; dvlp short-term & long

Real Singles, Real Fun...

term budgets & fin’l forecast’g.

30 Minutes free for Men, always free for ladies.

Req’s BBA & 2yrs exp. F/T, mail

1-210-933-1103

res to 12054 Starcrest Drive, 2nd Fl, San Antonio, TX 78247.

More Numbers: 1-800-926-6000 Livelinks.com 18+

Real hot chat now.

30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

210-933-1113

sacurrent.com | August 14-27, 2019

| CURRENT

57


NOW OPEN

@10538 POTRANCO RD CALL NOW 210 802 4599

FIRST CLASS FREE 13 STUDIOS IN SAN ANTONIO

VI S I T OR A N G ETH EO RYF ITNESS . CO M TO F IND YO U R NEAR E ST LO C AT I O N 58

CURRENT | August 14-27, 2019

| sacurrent.com


Profile for Euclid Media Group

San Antonio Current – August 14, 2019  

San Antonio Current – August 14, 2019