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in this issue Issue 18_35 /// August 29-September 4, 2018

San Antonio Current Publisher: Michael Wagner Editor-in-Chief: Greg Jefferson

Editorial

Senior Editors: Bryan Rindfuss, Jessica Elizarraras Art Director: Carlos Aguilar Food & Nightlife Editor: Jessica Elizarraras Staff Writers: Chris Conde, Sanford Nowlin Digital Content Editor: Sarah Martinez Contributors: Alexis Alvarez , Ron Bechtol, Erik Casarez, James Courtney, Callie Enlow, Jose Garza, Dan R. Goddard, Alejandra Lopez Gonzalez, Lance Higdon, Steven G. Kellman, Hannah Lorence, Michelle C. Lorentzen, Abby Mangel, Kiko Martínez, Jeremy Martin, Kelly Merka Nelson, M. Solis, Gary Sweeney, J.D. Swerzenski, Kelsey Valadez, Erin Winch Editorial Interns: Alisa Pierce, Lori Salazar, Camille Sauers, Victoria Wilson

Advertising

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Marketing and Events

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Creative Services

Creative Services Manager: Tina Corbeil Graphic Designer: Samantha Serna Graphic Design Interns: Michelle Moreno, Shelby Pinto, Noemi Solis

Circulation

Circulation Manager: Justin Giles

Business

21 Feature

College Guide

Shutterstock

43 Screens

Thank God for the River Walk

Burning Bright

Ethan Hawke’s music biopic gets to the true essence of late country songwriter Blaze Foley

The Feds back local fair-housing advocate in a potentially game-changing suit against Facebook

Retrospective reveals the artistic evolution of late San Antonio painter Alberto Mijangos 4

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55 Music

Texas Music Festivals to Look Forward to This Fall (When It’s Not Disgustingly Hot)

Our top picks for the week

Hidden Treasure

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What’s the Big Deal with Big Give?

After a computer glitch two years ago, the Big Give S.A. owns up to another problem

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Our 2018 College Guide offers students advice on how to eat cheaply but well, where to go for a cheap date, finding the hot study spots off-campus, how to get along with your roommates, and more. Art dierction by Carlos Aguilar

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news

What’s the Big Deal with Big Give? After a computer glitch two years ago, the Big Give S.A. owns up to another problem BY SANFORD NOWLIN

T

his month, organizers of Big Give S.A., one of South Texas’ highest-profile fundraising events, sent an email to participants saying they had found “what appeared to be examples of agencies manipulating the system in order to win more prize money.” Big Give, which awards cash to nonprofits based on their success spurring individual donations in a one-day online drive, said an audit after its March 22, 2018, event turned up the apparent scheming. What’s more, such audits will be part of its process going forward. “I wanted to give (the agencies) the benefit of explaining,” said Scott McAninch, CEO of The Nonprofit Council, the event’s lead agency. “But when you have a donor who’s got 30 different emails, there’s something going on there.” McAninich contacted three nonprofits, which he declined to identify, and asked them about donations they received from suspicious email accounts. After establishing some were erroneous, The Nonprofit Council re-awarded some of its prizes, he added. The five-year-old event, modeled after others around the country, helps nonprofits raise their community profile while driving extra donations. Some of its thousands of dollars in cash prizes are determined by how many individual donations agencies can rack up.

Switching Platforms This year’s phony-email scheme isn’t the first bug to bite the Big Give in recent years. In 2016, technical glitches crashed its old donation platform, cutting off potential contributors and leaving the event short of its fundraising goal. Subsequently, local techies helped point the organizers to another online platform called GiveGab. But that upgrade became part of the Big Give’s latest problem, McAninch said. The previous system tracked donations by credit card numbers, making it difficult to trick. GiveGab, on the other hand, only asks for email addresses. As a result, it’s possible to split a contribution between multiple fake identities, so they’re counted as multiple

Big Give S.A.’s Facebook

donations at prize time. “We are trying to be transparent with our nonprofits about how we’re handling it,” he said. “This isn’t something where we’re just going to spot-check the results.” So, problem solved. Or is it? Even before the latest Big Give, nonprofits raised questions about whether some were manipulating the process, either by creating fake accounts or registering in less-competitive categories. “It’s something that came up repeatedly,” said one person familiar with the event’s logistics who declined to be named. San Antonio World Affairs Council Development Director Laura Villarreal, who participated in four Big Gives while working for other nonprofits, understands why agencies might feel the pressure to play games. Some rely on it as their biggest annual fundraiser. “That’s the blessing and curse of the Big Give,” she added.

Slipping interest Competition or no, Big Give participation has slipped since the 2016 glitch, dropping from a high of 1,050 organizations that year to 613 in 2018. Its $5.1 million in donations the latest go-round also landed shy of its $7 million goal. Observers say the event’s fee structure may shoulder some blame. Chow Train, a group that feeds homeless people, sent an email to supporters in May 2017 saying it was dropping from the event because “a nonprofit shouldn’t have to pay to play.”

The email cites the Big Give’s decision to assess a $200 charge to each nonprofit, regardless of its budget, on top of the cut it takes from each donation. According to the Big Give website, those include a 2 percent service charge for GiveGab, a 2.2 percent credit card processing fee plus 30 cents, and another 1 percent each for The Nonprofit Council and the San Antonio Area Foundation, its main partner in the Big Give. “This year, we feel as though BigGiveSA (sic) has added insult to injury by assessing a fee to every nonprofit registered — and not on a sliding scale,” the Chow Train email said. Officials with the organization didn’t respond to interview requests. Revenues from the Big Give accounted for nearly $123,000 of The Nonprofit Council’s revenues for the fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 2017, according to its tax filings. That was the single biggest contribution to its $256,000 in total program service revenue. “(The fees) are not something outrageous, but I think they could be difficult for some small nonprofits,” said Kelly Toepperwein, annual campaign manager for the DoSeum, a regular Big Give participant. McAninch said the fees, which cover participant training and marketing materials, are in line with those of other giving days. Lorna Stafford, marketing director for the Area Foundation, said her organization remains a supportive partner and approves of the way The Nonprofit Council handled the recent email discrepancies. “I’m glad they found it,” she said. “I’m glad they acknowledged it, and they’re doing something about it.”

Find more newsmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


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8/22/18 11:45 AM


news | city current Thank God for the River Walk Unless you’re a tourist, you’re probably not within walking distance of a city park BY GREG JEFFERSON

T

he nonprofit Trust for Public Land has set a worthy goal for U.S. cities to aim for as they build up their park systems – see to it that every resident is no more than a 10-minute walk from the nearest park. The benefits of making that a reality would be huge. Residents would be healthier and enjoy a higher quality of life. The regional economy would be better off since parks, hike-and-bike trails and greenspace matter to many of the professionals talented enough to be choosy about where they live and work. Last week, the San Francisco-based Trust released its annual report on how the 100 biggest cities are doing in developing their parks and the progress they’ve made toward the goal of parks-accessibility for everyone. The headline news for San Antonio: The conventioneers and tourists filling the city’s downtown hotels are lucky – they’re less than 10 minutes from a park. In fact, the report identified the River Walk as the eighth most visited public park in the nation in 2017, with 12 million visitors. Locals, of course, make up some slice of that total. Occasionally, a San Antonian or two, maybe more, will make it to the crowded walkways snaking through the heart of downtown. Or they’ll explore the Museum Reach to the north or the Mission Reach to the south, both extensions of the River Walk. The linear park – and, for real, it is defined as a park – extends 15 miles from Brackenridge Park to the Spanish missions. “We include the whole stretch,” said Charlie McCabe, director of the Trust’s Center for City Park Excellence and one of the report’s authors. Unfortunately, no other San Antonio parks made it into the top 100 – not even Hemisfair Park, which is espe-

cially galling. After all, the city and the nonprofit corporation charged with developing the center-city park, historic site of the 1968 World’s Fair, showed so much concern for visitors that they agreed last year to lop off five acres for a 200-room boutique hotel as well as up to 800 parking spaces, 385 housing units and office space. The $200-million development by a Zachry Hospitality affiliate and its partners will be adjacent to the nine-acre Civic Park in Hemisfair. San Antonio, a parks-poor city? Yes, but... *shrug* So maybe Hemisfair Park will also win accolades like the River Walk in coming years. But, for now, the news is downhill after the River Walk. The city that’s wrapped around the destination park – well, it leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to greenspace. San Antonio’s park system ranked 67th out of 100, based on factors such as accessibility, acreage and spending. Only 38 percent of San Antonio’s non-visitor population can walk to a park in 10 minutes or less, according to the report. And while city spending on parks has increased in recent years, overall public investment – which also includes county, state and federal agencies – was $126.4 million last year.

That puts San Antonio in ninth place for public spending among the 10 largest U.S. cities. It’s not much better when it comes to private contributions. Nonprofits such as the San Antonio Parks Foundation and conservancies, including the ones focused on Brackenridge and Hardberger parks and Main Plaza, donated $1.5 million to San Antonio parks last year. That put them in eighth place among their counterparts in the 10 biggest cities. “A dim view” is the default setting when it comes to the state of parks and greenspace in San Antonio. Supported by our far-flung highway system, developers spent decades building subdivisions, strip malls and office parks like crazy across the North Side, with elected officials trying, but failing, to keep up with the sprawl. It was almost all about street building and maintenance. Parks were near the bottom of the priority list – and remain pretty far behind streets and sidewalks. But Doug McMurry, president-elect of the San Antonio Parks Foundation and former chairman of the city’s parks advisory board, says the parks pessimism ignores the progress made in recent years. “We’ve seen spending increase over

the last few years,” said McMurry, who’s also head of the local Associated General Contractors trade group. “In general, the trend line is good. I’m not horribly surprised by the statistics [in the Trust report]. In fact, I see some reason for encouragement.” He credits then-Mayor Phil Hardberger with helping turn the city around on parks with the purchase of ranchland deep inside Loop 1604 that would become the 311-acre Hardberger Park. With a bigger focus on greenspace, voters approved increasing amounts of parks spending in the 2007, 2012 and 2017 city bond elections. (They even said “fine” last year to $15 million for the controversial land bridge at Hardberger Park.) Voters have also overwhelmingly supported a sales tax for the build-out of a series of creekway parks and hikeand-bike trails – San Antonio’s “emerald necklace” – which got the Trust’s attention. “You have a pretty aggressive creekside trail system,” McCabe said. Another plus is a city ordinance requiring developers to set aside land for parks in their new subdivisions. This is all encouraging. Maybe, in a decade or two, every San Antonian will get the same benefit out of the city’s parks system as the tourists and convention-goers staying downtown.

sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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news

Sandra Tamez, executive director of the Fair Housing Council of Greater San Antonio, says she is shocked Facebook approved fake discriminatory ads she created.

a

Sanford Nowlin

Filter Fighters The Feds Back Local Fair-Housing Advocate in a Potentially GameChanging Suit Against Facebook BY SANFORD NOWLIN

A

San Antonio fair housing advocate’s anti-discrimination suit against Facebook got a recent booster shot from a pair of U.S. government agencies.   The suit, filed in March by the Fair Housing Council of Greater San Antonio (FHOGSA) and three similar groups, argues the social media giant knowingly 10

lets landlords and property sellers run ads that filter out who sees them based on factors such as race, disability, religion and whether a person has kids. A filing earlier this month by the Justice Department urged the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York to reject Facebook’s motion to dismiss the case, saying the corporation is a content provider and therefore fair game for a housing discrimination suit.  Separately, the Department of Housing and Urban Development filed an administrative complaint against Facebook, saying its filtering options violate the Fair Housing Act by letting advertisers exclude protected classes of people. “We appreciate the strong statements from DOJ and HUD,” said David Berman, an attorney representing FHGSA. “We’re confident that once this case is heard, the court will find that Facebook did violate the law.”  Facebook officials declined to be interviewed for this article, but the company emailed a written response. “There is no place for discrimination on Facebook; it’s strictly prohibited in our policies,” the unattributed statement reads. “Over the past year we’ve strengthened our systems to further protect against misuse. We’re aware of the statement of interest

CURRENT | August 29–September 4, 2018 | sacurrent.com

filed and will respond in court; and we’ll continue working directly with HUD to address their concerns.” What’s more, the company last week announced in a blog post it will kill off 5,000 ad-targeting options to “help prevent misuse,” such as excluding viewers based on ethnicity or religion. 

Blatant Exclusion Even so, the ability to make that kind of exclusion still exists on Facebook, and using it is as simple as clicking a few buttons, said Sandra Tamez, FHGOSA’s executive director. Prior to filing suit, her group generated five fake ads that used the targeting tools to exclude families with children — one of the classes protected under federal law. Facebook approved all five ads. “I was extremely surprised,” Tamez said. “It’s not like there hasn’t been a law forever and a day that says you can’t discriminate against certain classes of people. … Facebook’s categories just so blatantly excluded those groups.” In San Antonio, 235,000 households have at least one child under the age of 18, meaning that in our city alone, the potential for abuse is massive. And if you’re one of the people deliberately

passed over, how would you even know? “The capacity is there,” attorney Berman said. “It would just take one bad actor with a lot of properties to affect hundreds of thousands of apartments.” HUD officials began their Facebook probe after reading a 2016 investigation by online news site ProPublica of the company’s ad platform and a subsequent online rebuttal by Christian Martinez, then its head of U.S. multicultural sales. According to the agency, it’s held ongoing discussions with Facebook and resorted to its administrative action after the company failed to make meaningful changes to its ad policy.   “When Facebook uses the vast amount of personal data it collects to help advertisers to discriminate, it’s the same as slamming the door in someone’s face,” said HUD Assistant Secretary Anna María Farías in a written statement.

‘Engineers Gone Wild’ Housing advocates aren’t the only ones concerned. Earlier this summer, the Communications Workers of America union filed a class-action suit in federal court in San Francisco, alleging Facebook’s ad tools allowed employers to pass over older workers with their job listings. Those complaints have merit, said Roger Entner, founder of Boston-based Recon Analytics, which follows tech trends. What’s more, they hint that the feds are finally realizing society can’t afford to let tech companies operate in a regulatory vacuum. The most likely outcome, he said, is that the government will force limits on Facebook and other data filterers. Targeting dogfood ads to dog owners would be allowed, but filtering out ads for a rental property by race? No way. “Facebook has already proven several times that they’re trying to get away with as little oversight and regulation as possible,” Entner said. “You have to hold their feet to the fire. Up to this point, Silicon Valley has taken the view that if we’re smart enough to do it, we should be allowed to do it. It’s ‘Engineers Gone Wild.’”


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FRI | 8/31 - SUN | 9/2

WED | 8/29 ART

‘DEEP ROOTS: AN INTERSECTION OF BORDERS’ q

Borders are not real. Whether we are talking about the border between two nations or the less-defined (and somehow even more arbitrary) borders between such things as social classes, cultures and genders — we are talking about social constructs, collections of norms and rules that coalesce to make something imaginary seem real. “Deep Roots: An Intersection of Borders,” a new group exhibition curated by Liz Paris and Chris Davila, opens this week with the aim of seeing past borders in our neck of the woods. The five artists showing look to achieve this by visually evoking “the complex network of cultural diversity that San Antonio and the South Texas region were built from and continue to thrive upon.” The diverse exhibition features work by Ruth Buentello, Celeste De Luna, Rafael Fajardo, Joe Harjo and Kathy Vargas. Free, opening reception 5-7pm Wed, on view 10am-4pm Tue-Fri, 1-4pm Sat through October 5, UTSA Main Art Gallery, One UTSA Circle, (210) 458-4391, art.utsa.edu. — James Courtney

SPECIAL EVENT

SAN JAPAN

Cosplayers, furries, steampunks and Lolitas alike are gearing up for San Japan XI: Magical Universe 2018. San Japan is San Antonio’s largest annual anime convention. This year, three separate locations on Market Street downtown will host simultaneous events, including cosplay shows, trivia contests, swap meets and panel discussions on everything from LGBTQ representation in the superhero genre to the history of Asian horror film. There will also be appearances by special guests like voice actresses Kanae Ito (Shugo Chara!) and Natalie Hoover (Sword Art Online), power metal musician RichaadEB and Indonesian cosplayer Frea Mai. On Friday and Saturday, San Japan will go till the break of dawn with an electronic dance party at the Grand Hyatt featuring musical guests W.T. Snacks and DJ Hype Girl (Fri) and Ghost Data and Grimecraft (Sat). Attendees who can’t stay up that late will still get to show off their best moves at the Formal Masquerade Dance (7:30pm-11pm Fri) at the convention center. $31.50-$71.50, noon-4am Fri, 10am-4am Sat, 10am-7:30pm Sun, Henry B. González Convention Center (900 E. Market St.), San Antonio Grand Hyatt Hotel (600 E. Market St.), Marriott Riverwalk Hotel (889 E. Market St.), san-japan.org. – Kiko Martinez Kathy Vargas

ON SALE FRIDAY • MAJESTIC THEATRE • MARCH 19 14

CURRENT | August 29–September 4, 2018 | sacurrent.com


THU | 8/30

FRI | 8/31

ART

FALL EXHIBITIONS AT SOUTHWEST SCHOOL OF ART L

Although the first official day of fall isn’t until September 22, many are raring to shrug off a scorching summer slump and welcome a slightly more bearable season. While some of fall’s big cultural highlights won’t be unveiled until September or October, the Southwest School of Art is ready to roll out a trio of exhibitions populated by biomorphic images, “abstracted cartographies of imagined terrains” and even the 1980s-era collectible atrocities known as the Garbage Pail Kids. Approaching abstraction from three distinct points of departure, the imaginatively titled group exhi-

ART

‘DATA FICTIONS’

Thanks to the extra scrutiny (read: people actually starting to pay attention) that Facebook’s inner-workings received as a part of the whole Cambridge Analytica debacle earlier this year, folks are now hip to the meticulous sorting and identifying information that the social-media giant gathers on its users. This information results in users being identified by a set of Facebook categories — things like “U.S. Politics (Very Liberal),” “Engaged Shopper,” and “Multicultural Affinity,” among many others. Intrigued and unsettled by this, art-

calendar

Sylvanus Shaw

bition “We’re Not Even Supposed to Be Here” combines the map-like mysteries of widely exhibited Philadelphia-based artist Victoria Burge, the playfully surreal prints of Texas State University professor Jeffrey Dell and the oddly scientific output of Brooklyn-based woodblock printer and collage artist Takuji Hamanaka. The innovative applications of abstraction carry over into “Ideal Fadez,” an exhibition of digitally informed paintings by Austin-based Joan Mitchell Foundation award winner Jonathan Faber. Sure to appeal to nerds, collectors and contemporary art fans alike, Brooklyn-based West Texas native Sylvanus Shaw’s solo show “Fiat” comprises packaged, small-scale drawings inspired by both “the fiat currencies of banking reserves and the speculative excitement that emanates from an un-opened pack of collectible cards.” Free, opening reception 5:30-7:30pm Thu, on view 9am-5pm Mon-Sat, 11am-4pm Sun through September 23, Southwest School of Art, Navarro Campus, Santikos Building, 1201 Navarro St., (210) 200-8200, swschool.org. — Bryan Rindfuss

ist Emily Royall and Flax Studio have come up with a unique way of interacting with and critically examining the relationship between honest-to-god human people and their reductive Facebook categories. The public is invited to “come dressed as your Facebook categories to be part of a photo series documenting the border between our physical and online personas.” The results of the “Data Fictions” photo sessions will become an exhibition to be unveiled at Flax on October 5. $5 suggested donation, 8-11pm, Flax Studio, 1420 S. Alamo St., (909) 518-2245, flaxstudiosa.com. — JC DRAG

‘DECADANCE’

Halloween comes early and often for the outlandish, outrageous “patients” in the care of Shawn Benét’s MadHouse — an out-ofthe-box series billed as “San Antonio’s newest monthly alternative drag show.” Having recently served up a sinister smorgasbord of drag antics headlined by controversial queen James Majesty (runner-up on season two of The Boulet Brothers’ Dragula: Search for the World’s Next Drag Supermonster), host Shawn Benét and partner in crime DJ Mr. Grim have assembled a stacked roster for “Decadance” — an “over-the-top, flamboyant-as-fuck, loud and proud night of alternative drag honoring the gayest things about our community!” Benefiting the tradition-bucking Austin International Drag Festival (November 15-18), the evening promises “gay anthems blasting,” food and drink specials and unpredictable interpretations from nearly 20 performers — including MadHouse mother Shawn Benét, mainstays Miss Taint and Paradox Rei and newbies Giomara Bazaldua, Queen Squirtbox and the drag king troupe Los Mentirosos. $3, 10pm2am, Web House, 320 Blanco Road, facebook.com/shawnbenetsmadhouse. — BR

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tal awareness. $9-$12, grand opening 9am-5pm Sat (activities from 10am2pm), on view 9am-5pm daily through December 31, San Antonio Botanical Garden, 555 Funston Pl., (210) 536-1400, sabot.org. — Lori Salazar

SUN | 9/2 MUSIC

RESIDENTE q

Sean Kinney

SAT | 9/1 ART

‘NATURE CONNECTS: ART WITH LEGO BRICKS’ L

The San Antonio Botanical Garden welcomes award-winning artist Sean Kenney for a presentation of his fanciful showcase “Nature Connects: Art with LEGO Bricks.” Employing nearly half a million of the iconic building blocks, the touring exhibition features 13 displays — including a “larger-thanlife Monarch butterfly and a six-foot hummingbird on a trumpet flower” — that illustrate important topics concerning endangered species, the balance of ecosystems and mankind’s relationship with nature. So far, the supersize flora and fauna of “Nature Connects” have traveled across the U.S., Asia and Europe, evoking a sense of child-like wonderment while addressing biodiversity and environmen-

As the lyricist/rapper for Calle 13, Residente (born René Pérez Joglar in Puerto Rico in 1978) has been eating Daddy Yankee (and other insufferable reguetoneros) alive for years, both in terms of award shows and critical acclaim. If you have no clue who he is, here’s your crash course: go to YouTube and check out the Latin Grammy-winning video for “La Perla,” an absolute gem based on Afro-Uruguayan candombe played by Argentine drummers in a Brazilian style and complete with salsa horns and an actual rap written and spit out by none other than salsa god Rubén Blades. Then, look for the video of “Adentro” (the ultimate gangsta-rap diss) and, finally, listen to Residente, his first solo album, which he recorded after submitting to a DNA test and traveling around the world to create music with his ancestors. Residente comes to San Antonio with a full 12-piece band and potentially the best Latin show of the year. Even if you don’t speak Spanish, this is a thinking person’s idea of great Latin alternative grooves that go beyond hip-hop and, thank god, way beyond reggaetón. $30-$60, 7:30pm, Aztec Theatre, 104 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 812-4355, theaztectheatre.com. — Enrique Lopetegui

Courtesy of Residente

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CURRENT | August 29–September 4, 2018 | sacurrent.com

Courtesy of Anne Lewis

MON | 9/3 FILM + TALK

‘AN HONEST DAY’S WORK’ L

Held the first Monday of each month, long-running multimedia arts organization URBAN-15’s free Tricentennial offering Hidden Histories takes shape in a “magazine-format video series [that] highlights archival interviews with community leaders; significant performances by musicians, dancers and poets; interactions with working artists; lost documentaries; forgotten narrative films; and vintage discussions of important community issues.” Easily among the most unusual and informative local events tied to Labor Day in the Alamo City, the September edition of Hidden Histories is dedicated to the “worker experience in San Antonio and throughout Texas — from the everyday to the extraordinary.” Anchoring the September program is a discussion with Austin-based filmmaker Anne Lewis and excerpts from her experimental documentary A Strike and an Uprising. In addition to the three-month Pecan Shellers’ Strike led by San Antonio icon Emma Tenayuca in 1938, Lewis’ film covers a 1987 labor march that united housekeepers, cafeteria workers and groundskeepers in what’s been dubbed the “Showdown at Nacogdoches.” And with a big nod to Studs Terkel’s story-collecting project and 1974 bestseller Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do, the final component of “An Honest Day’s Work” features “a collage

of short film interviews with a range of San Antonio residents on one question: What was your first job?” Free but RSVP required via email at events@urban15.org by Sept 2, 7pm, URBAN-15, 2500 S. Presa St., (210) 736-1500, urban15.org. — BR

TUE | 9/4 TALKS

WORTH REPEATING: ‘ALIEN’

For the first installment of the fourth season of its deservedly popular series Worth Repeating, Texas Public Radio sets its sights and its participants’ stories on the concept and term “Alien.” For this session, as with previous ones (which have covered themes like “On the Street Where I Live,” “Big Mistakes” and “Because How I Am,” among many more), community members are invited to tell their own personal stories and share insights centered 19 6


Spanish Film Made by Women Friday, September 7–Sunday, September 9 Mujeres de Cine is a showcase of Spanish films made by women. Join us for a three-day festival of 2018 selections. For descriptions and trailers: samuseum.org/calendar. Last Chance: Visit Spain: 500 Years of Spanish Painting from the Museums of Madrid only through September 16! Included with your Museum admission (free for members).

Friday, September 7 Dancing Beethoven (1h 20min) Free | West Courtyard | Sundown Saturday, September 8 Julia Ist (1h 30min) Free | John L. Santikos Auditorium | 2:00 p.m. Summer 1993 (1h 37min) Free | West Courtyard | Sundown Sunday, September 9 Most Beautiful Island (1h 20min) Free | John L. Santikos Auditorium | 2:00 p.m.

San Antonio Museum of Art | 200 West Jones Ave. | samuseum.org sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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calendar 6 16 around the theme. The structure of the event dictates that it will feature seven storytellers (pre-selected through a process outlined on the website below) who have a total of seven minutes each to share their personal tales in relation to the theme. Want to hear how real San Antonians handle real (and often shared) issues in their own lives? You’ll want to attend this. And, who knows, maybe you’ll find yourself inspired to be among the seven presenters at a future installment of this unique and important series. $7, 7-8:30pm, Brick at Blue Star, 108 Blue Star, (210) 262-8653, tpr.org/programs/worth-repeating. — JC

TUE | 9/4 SPECIAL EVENT

WORLD ART DROP DAY M

For the collector on a shoestring budget, it doesn’t get much better than World Art Drop Day, which each year invites artists of all persuasions to “drop” artwork in a public location, photograph it and then post it on social media (possibly with a clue as to its whereabouts) using the hashtag #artdropday. In essence an art-centric scavenger hunt that unfolds online but entails searching in the traditional sense (with your eyes, #IRL), the annual event is the brainchild of Jake Parker, the Utah-based illustrator and animator behind the cartoon character Missile Mouse. Parker, who spent part of this summer conducting a cross-country art drop of his own, sums up the importance of World Art Drop Day as such: “The world needs this right now. We need to feel a little more connection to each other, and there’s nothing like the bond two random strangers can make through the act of creating and giving.” Thanks to organizing partner Southwest School of Art, World Art Drop Day continues to build momentum in San Antonio, with upward of 1,000 participants scouring streets, parks, landmarks and parking lots for paintings, drawing, photographs, even one-of-a-kind glass marbles. Those wishing to contribute are encouraged to pick up official World Art Drop Day tags for their pieces and use the localized hashtag #ssaartdrop2018. Free, midnight-11:59pm, citywide (tag pickup at Southwest School of Art, 1201 Navarro St.), (210) 224-1848, facebook. com/southwestschoolofart. — BR sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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Tour de las Misiones September 8, 2018 - 8 AM Mission Park Pavilions 6030 Padre Drive Narrated Bike Ride Tour 7 Miles: San Jose and San Juan 14 Miles: Alamo, Concepcion and San Jose 22 Miles: Alamo, Concepcion, San Jose, San Juan and Espada 5K and 10K Run & Walk Enjoy a walk or run through the scenic River Walk, Mission Reach and Mission San Jose Receive a passport and get a stamp at each of the stops. Plus, get a goody bag, commemorative medal and t-shirt designed by renowned artist Cruz Ortiz.

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first-of-its-kind retrospective exhibition celebrating the life and work of the late artist Alberto Mijangos is on view through November 11 at Centro de Artes. Curated by Dr. Teresa Eckmann, associate professor in the Department of Art and Art History at UTSA, and presented by San Antonio’s Department of Arts & Culture, the exhibition gathers 96 artworks by Mijangos, mostly largescale, mixed-media canvases that trace the artist’s trajectory over a half century. While Mijangos was a revered figure within the local arts community, his work remains largely unexamined in

national and international circles. This exhibition aims to set the scholarly ball rolling toward uncovering Mijangos’ work and examining his role in encouraging cross-cultural exchanges between Mexico and the United States. From the artist’s forays into neo-figuation, figurative abstraction and postmodern appropriation, the exhibition reveals an artist whose life straddled both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and whose work dealt with both social and spiritual issues. The retrospective, titled “Alberto Mijangos: 159,” is named after Mijangos’ affection for the number 159, which


arts

Alberto Mijangos, P.W.A. (Person with Aids)

for him signified the beginning, middle and end of life, but also represented God: “1 is the coming in, 5 is the time that we have until we die, and 9 is departing,” explains a label in the gallery. Oftentimes, this number would appear in his paintings rearranged as 195 or 951. In Mijangos’ own words, “When I finish my painting I say ‘thank you’ to the creative power. I put ‘159’ in the painting somewhere and — there.” Born in Mexico City in 1925, Mijangos

would eventually settle in San Antonio after facing several deportations. In 1959, he secured a diplomatic visa and was hired by the Ministry of Foreign Relations as the Mexican Consulate’s gallery director. He served as the first director of the Mexican Cultural Institute, a position he held until 1973 while battling alcoholism. In the 1980s, Mijangos quit drinking and fully committed his time and energy to creating art. He led a community of artists and students, first at the Salon Mijangos (now the arts complex at 1906 South Flores Street) and later at the Southwest School of Art in the late ’90s and early 2000s. In 2007, Mijangos succumbed to lymphoma after 28 years of sobriety. Among the earliest work included in the exhibition are Mijangos’ figurative paintings from the 1960s. A shift toward loose, aggressive brushwork led Mijangos into a period of figurative abstraction beginning in 1965. The artist’s mature period, beginning in the 1980s, is represented here by several series of Chónes for the Ruler work including Mijangos’ T-Shirt series, the ministration for its poor handling of the AIDS Olympia series, and the Chones series. epidemic. The term “HOMLES” spelled out in Taken from the T-shirt series and taking the background, evokes a sense of the isolaup much of the first floor are eight monution and desperation the figure must feel. mental paintings, each depicting both geoOn the second floor of the gallery, selecmetric and organic forms, and measuring at tions from Mijangos’ Chones series provide a least 80 by 80 inches. While each painting haunting yet pleasing spectacle for viewers. in this series has the cruciform in comInitiated in 1995, the series mon, each work explores a continued until Mijangos’ distinct vision represented death in 2007. Using underby its unique palette and Alberto Mijangos 159 wear as a metaphor for the textured surfaces. Free secrets that exist within our Mijangos’ Olympia se11am-6pm Tue-Sun lives, Mijangos built up layries, represented here by ers of paint upon large-scale nine large-scale paintings Through November 11 un-gessoed canvases. Among appropriating Édouard Centro de Artes the works here, Words Only Manet’s infamous painting 101 S. Santa Rosa Ave. Represent Something Else and Olympia, marked a dramatic Broken English, reveal the artdeparture from abstraction (210) 206-2787 ist’s mature signature style to figurative painting while getcreativesanantonio.com — abstract, architectural and also offering social criticism. layered with hidden text and In this series, Mijangos used colorful scribble. A powerful Manet’s 19th-century figure energy seems to emanate from these works as as a vehicle to explore pressing contemporary you make your way through the gallery. issues. Among the most stunning and still Also among this series is Mijangos’ final timely works in Mijangos’ oeuvre is the 1990 completed painting, The Shames of Adam canvas P.W.A. (Person with Aids), depicting a transgender Olympia with a bare skull against and Eve. Here, a pair of white underwear merges with a cruciform in what may be a grimy background of graffiti. A portrait of interpreted as the ultimate symbol of “acRonald and Nancy Reagan at the center of the ceptance and forgiveness.” painting points the finger at the Reagan ad-

Find more arts coverage every day at sacurrent.com

sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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Searching is a compelling digital thriller that never turns gimmicky BY KIKO MARTINEZ

T

he tech thriller Searching is a welcome surprise. Although the subgenre is new – a film told exclusively through modern-day technology (iPhones, laptops, hidden cameras, etc.) – Searching proves that with enough creativity, a project of this kind doesn’t have to play out like a gimmick. A movie such as Searching, unfortunately, will be copied and re-copied for years to come until Hollywood studios have exhausted its originality – see the found-footage subgenre after The Blair Witch Project debuted almost 20 years ago. Other computer thrillers have hit theaters before Searching (2014‘s Open Windows, 2014’s Unfriended and the 2018 sequel Unfriended: Dark Web), but it’s safe to say that this film is much more inventive and strikes some important and sympathetic themes. Directed and co-written by first-time fea-

Burning Bright

Ethan Hawke’s music biopic gets to the true essence of late country songwriter Blaze Foley

I

magine that Bob Dylan was never inspired to write something as perfect as “Blowin’ in the Wind” or if post-Beatles Paul McCartney didn’t release “Maybe I’m Amazed” on his first solo album. What if the Beatles had stayed together through the ’70s? Would they have recorded another album as admired as Revolver or Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band? What if a beloved song, film or piece of art was never created? How many of these mas-

Screen Gems

ture filmmaker Aneesh Chaganty, Searching begins with one of the most effective setups of 2018 – a quick montage of the happy life of a small family over the span of a few years through home videos, social media posts and other online platforms. When it’s revealed early on that mom (Sara Sohn) has died of cancer, Chaganty and co-writer Sev Ohanian hook viewers emotionally as dad, David Kim (John Cho), and his daughter, Margot, continue their lives on their own. By laying a strong foundation for a pair of characters we’re about to go through the wringer with for the next 90 minutes, Cha-

Sundance Selects

terpieces have we lost throughout the years? Those questions are at the heart of Blaze, a musical biopic on country-music singer and songwriter and San Antonio native Blaze Foley. His songs have been covered by luminaries such as Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson and John Prine. Foley (played magnificently by breakout star Ben Dickey), with his unbridled talent, hoped to give audiences as much of himself as he could for as long as he could. Blaze is an ode to a highly-gifted, troubled legend who left the industry (and this earth) with his own distinct brand of folk and country music, which seemed to arise from the depths of his soul. As tortured artist biopics go, it’s an authentic addition to the genre. Blaze is based on the memoir Living in the Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze Foley by Foley’s muse Sybil Rosen, who co-wrote the screenplay with the film’s director, four-

screens

Plugged In

ganty and Ohanian understand that without those opening scenes, Searching would only resonate on a visceral level. Instead, with these scenes, it’s much easier to sense the frustration and fear David conveys when 16-year-old Margot (Michelle La) goes missing after a latenight study session with friends. Working with leading Detective Rosemary Vick (Debra Messing) to search for Margot, David starts doing his own investigating by logging onto his daughter’s laptop and poring through her online behavior to see if he can find any clues. However, with Det. Vick and David running into countless dead ends, they both worry their window for finding Margot alive is closing fast. Like the best true-crime feature dramas and documentaries, Searching is a gripping mystery that features a handful of clever plot twists and an underlying feeling of dread that is unshakeable. Skeptical audiences might think a film like this would be limited by the method it chooses to tell its story, but with a smart script and a heartfelt father-daughter relationship at its core, Searching is an absorbing and unique achievement. For our interview with Searching director/ co-writer Aneesh Chaganty and co-writer/producer Sev Ohanian, visit sacurrent.com.

time Oscar-nominated screenwriter and actor Ethan Hawke (Before Midnight). In the film, which would make a wonderful double feature with Joel and Ethan Coen’s 2013 drama Inside Llewyn Davis, Hawke tells the story of Foley’s rise to fame – from the time he’s living rent-free in a dilapidated shack in the forest with Sybil (Alia Shawkat) to their journey to Austin and Chicago so they could introduce the world to his music. Fortunately, Hawke is more interested in tapping into Foley as a man and musician battling drug and alcohol addiction than he is about maneuvering through every nuance of his turbulent career, which comes to an end in 1989 when he is shot and killed by the son of a friend during an altercation. Foley was only 39. Hawke delivers a captivating narrative about a man who was larger than life. As Foley, Dickey might not be the biggest name Hawke could have cast, but in him he discovers the spirit and musicianship that Foley brought to the stage for every performance at every hole-in-the-wall bar he stopped at – even when under the influence. “Where does a real song come from?” Foley asks in the film. “Where was it before it arrived?” Wherever that place is, Foley was a master at finding it, and Blaze is equally capable of depicting that profound emotion on screen. For our interview with actor and musician Ben Dickey, visit sacurrent.com –Kiko Martinez

Find more news Find more every day at film stories sacurrent.com


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THE BIG SPOON

Ohhhh, so that’s why you don’t eat out with babies BY JESS ELIZARRARAS

T

hough still very childless, I’ve somehow eaten out with more kids in the last few weeks. Here’s how I survived. In early August, I joined a friend and former coworker on a road trip halfway to Kentucky with precious cargo in tow. Now, any road trip has the propensity to go awry, but we had two extra variables that made out trek even more fun: Lady, a 55-pound hound mix who hates car rides, and Baby M, an almost one-year-old with a tendency for diaper blowouts. I took for granted how varied my eating schedule is, but for 36 hours, I was on Baby M time. It’s not that she isn’t an amazing baby – she’s a morning person, and only fussed close to nap time. It’s that I didn’t have a say in when I would eat or how much or for how long. Unbeknownst to me, there are several widely-read parenting articles on why a messy eater is a good thing. It helps babies develop chewing skills and a taste for a variety of foods. So it was actually a good thing when Baby M and the foot-long radius around her was covered with a thin layer of hummus or yogurt or watermelon juice. Good for her, not so great for my phone or my clothing. But most of the snack times happened away from our hotel, and away from her inflatable rubber ducky bathtub where she could be rinsed off without a fuss. Instead, meals took place along our route. First, at Magnolia Silos of Fixer Upper fame where I spilled most of my coffee. Then at Chili’s (the only place in Sulphur Springs we could all agree on), where freeze-dried yogurt and apple-flavored puffs were the snack of choice for Baby M as mom and I scarfed down sandwiches and maybe a cold beer or two. Baby M tried her first French fry, and though she wasn’t a fan of the taste, she celebrated the discovery of a new flavor by flailing her arms and spreading fry innards all over the place. The splash zone was con-

tained, but even though the snacks weren’t in liquid form, the disaster swath we left in our trail was at least three feet wide. There’s not a whole lot you can do other than skulk out of the restaurant and avoid most eye contact. The rest of our stops were more of the same and truly blurred into one hummus-smeared event. Just outside of Texas in a picturesque Arkansas rest stop, we stretched our legs and Baby M enjoyed a serving of yogurt, which I hear works wonders on your skin. In Brinkley, Arkansas, the stop was less idyllic and more frantic as yet another diaper situation and a hangry baby necessitated a Sonic stop. Thankfully, the staff was gracious and helpful as we hurriedly exited from the car, took care of yet another blow-out, set up a bag of snacks and ordered food from the window. Baby M covered herself in hummus once more, babbled happily and tried to reach for more of my tots than I cared to share. By the time we got back on the road, with just over an hour left on our journey to Memphis, I was worse for the wear but filled with insight. So THAT’S why parents can’t go out to eat whenever they want. That’s why some restaurants have ditched high chairs altogether.

But I’ve never seen anyone eat chickpea spread with such gusto, or feel as accomplished as she did when she figured out how to hold watermelon the right way, or as indignant as when her mother would wipe her face (and there was somehow still hummus everywhere). It’s not the tidiest, but it’s still pretty neat watching a baby realize a love of food. Parents shouldn’t feel guilty for trying to have a good meal, especially given that they’re probably sleep-deprived and might need a strong drink — or maybe that was just me? Jess Elizararas, flavor@sacurrent.com.

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food | nightlife Day Drippin’

Booze and Beer in Dripping Springs BY RON BECHTOL

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he drive north up 281 is getting more depressing by the day as hillsides are razed and scraped for a wholesale carpeting of identical dwellings. The situation improves, at least for now, the closer one gets to Blanco. We’re turning east on 163/165 just short of town; it’s the shortest route to Dripping Springs, and the journey from this point on has as much appeal as the destination.Stretched out along 290, and perilously close to an avariciously expanding Austin, Dripping Springs lacks the immediate charm of small Texas towns that have escaped the pressure of adjacent cities. But as you enter from the west, signs of roadside sprawl are still few; it was here that we stumbled upon Crêpe Crazy (660B W. Hwy 90, crepecrazy.com). CC is staffed entirely by deaf personnel who communicate in American Sign Language: Service may be silent, and you point to your choice on a menu, but it’s altogether professional. And if you order judiciously (peanut butter, banana and caramel — what was I thinking?), the crêpes will also please. The eastern side of the town, with its chains and commercial centers, betrays more the influence of its omnipotent neighbor, and it was here that we elected to check out newly minted The Switch (166 Hargraves Drive, theswitchdripping.com ). If there’s such a thing as good corporate barbecue, Switch is it. The dining room is huge and bright, and there’s nary a whiff of smoke to be detected. A horseshoe bar dominates the space, and while the ‘cue was passable (ribs beat out brisket, and we’re told we should return to sample the Cajun fare that sets this place apart from its Austin sibling), the bar and its feisty female ‘tenders stole the show. Ask for a sample of the pit-smoked pineapple that goes into a sweet but potent rum drink. This was not our first drink of the day, and now’s as good a time as any to confess that the goal of this Sunday foray was neither historical, cultural, nor, really, culinary: we were in it for the booze and beer. The ring of distilleries, breweries, and, for that matter, wineries, that almost encircles Dripping Springs (called Drinking Springs by one wag) makes it unique among Texas small towns and argues for using the town as a headquarters for a more in-depth examination than we were able to conduct. But, starting with Desert Door Texas Sotol (211 Darden Hill Road, Driftwood; desertdoor.com), we still managed to touch down at an alarming number of destinations. Sotol is not a spirit on everyone’s lips — yet, and actually making it was not the original goal of Ryan Campbell, Judson Kauffman and Brent Looby. The trio met in the fall of 2015 in an executive MBA program at UT’s McCombs School of Business, they needed a project, and the rest is very recent history. After the partners produced over 40 trial batches in a domestic-scaled still, the first bottles deemed worthy of

Ron Bechtol

prime time emerged in the fall of 2017. That all three are ex-military may have something to do with the speed at which a theoretical enterprise became a working business. Kauffman, the still-trim Navy man among them, met us at the distillery and spun out the story as an almost-fanciful Texas yarn that just happens to be true. Having tasted Mexican versions of sotol (Hacienda is one of the first to be available

here), he realized that the plant, also called Desert Spoon, grows wild and abundantly in West Texas — up to more than 1000 per acre in some places. “There are billions; we’ll never run out,” says Kauffman. This spiky asparagus sibling flaunts a tall, central stalk, but it’s the bulbous base that’s processed much in the manner of tequila: it’s harvested, trimmed, steamed, shredded, pressed, fermented with  addition of some sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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food | nightlife

Ron Bechtol

Ron Bechtol

Top and bottom: The grounds and bar at Jester King; Right and left: Nate Seale of Family Business Brewing and the brewery’s tasting room.

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commercial yeast, then distilled — here, in a gleaming, new hybrid pot/column still that had just been installed the week before we arrived. The spirit is presented in a deep blue ceramic bottle made in Mexico and more than stands up to examples from that country. (You can find it in San Antonio at Alamo City Liquor, Cured and Paramour among other locations.) We also tasted a soon-tobe-released, small-barrel-aged version, initially to be available exclusively at the

distillery. Bar manager Bobbi Hitchen makes a mean cocktail with mesquite-bean infused Desert-Door, too. Buckle up; there’s more to come. The driving circuit between Desert Door to the south of Dripping Springs, and our final destination of the day, Family Business Brewery to the north, took us past perhaps a dozen enticing options — and this doesn’t even include the big boys, Dripping Springs/San Luis Spirits (vodka and gin — not open on

Ron Bechtol

Ron Bechtol

Sunday) to the west of the town, and Deep Eddy (vodkas), just to the east. Our first intermediate stop was at Jester King Brewery (13187 Fitzhugh Road, jesterkingbrewery.com). Situated on 165 acres, the sprawling stone and corrugated-tin complex, which includes two tasting bars and Stanley’s Pizza Kitchen, is exactly what a dyedin-the- wool Texan might come up with when asked to imagine the ideal, rural brewery setting. Apart from their wild yeasts, the farmhouse ales and barrel-aged wild ales are more disciplined than the setting — and these brews are not for the faint of palate. But there are lots of guest taps if somehow the Raspberry Funk Metal (a stout re-fermented with raspberries) should come across as a step too far. Jester King also offers guest ciders on tap, but wanting to sample from a source, we headed up the road to nearby Argus Cidery (12345 Paul’s Valley Road, arguscidery.com). The one-room facility is a part of a quasi-industrial complex that also contains Revolution Spirits (gin) and Last Stand Brewing Company. Argus is a highly recommend stop for its briskly dry ciders poured by the maker himself. We suggest a tasting flight or two. Moving on, our next port of call was Treaty Oak Distillery (16604 Fitzhugh Road, treatyoakdistilling. com); its ranch-like setting, with tables scattered under massive oaks

and an open-sided bar, makes it the distillery equivalent of Jester King. Though rum was an early success (they made the state’s first), and there was vodka for a time, gins, including the barrel-aged Waterloo Antique, and small-batch whiskeys are now the primary focus. Here we only had time for cocktails from plastic cups, so a return visit will be required to get deeper into the base spirits, along with the fairly ambitious food menu. It’s not easy to launch a new craft beer or spirit; the market is already pretty crowded. But Family Business Brewery (19510 Hamilton Pool Road, familybusinessbeerco.com) has a leg up:  the family includes Jensen Ackles, a star of the popular TV series Supernatural. It’s of course super-natural that folks will want to visit the brewery, housed in a large steel-clad structure on 15 acres of pristine Hill Country land, in order to catch a glimpse of the chiseled star — but don’t hold your breath. Go instead for the beer, made by head brewer Nate Seale, a star in his own right. Flights are another good option at FBB; with 13 brews on tap, including an impressive Imperial Stout called The Grackle, it will be hard to choose without a little help. Once you’ve made your choice, stay inside at the handsome, tall tables, or head to a picnic table under the oaks. Despite encroaching Austin, oaks still rule in Dripping Springs.

NOTE: You can dip your digits even further into the food and drink of Drip-

ping Springs at the annual Dripping WithTaste Festival, to be held this year on Sept. 8 at the Ranch Park and Event Center. Visit destinationdrippingsprings. com for more. sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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1 city. 1 night. 20 stages. 60+ local bands & artists.

participating venues: AMP ROOM (21+) DARKWAVE / GOTH / INDUSTRIAL PHANTOM Spell 27 Shadow Fashion LA BOTANICA (ALL AGES UNTIL 11 P.M., THEN 21+) DANCE / ELECTRONICA Lightwithin Voodoo Boogaloo Rivers Want THE MIX (21+) COUNTRY Michael J. & The Foxes Marcy Grace Band of Bandits VENTURA (21+) POP-ROCK Bad Heart The Please Help Nova Lux

SOCIAL SPOT (21+) ALT-ROCK Fox Motel Razor Doves Celestial Descent PAPER TIGER (ALL AGES) MAIN ROOM LATIN ALTERNATIVE/CUMBIA Pochos Chidos Los Nahuatlatos Grupo Frackaso PAPER TIGER (ALL AGES) COURTYARD BEATMAKER JKNODIC Arodbeats Jonah Conrad LIMELIGHT (21+) INDIE Optic Arrest Vintage Pictures We Leave at Midnight

THE GALLERY CLUB (21+) HIP-HOP SpyMC MAD-ONE Chris Conde The Kid Bootz DJ Dark Night ATTAGIRL (ALL AGES) SINGER-SONGWRITER Carly Garza George Garza Jr. Jordan Moonz GUILLOTINE (21+) METAL Aeternal Requiem Pigweed Hotzi BEXAR PUB (21+) AMERICANA / SOUTHERN ROCK / ALT-COUNTRY Winsome Losers Snowbyrd Claudine Meinhardt

JANDRO’S (21+) INDOOR STAGE, SURF / GARAGE / PSYCH Flower Jesus Quartet Junkie Saigon Sinners JANDRO’S (21+) OUTDOOR STAGE PUNK Lemmings Yo Existo Lloronas RUMBLE (21+) SOUL / FUNK / R&B The Shiny Knights StereoFiend Cadillac Muzik LA ROCA (21+) FOLK / FOLK-ROCK Yosh & Yimmy Jaik Yanez & The High Road Sweet ‘Shine & Honey

THE OTHER SIDE (ALL AGES) JAZZ/JAZZ FUSION Jose Amador & Terra Nova MADD WOLF SANCHOS (21+) UPSTAIRS STAGE, TEJANO / CONJUNTO Santiago Jimenez Jr. LA 45 SANCHOS (21+) DOWNSTAIRS STAGE BLUES Favorite Son Catherine Denise Jake Castillo Trio HI-TONES (21+) PUNK Viet-Ruse No Time Knockin’ Chucks Pinata Protest (acoustic duo)

complete lineup and $10 all-access wristbands @ sanantoniomusicshowcase.com In addition to the convergence of dope local music, there will be representatives from Pacifico Beer, Deep Eddy Vodka and Austin East Ciders at the participating venues. sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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music

Texas Music Festivals to Look Forward to This Fall (When It’s Not Disgustingly Hot)

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here is something to be said about how much better it is to be standing outside in 90-degree heat compared to 105. With that in mind, we’ve put together a list of festivals you look forward to as we enter Texas’ cooler months. So stay hydrated until then, and we’ll see y’all at these live-music shows.

River City Rockfest p

September 22 Bud Light River City Rockfest is returning for its sixth year on Saturday, September 22, at the AT&T Center, and they’re bringing fucking Nine Inch Nails. Yup, you read that right. Arguably one the most important industrial acts of the late ’80s and ’90s, the cult-like following of Trent Reznor and friends seems only to grow as the years go by. Trent has aged into such a dark lord daddy now, so it’s not surprising. Also on the bill are Primus, Stone Temple Pilots, Bush, Chevelle, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Clutch, Hellyeah, Yelawolf, Suicidal Tendencies, The Sword, Drowning Pool, The Fever 333, Upon A Burning Body, Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown, I See Stars, Demob Happy, The Heroine, Blacktop Mojo, Lynnwood King & The Revival and Covina. “With a new date and one of strongest lineups yet, we’re looking forward to the sixth year of the Bud Light River City Rockfest,” said Spurs Sports & Entertainment Vice President Tammy Turner in a press release. “After engaging with our fans, we are excited to provide new experiences at the event and look forward to continued expansion of the festival moving forward.” You can buy tickets at rivercityrockfest.com.

Jorda Frantzis

the Black album. Besides Metallica, the rest of the headliners include Paul McCartney, “Redbone” singer Childish Gambino, Arctic Monkeys, Travis Scott and Odesza. The full lineup is shaping up to be pretty fantastic too with St. Vincent, Janelle Monáe and David Byrne slated for appearances. Tickets can be purchased at aclfestival.com.

Mala Luna L

October 27-28 Well, damn, Mala Luna, y’all stepped up your game pretty high. Y’all have been holding it down for a few years, bringing in acts like Travis Scott and Steve Aoki in 2016, then Lil Wayne and Future in 2017. So, it’s not like super duper surprising that y’all continue to bring in higher caliber acts but... Cardi B, tho. The third annual

Courtesy of Nine Inch Nails

ACL 5

October 5-7, 12-14 Metallica is headed back to Texas to headline ACL, which is sort of weird and awesome since most of ACL’s headliners recently have been the likes of Radiohead, Jay-Z and Willie Nelson – not gigantic metal acts. If you’ve seen Metallica in recent years, you know they usually play very few new songs and a shit ton of their old work, which rules if you don’t really listen to anything past

Jaime Monzon

Mala Luna returns Saturday, October 27, and Sunday, October 28 of Halloween weekend, to the Nelson Wolff Stadium parking lot with none other than Offset’s better half, Cardi B. Alongside fellow headliners Nicky Jam, Dillon Francis and Tyler and the Creator, this is set to be (as of now) the “Bodak Yellow” singer’s first post-pregnancy performance, and we’re more than a little stoked if you can’t tell. Tickets can be purchased at malalunamusicfestival.com.

UTOPiAfest

November 2-4 Last fall, UTOPiAfest founder Travis Sutherland bid adieu to his family’s Four Sisters Ranch at the Southern tip of the Texas Hill Country in Uvalde County where the festival had been held for nine years. Organizers later revealed that the event will take up residence on a sprawling private ranch near Burnet. “Saying goodbye to our festival’s original home, Four Sister’s Ranch, never felt like an ending, but a new beginning,” Sutherland said in a press release. “To be able to expand our UTOPiAn dream and be accessible to more people is an honor. We can’t wait to create an unforgettable weekend in the Texas Hill Country.” With headliners like Grandmaster Flash, singer-songwriter Patty Griffin and Lukas Nelson, son of Willie Nelson. Tickets can be purchased at utopiafest.com.

– Chris Conde

Find more music coverage Find more news every day at sacurrent.com


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CURRENT | August 29–September 4, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | music Picks did you peep his cover of Ginuwine’s “Pony” that just came out this year? Oo. Wee. I’ll be the one getting escorted out for screaming and trying to climb on stage to hug Bridges. $42.96 - $848.04, 7:30PM, Whitewater Amphitheater, 11860 FM306 #1, whitewaterrocks.com. – CC

DEF LEPPARD, JOURNEY p Friday, August 31

With a May launch from Connecticut and trekking all the way down to LA in October, classic rock giants Journey and Def Leppard are co-headlining a tour with a stop at the AT&T Center on Friday. “The fact that we’re touring with Journey, and it’s putting us into

huge arenas like Madison Square Garden and stadiums, that is very special for us,” Def Leppard frontman Joe Elliott told Rolling Stone in a recent interview. “It’s two iconic bands touring together. It makes it more of an event when the bill is all bands that people have heard of. We went out with a really good band called Tripping Daisy in 1996, but nobody cared. But when you have people like Cheap Trick, Poison, Heart or Journey, it makes for a better night for the people in the crowd. They come in and they know what they’re going to get.” $49.50$201.50, 7pm, AT&T Center, One AT&T Center Pkwy, attcenter.com. – CC

Warner Music México

LUIS MIGUEL L Thursday, August 30

Iconic Latin musician Luis Miguel announced a North American leg of his ¡México Por Siempre! Tour earlier this year, and it’s finally here! The tour, which is named for Miguel’s most recent studio album, kicked off May 4 in San Diego. Although the Mexican singer performed in Dallas, Laredo and Houston in late May, Miguel won’t stop by the AT&T Center until Thursday. Miguel’s voice has enabled him to take on a number of genres – from pop and bolero to mariachi and big band tunes. He’s released 33 albums throughout his 36-year career, selling millions of

albums worldwide. Miguel is a six-time Grammy winner and has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. $39-$500, 8:30pm, AT&T Center, One AT&T Center Pkwy, attcenter.com. – Chris Conde

LEON BRIDGES Friday, August 31

What more can be said about this now-iconic Texas musician? Leon Bridges’ career seemed to just launch out of nowhere a few years back to the point where a lot of us didn’t even know the dude was from our own state. Melding vintage soul and rock textures with his own completely unique vibe, Bridges’ show is one that you must not miss. Also, Ash Newell Photography

MIDNIGHT CLEANERS + ELLIS REDON + DREAMBORED Thursday, August 30

Jangly guitars meet lo-fi pop vocals in a way that reminds me of Radiohead but sounds nothing like Radiohead if that makes any sense at all. There’s definitely some sharp songwriting from the Midnight Cleaners, whose latest eponymously named EP could end up on a lineup with other local sleepy, dream-garage DIY acts like Elnuh and Vonna. Punctuated by guitar solos that almost come across as cheesy, the Midnight Cleaners EP might be the most overlooked EP of the summer. Also on the bill are echoey-synth, indie rock guy Ellis Redon and Dreambored, a sleepy, indie-garage act that’ll have you dancing during a nap. $3, 8pm, Hi-Tones, 621 E. Dewey Pl., hitonessa.com. – CC

Courtesy of Midnight Cleaners

sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | August 29–September 4, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | music Picks

Imelda Vergara

CANCIONES: SOUNDS OF SPAIN AND SOUTH TEXAS W/ JOE REYES M Friday, August 31

The Pearl’s excellent Canciones series continues in partnership with Ole, its ongoing and multifaceted celebration of SA’s Spanish roots. For this installment of the series, which brings veteran local musicians to beautiful Pearl Park, Joe Reyes will take the stage and bring along some friends. Reyes is a Grammy-winning producer, an ace sideman, a guitar guru, and a key component of several of SA’s best bands (Buttercup and Mitch Webb and the Swindles, just to name a couple). He has been one of the most consistent and influential individuals in local music for three decades. In other words: if you’ve been sleeping on this swell concert series, now is the ideal time to remedy that. Free, 5:30pm-8:30pm, Pearl Park at The Historic Pearl, 200 E. Grayson St, atpearl.com. — JC

RANDY ROGERS BAND, JOSH ABBOTT BAND q

Sunday, September 2

When a country singer-songwriter includes their own name in the name of their band, you know they mean serious business. Such is just the case with this pair of Texas country artists who, bands in tow, will bring the hoedown to Whitewater this weekend. The Randy Rogers Band, out of San Marcos, has been as consistent and righteous a force in Texas country as any this millennium, dropping seven albums since its 2002 debut and generally serving up the Red Dirt rockabilly-tinged good stuff. Josh Abbott Band, meanwhile, hails from Lubbock and sounds exactly like a country band from Lubbock should – I’m talking river tubin’, daytime boozin’, hard chargin’, uproarin’ tunes for cuttin’ loose. All in all, this is a can’t-miss show for fans of Texas country music. $25.40-$942.26, 7:30pm, Whitewater Amphitheater, 11860 FM 306, New Braunfels, whitewaterrocks.com. — JC

Sony Music

YURIDIA FRIDAY, AUGUST 31 Since her debut in 2005, with a runner-up appearance on popular Mexican reality/talent show La Academia and her wildly successful first album La Voz de un Ángel, Yuridia has been a constant force, racking up staggering sales and winning audiences all over Latin America. Known for her big and versatile voice, her blending of Latin pop and stadium R&B, and her ability to incorporate whatever sound is selling lately into her work without coming off as disingenuous, Yuridia is a bonafide international phenomenon. The Mexican singer comes to SA still supporting her solid 2017 release Primera Fila, though fans and initiates alike can expect her to run through her considerable train of hits from throughout her seven albums. $49-$129, 7pm, Aztec Theatre, 104 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 812-4355, theaztectheatre.com. — James Courtney

Courtesy of Randy Rogers Band

sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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music | calendar WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29 Devin Jones and the Uptown Stomp Devan Jones & the Uptown Stomp specialize in great American music such as vintage jazz, big band swing and Chicago blues. $10. Jazz, TX, 8:30-11:30pm. Tab Benoit Tab Benoit has done his best over the years to maintain a commitment to his Cajun roots, creating a distinctive rusty blues sound that is uniquely his own. $20$120. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8pm.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30 Chuck Ligon Texas country musician Chuck Ligon is performing an evening of originals. Free. The Rustic, 8:30-11pm. Jarekus Singleton Inspired by the legendary sounds of Charley Patton, Muddy Waters and B.B. King, Jarekus Singleton creates a cutting edge sound that blends rap, blues, R&B and rock. $5-$45. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8pm. Mega Bailazo Mexican musician, composer and songwriter of Norteño and Conjunto music. Known as the “King of the Accordion,” Ayala will perform with special guests Siggno hailing in from Santa Rosa. $30$250. Cowboys Dancehall, 7pm. Midnight Cleaners, Ellis Redon, Dreambored Midnight Cleaners are an indie rock band that plays power pop infused with dark humor and jangly guitars. Ellis Redon is a multi-instrumentalist songwriter with a stellar backing band that blends the sonics of lo-fi Casio tones with gorgeous guitar lines. Dreambored plays a slick brand of dream pop that will make you swoon. $3. Hi-Tones, 8pm-2am. Tres Honchos Sancho’s Cantina is hosting Claude Butch Morgan, Robar Adams and Trevor Doak Morgan of the Bandaholics. The band is set to perform regularly on Thursdays. Free. Sancho’s Cantina, 7pm.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 31 Blackened: A Tribute to Metallica Blackened, a tribute to Metallica, is performing live at Fitzgerald. Special guests include Devilpee, a System of a Down tribute band, and more. $10. Fitzgerald’s Bar & Live Music Venue, 8pm-2am. Bob Schneider One of Austin’s most celebrated country/folk musicians, Bob Schneider, is set to release his 7th studio album Blood and Bones. $15-$90. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8:30pm. A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie New York Rapper Artist Dubose, also known as A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, is performing live at the Tobin Center. $39.50-$49.50. Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 7pm. Charley Crockett Blues artist Charley Crockett released his solo album A Stolen Jewel in 2015 and sophomore album In

the Night in 2016. This year, Crockett releases Lonesome As A Shadow, an album of original material. $13. John T Floore’s Country Store, 9pm. D-Soul Davis Vocalist hailing from Waco, Texas, D-Soul Davis has been influenced by the likes of James Brown, Frank Sinatra, Otis Redding and Michael Jackson $10. Luna, 9pm. Frankie Leonie Award-winning singer-songwriter and musician Frankie Leonie is establishing herself as the newest rising star in the Americana country/folk music revolution. Free. The Rustic, 9:30-11pm. Kali Masi Punk and garage rock band with a heavy DIY ethos performs with special guests Mockingbird Express, which plays in the traditions of early blues and psychedelia. $5. Limelight, 9pm.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 Bekah Kelso & The Fellas Blues and R&B group Bekah Kelso & The Fellas is performing at Sam’s Burger Joint for their “R&B to the Rescue” tour. $10-$45. Sam’s Burger Joint, 9pm. Blue Water Highway This Americana band released their newest album Heartbreak City this June. $18. Gruene Hall, 8pm. Dalton Domino Hailing from Lubbock, Dalton Domino blends energetic southern rock and Texas country. $10-$12. John T. Floores, 7pm. Dancewicz-Doucet Duo Violinist Dominika Dancewicz and pianist Donald Doucet have earned recognition for their compelling, eclectic and thought-provoking programs that include traditional music from every era as well as excursions into jazz, Broadway and pop. $30-$35. Cave Without A Name, 7:30-9:30pm. The White Rabbit Reunion Weekend 2018 Pop-punk/hardcore group Across the Atlantic is performing live for Paper Tiger’s The White Rabbit Reunion celebration. Special guests include Executioner Postcards from the Moon, A House Divided, Finding September, and more. $10-$20. Paper Tiger, 2pm-midnight.

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 Flamingosis New Jersey-based electronic music producer, beatboxer and DJ drawing on influences from producers such as Flying Lotus and J Dilla as well as vintage funk and disco music. $15. Paper Tiger, 9 p.m. Residente: US Tour 2018 René Pérez Joglar, also known as Residente, is a Puerto Rican rapper, writer, producer and co-founder of the alternative rap group Calle 13. $30-$119. Aztec Theatre, 8:30pm. The White Rabbit Reunion Weekend $10$20. Paper Tiger, 2 p.m.-midnight.

Check us out at SACURRENT.COM sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

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Quickies This woman has gone down on me (I’m a man) more than half a dozen times in the last three months. Each time seems to be better than the previous! She does not want reciprocation. She has also turned down all my offers for intercourse. As far as I know, she is heterosexual just like me. What’s with that? I am getting a bit frustrated. Also, without going all the way, am I considered a friend with benefits? Just Chilling

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My husband and I occasionally go to swingers clubs. I don’t want to inadvertently fuck any Trump supporters, but I hate the idea of bringing up politics and killing everyone’s collective boner. Any suggestions would be appreciated! Occasionally Swinging At the risk of killing your boner forever, OS, the organized swinging scene “leans right,” as pollster Charlie Cook would put it if Charlie Cook polled swingers. Easily half of the couples I met at a big swingers convention I attended in Las Vegas told me they were Republicans. One man – a swinger from Texas – told me he was a “traditional values” type of guy and that’s why he opposed same-sex marriage. Fun fact: His wife was off fucking someone else’s husband while we were chitchatting in the hotel bar. Good times.

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You’re benefiting here – think of all those blowjobs – and if she’s a friend, you can certainly regard yourself as a friend with benefits. As for why she won’t allow you to eat her pussy or put your dick in her pussy, JC, well, a few things spring to mind. She could be one of those women who love to give head and that’s all she wants from a casual partner. Or she could have body-image issues. Or she could have a sexually transmitted infection, and she’d rather blow than disclose. Or she might be unwilling to risk pregnancy. Or she could be intersex or trans and not ready to open up. If you enjoy those blowjobs – if you’re enjoying the benefits – focus on what you are getting instead of what you’re not.

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I’m a happily married 35-year-old mom. I have a loving and devoted husband. Recently, I started a job to get out of the house more and interact

with more people. Well, it turns out my new boss is a real hottie. I have a crush on him and often find myself fantasizing about him. While I know these feelings can be normal, I tend to fixate/ obsess. I’m basically looking for advice on how to move past this crush or maybe find a more productive outlet. Newbie Fantasizing Here’s a more productive outlet: Turn out the lights, climb on top of your husband, get him hard, then sink your pussy down on his cock and ride him while you fantasize about your boss. (Perhaps this is better described as a more productive inlet?) Bonus points if you and your husband are both secure enough in your marriage and cognizant enough of reality to regard crushes on others as normal and, so long as they remain crushes, not a threat to your marriage or commitment. Because then you can talk dirty with your husband about your boss – he can even pretend to be your boss – while you ride your husband’s cock.

The other night while my wife and I were watching porn and masturbating together, I suggested we masturbate in front of DirtyRoulette. I briefly explained what the site is about. She asked me if that’s what I do – if I get on DR when I masturbate. I replied yes, sometimes – and she was so taken aback, she ended our masturbation session to process it. We’re fine now, but do you think this is “cheating”? Dirty Rouletting I don’t think it’s cheating, DR, but you aren’t married to me. In other words, if your wife regards you masturbating with strangers on the internet as cheating, then it’s cheating. There are, of course, some people out there who regard too many things as cheating—fantasizing about others, looking at porn, even non-webcam-or-porn-enhanced masturbation. People who think this way usually regard cheating as unforgivable and, consequently, their relationships are doomed to failure.

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“The Long Name”– ooh, someone’s in trouble. ACROSS

46 It’s six of one ... and six of the other

21 Herd comment

1 Chunks of history

48 Bunches

25 “I want catnip”

5 Decaf brand

50 36-Down’s “Family”

27 “Careless Whisper” group (yeah, that’s

10 Lumberyard tools

54 Piece of Necco candy

the sax solo playing in your mind right now)

14 Turn into a puddle

58 Desert of Mongolia

28 D.C. diamond denizens

15 “Fuzzy Wuzzy was ___ ...”

60 Zany, formally?

30 Cartman, to his mom

16 Preserve, as meat

63 Practical applications

31 Truffle fries topper

17 Cupcake decorator

64 Love on the Loire

32 Victorian expletive

18 Show with skits

65 Mine vein

33 Hashtag acronym popularized by a

19 Remote Control host Ken (or German

66 Quartet member

Drake song

for “upper”)

67 George Eliot’s ___ Marner

34 Casual “industry,” formally?

20 IRS collection, formally?

68 City near Tulsa

36 50-Across “Cousin”

22 Poke ingredient, often

69 The Facts of Life actress Mindy

37 Comedian/actress Butcher of Take My

23 Saved by the Bell character Jessie

70 Ibsen heroine Gabler

Wife

24 Acid-base indicator

71 Brown and Rather, for two

38 Inspiron computer maker 41 Harry Potter accessory

26 Formal attire 29 Actor Rob, or either candidate named

DOWN

45 Stopped suddenly, as an engine

Ron who competed in a 2018 Kansas con-

1 Gives off

47 He held over 1,000 patents

gressional primary

2 Newscast summary

49 Be shy

32 “___ of Laura Mars”

3 Echo responder?

51 Overrun (with)

35 Coif

4 Orchestral section

52 First Lady of the ‘50s

39 George Gershwin’s brother

5 Dress in Delhi

53 Castigate

40 Amorphous amount (and an Arrested

6 His mother raised Cain

55 “Criminal” singer Apple

Development character)

7 On the Beach author Shute

56 “There’s no ___ sight!”

41 Light bulb measure, formally?

8 Hawaii’s “Garden Isle”

57 Orchestra needs

42 Zero, on some fields

9 Fail to exist

58 Nacho topper, slangily

43 “It’s hard to be humble when you’re as

10 RBG’s group, for short

59 1952 Olympics host

great as I am” boxer

11 Mass transit vehicle, formally?

61 College courtyard

44 Beer named for a Dutch river

12 Small songbird

62 “Major” constellation

45 Religious offshoot

13 It comes twice after “Que” in a song

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etc FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, our heroine encounters a talking caterpillar as he smokes a hookah on top of a tall mushroom. “Who are you?” he asks her. Alice is honest: “I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.” She says this with uneasiness. In the last few hours, she has twice been shrunken down to a tiny size and twice grown as big as a giant. All these transformations have unnerved her. In contrast to Alice, I’m hoping you’ll have a positive attitude about your upcoming shifts and mutations, Aries. From what I can tell, your journey through the Season of Metamorphosis should be mostly fun and educational. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Juan Villarino has hitchhiked over 2,350 times in 90 countries. His free rides have carried him over 100,000 miles. He has kept detailed records, so he’s able to say with confidence that Iraq is the best place to catch a lift. Average wait time there is seven minutes. Jordan and Romania are good, too, with nine- and twelve-minute waits, respectively. In telling you about his success, I don’t mean to suggest that now is a favorable time to hitchhike. But I do want you to know that the coming weeks will be prime time to solicit favors, garner gifts, and make yourself available for metaphorical equivalents of free rides. You’re extra magnetic and attractive. How could anyone could resist providing you with the blessings you need and deserve? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the big stories of 2018 concerns your effort to escape from a star-crossed trick of fate—to fix a long-running tweak that has subtly undermined your lust for life. How successful will you be in this heroic quest? That will hinge in part on your faith in the new power you’ve been developing. Another factor that will determine the outcome is your ability to identify and gain access to a resource that is virtually magical even though it appears nondescript. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that a key plot twist in this story will soon unfold. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Potential new allies are seeking entrance to your domain. Existing allies aspire to be closer to you. I’m worried you may be a bit overwhelmed; that you might not exercise sufficient discrimination. I therefore urge you to ask yourself these questions about each candidate. 1. Does this person understand what it means to respect your boundaries? 2. What are his or her motivations for wanting contact with you? 3. Do you truly value and need the gifts each person has to give you? 4. Everyone in the world has a dark side. Can you intuit

the nature of each person’s dark side? Is it tolerable? Is it interesting?

with ideas about how you and your people can enhance your joie de vivre.

suspect that in the next six weeks, plot twists will be telegraphed in advance.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): While a young man, the future Roman leader Julius Caesar was kidnapped by Sicilian pirates. They proposed a ransom of 620 kilograms of silver. Caesar was incensed at the small size of the ransom—he believed he was worth more—and demanded that his captors raise the sum to 1,550 kilograms. I’d love to see you unleash that kind of bravado in the coming weeks, Leo—preferably without getting yourself kidnapped. In my opinion, it’s crucial that you know how valuable you are, and make sure everyone else knows, as well.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “My tastes are simple,” testified Sagittarian politician Winston Churchill. “I am easily satisfied with the best.” I propose that we make that your motto for now. While it may not be a sound idea to demand only the finest of everything all the time, I think it will be wise for you to do so during the next three weeks. You will have a mandate to resist trifles and insist on excellence. Luckily, this should motivate you to raise your own standards and expect the very best from yourself.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Romanian philosopher Emil Cioran loved the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. “Without Bach, God would be a complete second-rate figure,” he testified, adding, “Bach’s music is the only argument proving the creation of the Universe cannot be regarded as a complete failure.” I invite you to emulate Cioran’s passionate clarity, Virgo. From an astrological perspective, now is an excellent time to identify people and things that consistently invigorate your excitement about your destiny. Maybe you have just one shining exemplar, like Cioran, or maybe you have more. Home in on the phenomena that in your mind embody the glory of creation.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Russian playwright Anton Chekhov articulated a principle he felt was essential to telling a good story: If you say early in your tale that there’s a rifle hanging on the wall, that rifle must eventually be used. “If it’s not going to be fired, it shouldn’t be hanging there,” declared Chekhov. We might wish that real life unfolded with such clear dramatic purpose. To have our future so well-foreshadowed would make it easier to plan our actions. But that’s not often the case. Many elements pop up in our personal stories that ultimately serve no purpose. Except now, that is, for you Capricorns. I

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Would it be fun to roast marshmallows on long sticks over scorching volcanic vents? I suppose. Would it be safe? No! Aside from the possibility that you could get burned, the sulfuric acid in the vapors would make the cooked marshmallows taste terrible, and might cause them to explode. So I advise you to refrain from adventures like that. On the other hand, I will love it if you cultivate a playful spirit as you contemplate serious decisions. I’m in favor of you keeping a blithe attitude as you navigate your way through tricky maneuvers. I hope you’ll be jaunty in the midst of rumbling commotions.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I foresee the withering of a hope or the disappearance of a prop or the loss of leverage. This ending may initially make you feel melancholy, but I bet it will ultimately prove beneficent—and maybe lead you to resources that were previously unavailable. Here are rituals you could perform that may help you catalyze the specific kind of relief and release you need: 1. Wander around a graveyard and sing songs you love. 2. Tie one end of a string around your ankle and the other end around an object that symbolizes an influence you want to banish from your life. Then cut the string and bury the object. 3. Say this ten times: “The end makes the beginning possible.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): People will be thinking about you more than usual, and with greater intensity. Allies and acquaintances will be revising their opinions and understandings about you, mostly in favorable ways, although not always. Loved ones and not-so-loved ones will also be reworking their images of you, coming to altered conclusions about what you mean to them and what your purpose is. Given these developments, I suggest that you be proactive about expressing your best intentions and displaying your finest attributes.

THIS MODERN WORLD BY TOM TOMORROW

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If a man treats a life artistically, his brain is his heart,” wrote Oscar Wilde. I’ll translate that into a more complete version: “If a person of any gender treats life artistically, their brain is their heart.” This truth will be especially applicable for you in the coming weeks. You’ll be wise to treat your life artistically. You’ll thrive by using your heart as your brain. So I advise you to wield your intelligence with love. Understand that your most incisive insights will come when you’re feeling empathy and seeking intimacy. As you crystallize clear visions about the future, make sure they are generously suffused sacurrent.com | August 29–September 4, 2018 | CURRENT

65


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AUCTION The vehicle listed below were impounded by San Antonio Police Department & will be auctioned at a public auction on SEPT. 12, 2018 at 6:00P at SAN ANTONIO VEHICLE IMPOUND FACILITY Registered owners may pick up vehicles by showing proof of ownership and paying all towing and storage fees prior to Auction.

FEE ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. ID #

YEAR

MAKE/MODEL

VIN#

CHARGES

2475858

2010

WABASH TRAILER

1JJV532D 9BL365102

$6,857.30

2320483

1977

FORD F150

F25SKB A1248

$7,092.70

2588426

1900

BOAT

UTO

$2,283.40

2301277

2000

TRAILER-GENERIC

5MYUU423 8FB044694

$19,265.08

2533242

2000

TRAILER-GENERIC

UTO

$3,206.00

2378854

2003

VOLKSWAGEN BUS

WV1ZZZ2D Z3H013287

$5,977.20

2495282

2014

TRAILER-GENERIC

2515128

2000

TRAILER-GENERIC

2522036

1900

TRAILER-GENERIC

2470372

2003

MITSUBISHI LANCER

2535577

2000 OTHER - MINI-BIKE

2513968

2013

2668650

2000 SUZUKI MC CRUISER

2635877

2019

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2303821

1997

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San Antonio Current – August 29, 2018  

College Guide 2018

San Antonio Current – August 29, 2018  

College Guide 2018