Page 1

This Is How SA Voters

Look to City Leaders


FREE HEALTH

SCREENS

SAT AUGUST 25 | 8AM-NOON REGISTRATION: 210-949-0122 7940 FLOYD CURL SUITE 630 FATTY LIVER • A1C • PROSTATE

SPONSORED BY DAHILL


PERMANENTCOSMETICSBYJEANETTEMCCRIGHT.COM

SPECIALIZING IN

PERMANENT COSMETICS EYEBROWS | EYELINER BLUSH | HIGHLIGHTER TINT/PERM LASHES LIPS | LIP LINER

BY JEANETTE MCCRIGHT DAAM-SPCP

50% OFF ANY

SERVICE! MUST MENTION AD TO RECEIVE

OFFER

8503 BROADWAY, STE 114 @ LOOP 410 210.826.8836

RECOMMENDED BY PHYSICIANS

Sip-n-Shop THE SUMMER AWAY!

EVERY SATURDAY FROM 2PM-6PM WE WILL BE OFFERING WINE WHILE YOU SHOP LOCATED AT

UPTOWNGYPSY.COM • (210) 530-1859 4522 FREDERICKSBURG RD. #B64

Check out fresh daily conent at sacurrent.com

SELLING TO CD EXCHANGE IS AS EASY AS 1.

2.

Find your unwanted movies, music + games

3.

Go to your nearest

CD Exchange, DVD Exchange, or Movie Exchange location

Get CASH!

We buy blu-rays, 4k blu-rays, dvds, cds, vinyl records,

video games, game hardware and accessories!

VISIT OUR 7 SAN ANTONIO LOCATIONS | CDEXCHANGE-SA .COM 4

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


in this issue San Antonio Current

Issue 18_33 /// August 15-21, 2018

Publisher: Michael Wagner Editor-in-Chief: Greg Jefferson

Editorial

Senior Editors: Bryan Rindfuss, Jessica Elizarraras Art Director: Carlos Aguilar Food & Nightlife Editor: Jessica Elizarraras Staff Writers: Chris Conde, Sanford Nowlin Digital Content Editor: Sarah Martinez Contributors: Alexis Alvarez , Ron Bechtol, Erik Casarez, James Courtney, Callie Enlow, Jose Garza, Dan R. Goddard, Alejandra Lopez Gonzalez, Lance Higdon, Steven G. Kellman, Hannah Lorence, Michelle C. Lorentzen, Abby Mangel, Kiko Martínez, Jeremy Martin, Kelly Merka Nelson, M. Solis, Gary Sweeney, J.D. Swerzenski, Kelsey Valadez, Erin Winch Editorial Interns: Alisa Pierce, Lori Salazar, Camille Sauers, Victoria Wilson

Advertising

Sales Director: Mallory Jochen Senior Multimedia Account Executive: Sarah Estrada Account Executive: Krystal Little, April Miller Sales + Events Coordinator: Tarah Martinez

Marketing and Events

Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni Events Manager: Chelsea Bourque Sales + Events Coordinator: Tarah Martinez Marketing and Events Interns: Julia Aguillon, Charo Nagafuchi, Frankie Parra, Sergio Ramirez

Creative Services

Creative Services Manager: Tina Corbeil Graphic Designer: Samantha Serna Graphic Design Interns: Sara Jane Filippini, Michelle Moreno, Noemi Solis

Circulation

Circulation Manager: Justin Giles

Business

Operations Manager: Sarah Estrada Business Support Specialist: Samantha Lopez

Euclid Media Group

Chief Executive Officer: Andrew Zelman Chief Operating Officers: Chris Keating, Michael Wagner VP of Digital Services: Stacy Volhein Creative Director: Tom Carlson Digital Operations Coordinator: Jaime Monzon Senior Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni www.euclidmediagroup.com National Advertising: Voice Media Group 1-888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com San Antonio Current 915 Dallas San Antonio, Texas 78215 sacurrent.com Editorial - (210) 227-0044 / Fax - (210) 227-7755 Display Advertising - (210) 227-0044 Fax - (210) 227-7733 Classified - (210) 227-CLAS / Fax - (210) 227-7733 The San Antonio Current is published by Euclid Media Group Verified Audit Member San Antonio Distribution – The Current is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Get listed 1. Visit sacurrent.com 2. Click “Calendar” and then “Submit an Event” 3. Follow the steps to submit your event details Please allow 48 hours for review and approval. Event submissions are not accepted by phone. Copyright - The entire contents of the San Antonio Current are copyright 2018 by Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising, and business correspondence should be mailed to the address listed above. Subscriptions - Additional copies or back issues may be purchased at the Current offices for $1. Six-month domestic subscriptions may be purchased for $75; one-year subscriptions for $125.

07 News

Back for More

Occupy ICE San Antonio briefly relocates, but it won’t shut up and go away

Glitter Political

10 Feature

Art Credit

Behind the Eight Ball

City Hall insiders are sweating the fire union’s proposed charter changes – with good reason G R E G J E F F E R SO N

Joe Gonzales, defying political gravity

16 Calendar

Our top picks for the week

25 Arts

Guess Who’s Coming to Cena

Liz Coronado Castillo’s Aye, No! makes an audacious debut at the Cellar Theatre

A Crucial Story to Tell Walk on the River illuminates the black history of San Antonio

29 Screens

L’enfant Terrible

New documentary pays tribute to the stunning work and troubled life of late British fashion designer Alexander McQueen

31 Food

Truth in Advertising

At Korean Market, restaurant delivers all the hits

The Big Spoon

The People’s People’s Market

Cocktail of the Week

Gin and tonic Thursdays at the Pearl

37 Music

The PLASTIK Collective Parties

Area haven for the alternative queer

46 Etc

Savage Love, Crossword Puzzle, Astrology, This Modern World

This Is How SA Voters

Look to City Leaders

San Antonio’s political and business leaders are worried that voters will throw their support behind the fire union’s three proposed charter amendments on November 6. In fact, some see that result as just short of inevitable. It’ll take a big, expensive campaign to stop the union. Illustration and Art Direction by Carlos Aguilar sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

5


450+ Beers

125+ breweries

one glorious DAY!

benefiting

0

.2

18 0 2

O ct

limited tickets

purchase TICKETS at s a n a n t o n i o b e e r f e s t i va l . c o m

10.20.18

1:30p-6:30p

Dignowity & Lockwood Parks # s a b e e r f e s t i va l 6

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

s a n a n t o n i o b e e r f e s t i va l . c o m


news

Back for More

Occupy ICE San Antonio Briefly Relocates, but It Won’t Shut Up and Go Away BY SANFORD NOWLIN

L

ast Tuesday, SAPD officers ordered Occupy ICE San Antonio protesters camped outside of an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility on the Northeast Side to vacate the property and move along. And they did. For a while. After staying away the next two days for fear of arrest — and at one point temporarily setting up under a downtown bridge to feed the homeless — the protesters returned to the ICE building early last Friday. “As long as they’re still trying to have buses coming in and out, we’ll stay here,” said the camp’s masked spokesman who would only identify himself as “Kazi.” “We’re having an effect, which is why we decided to come back.” Four other college-age protesters huddled in lawn chairs under a covered pavilion, and sleeping bags overflowed from an adjacent tent. When a group of women pulled up to the ICE facility, one of the protesters hurried after them to hand out kids’ activity books to share inside. He didn’t get to them before they entered the squat, fortress-like building. Occupy ICE San Antonio has spent nearly a month camped at the spot, dubbed “Camp Cicada,” stretching banners across the entryway, banging pots and chanting slogans to disrupt the arrival of buses carrying immigrant detainees. The buses, which once arrived every afternoon, stopped Monday, July 30, suggesting the protests had disrupted the agency’s routine, Kazi said. About five to 10 protesters are at the camp at any one time. The camp is one of several across the country – most are on the West Coast – set up to call for the abolition of ICE and draw attention to the Trump Administration’s treatment of migrant detainees.

Yelling ‘Fire’ The group’s recent confrontation with SAPD came after someone — a police spokeswoman would not say who — called to report a small fire in the landscape mulch along the sidewalk at the ICE center. Four police cars arrived on scene, followed by an arson investigation unit, according to protesters. Police initially gave the protesters two hours to vacate the spot, but relented after SAPD contacted the property owners, who said they had no problem with the protesters so long as they remained peaceful.

Sanford Nowlin

Marisa Bono, Mayor Ron Nirenberg’s chief of policy, confirmed that the Occupy ICE could remain at the site in a letter first shared on the blog Deceleration. “As long as there is no breach of peace or fire, or a potentially dangerous disturbance of that nature, the protestors ARE NOT under order to vacate from SAPD, and SAPD should not interfere with peaceful protest,” Bono wrote. According to the SAPD spokeswoman Romana Lopez, officers couldn’t locate a fire when they arrived on the scene. On the Current’s Friday visit to the camp, there was no evident damage to the area. “It was something you could have poured a water bottle on or stomped out,” Kazi said. Even so, the campers dispersed shortly after the incident, fearing SAPD might come back with arrest warrants, he added.

‘Sacrifice and Commitment’ The run-in with local police isn’t the only difficulty Camp Cicada’s experienced. In late July, a group of 20 or so masked individuals claiming to represent the neo-Na-

Occupy ICE San Antonio spokesman “Kazi” shows off a box of food and activity books the group gives out to people entering San Antonio’s ICE detention facility.

L

zi group Patriot Front harassed sleeping protesters and knocked down tents. In video captured by Occupy ICE San Antonio, the group stood in the street chanting nationalist slogans and waving flags. A few days later, ICE picked up and detained Sergio Salazar Gonzalez, an 18-yearold DACA recipient known to other protesters as “Mapache,” near the camp. U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-San Antonio/Austin, submitted a formal letter asking for the young man’s release. While Occupy ICE San Antonio remains cautious about more run-ins with the law, Kazi said the group won’t cave to outside pressure. “It’s a sacrifice and commitment to sleep out here, day in-day out.” He nodded to the ICE building and its chain link fence. “But

Find more newsmore coverage Find news every day at sacurrent.com


SUNSET DINNER

@ MISSION SAN JUAN FARM

ENJOY

Jungle Boogie

a picnic-style dinner at sunset adjacent to the historic farm at Mission San Juan. Join us for hay-ride tours of the farm, mission tours, music, appetizers, beer, wine, cocktails and more! The event begins at 6:30 PM with picnic baskets available for pick-up at 7:15 PM.

SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM 9101 GRAF RD., SAN ANTONIO, TX 78214

Nights

ADULT MEALS = $ 75 CHILD MEALS = $ 15

LIVE MUSIC • FOOD • DRINKS • GAMES

EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT JUNE 16 – AUGUST 25 EXTENDED HOURS

san antonio®

DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

SAZ22184-01-SACurrent-4.79x10.6875-JungleBoogieNights.indd 1

Picnic dinners will be offered from a handful of San Antonio’s finest restaurants including: - Bohanan’s - Clementine - Tim The Girl - Botika - Restaurant - Tre Trattoria at - Catalyst Catering Gwendolyn SAMA

edible

PURCHASE TICKETS AT SAZOO.ORG 8

Register and view restaurant menus at www.safoodbank.org/sunset.

6/18/18 8:17 AM


news | Glitter Political Joe Gonzales, defying political gravity BY JADE ESTEBAN ESTRADA

J

oe D. Gonzales is sitting across from me, giving me a much-needed refresher on his favorite Broadway musical Wicked. A silver statue of Lady Justice, one of the finest I’ve ever seen, stands behind him. The Democratic nominee for Bexar County district attorney gleefully explains the popular storyline, highlighting “the special relationship” between Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, and Glinda, the Good Witch of the North. They “try to stay friends until the end, but then decide to separate [to] have different lives,” Gonzales says. I can’t help but note an unhappy parallel to his currently fraught relationship with DA Nico LaHood, whom he defeated by a large margin in the March primary election. Many political observers may have viewed the 59-year-old Gonzales’ victory as poetic justice. Long before LaHood went on-air to deplore the campaign contributions that Gonzales received from liberal philanthropist George Soros, the enchantment between the two men ended when LaHood threatened to “destroy” Gonzales after the latter raised the issue of prosecutorial misconduct in a murder case. The event took place in front of a state district judge, who in April backed up Gonzales’ story about being threatened by LaHood. Gonzales says he and LaHood were part business owners of a building at one time. Their relationship was fine then. “He’s [even] come to my house,” the candidate says. His rivals continue to paint him as soft on crime. However, during our interview, Gonzales explains his belief that everyone deserves their day in court no matter how grave the crime. “There are a lot of reasons why a prosecutor should temper justice with mercy,” he says, glancing back at the statue of Lady Justice. As a Latino who grew up in the public school system and put himself through law school, Gonzales embraces his position as a role model for young people. He remembers how his mother once told him that getting a job at the then-Kelly Air Field meant you had arrived. “She had no idea what it was

like to send someone off to college,” he says, adding that “an Anglo-American” chemistry teacher once made him the target of a joke when Gonzales told her that he wouldn’t need to learn about chemistry because he was going to be lawyer. “She laughed and said, ‘No, you’re not going to be a lawyer. People like you don’t become lawyers.’” Gonzales’ impression was that this was intended as a racist comment. “She said it loud enough for the other kids to hear – and they laughed,” he recalls. This fueled his motivation to succeed. “All these years, I feel I proved her wrong.” As he explains how he decided to run for DA, he recalls his time at St. Mary’s University Law School and even earlier – a random event in grade school that planted the seed that would blossom into a passion-filled profession. He and a schoolmate were playing a hacky sack game, a popular pastime in the 1970s. The bag fell in the center of the room, and both boys dived in to retrieve it. At just the wrong time, a teacher walked in and assumed they were fighting. The principal passed judgement on them without giving them chance to explain. The lack of due process would stay with him throughout his life. His 30 years of experience “dealing with people’s lives and people’s freedoms” have taught him to sleep on it if possible when a major decision is looming. “That’s very important because in my career. You don’t want to just have a knee-jerk reaction when you’re presented with an issue or with a situation where you have to react,” he says. “You have to do the right thing, even when people aren’t looking,” he says, coming back to the things he’s learned during his studies and observations of crime and punishment. He feels LaHood has mismanaged the office of the DA. This was his impetus to run. “Many people have said that [my campaign] is revenge politics,” he says. “It’s not.” Though Gonzales wouldn’t consider himself an art collector, he owns about twenty statues of Lady Justice. Varying in size and quality, the objects geekify his home and office. “Each one has a little

Jade Esteban Estrada

story to tell,” he says with a gentle smile. The aforementioned statue he and his wife picked up in San Miguel de Allende. Is there something in the practice of law that you know you can’t fix? I ask. He pauses and breathes in deeply. “The reality that sometimes people are evil... and people commit crimes for various reasons,” he says, allowing me a glimpse of how carefully he chooses his words. “Sometimes people commit crimes just for the sake of committing crimes. Those are the individuals that have to be punished.” For about the seventh time, his phone pings. He says he can’t turn it off. Which is understandable, especially during a campaign. Gonzales tries to leave his work at the office. He says the love and support of his family keeps him centered. “You can’t just shut [the job] off at 5 p.m. It’s hard to leave it behind. If you’re going to have any measure of success, if you’re going to be an ethical and dedicated lawyer, you have to be willing to put in the time and the effort,” he says. And that means taking calls from clients in the middle of the night. “I would say my

work is 60 percent of my life.” His wife, whom he describes as his “heart and soul,” draws my interest. I ask about her, saying, “They say behind every great man…” “Is an even better woman,” Gonzales replies. They’ve been married for as long as he’s been a lawyer. In fact, the couple put each other through law school. He and his wife, who is an associate judge, have one college-bound daughter. His wife and daughter love musicals, too. Gonzales says he and his family have a 15-year tradition that they spend Thanksgiving weekend in New York City. They have Thanksgiving dinner at Rockefeller Center. Afterwards, he and his daughter go ice-skating. “Well, she skates. I fall,” he says with a chuckle. When asked about the key to a happy marriage, Gonzales answers immediately. “Compromise,” he says. “There’s a give-and-take. That’s the hallmark of our marriage.” Now that’s some wicked advice. sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

9


news | Their Town

Mayor Ron Nirenberg said he supported paid sick time during a speech last week to the North San Antonio Chamber of Commerce. But he thinks the mandate should come from the state.

Y

facebook

Behind the Eight Ball

City Hall insiders are sweating the fire union’s proposed charter changes – with good reason BY GREG JEFFERSON City Hall is panicking over the possibility of voters falling in love with the fire union’s three damaging amendments to the city charter this fall. The behind-the-scenes consensus is that the measures – one would cap future city managers’ compensation and force him or her to quit after eight years, and another would make it easier to force public votes on a broad range of spending decisions – are likely to prevail at the ballot box on November 6. That is, if the proposed amendments survive the legal challenge unleashed last week by the Secure San Antonio’s Future political action committee, which is bankrolled by corporations, 10

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

business and community leaders, and special interests. Campaign consultant Christian Archer and trial lawyer Mikal Watts, longtime fishing buddies and political partners, are behind the lawsuit. It picks up on reporting by the San Antonio Express-News showing the San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association flouted campaign-finance reporting rules, effectively masking the source of funding for the wildly successful signature-gathering operation for the three measures. The PAC’s aim is to convince a judge to keep the three proposed amendments, for which more than 100,000

people signed petitions, off the ballot and out of the reach of voters. In the meantime, the City Council is expected to vote Thursday to place the union’s “San Antonio First” (zero points for originality) measures on the ballot. That same day, council members will decide whether to hand off another petition-driven initiative – this one requiring all San Antonio employers to provide their workers with paid sick time – to voters in November. If council falls short of passing paid sick time as an ordinance, it’ll go to a public vote in November – and there was doubt late last week whether enough council members would vote yes to adopt it. Sticking their necks out like that could make them targets of the business community in next year’s city election. “There does seem to be some energy [on council], though I don’t know if there’s enough energy, to pass this by ordinance,” said Michelle Tremillo, executive director of the grassroots Texas Organizing Project, or TOP, part of the

Working Texans for Paid Sick Time coalition. The Texas AFL-CIO, Move Texas, Planned Parenthood and Texas Civil Rights Project are among the other advocates. A member of the coalition, speaking on condition of anonymity, said flatly that as of August 10, paid sick time was short of a council majority – even though the coalition’s polling on the issue is said to show overwhelming support, north of 70 percent. Supporters of paid sick time packed council chambers last Wednesday night for a public hearing on the issue. TOP and other Working Texans members, including Planned Parenthood, had worked the grassroots with robo-calls and emails, encouraging them campaign-style to turn out for the hearing. In San Antonio political consultant Laura Barberena’s view, paid time off for illness or to care for a sick child strikes many voters as fair play. “Most people support the notion of paid sick time from a moral perspective,” she said. “I feel a moral tug. That’s what’s right. That’s American. But, of course, the devil is in the details.” In a speech last Friday to the North San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, Mayor Ron Nirenberg likewise said he supported paid sick leave for everyone. Yet he didn’t want the fingerprints of City Council or San Antonio voters anywhere on it. “Let me be clear: I believe that paid sick leave is good for business and good for families, but it would be better addressed at the state level,” Nirenberg said, according to the text of his speech. “My hope is that the business community and labor leaders can come together to support a statewide solution that is both pro-business and beneficial for every family.” Of course, the idea of the GOP-controlled legislature bowing to labor leaders, community activists and Planned Parenthood among others on this issue is as likely as Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick turning down an appearance on Fox News. Nirenberg saved his energy for the fire union’s three flaming bags of dog shit.


Noche-current-9.75x10.6875-white-Ad-PRINT.pdf

1

8/9/18

1:43 PM

San Antonio Museum of Art

Friday, August 17 6:00–10:00 p.m. C

M

Free with Museum admission samuseum.org/calendar

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Dress in your summery whites for an evening filled with Spanish art and music celebrating Spain: 500 Years of Spanish Painting from the Museums of Madrid.

Arte y Pasión flamenco • Duo Peña guitar and violin • Art Making Pack a picnic or pre-order @ tretrattoria.com/noche-blanca • Cash bar Film on the Green: Vicky Christina Barcelona San Antonio Museum of Art | 200 West Jones Avenue | samuseum.org

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

11


12

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


news | Their Town

Fire union President Chris Steele announces the petition drive – ultimately successful – to put three city charter amendments on the November ballot.

Y

facebook

“These destructive proposals are an all-out attempt to undermine local leadership and gain leverage over taxpayers,” he said. “They would take our city backwards, bringing divisive politics and bad policy to our local government – the one level of government that still works. “We are among the fastest growing cities in America, and that means we have to invest in our future. Yet these charter changes would put all of our progress at serious risk.” The possibility of all four measures going to San Antonio voters in November scares the bejesus out of City Hall. If the paid sick time initiative goes on the November 6 ballot, the voters who support it will also be good with capping a future city manager’s pay and making it easier to bring more city business to a public vote. Ramiro Cavazos, president of the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, said he worries about having both the charter amendments and paid sick leave on the same ballot, that “it would create confusion.” “City Hall wants to defeat the amendments, and have paid sick time on the ballot would make it that much harder,” said a member of the Working Texans for Paid Sick Time coalition, speaking on condition of anonymity. But city insiders may be

overthinking it, the person added. “I personally don’t think they have a chance of beating these charter amendments, whether or not paid sick time is on the ballot.” The Hispanic Chamber and other business organizations that have come out against the initiative say they’re OK with paying for sick leave, that most of their members already provide the benefit. But they say it would hurt small businesses, and that, most importantly, local government has no business dictating HR policy to employers. Earlier this year, the Austin City Council mandated paid sick time and promptly got sued by the powerful National Federation of Independent Businesses and other opponents. Their argument is that only state and federal government can require businesses to offer the benefit. To no one’s surprise, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton intervened in the lawsuit, siding with employers. Last month, Paxton also sent a poison-pen letter to Nirenberg, saying: “We write to inform you that no matter the Council’s decision or the result of any ballot initiative, Texas law preempts a municipal paid sick leave ordinance… We ask that the City Council reject the proposed ordinance...” Last week, state Sen. Donna Campbell, R-New Braunfels, made the same point in a letter of her own to city officials.

‘We Are Behind’ A quick recap on the fire union’s proposed amendments: One would make it easier to put city ordinances to a public referendum, potentially opening the way for voters to ultimately decide all kinds of spending issues, by increasing the time for signature-gathering and reducing the number of signatures required. Another would cap how much the city managers who follow City Manager Sheryl Sculley can earn and force them to step down after eight years. And, lastly, one would require the city to take labor-contract disputes to arbitration instead of court. For months now, Nirenberg and company have talked in campaign fashion about the proposed amendments as momentum killers, threatening to return the city to the old days of under-investment in streets, drainage and services. In a March interview, union President Chris Steele shrugged off the idea that the charter amendments would damage city government, saying that’s “power brokers and politicians trying to scare the people.” “The people are the smartest ones, and they run this city,” Steele said. “If there’s

going to be a problem [caused by a referendum], they won’t do it.” That overly simple message, combined with the unpopularity of Sculley and her compensation package, have given insiders the chills. Expect a well-funded anti-amendment campaign that tries to drown out the fire union’s claims. “It’s clear we are behind,” Cavazos said. “We need to educate the voters about the dangers of these three charter amendments.” Secure San Antonio’s Future, launched by Archer and consultant Kelton Morgan, Nirenberg’s 2017 campaign manager, will pay for the campaign. Last month, the PAC reported collecting $255,800 between June 19 and June 30. Among the donors: developer Gordon Hartman, the PAC’s treasurer, $25,000; Jenna Saucedo Herrera, CEO of the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation, $1,000; Berto Guerra, chairman of SAWS’s board of trustees and CEO of Toyota parts maker Avanzar, $25,000; USAA, $100,000; and accounting giant Ernst & Young, which in 2017 received a six-year property tax abatement from the city and a $309,000 grant to create 600 new jobs locally, $25,000. Cavazos said he’s heard the PAC has raised more than $1 million to date. And if any of the contributors have any qualms about being on the same team as Mikal Watts, a Democratic kingmaker, they’ve kept quiet about them. The anti-amendments crowd will need every dime it raises. Barberena is expecting to see a surge of voters who are less than rigorous about casting ballots. “I think the charter amendments have the ability to turn out voters who don’t typically turn out in gubernatorial elections,” she said. On the other hand, “I could definitely see [the paid sick time measure] bringing out more working-class voters than you’d see otherwise.” It’s not lost on the insiders who are fighting the union’s San Antonio First amendments that a recent study found that new and infrequent voters effectively elected Donald Trump. sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

13


BENEFITING

14

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


ONLY 100 PAIRS

O F

T I C K E T S

R E M A I N !

7PM VIP ENTRY • 8PM GA ENTRY

WITTE MUSEUM

N E X T F R I DAY AU G U S T 2 4 T H

featured Distillers BALCONES DISTILLING | BULLEIT BOURBON | DEVIL’S RIVER | TOKI RANGER CREEK | TEXAS CROWN| GARRISON BROTHERS | SELECT CLUB G I A N T T E X A S B O U R B O N | R E B E C C A C R E E K D I S T I L L I N G | H E AV E N ’ S DOO R S T I L L H O U S E B O U R B O N | M A K E R ’ S M A R K | T R E AT Y O A K D I S T I L L I N G + M O R E !

featured Restaurants ART INSTITUTE OF SAN ANTONIO | CELLAR MIXOLOGY | THE RUSTIC | COVER 3 | LA MARGINAL D I G N O W I T Y M E AT S | A R T O F DO N U T | F R A N C I S B OG S I D E | M A R K E T O N H O U S TO N S H A K E S H A C K | TO R O K I TC H E N + B A R | G R AY Z E | S O U T H B B Q + K I TC H E N | H A N Z O

PURCHASE YOUR 2018 TICKETS NOW AT SAWHISKEYBUSINESS.COM

Experience interactive seminars led by ambassadors from

RANGER CREEK DISTILLING | GARRISON BROS. DISTILLING | REBECCA CREEK DISTILLING T R E AT Y O A K D I S T I L L I N G + B U L L E I T B O U R B O N

Enjoy

W H I S K E Y S F R O M L OCA L , R E G I O N A L + WO R L DW I D E D I S T I L L E R I E S | B I T E S FROM TOP SAN ANTONIO RESTAURANTS | SELECT WITTE MUSEUM EXHIBITS LIVE MUSIC | 4 DJ STATIONS | A CIGAR LOUNGE + MORE!

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

15


FRI | 8/17SAT | 8/18 THEATER

BETTER BUTTER

Courtesy of Lupe Fiasco

FRI | 8/17

THU | 8/16

MUSIC

LUPE FIASCO L Universal Pictures

FI LM

THE JERK

In what’s considered one of his most memorable movie roles, actor, comedian, Waco native and “wild and crazy guy” Steve Martin stars in the 1979 absurdist comedy The Jerk as Navin R. Johnson, the naive, adopted white son of a poor black sharecropping family, who grows up never knowing his true race. When he finally finds out (“You mean I’m gonna stay this color?!”), he packs his bags and leaves the farm to start a new life in St. Louis. There, he lands a series of jobs, including as a gas station attendant (“He hates these cans!”), a carnival worker and an unwitting inventor. Directed by Carl Reiner (Summer School), the rags-to-riches-to-rags-to-riches blockbuster (it made $100 million worldwide) was listed at No. 89 on the American Film Institute’s Top 100 comedies. In their original review, the New York Times called the movie “funny, vulgar and backhandedly clever, never more so than when it aspires to absolute stupidity.” During an AFI presentation a decade ago, Martin, who co-wrote the film, said of the screenplay, “Our goal was to have a laugh on every page.” So, order a glass of “fresh wine” Thursday night and LOL with some sophisticated people during this free outdoor screening presented by Video Dungeon Theatre. Free, 9pm, Oak Hills Tavern, 7920 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 614-8855, facebook.com/thevideodungeon. — Kiko Martinez

Before he was known for posting long-winded rants on social media, Chicago-native Lupe Fiasco was one of hip-hop’s most promising artists. Much like Kanye West’s The College Dropout or Kendrick Lamar’s Damn, Fiasco’s 2007 sophomore effort The Cool became an instant hip-hop classic, ahead of its time and regularly quoted by many of today’s leading rappers. Led by the infectious Billboard Top 10 hit “Superstar” featuring Matthew Santos, The Cool’s subject matter touched upon issues of race, class and police brutality, all the while appealing to white kids across the globe. Eleven years after the album’s release, Fiasco may no longer be hiphop’s golden child (he’s touted as one of the genre’s greatest lyricists), but his early works and their enduring legacy remain intact. $25-$50, 9pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. — Marco Aquino

Better Butter is a collection of short plays written and performed by a talented and forward-thinking ensemble of artists: Clint Taylor, Joyous Windrider Jimenez, Fernanda Covarrubias, Lilith Tijerina, Sarah Tijerina, Giovan Lugo and Abel Ramirez. The meta, fourth-wall-demolishing result of this group’s effort is drama that asks questions of the purpose and framework of drama itself – especially in terms of concepts like “actor,” “character” and “audience.” The experience of Better Butter is a unique one, and one that allows for, or at least attempts to allow for, real interpersonal connection between the folks on stage and the folks in the audience. Which makes sense, since the creators’ stated objective is “to strengthen human connection and build community by directly sharing their experi-

Courtesy Gary Gulman

ON SALE FRIDAY • NOVEMBER 24 • MAJESTIC THEATRE 16

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


director of counseling for the Northside Independent School District, will be the keynote speaker. Lauryn Farris will moderate and ACLU attorney Kali Cohn will also speak. In addition, the event will highlight the voices of local trans students and their parents. Free, 5-8pm, Esperanza Peace and Justice Center, 922 San Pedro Ave., (210) 228-0201, esperanzacenter.org. — Georgina Cortinas

SAT | 8/18

SUN | 8/19

TALKS PLUS Esperanza Center

ences with an audience.” $10, 10pm, Jump-Start Performance Co, 710 Fredericksburg Rd., (210) 227-5867, jump-start.org. — JC

FRI | 8/17SUN | 8/19 COMEDY

GARY GULMAN \

Apparently, Gary Gulman is stand-up comedy’s best kept secret. The Boston native and current New Yorker was lauded by the Village Voice in the same breath as Louis C.K. and Bill Burr as the “next giant ex-Bostonian comic to break huge.” In 2014, the New York Times described him as a “vivid storyteller” and said he was “finally being recognized as one of the country’s strongest comedians.” Since then, Gulman, who is gearing up for his Must Be Nice! tour later this year, has continued to perform on talk shows like Conan and Late Night with Seth Meyers. During his appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert last year, Gulman joked about the hardships of doing laundry, the difference between “waking up” and “getting up” in the morning and his unique way of eating a pint of ice

calendar

cream (“Fork prints in ice cream are evidence of a life in chaos”). His latest comedy special, 2016’s It’s About Time, is currently available on Netflix. Earlier this year, Gulman played a fictional version of himself on comedian Pete Holmes’ HBO series Crashing. $20, 8pm & 10:15pm Fri-Sat, 8pm Sun, Laugh Out Loud Comedy Club, 618 NW Loop 410, (210) 541-8805, lolsanantonio.com. – KM

TH EATER

SON TUS NIÑOS TAMBIÉN: TRANS KIDS ‛AN EVENING OF ZARZUELA’ q BACK TO SCHOOL \ Dating back to the 17th century in its earliest For many kids, the beginning of a new school year sparks nervous excitement. For trans students and their parents, however, the experience may be a little more daunting. Fortunately, the Esperanza Peace and Justice Center has been keeping the needs and concerns of trans students in mind since 2016. It is hosting its third annual Son Tus Niños También: Trans Kids Back to School event on Saturday, August 18. In a press release, Esperanza cites the Texas bathroom bill that nearly passed in 2017 (SB6) and last March’s military ban on trans people as recent examples of anti-trans hostility on state and national levels. Esperanza knows, however, that change begins on the local level. “We want to create a safe space to share the experiences, concerns and visions of parents of trans kids and trans individuals so that the community can get different perspectives of what is happening here in San Antonio,” they explain. The event aims to facilitate a dialogue on “how to best include, respect, and protect trans youth in schools.” Hosted by the Queer Corazones de Esperanza, it will feature school administrators, counselors, and legal experts discussing the treatment of trans students in schools and their legal rights. Dr. Kimberly Ridgley,

form, Zarzuela is a Spanish theatrical genre that blends spoken word with lyrical/musical content delivered in both operatic and popular song styles. It is theater and musical theater at once, high-brow and common — a mode accessible and enjoyable for all. Sound intriguing? This weekend, as a part of our city’s ongoing celebration of its Spanish heritage in the context of our Tricentennial, you can experience this vibrant form of theater for yourself at “An Evening of Zarzuela.” Presented by Casa de España en San Antonio, this performance will feature Soprano Judith Rodriguez, tenor Erich Schmidt, and pianist Anna Hakabyan performing a selection of famous arias. As an added bonus, the evening will include tapas and Spanish wine. $25, 5:30-8pm, Pearl Stable, 307 Pearl Pkwy., atpearl.com. — JC

The Historic Pearl

Sign up for ExcluSivE prESalES & announcEmEntS! tExt maJESticEmpirE to 22828

@EMPIRE

AUGUST 20

AUGUST 21

AUGUST 23

SEPTEMBER 21

SEPTEMBER 22

DECEMBER 1

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

17


11

SAN ANTONIO, TX

AUGUST

25

AUGUST

2018 For all the details: CulinariaSA.org

Facebook: /CulinariaSA Insta/Twitter: /CulinariaSA

Restaurants are on

display showcasing their

finest Cuisine August 11-

25. Restaurants will offer special three-course prixfixe menus for breakfast, lunch and dinner

throughout the cities.

Make your reservations

and experience all of the amazing summer eats. Menu Offerings: $25

Breakfast/Brunch, $15 lunch, $35/$45 dinner Reservations are not required to participate – but, are strongly encouraged – and can be booked directly with restaurants.

18

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


calendar MON | 8/20 FI LM

PLANET OF THE APES 5

When French writer Pierre Boulle wrote a satirical novel in 1963, he couldn’t have known those apes would have legs. The franchise would yield five initial films, two TV series (including one Saturday morning cartoon), and a rebooted series launched by Tim Burton in the new century. It all would have petered out fast without the impact of the first film in 1968, as directed by Franklin Schaffner with an eye toward preserving some of the satire in the middle of a sci-fi adventure about astronauts landing on, well, a planet of apes. Charlton Heston growls up a storm as the hero enslaved by “damned dirty apes” while Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter and Maurice Evans make an impact as civilized and sympathetic characters under a ton of Oscar-winning makeup. The twist ending is as good as anything from co-writer Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone. Alamo Drafthouse revives the enduring classic in conjunction with its The Nerd 411 podcast. $5, 7:30pm, Alamo Drafthouse Park North, 618 NW Loop 410, (210) 6778500, drafthouse.com. — Michael Barrett

20th Century Fox

TUE | 8/21 FILM

HORSE FEATHERS E

The four Marx Brothers were in their prime when they made this college football comedy. Groucho plays college president Quincy Adams Wagstaff, introducing himself with the delightful song “I’m Against It.” His brother Zeppo plays his son, which is a typical example of how Marx plots can’t be taken seriously, and an even better example is how Chico and Harpo get recruited to play on the football team. The climax shows how “the big game” has been effective in comedies for decades, and as recently as 2008 was named No. 1 in an ESPN rundown of the top 11 football scenes in movies. Some of the more ris-

Paramount Pictures

qué moments in this pre-Code comedy have been censored and never recovered, but it’s still funny. For additional anarchy, this screening is accompanied by the second ever Three Stooges short, Punch Drunks, in which Curly turns into a champion boxer whenever he hears “Pop Goes the Weasel.” He’s a victim of soycumstance. Free for Victory Rewards members (free registration at drafthouse. com/victory), 7:30pm, Alamo Drafthouse Stone Oak, 22806 Hwy. 281 N., (210) 6778500, drafthouse.com. —MB COMEDY

ADDICTS COMEDY TOUR E

Ask any comedian out there and they’ll tell you that comedy and pain go hand in hand. Although the industry has lost many talented performers to their

FI LM

BIG SONIA For more than 30 years, Sonia Washawski has been distracting herself from somber thoughts through needle work. But an eviction notice for her tailor shop, which has clung to life in a vacant Kansas City mall, forces the vibrant great grandmother to confront questions of survival, not only commercial. Agonizing memories of three Nazi death camps come surging back, and she embarks on a speaking tour to share her experiences of the Holocaust. Co-directed by one of her granddaughters, Big Sonia is the loving portrait of an extraordinary woman who, even at 91, refuses to accede to darkness. It follows Sonia as she closes up shop and bids farewell to the customers who adore her and also as she recounts tales of excruciating horror to students, prison inmates and her own extensive family. Though the film at times loses focus, it documents the profound effect Sonia’s indomitable spirit has on everyone she meets. A viewer of Big Sonia can no more deny the life force of Sonia Washawski than her testimony to the genocide of millions of her fellow Jews. $8, 5pm, Barshop Jewish Community Center, Holzman Auditorium, 12500 NW Military Hwy., (210) 302-6820, jccsanantonio.org/filmevents. — Steven G. Kellman

SUN | 8/19

Courtesy of Addicts Comedy Tour

addictions, using their craft to recover from that sorrow is something many comedians have successfully done – from Marc Maron to Mike DeStefano to Jason Mewes. Stand-up comedians Kurtis Matthews and Andy Gold know what it’s like to overcome life’s challenges through humor. They’ll share their stories about addiction, rehab and recovery on stage in San Antonio for the first time ever Tuesday evening. Matthews has been sober for more than 30 years. He hit rock bottom when he almost died in a drunken car accident at the age of 22. Gold’s life, too, was almost cut short after a failed suicide attempt. He has been off heroin for five years. While it might not sound like material for a fun-filled night, Matthews and Gold have a lot to laugh about. “The more honest we are, the more fans we gather and the more people recognize themselves in our humor,” Matthews said in a past interview. “And hopefully it helps them heal.” $20, 8:30pm, Improv Comedy Club, 849 E. Commerce St., (210) 229-1420, rivercentercomedyclub.com. – KM

Inflatable Film

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

19


CHECK OUT FRESH DAILY CONTENT AT

• SACURRENT.COM • Check out fresh daily content at sacurrent.com

Tour de las Misiones September 8, 2018 - 8 AM Mission Park Pavilions 6030 Padre Drive Narrated Bike Ride Tour 7 Miles: San Jose and San Juan 14 Miles: Alamo, Concepcion and San Jose 22 Miles: Alamo, Concepcion, San Jose, San Juan and Espada 5K and 10K Run & Walk Enjoy a walk or run through the scenic River Walk, Mission Reach and Mission San Jose Receive a passport and get a stamp at each of the stops. Plus, get a goody bag, commemorative medal and t-shirt designed by renowned artist Cruz Ortiz.

Register at www.WorldHeritageFestival.org 20

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

AUCTION The vehicle listed below were impounded by San Antonio Police Department & will be auctioned at a public auction on SEPT. 12, 2018 at 6:00P at SAN ANTONIO VEHICLE IMPOUND FACILITY Registered owners may pick up vehicles by showing proof of ownership and paying all towing and storage fees prior to Auction.

FEE ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. ID #

YEAR

MAKE/MODEL

VIN#

CHARGES

2475858

2010

WABASH TRAILER

1JJV532D 9BL365102

$6,402.66

2320483

1977

FORD F150

F25SKB A1248

$6,789.60

2588426

1900

BOAT

UTO

$1,980.30

2301277

2000

TRAILER-GENERIC

5MYUU423 8FB044694

$18,934.66

2533242

2000

TRAILER-GENERIC

UTO

$2,859.60

2378854

2003

VOLKSWAGEN BUS

WV1ZZZ2D Z3H013287

$5,674.10

2495282

2014

TRAILER-GENERIC

2515128

2000

TRAILER-GENERIC

2522036

1900

TRAILER-GENERIC

2470372

2003

MITSUBISHI LANCER

2535577

2000

OTHER - MINI-BIKE

2513968

2013

TAO TAO MINI-BIKE

2668650

2000

SUZUKI MC CRUISER

2635877

2019

INTERNATIONAL SEMI/TRACTOR

2303821

1997

DODGE RAM

4D1US162 9X5007361 4DFTS0616 XN024834 4H10U131 140346312 JA3AJ26E5 3U032518 L0WHDA10 5F1000349 L9NTEACB 8D1053547 GS1000 701527 3 H A M K TA R 6KL495459 1B7HC16Y 3VS101882

$3,574.05 $3,227.65 $3,097.75 $4,007.05 $2,859.60 $3,249.30 $608 $5,169.21 $20,509

3625 Growdon Rd. San Antonio, TX. | 210.881.8440


calendar ART

“Alberto Mijangos: 159” Comprising 96 artworks gathered from private and institutional collections, the retrospective “Alberto Mijangos: 159” spotlights a revered painter who was born in Mexico City but made San Antonio home and left deep impressions on our art community as an educator and gallery director. Curated by Dr. Teresa Eckmann in observance of the Tricentennial, the exhibition draws its title from a number that held symbolic meaning for Mijangos — 1 signaling the beginning, 5 referencing the middle and 9 representing the end of his artistic career. Free, 11am-6pm Wednesday-Sunday, 11am-6pm Tuesday; Centro de Artes, 101 S. Santa Rosa Ave., (210) 206-2787. “Immersed” Organized by the McNay’s René Paul Barilleaux in conjunction with San Antonio’s Tricentennial and the 50th anniversary of HemisFair ’68, “Immersed” places San Antonio artist Chris Sauter’s disorienting installation Pleasure Principle (a constructed and furnished living room outfitted with models of dopamine) alongside works by three internationally recognized artists known for complex, environmental installations: Yayoi Kusama (whose “Infinity Mirrors” exhibit is on a blockbuster national tour), Philip Worthington and Andy Warhol. $15-$20, 10am-4pm Wednesday, 10am-9pm Thursday, 10am-4pm Friday, 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-5pm Sunday, 10am-4pm Tuesday; McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368. International Artist-in-Residence Exhibitions Guest curated by Jeffreen Hayes, director of the Chicago-based art space Threewalls, the summer edition of Artpace’s International Artist-in-Residence exhibition cycle combines site-specific projects by Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum (Botswana/Toronto/Johannesburg), Zoë Charlton (Baltimore) and San Antonio’s own Jenelle Esparza. Free, noon-5pm Wednesday-Sunday; Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave., (210) 212-4900. “Selections from Manuel Alvarez Bravo And Paul Strand” In conjunction with Fotoseptiembre, Trinity’s Art and Art History Department showcases works by iconic photographers Manuel Alvarez Bravo (1902-2002) and Paul Strand (1890-1970) pulled from the university’s teaching collection. Free, 1-5pm Wednesday-Saturday, 1-5pm Tuesday; Trinity University, Michael And Noemi Neidorff Gallery, One Trinity Pl., (210) 999-7682. FILM

A League of Their Own Mission Marquee Plaza hosts a free outdoor screening of director Penny Marshall’s 1992 sports dramedy starring Geena Davis, Madonna and Lori Petty as members of a women’s baseball team during WWII. Free, 8pm Thursday;

Mission Marquee Plaza, 3100 Roosevelt Ave., (210) 212-9373. Grave of the Fireflies Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata co-founded Studio Ghibli, which became Japan’s most revered animation studio, and one of their first releases was Takahata’s Grave of the Fireflies. The WWII story of a young brother and sister who, after their mother’s death in a firebombing, wander the landscape scrounging and starving in the final days of Japan’s defeat, doesn’t sound like a feel-good hit, and it wasn’t. Over time, however, it’s become acclaimed as one of the greatest animated films and one of the hardest-hitting depictions of war’s effect on children. While the story balances its grimmest realities with sentimental fantasy about ghosts and fireflies, the effect remains overwhelmingly sad. $12.50, 7pm Wednesday; Santikos Bijou, 4522 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 734-4552. Vicky Cristina Barcelona In conjunction with its exhibition “Spain: 500 Years of Spanish Painting from the Museums of Madrid,” SAMA continues its Film on the Green series with a free, outdoor screening of Woody Allen’s 2008 romantic drama starring Rebecca Hall and Scarlett Johansson as friends who both fall for a free-spirited Spanish painter (Javier Bardem) who’s involved in a tempestuous relationship with his ex-wife (Penelope Cruz). Free, 8:30pm Friday; San Antonio Museum of Art, 200 W. Jones Ave., (210) 978-8100.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17 AT&T CENTER TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

TH EATER

8 X 8: Cabaret Du Jump With the intriguing promise of “hot summer fun in a hexahedron” and the Spanglish disclaimer “no te preocupes, theater is kept at 69 degrees,” Jump-Start Performance Co. reboots its 8 X 8 series, in which eight new eight-minute performances (encompassing dance, spoken word, multimedia, performance art, live music – “absolutely anything goes”) are staged in an eight-foot cube. $8, 8pm Friday-Saturday; Jump-Start Theater, 710 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 227-5867. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus LIVE! John Gray’s pop-psychology book Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus first entered the zeitgeist in the early ‘90s, and has displayed remarkable staying power despite the influx of numerous more nuanced takes on the gender divide in the intervening decades. While there’s a glut of more accurate (and less heteronormative) information on the market now, sometimes it’s nice to just sit back and laugh at the foibles that can result from casual misunderstandings between the sexes. The one-man show Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus LIVE! reframes the source material in a stand-up-esque style,

11815 PERRIN BEITEL RD | 210-627-6008

Staying Cool for Back to School

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

21


your city through

our lens VISIT SACURRENT.COM/SLIDESHOWS

DWI + DIVORCE legal210.com | 310 S. St. Mary’s St. STE 1860

CALL NOW! 210-361-7060 HEALTHY KIDS NEEDED FOR A STUDY ON BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

We are conducting a study on brain development, using MRI to study the structure and function of the brain. There is NO radiation in MRI. To be in the study, the child should: Be between the ages of 8-17 years old, have not received a psychiatric diagnosis & have a parent without a psychiatric diagnosis.

Children will be: - Given pictures of their brain - Given a certificate from the University acknowledging their successful time volunteering in research - Given the gratification of knowing their participation may help other kids who are seriously ill - Paid for their participation

If you are interested in participating in this research,

Please Call (210) 450-8362 OR BDstudySA@uthscsa.edu 22

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


calendar

COMEDY

Loco Comedy Jam Emmy-winning Que Locos creator Mike Robles emcees a night of stand-up featuring headliner Joey Medina (Original Latin Kings of Comedy, Taking Off the Gloves) with support from rising regional comics. $20-$30, 8-10pm Saturday; Guadalupe Theater, 1301 Guadalupe St., (210) 395-4500. SPECIAL EVENTS

Bacon Bacon Bacon Pioneering multimedia arts organization URBAN-15’s “sizzling summer fundraiser” tempts guests with “whimsical bacon samplers” ($5 each) prepared by area chefs (Michael Sohocki, Destiny Aponte and Laurel Bodinus among them) and URBAN-15 pilsner glasses filled with Big Hops beer ($15). Free admission, 7-10pm Saturday; Big Hops, 306 Austin St., (210) 736-1500. Cocktail Scavenger Hunt: Picnic Pickins Inspired by National Picnic Month, the August edition of the Botanical Garden’s adults-only Cocktail Scavenger Hunt challenges attendees to find and photograph ingredients onsite and then present them to a bartender in exchange for a cocktail. $20, 12:30-3:30pm Sunday; San Antonio Botanical Garden, 555 Funston Pl., (210) 536-1411. Culinaria Restaurant Week Aiming to give “visitors and residents the opportunity to experience the quality, variety and hospitality that embody the San Antonio dining experience,” local nonprofit Culinaria’s biannual Restaurant Week unites more than 100 eateries offering fixed-price menus for breakfast/brunch ($25), lunch ($15) and dinner ($35-$45) through August 25. $15-$45, visit culinariasa.org for details. Noche Blanca SAMA invites guests to don “summery whites” for a Spanish-inspired evening featuring performances by the flamenco troupe Arte y Pasión and the guitar/ violin outfit Duo Peña, art-making activities, a cash bar provided by Tre Trattoria and an outdoor screening of Vicky Christina Barcelona (see Film listings). $12-$20, 6-10pm Friday; San Antonio Museum of Art, 200 W. Jones Ave., (210) 978-8100. Camp Gladiator Stadium Takeover Billed as

the “ultimate CG celebration with workout challenges, amazing local vendors, music, food, gear and giveaways,” this high-energy event challenges attendees to “dash up, down, around and throughout the concourse bleachers and field while working out at 10 CG-style fitness stations along the three-plus mile course.” Free, 7am-1pm Saturday; Alamodome, 100 Montana St, visit eventbrite.com for details. Honey Dew Hullabaloo Garrison Brothers Distillery launches a new Honey Dew bourbon at this free event featuring Habana Cowboy’s mobile cigar lounge, cocktails mixed with liquid nitrogen by Frost 321, and a honey bee education tent courtesy of Burleson’s Honey. Free, noon-6pm Friday; Garrison Brothers Distillery, 1827 Hye-Albert Road, Hye, (830) 392-0246. TALKS PLUS

“Historic San Antonio Today” Office of Historic Preservation Director Shanon Shea Miller discusses the historical framework of early San Antonio, how it relates to the city today, and current preservation projects. Free, 6:30-7:30pm Thursday; McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368. “Pathological Science” The Freethinker Association of Central Texas (FACT) welcomes guest speaker John Blanton for a conversation covering “the pitfalls some scientists have fallen into when researching pathological science, failing to use rigorous scientific method in data collection.” Free, noon-3pm Saturday; Tripoint, 3233 N St. Marys St., (210) 738-7786. “La Cocina en el Bolsillo: Early 20th Century Recipes for a Mexican Palate” Casa Navarro’s new exhibit sheds light on San Antonio culinary heritage through displays of pocket-sized cookbooks published at the turn of the 20th century. Free recipe cards for a few dishes are available while supplies last. Free, 10am-5pm Wednesday-Saturday, noon-5pm Sunday, 10am5pm Tuesday; Casa Navarro State Historic Site, 228 S. Laredo St., (210) 226-4801. SASpeakUp Community Days Aiming to provide a better understanding of the proposed Fiscal Year 2019 budget, SASpeakUp’s kid-friendly community meetups include opportunities for guests to meet with city leaders and provide feeback, take advantage of giveaways and free health screenings, and enjoy live entertainment. Free, 5:30-8pm Thursday, Morgan’s Wonderland, 5223 David Edwards Drive; 5:30-8pm Monday, Hardberger Park Urban Ecology Center, 8400 NW Military Hwy.; 5:30-8pm Tuesday (in Spanish), Palo Alto College Student Center, 1400 W. Villaret Blvd.; visit saspeakup.com for details.

MSalon

MICHELLE MOORE TEXTURIZING SPECIALIST | 17 YRS. EXPERIENCE

PERMANENT JAPANESE STRAIGHTENING

E n j oy S m o o t h S t ra i g h t H a i r w i t h o u t t h e F u s s !

BRAZILIAN BLOWOUT Control Frizz & Minimize Curl Pattern for 3 Months

PrEP is a PILL that PREVENTS HIV.

303 N. FRIO ST. M-F: 8A-4:30P (210)688-5792

Learn about this once a day treatment at AARCSA.com

YO

UR ROUTE

ARRIVING SOON M—

F 6 AM — 6 P

M

with vignettes that follow the track of relationships from dating through marriage, as well as the quarrels that can spring up in the bedroom. (With that in mind, it’s definitely not a show for kids!) And while it might not be the most woke show on the block, some nuggets of wisdom can still be gleaned from this comedic take on the gender divide. $55, 7:30pm Wednesday-Thursday, 8pm Friday, 4pm & 8pm Saturday, 2pm Sunday; Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, (210) 223-8624.

F R E E C O N S U L TAT I O N S 2 1 0 . 7 7 7 . 2 8 6 4

MORE TIME FOR YOU.

Shorter wait. Faster connections. Your time is important. We’ve adjusted our schedules to improve yours.

VIAinfo.net sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

23


Tuesday, August 21 | 6:00pm Silverado (1985/135 MIN./PG-13)

Lada Ladies Food Truck Fare! Popcorn & Beer!

Free Museum Admission from 4:00 - 9:00pm

Briscoe Western Art Museum | 210 W. Market St. | BriscoeMuseum.org

Emergency Ice Delivery

Special Events • Retail & Industrial Call (210)824-2400 or (844)4-ICEMAN MirelesIce.com 24

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


arts Carrie Daniels

Aye, No! $20-$35 7:30 pm Thu-Sat, 2pm Sun Through Aug. 26 The Public Theater of San Antonio Cellar Theatre 800 W. Ashby Pl. (210) 733-7258 thepublicsa.org

Find more arts coverage every day at sacurrent.com

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

25


26

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


arts

sacurrent.com/slideshows

Melaneyes Media

A Crucial Story to Tell

Walk on the River illuminates the black history of San Antonio BY JAMES COURTNEY

B

rought to you by producer Baba Aundar Ma’at and director Born Logic Allah (Melaneyes Media), the independent San Antonio team that made 2017’s excellent Message to the People: A Story of Malcolm X, a new film looks to tell the story of black San Antonio. The documentary Walk on the River: A Black History of SA features commentary and reflections from an impressive collection of local black leaders, organizers and historians. In detailing and discussing the struggles, legacies and contributions of our city’s black community, A Walk on the River does a admirable job of introducing a rich, complex and proud history to a broader audience. Sadly, part of what makes this such an important and revelatory film is the fact that the stories it weaves are so seldom included among the prevailing narratives of the Alamo City.

This project, which should properly be thought of as a point of departure and inspiration (rather than an exhaustive/definitive piece), is an important work that stands well on its own, a gem that is as well-constructed as it is insightful. It’s also a loving message to the broader city as well as San Antonio’s black communities: Our roots here are as deep as any – we have made this city right alongside influential white and Hispanic leaders. Not only is Walk on the River a must-see film, but this special premiere will offer up loads of extra perspective via a post-screening Q&A with the producer, director and several historians. Head on over to walkontheriver. com for a preview and details. $10, 6-9:30pm Fri, Aug. 17, Carver Community Cultural Center, 226 N. Hackberry St., (210) 207-7211, thecarver.org. sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

27


3 Day

DOLLAR SALE CO M I N G L ATE AU G U ST U N B E LI EVAB LE SAVI N G S O N EVE RY B OT TLE FO L LO W U S O N FACE B O O K , T W IT TE R AN D I NSTAG R AM , O R SI G N U P FO R O U R E N E W SL E T TE R FO R D E TAI L S !

TWINLIQUORS.COM *Includes wine and spirits 750ml or larger at all Twin Liquors locations. Some exclusions apply. No further discount. No rain checks. Please drink responsibly.

28

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


New documentary pays tribute to the stunning work and troubled life of late British fashion designer Alexander McQueen BY KIKO MARTINEZ

D

uring a scene in the 2009 dramedy The Devil Wears Prada, an inexperienced fashion magazine assistant played by Anne Hathaway complains to her boyfriend about the pretentious nature of the fashion world. The magazine’s callous editor had berated her for an innocent, albeit clueless, remark she made about accessories. “They all act like they’re curing cancer or something,” she says of the fashionistas. “The amount of time and energy that these people spend on these insignificant, minute details, and for what?” If moviegoers can identify with Hathaway’s initial attitude about the garment industry — that putting something as frivolous as fashion on a pedestal is a pointless fascination — it’s probably safe to say that they’re not Project Runway fans nor are they likely to care about the difference between weft and warp knitting. That doesn’t suggest, however, that, like Hathaway’s character, they can’t appreciate the hard work and effort it takes to construct something like an A-line skirt or cardigan jacket. Even if the names Christian Dior or Donatella Versace mean little in the grand scheme of things, one must recognize the artistic ability needed to be a successful fashion designer. That theme couldn’t be truer than in the documentary McQueen, a touching and deeply personal, rags-to-riches story of the

Bleecker Street Media

screens

L’enfant Terrible

Bleecker Street Media

late British fashion designer Lee Alexander McQueen. A fascinating tribute to McQueen, who committed suicide in 2010, the doc delves into his brilliant career and the inspiration behind his collections, and explores his devastating depression that ultimately led to his death. Directed by first-time feature documentarians Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui, McQueen represents the vision of the title protagonist through intimate home recordings, heartfelt interviews with family and friends and, most importantly, video of the intricate runway shows the highly-skilled designer staged. Like the cinematic equivalent of his couture pieces, McQueen is stunning and conspicuous. What it isn’t, unfortunately, is unconventional. McQueen follows the standard documentary blueprint featuring a tortured artist and does so with satisfying, but not revolutionary, results. In recent years, films that have fallen under this category include 2012’s Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, 2014’s Academy Award-nominated Finding Vivian Maier and the Academy Award-winning 2015 Amy Winehouse doc Amy. McQueen isn’t able to reach those heights mostly because, as storytellers, Bonhôte and Ettedgui don’t match the creativity of their subject. Bonhôte and Ettedgui attempt to customize the narrative by breaking it up into different sections (for example, “Tape One: Jack the Ripper Stalks His Victims” and “Tape Three: It’s a Jungle Out There”), but it turns out to be a meaningless exercise in editing. Also unnecessary are transition shots of gold skulls melding with flowers that the directors use as some kind of metaphor linking life and death, which feels like an afterthought. Then, there’s the overdone piano score by British composer Michael Nyman (The Piano, The End of the Affair). Nyman’s music is lovely, but is out of place in McQueen, especially when the swelling classical arrangements overwhelm

scenes where it would be more interesting to watch McQueen work meticulously in silence. Despite some of these less than effective decisions, McQueen is at its best when the fashion designer, his thoughts and the clothes themselves are front and center. Secondary interviews with McQueen’s mother Joyce, sister Janet and some of his colleagues are illuminating, but nothing speaks to how McQueen was wired as much as the archived footage of him interacting with fabric and transforming it into something dramatic for the catwalk. It’s like watching a much more grounded version of Daniel Day-Lewis’ fictional fashion designer Reynolds Woodcock in last year’s Phantom Thread. Both are driven by the desire to create something wholly original and perfect, even as it pushes them to the brink. This obsession is evident when looking at McQueen’s entire catalog — from his stints with high-end fashion houses like Givenchy and Gucci to his own label. With these platforms, McQueen transcended the industry and gave audiences some of the most bold, controversial and thought-provoking works of art, which were inspired by everything from murder to mythology to technology. In one of his most famous shows, McQueen converted the stage into a psychiatric ward and blurred the lines between beauty and madness. In another, he sent his models down the runway dressed as rape victims, a decision that received backlash from critics for its heavy misogynistic tone. But McQueen, as always, pressed on and refused to allow anyone to dictate the messaging he wanted to put forth as an artist and designer — unfiltered ideas that were many times conjured in the darker side of his psyche. If anything, McQueen the movie is a worthy testament to McQueen the man and illustrates the passion he had for his elaborate craft.

Find more news Find more every day at film stories sacurrent.com


JAPANESE STYLE GASTROPUB D A I LY H A P P Y H O U R + LATE NIGHT KITCHEN m o n d ay- s u n d ay: 4 p m - 2 a m 7 7 0 1 B r o a d w ay S t. # 1 2 4 hanzoBar.com

30

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


food

Jess Elizarraras

Jess Elizarraras

Find more food & drink news at sacurrent.com Contact the author: Flavor@sacurrent.com

,

when san antonio meets spain atpearl.com

Download the OlĂŠ at Pearl app TODAY!


N

N DI

G IN • AME O

E

PAN DULCE, PASTRIES & CAKES MADE TO ORDER. MON- FRI 5:30AM-4PM SAT 6:30AM-4PM • SUN 7:30AM-3PM 602 NW 24th St. SATX 78207 | 210.434.9290 | www.panifico.com

THE ABSOLUTE

TASTIEST & AWESOMENEST

CRAWFISH IN SAN ANTONIO

521 E Woodlawn Ave. • 210.737.8646

News 4 WOAI Blue Plate Award Winner!

7460 CALLAGHAN RD. STE, 202 78229

210.237.0393 |

need another bite? 410 Valley Hi Dr 78227| P:210.845.1165

10919 Culebra Rd, Ste 150 SA, TX 78253

22502 U.S. 281, Ste 110 SA, Tx 78259

8507 McCullough Ave 78216| P:210.399.1645

kmturkishgrill.com

2738 BLANCO RD SA TX | 210.734.8672 | ALAMOCANDY.COM

VOTE FOR US IN BEST OF SAN ANTONIO

Tejano artist Willie Cantu & Estela Cantu invite you to

SERVING SAN ANTONIO SINCE 1989

Daily Specials | 210.699.1189 | 9010 Huebner Rd texashamburgercompany.com 32

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


Jess Elizarraras

Jess Elizarraras

sacurrent.com  |  August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT  33 


food + drink specials every night! CHECK WEBSITE

FOR KITCHEN

HOURS!

HAPPY

Charlie Brown’s Neighborhood Bar & Grill

TEXASPRIDEBBQ.NET

Restaurant

SIMPLY THE BEST IN FRESH, AUTHENTIC THAI + CHINESE CUISINE

HOUR

M ON-SAT 2 -7 P M

serving texaNS since 1922

10% OFF PURCHASE WITH THIS AD! DINE IN | CARRY OUT | DELIVERY |

1146 AUSTIN HIGHWAY SAN ANTONIO, TX 78209 | 210.829.7345 | TONGSTHAI.COM

KARAOKE + TRIVIA

aug 25

aug 16 b i k e n i g h t w| /6 D–a1r0k: 3c0iptmy

AUSTIN FORREST

sept 1

thursday

I-35

aug 17

fish fry | 6:30–11:30pm w/ Whiskey 2 step

aug 18

I n t e x i c at e d l i v e

F r i d ay

sept 8 ROCK BOTTOM STRING BAND 1 1 8 8 8 S TA R C R E S T | 21 0 4 9 6 - 7 0 9 2 CHARLIE-BROWNS.COM

S at u r d ay

6–11pm | no cover

custom Playground | fish fry friday | event center 2980 E Loop 1604 S, Adkins, TX 78101 210–649–3730|

HUNGRY FOR MORE? .

VISIT SACURRENT COM

POOL • DARTS • PING PONG

ENJOY OUR PATIO AREA

200 10141 Wurzbach, San Antonio, Texas 78230 • (210) 877-2100 wurzbachicehouse.com • Corner of Ironside and Wurzbach 34

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


food | nightlife

Erin Winch

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

35


JOIN US FOR

LIVE

M U S I C

B Y

MITCH WEBB & THE SWINDLE S

SATURDAY,

A U G .

1 8 ,

1 0 P M - 2 A M

1 S T A N N UA L YAC H T R O C K SU M M E R W R A P U P & PIG ROAST FRIDAY,

8 0 3

S

S T .

HOURS

A U G .

3 1 ,

S T R E E T , MONDAY-SUNDAY 4PM-2AM

C A L L : 210.369.9192 | 36

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

7

S A N

P M

-

1

A M

A N T O N I O ,

SERVING FOOD TILL 1:30AM SUNDAY-THURSDAY

FRANCISBOGSIDE.COM

T E X A S

7 8 2 0 5

DAILY HAPPY HOUR, 4-7PM ALL DAY SUNDAY & MONDAY

|


music Zachry Smith

The PLASTIK Collective Parties Are a Haven for the Alternative Queer BY CHRIS CONDE

W

hen some friends invited me to check out this party called Glitter Baby, I thought, “My old gay ass don’t really go to parties anymore.” However, I was curious because of where they were throwing the event – the Gallery, formerly Hardbodies on North St. Mary’s Street. Founder/promoter Oliv Ryan, a local multi-disciplinary artist, explained the whole vibe. “It’s an event that is being put together by queer artists for the queer community,” Ryan messaged me through Facebook. “We plan on highlighting and glorifying parts of the spectrum that SA’s lgbtq+ scene has a tendency to shit on or sweep under the carpet. We aren’t going to be catering to heteronormativity whatsoever and are going deeper than just Ariana and RuPaul.”

This intrigued me. So last week, I showed up. What I saw was a multigenerational sea of queer folk – some in leather harnesses, some in glitter, some in both, dancing and watching a mix of performances on stage – everything from rapping to burlesque and vogueing. It was nothing I had ever really seen in San Antonio before, and I really felt a sense of family and relief knowing that this next generation of young LGBTQ folk in San Antonio would have a space to be themselves without feeling like they have to fit into a certain “category” of queerness. While Ryan is definitely the ringleader for these events, which will take place every Thursday indefinitely, the whole show is put on by a collective he founded called The PLASTIK. It’s made up of performers, producers, artists and DJs, including Shayla Shimmy, Gilbert Votion, StreetQueer, Girl6, X, Melody Mala, and HVXVN. “I founded The PLASTIK because I saw a whole bunch of queer creatives that needed a family-charged platform,” Ryan said. “All of us were going through some very transitional experiences that were close to inhibiting us individually as artists, so I formed a group

of artists that I had worked with before that I know needed like-minded people as a support system. The main goal for The PLASTIK is to create an experiential safe space for SA’s queer community every week. There are a ton of gay bars in SA, but all of them are either extremely heteronormative or only pander towards a certain gay demographic.” The Gallery owner Randi Simpson told mySA.com that she and her business partners Kenny Simpson and Joe Griffin saw that St. Mary’s Strip was changing and wanted to adapt to that change. “[We want] to branch out and reach a wider audience, be part of that change,” said Simpson, who explained offering live music and having a dance floor will help achieve that. Every Thursday, The PLASTIK will throw a themed party with an open invitation to LGBTQs of all shapes, sizes, pronouns and backgrounds with a goal of celebrating diversity in the queer community and to destroy the stigmas that still exist within it. $3, 10-2am, 21+, The Gallery, 2726 N. St. Mary’s St., facebook.com/Plastik-235251213921320.

Find more music coverage Find more news every day at sacurrent.com


CARRYING CBD INFUSED NATURAL HEALING PRODUCTS FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY. 6923 W LOOP 1604 N, STE #104 ,SA, TX 78254 | 210.688.22GO |

@GGBSANANTONIO

2090 N INTERSTATE 35 FRONTAGE RD STE #4107, NEW BRAUNFELS, TX 78130 | 830.608.94GO

4553 NORTH LOOP 1604 W #1229 SA N A N TO N I O, T X 78 249 (210) 957-1670

BURNHOUSESATX

BURNHOUSESATX.COM 38

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


music | music Picks

Atom Splitter PR

ATTILA L

J. COLE

Fans of hardcore, metalcore and related genres have something to get excited about in this weekend’s Rage Fest, which brings together artists from around the country. The minifest will feature, for starters, beloved metalcore outfit Attila, which has made itself a consistent player in the genre over the course of six solid LPs since 2007. Meanwhile, California’s Suicide Silence, also in the line-up, skews more toward deathcore. The bill, an excellent opportunity to vent your frustration at the sweltering summer and/or the start of another school year, also includes Volumes (LA), Rings of Saturn (Bay Area), Spite (Michigan) and Cross Your Fingers (Nashville). $20-$25, 6pm, Alamo City Music Hall, 1305 E. Houston St., ticketfly.com. — James Courtney

Rapper J. Cole is embarking on a 34date tour in support of his new album KOD, with special guests Young Thug, Earthgang, Kill Edward and Jaden Smith. The tour kicked off in Miami on August 9, and is making stops across North America, including one right here in the Alamo City. While KOD has been met with mixed reviews from longtime fans of the rapper, J. Cole’s entire body of work is a tribute to the real MCs and rappers pushing hip-hop forward rather than riding on some trend in the genre, i.e. trap music. $49$149, 7:30pm, AT&T Center, attcenter. com. – CC

Friday, August 17

Courtesy of Slayer

SLAYER

Wednesday, August 15 Throw those horns to the sky, folks. Your favorite metal act is coming to town. In January, metal legends Slayer announced dates for what they said is their final world tour, which was disappointingly going to miss San Antonio altogether. However, with more than half the tour’s first leg dates already either completely sold out or close to it, Slayer announced a second leg in North America, including SA. The now 46-date tour includes metal-heavyweights Lamb of God, Anthrax, Behemoth and Testament. “If you are lucky enough to be invited to play even just once with living legends like Slayer, it’s an incredible honor,” Lamb of God singer Randy Blythe said in a press release. “It is irrefutable that Slayer helped create the genre of aggressive metal, and all modern bands of that ilk owe them a huge debt – I know we do. To be asked to be a part of their final tour – well, it just makes you stop and realize just how lucky you are. Hail Slayer! We’ll see you on the road.” $49-$193, 4:30pm, Freeman Coliseum,3201 E. Houston St., freemancoliseum. com. – Chris Conde

Friday, August 17

EMERY \

Friday, August 17

Amid several other great heavy shows this weekend, stalwart South Carolina post-hardcore band Emery will stop at Jack’s with a few other choice acts. Emery, which has kept fans waiting on new material since 2015’s rad You Were Never Alone LP, makes Christian post-hardcore that fuses in elements of emo and alternative, and largely avoids some of the usual pitfalls of Christian music in popular styles – especially the cardinal sin of unoriginality. Other likeminded/ similar sounding acts on this bill are Oh, Sleeper, Limbs and Rough Start. Whether you are a Christian or a rocker or a Christian rocker, the outfits on this bill are likely to provide the kind of searing musical onslaught that has been known to convert people – or at least leave them enraptured for a spell or two. $20, 7:30pm, Jack’s Patio Bar, 3030 Thousand Oaks Dr., (210) 4942309, jacksbarsa.com. — JC

Bad Christian

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

39


NEW LOCATION NOW OPEN!

3 3 0 e g r ay s o n s t

8213 BROADWAY (INSIDE LOOP410) 1733 SW MILITARY DR. @ IH35

LANCE LOPEZ

2808 THOUSAND OAKS @ JONES MALTSBERGER

THUR., AUGUST 16 | DOORS 7PM | SHOW 8PM

6620 FM 78 @ FOSTER RD 2710 IH-10 WEST @ DE ZAVALA 8141 PAT BOOKER RD @LIVE OAK 18360 BLANCO RD @ 1604 STONE OAK

AUGUST 17 • SUNNY SWEENEY & WARD DAVIS

SKYROCKET! FRI., AUGUST 17 | DOORS 8PM | SHOW 9PM AUGUST 18 THE REED BROTHERS

ROB BAIRD WITH GUEST THOMAS CSORBA SAT., AUGUST 18 | DOORS 8PM | SHOW 9PM

THE BEST SELECTION E-CIGS, VAPORIZERS, TOBACCO PRODUCTS & ACCESSORIES! 1-888-403-7638 | SMOKERZPARADISE@GMAIL.COM | SMOKERZPARADIZE.COM

AUGUST 24 • SHINYRIBS

HAP P Y

HOUR

A L L D AY SUN-MON

AUGUST 25 • MAX STALLING

ARKANSAUCE SUN., AUGUST 19 | DOORS 6PM | SHOW 7PM

AUGUST 31 CHARLEY CROCKETT

SWING DANCE NITE WITH LINDSAY BEAVER MON., AUGUST 20 | DOORS 7PM | SHOW 8:30PM

C O L D D R A F T & H A N D C R A F T E D C O C K TA I L S .

LOCATED IN THE PEARL.

samsburgerjoint.com 40

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

312 PEARL PARKWAY | BLUEBOXBAR.COM | HOURS: MONDAY - SUNDAY, 4PM - 2AM

HAPPY HOURS: MONDAY - SUNDAY, 4PM - 8PM


music | music Picks

THE SOUL SUPPORTERS L Saturday, August 18

Capping off a summer of excellent shows, especially of the soulful variety, Luna hosts Austin outfit the Soul Supporters this weekend. The fivepiece, which makes smooth-ass music in the retro soul, vintage blues and classic R&B wheelhouse, keeps busy, honing its live show in some of the finest venues around ATX night after night. The result of such long traffic in the craft is a band that’s as tight as can be on stage, finding the sweet spot where technical excellence and emotional potency become one. On any given night, in addition to their originals, the Soul Supporters are likely to offer up well-chosen covers from the likes of Etta James, Ruth Brown, Soloman Burke, Sugar Pie DeSanto, Little Willie John, Tina Turner and more. $10, 9:30pm, Luna, 6740 San Pedro Ave., lunalive.com. — JC

LYLE LOVETT p Monday, August 20

The last several years, ever since 2012’s Release Me, the prolific singer-songwriter and bandleader’s most recent album of new material, Lyle Lovett has been in puro greatest hits mode. The

Houston-area native and country and western/Americana music master has also been sticking to his characteristic regimen of hard-touring, playing shows in a variety of arrangements, from stripped down duo shows to the all-star lineup of his “Large Band.” Lovett, a four-time Grammy Award winner and renowned songwriter (one of those people like to call “a songwriter’s songwriter”), has carved his niche through his ability to incorporate nearly the entire spectrum of American music into his songs and performances. He’s a true Texas original and a singular voice. $45-$85, 8pm, Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., majesticempire. com.– James Courtney

ORGY 5

Monday, August 20

Led by 9-foot-tall Hot Topic model Jay Gordon, Orgy rose to prominence on their Family Values Tour-approved cover of New Order’s “Blue Monday.” Considering Gordon is the single original member, the outfit could consider going Mach-2 and renaming the band New Orgy.  Also on the bill and definitely falling onto the nu-metal end of the hard-rock spectrum, Austin’s Mo-

D1 Music

tograter do the genre better than most. While it’s definitely not the coolest style of hard rock right now, after being overdone in the late ’90s and early aughts, Motograter manage to add some interesting elements and dynam-

ics to the genre, throwing in unexpected transitions, vocal harmonies and double-bass to keep shit changing up throughout their songs. $15-$20, 6pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Marys St., papertigersatx.com. – CC

TONY BENNETT

Tuesday, August 21 With 19 Grammy Awards, worldwide record sales in the millions, and dozens of platinum and gold albums to his credit, Tony Bennett is sort of the Man. And at 90, it’s hard to throw shade at this guy – ’cause it’s Tony Bennett. Bennett’s “Steppin’ Out with My Baby” and “I Left My Heart In San Francisco” form part of the fabric of American music culture. He’s headed back to San Antonio on Tuesday, August 21  at the Majestic Theatre. Oh, yeah, he did an entire album with Lady Gaga. So what’s not to love? $57.75$156.25, 8pm, Majestic Theatre, 224 E. Houston St., majesticempire.com. — CC

Courtesy of Tony Bennett Eric Frommer//Creative Commons

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

41


6322 SAN PEDRO AVE | (210) 847-9488

BEST FROZEN MANGO, CHAMOY, AND CLASSIC MARGARITAS!

THURSDAY @ 9PM THE BEST 90’S-2018 ALT. ROCK-INDIE NO COVER

OM

FRIDAY @ 9PM $2 CAPE CODS & $3 STRANGELOVE SHOTS ALL NIGHT NO COVER

K

CHEC

T AT US OU

NT.C URRE

SAC

SATURDAY $3 DOS XX & $3 MARGARITAS

ALL NIGHT NO COVER

FRIDAY • AUG 24 9PM–2AM MICHAEL JACKSON ROCK WITH YOU DANCE

J OI N U S THU R S D AY F OR

¡Vamos a Tequila! SPEC IA LS ON F INE TEQUILA A ND TEQUILA C OC KTAILS

DJ Biig Miike 10 P.M. - 2 A.M.

SUNDAY • SEPT 2 9PM–2AM LABOR DAY WEEKEND PARTY 80’S NEW WAVE & INDIE DANCE BEER SPECIALS FROZEN MARGARITAS NO COVER | 21+ 42

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

Open Mic Night! E V E R Y T U E S D AY | 1 0 P M - 2 A M WITH BRIAN HECKLER


music | calendar WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15 Aküestix, Social Trauma Local punk band Aküestix, Social Trauma and others are performing live at Fitzgerald’s. $5. Fitzgerald’s Bar & Live Music Venue, 8pm-2am.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 16 Lance Lopez Texas six-string legend Lance Lopez released his new solo album Tell The Truth on Mascot Label Group. With his latest album release, Lance Lopez is documenting his slow and steady climb up the blues/rock n’ roll scene for the last decade. $10-$40. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8pm. Lone Star Pickers Lone Star Pickers will perform popular renditions of fan-favorite blues, rock and country covers. Free. Quarry Hofbrau, 9pm-midnight PM Jazz with Michelle Garibay Tight R&B, soul and pop-jazz act fronted by daughter of legendary Chicano bluesman Randy Garibay. $5. Luna, 8pm. Salsa Night Jose Amador (band leader and congas), Richie Vega (musical director and trombone), Curtis Calderon on trumpet, Rogelio Escobar on Sax, Raul Questel on bass, Frank Cano on piano, Gabriel Garcia on bongos/percussion, Mike Baez on drums, Anthony Ibañez on Lead Vocals and Juan Padin on percussion and background vocals. $10-$30. Jazz, TX, 8:30-11:30pm. Tres Honchos Claude Butch Morgan, Robar Adams and Trevor Doak Morgan of the Bandaholics. The band is set to perform regularly on Thursdays. Free. Sancho’s Cantina, 7pm.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17 Hayes Carll Much of Hayes Carll’s songwriting catalog revolves around dashed dreams, doomed romance and drunken predicaments. This Americana musician has leavened his failures with humor, a writing trait he shares with Guy Clark, Robert Earl Keen, Lyle Lovett and even Miranda Lambert. $25. Gruene Hall, 8pm. Lupe Fiasco Wasalu Muhammad Jaco, better known by his stage name Lupe Fiasco, is an American rapper, record producer and entrepreneur. He rose to fame in 2006 following the success of his debut album, Lupe Fiasco’s Food & Liquor. Fiasco takes stage with special guests Kota the Friend and Billie Blue. $25-$50. Paper Tiger, 9pm-2am. Micky and the Motorcars Alternative country band Micky and the Motorcars take the stage to perform originals. $12-$15. Tejas Rodeo Company, 8-11:30pm. Nakia and the Blues Grifters Soul/blues band formed in 2010 on tour for their new album Nakia that was seven years in the making. $10. Luna, 8pm.

The Palm Trees, Poets & Saints Versatile songwriter/producer from Amsterdam who goes by the name of Palm Trees takes the stage with Poets & Saints, Chavela and Middle Ground. $5. Imagine Books and Records, 8pm. Skyrocket Skyrocket will perform renditions of fan-favorite 70s’ tunes. $15-$100. Sam’s Burger Joint, 9pm.

2809 N. ST. MARYS ST SAN ANTONIO, TX 78212

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18 Obsolete Machines Synth pop duo Mr. Pidge and Voodoo Boogaloo are hosting Austin electronic rhythm band Obsolete Machines. Free. Limelight, 10pm-1am. The Reed Brothers, Grant Ewing Local natives Keegan and Kyle Reed mix blues and rock for a unique sound. Special guests include soul group the Grant Ewing band from Austin. $10-$12. John T Floore’s Country Store, 7pm. Rick Barroso and the BigNasty Juke Joint Experience Blues artist and front man Rick Barroso performs an evening of blues and deep jazz alongside his band. $5. Jazz, TX, 5:30-7:30pm. Logan Ryan Band Country group the Logan Ryan Band is performing live at the Tejas Rodeo Company. The rodeo starts at 7:30pm, while the live music and dancing event starts at 9pm. $6-$12. Tejas Rodeo Company, 7:30-9pm.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19 Arkansauce Genre-hopping, four-piece string band from Northwest Arkansas, bending the rules and blurring the lines between Americana, bluegrass, newgrass, folk, country, blues and funk. With a loyal following in their home state, the band is proud to be stepping into a hard-driving sound unique to the Arkansas quartet. $5-$30. Sam’s Burger Joint, 7pm.

MONDAY, AUGUST 20 Bit Brigade Bit Brigade will perform rock covers of full NES game soundtracks alongside local band Bitforce. $10. Limelight, 7pm. Spud Cannon, Mr. Pidge Spud Cannon wears furs to the party, brings summer time to the coldest winter days and makes you move like you haven’t before! They describe their genre as “Sloppy Kiss Rock.” Special guests include synth pop duo Mr. Pidge, Indie rock band St. Dukes and The Skipping Beats. $5. Imagine Books and Records, 8pm.

FACEBOOK.COM/TRIVIANIGHT

@TRIVIAFACTORY

TheTriviaFactory.com

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

43


Daily Specials

8pm 2am

$3 Wells Mon-Thur | $4 Wells Fri-Sun

$3 Frozen Margaritas, Jager, Domestic Pints & Fireball $4 Dos XX Longnecks $2.5 Domestic Longnecks

CLUB SiRIUS

Weekly Specials Mon- $4 You Call It Tues- $3 Rumplminze Wed- $2 Pint Night Thur- $3 Jameson Fri- $5 Patron Sat- $5 Goose & Ciroc Sun- $3 Shot Board

featuring dj slic ric & dj naawz mixing the latest music and videos 228 Losoya St, San Antonio, TX 78205 lesa@drinksirius.com 44

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

@clubsirus

/toosirus

@drinksirius


Check us out at:

SACURRENT.COM

MILITARY 20% OFF EVERY DAY WITH VALID I.D

CHECK-IN ON FOR 20% OFF

FOLLOW US FOR THE LATEST ON CLASSES, EVENTS, SPECIALS AND MORE

MEGAPLEXSA.COM

4 CONVENIENT SAN ANTONIO LOCATIONS

9405 IH-35 @ THOUSAND OAKS | 657-9999 11827 HWY 281 N @ NAKOMA | 404-0011 OPEN DAILY: 7AM - 2AM

8806 Bandera Rd #103 - 2 10. 6 8 4. 2 2 8 5 | 9 8 2 2 Po tran co Rd #115 - 2 10. 6 8 4. 2 2 8 5 19422 U.S. Highway 281 N. #105 - 210.251.4058 | 7325 N Loop 1604 W STE 101 - 210.988.3720

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

45


etc

S AVA G E L O V E B Y D A N S AVA G E

Secret Perving Playmates and soul mates...

San Antonio:

210-320-5825 18+ MegaMates.com

Masochists And Sadists Tackling Ethical Relations

Real Singles, Real Fun... 30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

1-210-933-1103

More Numbers: 1-800-926-6000 Livelinks.com 18+

Real hot chat now.

T XE

SA

30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

210-933-1113

SAXET GUN SHOW THE BEST GUN SHOW

SAT. SEPT 1 9 AM–6 PM

SUN. SEPT 2 9 AM–5 PM

SAN ANTONIO EVENT CENTER 8111 MEADOW LEAF • LOOP 410 & MARBACH

FOR INFO CALL 361.289.2556 SAXETSHOWS.COM 46

I’ve been enjoying consensual nonmonogamy for the past two years, in part thanks to your column and podcast. I have a delightful young lover, and our connection has evolved into a kind of Master/slave relationship. I “allow” her to fuck other men and women, and she delights in asking my permission and recounting the details of her other trysts to me. We are curious how much of this she needs to disclose to her other lovers. They know she isn’t monogamous and they are aware of her relationship with me, but so far, she has chosen not to tell them the extent to which I “own” her and have jurisdiction over her body and actions. Of course, it’s just an elaborate role-playing game – but is it wrong to be using these people as pawns in our game without their knowledge and consent? If so, when should she tell them? Before she sleeps with them even once? Or after she’s developed a more intimate rapport with them? There’s a perverse thrill in her other lovers being totally oblivious to it, but we want to be ethical in our polyamorous ways.

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

This falls under the header of permissible secret perving (PSP), MASTER, and I will allow it – with one caveat. My go-to example of PSP is the foot fetishist who works in a shoe store. So long as he’s good at his job and his secret perving is undetectable – no bulges, no heavy breathing, no creepy comments – no harm done. And if he goes home and jacks off about all the sexy, sexy feet he saw and, yes, handled during his shift, he’s not hurting anyone or doing anything unethical. It’s important, however, to note that the foot fetishist salesclerk’s perceptions aren’t the ones that matter. If he thinks he’s playing it cool – he thinks his perving is secret – but his customers or coworkers are creeped out by his behavior, demeanor, heavy breathing, etc., then his perving isn’t secret and is therefore impermissible. The secret perving you’re doing – the girlfriend has to beg for your permission to fuck other people and report back to you afterward – is small and it’s a bank shot. The other people she’s fucking provide mental fodder for your D/s role-playing games, MASTER, you aren’t directly involving them. Your role-playing games take place before she fucks someone else (when she asks your permission) and after she fucks someone else (when she recounts her experience). And what turns you on about your girlfriend sleeping with other people – and how you and your girlfriend talk to each other about it – is no one’s business but yours.

Now for the caveat: If one of your girlfriend’s lovers strongly objects to Dom/sub sex, relationships, or role-playing games, and your girlfriend is aware they object, and you two want to be exquisitely ethical, MASTER, then either your girlfriend shouldn’t fuck that person or she should disclose your Master/slave dynamics to that person and allow them to decide whether they want to fuck her anyway. Zooming out for a second: Some people in open relationships don’t want to know what their partners get up to, and these couples usually have “don’t ask, don’t tell” agreements about sex outside the relationship. But many more people in open relationships do want to hear about their partners’ adventures because it turns them on. Someone who doesn’t want to risk being fodder for a couple’s dirty talk or even their D/s role-playing games shouldn’t be sleeping with people who are partnered and in open relationships. There are things we have a right to ask the people with whom we have casual sex – like whether they’re practicing ethical nonmonogamy, if they have an STI, what kind of birth control they’re using, whether they’re on PrEP, etc. – but a casual fuck isn’t entitled to details about your relationship.

My boyfriend of one year has refused to delete photos from his Instagram account that show him with his ex-girlfriend. They were together for three years and briefly engaged, and they broke up two years before we met. They aren’t in contact in any way, so I don’t have any worries there, but I think making photos of him with someone else available to his friends and family – and now my friends, too, as many are now following him – is incredibly disrespectful. We’ve had numerous arguments about this, and his “solution” is for me to “stop thinking about it.” He also insists that no one is looking at five-year-old pictures on his Instagram account. If that’s true, why not delete them? He refuses to discuss this issue, even as I lose sleep over it. I’ve tried calmly discussing this with him, I’ve tried crying, I’ve tried screaming my head off – nothing works. Personal Insult Causing Stress

There’s definitely something your boyfriend should delete, PICS, but it’s not old photos of his ex.

mail@savagelove.net @FakeDanSavage on Twitter www.ITMFA.org

,


EMPLOYMENT J O N E S I N ’ C R OS S W O R D BY M AT T J O N E S

“Even Chances”– the odd one’s out. ACROSS 1 Worker’s compensation 5 M*A*S*H actress Loretta 9 Wilson of The Office 14 Have ___ in the oven (be preggers) 15 “What ___ God wrought” (first official Morse code message) 16 Muppet wearing a horizontally striped shirt 17 2000 movie with the quote “What we do in life echoes in eternity” 19 Box lunch? 20 Relative that might be “once removed” 22 Wood for baseball bats 23 Removed 27 Mustard sometimes mixed with mayo 31 “Out of the Cellar” glam rockers 33 ___-de-France (Paris’s region) 34 1998 skating gold medalist Kulik 35 In-between feeding time invented for a Taco Bell ad campaign 38 Olympus ___ (Martian volcano) 39 Come together 40 90 degrees from norte 41 Intuitive power 43 “Don’t change” 44 Suffix similar to -let 45 Painters’ mediums 46 Lunar cycle segment 47 Present-day

49 Act like an old-timey suitor 51 Honorific for landmarks like the Great Wall of China, Taj Mahal, or Empire State Building 58 Cable movie channel owned by Lionsgate since 2016 61 Lou Gehrig’s nickname, with “The” 62 TV input or output component 63 Appellation 64 Johnny of Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald 65 Color for rolls of dimes 66 Actress Natalia of Stranger Things 67 Undertale character named for a derided font DOWN 1 Tail movements 2 Skilled 3 Burrito bar side, for short 4 Prefix with plasm 5 Sardine cousins 6 Look after 7 “Was ___ harsh?” 8 “No ___ Traffic” 9 Renaissance 10 Bowl game venue, maybe 11 Roadside rest stop 12 Insect egg 13 Keanu, in the Matrix series 18 “___ ever-changing world ...”

21 Living room piece 24 Short nap 25 Makes happy 26 Leave out 27 Chinese restaurant style 28 Repetitive-sounding province of the Philippines 29 Brought bad luck to 30 Brewer’s dryer 31 Archaeological site 32 The “A” that turns STEM into STEAM 35 Joining with heat 36 Harvard-set Turow book 37 Fit together 42 Range of perception 46 Christopher Robin character 48 Like feelings from ASMR videos, for some 49 Mock-innocent reply 50 Team VIP 52 Golden ___ (Sir Francis Drake’s flagship) 53 Airplane seat attachment 54 Head bobs 55 De Matteo of The Sopranos 56 Channel with a “Deportes” version 57 Sales force members 58 Succumb to gravity 59 NBC News correspondent Katy 60 Ending for Power or Gator ANSWER ON PAGE 19

DO YOU LOVE SAN ANTONIO CULTURE? ARE YOU LOOKING TO ADVANCE AND DEVELOP YOUR ADVERTISING & MARKETING CAREER?

WE’RE HIRING!

San Antonio Current is hiring ambitious, hard-working Advertising Account E xe c u t i ve s to c re ate a n d s e l l m a r ke t i n g s o l u t i o n s to l o c a l b u s i n e ss e s .

J O I N O U R PA S S I O N AT E T E A M

s e e d e t a i l s a t b i t . l y/s a c u r r e n t c a r e e r s

sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

47


48

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com


etc FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “The prettier the garden, the dirtier the hands of the gardener,” writes aphorist B. E. Barnes. That’ll be especially applicable to you in the coming weeks. You’ll have extra potential to create and foster beauty, and any beauty you produce will generate practical benefits for you and those you care about. But for best results, you’ll have to expend more effort than maybe you thought you should. It might feel more like work than play – even though it will ultimately enhance your ability to play.

phase of your cycle when you have maximum power to raise your appreciation of elegance, understand how it could beautify your soul, and add more of it to your repertoire. So here are your homework meditations: What does elegance mean to you? Why might it be valuable to cultivate elegance, not just to enhance your self-presentation, but also to upgrade your relationship with your deep self? (P.S.: Fashion designer Christian Dior said, “Elegance must be the right combination of distinction, naturalness, care, and simplicity.”)

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Author and theologian Thomas Merton thought that the most debilitating human temptation is to settle for too little; to live a comfortable life rather than an interesting one. I wouldn’t say that’s always true about you, Taurus. But I do suspect that in the coming weeks, a tendency to settle for less could be the single most devitalizing temptation you’ll be susceptible to. That’s why I encourage you to resist the appeal to accept a smaller blessing or punier adventure than you deserve. Hold out for the best and brightest.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Many of us imagine medieval Europe to have been drab and dreary. But historian Jacques Le Goff tells us that the people of that age adored luminous hues: “big jewels inserted into book-bindings, glowing gold objects, brightly painted sculpture, paintings covering the walls of churches, and the colored magic of stained glass.” Maybe you’ll be inspired by this revelation, Virgo. I hope so. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you can activate sleeping wisdom and awaken dormant energy by treating your eyes to lots of vivid reds, greens, yellows, blues, browns, oranges, purples, golds, blacks, coppers, and pinks.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I’ve learned quite a lot, over the years, by avoiding what I was supposed to be learning.” So says the wise and well-educated novelist Margaret Atwood. Judging by your current astrological omens, I think this is an excellent clue for you to contemplate right now. What do you think? Have you been half-avoiding any teaching that you or someone else thinks you’re “supposed” to be learning? If so, I suggest you avoid it even stronger. Avoid it with cheerful rebelliousness. Doing so may lead you to what you really need to learn about next. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Sometimes you make it difficult for me to reach you. You act like you’re listening but you’re not really listening. You semi-consciously decide that you don’t want to be influenced by anyone except yourself. When you lock me out like that, I become a bit dumb. My advice isn’t as good or helpful. The magic between us languishes. Please don’t do that to me now. And don’t do it to anyone who cares about you. I realize that you may need to protect yourself from people who aren’t sufficiently careful with you. But your true allies have important influences to offer, and I think you’ll be wise to open yourself to them. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Whoever does not visit Paris regularly will never really be elegant,” wrote French author Honoré de Balzac. I think that’s an exaggeration, but it does trigger a worthwhile meditation. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re in a

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): An astrologer on Tumblr named Sebastian says this about your sign: “Libras can be boring people when they don’t trust you enough to fully reveal themselves. But they can be just as exciting as any fire sign and just as weird as any Aquarius and just as talkative as a Gemini and just as empathetic as a Pisces. Really, Librans are some of the most eccentric people you’ll ever meet, but you might not know it unless they trust you enough to take their masks off around you.” Spurred by Sebastian’s analysis, here’s my advice to you: I hope you’ll spend a lot of time with people you trust in the coming weeks, because for the sake of your mental and physical and spiritual health, you’ll need to express your full eccentricity. (Sebastian’s at http://venuspapi.tumblr.com.)

how much you believe in and are alert for magic. Why not go for the maximum?

described. I dare you to find out how voracious you can be if you grant yourself permission.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Since 1969, eight-foot-two-inch-tall Big Bird has been the star of the kids’ TV show Sesame Street. He’s a yellow bird puppet who can talk, write poetry, dance, and roller skate. In the early years of the show, our hero had a good friend who no one else saw or believed in: Mr. Snuffleupagus. After 17 years, there came a happy day when everyone else in the Sesame Street neighborhood realized that Snuffy was indeed real, not just a figment of Big Bird’s imagination. I’m foreseeing a comparable event in your life sometime soon, Sagittarius. You’ll finally be able to share a secret truth or private pleasure or unappreciated asset.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According to my reading of the astrological omens, the coming weeks will be prime time to vividly express your appreciation for and understanding of the people you care about most. I urge you to show them why you love them. Reveal the depths of your insights about their true beauty. Make it clear how their presence in your life has had a beneficent or healing influence on you. And if you really want to get dramatic, you could take them to an inspiring outdoor spot and sing them a tender song or two.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Activist and author Simone de Beauvoir was one of those Capricorns whose lust for life was both lush and intricate. “I am awfully greedy,” she wrote. “I want to be a woman and to be a man, to have many friends and to have loneliness, to work much and write good books, to travel and enjoy myself, to be selfish and to be unselfish.” Even if your longings are not always as lavish and ravenous as hers, Capricorn, you now have license to explore the mysterious state she

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In her book Yarn: Remembering the Way Home, Piscean knitter Kyoko Mori writes, “The folklore among knitters is that everything handmade should have at least one mistake so an evil sprit will not become trapped in the maze of perfect stitches.” The idea is that the mistake “is a crack left open to let in the light.” Mori goes on to testify about the evil spirit she wants to be free of. “It’s that little voice in my head that says, ‘I won’t even try this because it doesn’t come naturally to me and I won’t be very good at it.’” I’ve quoted Mori at length, Pisces, because I think her insights are the exact tonic you need right now.

THIS MODERN WORLD BY TOM TOMORROW

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A blogger who calls herself Wistful Giselle has named the phenomena that make her “believe in magic.” They include the following: “illuminated dust in the air; the moments when a seedling sprouts; the intelligence gazing back at me from a crow’s eyes; being awaken by the early morning sun; the energy of storms; old buildings overgrown with plants; the ever-changing grey green blue moods of the sea; the shimmering moon on a cool, clear night.” I invite you to compile your own list, Scorpio. You’re entering a time when you will be the beneficiary of magic in direct proportion to sacurrent.com | August 15-21, 2018 | CURRENT

49


CULTURE

tickets

L O C A L C U LT U R E T I C K E T S . C O M

VIP

SOLD OUT

WHISKEY BUSINESS FRI, AUG. 24

VIP ENTRY 7:00PM • GA ENTRY 8:00PM END 11PM • THE WITTE MUSEUM

SAN ANTONIO BEER FESTIVAL SAT, OCT. 20 • VIP ENTRY 12 PM • GA ENTRY 1:30 PM • END 6:30PM DIGNOWITY & LOCKWOOD PARKS

“COLLECTION QUATRE”

SAN ANTONIO MUSIC SHOWCASE

SAT, SEP 15 • 7PM

N. ST. MARY’S STRIP

BY LEIGHTON W.

BRICK AT BLUE STAR

6TH ANNUAL TANGO OF THE VINES

FRI, NOV 2 • 7PM WITTE MUSEUM

Sell Your Event Tickets 50

CURRENT | August 15-21, 2018 | sacurrent.com

SAT, SEPT. 29

DULCE

FRI, DEC. 7

JACK GUENTHER PAVILION AT THE BRISCOE

On Localculturetickets.com And Get Free Promotion In The Current

Call 210-388-0606 For More Info


1 city. 1 night. 20 stages. 60+ local bands & artists.

participating venues: AMP ROOM (21+) DARKWAVE / GOTH / INDUSTRIAL PHANTOM Spell 27 Shadow Fashion LA BOTANICA (ALL AGES UNTIL 11 P.M., THEN 21+) DANCE / ELECTRONICA Lightwithin Voodoo Boogaloo Rivers Want THE MIX (21+) COUNTRY Michael J. & The Foxes Marcy Grace Band of Bandits VENTURA (21+) POP-ROCK Bad Heart The Please Help Nova Lux

SOCIAL SPOT (21+) ALT-ROCK Fox Motel Razor Doves Celestial Descent PAPER TIGER (ALL AGES) MAIN ROOM LATIN ALTERNATIVE/CUMBIA Pochos Chidos Los Nahuatlatos Grupo Frackaso PAPER TIGER (ALL AGES) COURTYARD BEATMAKER JKNODIC Arodbeats Jonah Conrad LIMELIGHT (21+) INDIE Optic Arrest Vintage Pictures We Leave at Midnight

THE GALLERY CLUB (21+) HIP-HOP SpyMC MAD-ONE Chris Conde The Kid Bootz DJ Dark Night ATTAGIRL (ALL AGES) SINGER-SONGWRITER Carly Garza George Garza Jr. Jordan Moonz GUILLOTINE (21+) METAL Aeternal Requiem Pigweed Hotzi THE OTHER SIDE (ALL AGES) JAZZ/JAZZ FUSION Jose Amador & Terra Nova PM Soul MADD WOLF

JANDRO’S (21+) INDOOR STAGE SURF / GARAGE / PSYCH Flower Jesus Quartet Junkie Saigon Sinners JANDRO’S (21+) OUTDOOR STAGE PUNK Lemmings Yo Existo Lloronas RUMBLE (21+) SOUL / FUNK / R&B The Shiny Knights StereoFiend Cadillac Muzik LA ROCA (21+) FOLK / FOLK-ROCK Yosh & Yimmy Jaik Yanez & The High Road Sweet ‘Shine & Honey

SANCHOS (21+) UPSTAIRS STAGE TEJANO / CONJUNTO Santiago Jimenez Jr. LA 45 SANCHOS (21+) DOWNSTAIRS STAGE BLUES Favorite Son Catherine Denise Jake Castillo Trio BEXAR PUB (21+) AMERICANA / SOUTHERN ROCK / ALT-COUNTRY Winsome Losers Snowbyrd DT Buffkin HI-TONES (21+) PUNK Viet-Ruse No Time Knockin’ Chucks Pinata Protest (acoustic duo)

complete lineup and $10 all-access wristbands @ sanantoniomusicshowcase.com In addition to the convergence of dope local music, there will be representatives from Pacifico Beer, Deep Eddy Vodka and Austin East Ciders at the participating venues.


San Antonio Current – August 15, 2018  
San Antonio Current – August 15, 2018