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up close with Public Art San Antonio sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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in this issue San Antonio Current

Issue 18_29 /// July 18-24, 2018

Publisher: Michael Wagner Editor-in-Chief: Greg Jefferson

Editorial

Senior Editors: Bryan Rindfuss, Jessica Elizarraras Art Director: Carlos Aguilar Food & Nightlife Editor: Jessica Elizarraras Staff Writers: Chris Conde, Sanford Nowlin Digital Content Editor: Sarah Martinez Contributors: Alexis Alvarez , Ron Bechtol, Erik Casarez, James Courtney, Callie Enlow, Jose Garza, Dan R. Goddard, Alejandra Lopez Gonzalez, Lance Higdon, Steven G. Kellman, Hannah Lorence, Michelle C. Lorentzen, Abby Mangel, Kiko Martínez, Jeremy Martin, Kelly Merka Nelson, M. Solis, Gary Sweeney, J.D. Swerzenski, Kelsey Valadez, Erin Winch Editorial Interns: Tehua Cruz, Alex Czaja, Alisa Pierce, Megan Rodriguez, Lori Salazar, Camille Sauers, Victoria Wilson

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Isabel Castro

09 News

Lawsuit: Prison Guards Hounded Inmate at Private SA Facility

Allegations against GEO – ICE’s top contractor – include cruelty, medical malpractice

13 Feature

Public Schools’ Inclusion Illusion

SA schools are still segregated – by income as much as race BY B E K A H M C N E E L

Charm offensive

Will Hurd’s playing to the center in Texas’ most competitive congressional race. But his record tells another story.

18 Calendar

Our top picks for the week

27 Arts

On Pointe

Joffrey Texas celebrates its 40th anniversary in San Antonio

29 Screens

Road to Nowhere

Boundaries is an all-too-obvious dysfunctional family dramedy

Corporate Animals

Sorry to Bother You depicts the pursuit of self-interests as an effed-up fever dream

31 Food

The Big Spoon

Food Costs Money: Ramen Edition

Cocktail of the Week

Lowcountry’s The Good Neighbor

Haute Dinners

Beer, wine and spirit dinners to check out this month

37 Music

5 Acts You Need To See at This Year’s Float Fest in San Marcos Music Top Picks

47 Etc

Savage Love, Crossword Puzzle, Astrology, This Modern World

Segregation is alive and well in San Antonio school districts. But family income is an even bigger divide than race and ethnicity, and economic segregation is much harder to fight than racial segregation. Illustration by Isabel Castro Art direction by Carlos Aguilar sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com

BENEFITING


Allegations against GEO – ICE’s top contractor – include cruelty, medical malpractice BY DANIEL CONRAD

S

ina Moghtader was pursuing medical school when he was detained in a private prison run by the GEO Group Inc., ICE’s top contractor. The 35-year-old UTSA graduate had fled childhood persecution in Iran for his family’s Bahá’í faith. He says guards called him a terrorist for his Iranian ethnicity, and encouraged other inmates to do the same. On June 24, Moghtader filed a lawsuit against GEO, accusing guards of turning away when other inmates beat him, broke his nose and shoved a toilet brush up his rectum. His injuries led to an ear infection that doctors allegedly wouldn’t treat, so now he can’t hear out of his left ear. He says the medical staff also refused to provide medications prescribed for his PTSD and anxiety diagnoses, despite letters from his doctor and lawyer demanding proper treatment. According to the complaint, Moghtader was told he’d see a doctor only if he pled guilty. Authorities eventually dropped all charges against him, but not before Moghtader spent a full year in GEO’s downtown San Antonio prison. Topped with razor wire, GEO’s Central Texas Detention Facility sits where San Pedro Creek meets Dolorosa Street, mere blocks from the Riverwalk and a stone’s throw from Mi Tierra and the historic Market Square. Moghtader was imprisoned two years ago for sending threatening texts, emails and phone calls to two Department of Justice attorneys and their families. He had just lost a complaint accusing the National Board of Medical Examiners of illegally refusing to accommodate his learning disability during med school tests. A federal judge dropped the charges against him last April, blaming his actions on a psychotic break brought upon by a negligent Adderall prescription that severely and dangerously interacted with the post-traumatic stress disorder related to his troubled childhood in Iran. “Everyone is in prison for some reason.

news

Lawsuit: Prison Guards Hounded Iranian Inmate at Privately-Run SA Facility

Daniel Conrad

He did not injury anybody,” said Randall Kallinen, Moghtader’s lawyer, in a phone interview. “He was in there for saying words, and... he was found not guilty by reason of his mental condition.” At a press conference held in front of the San Antonio federal courthouse on June 26, Moghtader spoke out about his experience in the facility, named “Texas Parole Violation Center” but listed as a detention center on ICE’s website thanks to a contract between the company, Bexar County and the U.S. Marshals Service. GEO has leased the facility, formerly a county jail, since 1989. “It was terrible. It was like a nightmare,” Moghtader said. “I want this facility to treat people right, and not abuse their power.” Kallinen likened the experience to “torture.” “Although [prison] is not a vacation, you cannot be subjected to excessive force – you cannot be denied reasonable care for your serious medical needs,” Kallinen said. GEO did not respond to requests for comment. Kallinen says the company has not yet gotten back to his law firm, and believes that it may not be until next fall that the case makes it to either trial or mediation. GEO is no stranger to allegations and negative press. Since 2012, five guards and other employees of this San Antonio facility have been arrested for crimes such as smuggling contraband, including cell phones and drugs, to inmates, as well as sexually abusing them. A June report released by Human Rights Watch, the American Civil Liberties Union and other government watchdogs cites medical professionals who say that, since 2012, at least four deaths in GEO prisons across the nation can be attributed to substandard medical care. An August 2016 report issued by the Department of Justice found that GEO’s prisons “had more incidents per capita” than facilities operated by the government as well as competing

corrections companies in the areas of “contraband finds” and “lockdowns, guilty findings on inmate discipline charges, positive drug test results and sexual misconduct.” That DOJ report was cited in an August 2016 memo issued by former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates that ordered the Bureau of Prisons to begin phasing out the use of private prisons. The next day, GEO Corrections Holdings Inc. donated $100,000 to a pro-Trump super PAC, Rebuilding America Now, and gave another $125,000 one week prior to Trump’s electoral victory. Two weeks into Jeff Sessions’ career as attorney general, he reversed Yates’ decree. Last April, ICE gave GEO a 10-year, $110 million contract to build and operate a new 1,000bed immigrant detention center in Conroe, north of Houston. These events led the nonprofit Campaign Legal Center to cry foul. Their lawyers have filed lawsuits against ICE and the Federal Elections Commission over unfulfilled requests for information about these donations. They say that if ICE had an operating agreement to run a GEO prison in Washington when the donations were made, then they were illegal. GEO has given a total of $845,000 to political committees since 2015. Moghtader’s suit cites violations of the Fourth Amendment (against cruel and unusual punishment), the Americans with Disabilities Act and due process, and also charges GEO with negligence, medical malpractice and racial discrimination. Besides damages for himself, Moghtader seeks a court order for the company to “implement and train employees in the importance of not inciting violence between inmates and not denying inmates access to needed medical care.” Moghtader has also taken his psychiatrist, Shawna Deeves, to district court over the negligent Adderall prescription that induced his psychotic break.

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com


news the idea of a 30-foot wall towering over their property and decimating local wildlife isn’t exactly popular.

Road Trippin’

I

U.S. House of Representatives

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n fairness, Hurd hasn’t matched the viciously partisan tone of many of his House colleagues. He reached across the aisle with GOP moderates to shoot for a bipartisan deal on immigration. Also, he made headlines last March by taking a 1,600-mile road trip with Democratic U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who’s now running for Ted Cruz’s Senate seat. But, those efforts aside, Hurd’s two terms representing the district haven’t exactly shown him leaning across the aisle with great regularity. Conservative business interests like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Club for Growth give him glowing reviews on their congressional scorecards, but progressive groups tend to rank him in the single digits. The American Civil Liberties Union rated him at 7 percent, Planned Parenthood Action Fund at 5 percent and the League of Conservation Voters at a whopping 2 percent.

Charm offensive

Tough Fight

Will Hurd’s playing to the center in Texas’ most competitive congressional race. But his record tells another story. BY SANFORD NOWLIN

L

ast month, during a BBC interview, U.S. Rep. Will Hurd blasted the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy with such virulence, the interviewer asked the Republican if perhaps he’d thrown in with the wrong party. It’s easy to see why. In recent media appearances, Hurd’s made great effort to distance himself from a few of the Trump administration’s most controversial issues — namely, the border wall and stripping migrant parents of their children. But Hurd, who faces a midterm challenge from San Antonio Democrat Gina Ortiz Jones, has a record that puts him much closer to the president’s camp than his pronouncements might let on. He’s voted in line with Trump’s position more than 95 percent of the

time, according to a tally by the blog FiveThirtyEight. The Hurd campaign didn’t respond to interview requests. But it’s not hard to theorize why the candidate’s eager to show a moderate public face. He’s defending the state’s most competitive congressional seat, the Texas 23rd District, which has flipped like a light switch in recent years. The district narrowly went to Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, and November’s contest looms as trends favor both Democratic and female candidates. Jones has hit Hurd’s record on the campaign trail. The number one issue voters ask her about is health care, she said, pointing out that Hurd has voted to dismantle Obamacare. What’s more, Hurd in January 2015 voted to end President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,

and, in May 2015, to delete language that encouraged the Defense Department to let DREAMers serve in uniform. Last year, as a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, he voted along party lines for a security bill that included $10 billion for a border wall. “He’s part of the problem,” Jones said. “I liken his [recent statements on immigration] to someone lighting your house on fire and then showing up with a bucket of water to help put it out.” To use a less polite metaphor, Hurd knows Trump’s wall and children in cages are unpopular, and he’s a smart enough politician not to shit in his own lunchbox. In addition to portions of San Antonio, the 23rd District spans a third of the U.S.-Mexico border. Even among conservatives in that region,

H

urd eked out narrow victories against Pete Gallego, his opponent in the past two elections — the last by a 1.3 percent margin. But beyond national trends, a few other factors could work against him this time around. Jones’ campaign has raked in $2.2 million since she entered the race — more than Gallego raised over the life of his whole 2016 run. So far, Hurd has raised $2.4 million. And while Hurd was able to tout his track record as a former CIA officer, Jones’ credentials as a former Air Force intelligence officer and an Iraq War veteran are also likely to appeal to mainstream voters. Jones, who last week launched her first TV spots of the campaign, said she plans to keep her ads focused on telling her own story rather than mounting attacks. But, she added, she’s not afraid to point out exactly where her opponent stands. “When he hasn’t voted against his constituents’ interest, he just hasn’t shown up,” she said. sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com


news

BY BEKAH MCNEEL

I

n 1954, the Supreme Court rocked the segregated South when it ruled that the State Board of Education of Topeka could not prevent third-grader Linda Brown from attending Sumner Elementary, an all-white school seven blocks from her house. After the decision, a trickle of black students attended white schools, and a tsunami of white families continued their flight to the suburbs, paying higher home and commute prices to keep their kids “safe”from the influence of brown and black classmates. Legally-sanctioned segregation was dead. But subtler forms of segregation took its place, and it would prove to be damn near impossible to eradicate. Linda Brown died on March 25, just weeks before the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. It seems like the right time to ask ourselves, “How are we doing in ending segregation?” The answer is it’s still alive and well in the American Northeast, Midwest, West Coast, and, yes, the South.

It’s also alive on the North, East, West, and South sides of San Antonio, a city that prides itself on its Mexican-American heritage. If you want to understand the city’s particular brand of segregation, no data is more compelling than the economic disparities in local schools. At McAndrew Elementary (Northside ISD) on the northern edge of Bexar County, fewer than three out of every 100 students were considered to be at an “economic disadvantage” under federal guidelines in 2017. That same year, at J.T. Brackenridge Elementary (San Antonio ISD) on the city’s near West Side, the number was 99.5 percent. Twenty-six miles separate the two schools, but according to the Bexar County Health Collaborative, the children who go there are also separated by a 10 to 20 year life expectancy gap. If they stay in the same neighborhoods, a child attending McAndrew is statistically likely to live 10 to 20 years longer than a child going to J.T. Brackenridge.

Still Segregated, Despite SelfCongratulations

A

sk many San Antonians – especially Anglos – and they’ll tell you that the Alamo City is not segregated. They’ll tell you about wealthy Mexican nationals living in Stone Oak. They’ll tell you about their black neighbors in Dignowity Hill. They’ll tell you about Fiesta and how their school celebrates Dia de los Muertos. In a way, they are right. San Antonio doesn’t show up on any of the “most racially segregated” lists published by think tanks and policy institutes. But since the 1970s, researchers have realized that economic segregation — the stark contrast between the rich and poor sides of town — is on the rise. In that regard, San Antonio tops the charts. Researcher Richard Florida has repeatedly ranked San Antonio as one of the most economically segregated cities in the nation. The results reappear

annually, and other studies echo these claims. Every time they do, it generates a media frenzy. Reporters compare zip codes 78207 and 78208 east and west of downtown with zip codes like 78257 and 78231 on the Northwest Side. What they are missing, says Trinity University professor Christine Drennon said, is the potential to close the gap. We may be segregated, but high- and low-income neighborhoods pay taxes into the same City and County coffers. It’s possible to spread some of the wealth. “If we know that portions of our population have been denied investment for generations, is it our responsibility, as a society, to alleviate those mistakes?” Drennon asks. (She would answer yes.) Economic segregation has a racial component. But it is more insidious than straight-up efforts to keep people of different races and ethnicities separate. It’s also harder to address, thanks to another Supreme Court ruling that hits disturbingly close to home. In the 1973 San Antonio ISD v. Rodriguez ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court said that poverty does not count as a 15 6 sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

13


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news 6 13 protected class like race did in the Brown decision. School districts and local governments are not required to address inequities based on income. It was just too complicated, woven into housing, the lack of economic opportunity and all the other inequities that the Supreme Court wasn’t ready to take on, says Albert Kauffman, a St. Mary’s Law School professor and former attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund. “I consider it one of the worst opinions ever written,” Kauffman said. He represented the plaintiffs in one of many subsequent school finance lawsuits against the state of Texas. His suit and those that followed tried to show that the system was unconstitutionally stacked against poor students, but the Rodriguez decision would prove a major obstacle, broad and intractable. In other words, you can’t enforce economic equity. It’s no coincidence that parents in both Brown and Rodriguez filed suit over their children’s school assignment. Both wanted their kids to be allowed to attend a “better” school with more resources. In Brown, those resources were allocated based on race. In Rodriguez, disparities resulted from wealth. Just as it was in 1954 and 1973, current school segregation is as obvious as it is harmful. San Antonio schools have been feeling the effects of economic segregation for decades. They’ve watched the students from McAndrew and J.T. Brackenridge grow up in drastically different worlds with deepening disparities. So, what are they doing about it?

Right Solution? Depends on Who You Ask.

D

epending on how you count, Bexar County has between 16 and 19 independent school districts. The lines were set in 1947, after the state legislature provided incentives for districts to consolidate under the Gilmer-Aiken Act. When San Antonio’s 60-plus districts began the horse-trading process of who would join up with whom, a few notable things happened. The 12 largely rural districts in northwest Bexar, Medina, Bandera counties became Northside ISD, a geographical behemoth with more space than students in 1947. North East ISD became

the premier suburban school district. Alamo Heights ISD opted to stay small since it had a higher wealth per capita than its largest neighbors. Edgewood ISD also stayed small, but not by choice. The district was too poor for its neighbors to take on the financial liability. In the decades that followed, the city changed. City Council invested heavily in the North Side, and the populations of Northside and North East ISDs exploded. White flight shaped and continues to shape those districts, the two largest in the city with 106,000 and 67,000 students, respectively. Both have added high schools further and further afield with each decade. As the neighborhoods and schools between Loop 410 and Loop 1604 age and the population grows more economically and racially diverse, new subdivisions and high schools pop up along 1604 and increasingly outside of it. Allocating resources across this spread is a matter of political will and can be tricky. “If you really are pro-every kid then the question has to be how do you improve and resource some without taking away from others,” said State Rep. Diego Bernal, whose district covers several school districts and a mix of income levels. Bernal has visited every single public school in his district as well as some private schools and home-school groups. To get to the school, he’s had to drive through the residential blocks surrounding it, and what he sees usually foreshadows what he will hear inside. “Nine out of ten times, the schools and the neighborhood are in lockstep,”

Bernal said. Every school has needs, he said, and no one feels like they are in any position to give up resources. The effects of segregation are “less about hoarding resources in one place, and more about comfortableness with and acclimation to the fact that there are children who have to do with less,” Bernal said. Bernal has increasingly come to the conclusion that school district boundaries keep people from having to worry about the kids across town.

Northside ISD: Welcome to the (Concrete) Jungle

N

orthside ISD superintendent Brian Woods can’t ignore the effects of San Antonio’s economic segregation. He’s living it. What was once a rural school district of 823 students and one high school is now a microcosm of San Antonio’s metropolitan makeup. This is the district of McAndrew Elementary. Its lowest income school, Westwood Terrace Elementary, is 93.7 percent economically disadvantaged. It is closer geographically and demographically to JT Brackenridge than it is to McAndrew. “The diversity of Northside mirrors the diversity of the city,” Woods said. Its challenges also mirror the challenges of the city.

He believes in the value of socioeconomic diversity, but the city’s sprawling geography is making that more and more difficult to achieve. A few schools such as Clark High School can capture high- and low-incomes families in one attendance zone. But with no shortage of wide open space to the northwest, Woods sees more sprawl in the future. Simply refusing to build schools to serve those students is not an option for the district, he said. Northside ISD uses school choice to try to draw middle-class students back to the economically diverse or lower-income campuses like Holmes High School and John Jay High School. They put desirable courses of study and magnet programs at those schools and allow students to transfer into them. They market directly to middle schoolers on all Northside campuses to make sure students know their district options. Some socioeconomic mixing has been a happy byproduct, Woods said, but it’s not an initiative specifically aimed at integration. But a lot of division between wealthy and poor students remains. Rather than allocating funds using only the blunt instrument of free and reduced lunch rates, Northside – using highly granular data – targets academic interventions, coaching, professional development and other services to the exact students and teachers who need them. While those efforts are getting results, Woods wishes they could gather data for kids’ mental, emotional and social wellbeing so that the district could deploy similarly specific interventions. “Kids’ situation outside the school day clearly impacts their ability to be successful inside the school day,” Woods said, “The data’s just harder to gather.” The district does what it can with the information it has, and relies on teachers and school administrators to send up a flare when they need more “wraparound services” such as food pantries, trauma counselors, bus passes and social workers. “Resources are really hard to come by for that stuff, too,” Woods said, “State funding is not adequate for wraparound services.” The poorer the southern edges of the district become, the more creative the district has to be to meet their needs. 16 6

A map of the major school districts in Bexar County

a

sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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news 6 15

North East ISD: The Times they are a-Changing

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nce considered an exclusive, wealthy district, North East ISD now covers a wider spread of economic geography. At Johnson High School, 15.6 percent of the students qualify as economically disadvantaged. At Roosevelt High School, 66.4 percent meet the criteria. “Most kids look down on Roosevelt,” Churchill High School sophomore Sophia Mendez said. “Also, they’re jealous of Johnson because of all the money that school has. We all know that being at Johnson will give you a better chance for a successful future.” She described Johnson as academically competitive, more so than Roosevelt and even Churchill, one of the NEISD schools where the population is growing more economically diverse as its neighborhood ages. Mendez and her peers are witnessing the effects of a national reality. Family income is the largest predictor for academic success in the United States. The Pell Institute and the National Center for Education Statistics track college graduation rates of low- and high-income students. The numbers fluctuate based on how researchers measure them (Did students graduate in four years or six years? Do you include two-year degrees and certificates?), but a gap persists. In almost all higher education settings, a minimum ten-point gap sits between graduation rates for high- and low-income students. It gets worse from there. Remember that 20-year life expectancy gap? If wealth predicts educational attainment… guess what predicts health. “Income and educational attainment,” said San Antonio Metropolitan Health District director Colleen Bridger. One of the best ways to combat the ill effects of poverty in certain parts of town, she said, is to support the city, the police department, school districts and anyone else involved in making stronger, more stable communities. Improving individual health needs to happen in the context of community health, Bridger said. Like Northside, North East is trying to balance its income disparities by sending resources where they are needed most. The district relies heavily on data to allocate resources, NEISD executive director of curriculum and instruction 16

CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com

Patti Salzmann said. “The strategies we use for one school may not work for another school.” Federal and state money for low-income students goes directly to bulking up everything from food pantries to extra technology on low-income campuses in NEISD. Since the buildings in poorer neighborhoods are usually older, the district puts extra money into maintenance and upgrades. “You won’t go to one school and say, ‘Oh, this is the rich school,” and to another school and say, ‘Oh, this is the poor school,’” Salzmann said. Each low-income school also gets additional personnel, an expense paid for by the district. Academic coaches allow teachers to teach across different levels. But maybe even more important are the social supports. The less well-to-do schools in NEISD each have a professional family specialist who helps with everything from rent assistance to parent coaching. These campuses also have a Communities in Schools site coordinator to provide social and academic support as well as a clinical counselor through Project Access, another Communities in Schools program. Years ago, Salzmann said, NEISD looked to the horizon and saw the

increasing poverty rate across the state and in their district. It planned accordingly so that as neighborhoods changed, schools stayed stable. “We can’t change the societal challenges that we have,” she said. “But we can make sure that when kids walk in the doors that they don’t feel those influences.”

SAISD: We’re Not Gonna Take It Anymore

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fter decades of families – and money – moving northward, the districts inside and south of Loop 410, except Alamo Heights, have seen a decline in student numbers and wealth. Yet even Alamo Heights feels a little bit of the pinch. In Alamo Heights ISD, 20.7 percent of students qualify for free or reduced lunch. That number may seem high – until you see the numbers in San Antonio, Edgewood, Harlandale, South San, Southside and Southwest ISDs. All six have economic disadvantaged rates over 85 percent. SAISD, the city’s third largest district, serves 50,000 kids,

Members of SAISD’s teachers union recently protested the conversion of an public elementary school to a Democracy Prep charter school. Shrinking student populations and scarce funds are forcing inner-city and South Side districts to make tough decisions.

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more than 90 percent of whom meet the federal definition. Here it’s worth checking back in on those claims that San Antonio is not racially segregated. Check the racial demographics of all six southern districts. They are more than 90 percent Hispanic, and none have student populations with more than 7 percent Anglos. Many decades of racial discrimination created entrenched housing and wealth accumulation patterns that continue to affect Hispanic and black families. It hasn’t been that long since property owners were allowed to draw up that deed restrictions that blocked minority homebuyers from moving into the neighborhood. “If we’re wondering if the effects of those lines have changed…they


news haven’t,” SAISD chief innovation officer Mohammed Choudhury said. Poverty is still concentrated in certain schools across the United States, according to the National Equity Atlas. What’s more, 42.6 percent of students of color attended those schools in 2014, while only 7.6 percent of white students did. Racial segregation is not only about looking at where Hispanic and black students go to school. It’s about looking at where white students are not. To serve its students, SAISD knows it must do two things well, Choudhury said. “We have to do high poverty schools well. At the same time, we have to stop recreating them.” Putting stronger curriculum and better teachers into the highest poverty schools is part of the plan. But Choudhury’s economic integration effort is more ambitious. It hinges on the success of parents choosing to do what they would not allow the government to force them to do: integrate schools. In the 1960s and 1970s, districts across the country tried to force racial integration by sending kids to schools outside their neighborhoods in order to achieve racial balance. Parents lost their shit. Families living in affluent neighborhoods served by affluent schools hated being told that their child would lose that benefit. They’d bought those houses for a reason. “You have attendance zones that concentrate poverty in a certain manner and attendance zones that mirror affluence,” Choudhury said. Until the city achieves more balanced and mixed-income neighborhoods, Choudhury plans to use open enrollment to overcome residential economic segregation. Open enrollment means that anyone can go to the school, not just the kids who live nearby. The district has several high-performing open enrollment schools already. Young Women’s Leadership Academy and Travis Early High School are National Blue Ribbon Schools. While they are both technically majority economically disadvantaged, they skew toward the higher end of that spectrum – most of the district skews to the lower end. The high performance of those schools has also attracted philanthropic investment. “Although most girls at my school are low-income, I think we can all recognize that the driving factor that brought us to YWLA was the availability of resources there versus at our near-

OCTOBER 20, 2018 est home school,” Ruby Polanco, who graduated this year from YWLA, said. She watched gang violence, teen pregnancy and the stress of poverty ravage what would have been her senior class at Lanier High School. Those kids, many of whom went to elementary school at JT Brackenridge, had “all the potential in the world,” Polanco said. They just didn’t know how to get the resources they needed. Under Choudhury’s plan, the district will continue to create specialized schools – schools with Montessori, early college, dual language, or other high-demand curriculums, as it has been doing for the past decade. But instead of letting those campuses fill with the kind of students who typically fill strong, trendsetting schools (middle-class kids whose parents make sure they get in), Choudhury plans to ensure that the schools stay economically diverse – truly economically diverse. Instead of the federal, income-based, yes-or-no economic disadvantage rate, Choudhury uses four “blocks” to define poverty in the district. “Block one” neighborhoods have higher homeownership rates, median income and educational attainment than “block four” neighborhoods. Block one neighborhoods have lower rates of single-parent households. The blocks are relative to SAISD, where the districtwide median income is $30,000. So, blocks two through four all include students who meet the federal criteria for economic disadvantage. It’s a nuance that gets lost using the free and reduced-price lunch rate. When Choudhury fills a school, he doesn’t just look at the free lunch rate. He makes sure the kids from the most challenging neighborhoods make up at least 12 percent of the student body. These kids will go to school with kids from usually higher-income families outside SAISD whose parents are driving them, in some cases, across the city. They are busing their kids by choice. These parents are capturing an additional benefit for their students, Choudhury says. Research shows that diversity in and of itself has social and cognitive benefits for kids. So not only is SAISD alleviating the effects of segregation, it’s going a step further and harnessing the benefits of integration for those students who choose it. “This is a great example of doing it right,” Metro Health’s Colleen Bridger said. “I hope that other districts are listening and asking them how they are doing it, because that’s the longterm solution.”

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ART

‘ALBERTO MIJANGOS: 159’

Comprising 96 artworks gathered from private and institutional collections, the retrospective “Alberto Mijangos: 159” spotlights a revered painter who was born in Mexico City but made San Antonio home and left deep impressions on our art community as an educator and gallery director. Organized by San Antonio’s Department of Arts and Culture and curated by Dr. Teresa Eckmann in observance of the Tricentennial, the exhibition draws its title from a number that held symbolic meaning for Mijangos — 1 signaling the beginning, 5 referencing the middle and 9 representing the end of his artistic career. With those milestones as a framework, “159” lays out various chapters in Mijangos’ life, from studies at Mexico’s Academia de San Carlos and the Art Institute of Chicago to his arrival in San Antonio, his acquisition of a resident’s visa and appointment as director of what’s now the Mexican Cultural Institute. During his determined pursuit of the American Dream (which involved several deportations), Mijangos experimented with an array of genres and styles, including traditional portraiture and densely textured figurative abstraction. Among the highlights included in “159” are his amusing odes to Édouard Manet’s 1863 icon Olympia and multiple series inspired by flags, T-shirts and underwear (don’t miss his painting Jasper Johns’ Chones from 2001). Taken as a whole, the impressive show goes above and beyond its mission to “uncover for a broad audience the hidden treasure that is Alberto Mijangos’ oeuvre.” Free, 11am-6pm Tue-Sun through Nov. 11, Centro de Artes, 101 S. Santa Rosa Ave., (210) 206-2787, getcreativesanantonio.com. — Bryan Rindfuss

WED | 7/18 TUE | 7/24

WED | 7/18 ART

‘SECRET GARDEN: NATURE OBSERVED — NATURE IMAGINED’ 5

Houston-based artist Orna Feinstein creates monoprints, sculptures, paper installations and site-specific installations that seem to encompass both the beautiful chaos and rude order found in nature. Often with a limited number of colors, Feinstein is able to create the rhythms and moods of natural space and incident in her work. With solo shows in Austin, Dallas and Houston over the past couple of years, it was high time we got Feinstein in San Antonio. For her Cinnabar exhibition “Secret Garden,” the artist has created a meadow of paper flowers that simulate the organic and geometric patterns that occur in nature. On the opening night of this exhibit, Feinstein will discuss her work starting at 7:30pm. Free, opening reception 6:30-9pm Wed, on view noon-6pm Wed-Sat through Sept. 6, Cinnabar Gallery, 1420 S. Alamo St. #147, (210) 557-6073, cinnabarart.com. — JC

Bryan Rindfuss

McNay Art Museum

WED | 7/18 - TUE | 7/24 ART

‘SPOTLIGHT’ L

What happens when we look, I mean really look, at art? For young artists (some who might not even know they are artists yet), the experience of a single piece of art can change the whole trajectory of their

life and have immeasurable reverberations throughout their subconscious trove of inspiration. For eight years now, the McNay, through its award-winning Spotlight program, has challenged young artists to consider a single piece from its collection, and to create their own work inspired by that piece. This year, for the first time in the program’s history, the results of this creative exchange across the years will be on display for the public. The exhibit features 95 works (including paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, ceramics, mosaics and more) from 250 students, all inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe’s Leaf Motif, No. 2. Want to know what the future of San Antonio art looks like? “Spotlight” is a good place to start. $10$20, 10am-4pm Tue-Wed, 10am-9pm Thu, 10am-4pm Fri, 10am-5pm Sat, noon-5pm Sun through Nov. 4, McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart.org. — James Courtney

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com

THU | 7/19 ART

INTERNATIONAL ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE EXHIBITIONS 5

Despite a fairly recent leadership shakeup that involved longtime Studio Manager Riley Robinson becoming Interim Executive Director in the wake of Veronique Le Melle’s departure, it’s looking like business as usual at Artpace, the revered contemporary art space late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace (1945-2007) opened in 1995. Widely recognized for its International Artist-in-Residence program (which annually welcomes nine artists — three from Texas, three from elsewhere in the U.S. and three from abroad — to “live and create art in San Antonio for two months”), the institution just received a $100,000 grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation


calendar

Orna Feinstein

for the Visual Arts for “operational support for artist and curator residencies at Artpace over two years.” With two exhibitions already on view — local artist Sarah Fox’s street-level installation “She Called Herself Olympia” and “Then and Now,” a retrospective of works both old and new by former resident artists John Hernandez, Ken Little, Constance Lowe, Angel Rodríguez-Diaz and Kathy Vargas — Artpace is set to unveil exhibitions by its three summer residents. Organized by Jeffreen Hayes, director of the Chicago-based art space Threewalls, the site-specific projects explore “history, place-making and gentrification” through the eyes of Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum (Botswana/Toronto/Johannesburg), Zoë Charlton (Baltimore) and San Antonio’s own Jenelle Esparza. Thursday’s opening reception marks the revival of an Artpace tradition — a public talk between the guest curator and all three residents beginning at 7pm. Free, opening reception 6-9pm Thu, on view noon-5pm Wed-Sun through Sept.

9, Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave. (210) 212-4900, artpace.org. — Bryan Rindfuss

FRI | 7/20 WORDS

‘MIGRATION | ASSIMILATION | IDENTITY’ q

When our governments, social networks and ideologies fail us — which they sure as fuck are right now — it is often writers and poets, rather than philosophers or politicians, who see the way forward. With a nearly mystical sense of knowing the world, down to its last sinew, by its original names, poets seem especially adept at piercing the veil of the status quo in search of something more. This special reading and talk will allow the general public to receive just such direction from three celebrated writers: Martín Espada (renowned poet, activist and professor), Debra Monroe (award-winning author of fiction and memoir) and Veronica Golos (acclaimed poet). The topical focus for the event, a Gemini Ink Writer’s Conference affair that is open to all, will find these important thinkers navigating the murky waters at the heart of our national identity crisis. Free, 8pm, Brick at Blue Star, 108 Blue Star, (210) 734-9673, geminiink.org. — JC

Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum photographed by Chris Castillo

Martín Espada

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usic? m d e d r hunt o e c h e t r n h o t i s l artist w tlight Program i a c o l a ngs. u i t o e p e S m c l i Are yo i s y Counc ocal Mu t L i l C i c g n n i u r o City C case du w o h s o t The new music ic way! v i c a n for local i ission! usic m m r m u o o C y /Music ght on i l m t o o c . p s o i e n ananto s Shine th e v i t a e r y at Getc a d o t y l App

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com


calendar of his toothy dog Olive. $20, 8pm & 10:15pm Fri-Sat, 8pm Sun, Laugh Out Loud Comedy Club, 618 NW Loop 410, (210) 541-8805, lolsanantonio.com. – Kiko Martinez

SAT | 7/21 ART

‘10,000 YEARS OF LOVE AND RESISTANCE’ q Courtesy of Kyle Dunnigan

FRI | 7/20 SUN | 7/22 COMEDY

KYLE DUNNIGAN L

For just the price of a lap dance at one of those fancy local strip clubs, San Antonians will get a chance to see the comedy stylings of writer, producer, stand-up and award-winning lyricist Kyle Dunnigan, the least popular ex-boyfriend of comedian Sarah Silverman. Besides that designation, Dunnigan earned an Emmy in 2015 for the song “Girl You Don’t Need Makeup” featured on the Comedy Central series Inside Amy Schumer. The boy-band pop single starts off with a guy telling a girl she is pretty without makeup, but then changes his tune when he actually sees her au naturel. “It’s like I tore up the shag carpet assuming there were hardwood floors underneath, but it turned out to be just dirty linoleum.” Best known for starring as a closeted serial killer on the first three seasons of Reno 911!, Dunnigan, who could pass for Zach Braff and James Roday’s love child, has a mass following on social media. Online, he entertains his fans with impressions of Donald Trump and the Kardashians via face swapping filters and shares photos and videos

Aiming to spark an “intergenerational dialogue about the LGBTQ-plus realities in a maturing, evolving and empathetic world,” Bihl Haus Arts’ summer group show “10,000 Years of Love and Resistance: A Celebration of the Arts and Spiritual Union” brings together paintings, photographs, installations and sound-based projects that celebrate the DIY spirit of rasquachismo — an increasingly pervasive aesthetic distinguished by DIY practices and the creative reuse of readily available materials — and the 50 year union of Dudley Brooks and Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, the latter of whom published the influential essay Rasquachismo: A Chicano Sensibility in 1989. A recipient of both the Smithsonian Institution’s Joseph Henry Medal and the Mexican government’s Order of

the Aztec Eagle (based on his work “fostering cultural understanding between the United States and Mexico through the arts and humanities”), Ybarra-Frausto defined rasquachismo as an “underdog” perspective as well as “a form of resistance incorporating strategies of appropriation, reversal and inversion.” Curated by San Antonio surrealist David Zamora Casas (aka Nuclear Meltdown), “10,000 Years of Love and Resistance” assembles work by more than 20 local artists and rasquachismo enthusiasts (Franco Mondini-Ruiz, Agosto Cuellar, Rita Urquijo-Ruiz and Debora Kuetzpal Vasquez, to name a few) and nods with its title to “recently discovered skeletal remains that place native human inhabitants in the Americas 10,000 years ago.” Also presented as an “opportunity to explore vocabulary introduced by the LGBTQ community to identify and claim our preferred pronouns,” the exhibition opens with a reception featuring information tables, HIV testing courtesy of Anna De Luna (aka the AIDS Lady), live music by Latin fusionists Los Nahuatlatos and a “literary piñata,” plus paletas and margaritas. Free, opening reception 6-9pm Sat, on view 1-4pm Fri-Sat through Sept. 1, Bihl Haus Arts, 2803 Fredericksburg Road (inside the gates of Primrose at Monticello Park Senior Apartments), (210) 383-9723, bihlhausarts.org. — BR

SAT | 7/21 MUSIC

FOLK UKE q

Folk Uke is the unstoppably buoyant, inexcusably delightful, and endearingly indecent folk-pop duo of Cathy Guthrie and Amy Nelson — who just happen to be the daughters of Arlo Guthrie and Willie Nelson, respectively. Armed with excellent voices, wit, a guitar and a ukulele, Guthrie and Nelson offer up songs with titles like “Shit Makes the

Deborah Kuetzpal Vasquez

Courtesy of Folk Uke

Warner Bros.

Flowers Grow,” “I Gave a BJ to a DJ,” and “Knock Me Up.” But it’s not all jokes with this pair. There’s a shrewd critique of the Boys Club that dominates (especially) Americana music underlying Folk Uke’s defiant cheekiness, and the duo has plenty of songs that, while perhaps odd or dark in unexpected ways, aren’t funny in the least. They are three albums into a promising career, and you really ought to check them out this weekend. Local cosmic country revivalist and rock ’n’ roll enthusiast Garrett T. Capps joins Folk Uke on this bill. $12, 8pm, Period Modern, 4347 McCullough Ave., (210) 902-1217, nowhere-road-presents.ticketleap.com. — JC

TUE | 7/24 FI LM

FULL METAL JACKET L

“I’m going to gouge out your eyeballs and” — well, let’s just say that the late R. Lee Ermey got off many memorably intense and profane one-liners as the drill sergeant who dominates the first half of Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket (1987), which functions as a lesson in socialization. Sometimes the breakdown and rebuilding of a personality into one piece of an all-male Mickey Mouse Club doesn’t work, or works too well, as with Vincent D’Onofrio’s hapless character Pyle (a nod to Gomer?), and sometimes it works like clockwork, as with Matthew Modine’s Joker. Filmed with Kubrick’s standard smooth intensity and technical brilliance — check out the astonishing transition to the Vietnam section, marked by Nancy Sinatra’s “These Boots Are Made for Walking” — the script by Kubrick, Michael Herr and Gustav Hasford adapts Hasford’s novel The Short-Timers, with many incidents and dialogues transferred word for word. Texas Public Radio revisits the Oscar-nominated war drama in conjunction with its Cinema Tuesdays film series. $10-$15 suggested donation, 7:30pm, Santikos Bijou, 4522 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 614-8977, tprcinema.org. — Michael Barrett sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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Robert Indiana

THU | 7/19 TALKS PLUS

HEMISFAIR ’68 REUNION

For many of us, Hemisfair is not a memorable event but a place — an urban park with a newfangled playground and such storied structures as the Tower of the Americas. But for locals of a certain age, still-evolving Hemisfair Park is tied to memories of the 1968 World’s Fair, which brought 33 exhibiting “nations” (from Japan and Switzerland to Texas and Arkansas) and a host of corporations (IBM, Eastman Kodak, Coca-Cola and Pearl Brewing Company among them) to the Alamo City for a six-month extravaganza following a theme of “Confluence of Civilizations in the Americas.” A good percentage of these old-schoolers will also recall a darker side of fair that involved the city employing eminent domain to snap up a church and 19th-century homes, many of which were destroyed to make way for pavilions and the 750-foot tower. Speaking to the Current earlier this year, Hemisfair Communications Manager Drew Hicks explained that “there were literally people that had to be dragged out of their homes … It’s a story that our city, collectively, we’ve not been super comfortable talking

about, and as we’ve gone through the development of Hemisfair, I think that it’s critical that we tell the story of that time.” While the specific focus remains to be seen, the McNay’s upcoming panel discussion “HemisFair ’68 Reunion” will likely go beyond fan favorites — like the mini-monorail, sky rides, Los Voladores de Papantla (who “flew” down a 135-foot pole with ropes tied to their ankles) and Canadian nutjobs Sid and Marty Krofft’s adults-only musical puppet show Les Poupées de Paris — to shed expert light on more serious fare. Organized in observance of the fair’s 50th anniversary, the conversation promises insights from moderator Sherry Kafka Wagner (a writer and urban planner who donated her covetable book collection to the library at Hotel Emma) and panelists George Cisneros (co-founder/music and media director of URBAN-15), Richard Rosen (founder of the Magik Theatre, which is housed in a former concert hall that got transformed into the Laterna Magika for HemisFair ’68) and Lonn Taylor (a writer, curator and historian who worked for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History for 20 years). Free, 6:30-7:30pm, McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart.org. — BR sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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calendar

Tickets on sale Friday! Robert Indiana

THU | 7/19 TALKS PLUS

HEMISFAIR ’68 REUNION

For many of us, Hemisfair is not a memorable event but a place — an urban park with a newfangled playground and such storied structures as the Tower of the Americas. But for locals of a certain age, still-evolving Hemisfair Park is tied to memories of the 1968 World’s Fair, which brought 33 exhibiting “nations” (from Japan and Switzerland to Texas and Arkansas) and a host of corporations (IBM, Eastman Kodak, Coca-Cola and Pearl Brewing Company among them) to the Alamo City for a six-month extravaganza following a theme of “Confluence of Civilizations in the Americas.” A good percentage of these old-schoolers will also recall a darker side of fair that involved the city employing eminent domain to snap up a church and 19th-century homes, many of which were destroyed to make way for pavilions and the 750-foot tower. Speaking to the Current earlier this year, Hemisfair Communications Manager Drew Hicks explained that “there were literally people that had to be dragged out of their homes … It’s a story that our city, collectively, we’ve not been super comfortable talking

about, and as we’ve gone through the development of Hemisfair, I think that it’s critical that we tell the story of that time.” While the specific focus remains to be seen, the McNay’s upcoming panel discussion “HemisFair ’68 Reunion” will likely go beyond fan favorites — like the mini-monorail, sky rides, Los Voladores de Papantla (who “flew” down a 135-foot pole with ropes tied to their ankles) and Canadian nutjobs Sid and Marty Krofft’s adults-only musical puppet show Les Poupées de Paris — to shed expert light on more serious fare. Organized in observance of the fair’s 50th anniversary, the conversation promises insights from moderator Sherry Kafka Wagner (a writer and urban planner who donated her covetable book collection to the library at Hotel Emma) and panelists George Cisneros (co-founder/music and media director of URBAN-15), Richard Rosen (founder of the Magik Theatre, which is housed in a former concert hall that got transformed into the Laterna Magika for HemisFair ’68) and Lonn Taylor (a writer, curator and historian who worked for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History for 20 years). Free, 6:30-7:30pm, McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart.org. — BR sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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calendar FILM

A Bug’s Life Confluence Park hosts a kid-friendly night featuring an outdoor screening of Pixar’s 1998 animated feature A Bug’s Life (following a misfit ant in search of “warriors” to save his colony from greedy grasshoppers) and insect-related activities. Free, 8pm Wednesday; Confluence Park, 310 W. Mitchell St., (210) (210) 212-9373. Hardware & The Terminator Video Dungeon Theatre takes over Oak Hills Tavern for an outdoor double feature pairing the 1990 sci-fi horror film Hardware (about a self-repairing robot raising hell in a post-apocalyptic slum) and 1984’s The Terminator (starring Arnold Schwarzenegger as a seemingly indestructible android sent from the future to assassinate a waitress). Free, 9pm Thursday; Oak Hills Tavern, 7920 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 614-8855. Star Wars: The Force Awakens Mission Marquee Plaza and Slab Cinema team up for an outdoor screening of J.J. Abrams’ 2015 entry in the Star Wars saga set three decades after the Empire’s defeat. Free, 8pm Saturday; Mission Marquee Plaza, 3100 Roosevelt Ave., (210) 207-8612. THEATER

Mamma Mia! When it premiered on Broadway back in 2001 — just five weeks after 9/11 — British playwright Catherine Johnson’s Mamma Mia! got New Yorkers clapping along to disco mainstays and even dancing in the aisles. Referencing its spirit-lifting powers, critic Ben Brantley likened the jukebox musical to “the theatrical equivalent of comfort food.” Cleverly weaving together 20-plus earworms by Swedish pop quartet Abba, it follows a young bride-to-be who invites three of her mother’s ex-lovers to her wedding (on the Greek island where her mother lives) in hopes of determining which one is her father. Ken Urso directs the Public Theater’s production. $10-$40, 7:30pm Friday-Saturday, 2pm Sunday; The Public Theater of San Antonio, 800 W. Ashby Pl., (210) 733-7258. Quills The Overtime Theater and Aria Creative Productions stage an adults-only production of Texas-born playwright Doug Wright’s Obie Award-winning drama inspired by the life and work of the Marquis de Sade — who spent the better part of his adult life in prisons and asylums throughout France due to his passion for writing macabre stories fraught with pornography, violence and some of the most extreme aspects of human behavior. $20, 8pm Friday-Saturday; The Overtime Theater, 5409 Bandera Road, Suite 205, (210) 557-7562.

The Wizard of Oz Rick Sanchez directs the Woodlawn’s production of Frank Gabrielson’s iconic musical (based on the novel by L. Frank Baum) following Dorothy Gale and her beloved dog Toto on a surreal adventure down the Yellow Brick Road accompanied by newfound friends the Cowardly Lion, Tin Man and Scarecrow. $18-$30, 7:30pm Friday-Saturday, 3pm Sunday; Woodlawn Theatre, 1920 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 267-8388. Zig Zag Woman & Patter for a Floating Lady Part magic show, part love story, these two comedies penned by iconic comedian and musican Steve Martin intertwine a balance of humor and sentimentality. Free, 8pm Thursday-Saturday; Northwest Vista College, Black Box Theatre at Palmetto Center for the Arts, 3535 N. Ellison Drive, (210) 486-4527.

your city through

our lens VISIT SACURRENT.COM/SLIDESHOWS

SPECIAL EVENTS

Hemingway’s Birthday Ocho and Hotel Havana celebrate iconic author, booze enthusiast and cat lover Ernest Hemingway’s birthday with a seventh annual event featuring food and drink specials along with live Latin music courtesy of Jose Amador and Terra Nova. Free, 8-10pm Saturday; Hotel Havana, 1015 Navarro St., (210) 222-2008. Still Here: Homenaje al Westside de San Antonio Join the Esperanza Center for a special Sunday tardeada performance of their multimedia project Still Here, featuring original music by Lourdes Pérez. $7, 3-5:30pm Sunday; Esperanza Peace & Justice Center, 922 San Pedro Ave., (210) 228-0201. Summer Music Heat Wave Sounds of Wax presents a summer sale promising vinyl records, 8-tracks, cassettes, toys, CDs and DVDs. Free, 10am-6pm Saturday; Wonderland of the Americas, 4522 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 785-3500. Summer Crush La Santa Luna boutique pops up at La Botánica for a lingerie/pajama-themed mixer with singles games, music and performances. $5, 10pm-2am Saturday; La Botánica, 2911 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 716-0702.

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TALKS PLUS

Under Negotiation: A Conversation on Gender and Literary Expression As part of Gemini Ink’s Writers Conference, Pulitzer-winning poet Vijay Seshadri, 2018 Women’s Advocate of the Year Anel Flores and award-winning Chicana writer and educator Norma Cantú read excerpts from their work and conduct a conversation about how women are living through a time in which gender identity and relations are under negotiation. Free, 7-11pm Saturday; Radius Center, 106 Auditorium Circle, (210) 734-9673.

SEND RESUME TO SAMARKETING@SACURRENT.COM sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

25


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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com


arts

On Pointe

Joffrey Texas celebrates its 40th anniversary in San Antonio KELLY MERKA NELSON (in contrast to New York), and conceived While most colleges are relatively quiet this time of year, St. Mary’s University campus the idea of a summer educational program that would be based here. At its inception, is currently buzzing with a cadre of student there were few, if any, programs of this kind, dancers who have taken over this month as so it was particularly notable to be invited a part of the annual Joffrey Texas workshop. by Joffrey to take part in the workshop, This year marks the 40th anniversary of which he personally directed. Villanueva Joffrey Texas, which was founded by Robert notes that “there weren’t that many places Joffrey in 1978. The program hosts students to go that had such a direct connection to a for up to a month of rigorous training in professional company,” and many dancers multiple styles of dance and has produced a who participated in the summer program number of professionals. would eventually be accepted into either Joffrey is notable as one of the pioneers of the hybrid style of classical dance and modern the main or second companies of the Joffrey Ballet. movement common in dance performance Originally based at UIW, Joffrey Texas today. His sizable oeuvre is marked by a style that combines balletic precision and footwork moved to St. Mary’s around a decade ago. The main program is comprised of two with floorwork and evocation of raw emotion tiers of study — a two-week program for drawn from the modern school. intermediate students and a four-week In 1954, Joffrey created his eponymous program for top-level students — both of company, which resided in New York and which feature intensive classes in ballet, then Los Angeles before settling in Chicago modern and contemporary dance taught by in 1995. The company departed from the professional faculty that include Joffrey Ballet traditional rankings of ballet, opting alums Diane Orio and Trinette Singleton. instead to organize as an ensemble with For its 40th anniversary, Joffrey Texas has dancers rotating in and out of leading roles, expanded in two major ways. In a shift to which created a cooperative — rather than focus more on the foundational education competitive — atmosphere that fostered of younger dancers, this year marks the creativity and unity among the dancers. inception of a week-long day-program, “the After his death, Joffrey’s romantic partner FUNdamentals,” in which young students and collaborator Gerald Arpino took over the firm up basic dance techniques so that Joffrey Ballet until 2007, and the company they can continue to grow continues to perform, tour, through the next year with and teach from its base in the goal of eventually joining Chicago to this day. Joffrey Texas the higher level programs at But how did Joffrey end Showcase Joffrey Texas. up hosting this workshop in $25, 2pm Sat, July 21 This year’s other new San Antonio? According to John Paul Stevens program is a Pre-Professional Joffrey Texas Director Mauro High School Experience, in which Villanueva, who grew up in 600 N. Ellison Drive university and trainee-level San Antonio and studied (210) 418-1421 dancers gain experience in dance at University of the joffreytexas.com leadership roles by working Incarnate Word (UIW), closely with the artistic the Joffrey Ballet Company directors and chaperoning regularly visited San Antonio the younger dancers. Most of the participants on tour, and Joffrey took a shine to our fair in this new program are returning Joffrey city. He wanted to take advantage of the Texas students, who have now taken the lead calmer atmosphere of the South Texas burg

Joffrey Texas Director Mauro Villanueva

L

in helping execute choreography and even conducting sessions of their own. The workshop culminates in a showcase performance on July 21, in which students will present new works conceived specifically for Joffrey Texas alongside excerpts from the ballets of Joffrey and Arpino. Of particular note is a collaborative piece co-created by guest artistic director Joshua Peugh and the participants in this year’s workshop, in which they devised the choreography from the ground up “based on a vocabulary that they created together,” Villanueva says. Additionally, artistic director Katie Cooper, L.A.-based composer Nick Norton and Villanueva collaborated on a brand-new piece of music and dance that will premiere at the showcase. Other performances include excerpts from Joffrey’s Gamelan, a ballet inspired by haiku, and Arpino’s Kettentanz, which evokes the atmosphere of old Vienna balls, as well as pieces choreographed by Orio, Singleton and Villanueva.

Find more arts coverage every day at sacurrent.com

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livebrooks.com/visit-embassy sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

27


arts

On Pointe

Joffrey Texas celebrates its 40th anniversary in San Antonio KELLY MERKA NELSON (in contrast to New York), and conceived While most colleges are relatively quiet this time of year, St. Mary’s University campus the idea of a summer educational program that would be based here. At its inception, is currently buzzing with a cadre of student there were few, if any, programs of this kind, dancers who have taken over this month as so it was particularly notable to be invited a part of the annual Joffrey Texas workshop. by Joffrey to take part in the workshop, This year marks the 40th anniversary of which he personally directed. Villanueva Joffrey Texas, which was founded by Robert notes that “there weren’t that many places Joffrey in 1978. The program hosts students to go that had such a direct connection to a for up to a month of rigorous training in professional company,” and many dancers multiple styles of dance and has produced a who participated in the summer program number of professionals. would eventually be accepted into either Joffrey is notable as one of the pioneers of the hybrid style of classical dance and modern the main or second companies of the Joffrey Ballet. movement common in dance performance Originally based at UIW, Joffrey Texas today. His sizable oeuvre is marked by a style that combines balletic precision and footwork moved to St. Mary’s around a decade ago. The main program is comprised of two with floorwork and evocation of raw emotion tiers of study — a two-week program for drawn from the modern school. intermediate students and a four-week In 1954, Joffrey created his eponymous program for top-level students — both of company, which resided in New York and which feature intensive classes in ballet, then Los Angeles before settling in Chicago modern and contemporary dance taught by in 1995. The company departed from the professional faculty that include Joffrey Ballet traditional rankings of ballet, opting alums Diane Orio and Trinette Singleton. instead to organize as an ensemble with For its 40th anniversary, Joffrey Texas has dancers rotating in and out of leading roles, expanded in two major ways. In a shift to which created a cooperative — rather than focus more on the foundational education competitive — atmosphere that fostered of younger dancers, this year marks the creativity and unity among the dancers. inception of a week-long day-program, “the After his death, Joffrey’s romantic partner FUNdamentals,” in which young students and collaborator Gerald Arpino took over the firm up basic dance techniques so that Joffrey Ballet until 2007, and the company they can continue to grow continues to perform, tour, through the next year with and teach from its base in the goal of eventually joining Chicago to this day. Joffrey Texas the higher level programs at But how did Joffrey end Showcase Joffrey Texas. up hosting this workshop in $25, 2pm Sat, July 21 This year’s other new San Antonio? According to John Paul Stevens program is a Pre-Professional Joffrey Texas Director Mauro High School Experience, in which Villanueva, who grew up in 600 N. Ellison Drive university and trainee-level San Antonio and studied (210) 418-1421 dancers gain experience in dance at University of the joffreytexas.com leadership roles by working Incarnate Word (UIW), closely with the artistic the Joffrey Ballet Company directors and chaperoning regularly visited San Antonio the younger dancers. Most of the participants on tour, and Joffrey took a shine to our fair in this new program are returning Joffrey city. He wanted to take advantage of the Texas students, who have now taken the lead calmer atmosphere of the South Texas burg

Joffrey Texas Director Mauro Villanueva

L

in helping execute choreography and even conducting sessions of their own. The workshop culminates in a showcase performance on July 21, in which students will present new works conceived specifically for Joffrey Texas alongside excerpts from the ballets of Joffrey and Arpino. Of particular note is a collaborative piece co-created by guest artistic director Joshua Peugh and the participants in this year’s workshop, in which they devised the choreography from the ground up “based on a vocabulary that they created together,” Villanueva says. Additionally, artistic director Katie Cooper, L.A.-based composer Nick Norton and Villanueva collaborated on a brand-new piece of music and dance that will premiere at the showcase. Other performances include excerpts from Joffrey’s Gamelan, a ballet inspired by haiku, and Arpino’s Kettentanz, which evokes the atmosphere of old Vienna balls, as well as pieces choreographed by Orio, Singleton and Villanueva.

Find more arts coverage every day at sacurrent.com

sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com


Boundaries is an all-tooobvious dysfunctional family dramedy BY KIKO MARTINEZ

I

t’s nothing new in cinema when an eccentric old man is put in a car and dragged across a few states while he attempts to make a meaningful connection with another person in the vehicle. What better way to learn about someone than to spend a few days on the road together? Actors Bruce Dern and Will Forte do it exceptionally well as a father and son traveling to claim a million-dollar sweepstakes prize in Alexander Payne’s bittersweet 2015 film Nebraska. Alan Arkin won an Oscar for playing a heroine-addicted grandfather on an adventure with his dysfunctional family in 2006’s Little Miss Sunshine. With enough screen time, a sharpminded senior citizen can usually impart some life lessons and words of wisdom for

Sony Pictures Classics

those willing enough to accept it. Laura Jaconi (Vera Farmiga) is not, in fact, one of those characters. She’s not interested in anyone stepping into her lane, especially if that someone is her estranged 85-year-old father Jack (Christopher Plummer). When Jack is kicked out of his retirement home for growing weed, she has two options: let him move in with her and her rebellious teenage son Henry (Lewis MacDougall), or put him on a plane to Los Angeles to live with her younger sister JoJo (Kristen Schaal). She chooses option two, but consents to making the drive from Seattle to L.A. when her father agrees to pay for Henry’s private school. Jack, however, has ulterior motives. With $200,000 worth of weed in the trunk of his vintage Rolls Royce, he recruits his grandson to help him unload the product

Corporate Animals

Sorry to Bother You depicts the pursuit of self-interests as an effed-up fever dream

screens

Road to Nowhere

during their trip down the West Coast, which includes a stop to meet Jack’s old friend Stanley (Christopher Lloyd) and Henry’s loser father Leonard (Bobby Cannavale). While some complex themes like abandonment and redemption are touched upon lightly, there’s not much room for anything else to breathe with Farmiga’s exaggeratedly neurotic character overshadowing some of the more interesting relationships that should’ve been given top billing. Farmiga’s performance, in itself, is not bad, but Laura’ character is cliché, obvious and far from nuanced. She is an animal lover who takes in every single stray dog that she finds, a metaphor for the trauma she’s experienced throughout her life with an absent father. Even then, Boundaries writer/director Shana Feste (Country Strong) never explores the troubled dynamic between father and daughter. We’re told Jack was a less-than-stellar dad — and we definitely see the effects of the flawed upbringing in Laura’s personality — but Feste fails to get to the heart of the issue. By the end, no one has grown emotionally or identified the root of the problem or learned anything about themselves or the people they love. Sadly, closure only happens because the credits start to roll.

BY KIKO MARTINEZ

E

mbrace the absurdity. That’s the best advice anyone could give moviegoers who walk into the bizarre, dark comedy Sorry to Bother You, written and directed by rapper Boots Riley. It’s one of the most original films you’ll likely see all year, which, depending on your threshold for certifiably crazy storylines, could be a rewarding experience or one that frustrates you. STBY is really an indie movie told in three substantially different acts, all of which progress (or digress, if you refuse to go along for the ride) into a stranger narrative than the one before. To begin, we’re introduced to Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield), a young black man desperate to find a job and move himself and his girlfriend Detroit (Tessa Thompson) out of his uncle’s garage apartment. He gets the opportunity to climb the corporate ladder when he takes a job with a sketchy telemarketing corporation that promises him a bright and prosperous future if he is able to work his way up and become

one of their elite “power callers.” With a promotion comes the opportunity to rub elbows with Steve Lift (Armie Hammer), the coke-snorting CEO of a controversial company that profits from slave labor. The first act is clever and funny as we watch Cassius make sales calls and transport into the houses of the people he is trying to pitch. It’s an inventive way to show the intrusive nature of Cassius’ position and how little power he wields as an insignificant voice behind a telephone. Cassius starts to get the hang of it, however, when a veteran coworker (Danny Glover) advises him to use his “white voice” when speaking to customers. The trick works, and Cassius skyrockets to the top floor, to the frustration of his co-workers who hoped he would support their efforts to unionize so they could demand higher pay and benefits. Seen as a sell-out — a theme Riley also explores with Detroit, an aspiring performance artist — Cassius pursues his capitalistic self-interest, which leads him to the discovery of

Annapurna Pictures

what “power callers” are actually selling their clients, and calls into question Cassius’ own sense of moral responsibility. Riley piles on the surreal, politically charged metaphors and satirical scenes at a frenetic rate, so if you keep up, you’ll probably enjoy most of the insanity. It’s the third act of STBY that’ll certainly be the defining moment for viewers who are on the fence about whether Riley lets his sometimes unfocused ambition as a first-time filmmaker get the best of him. What STBY has going for it in these final scenes is that it never loses its identity as a bat-shit ridiculous concept that doesn’t take itself the least bit seriously. If anything, it’s refreshing to know there are creators bold enough to attempt something so risky and anarchic.

Find more film stories at sacurrent.com


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food

Tenko Ramen 312 Pearl Pkwy., Building 6, 6112, (210) 267-2996, tenkoramen.com

Jess Elizarraras

THE BIG SPOON

Food Costs Money Ramen Edition BY JESS ELIZARRARAS

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ine years after lauded chef David Chang opened Momofuku in New York City’s Bowery neighborhood, San Antonio was blessed with its first honest-to-goodness noodle shop. There had been chances to try ramen previously, of course. Fujiya had ramen on their menu

long before then, as did Niki’s Tokyo Inn, and home cooks could visit Tokyo Mart for their ramen-making needs. But the ramen craze truly hit San Antonio in 2013 with the opening of Kimura, chef Michael Sohocki’s second restaurant on Pecan Street. The James Beard semifinalist had billed the restaurant as a noodle shop with handmade noodles, but the slurpin’ fervor was fierce and long wait times led to a temporary shut down so the staff could keep their heads above (boiling) water. The Granary’s bowl o’ noodles followed, as did Hot Joy’s ramen offering in 2014. In 2018, ramen can be found in just about every quarter of the city. There’s Wild Goji on Blanco and 410; Suck It The Restaurant off Louis Pasteur in the Medical Center; Nama Ramen holds court off Babcock and DeZavala; Ito Ramen packs in noodle lovers on Blanco and

There’s an 18-hour process that goes into every bowl of ramen at Tenko.

M

West; and the noodles stretch all the way to Selma, where Ginza Ramen and Poke recently opened. And there’s Tenko Ramen inside the Pearl’s Bottling Department Food Hall, which celebrates its first year of business this week. Tenko, named after a mythical multi-tailed fox and owned by business partners Jennifer Dobbertin and chef Quealy Watson started out as a pop-up in September 2016. Watson’s reputation as opening chef at Hot Joy preceded him and the turn-out for the weekly pop-ups was jaw-dropping. Imagine several hundred noodle lovers patiently waiting to score a bowl. But the general San Antonio public didn’t have to imagine for long 33 6

when san antonio meets spain

Find more food & drink news at sacurrent.com

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food

Jess Elizarraras

Jess Elizarraras

From left: The staff at Tenko prepares broth by blanching pigs feet. Chef Quealy Watson breaks down pork femurs before they’re simmered for 18 hours.

M

6 31 because when Tenko opened inside the Bottling Department, the lines were almost as long. And so in the dead heat of summer in South Texas, Tenko opened to tons of fans that ranged from noodle newbs to ramen professors ready to espouse on Tenko’s authenticity or lack thereof. Still, the biggest criticism that ramen shops draw is based on their price. Now, James Beard-award winner Chang can charge whatever he wants for his NYC noodles. The going rate is the high teens ($18) for lunchtime pork ramen with pork belly, pork shoulder and a poached egg. So it’s awkward when a $10 bowl of Tokyo shoyu at Tenko (or really any local ramen shop) gets hit with comments like “The food is expensive and over hyped,” “The reason for 4 stars is that it’s really expensive, and finding a seat is a nightmare,” “I also think it was a little expensive at $10 for the portion size that you receive,” “Expensive too, especially if you’re throwing it away,” “Tenko Ramen was fairly priced; however, the quality of the ramen wasn’t worth the price,” “It was way over priced for its quality,” “Prices weren’t up to the quality unfortunately, but I guess that’s the cost of convenience?,” “But the ramen is only average for an above average price,” “I thought for the price it didn’t come with a whole lot.” And that’s just a small selection from Yelp. Yes, add-ons range from 50 cents for menma (fermented bamboo shoots) and sesame garlic paste to $3.50 for chashu

pork, but the prices are on par with what’s available in San Antonio. Kimura’s prices start at $8 for miso, and go up to $14 for pork belly-topped tonkotsu; Nama keeps everyone happy with $9.75 shoyu and $10.50 spicy miso; Wild Goji hovers at $12 and $13; Ito’s bowls are priced between $10.99 and $12.99. “One of the questions we get most often is, ‘What ramen should I order that will taste like my Cup of Noodles?’” Dobbertin said. This isn’t your dorm room. This isn’t Cup of Noodles. So it stands to reason that prices will reflect that. Earlier this year, when I spoke to Dobbertin about the promotions restaurants set up to draw in customers (like the Bottling Department’s day-long happy hour on Mondays), she shared labor costs are what takes up a sizable portion of Tenko’s budget. “We pay our staff a living wage that’s above market, and ramen is priced based on San Antonio and Austin and where we can stay open,” Dobbertin said. For Watson, the labor costs (which sit just under 40 percent) mean Tenko doesn’t have to streamline production all the way down to the broth. This means the unctuousness comes from the broken down femurs that are sledgehammered to produce that rich marrow. This means production is a 24-hour process. An overnight crew (one on weekdays, two on weekends) clocks in at 9 p.m. and works through 5 a.m. cutting green onions, pickling mushrooms, prepping tares, peeling hardboiled eggs, making

sauces and cleaning before the morning crew checks in at 8 a.m. I shadowed the morning crew this past Thursday as they worked their way throughout the small Tenko kitchen (roughly 96 square feet). Laura Limon and Loy Smoak finished off the broths with ginger, onions and apples; drained the massive pots into 22-quart plastic bins; scrubbed the pots and started on the broths for the following day by noon. Eggs are cut, chicken is fried, chasu is

The broth is finished by adding ginger, onions and apples, and is drained into 22-quart containers for service.

L

pulled off the sous vide machine and sliced — all while working the line as orders come in. By 4 p.m. the night crew rolls in to finish the chasu, clean and start the process all over again. Because of Tenko’s processes, they’re the only restaurant in the food hall to have a staff member on-site throughout the day. If it’s a good week, labor evens out to the usual 25 to 30 percent. A slow week (see: rain or extreme heat) could mean a hike of up to 10 percent in labor costs and, as Dobbertin puts it, “We just can’t fire three employees.” Comparing San Antonio shops to ramen shops in Japan is silly. This isn’t to argue authenticity, but labor and food costs can be lowered when most Japanese shops only make one or two broths. Americans love their options: vegan, chicken-only, and Tenko’s also considering adding gluten-free zucchini noodles to the mix. When trying to price out a ramen, it’s worth noting that flash frozen noodles cost 62 cents a pop (collectively, Tenko has spent $40,000 on noodles alone this year), and a staff member is tasked with unfurling the noodles, heating and shaping them into a picture-perfect swirl. That’s when the pasta boiler isn’t broken. “We just spent $500 servicing it,” Dobbertin said. “It costs money to run a restaurant.” But in Yelp/Facebook/Google pages across the city, price will continue to come up in regards to ramen. At last year’s Ramen Expo in Austin (the event is heading to Dallas this October), several Japanese producers lined a small convention center on the outskirts of town with all manner of bowls, chop sticks, clayware, and pre-made foods that would essentially streamline any ramen shop with broth concentrates and manufactured tare. The results are similar, but the 18-hour process at Tenko, at Kimura, at Ito and at the ramen shops across town serve to create comforting bowls of rich broth, and we shouldn’t want these owners to trim costs for the benefit of our bank accounts. “We’re not rolling in ramen money and laughing all the way to the bank because we’re giving you instant noodles,” Dobbertin said. And they shouldn’t have to cheapen their process for San Antonio diners to stop bemoaning the price.

Contact the author: flavor@sacurrent.com

,

sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

33


Tejano artist Willie Cantu & Estela Cantu invite you to

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food | nightlife COCKTAIL OF THE WEEK

Lowcountry’s The Good Neighbor BY ERIN WINCH

A Erin Winch

HAUTE DINNERS

Beer, wine and spirit dinners to check out this month BY JESS ELIZARRARAS Bourbon Dinner // Dayton A. Vause will team up with Rebelle for a bourbon dinner featuring Garrison Brothers smallbatch, single-barrel and Balmorhea bourbon on July 19 from 7 to 10 p.m. The four-course dinner will feature a deviled egg stuffed with smoked Artic char, trout caviar and furikake, poached oyster panade with spinach, bacon and horseradish cream, pastrami-crusted lamb rib and and Old Fashioned panna cotta. $90, 300 E. Travis St., (210) 352-3171. Saint Arnold Dinner // Four courses and lots of Saint Arnold Brews to pair

with flavors from Stella Public House are what’s in store on July 19 from 7 to 10 p.m. $50, 1414 S. Alamo St., (210) 277-7047. Craft Cocktail Dinner // Hanzo will host a three-course craft cocktail dinner with oxygen pairings on July 21 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The menu includes tuna tartare, snapper ceviche and cured salmon cucumber bites. $50, 7701 Broadway, Suite 124, (210) 826-1488, tickets here. Blues @ Bending Branch // Bending Branch Winery hosts the Peterson Brothers, led by Glenn Jr. and Alex Peterson, for a night of old school blues, soul and funk. Take your dancing shoes and chairs. The event will feature wine specials and food trucks including Conchita’s, Firehouse Fare, Burned Out Pizza & Gyros and Lani’s Cheesecakes and Coffehouse. $10 (kids under 12), $20 (13 and over) and $25 at the door, $5:30pm, 142 Lindner Branch Road, Comfort, (830) 995-2948; tickets through eventbrite.com. Summer Guest Chef Series // The Granary continues its summer-long chef series with chef BJ Dennis of Charleston, South Carolina. After cooking at Anson’s, Carolinas, Hank’s Seafood and

couple of weeks into June, Lowcountry released their new summer menu, and while every drink on it is a hit, there’s one that stands out. The Good Neighbor is a beautifully crafted drink combining whiskey, sherry, lemon, cucumber and Chareau, the aloe vera liqueur that we’ve been hearing about. The cocktail is not only railing against the summer stereotype that only gin, vodka and other clear spirits can be on a drink menu, it also unites two ingredients that you don’t typically find with one another – whiskey and cucumber. “I wanted something that was different,” said Denise De Glopper, bar manager at Lowcountry and creator of the drink. “I had wanted to do something

with cucumber and whiskey for a long time now but the two ingredients are hard to marry. Then I tried the Chareau and it just made sense.” The addition of the aloe liqueur subtly introduces that cucumber flavor profile and compliments the whiskey. The lemon completes the cocktail and instills that refreshing note that is essential in a summer tipple. With three liquors in it, this drink is a strong one, perfect for sipping and savoring. It’s not a bad price either, $9 during regular business hours and $7 during happy hour, which runs Monday through Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. Erin Winch writes about boozin’ in the Alamo City on her blog Drinking In SA. 318 Martinez St., (210) 214-4257.

82 Queen, Dennis now serves up cuisine inspired by his knowledge of the Gullah Geechee culture and its West African origins. He joins chef Tim Rattray for a Southern Potluck Takeover on Sunday, July 22 at 6:30 p.m. $85, 602 Avenue A, (210) 228-0124, thegranarysa.com. Cocktail Scavenger Hunt // Traipse through the San Antonio Botanical Garden during its monthly cocktail hunt. This self-guided photo hunt tasks participants with finding cocktail ingredients, snapping photos and presenting them to the bartender on hand. $20, 12:30pm, 555 Funston Pl., (210) 536-1400, sabot.org. Onward + Farmstrong Wine Dinner // Castle Hills’ Clementine will host Faith Farmstrong of Napa Valley for a fivecourse wine dinner on Tuesday, July 24, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Onward wines are single-vineyard, site-driven wines and Farmstrong Wines are blends. Guests will get a chance to taste both labels as paired with a menu by John and Elise Russ. $125, 2195 NW Military Hwy., (210) 503-5121, clementine-sa.com. Peggy’s and Justin // Peggy’s on the

Keely Laughlin

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Green welcomes Justin Vineyard and Landmark wines for a six-course dinner on July 25. The menu includes locally grown heirloom tomato salad, spicy Jamaican jerk scallops, smoked pork belly burnt ends and mesquite grilled ribeye. $125, 6:30p m,128 W. Blanco Road, Boerne, (830) 572-5000, peggysonthegreen.com. sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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music Chuff Media

5 Acts You Need To See at This Year’s Float Fest in San Marcos BY CHRIS CONDE

E

arlier this year, the folks behind Float Fest, which is back for its fifth year, announced a S-T-A-C-K-E-D bill. It is their best-looking lineup since the inaugural event. However, before the lineup was announced, the festival came into some problems with permits – something that Float Fest isn’t exactly new to. Current Events LLC and Guadalupe County Commissioners Court couldn’t see eye-to-eye on the capacity for the event, but eventually came to the agreement on 20,000 guests. The original request for 30,000 guests was denied back in February. With all the logistics worked out, and to get you prepared for a weekend (Saturday, July 21, and Sunday, July 22) of tubing, camping and live-music shenanigans, we’ve picked 5 acts you absolutely need to throw in your itinerary.

Run The Jewels 5 Saturday, 10:15-11:30pm Sun Stage If you’ve been paying attention to the underground alternative hip-hop scene the last couple decades, then you’ve most likely heard of the producer/rapper and former Definitive Jux label owner El-P. The Brooklyn-born artist has produced an enormous catalog of music for himself and other artists, including his biggest effort yet, Run The Jewels. Shoulder-to-shoulder with rapper Killer Mike, who manages to match conscious hip-hop with raw rap, Run The Jewels might be a more iconic duo than peanut butter and jelly. Lil Wayne Saturday, 7:45-9pm Sun Stage What can be said about Lil Wayne that we

Tame Impala playing the Water Stage on Sunday at 9:30-11pm

L

haven’t already heard? Dude’s been in the game since he was a little kid, pumped out a grip of hits, might have an addiction to liquid hydrocodone (lean) and we’re all still waiting for The Carter V to come out (which apparently is closer to coming out than ever). But even through the multiple seizures, legal battles and controversial stance with the Black Lives Matter movement, his music still bangs. It’s no surprise he’s a headliner. 38 6

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6 37 Com Truise 5 Saturday, 3:45-4:30pm Water Stage You know that dark progressive synth track that opens the Netflix show Stranger Things? Yeah, you know the one. Anyway, though that song was written by dudes from S U R V I V E, their music is very similar to electronic producer Com Truise. So much so, in fact, that I thought it was Com Truise who produced the music for the show. Anyway, if you love ‘80s synth textures that soar into poppy melodious bliss before plunging into haunting, dark corridors, you’re not going to want to miss this dude.

listeners through swirling landscapes of kaleidoscopic experiences.

Tame Impala Sunday, 9:30-11pm Water Stage The first time I heard Tame Impala’s “Feels Like We Only Go Backwards,” I knew that I had greatly underestimated this band that I had previously disregarded as basic, hipster trash. Listening to more of the Australian frontman Kevin Parker’s sounds, I knew this band was an important asset to the indie music world as a whole. If you’re unfamiliar with their tunes, Tame Impala writes pop music for indie kids essentially. Warm textures with synth pop tones punctuate his tracks as Parker’s honey-tenor vocals pull

Snoop Dogg L Sunday, 7:-8:15 pm Water Stage When Float Fest announced that Snoop Dogg was headlining, we threw deuces to the gods of weed and bumped “Gin And Juice” in the office ’til, well, the song was over. Since 1993, the rapper and pop culture icon has released thirteen albums (his first one being Doggystyle, which debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart and sold over 800,000 copies in the first week – damn), collaborated with pretty much anyone who’s worth collaborating with, and arguably taught us all how to smoke weed.

Ghostly International


music | music Picks WAX IDOLS + SRSQ Thursday, July 19 Four-piece post-punk act Wax Idols from Oakland, Calif., will be bringing their reinvented aesthetic of full-fledged introspective gothic ballads to the Paper Tiger. Their latest album, Happy Ending, is chockfull of dark-wave baselines, heavy drums and propulsive melodic melodrama. Lead vocalist and songwriter Hether Fortune serves as a frantic, dreamlike lighthouse as you listen, guiding you through the album’s core pilgrimage – the confrontation with death from every angle. Her voice is triumphant and elongated. Robert Smith, the devastatingly gloomy goth forefather who made Disintegration happen (arguably The Cure’s best album) would be proud. The band will open to SRSQ, a textured, hazy and ethereal breakaway project from Kennedy Ashlyn, the vocalist of the Bay Area’s Them Are Us Too. $8-10, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Marys St., papertigersatx.com. – Camille Sauers

Force Field PR

DESTROYER OF LIGHT Thursday, July 19

Slow-moving, gloomy, stoner power metal, Destroyer of Light would be playing the literal ending of the world as stars exploded and the earth folded into itself in an exhalation of flames and tidal waves. Yeah, their music is pretty epic shit, and if you dig the sound of fellow Austin stoner rockers The Sword, you’re gonna need to get down to the Mix to see these dudes. 8pm, The Mix, 2423 N. St Mary’s St., (210) 735-1313, themixsa.com. – Chris Conde

AMERICAN IDOL LIVE q Friday, July 20

American Idol, on the heels of this season’s finale, is taking the tears, standing ovations and overcoming-adversity stories on the road this summer. Luckily for

you, San Antonio made the list of stops. The Friday night show will feature this season’s most gifted finalists, including Cade Foehner, Caleb Lee Hutchinson, Catie Turner, Gabby Barrett, Jurnee, Maddie Poppe and Michael J. Woorard. The Idol extravaganza will be hosted by the stubbly season 8 winner and “Live Like We’re Dying” singer Kris Allen. It will be cathartic and fun, plus this is your chance to breathe the same air and observe firsthand how both savage and warm Lionel Richie, Luke Bryan and Katy Perry can be. Unfortunately, SA’s own Ada Vox will not be there since she was eliminated after making the top 10. In the slightly modified immortal words of inaugural judge Randy Jackson – this show’s gonna be a yes from us, dawg. $35-75, 7pm, Tobin Center for Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle, tobincenter. org. – Camille Sauers

David McClister Photo

FUTUREBIRDS L Thursday, July 19

In keeping with The Rustic’s confounding tradition of bringing damn fine acts to a lame-ass part of town, Futurebirds will be at said venue this week. The Athens, Ga., outfit, beloved on the alt-country scene since the release of its debut album Hampton’s Lullaby in 2010, is definitely a band that you’ll wanna catch live. Bringing indie rock playfulness and an ethereal mood to bear on tunes that default to a country-rock/ alt-Americana style, Futurebirds are

soulful and magnetically emotive in their sound. Sure, this is roots music – but the roots are finely manicured, to say the least. In the live setting, like any self-respecting country crew, Futurebirds dials up the honky-tonk, but without losing any of the pristine quality that its music manages on record. For the uninitiated, let me put it like this: Futurebirds are like the crazy combination of Fleet Foxes and DriveBy Truckers that you never knew you always wanted. Free with RSVP, 8:30pm, The Rustic, 17619 La Cantera Pkwy Ste. 204, therustic.com. – James Courtney sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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music | music Picks

tence, Trivium did both. The band still traffics in whiplash tempos, life-is-pain screams and surgically precise riffing, but it also benefits from melody and nuance. Singer Matt Heafy’s clean vocals have a confidence and maturity that prevent them from sounding like a cutand-paste afterthought — something a lot of other metal bands could learn from. If nothing else, it should be fun to see these guys execute some of the most challenging material of their career live. $20-$119, Fri Jul 20, 6pm, Alamo City Music Hall, 1305 E Houston St., alamocitymusichall.com. – Sanford Nowlin

TV GIRL L

Sunday, July 22 Jimmy Fontaine

THEORY OF A DEADMAN L Friday, July 20

The first act to sign with Nickelback’s Chad Kroeger’s 604 Records imprint in 2001, Theory of a Deadman has pretty much carried the torch of ’90s alternative rock in the vein of, well, Nickelback. And even though they haven’t really done much to contribute to the genre, they do what they do well, which secured them a Juno Award for best new group in 2003 and got them eight Top 10 hits on the US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, includ-

ing three No. 1 hits – “Bad Girlfriend”, “Lowlife” and “Rx (Medicate)”. $27, 7pm, The Aztec Theatre, 104 N. St. Mary’s St., theaztectheatre.com. – CC

THE SPITS p Friday, July 20

This bill is pure, unadulterated punk fuck all. The Spits, a low-key punk legend from Michigan, is a seasoned garage punk act that makes fast, dirty and gloriously sloppy racket that incorporates psychedelic flourishes, synthesizers and belligerent lyrics to outsized effect. The Spits, underground stal-

warts since 2000, will be joined on this bill by likeminded Houston band The Cops, which plays aggressive and fuzzy punk rock that, as the name suggests, frequently critiques law enforcement. By presenting, in first person, a slimy and corrupt cop character in its lyrics, The Cops make music that feels dark as fuck, if only because it feels so close to the truth. Check out the band’s 2017 release First Offense at artificialheadrecords.bandcamp.com. Local punk crew Murdered Out will round out this gnarly bill. $15, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – JC

TRIVIUM + FIT FOR AN AUTOPSY + BAD OMENS 5 Friday, July 20

Ground Control Touring

Over the course of eight full-length albums and nearly 20 years as a band, Trivium has strayed from the straightahead metalcore of its early days. Some fans may have written the band off like bad debt, but plenty stayed along for the ride as it veered into a more accessible sound. And recent album sales suggest plenty of new ones were happy to jump on board. Truth is, accessibility isn’t a terrible thing if it means writing better songs and stretching at the boundaries of extreme metal. And on last year’s lauded The Sin and the Sen-

TV Girl sounds like a French record shop in Los Angeles got swallowed by a toy beat machine, which then got played by a guy on acid who loves indie rock, hip-hop and disco in equal measure. The (almost always) solo project of LA-based producer/musician Brad Petering, TV Girl has managed to keep that nostalgic and groovetastic kind of magic alive over the course of a surprising number of albums, going back to 2010. Petering has a special knack in his production for creating lackadaisical, wispy, and dreamy atmospheres, building samples and beats into hypnotic patterns and layering washed-out vocals. His music is consistently interesting and always dancefloor ready, as long as the dancefloor’s not looking to wove too fast. Dig tvgirl.bandcamp. com for the whole TV Girl catalog, including this year’s rad Death of a Party Girl LP. $12, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – JC

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sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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music | calendar WEDNESDAY, JULY 18 The Adam Carrillo Quartet The quartet includes Adam Carrillo, Chris Villanueva on piano, Mike Porter on bass and Brandon Guerra on drums. Free. Jazz, TX, 5:30-7:30pm. Chris Cuevas Project Adriel Cuevas, Zeke Galvan and Chris Villanuev of the Chris Cuevas Project will perform blues, soul, and jazz. Free. Sancho’s Cantina, 6:308:30pm. Mitch Webb & The Swindles This local Americana band, Mitch Webb & the Swindles, is performing live at Sam’s Burger Joint. Free. Sam’s Burger Joint, 8pm. Ruben V Join Ruben V for an intimate rock and blues performance. Free. Sancho’s Cantina, 9-11pm.

THURSDAY, JULY 19 The Blues Lawyer The band will perform covers from Clapton, BB King, Muddy Waters and others. Free. Hidden Tavern, 8-10pm. Knockin’ Chucks and Sketchy Trench Local punk bands, Knockin’ Chucks and Sketchy Trench, are performing live at Limelight for the start of their Midwest tour. Limelight, 9pm-2am. Salsa Night Jose Amador, band leader and congas, Richie Vega, musical director and trombone, Curtis Calderon on trumpet, Rogelio Escobar on Sax, Raul Questel on bass, Frank Cano on piano, Gabriel Garcia on bongos/percussion, Mike Baez on drums, Anthony Ibañez on lead vocals and Juan Padin on percussion and background vocals. $10. Jazz, TX, 8:30-11:30pm. Tres Honchos Sancho’s Cantina is hosting Claude Butch Morgan, Robar Adams and Trevor Doak Morgan of the Bandaholics. The band is set to perform regularly on Thursdays. Free. Sancho’s Cantina, 7pm.

FRIDAY, JULY 20 The Aaron Prada Trio Pianist Aaron Prado, bassist George Prado and drummer Brandon Guerra explore the jazz movement from swing classics to boleros, bebop to European avant garde. $5. Jazz, TX, 5:30-7:30pm. Jose Armadillo Roadshow The David Lee and Jose Armadillo Roadshow will feature the work of several award-winning country music singer-songwriters. The show’s headliners include Davin James, Kevin Denny and David Lee $25-$45. The Roundup Outdoor Music Venue, 6-10pm. Balcones Heights Jazz Festival Diverse headliners from across the country take

the stage at the 25th annual Balcones Heights Jazz Festival. This free festival celebrates jazz in and around Texas and brings together jazz lovers for a month of live and entertaining concerts. Free. Wonderland of the Americas, 7-10pm. Cody Canada & The Departed Canadian country-rock group Cody Canada & the Departed is performing live at Floore’s Country Store. $18. John T Floore’s Country Store, 9pm. Jordi Baizan and Terri Klein Folk musician Jordi Baizan is a first-generation American and native Texan songwriter. His work has been recognized by the Grassy Hill Kerrville New Folk Songwriting Competition and the Songwriter Serenade Competition. Special guest includes Austin country musician Terry Klein. $15. The Impact Guild, 7-9:30pm. Maryann Cotton - Murder World Tour 2018 Maryann Cotton is a Danish/ American shock rock singer who was discovered by the legendary producer and songwriter Dick Wagner from Aerosmith, Kiss, and more. Cotton is considered “The Prince Of Shock Rock” and, with energetic live performances, he has garnered plenty of positive publicity around the world. $10. Fitzgerald’s Bar & Live Music Venue, 8pm-2am. Mike Ryan Country singer-songwriter and guitarist from San Antonio. He has released two studio albums and one EP. After touring regionally, he released an EP The First One in 2010 and his debut studio album Night Comes Falling in 2012. He then signed a publishing contract with Sea Gayle Music and released his second studio album Bad Reputation in 2014. $10-$20. Cowboys Dancehall, 7pm. New Orleans Night - Doc Watkins and Pierre Poree South Texas jazz musician Doc Watkins is joined Pierre Poree of New Orleans and friends to perform live. Jazz, TX, 8:30-11:30pm. Pink Hawks with Corazon De Nopal Afrobeat/Chicano hip-hop orchestra, playing original and future-traditional dance music. Your body, mind and soul will thank you later. La Botánica, 9 p.m.-midnight. The Please Help Pop-rock band The Please Help will be performing their newest singles. Ventura, 8pm-2am. The Remedies Reggae band The Remedies are performing live at the Rock Box with special guest DJ Bace Boose. $7-$10. The Rock Box, 8pm-2 am. The Rock & Hip-Hop Summer Top Off The Melt Down comes to Imagine Books and Records with performances by Bushidist, The Milk Theory, The Romance Club,

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music | calendar Andria Rose, Black Domino and Pack Static. $5. Imagine Books and Records, 8pm. Will Hoge Americana country music singer, songwriter and musician from Nashville, Tennessee. $12-$60. Sam’s Burger Joint, 9pm.

SATURDAY, JULY 21 Acoustic Night with Claudine Meinhardt Acoustic set with Claudine Meinhardt at the Cove. The Cove, 6:30-8:30pm. Beach Fossils American indie rock band from Brooklyn, New York, formed in 2009. The group includes Dustin Payseur, Jack Doyle Smith and Tommy Davidson. They are known for their lo-fi, atmospheric sound and Payseur’s vocal style. $16. Paper Tiger, 8pm. Chavela A night of local, rising musicians with performances by Chavela, Dream Place, Calendar Days, Harper Rye of Die and Jaeleenarianna. $5. Imagine Books and Records, 8pm. The Doc Watkins Orchestra South Texas jazz musician Doc Watkins will perform classical, jazz, blues and Texas swing. Jazz, TX, 8:30-11:30pm. The Doc Watkins Trio South Texas jazz musician Doc Watkins will perform classical, jazz, blues and Texas swing. $10. Jazz, TX, 5:30-7:30pm. Dorothy Dorothy Martin, singer/songwriter and namesake of the Los Angeles rock band Dorothy, takes the microphone and goes into full rock star mode. $17$100. Sam’s Burger Joint, 9pm. Fea Mixing humor with abandon and English with Spanish, Fea explores current societal, cultural and gender-related issues in their songs. $7. Paper Tiger, 8pm-midnight Folk Uke and Garrett T. Capps Folk Uke, the Austin-based duo of Cathy Guthrie and Amy Nelson, is celebrating 20 years in the music industry that began with a friendship between the 2 daughters of legendary musical fathers Willie Nelson and Arlo Guthrie. The Folk duo’s music has been featured on Netflix’s ‘Orange is the New Black’ and even have a holiday named after them in Austin. The Period Modern’s concert will also include local rock and soul musician Garrett T. Capps. $12-$15. Period Modern, 7pm. Noche Azul de Esperanza: Noche Bohemia Join the Esperanza Peace & Justice Center for their monthly Noche Azul concert. This month, Azul introduces a new miniseries within Noche Azul called Noche Bohemia. Noche Azul showcases traditional Mexican songs while highlighting the cultural influences and interconnections between Latin America,

Spain and Mexico. $7. Esperanza Peace & Justice Center, 8-10pm. Peterson Brother Concert The band combines youthful and modern influences from old-school blues, soul and funk to a create a sound that is uniquely their own. The event will have wine specials and food trucks. $20-$25. Bending Branch Winery, 6-9pm. Ziggy Stardust with Ronnie Heart The Rustic is partnering with the Current for a live David Bowie tribute concert by Ziggy Stardust. Ronnie Heart will be performing some of the top hit songs from Bowie’s extensive musical career. Free. The Rustic, 8-11pm. Twelve Years Driven Houston rock band Twelve Years Driven headlines an allstar cast at Fitzgerald’s, which includes SA natives Kingdom Collapse, Deathdodger, Last Battle and more. $7-$10. Fitzgerald’s Bar & Live Music Venue, 8pm-2am. Tyler Childers Kentucky singer-songwriter, Tyler Childers, is performing live at Floore’s Country Store. His country album Purgatory was co-produced by Grammy Award winners Sturgill Simpson and David Ferguson. $17-$300. John T Floore’s Country Store, 9pm.

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SUNDAY, JULY 22 Salsa Japanese rock band Salsa is performing live at Imagine Books and Records. Local support include indie rock group St. Dukes and more. $5. Imagine Books and Records, 8pm-midnight

MONDAY, JULY 23 2018 Carver Summer DJ Camp At the heart of the AM Project approach is teaching young people how to work as DJs. The best DJs and artists know how to research, think critically, apply mathematical concepts and engage the creative and analytic portions of their brains. These are skills creative young people can use in the DJ booth, in the classroom and in the business world. $135. Carver Community Cultural Center, -27, 8:30am-4pm. Void Vator Heavy hard rock band out of Los Angeles, California. Lucas Kanopa (vocals/guitar) and German Moura (drums) visited Los Angeles from their native country of Uruguay to attend the NAMM show in winter of 2013, and immediately fell in love with the rock culture of the city. Free. The Mix, 8pm-2am.

TUESDAY, JULY 24 Sotomayor Lain American electronica group Sotomayor is performing live at the Paper Tiger. $17. Paper Tiger, 8pm.

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sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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Connections I’m a 20-year-old submissive woman. I’m currently in a confusing affair with a 50-year-old dominant married man. He lives in Europe and has two kids close to my age. We met online when I was 17 and starting to explore my BDSM desires – out of the reach of my overbearing, sex-shaming, disastrously religious parents – and we’ve been texting daily ever since. We’ve since met in different countries and spent a total of three weeks together. Those weeks were amazing, both sexually and emotionally, and he says he loves me. (Some will assume, because of the age difference, that he “groomed” me. He did not.) I date vanilla boys my age, with his full support, while we continue to text daily. I don’t know what to do. I don’t want to blow up his family if (or when) our affair is discovered. But at the same time, our relationship has really helped me navigate my kinks and my sexuality. Expecting him to leave his wife for me is a highly unrealistic cliché, I am aware. Yet I fear I’ve become dependent on his conversation and advice. I’m graduating soon and have a big job lined up in a big city. I’ll finally be financially independent, and I’d like to start making the right choices. Any perspective you have would be much appreciated. Things Must Improve He is not going to leave his wife for you, and you shouldn’t assume his wife is going to leave him if (or when) this affair is discovered (or exposed). Divorce may be the default setting in the United States in the wake of an affair, TMI, but Europeans take a much more, well, European attitude toward infidelity. Definitely not cricket, not necessarily fatal. And you don’t need him to leave his wife for you, TMI. Okay, okay—you’re in love, and the three weeks you’ve managed to spend together were amazing. But don’t fall into the trap of believing a romantic relationship requires a tidy ending; film, television and literature beat it into our heads that romantic relationships end either happily at the altar (à la Pride and Prejudice) or tragically at the morgue (à la Forensic Files). But romantic relationships take many forms, TMI, as does romantic success. And this relationship, such as it is, this relationship as-is, sounds like an ongoing success. In other words, TMI, I think you’re confused about this relationship because there won’t be a resolution that fits into a familiar mold. But you don’t need a resolution: You can continue to text with him, and he can continue to provide you with his advice and support while

you continue to date single, available and kinky men (no more vanilla boys!) closer to your own age and/or on your own continent. Eventually you’ll meet a new guy you’re crazy about – someone you can see for more than one week a year – and you’ll feel less dependent on and connected to your old flame. While on vacation, I went for a full body massage. The first half of the massage – me on my stomach – was great. When the masseuse asked me to flip on my back, things took a turn. She uncovered one of my legs and began massaging my thigh. As she worked on my inner thigh, her finger grazed my scrotum. Then it happened again. And again. She was working on my thigh, but it felt like I was getting my balls caressed. I began to worry I was getting a visible erection. Then I started to panic when I felt like I might actually come. (I have always had issues with premature ejaculation.) I tried hard to clamp down and think about baseball and senior citizens, but I wound up having an orgasm. She eventually moved to my arms, shoulders, etc., but meanwhile I’m lying there with jizz cooling on myself. Am I guilty of #metoo bad behavior? Should I have said something or asked her to stop? Is it possible she didn’t have any clue? (My penis was never uncovered and I didn’t create an obvious wet spot on the sheet.) I tipped her extra, just in case she was mortified, though I didn’t get the sense she was because nothing changed after I came in terms of her massaging me. (She didn’t hurry away from my legs or rush to finish my massage.) I still feel really weird about the whole thing. I get massages frequently, this has never happened before, and I certainly didn’t go into it looking for this result. Lost Opportunity At De-escalation If it all went down as you described, LOAD, you aren’t guilty of “#metoo bad behavior.” It’s not uncommon for people to become unintentionally aroused during a nonerotic massage; it’s more noticeable when it happens to men, of course, but it happens to women, too. “Erections do happen,” a masseuse told me when I ran your letter past her. “So long as guys don’t suddenly ask for a ‘happy ending,’ expose themselves, or—God help me—attempt to take my hand and place it on their erection, they haven’t done anything wrong.”

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ACROSS 1 Faucet 4 Self-referential, like this clue 8 American realist art school 14 Sorta, in suffix form 15 Planetary path 16 Mr. or Ms. Right 17 General linked to chicken 18 Company named for a goddess 19 1955 pact city 20 Sky viewer used at an airline’s main airport? 23 Atlanta university 24 Catan resource 25 Org. with a tour 28 Lucille’s co-star 29 Cargo carrier 32 Diamond call 33 Rita of Netflix’s One Day at a Time 35 LPs and 45s 36 The origins of singing wordlessly? 39 George of Star Trek and Twitter 40 Excited 41 Finished 42 Fiddler on the Roof matchmaker 43 Follow commands 47 “Indubitably!” 48 Scribble (down) 49 Sudden onrush

50 Scratch some statuary? 54 Music organizer on a wall, maybe 57 Modern cheesecake ingredient 58 ___ Interwebz (intentional online misspelling) 59 Onetime Sidekick maker 60 Helicopter designer Sikorsky 61 Country set to share the 2026 World Cup 62 Lounging chair 63 Multiple-day music gathering, e.g. 64 Dir. at 202.5∞ DOWN 1 Paid to the church 2 Jump to conclusions 3 Innermost of Mars’s two moons 4 Coinage 5 Heinous 6 Seize 7 Microbrewery brews 8 On the job 9 Geometric figure 10 In this location 11 Prefix with play, at some cons 12 Tennis’s Ivanovic 13 Just out 21 Weed whacker, e.g. 22 Shell in a Monty Python and the

Holy Grail running gag 25 Early Atari game 26 Start of a Frank Loesser title 27 Just over 99%? 29 Low number in Naples 30 Word misspelled in a tattoo meme 31 Part of ACLU 32 Discover 34 Kimono sash 35 “C’est la ___!” 36 Hold’s partner 37 HI-strung instruments? 38 “The Puzzle Palace” org. 39 Kids’ meal prize 42 Terrier type, informally 44 Julius Caesar conspirator 45 Way out 46 Cowboy’s yell 48 Game with a bouncing ball 49 Cricket, say 50 Wailuku’s island 51 Updo, e.g. 52 Entreat 53 They share the same season as Geminis 54 Sine’s reciprocal, in trig (abbr.) 55 “Well, that’s obvious!” 56 Head producer for the Wu-Tang Clan ANSWER ON PAGE 21


etc FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are magic.” Whenever that quote appears on the Internet, it’s falsely attributed to painter Frida Kahlo. In fact, it was originally composed by poet Marty McConnell. In any case, I’ll recommend that you heed it in the coming weeks. You really do need to focus on associating with allies who see the mysterious and lyrical best in you. I will also suggest that you get inspired by a line that Frida Kahlo actually wrote: “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are a bourbon biscuit.” (If you don’t know what a bourbon biscuit is, I’ll tell you: chocolate buttercream stuffed between two thin rectangular chocolate biscuits.) TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s what author Franz Kafka wrote in his diary on August 2, 1914: “Germany has declared war on Russia. I went swimming in the afternoon.” We could possibly interpret his nonchalance about world events to be a sign of callous self-absorption. But I recommend that you cultivate a similar attitude in the coming weeks. In accordance with astrological omens, you have the right and the need to shelter yourself from the vulgar insanity of politics and the pathological mediocrity of mainstream culture. So feel free to spend extra time focusing on your own well-being. (P.S.: Kafka’s biographer says swimming served this role for him. It enabled him to access deep unconscious reserves of pleasurable power that renewed his spirit.) GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Am I delusional to advise a perky, talkative Gemini like yourself to enhance your communication skills? How dare I even hint that you’re not quite perfect at a skill you were obviously born to excel at? But that’s exactly what I’m here to convey. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to take inventory of how you could more fully develop your natural ability to exchange information. You’ll be in robust alignment with cosmic rhythms if you take action to refine the way you express your own messages and receive and respond to other people’s messages. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Self-described skeptics sometimes say to me, “How can any intelligent person believe in astrology? You must be suffering from a brain dysfunction if you imagine that the movements of planets can reveal any useful clues about our lives.” If the “skeptic” is truly open-minded, as an authentic skeptic should be, I offer a mini-lecture to correct his misunderstandings. If he’s not (which is the usual case), I say that I don’t need to “believe” in astrology; I use astrology because it works. For instance, I have a working hypothesis that Cancerians like myself enjoy better-than-average insight

and luck with money every year from late July through the month of August. It’s irrelevant whether there’s a “scientific” theory to explain why this might be. I simply undertake efforts to improve my financial situation at this time, and I’m often successful.

for yourself, and get closer to knowing the ultimate form of what you want, and be daring enough to imagine the most sublime possible outcomes for your future. If you do all that with the proper chutzpah, some people may indeed laugh at your audacity. That’s OK!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are some of the fine gifts you’re eligible for and even likely to receive during the next four weeks: a more constructive and fluid relationship with obsession; a panoramic look at what lies below the tip of the metaphorical iceberg; a tear-jerking joyride that cracks open your sleeping sense of wonder; erasure of at least 20 percent of your self-doubt; vivid demonstrations of the excitement available from slowing down and taking your sweet time; and a surprising and useful truth delivered to your soul by your body.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This mini-chapter in your epic life story is symbolically ruled by the fluttering flights of butterflies, the whirring hum of hummingbird wings, the soft cool light of fireflies, and the dawn dances of seahorses. To take maximum advantage of the blessings life will tease you with in the coming weeks, I suggest you align yourself with phenomena like those. You will tend to be alert and receptive in just the right ways if you cultivate a love of fragile marvels, subtle beauty, and amazing grace.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): During the last three months of 2018, I suspect you will dismantle or outgrow a foundation. Why? So as to prepare the way for building or finding a new foundation in 2019. From next January onward, I predict you will re-imagine the meaning of home. You’ll grow fresh roots and come to novel conclusions about the influences that enable you to feel secure and stable. The reason I’m revealing these clues ahead of time is because now is a good time to get a foreshadowing of how to proceed. You can glean insights on where to begin your work.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I swear the astrological omens are telling me to tell you that you have license to make the following requests: 1. People from your past who say they’d like to be part of your future have to prove their earnestness by forgiving your debts to them and asking your forgiveness for their debts to you. 2. People who are pushing for you to be influenced by them must agree to be influenced by you. 3. People who want to deepen their collaborations

with you must promise to deepen their commitment to wrestling with their own darkness. 4. People who say they care for you must prove their love in a small but meaningful way. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You will never find an advertisement for Nike or Apple within the sacred vessel of this horoscope column. But you may come across plugs for soul-nourishing commodities like creative freedom, psychosexual bliss, and playful generosity. Like everyone else, I’m a salesperson – although I believe that the wares I peddle are unambiguously good for you. In this spirit, I invite you to hone your own sales pitch. It’s an excellent time to interest people in the fine products and ideas and services that you have to offer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Would you do me a favor, please? Would you do your friends and loved ones and the whole world a favor? Don’t pretend you’re less powerful and beautiful than you are. Don’t downplay or neglect the magic you have at your disposal. Don’t act as if your unique genius is nothing special. OK? Are you willing to grant us these small indulgences? Your specific talents, perspectives, and gifts are indispensable right now. The rest of us need you to be bold and brazen about expressing them.

THIS MODERN WORLD BY TOM TOMORROW

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reader asked Libran blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle, “How does one become more sensual?” I’ll ask you to meditate on the same question. Why? Because it’s a good time to enrich and deepen your sensuality. For inspiration, here are some ideas that blend my words with Cardelle’s: “Laugh easily and freely. Tune in to the rhythm of your holy animal body as you walk. Sing songs that remind you why you’re here on earth. Give yourself the luxury of reading books that thrill your imagination and fill you with fresh questions. Eat food with your fingers. Allow sweet melancholy to snake through you. Listen innocently to people, being warm-hearted and slyly wild. Soak up colors with your eager eyes. Whisper grateful prayers to the sun as you exult in its gifts.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If people aren’t laughing at your goals, your goals are too small.” So says bodybuilder Kai Greene. I don’t know if I would personally make such a brazen declaration, but I do think it’s worth considering -- especially for you right now. You’re entering into the Big Bold Vision time of your astrological cycle. It’s a phase when you’ll be wise to boost the intensity of your hopes sacurrent.com | July 18-24, 2018 | CURRENT

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CURRENT | July 18-24, 2018 | sacurrent.com


San Antonio Current – July 18, 2018  
San Antonio Current – July 18, 2018