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CINCINNATI’S NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY | AUG. 28-SEP. 3, 2019 | FREE

Once known as an urban manufacturing center, Camp Washington is shifting into one of Cincinnati’s up-and-coming arts and culture hubs + CityBeat Staff

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NEWS

Efforts Underway to Aid Residents in Changing West End, but Some Still Struggle

West End buildings undergoing rehabilitation PH OTO: NIC K SWARTSELL

A housing study, complete with recommendations for minimizing displacement, is nearing completion. Meanwhile, a neighborhood nonprofit is trying to tend to more immediate needs BY N I C K SWA R T S EL L

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y March 2021, the West End will have a $250 million professional soccer stadium operating in the heart of the neighborhood. That is likely to bring some big changes — shifts that neighborhood groups and others are trying to help residents adjust to. Seven Hills Neighborhood Houses, the longstanding nonprofit that serves as the West End’s community development corporation, has worked with the Port of Greater Cincinnati and other groups to administer two programs it is hoped will help residents deal with rising rents, code compliance scrutiny and other potential side effects of the coming soccer stadium and general growing interest in the neighborhood’s real estate. Those efforts have already borne fruit for some West End residents, though others continue to struggle. Meanwhile, longer-term planning is also underway. A housing study commissioned by Seven Hills and the Port and paid for by FC Cincinnati could shed more light on what is needed in terms of housing. That study, conducted by Atlanta-based APD Urban Planning and Management, is in its final stages and should be released in the next few weeks, according to the Port. A few of the takeaways from that report APD discussed at an Aug. 21 presentation for residents underscore why Seven Hills

and other advocates for the West End feel the situation is urgent. According to the report, which uses Census data, a parcel-by-parcel survey of the neighborhood’s housing stock and a separate quantitative data gathering effort by Design Impact, more than a quarter of the West End’s 6,650 residents are “extremely threatened” by the prospect of displacement due to low or fixed incomes. Another 17 percent are threatened to some lesser degree. According to surveys, 80 percent of residents in the neighborhood want to stay there. Roughly 87 percent of the neighborhood’s residents are renters, Census data reveals. Subsidized housing — either in the form of housing projects or landlords accepting housing choice vouchers — makes up about 1,700 units of the community’s housing, making its residents somewhat less vulnerable to displacement than market-rate housing. APD’s study will also provide nine recommendations in its finished form. Among them: which parts of the neighborhood could best handle new development. The study assessed vacant parcels

in the West End and found four areas with lots of vacant land in which new development could occur with minimal direct displacement. If those developments included affordable housing, that could help existing residents struggling to find or keep homes in the neighborhood. “We got a lot of information from Design Impact, we got existing conditions data, we used Census data,” APD Chief Operations Officer Bridget Wiles says. “We took all that data and came up with actual areas where you could price-appropriate housing that would result in the least amount of displacement possible. We think that’s going to be very valuable, and once we move into implementation, those things are going to be very important.” In the meantime, Seven Hills is working to mitigate immediate needs from residents. One initiative the nonprofit is overseeing involves $100,000 provided by FC Cincinnati to help West End homeowners with repairs to their buildings. So far, one resident has applied and successfully used $10,000 from the program (the individual limit) plus some other funding to shore up their house. Four other homeowners have been accepted

into the program and 17 total have applied. Another effort to address residents’ current needs is an eviction prevention program funded by $176,000 from the relocation of Tri-State Wholesale Building Supplies. FC Cincinnati purchased the company’s West End location, and it subsequently bought city-owned land in Lower Price Hill. The city’s proceeds from that sale go toward eviction prevention in the West End. So far, 32 West End residents have received eviction prevention aid totaling roughly $18,000, Seven Hills says. That money goes to helping residents avoid eviction proceedings by paying one month’s delinquent rent plus late fees for residents who have fallen behind but can show that they will be able to pay future months’ rent. Seven Hills is also working with a separate city-funded eviction prevention program run by St. Vincent de Paul that can provide more help to tenants who are further behind in their payments. Though the program has helped some residents, it can’t help everyone. One severely cost-burdened (paying more CONTINUES ON PAGE 08


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CITY DESK

As the Violent Summer Continues, Officials Mull New Approaches BY N I C K SWA R T S EL L

It has been an especially violent summer in Cincinnati, and a new rash of shootings has upped the sense of urgency around gun violence in Queen City neighborhoods. Now, city officials are calling for a number of efforts to address the shootings — including making counseling and other mental health services available at the city’s recreation centers. As of Aug. 20, there had been 49 murders in Cincinnati year-to-date. Those include the Aug. 17 shooting of 21-year-old Neko Larkin, who was killed by crossfire from a gunfight while riding a Metro bus; the shooting death of 16-year-old Eric Shields in the West End the same night; and the shooting death of 19-year-old James Hazel in Over-the-Rhine in the early morning hours of Aug. 20. Overall, violent crime is roughly trending where it has been the past few years in the city and has long been on a downward slope since highs in the 1990s. In 2018 — one of the lowest years on record — there were 207 shootings in Cincinnati by Aug. 20. This year so far, there have been nine more. But this summer has seen a big increase in violence proportional to the rest of the year and past summers. Twenty people were murdered in Cincinnati between

May 30 and the end of June, and the violent spike continued into July. The violence took the lives of two 14-year-olds just a week apart in Over-the-Rhine and Lower Price Hill during that time. One of those teens, Anthony Hinton, died June 30 after he was shot near Grant Park. That’s within a block and a half of where James Hazel recently died and where 37-year-old Jerome Young was shot and killed just days before Hinton. In May, Ladon Williams also died less than a block from the park after he was shot. Police arrested a 16-year-old suspect in that murder. Block watch captain John Donaldson, who has lived nearby for two decades, says neighbors have worked hard to offer programming in the park to try and keep the violence out. But he points out that Hazel’s death is the fourth murder near the park this year. He’d like to see a more active police presence around the park aimed at drug dealers he says frequent the area. Donaldson says the majority of the people in the neighborhood aren’t involved, and that most of the disturbance is coming from people from outside the area coming in. The violence has hit young men

especially hard. It is the first time since 2016 that three juveniles have died from gun violence by this point in the year. Twenty-two more have been shot but not killed, also the highest number since 2016. Earlier this summer, Cincinnati City Council, Mayor John Cranley and Cincinnati Police officials promoted a number of potential ways to address the problem, from increasing the number of officers in CPD to expanding gunshot detection technology called ShotSpotter to boosting the Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence to keeping recreation centers open until midnight and increasing curfew enforcement. Cranley advocated for an increase in police officers to bring the force up to the 1,055 sworn officers Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac has requested. Isaac says that when CPD dips below 1,000 officers, it can’t operate some of the programs it uses to reduce violence. Fortytwo new recruits will come aboard in the coming weeks, but attrition will keep CPD’s numbers low, Isaac says. Some Cincinnati City Council members agree with that idea. But others, like council member Tamaya Dennard, say that more police isn’t the solution to the deeper problems created by poverty, exposure to trauma and racial disparities.

A motion by council members P.G. Sittenfeld and Greg Landsman took a small step toward some of those issues, directing city administration to explore partnerships with community groups to offer trauma support at Cincinnati Recreation Centers. But more needs to be done, Dennard said. Dennard recently convened a gathering of groups — city administration, faith organizations and community leaders — to explore more holistic approaches to the problem. “These kids are hurting,” she said at a council meeting in July. “They’re dealing with issues that need to be addressed. One of the reasons I’m not in favor of adding police is that we cannot arrest away our problems.” The mental health and trauma reduction element of reducing violence seems to be gaining some traction of late. The Cincinnati Health Department says over the next few weeks Mayor Cranley’s office will roll out a plan similar to Sittenfeld’s and Landsman’s offering individual and group counseling at recreation centers across the city. There will also be a series of forums where residents can express their concerns, fears and ideas for solutions.

Cincinnati, Hamilton County Leaders at Odds Over Venue at The Banks BY N I C K SWA R T S EL L Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley has some questions about the site of a planned music venue at riverfront development The Banks, he wrote in a letter to Cincinnati City Council Aug. 22, signaling that the complex development plan for the venue may not be out of the woods just yet.

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Cranley says the county should divulge how much it will pay for the property tied up in a complicated land swap; the county says it doesn’t have a contract yet and that discussing numbers would spoil its position in negotiations.

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Current plans for the proposed venue by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s concert promotion arm MEMI call for it to be located on a site called Lot 27 near Paul Brown Stadium, where the Cincinnati Bengals could veto the project due to a clause in the team’s lease with the county. The team has indicated it will not stand in the way of the venue provided the city and county replace the parking lot where the venue is slated to go — a space fans use for tailgating. That, in turn, has set in motion efforts to swap land with longstanding business Hilltop Basic Resources, which owns 15 acres nearby that it uses for its concrete

business. It wants land at two sites near the Ohio River in Queensgate and Lower Price Hill in exchange for the land south of the stadium that would be used to replace the Bengals’ parking lot. Some residents in Lower Price Hill have asked questions about the relocation, though a deal could soon be worked out there as well. Hilltop currently has a purchase option on land it would transfer to the city for the completion of a long-awaited park in Lower Price Hill if the land-swap were to be approved. Cranley has promoted an alternate location for the MEMI venue, called Lot 24, farther from the stadium. That location doesn’t need the Bengals’ permission and already has a parking garage podium constructed. In his letter, Cranley wanted several questions and concerns answered before a Sept. 3 presentation before Cincinnati City Council’s Growth and Zoning Committee. Among them, Cranley asked for detailed plans of Hilltop’s proposed new location, including how trucks and other vehicles will access the site; an unredacted copy of the contract between

Hilltop and the county for the site in question; the exact location of a proposed asphalt plant Hilltop wants to construct; that appraisals of both properties in question be published before a deal is made; and other questions about the property transfer related to loss of city revenues, as some of the land Hilltop wants from the city is currently leased to another company. “I believe it is vital to the public interest and to the city’s consideration of any proposed transaction to know how much money the public is spending on this purchase of Hilltop’s existing site,” Cranley wrote in his letter. Hamilton County Commission President Denise Driehaus, meanwhile, says the deal is a good one and expressed concerns that without the music venue deal, Lot 27 will remain undeveloped. Driehaus also touted community support for the Hilltop relocation in Lower Price Hill and says she has worked with Cincinnati City Council member Amy Murray to broker a deal in Lower Price Hill and get everything lined up for Hilltop’s relocation. As if the deal wasn’t complex enough, the county’s renegotiation of its lease

with the Bengals is also tied up in the MEMI negotiations. Driehaus and other county leaders believe those renegotiations could save the county millions of dollars in game day payments and enhancements to the stadium the Bengals could try to make the county fund; Cranley, however, is doubtful and wants the exact calculations made public. “We are told that this deal makes the county’s stadium deal better,” Cranley wrote in his letter. “But the public won’t know if that’s true until it sees the amount of public money that will be spent to move Hilltop.” Driehaus, however, is sticking to her guns. “When the Hilltop relocation is complete, our community stands to gain more vibrancy on the riverfront with a new music venue, a renegotiated lease with the Bengals that will save taxpayers tens of millions of dollars, a new public space with bike and pedestrian infrastructure… and the city will control a parcel of land that is the last piece of the puzzle for the planned Price Landing Park,” Driehaus wrote in a statement. “We also keep a company that employs 100 people in Cincinnati.”


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request. That request will go before the Cincinnati Planning Commission on Sept. 13. The commission will hold a staff hearing about the proposed change in the West End Aug. 28. The team has purchased a number of parcels running up to Liberty Street, though its requested planned development zoning only runs up to Wade Street. The team has indicated it will use the parcels within the zoning application for surface parking in the near future, though it is believed the team wants to develop the larger area eventually. Most residents have found other places to live, but the remaining four are having difficulty, Page’s niece and caretaker Kim Dillard says. Dillard would like to have Page out of her building at 421 Wade St. before the weather gets cold but has run into problems finding suitable affordable housing, with the application process for housing she has found and other issues. She says she has viewed an apartment in City West, a nearby housing development, but is afraid it won’t be a great fit for Page due to security and accessibility concerns. “It is just a whole bunch of roadblocks put in front of us,” Dillard says, relating troubles with applications that request income verification and employment history for her elderly aunt. “It’s not like we don’t want to get out of these buildings.”

Help with housing could be coming — albeit in pieces, and at a long-term pace. One development that could help West End residents and others across the region searching for affordable housing: the Cincinnati Metropolitan Housing Authority will open up its waitlist for housing choice vouchers from Sept. 9 to Sept. 12. It will be the first time since January 2017 that the waitlist has been open. Currently, there are 1,428 people on the list. Longer-term, Seven Hills, the Port and APD say the results of the finished housing study could guide future policy and development decisions in the West End. The study has identified gaps in housing availability — for families with incomes around $18,000 a year and for those above $56,000 a year. The neighborhood’s median household income is roughly $14,000 a year, according to Census data, and 65 percent of its residents live in poverty. The market could address the gap in higher-income housing as real estate continues to heat up in the West End, but the lower-income residents will likely need some policy intervention. Even before talk of the stadium, interest in the West End was ramping up. In 2012, there were 16 home improvement or mortgage loans written in the three full Census tracts that make up the

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than a third of income for rent) applicant to the program was evicted because she owed two months’ rent plus late fees. The resident was paying $775 a month on a monthly income of $1,600. “How could she continue paying that?” Seven Hills Neighborhood Houses Community Engagement Director Tia Brown asks. “We’re hoping to help her find a more affordable place to live, but with the changes happening, that’s getting harder and harder.” Others are struggling to find affordable housing in the neighborhood as well, including four remaining residents in two buildings purchased by FC Cincinnati earlier this year. Those residents, including 99-year-old Mary Frances Page, were informed by the buildings’ former owner that they would need to move in February. Controversy ensued — the team had made promises that it wouldn’t displace anyone — and the team and residents agreed to a private settlement that allowed the roughly dozen households to stay in their homes until Jan. 31 next year. According to sources close to the deal, it also involved affordable housing for the residents funded by the team. FC Cincinnati recently included the land occupied by Page’s apartment building in its planned development zoning

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West End, according to federal data. In a neighborhood that is 85 percent black with a median household income of about $15,000 a year, the $2,124,000 in loans went to applicants with a median income of $58,000 a year. Only three of the recipients were black. By 2017, the last year for which federal data is available, there were 41 such loans worth $5,554,000 sold to applicants with a median income of $80,000 a year. Thirteen of the recipients of those loans — about 30 percent — were black. Meanwhile, funding for new affordable housing projects in the West End has lagged. The neighborhood’s last allocation of Low Income Housing Tax Credits — which fund the development of much of America’s low-income, non-Section 8 housing — was $972,000 for the Sands Senior Apartments in 2014. Seven Hills is working to raise money for the development of housing that will be affordable to residents of the neighborhood, hosting fundraisers and looking into other ways to finance housing. “There is a lot of work that has already been done,” Brown says. “There is a lot more to do. We’re hoping we can do it all together so that when big development comes, we’re not at its mercy.”


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Once known as an urban manufacturing center, Camp Washington is shifting into one of Cincinnati’s up-and-coming arts and culture hubs

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+ CityBeat Staff

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C A M P WA S H I N G TO N C H I L I | P H OTO : H A I L E Y B O L L I N G E R

ocated just three miles north of downtown Cincinnati, Camp Washington, or “Camp,” as residents affectionately call it, is primarily an industrial neighborhood. Meat-packing plants dominated the area when folks of largely Appalachian descent flowed in during the 19th and 20th centuries, wooed by the prospect of work. Residents — numbered at just over 12,000 at Camp’s peak population before World War I — rose in the mornings to cross their streets to work at those same plants before heading home again. (Informative historical markers along Spring Grove Avenue pay tribute to the area’s contributions to Porkopolis, as well as the metal-working, printing and fire-fighting industries.) Today, the face of Camp Washington has been altered by the build-out of I-75 in the 1960s, and the Mill Creek Expressway before that in the ’40s, as well as the encroachment of vacant lots and buildings every decade since. But as so often happens in well-situated urban neighborhoods blighted by exurban growth, Camp is turning a new page. Enticed by low rent and close proximity to the city center, a number of artistic outposts have set up shop, primarily on Colerain Avenue, the main business thoroughfare — places like Wave Pool gallery, focused on community-driven creativity, and the CampSITE Sculpture Park, intent on helping reframe the way people experience their environments. And, increasingly, the Camp Washington Community Board and Center Development Corporation, established over 30 years ago, have gained traction as agents of more codified change.

“Our initial focus was basically keeping housing stock online. The city, by the ’70s and ’80s, had pretty much written off Camp Washington as a place to live,” says James Heller-Jackson, community organizer for the Camp Washington Community Board. In 2014, the two organizations applied for and received a grant to create a study of the neighborhood to assess its points of viability and growth opportunity, to talk to the remaining community members and to put all that information into a plan. That analysis and public input came to fruition in 2017 with a 78-page document called “Made in Camp.” The obstacles to making Camp as viable as it could be are numerous. Residential population plunged to 1,343 as of the 2010 Census, where it hovers now. (The coming 2020 Census should show some growth, especially in the number of foreign-born residents; the neighborhood and its Welcome Project, helmed in part by the aforementioned Wave Pool, have become a hub for recent immigrants to the city.) There are plenty of vacancies ripe for rehab opportunities, but also ripe for less-savory endeavors. And the infrastructure of Camp, as it stands now, isn’t doing it any favors. “That’s evidenced in the zoning that happened here. Most of the western side of Camp Washington is (an) industrial annex and that’s appropriate for that, but this whole business district was zoned commercial-auto,” says Heller-Jackson. “Which is great if you want to build a McDonald’s with a big parking lot and drive thru, but pretty horrible if you’re an Italianate building that sits right on the street in a former business district.”


The heart of that former business district can be found at the intersection of Colerain Avenue and Hopple Street. There’s a Shell gas station, and stalwart neighborhood mainstay Camp Washington Chili (open since 1940) catty-corner across the street. Directly across from that is the vacant U.S. Chili, a still-beautiful husk of a building. The Camp CDC recently acquired funds through a grant from the City of Cincinnati’s Neighborhood Business District Improvement Plan to purchase the building, saving it from, among other things, becoming a parking lot. The previous zoning designation, Commercial Community-Auto, in place for years and years, essentially allows big-box developers to aggregate (including through removal) existing properties to build CC-A-friendly businesses, aka those with easily accessible parking lots. By bringing a rezoning request to city council in 2018, which was approved, Camp is able to protect more of the existing infrastructure in the neighborhood and be deliberate about who gets to develop, and where. The goal is an Urban Mix, a zoning designation to “provide a balance of uses and amenities fostering a vital economic, livable and cultural area and enhance its urban, aesthetic qualities,” according to the proposal. That means no drive-thrus, conditional use for standalone parking lots and buildings that meet the street line. And now? The sky’s the limit, as it often is at the precipice of a big change. “A big dream of mine would be to connect Camp Washington via the old subway to downtown,” says Joseph Gorman, executive director of the Camp Washington

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Community Board. (The never-completed Cincinnati subway system has an entrance near the Hopple Street exit.) For now, Camp is still focused on building inward and then out. So in this issue, we’re going to be highlighting the attractions that draw people there — places like Mom ‘n ‘em coffee shop and wine bar, whose coffee culture enticed Food & Wine magazine editor David Landsel to visit Camp to be a barista for a day. And Swing House, the renovated 1880s brick home that artist and architect Mark de Jong has reimagined to include a functional swing; it had its own Contemporary Arts Center exhibit, hosts open houses and also hosts Airbnb guests. And one of the early adopters of Camp — a neighborhood anchor — the American Sign Museum, which moved its collection of nostalgic neon and roadside history from its former home in Walnut Hills to the area and reopened there in 2012. There are also several new or notable venues that aren’t covered in this package, including Sunny Blu Coffeehouse, HudsonJones gallery, Schenz Theatrical Supply and the now-defunct Chase Public, among others. Visit them all — or most of them — during the Second Saturday Art Walk, a monthly event wherein local businesses open their doors for art exhibits, wine tastings, live music and more. (The next Second Saturday Art Walk will take place Sept. 14.) It’s a chance for fellow Camp residents and visitors to see the arts and culture hub the neighborhood is becoming and experience the longstanding history that’s made this industrial enclave a vital part of the city’s urban fabric.

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1. AMERICAN SIGN MUSEUM 2 . C A M P WA S H I N G TO N U R B A N FA R M 3. MOM ‘N ’EM 4. SWING HOUSE

6 . W AV E P O O L 7. T H E W E L C O M E P R O J E C T 8 . C A M P S I T E S C U L P T U R E PA R K

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5. THE FRINGE BOOKSHOP

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create activities, games, events, sculptures that gather feedback and then we take that and respond with more projects that aim to solve those issues.” Camp Washington is currently not served by a retail grocery store, and a lack of fresh produce is something residents have been bemoaning since Wave Pool first arrived in the neighborhood. So they decided to do something about it, falling firmly under the “create change” wing of their mission statement. Wave Pool partnered with Camp Washington Urban Farm to create a rolling tricycle, delivering fresh produce to the neighborhood from the farm. The organization wanted to scale up their efforts and, combined with new funding from an Impact 100 Grant, they hope to make a built-out market in the Welcome Project building directly across the street from Wave Pool a reality. “The goal will be pay what you can,” says Cullen of the items for sale in the market, which will continue to include produce from the Urban Farm and select shelf-stable items. Currently, the Welcome Project exists as a very-nearby satellite operation of Wave Pool, with distinct programs and offerings, much of it heavily focused on the refugee and immigrant population in Camp Washington. Here again the intersection of art and community is made evident, most notably in Welcome Editions, an endeavor pairing artistdesigners with community resident fabricators, providing an opportunity for employment and empowerment.

In 2014, Wave Pool, the community-driven, artist-led experimental art gallery, was one of the first generation of new artistic outposts to stake a claim in Camp. Situated in a repurposed firehouse, Wave Pool has become a burgeoning force for change and action in the small community. It also acts as a haven for artists-in-residence and niche exhibitions. Calcagno Cullen, executive director, says that was intentional.

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On Sept. 21, Wave Pool celebrates its five-year anniversary with High Five Fiesta! at The Factory. Tickets start at $50 and include Latin food from Welcome Project chefs, libations, live music, printmaking and an auction. 2940 Colerain Ave., wavepoolgallery.org. — LEYLA SHOKOOHE

“Wave Pool’s mission is to pair community needs with artists’ sense of possibilities,” she says.

Wave Pool itself is a bridge of sorts, spanning the gap between underheard residents and both potential and definitive tangible change. “We do projects that their aim is to listen to our neighborhood,” Cullen says. “We’ve done several projects like that where we commission artists to

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Take, for example, experimental art. This entails an artistsin-residence program, a curatorial residence, socially engaged art and exhibitions. The residency program, called Art Space Is Your Space, has had a total of 10 artists in residence since 2015, including Maggie Lawson and Abigail Smithson in 2019. Artists receive a stipend and are asked to engage the community in at least one experience during their stay. Most recently, Smithson’s What is the Harm in a Reach? reflected on bridging the gap between sports and art, using input from basketball team members from local STEM high schools.

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The organization’s approach to navigating that intersection includes a Venn diagram of directives: experimental art, connecting community and creating change. Each directive comes with its own set of initiatives, ones that holistically fit both with one another and with a broader mission.

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For September’s event, everyone and anyone is invited to a special farm-to-table dinner at Cincinnati State that will feature the cooking of four to five chefs. The dinner will coincide with Welcoming Week, which includes thousands of events held across the country to unite immigrants and non-immigrants in the same communities. 2936 Colerain Ave., welcomecincinnati.org. — MORGAN ZUMBIEL

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The project has also launched an initiative called Cincinnati’s Table. Until October 2019, Cincinnati’s Table will host traveling monthly free dinners across the city with the goal of connecting immigrants and refugees to each other and their U.S.-born neighbors. Centered around themes such as “gratitude” or “exchange,” each meal features the cooking of immigrant chefs from across the globe and includes interactive activities to bring together groups of strangers, like guided meditations and roundtable discussions, art installations and simple projects. Cincinnati’s Table also plans to expand and offer a teaching kitchen in the Welcome Project space in November.

“That’s the goal of Cincinnati’s Table — to open the door for communication to people in the same neighborhood,” says Welcome Project manager Erika Nj Allen. “When you share food, even with strangers, that opens this door that allows you to communicate, or at least try to be friendly or giving. ‘Thank you.’ A lot of people know what that means, even if it’s not your own language.”

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Operating out of a space next door to Wave Pool on Colerain Avenue, the project initially led art classes. Then, the artisan goods made there spawned a boutique business, followed by additional enterprises in education, job training, language lessons and more. Currently, individuals from countries including Iraq, Syria, Tanzania, Bhutan, Mexico and Nepal gather at the Welcome Project for everything

from public ceramics classes and art openings to Spanish lessons and entrepreneurial workshops.

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The Welcome Project is a social enterprise started in 2017 by Wave Pool and the immigrant and refugee resource group Heartfelt Tidbits. Part workshop, part retail space and part cozy hangout, the Welcome Project began as a way to empower Cincinnati’s “newest neighbors” and provide a support system for recent refugees and immigrants to Cincinnati.

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Get lost in the ads and landmarks of yesteryear at the American Sign Museum. After opening in a small space in Essex Studios in Walnut Hills in 2005, the museum acquired the historic Oesterlein Machine Company-Fashion Frocks warehouse in Camp Washington and opened a 20,000-square-foot exhibition and event space there in 2012, with room to grow. “We came here because we could afford it and it was a great space for us,” says museum founder Tod Swormstedt. “A lot of people don’t know Camp Washington in Cincinnati — it was kind of unheard of — and so artists could quietly find affordable space.” Inside, Swormstedt and his team have transformed the former industrial complex into a glowing wonderland. Winding pathways of colorful signage give way to a mocked-up Main Street, with faux storefronts, cobblestone

and giant logos from Howard Johnson, McDonald’s and Marshall Field. From roadside nostalgia and a looming Big Boy to pharmacy signs and gas station markers, the flashing lights, buzzing electricity and rotating wonders illuminate and preserve the past with a collection that encompasses signs from the late 1800s to the 1970s. The largest public sign museum in America, there’s the option to take a guided, informative tour ($15 adult; $10 seniors) to learn about the history and manufacturing process behind different signs — including many with connections to Cincinnati’s past. Or wander on your own. The museum also hosts a slew of special events, like weddings, as well as events like bus tours of local ghost signs and a popular Signs and Songs music in the museum series (which is returning in February 2020).

In terms of how Camp’s burgeoning arts scene is affecting one of its pioneers? In 2014, the museum saw 16,200 attendees. In 2017, that number was 32,400 and in 2018 attendance jumped to 41,500. “We’re on this pretty strong curve upward,” Swormstedt says. Part of that is the pulsing electric lure of America’s novel past and part of that is the draw of the neighborhood itself (directly nearby I-75, I-74 and downtown) — a place where the Sign Museum is now an anchor attraction. “Where it is on the map of Cincinnati, (Camp is) a great place. It’s got a really rich history — it’s a really fun history,” Swormstedt says. “There’s a lot of physical things about the Camp, but there’s a lot of subjective emotional, historical stuff that’s really cool that makes the Camp feel like a neat place to be part of.” 1330 Monmouth Ave., americansignmuseum.org. — MAIJA ZUMMO


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Mark de Jong, a trained artist and a renovator/ reimaginer of old houses, spent three years working on Swing House, a freestanding 1880s three-story residential brick building, whose location and exterior appearance wouldn’t lead passersby to expect that a major work of Contemporary art — an ambitious and unusual house-size sculptural installation — awaits inside. It is called Swing House because de Jong has removed the interior walls and upper floors and built a swing right inside. Made from reddish pine he salvaged from third floor joists, the swing is attached by 30 feet of natural-fiber rope to a newly installed metal beam on the ceiling. The swing is functional in and of itself, yes. But swings are hardly a common inclusion for homes, so this one has far more than a practical use. It represents freedom from architectural convention — it’s a radical departure from our expectations of everyday domesticity. It is, thus, not merely a swing. It is an experiential and experimental artwork — as is the house that surrounds, complements and is named for it. The strong metal beams that de Jong had to install along the sides and roof of Swing House, since the load-bearing floors were removed, serve like a set of Christo’s gates through which one swings. And as you do, if you look up, there’s a white hourglass-like form painted on the otherwise-black ceiling. There are also two sleek, Minimalist-style white ceiling fans that look like 1950s-era atomic clocks. “I’ve always seen the swing not so much as a vehicle for pleasure as a vehicle for contemplation and the

SWING HOUSE passing of time,” de Jong told CityBeat when this initial interview ran in April 2018. “When you see the hourglass shape on the ceiling, the swing acts as a pendulum and is descriptive of time passing.” And that gets to the larger meaning of Swing House. “This piece, in its perfect manifestation, is about experiencing,” de Jong says. “It is to really be alone inside the space. A couple or an individual will be having a quiet moment with the house, with my work and with my journey. Being on the swing is about contemplation of lives lived — those who lived in the house as well as that of the person participating in the piece by swinging.”

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The home and its ephemera were the subject of a Contemporary Arts Center exhibit from April to September 2018 which displayed art objects and material derived or inspired by Swing House, plus new work by de Jong. The exhibit also included special tours of the space. Today, the Swing House is open to the public the second Saturday of the month for tours and is also available to rent on Airbnb. The one-bedroom, one-bathroom home allows guests to stay in and utilize a work of modern architectural art. 1373 Avon Place, swing-house.com. — STEVE ROSEN

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“Swing House fits into this idea of people in Camp Washington being really creative, and able to utilize spaces and assets in unconventional ways to make interesting things happen,” says Wave Pool’s Calcagno Cullen. “It helps to elevate the neighborhood by speaking to Camp Washington’s past and future through its reuse of a house.”

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work-a-day world and the duties of home could be achieved in just about any space. “The idea wasn’t about becoming millionaires,” Austin says. “It was about creating a cool, fun idea for the community to hang out in.” The sons of immigrant father Fausto and American mother Theresa — she was the first girl he met next door — they are passionate about family and food and bringing the former into the latter, and oftentimes, vice versa. The menu here features coffee and espresso drinks, a curated wine list, cocktails and food, including pastries, sandwiches and tinned fish. Their first foray into local coffee began with Ferrari Barber & Coffee Co., a barbershop run by their great-uncle Fausto (same name as their dad). Then came Mom ‘n ‘em, lovingly referencing their mother (her face graces the welcoming mural on the side of the house), followed by the recently opened Fausto at the CAC, a contemporary restaurant outfit focused on seasonal cuisine. The beginnings of a renaissance in Camp Washington are invigorating for them, the artists leading the charge on the other side of Hopple serving as inspiration and motivation, and they plan on sticking around for some time.

Built in 1893, the site of Mom ‘n ‘em is on the other side of Hopple Street, a bit farther down Colerain Avenue and into Camp Washington than the central cluster of burgeoning arts-related operations taking up residence in the area.

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“We want to be part of that. We’re artists, too, in different ways,” Tony says. “Why don’t we make it an arts district, where we don’t allow any big developers, any big corporations. It’s all about mom-and-pops, all about working with your hands. Still very much working-class craftsmanship. Everyone creates something in this neighborhood.” 3128 Colerain Ave., momnemcoffee.com. — LEYLA SHOKOOHE

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Brothers Tony and Austin Ferrari are the duo behind the neighborhood coffee shop — familiar territory for the pair, who run Provender Coffee Shop in San Francisco, too. Mom ‘n ‘em marks a return home for the brothers, both of whom live in Camp and grew up in Clifton, but its purpose is to bridge the gap between work and home.

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“In the ’50s and ’60s, when everyone knocked everything down to go out to the suburbs, we lost all those kinds of places. We lost that (place) in between work and your home,” Tony says. “Before that we had our local watering holes, we had our coffee shops, we had our markets. Every neighborhood needs those things to survive. (The reason) why Camp Washington was in despair all these years was the highway cut it right in half. And what happened? All the ‘third places’ were gone and neighborhoods were lost. People abandoned them. For us, we want to bring that back.” The Mom ‘n ‘em site sat vacant for the last 20 years before Tony snapped it up (he intended to live in the space, a former single-family home). The original plan for Mom ‘n ‘em was fairly different; inspired by a coffee outfit in Austin, Texas, the brothers wanted to create an outdoor coffee garden using a 1969 Airstream as the center of operations. Ironically, zoning regulations being what they were at the time they purchased the Mom ‘n ‘em building, the Airstream idea was scrapped. But no matter. Their goal of providing a respite from the T H E T E A M B E H I N D M O M ‘ N ‘ E M | P H OTO : H A I L E Y B O L L I N G E R


C A M P S I T E S C U L P T U R E PA R K The latest addition to the artistic stakeholders rising up in Camp is CampSITE Sculpture Park, a relatively selfexplanatory outdoor experience at 2866 Colerain Ave., right next door to the former site of Chase Public. The ethos of CampSITE, founded by Sean Mullaney and Lacey Haslam, is one of good-natured irreverence, tempered by an earnest desire for connection — and a fierce belief that Camp is a singular place.

Traipse through CampSITE today and you’ll spot the shell of a vintage car hanging off the wall of an adjacent building; a massive tree trunk ring with the center burned out, fashioned to resemble a guitar; a few leftover glitter rocks from a community project; a fire pit; and a refurbished Airstream that houses Haslam’s personal project, the Archive of Creative Culture, described as “a living collection of books sourced from the personal libraries today's arts leaders.” CampSITE’s ethos is rooted in theories about social sculpture parks and urban spaces, engagement and, most importantly perhaps, that everyone is an artist. “The park is really designed to be for displaying works by artists and non-artists, but it’s for everybody,” Haslam says. “The goal is that we are bringing in, we’re adding something in the neighborhood that’s a way for people to come onto ‘private property’ and have a really engaging, interactive experience, kind of on a consistent basis with the Second Saturday Art Walks.” Programming varies, depending on the lineup for the

“It’s nice to have places to congregate, and that’s what the sculpture park is, too. We’d like to see that as an outdoor congregation place,” Mullaney says. Haslam agrees, and sees CampSITE as well-positioned within the neighborhood’s shifting landscape. “I want it to be a place where people come down and just play and hang out. That’s really my main thing — having more people down here working, living, playing,” she says. “I would love to walk down the street and say ‘hi’ to everybody and everybody knows each other. There’s a level of community where we might not all get along but we look out for each other. And the more space we say, ‘Hey, you’re welcome (here),’ is the basis of that. Because our built environments really do tell us how to interact. If there’s more places people can gather, then the better.” CampSITE hosts Camp, Cars and Coffee from 9 a.m.noon each Saturday, a gathering event to admire vintage cars. 2866 Colerain Ave.; get details about upcoming events on Instagram @campsitesculpturepark. — LEYLA SHOKOOHE

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For Mullaney and Haslam, that means taking advantage of the vacant lot where CampSITE now lives. Mullaney owns several properties on the block, and recently, he put some miscellaneous items from his studio space at 2868 Colerain Ave. into the vacant adjacent lot, including some large painted boxes, to make a little room inside. But then

“They were just into it, because it was kind of weird, and you didn’t really have to understand it,” Mullaney says.

Second Saturday Art Walk that involves multiple other organizations in Camp, but past iterations have included varied vendors and a pizza oven, music and activities.

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“The people that are here, that have been here, there’s deeper roots in this idea of people that are here having a long history of doing what we’ve done, just maybe in different places. So now it’s continuing to do what we’re used to doing, just in the place where we feel like there’s a certain level of opportunities.”

neighbors started to tell him how cool they thought the boxes were. (You can still see one on Google Street View.)

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“To kind of start with that whole phrase of, ‘We’re the next something,’ I think that’s the big question we’re digging into right now,” Haslam says. “We don’t identify as being the next anything.

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The FRINGE bookshop is the brainchild of Andrew McKinley, who first came to the area from San Francisco as an artist in residence at Wave Pool two years ago. He stayed there for about a month and turned the downstairs gallery into a bookstore/community living room. Christened “The Gathering Space,” it was a hit. McKinley decided to make Cincinnati his new home and bought a house across the street from Wave Pool. With their help — and an ArtsWave grant — he transformed his shed into a colorful bookstand, which opened April 6. “We’re getting books into local people’s hands,” McKinley said in an interview with CityBeat in May. “I’m trying to bring

good books into the pop-up so they’ll spread throughout the neighborhood.” They’re priced about $3 apiece. He’s been pleased that the shed — covered with literal colorful pieces of fringe and made interactive with chalkboard walls — has become a meeting place for people in the community and hopes that, in the future, other groups might use the space for other creative endeavors. “It’s set up like a carnival booth, or an ice cream booth,” he says. “It should morph into something more substantial down the line. It’s really in its infancy.” McKinley’s interest and passion for the introduction of a

pop-up bookshop wasn’t happenstance; he founded the renowned Adobe Books in San Francisco 30 years ago. Pulling from his own collection of books and texts, FRINGE customers can expect to sift through an array of works that relate to “inclusion, equality and equity” — specifically ones that speak to the LGBTQI community. FRINGE was originally slated to close on June 1 — or at least it finished out its Wave Pool-programmed run then — but McKinley still has it open each Saturday for passersby to peruse the window shelving and outside tables, with additional hours for special events and readings. 2931 Jessamine St. — BILL FURBEE


To Camp Washington’s east, cars sit in traffic on I-75, waiting to make their exit downtown or to cross the bridge into Kentucky. To its west, the high-pitched whistles and screeching of trains can be heard long into the night as they roll through the Queensgate rail yards. A bright white salt dome on Colerain Avenue is the area’s best recognized place marker. If you didn’t know where to look, you might miss the soft, green plot of earth at the heart of this once-industrialized neighborhood. It’s a surprising place for flourishing gardens and broods of baby chicks, but the folks at Camp Washington Urban Farm have been feeding their neighbors with the fresh produce grown here since 2012.

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The two-and-a-half acre farm sits on the former site of the Cincinnati Work House and Hospital, which operated from 1869 to 1985 and was demolished in 1990. The workhouse’s stone foundation still exists under a foot of dirt, making for less-than-ideal farming conditions, so composting has been instrumental in improving the soil over the years. It’s proved fertile. A small army of about 300 volunteers a season plant, tend and harvest everything from tomatoes, peppers, squash, radishes and fruit trees to herbs, kale, spinach, cabbage and bok choy. The farm is also vital to accessibility in Camp Washington’s food desert — the neighborhood’s last grocery store, Kroger, closed a decade ago.

C A M P WA S H I N GTO N U RBA N FA RM Now, the Family Dollar — which has a more limited food selection and does not sell fresh produce like that grown at the farm — is the closest option. Once harvested, fresh fruits, vegetables and greens are loaded onto a miniature teardrop Airstream trailer, hooked up to a tandem bicycle and carted around the neighborhood to be handed out for free. The cart, called Camp Washington Art and Mobile Produce (CAMP for short), is a partnership with Wave Pool and volunteers bring arts and crafts activities along with fresh produce. The farm aims to give away 1,500 pounds of produce every year. “We just want to be able to feed our neighbors,” says community organizer James Heller-Jackson. “That’s our goal here.”

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“I really see this space being somewhere kids can come and learn,” she says, eager to share her love of gardening. “I’ve always been a flower child. Nature has never failed me, so I never want to fail her. It’s in my spirit, it’s in my soul.” 3220 Colerain Ave., facebook.com/cwurbanfarm. — MORGAN ZUMBIEL

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Farm Manager Aziza Love (also of local Hip Hop group Triiibe) is focused on building more opportunities for community members by hosting gardening and cooking classes as well as creating space for neighborhood events and live music. Eventually, she says, she’d also like to see the farm become a source of produce throughout Ohio.

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STUFF TO DO

Ongoing Shows ART: No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man Cincinnati Art Museum, Mount Adams (through Sept. 2) ART: Bubi Canal: Into the Gloaming Contemporary Arts Center, Downtown (through Sept. 15)

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HomeMakers Bar PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLINGER

$15. Dayton Masonic Live, 525 W. Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio, daytonmasoniccenter.org. — JEFF NIESEL

THURSDAY 29

MUSIC: KISS: End of the Road World Tour The larger-than-life Rock and Roll Hall of Famers will be making their final stop in Cincinnati, ever — one last time to rock and roll all night for the Queen City KISS Army. “All that we have built and all that we have conquered over the past four decades could never have happened without the millions of people worldwide who’ve filled clubs, arenas and stadiums over those years. This will be the ultimate celebration for

those who’ve seen us and a last chance for those who haven’t. KISS Army, we’re saying goodbye on our final tour with our biggest show yet and we’ll go out the same way we came in… unapologetic and unstoppable,” the band said in a release. Break out the face paint. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. $25-$143. Riverbend Music Center, 6295 Kellogg Ave., California, riverbend.org. — MAIJA ZUMMO

FRIDAY 30

MUSIC: Will Payne Harrison plays the Southgate House Revival. See Sound Advice on page 42. ART: Dress Up, Speak Up at the 21c grapples with contemporary identity. See review on page 30. MUSIC: Hank Williams Songwriter Showcase This year marks the 70th anniversary of music icon Hank Williams’ second recording session in Cincinnati. On Aug. 30, 1949, Williams cut four tracks

— including his enduring classic “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” — at downtown’s Herzog recording studio. The Herzog building is now home to the Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation and the music-gear-andmore store Herzog Music, which together will host a special “songwriter showcase” featuring artists from around the country who’ve been heavily influenced by Williams’ music. Among the songwriters scheduled to appear at the Williams celebration is Joey Allcorn, the young Georgian who is renowned for his traditional Honky Tonk style, something he’s been exploring ever since his mother gave him a Hank Williams greatest hits album when he was a child. Other artists slated to appear include Josh Morningstar, Amanda Lynn, Brad and Tammy Sue Magness, Bobby Tomberlin, W.D. Miller and Zachariah Malachi. This year also CONTINUES ON PAGE 26

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COMEDY: Joe Zimmerman “I still talk about things I’m interested in and things I’m curious about,” comedian Joe Zimmerman says of his current set. “Right now, I’m watching that documentary on Netflix called One Strange Rock.” It’s narrated by eight former astronauts, as well as actor Will Smith. “On the one hand, I’m blown away by how amazing our planet is, and on the other hand, I want to be friends with Will Smith.” Zimmerman has also channeled his curiosity into a new podcast called A Great Listening Experience in which he studies a topic and looks for what he calls the upside.

“Depression, for example,” he says. “Turns out there are some benefits to depression.” When not satisfying his curiosity about certain subjects, he plays guitar. “I do that to relax,” he says. “I definitely don’t play with anyone watching, and I definitely don’t do it to impress any girls.” Through Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy. com. — P.F. WILSON

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EVENT: The 51% at HomeMakers Bar: Vermouth HomeMakers Bar owners Julia Petiprin and Catherine Manabat lead this “retro adventure” into the world of vermouth with the 51%, a social drinking club that brings “bourbon and badass women together” — except this time they’re talking vermouth. The evening kicks off with a vermouth tasting featuring three different spirits. Manabat and Petiprin will lead attendees through the differences between each, how the regions the spirits came from affect their taste and “the most common mistakes people make when it comes to vermouth.” HomeMakers’ version of happy hour — aka Spritzer Hour — runs until 7 p.m. with $6 spritzers (featuring vermouth), plus $1 off well

spirits, draft beer, red wine and all menu items featuring ham. Open a tab during the event and get 10 percent off the rest of the night. 6-8 p.m. Thursday. $15. HomeMakers Bar, 39 E. 13th St., Overthe-Rhine, facebook.com/ the51bourbon. — MAIJA ZUMMO

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MUSIC: Dayton United: A Benefit for The Dayton Foundation In the week following the recent mass shooting that took place in the Oregon District in Dayton, local organizers rallied to put together Dayton United: A Benefit for The Dayton Foundation, a concert featuring acoustic performances from Anthony Raneri of Bayside, Vinnie Caruana of The Movielife and I Am the Avalanche, Geoff Rickly of Thursday, Chris Conley of Saves The Day and Joe Anderl of Dayton’s own The 1984 Draft. “I knew I had to do something,” says Anderl in a press release. “The Oregon District has been instrumental in my evolution and more than just place for us to grow as a band or musicians. It’s been the place we’ve celebrated with our families. It’s the place we’ve made a few regrets. It’s the place we’ve drowned our sorrows and celebrated our successes. It was one of the first places I took my son when he was born to buy a record and just get out of the house. It’s where my wife and I go on dates. It is part of my entire adult existence. The people who live and work in the Oregon are a part of our family.” Anderl says he hopes the concert honors Dayton and “brings a little joy” to the community. The Dayton Foundation is an organization that distributes and raises funds for various nonprofits in the Dayton area. 6-11 p.m. Wednesday.

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FRIDAY 30

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AFTER 5 PM

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HOW IT WORKS 1. Buy your glassware and first pour at our Tasting Bar. 2. Back that glass up every Wednesday after 5 PM to save $1 at our Tasting Bar. Visit Junglejims.com/Events for more information. Offer only valid on Wednesdays. Must be 21+ to purchase.

EVENT: Art After Dark: All Good Things Must End As they say, all good things must come to an end and that includes the trippy, immersive experience that is the Cincinnati Art Museum’s No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man exhibit. The show departs Sept. 2 (also the last day of Burning Man itself), so this final Friday, head to Art After Dark for a chance to check out all the psychedelic and interactive installations that have brought the Black Rock playa to Eden Park. Take a free docent-led tour of the exhibit (and the Kimono: Refashioning Contemporary Style show), listen to live music from Triiibe and grab food for purchase from Revolution Rotisserie, Dewey’s Pizza and Graeter’s. 5-10 p.m. Friday. Free admission. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, cincinnatiartmuseum.org. — MAIJA ZUMMO FROM PAGE 25

marks 10 years since the formation of CUMHF. Over the past decade the organization, among many other things, has helped get a marker installed at the site of the 1979 Who concert tragedy, drawn attention to and assisted in the preservation of the original King Records complex in Evanston and helped develop Herzog Music into a downtown music hub. 7 p.m. Friday. $20-$50. Herzog Music, 811 Race St., Downtown, herzogmusic.com. — MIKE BREEN

PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLINGER

EVENT: Cincinnati Tattoo Arts Convention This second annual Cincinnati Tattoo Arts Convention hits the Duke Energy Convention Center this weekend, during which guests can get ink from some 150 of the best local, national and international artists. In addition to the option to get a permanent reminder of your visit, you can also check out live sideshow entertainment from the likes of Alakazam the Human Knot, aerial burlesque artist Shannon Sexton, risky risqué performer Marlo Marquise and the jigsaw-tattooed Enigma. There will also be tattoo contests and seminars including advanced cover-up techniques. Special guests slated to attend are Shanghai Kate Hellenbrand, various Ink Master participants and the Black Ink Crew. 2 p.m.-midnight Friday; 11 a.m.-midnight Saturday; 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday. $20; $40 three-day pass. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown, villainarts.com. — MAIJA ZUMMO

SATURDAY 31

EVENT: Ohio Renaissance Festival Maidens, mages and minstrels take heed: 16th century England returns

to Waynesville, Ohio for adventure, merriment, craftsmen and giant turkey legs during the Ohio Renaissance Festival. The historically recreated Elizabethan village covers 30 acres with daily stage shows (dueling swordsmen, rowdy pirates and jousters); a Medieval marketplace with glassblowers, blacksmiths and leather experts; rides powered by humans; and Renaissance-style fair food ranging from bread bowls and mead to steak on a stick. Opening weekend offers buy-one, get-one adult tickets and themed weekends continue with Time Travelers Weekend Sept. 7-8 (free TARDIS parking). Through Oct. 27. $23 adults; $21 seniors; $9.50 children; free 5 and under. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville, renfestival. com. — MAIJA ZUMMO EVENT: Lunken Airport Days The Cincinnati Warbirds are taking over Lunken Airport for Lunken Airport Days, a chance for visitors to get up-close with jets, sport airplanes and a B-17 Aluminum Overcast bomber — a 65,000-pound, World War II-era “flying fortress.” The Warbirds are a nonprofit educational organization with the goal of preserving historic military aircraft, honoring veterans/current military and educating the public about all of the above. Airport Days will be offering


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ground tours of the planes and about 20 to 25 rides each morning in the B-17 (for a tax-deductible donation of $409-$475; call 920-3712244 or visit b17.org to book). There will also be free hot dogs, a static B-25 and other aircraft displays, helicopter rides, vendors and kids activities, a chance to checkout Lunken’s Art Deco tower and a color guard ceremony at noon each day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free admission. Lunken Airport, 262 Wilmer Ave., East End, cincinnatiwarbirds.org. — MAIJA ZUMMO

MONDAY 02

TUESDAY 03

MUSIC: Future and Meek Mill co-headline a show at Riverbend. See Sound Advice on page 43.

SEPT. 6 | $44 - $64

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tickets; $20 additional dog tickets. Great American Ball Park, 100 Joe Nuxhall Way, Downtown, reds.com. — MAIJA ZUMMO

YOUR WEEKEND TO DO LIST: LOCAL.CITYBEAT.COM

MOST TICKETS INCREASE $5 DAY OF SHOW All ticket sales are final. Artists and programs subject to change.

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EVENT: Cincinnati Reds Bark in the Park Bring your pup to the ballpark to see the Reds take on the Phillies. It is the final Bark in the Park of the season and there will be a pre-game dog parade around the field, a pet expo, dogs available for adoption from the SPCA and more. Dog seating is in a specified section and all dogs must enter through Gate 1. Dogs and humans are required to have a ticket and humans are required to sign a waiver for their dog companion. 5:40-9:30 p.m. Tuesday. $50 includes one human and one dog ticket; $30 additional human

DAVE KOZ & FRIENDS SUMMER HORNS

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EVENT: Labor Day Picnic at Stricker’s Grove Stricker’s Grove is closed to the public for most of the year, save for a few special days in the summer and fall, including during its annual Labor Day celebration. This family-owned and operated, 25-acre old-fashioned amusement park is home to tons of nostalgic games and classic rides. Play mini-golf and arcade games or take a ride on the Ferris wheel, tilt-a-whirl or swinging pirate ship. If it’s thrills you seek, hop on one of their two roller coasters: the Teddy Bear or Tornado. The wooden Tornado, completed in 1993, was constructed by park owner Ralph Stricker — the only person in the United

States to build his own roller coaster. 1-8 p.m. Monday. $14; free 2 and under. Stricker’s Grove, 11490 Hamilton Cleves Road, Hamilton, strickersgrove.com. — MAIJA ZUMMO

EVENT: Riverfest Launched more than four decades ago to celebrate the 10th anniversary of radio station WEBN, this Labor Day bash officially signals the end of summer with a series of colorful explosions in the sky. In addition to food, music, major traffic jams and one of the largest firework displays in the Midwest set to music from 102.7 FM (you are 100-percent guaranteed to hear “Smoke on the Water”), festgoers can expect to see half a million other humans and a river full of boats. During the lead-up to the big show, the Freestore Foodbank hosts its annual Rubber Duck Regatta, dropping as many as 200,000 yellow duckies from the Purple People Bridge into the Ohio River in a race to benefit the foodbank (buy a duck, feed a child, possibly win a car and $1 million). Ducks cost $5 and provide 15 meals each; they launch into the river at 3 p.m. Noon-10 p.m. Sunday. Free; $5 per duck. Sawyer Point, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown, webn.iheart. com, rubberduckregatta.org. — MAIJA ZUMMO

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October 14-20 Essen Kitchen Frida 602 La Jaiba

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more to be announced soon!

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ARTS & CULTURE A Change is Going to Come The world is beginning to feel the impacts of climate change. How will it affect Cincinnatians? BY C H R I S A N D ER S O N

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A view of Cincinnati’s skyline from Devou Park PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLIGNER

this effort and take advantage of these new jobs can have an important impact on the environment and poverty.” However, Dr. Brooke Crowley, associate professor of geology and anthropology at UC, says that Cincinnati is no island. “Most of the food we eat is not produced locally, and we rely on goods imported from distant places,” Crowely says. ”Prices will increase and availability of some commodities will likely decline.” Since Cincinnati will be less drastically impacted by climate change than other places around the world, our region could see an influx of immigration. While this could boost the region’s economy, without proper planning it could also result in increased traffic congestion, stress on infrastructure and a spike in the housing market. While there is uncertainty about how climate change will affect us throughout the 21st century, two things are clear: If we keep increasing the amount of CO2 in our atmosphere, things will get worse; and while the lives of every person on this planet will change with a warming world, it will be our most vulnerable — specifically the poor, the elderly and children — who will feel the greatest heat. The Mercantile Library will host a threepart Science & Nature Lecture about climate change, starting on Aug. 29 with “Understanding Climate Change,” followed by “Climate Change and Social Justice” on Sept. 12 and “Climate Change and Cincinnati Life” on Oct. 3. More info: mercantilelibrary.com.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable and marginalized groups — the youngest and oldest Cincinnatians, people of color and the poor.” A third of Cincinnati families also have food insecurity. Dr. Nancy Tuana, a professor of philosophy and women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Penn State University, will explore these issues even further on Sept. 12 during “Climate Change and Social Justice.” She says that higher food prices caused by drought conditions and famine would likely cause more families to struggle to feed their kids. So what can cities do to protect their citizens from the impacts of climate change? Without leadership at the federal and, at least in Ohio, the state level, cities will be key in implementing policies and programs to fight climate change’s effects. Cincinnati is part of the Climate Mayors effort, a network of U.S. mayors working together to transition their cities to run more sustainability. In 2018, the city adopted the Green Cincinnati Plan as a citywide effort to link sustainability and equity. This includes support for urban agriculture programs, efforts to reduce food waste, and support of “green jobs” that produce goods and services with positive environmental and social impacts. “New jobs will arise from energy efficiency improvements, as well as from increased commitment to the wind and solar industry, as well as to the electric vehicle industry,” Trott says. “Ensuring that those in the most need of jobs have the training they need to participate in

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water on and in our clay-rich hillsides,” Hunda says. “Wetter springs typically result in more slope failure, and these events can be expected to be more frequent with increased rainfall in the region.” But outside of the urban core, flooding can be particularly damaging to agriculture. Numbers released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that this has been the worst planting season on record for Ohio farmers — one of every seven acres of Ohio cropland went unplanted this year. As Nicole Gunderman, director of education at Gorman Heritage Farm, explains, farmers have always faced weather challenges, but now with more severity and frequency. “I think one of the biggest messages we need to get across about climate change is how it brings erratic, unpredictable and unrelenting changes in weather patterns,” says Gunderman, who will participate in the Mercantile’s Oct. 3 event, “Climate Change and Cincinnati Life.” Certainly, everyone will feel the heat of a warmer world. But that’s not to say everyone will feel climate change’s impacts equally — 45.3 percent of children within Cincinnati’s city limits live below the poverty line, according to data from the National Center for Children in Poverty. That’s the fourth highest rate in the U.S. among major cities. Dr. Carlie Trott, a community psychologist and assistant professor at the University of Cincinnati, will speak alongside Hunda on how climate change will “exacerbate existing inequalities by

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n 1963 legendary Soul singer Sam Cooke wrote “A Change is Gonna Come.” That same year, the average global carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere were around 319 parts per million (ppm), according to data from NASA. And though that’s not the kind of change Cooke was singing about, in the 56 years since his hit single, change has indeed come. This May, data from Hawaii’s Mauna Loa Observatory showed that CO2 levels had surpassed 415 ppm for the first time in human history. In less than 60 years, CO2 levels have increased nearly three times as much as they did in the previous 113 years. While our planet is a dynamic and complex system, research has shown that increases in atmospheric CO2 boost global temperatures. Worldwide, scientists and citizens alike are bracing for the impacts of a warmer world, which include rising sea levels, ocean acidification, drought, famine and megastorms. But how will Cincinnati, a city not situated on the coast and with ample fresh water for drinking and farming, fair as our global climate systems shift? The Mercantile Library, in partnership with Cincinnati’s Center for Public Engagement with Science, will host a three-part series to address that very question this fall, starting with “Understanding Climate Change” on Aug. 29. One of the experts involved is Dr. Brenda Hunda, curator of invertebrate paleontology at the Cincinnati Museum Center. She says that several climate models have predicted drastic changes to the Ohio River Valley. “For starters, this region will be hotter, with a possible 12.3 percent increase in average annual temperature, which means more high heat index days throughout the year,” Hunda says. Southwest Ohio will likely also experience more severe weather events similar to the tornadoes that hit Dayton earlier this spring; more rainfall is also expected. “Increased precipitation means more

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VISUAL ART

‘Dress Up, Speak Up’ Demands to be Seen BY M AC K EN ZI E M A N L E Y

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The figures within 21c Museum Hotel’s not confined to going to jail or being Dress Up, Speak Up: Regalia and Resistance someone’s servant.’ ” demand visibility as they lay out personal, The blackened tar is juxtaposed with social and political issues. The exhibition a lightly-colored background — what greets viewers when they first walk in to appears to be an intricately patterned the hotel’s lobby, with works displayed on mandala-esque wallpaper. Posed regally, multiple floors. Kaphar shows her deep reverence. Each piece grapples with contemporary On an adjacent wall is an homage to Eric identity by using elements such as costumGarner, a black man who died in 2014 after ing, makeup, self-adornment and embela New York City Police Department officer lishment. By reaching backward into put him a chokehold. Fahamu Pecou’s realhistory, these figures often seem to reach istically rendered painting depicts a black forward in an act of reclamation to a past man wearing sagging jeans and sneakers. denied by the white gaze. Alice Gray Stites, chief curator and museum director, explained during a recent tour that this exhibit contains several references to history revealing experiences held by varying cultures that have been dominated or altogether erased by the legacy of colonialism. “Those histories that become embedded in both personal and public memory eventually seep to the surface and often are expressed in the way we dress or present ourBisa Butler’s “Three Kings” at the 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati selves,” Stites says. “One PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLINGER of the artists in the show, Titus Kaphar, he specifically describes this work as ‘reconstructed He hunches over, elbows resting on his histories’ — taking Renaissance and old thighs. Backdropped by off-white, the figmaster paintings and telling a different ure appears to be transcending. Light lines side of the story. punctuated by dots orbit around him — “He says, ‘In the absence of adequate meant to be blessings, according to Pecou. facts, our hearts rifle through memories, Above his head in red crayon-like print foraging for satisfactory fictions.’ ” is the title of the work. “Breathe.” You can Kaphar, a MacArthur Fellow, recognizes almost feel the figure inhale and exhale. that black history has been depicted Other highlights include Jefferson visually in Western art as “enslaved, in Pinder’s film Afro-Cosmonaut/Alien (White servitude or impoverished,” as he cites in Noise), tucked away in a corner room on the exhibition’s description. In his work, he the first floor. Beverly McIver poses with deconstructs that history and in doing so, her childhood doll in dreamy, selfie-like uncovers shoved-away truths of the past. painted portraits. One of Nick Cave’s surFrom these revelations, those who have real “Soundsuits” stands tall. been made invisible become visible. Bisa Butler’s quilted “Three Kings” is He’s known for The Jerome Project, which colorful and vibrant. Through using the consists of a series of portraits that began traditional form of a quilt, she weaves when Kaphar was researching his father’s historical photographs into a new context. prison records only to find 99 other men Though Stites says the three black men that shared his first and last name. depicted were likely from the Midwest “An Icon for Destiny,” on display at 21c, or on a farm, Butler transforms them by runs parallel to that work. As much as giving them detailed and dapper clothing. Kaphar’s work sought to unearth what As a whole, Dress Up, Speak Up is both had been ignored, his focus hadn’t been compelling and resonant as the artists on women. In “Destiny,” a woman’s entire attempt to render what they know to be figure is covered in a thick layer of tar. true, both in history and personally — and Hands in her lap, her head is wrapped in oftentimes, both. an orange scarf and fabric of the same Dress Up, Speak Up: Regalia and shade is draped around her legs. Resistance opens with a reception Aug. “It’s black women who bear the burden 30 and runs through July 2020. More info: historically,” Stites says of the work. 21cmuseumhotels.com/cincinnati. “And the name Destiny, he wanted it to be — ‘There is another Destiny, you’re

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ONSTAGE

MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR THESE ‘DON’T MISS’ EVENTS

SEP. 23 - 29

NOVEMBER 2

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OCT. 14 - 20

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FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT CITYBEAT.COM

What to Expect On Cincy Stages This Season I N T ERV I E WS BY JAC K I E M U L AY

Cincinnati’s theater community is unique, vibrant and thriving with over four main commercial theaters, plus fresh college and community venues. As the 2019-2020 season slides into full gear, we sat down with the producing artistic directors from four Queen City institutions — the Cincinnati Miss Holmes kicked off Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s current season. Playhouse in the Park, the CincinPHOTO: MIKKI SCHAFFNER PHOTOGRAPHY nati Shakespeare Company, Ensemmore triumphant. It really has been a ble Theatre Cincinmulti-season arc. I first read Girl in the Red nati and Know Theatre of Cincinnati — to Corner back when we were planning our dive into what their respective seasons 21st season, as it was starting to coalesce, have to offer. and I knew (it didn’t fit). But boy, what a Though this interview was edited for great way to kick-off Season 22, “The Fight.” brevity and clarity, highlights include Seasons are influenced both by what’s selecting shows with diversity in mind going on in our artistic lives as a company — both onstage and behind the scenes — and as a community, but also in just the and producing works that resonate with realities of the world around us. Last year modern audiences, be it a twist on a classic seemed like a good time to confront the offering or an entirely new work. idea of fears and how we face them and CityBeat: What can we expect to see how we overcome them. And then really, thematically this season? what The Fight is all about is the struggles that we all can face. Whether on a grand Blake Robison, Playhouse in the Park: We scale or just within our own lives, whether don’t program seasons thematically. It’s it’s a struggle to overcome personal trauma, not a season about love or a season about or a struggle against greater forces in the hope or a season about challenge. The world. And how do we fight is really about bedrock of a Playhouse season is variety. how do we take action? And how do we As the flagship theater organization in mobilize against these forces to overcome? town, we see it as our responsibility to reach out to as broad a demographic as Brian Isaac Phillips, Cincinnati possible. So, every season at the Playhouse, Shakespeare Company: Thematically there’s going to be some musicals and one of the things that we’re going for is some dramas, some new plays and familythe Season of the Woman. We’re really friendly things, some plays that speak to sort of celebrating this community-wide diverse peoples and cultures. celebration of The Power of Her that ArtsWave is curating (to celebrate 100 years D. Lynn Meyers, Ensemble Theatre: I just since women’s suffrage). We really wanted think it’s really essential theater. And that to put that front and center in everything makes it sound like it’s all going to be sad that we were doing. Throughout the season and preachy. And it’s not; it’s glorious. Fun we’re having some traditionally male Home is going to completely uplift and roles being played by women, whether touch your heart. And Photograph 51, if it’s Sherlock Holmes or Hamlet. And you don’t know who Rosalind Franklin is, having women playwrights (such as) Kate you got to see that. And if you’ve ever had Hamill and a commission from Lauren a friend that’s been with you most of your Gunderson, or having women directors — life, 20th Century Blues is something you’ve Jemma Levy just did Miss Holmes for us. got to see. (This season) has something that And we’ve got Melinda Pfundstein coming I think appeals to the humanity in all of to do Hamlet; she’s from Utah Shakes. And us. It has something that will enliven and Sam White is coming to direct The Book engage as well as entertain. I also think of Will; she’s from Shakespeare in Detroit. that we are a little bit of a comfort in the And, of course, every show tends to have storm. a very strong female role and presence. Andrew Hungerford, Know Theatre: We’re really celebrating a lot of the women Last year, as we were looking together for that are already a part of Cincinnati Season 21, which was all focused around Shakespeare Company, and then some of fear, we knew that we would need to follow the guest artists that we’ve wanted to work that up with something that felt a little with in the field as well.


TV

‘Mindhunter’ Thrills, Leaves Us Wanting More R E V I E W BY JAC K ER N

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Netflix’s Mindhunter introduced the early days of criminal psychology and profiling when it premiered in 2017, following FBI agents Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff) and Bill Tench (Holt McCallany), along with psychologist and academic Wendy Carr (Anna Torv), as they create the bureau’s first Behavioral Science Unit in the late 1970s. Set in the early ’80s, Season 2 finds Jonathan Groff as Holden Ford (left) and Holt McCallany as Bill Tench the unit with a new boss — one that actuPHOTO: COURTESY OF NETFLIX ally takes the BSU’s work seriously and investigated by local forces — his unit invests in this new line of thought. steps in, with stakes higher than ever He seeks to empower Holden’s work, but before. It truly exposes the cracks in also to reel him in a bit. Last season ended the criminal justice system and law with Holden in a full-blown panic attack enforcement, especially as they relate to after getting a little too close to killer Ed people who are already disenfranchised. Kemper (who sadly appears only briefly in One thing the show does well is create a this season; Cameron Britton gave such a dark sense of foreboding without actually spot-on, chilling performance). That task showing more than a flash of gore. It’s falls to Bill, who not only has the pressures purely psychological, a nod to the work of his job to manage, but also an intense Holden and Bill’s team do. There’s nothing family crisis at home. wrong with subtlety and ambiguity, but If Bill’s child, Brian, seemed creepy last this season left so many unanswered season — not communicating or showing questions and unresolved plotlines — emotion, stealing photos of crime scenes including the mysterious ADT guy that’s and hiding them in his room — he ups been teasing viewers for two seasons — I the fear factor this time around when he’s feel just a tad shortchanged. Hopefully involved in a horrific incident with some we won’t have to wait two more years for a other kids. The storyline brings about the little resolution. debate of nature versus nurture, sending It doesn’t appear the popularity of true Bill on a painstaking mission to be a good crime media will subside anytime soon. As dad and husband while still doing his job, frightening and macabre as these sinister and feeling like he’s failing at everything. people and acts may be, it’s endlessly It’s a heartbreaking but compelling way to fascinating. That’s nothing new. People show more facets of his character. have been interested in serial killers since We also see more of Wendy’s personal before the term even existed — just watch and professional life this season, as she the reaction Bill gets from his neighbors delicately deals with not only being a when his work comes up in this season’s woman in a male-dominated field, but first episode. Bill reluctantly shares a few also with being gay when it was considered details with the guys at a cookout, much to a mental disorder by some of her own his wife’s chagrin. But they’re not repulsed. colleagues. Rather, they’re intrigued, eager to know A major draw of this series is the more about coming face-to-face with portrayal of real-life cases and criminals, pure evil. As counterintuitive as it may the latter being depicted with uncanny seem, many of the killers in Mindhunter accuracy by doppelganger performers. themselves are no different. They speak This season brings a long-awaited candidly about their crimes, or return to interview with Charles Manson (Damon the scene to relive the thrill. Herriman, who also portrays the cult No doubt Holden and Bill, too, will leader in Quentin Tarantino’s summer revisit their experiences from this season, blockbuster Once Upon a Time in… not for pleasure or intrigue, but to question Hollywood, and it’s clear why he’s the whether they did everything they could go-to) and David “Son of Sam” Berkowitz — to help those Atlanta mothers, to raise (Oliver Cooper), among others. a healthy, happy son. Because catching a But the team isn’t just doing research bad guy doesn’t always equate to solving anymore. When a chance encounter a crime. introduces Holden to the mothers of the Contact Jac Kern: @jackern victims of the Atlanta child murders — cases that aren’t being properly

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FOOD & DRINK

Meet Mochiko This sweet and savory Japanese-style pop-up creates works of art and delicious meals informed by traditional methods BY S E A N M . PE T ER S

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Mochiko’s ramen uses noodles from Keizo Shimamoto, who ran New York’s acclaimed Ramen Shack PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLINGER

like an ocean wave, the way the dough has been folded like an accordion. The sweetness from the plum essence complements the laminated buckwheat’s buttery layers, only to have your palate shift to the slightly tart aspects of the pickled juice. Seek the pastry out at Pleasantry and 1215 Wine Bar & Coffee Lab. (Mochiko’s vanilla melonpan, a fluffy sweet bun that resembles a ripe melon, is also available at 1215.) Townsend says she likes to bake with what’s seasonal, so expect to see a variety of offerings as their business expands. Mochiko’s sweet and savory offerings are simultaneously works of art and delicious meals made from conscientiously sourced ingredients and crafted with masterful precision. The duo elegantly prepares food that is informed, but not limited by, traditional methods. “I just do classic Japanese dishes,” Bentz says. “Japanese food, if you’re Japanese, there’s not a lot of rules. But if you’re not Japanese, you have to follow some rules. You’ve got to do it old-school... It’s just about caring.” Follow Mochiko on Instagram @mochikocincy to find out when/where the next pop-up is.

FIND MORE RESTAURANT NEWS AND REVIEWS AT CITYBEAT.COM/ FOOD-DRINK

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ketchup-based sauce on top, heavy with Worcestershire, giving the dish a salty acidic kick. To take a bite you had break through a mouthful of egg into the chicken fried rice with your chopsticks and lift the parcel into your mouth with the care of a game of Jenga. Now on to Townsend’s pastries. First up was mochi. Mochi is a subcategory of wagashi, which is a variety of Japanese treats popularly paired with matcha tea. Townsend’s was shaped like an intricate flower with dozens of overlapping handcut petals. Wagashi are often made to resemble seasonal produce, so in wintertime you could expect the dessert to be shaped like a chestnut or a sweet potato instead of a blossom. This mochi was made with rice flour and buckwheat for the wrapper with a decadent filling of chocolate and Earl Grey tea ganache — not a strictly traditional filling like sweet bean paste, but so delicious. Next on the bakery tray was a blueberry sticky bun dusted with kinako, which is roasted soybean flour that’s similar in taste and texture to peanut butter powder. This is Townsend’s take on peanut butter and jelly. Blueberry jam is cooked into the brioche-like pastry for a sweet contrast to the toasty nuttiness of the kinako. Her ume kouign-amann is a hybridization of sorts: a French croissant-like pastry glazed with syrup made from salted and pickled Japanese plums. The bun looks

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While noodles boiled on the stove in the Incubator Kitchen, Bentz started to build a bowl of tori shoyu ramen. He began with a ladle of chi-yu, clarified rendered chicken fat from bones provided by TS Farms in New Vienna, Ohio. Then came the shoyu tare, a soy sauce-based concentrate, and then broth — clear and beautifully fragrant when mixed with the other liquids. Shimamoto’s noodles were then dropped in and arranged with care. Tender char siu (essentially Chinese barbecued pork), sliced chicken breast, boiled egg, pickled bamboo shoots and sliced scallion went on top, then more chi-yu to give it a beautiful sheen, with a nori garnish. After, Bentz served gyokai tsukemen, something I’ve never eaten: cold noodles dipped in a separate bowl of hot seafood broth with an egg and pork. This broth captured the salty essence of the sea with a fleet of thick umami-packed flavors. The cold noodles created a wonderful contrast to the hot soup. Slivers of lemon zest cut through the rich broth with a citric zing. The final dish was omurice, a captivating piece of performance art. A specially shaped mold was filled with chicken fried rice and an eye-shaped omelet was placed on top. The performative flair came in when Bentz delicately sliced the top of his seamless omelet with a razor-sharp knife. The omelet unfurled like an umbrella and creamy scrambled eggs rained down from the center. Bentz then poured a

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ochiko is a new Cincinnati culinary endeavor that takes inspiration from a style of Japanese cuisine known as “yoshoku,” which incorporates Western recipes with Eastern ingredients and sensibilities. Erik Bentz cooks the savories and Elaine Townsend bakes the sweets. If you’ve dined at Money Chicken or Pleasantry recently, it’s possible you’ve seen adverts for one of Mochiko’s popup events. Bentz’s ramen, omurice and fried katsu cutlets are served alongside Townsend’s beautiful and diverse range of pastries and desserts. Since their first pop-up in May, they’ve already established a cult-like following — some devotees have yet to miss a meal and their August dinner at Money Chicken sold out in the first hour. “Ultimately our endgame is to open up our own place, but right now we’re just putting our name out there,” Townsend says. Bentz and Townsend met in California and decided to pursue a career together. Both earned degrees in the culinary arts at their respective colleges: Townsend studied at Orange Coast College, while Bentz went to the Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State. Afterward they set up shop in Chicago. While there, Townsend was a pastry chef and ran the bakery at Fat Rice, where she developed desserts with Chinese, Macanese and Portuguese influences. Bentz was the chef at The Izakaya at Momotaro, acclaimed for its Japanese comfort food. Originally from this area, Bentz knew there was potential to bring their style of Japanese food to Cincinnati. “I always wanted to come back here to cook,” Bentz says. Mochiko currently works out of the Incubator Kitchen Collective in Newport, and recently invited us for a tasting of their dishes. Bentz prepared two different noodle bowls and an egg and rice dish and Townsend served three kinds of pastries. If you’ve explored all of the city’s ramen options, you owe it to yourself to experience a bowl of Mochiko’s incredibly thoughtful noodle soup. Mochiko gets its noodles from Keizo Shimamoto, who operated New York’s acclaimed Ramen Shack. Shimamoto now makes noodles in small batches and Bentz figures a Mochiko popup is the only place to eat them outside of New York City.

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WHAT’S THE HOPS

Oktoberfests, Goat Yoga, New Beers and Brewery Anniversaries BY G A R I N PI R N I A

S

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ummer might be winding down, but the next month will be filled with anniversary parties, Oktoberfests (including Oktoberfest Zinzinnati Sept. 20-22) and a few goat yogas. First up, goats. (Note: These events always sell out.) On Sept. 8, Fifty West will host goat yoga at their Production Works. Tickets are $25 and include a complimentary beer. Then on Sept. 15, 16 Lots will host two goat yoga sessions as part of their second anniversary party weekend. Yoga tickets cost $25 and include your choice of a mimosa or a pint of Lulu Blonde Ale. Taft’s Brewpourium is getting in on the animal craze with two separate events. There’s goat yoga on Sept. 17 and then on Friday the 13, the Brewpourium partners with the League for Animal Welfare and BodyMind Balance to bring Black Cat Pilates to the taproom aka Pilates with roaming black cats. Tickets are $18 and attendees receive $1 off pints, plus a percentage of sales goes toward the animal charity. Oktoberfest season starts as early as August in Zinzinnati. The party continues on Sept. 14 as Little Miami Brewing Co. throws the inaugural Old Milford Oktoberfest with live music; a steinholding competition; food from Lehr’s, Pickles & Bones and Padrino; beers from Little Miami; and games. On the same day, celebrate “Oaktoberfest” in Oakley Square. The free event features performances from School of Rock and a Polka band, Aglamesis Bro.’s ice cream, a chicken dance, kid’s entertainment and brews from MadTree. Also on Sept. 14, West Side Brewing begins their Oktoberfest celebration. Until Sept. 19, they’ll have various German-inspired food and events and entertainment like a stein-holding competition and a live performance from Bidinger Musikanten, a 16-piece band from Germany. Or on Sept. 14, avoid Oktoberfests completely and get some real exercise (sorry, stein-holders) with Bikes and Beers. Start at Rhinegeist’s distribution facility on Spring Grove Avenue in Camp Washington

and take a 15- or 30-mile ride around town. After the ride, bikers receive a pint glass, a koozie, a raffle ticket and two free pints. Tickets cost $25-$60 and proceeds go toward the Cincinnati Cycle Club. Sonder is hosting Mason Deerfield Oktoberfest Sept. 27-28, featuring German beer, “festive” food from BrewRiver, a German homebrew competition, live music, a costume parade and contest and, of course, a stein-holding competition.

New Beer • Rhinegeist has released three new beers. Mushhushshu is a dark beer that sat in New Riff barrels for 10 months and it’s Rhinegeist’s first barrel-aged beer of the year; find it in bottles at the taproom. While you’re there, try Y’all Peachy, a hoppy wheat ale collaboration with Atlanta brewery New Realm Brewing. Roar, another new beer, is a “regal Imperial IPA” and is available on draft and in four-packs — with a sleek black and gold lion design — at the brewery. • Wooden Cask recently released The Peach Truck, an American wheat brewed with peaches from Nashville’s The Peach Truck. Try it on tap at the brewery. They also tapped their spiced pumpkin ale beer, because Starbucks also started selling its PSL. Yes, it’s too early for pumpkin anything, but whatever. • A couple of weeks ago, The Common Beer Company released Burdicks Brown, a brown ale brewed with Cocoa Puffs and named after bartender/assistant brewer Nicholas Burdick. • Urban Artifact has released Centerpiece, their latest Midwest Fruit Tart. It was brewed with 1,500 pounds of pineapple and 1,500 pounds of strawberries.

Events • On Aug. 29, come to the Samuel Adams Cincinnati Taproom for flights of OTR Candy Bar treats paired with exclusive Sam Adams beers. The cost is $20. • On Sept. 5, Bircus Brewing hosts the second annual Pies for Pride Fundraiser.

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Fifty West goat yoga PHOTO: PROVIDED BY FIF T Y WEST

Bid on a silent auction and throw pies at people’s faces. Proceeds support Children’s Hospital’s Transgender Health Clinic, which gives psycho-social support to young patients and their families. • Grainworks’ second anniversary bash takes place Sept. 6-8. The weekend-long party includes live music, food, 25 beers on tap and a special can release. • The second annual 12th Street Shuffle — 12 bars on 12th street in OTR and Pendleton — takes place Sept. 7. Stop at 3 Points, Nation Kitchen and Bar, Boomtown Biscuits, rhinehaus and Cobblestone for $4 beers from 3 Points, MadTree, Streetside and West Side Brewing. Tickets are $12 and proceeds benefit Give Back Cincinnati. • On Sept. 7, the Williamsburg Honor Fest — which also coincides with Old Firehouse Brewery’s fifth anniversary — takes places in downtown Williamsburg. The event honors fallen officers, firefighters and military service members. • On Sept. 20, millions of people are supposedly going to storm Area 51, located in

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the Nevada desert. Participants are going to livestream the event, so Swine City has called their bluff and will host an Area 51 raid watch party. They will have alienthemed drinks, a tinfoil hat contest and give $1 off to anyone dressed as an alien. The truth is out there. • On Sept. 21, head to Listermann for their XI Anniversary party. Expect rare and one-off beers on draft and in bottles, including a special XI variant sold to VIPs. Listermann is offering three different sessions and each comes with drink tickets, anniversary bottles pre-sale and a commemorative tasting glass. • On Sept. 22, Braxton and Queen City Bulldog Rescue host Brews + Bulldogs: 3 at the brewery. Tickets cost $20-$25 and include a pint glass, a koozie and five raffle tickets. They’ll have a dog kissing booth, raffle baskets and baby pools (for the dogs).

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The centerpiece mural of the newly opened BlaCk Coffee Lounge is colorful, featuring a large tree, coffee beans and music notes, as well as a street light with two intersecting street signs labeled “culture” and “community.” The lounge itself strives to be that intersection, a place where people of all communities can congregate to celebrate black culture while enjoying great coffee. “You wouldn’t walk into just The exterior of BlaCk Coffee Lounge any coffee shop and hear Cactus P H OTO : E L I Z A B E T H DAV I S Jack (Travis Scott) rapping,” says Means Cameron, a Cincinnati places in every community,” he says. native, avid coffee drinker and the owner “Coffee shops should provide energy and of both BlaCk Coffee and the BlaCk OWned support to the communities that they clothing brand/boutique, housed in the are in. I think we have great coffee in storefront next door. Cincinnati, but I didn’t feel the coffee To Cameron, there is a deeper shops were really connecting with connection between BlaCk Coffee and his specifically non-white communities. We boutique than their adjacent storefronts. expect people to visit BlaCk Coffee for what “I created BlaCk OWned to inspire it represents and brings to the community a generation to be conscious of their and while they’re here they’ll discover that community through fashion,” he says. “I the coffee is amazing, too.” created BlaCk Coffee to push the culture BlaCk Coffee’s coffee is supplied by La and give the community a space to build Terza and uses three roast varieties for its on their inspirations.”  non-espresso-based coffee: their house If you like Hip Hop and R&B, the “Wakanda” blend is a mix of Ethiopian, playlist at BlaCk Coffee won’t disappoint. Rwandan and Brazilian beans; the other Within the span of one hour on a Monday two use beans from Colombia and Sumamorning, two speakers in the corner of tra. Alongside those options, the menu the shop reserved for live performances — showcases a variety of teas, juices, sandboth poetry and music — played songs by wiches, pastries and baked goods. Queen Latifah, Prince, Solange, Playboi All of the food served at BlaCk Coffee Carti and Jay-Z, Cameron’s favorite rapper. come from black-female-owned busiThe décor at BlaCk Coffee is modern and nesses in Cincinnati; pastries are provided comfortable, with leathery couches and by Sweet Petit Desserts, the cakes are from chairs. Stylized portraits of Tupac Shakur, Shana’s Sweet Treats and sandwiches are Biggie Smalls, Cardi B and Beyoncé adorn made by personal chef Chanel Jordan of the walls and a variety of plants get a Chanel’s Upscale Homestyle Cooking. healthy dose of sunlight from the row of “I chose Chanel because I respect her floor-to-ceiling windows facing the street. hustle. She’s a black-owned small business Cameron and a close-knit team of and her food is fire,” Cameron says. associates spent over three years working The coffee shop held its soft opening on to achieve his dream of opening a shop July 19 and was officially open for business at BlaCk Coffee’s current location and July 27. Cameron says they had over 1,000 navigated a variety of setbacks and delays, customers in the first week and expect including needing to redraw and submit more business as word of mouth travels. floor plans three times to pass inspection “I believe the community fell in love with from the City of Cincinnati. the space before we ever opened our doors,” Bla’szé, a local artist and a graduate of he says. “We’re changing the downtown the University of Cincinnati’s College-Concommunity and the way people do coffee servatory of Music, is BlaCk Coffee’s manin Cincinnati and people love that.” ager and has been a part of the process of Bla’szé says, “Everyone who has visited opening BlaCk Coffee since its inception. us are as excited to see us as we are to be “(Cameron) is like my big brother,” here,” adding that the only feedback she’s Bla’szé says. “He’s very business savvy, so heard is that patrons wanted longer hours. he teaches me daily and with my knowlThey listened. BlaCk Coffee is now open 8 edge of customer service and the coffeea.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. house life, I’m able to help him, too. I forget And as a steady flow of customers come he’s my boss most times because now he in and out of BlaCk Coffee’s doors — some feels more like family.” hunkering down to work, others just stopCameron claims to have sunk a majority ping by to get a caffeine fix — it’s clear that of his life savings into opening BlaCk CofCameron’s long-delayed dream is well on fee and has been adamant in his vision of its way to being realized. its success. BlaCk Coffee Lounge, 824 Elm St., “My travels have revealed that coffee Downtown, facebook.com/blackcoffeecincy. shops are some of the most important

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Visceral Maturity

MUSIC

Cincinnati Post Punk band Hissing Tiles’ Boychoir is a cerebral, gut-punch examination of things like institutional oppression and male toxicity BY B R O DY K EN N Y

O

Hissing Tiles’ Boychoir will be released Aug. 30 on Whited Sepulchre Records. The band plays a free album release show on Aug. 31 at MOTR Pub. More info: hissingtiles.bandcamp.com.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

Other tracks delve into topics like male accountability and machismo entitlement, multiple instances of which have been witnessed by Squeri personally, who says he’s gone through his own journey of growth.   “Speaking as someone who used to be an idiot 20-year-old, I feel a lot of the worst opinions I had were changed from one-onone deep conversations with people close to me,” he says.  Ziedses des Plantes, a father of two girls, stresses that there is a personal connection behind what they’re trying to impart.  “If we’re shouting at stuff, we’re also shouting about things like this affecting the people we love,” he says.  Though Hissing Tiles have given their sound more nuance and their message more layers, their intention is to keep striking listeners right in the gut as well as the brain. “If I’m going to try to approach those topics in any kind of art form, I feel like I would not be true to myself if it wasn’t visceral,” Squeri says.

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new name — one which fit Squeri’s criteria of being “kinetic, nihilistic and abstract” (and has seemingly gotten them confused for tile wholesalers more than once) — but needed a permanent drummer. Squeri knew Apfelbeck, of Electronic Dance Rock band Fluffer, from his time in Bloomington, Indiana. According to Ziedses des Plantes, Hissing Tiles “came together” once Apfelbeck rounded out the trio. Chemistry between Ziedses des Plantes and Apfelbeck helps to conjure the Hissing Tiles backbone of songs like PHOTO: PROVIDED Boychoir’s second track, the slinking “Rist,” which came about from a rehearsal session featuring just the two of them. In the works since and we try to assemble it into a working 2016, Boychoir is an act module,” Apfelbeck says. of maturity and refinement from a band Apfelbeck, who’s describes the album as able to retain their earlier work’s rawness “broken dance music,” made his work on of feeling without making something that “The Two of Us” sound like a malfunctioncould be crafted in just any basement ing drum machine. Inspiration was also by just any group. Recorded with Jacob taken from Brooklyn Electronic producer Tippey of Calumet, who also recorded Oneohtrix Point Never. the band’s first two EPs, the album makes Although no one would mistake Boythrilling use of the exploratory realm of choir for Easy Listening, Squeri is deliberPost Punk, adding vibraphone, choral ate about a sound that’s intense but not vocals (from Maggie Cleary and Regina off-putting, such as with his vocals, which Squeri, Squeri’s sister and bassist in are anchored in his diaphragm but aren’t Columbus’ Slimfit), birdsong samples and incapable of volleying, like on “I Make even a washing machine as percussion, Contact.” without any of it ever coming across as “I like things that are unsettling and ostentatious.  abrasive but also it needs to be, for me at Even the more traditional elements of least, palatable to some degree,” he says. guitar, bass and drums are given a shift. The lyrical content and song topics of Squeri, who has two prepared guitars Boychoir are also important to the point and one standard guitar in a “weird tunthat total abrasion would be a hindrance to ing,” says the intention “is to treat it like getting a message across. an appliance more than an instrument.” Across 42 minutes, Hissing Tiles are Album closer “The Idiot Lights” opens with throwing shade at institutional oppresa bass loop made from Ziedses des Plantes sion and gender-policing in the context of singing different tones into his bass’ pickthings like religion. The opening title track, ups until he ran out of breath.  inspired by Squeri’s Catholic upbringing, Ziedses des Plantes’ aversion to writing “is about an event that every boy inevitably repetitive music has resulted in some experiences — the first time he is punished good-natured teasing from his bandmates. for behaving like a girl.” “Erik comes in with 14 ideas per song,

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n the wall of Michael Squeri’s living room in Northside is a four-by-four arrangement of framed records by Elvis Costello, an artist who, at first blush, might not seem all that kindred with Squeri and his Noise Rock/Post Punk outfit, Hissing Tiles, whose music sounds more in line with the tightly-wound styles of bands like Wire or Iceage. But listening closely to Hissing Tiles’ forthcoming album, Boychoir, a lyric like “Man uses words to dress up his vile instincts” from Costello’s “Monkey to Man” would fit perfectly into their thesis. Costello’s aforementioned indictment of toxic masculinity was released in 2004, before such a phrase had been popularized to the point of being completely misunderstood by those not willing to do even a minute of research. It was Dr. John P. McCombe, of the University of Dayton, who, in 2009, wrote: “Costello complicates most every trope of masculinity prevalent in the Rock music of the late 1970s.” Make the genre more niche and the decade more contemporary and you have an apt descriptor of Hissing Tiles and what they’re showing 2010s Noise Rock and Post Punk is capable of being, both sonically and socially. The band, which features Squeri on guitar and vocals, Erik Ziedses des Plantes on bass and vocals and Patrick Apfelbeck on drums, has been around since 2012. However, it wasn’t always with that lineup, or even that name. Squeri and Ziedses des Plantes started the band with the name “Gazer,” a moniker that was chosen without total enthusiasm and whose connotations started to undercut their intentions. “I was super-uncomfortable with the name,” Squeri says, “Because we were a band with three dudes, with a lot of yelling and we have the name ‘Gazer.’ ” The band’s first two EPs, Fake Bulbs and Phone Commercial, recorded as Gazer, were released on a 12-inch in 2014. BJ Marsee, the group’s first long-term drummer, was with the band for two years before leaving amicably in 2015, prior to the name change. Drumming duties for their debut full-length, Aces Read Me to Sleep, were split between Marsee and Joseph Frankl. Upon Marsee’s departure and the birth of Ziedses des Plantes’ first daughter in 2014, it wasn’t entirely clear what was to become of the band, which went inactive for the better part of a year. They had a

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SPILL IT

An Unearthed Local Soul Classic BY M I K E B R EEN

BY M I K E B R EE N

In Other (Good) News

With everything from refugee abuse to nuking hurricanes dominating the discourse today, good news feels like a mentalhealth imperative. Music legend David Byrne is doing his part to help alleviate the stress of headline browsing with his new Reasons to Be Cheerful website, which shares original journalism “meant to inspire and uplift.” Byrne says he came up with the idea for the solutions-oriented news site (reasonstobecheerful.world) after finding himself “depressed half the day” just from reading the morning newspaper. Early stories have included pieces on college education programs for inmates and an arts community in a small town in India. Byrne had started the project in 2016, but recently re-launched it on a broader scale, with an eye on expanding into video, podcasts and other mediums.

Presidential Playlist

When our current president makes music-related news, it’s often been about how artists are furious that he uses their music at his rallies. But our previous president recently celebrated his love of music in a much more agreeable manner and none of the musicians spotlighted are complaining. Barack Obama shared a list of his and his wife’s favorite music of late, a fairly regular practice for the former first couple. Their eclectic “Summer Playlist 2019” includes Pop hits (like “Señorita” by Shawn Mendes and Camila Cabello and “Juice” by Lizzo); hip choices like Koffee’s “Toast,” Sharon Van Etten’s “Seventeen” and GoldLink’s “Joke Ting;” and older classics by The Spinners, Steely Dan, Ella Fitzgerald, A Tribe Called Quest, Charles Mingus and Lauryn Hill.

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In 1968, when riots following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. left Cincinnati torn and on edge, Steve Reece had a plan to help kickstart the healing process. The future civic leader and businessman started a talent show for local residents to bring some positivity and unity to local communities like Evanston and Avondale. The events that came out of Reece’s Operation Step Up program proved incredibly popular and also led to a personal relationship that would change his life forever. One of the singers who participated in the Operation Step Up talent shows was 18-yearold Barbara Howard. Reece was so impressed with her talBarbara Howard’s 1969 album On the Rise ent, he decided to go all in and PHOTO: COLEMINE RECORDS make an album with her. That album, On the Rise, was “So that LP that walked into the store was never the huge hit it was intended to be, the source material (for the reissue),” Cole but it was the start of a 38-year love story. says of the lovingly restored album that Reece and Howard were married and was released this past February through had three children, including onetime Colemine. “We sent it to the same person Cincinnati vice mayor and former member that Numero uses for all of their restoration of the Ohio House of Representatives Alicia and they made it sound beautiful. It Reece. sounds way better than the original.” Released in 1969, On the Rise had a very Photographer Whitney Pelfrey helped limited run and was released mostly on clean up and recreate the original album a local level, so vinyl copies of the album cover from the same source copy. fetched a pretty penny among traders. In On Aug. 23, Colemine released more of 2016, one of those copies found its way to Howard’s music, this time featuring a track Loveland’s Plaid Room Records, run by even rarer than On the Rise. brothers Terry and Bob Cole, who also “The only reason I even knew Barbara operate the renowned Soul/Funk record Howard is because she had a 45 that was a label Colemine Records. deep-Funk head cut,” Cole says of “I Don’t “We had the record on the floor for 500 Want Your Love,” a 45 release that Reece bucks for like five weeks,” Terry Cole told Cole was just a “throwaway groove.” says of Plaid Room’s fateful On the Rise The song had become a cult classic for rarepurchase. “And then one day I was like, groove DJs all over the world. ‘I’m going to listen to this thing.’ And then “It’s nasty,” Cole says of the track. “Like I was like, ‘This is pretty good. I wonder this holy-shit, insane type of Midwest deep why (noted reissue label) Numero Group or Funk.” someone hasn’t (tried to reissue) this.’ ” Colemine released “I Don’t Want Your Cole contacted Steve Reece and, when Love” as it was issued originally — on he heard the backstory — the love story 7-inch vinyl. The new 45 is backed with On — behind the LP, he knew he wanted to the Rise track “The Man Above.” reissue it through Colemine. Working on the Barbara Howard “Good record,” Cole says. “Better story.” projects with Reece has been one of the Cole says that he was impressed with more rewarding experiences of Cole’s the sound quality, which was exceptionally career in the music biz. high for a locally-produced, DIY album. “Maybe my favorite moment of running “It just sounds expensive,” he says. “The the label was when Steve and Alicia came first time I heard it, I was like, ‘This record sounds like how a ’67 Aretha Franklin to the store when the (On the Rise) LPs record would sound — it has strings and got here and we all listened to the record horns and the arrangements are proper together,” Cole says. “And Steve was just and everything sounds good. like, ‘Man.’ Because she passed away (in “I was like, ‘Steve, you could have just 2008) and this was probably the first time bought her a ring. You had the most that Alicia’s ever heard this record as it expensive courtship known to man.’ ” should sound. Same with Steve — he probThe path to Colemine’s reissue of the ably hadn’t heard the record other than album wasn’t easy. Reece didn’t have the some shitty CD transfer in like 30 years.” master tapes from the recording sessions. Contact Mike Breen: mbreen@citybeat.com In fact, he didn’t even have a copy of the LP.

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Friday • Southgate House Revival

27 Years of Live Stand-Up Comedy in Cincinnati!

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Will Payne Harrison with Chelsea Ford and The Trouble and My Brother’s Keeper

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“She just likes Cincinnati more than me,” admits Americana songwriter Will Payne Harrison about the subject of a second single off his new album, Living With Ghosts. The track — “Anne Marie” — was written in the fruitless hopes it would convince a certain young woman to leave the Queen City for Harrison’s home in Nashville. Harrison grew up in Louisiana, simmering in its rich musical heritage and culture. Then, five years ago, he made the move to Nashville hoping to find work as a music publicist. “After a swift Nashville kick-in-the-butt I realized that I could do it if I worked hard,” Harrison recently wrote in a post on Facebook. Since then, he’s released two albums and an EP, chronicling his development along the way as a songwriter to be reckoned with. Living With Ghosts is an engaging dispatch, a shaken mixture of Bayou and Nashville influences settling in a solution of 100-proof small-town America. “(The album) represents my growth as an artist, songwriter and musician,” Harrison wrote in August on social media, “but (it’s) also a reconnection to my Louisiana roots.” Although he’s obviously no stranger to our greater Cincinnati region, the album release show will be his first here with what he calls the “Nashville band,” consisting of Tim Kuras on drums, Steven Dunn on bass and Ben de la Cour on lead guitar. Harrison’s first album, East Nashville Blues, was an exploration of Country and Bluegrass songwriter traditions, a trip down hallowed hallways and a bold

Judah & The Lion PHOTO: PROVIDED

opening statement. That was followed by last year’s Blue, an EP collecting primarily cover tunes bound by references to the color blue. As for what lies ahead, one would be forgiven to assume more tracks of unrequited admiration are on deck — after all, the first single on Ghosts was also written about a woman who caught his eye, this time in Lafayette. Not so, Harrison assures. “I think I met my quota for the year on songs about women,” he jokes. “From now on, it’s all murder ballads, whiskey and Gospel songs.” (Bill Furbee)

Judah & The Lion with PUBLIC and Stephen Puth Sunday • Sawyer Point

If the broadened access to music in the digital age is leading to a lessening importance in genre classifications, Judah & The Lion might just be the poster children for the streaming generation. The band has found a huge audience with their blurred stylistic lines, mixing Hip Hop beats, Electronic sounds and Americana


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instrumentation like the banjo into a poppy AltRock foundation for a style they accurately dubbed “Folk Hop N’ Roll.” That’s also the title of Judah & The Lion’s 2016 sophomore album, which spawned a breakthrough single, the Gold-certified “Take It All Back.” After that hit, things were going well for the band, which was playing in front of increasingly larger audiences. But behind the scenes, things weren’t going so well for front man Judah Akers. “His parents got divorced about two years ago as we were on the road,” says banjo player Nate Zuercher in a recent phone interview from his Nashville home. “Things were going up and up and up for the band. He had a lot to deal with back home. It was very confusing. It’s this inner struggle about not knowing how to feel about anything and things not going the way they should overall.” “There are also mental health things he was dealing with. It’s his story and we know the people involved so it was easy for (singer/mandolin player) Brian (Macdonald ) and I to relate to it. He was willing to put them out, and I’m thankful and proud he did that.” Though sometimes centered on somber themes, the upbeat songs on the new album should translate well live. “We love to keep the energy going (in the live show),” Zuercher says. “A lot of the songs are really heavy, but we want to keep things positive and we want to be real and honest but not discouraging. We put so much thought and energy into the show. We thought about the live show the entire time we made the record.” Judah & the Lion will headline KISS 107.1 FM’s “Just Show Up Show” at Sawyer Point ahead of Sunday’s Riverfest fireworks extravaganza on the river. Cincinnati AltPop trio PUBLIC, which recently signed to Island Records, will also appear at the free, 5 p.m. concert. (Jeff Niesel)

As the end of the decade nears, both Future and Meek Mill could make a convincing case for having shaped Hip Hop’s evolution through the 2010s. The raspy-voiced Future, who hails from Atlanta, laid down the melodic blueprint for his city’s current scene — his legendary mixtape trilogy in 2015, which included Dirty Sprite 2, Beast Mode and his collaborative album with Drake, What a Time To Be Alive, solidified a Trap Rap criteria that now dominates both the airwaves and streaming charts. Dirty Sprite 2 best encapsulates Future’s artistry: he croons atop lush, almost cinematic instrumentals, contorting his robotically autotuned delivery into a series of voice cracks and sighs that illustrate his pain. Riffing off of the traditional “Rock star” archetype, Future embodies the hedonism of life on the road while lamenting the loneliness and addiction that soon comes with them. It’s trunkrattling music you can feel a little guilty about getting hyped to. In recent years, success has allowed Future to delve into more experimental territory. The Save Me EP, which dropped in June, is among his moodiest work to date, especially the track “Shotgun,” which merges steely R&B with the Dream Pop glossolalia of the ’80s. While Future shines as an aesthete, Philadelphia’s Meek Mill is noted for his storytelling. Making his major label debut in 2012 with Dreams and Nightmares, a gritty LP that juxtaposes introspective tales with vengeful bangers, sometimes on the same track. An arrest and sentencing for parole violation in 2017 made him a folk hero of sorts after abuses of discretion by judge Genece Brinkley were brought to light. Free Meek, a docuseries on the legal battle produced by Jay-Z, was released via Amazon Prime earlier this month. His latest album, Championships, is a testament to the support he’s garnered over the past few years. It’s an hourlong effort with a star-studded cast of collaborators, from Cardi B to Kodak Black to Jay-Z himself. With a Drake-featuring hit single (“Going Bad”) still getting radio spins, it’s safe to say Meek’s having an exceptional year. (Jude Noel)

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LISTINGS

CityBeat’s music listings are free. Send info to Mike Breen at mbreen@citybeat.com. Listings are subject to change. See CityBeat.com for full music listings and all club locations. H is CityBeat staff’s stamp of approval.

WEDNESDAY 28

BLIND LEMON - Tom Roll. 8 p.m. Acoustic. Free.

BRICKHOUSE PUB & GRUB - The Twirlers. 7 p.m. R&B/Pop. Free. CAFFÈ VIVACE - Blue Wisp Big Band. 8 p.m. Big Band Jazz. $10. HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Brad Myers Trio. 6 p.m. Jazz. Free. KNOTTY PINE - Dallas Moore. 10 p.m. Country. Free.

H H

MOTR PUB - Ramonda Hammer. 10 p.m. Rock. Free.

NORTHSIDE TAVERN - Ghost Town Remedy with Roof Rabbit and Bon Air. 10 p.m. Indie Pop/Rock. Free.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) - Adam Flaig and The Jellyfish. 9:30 p.m. Rock. Free. STANLEY’S PUB - El Ritmo Del Manana. 9 p.m. Latin Jazz. Cover.

THURSDAY 29

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL - Philip Paul Trio. 7:30 p.m. Jazz. Free. BLIND LEMON - Billy Otten. 8 p.m. Acoustic. Free. BREWRIVER CREOLE KITCHEN - Ricky Nye. 7 p.m. Blues/Boogie Woogie. Free. CAFFÈ VIVACE - The Jazz Coaster Hot 4. 8 p.m. Jazz. COMMON ROOTS - Open Mic. 8 p.m. Various. Free.

HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Marc Wolfley Trio. 6 p.m. Jazz. Free.

Cold Blood, Low End, Fixation and Treason. 8:30 p.m. Hardcore. $10, $12 at the door. RIVERBEND MUSIC CENTER - KISS. 7:30 p.m. Rock. $39.50-$250.

H

RIVERSEDGE - Who’s Bad with Freak Mythology and Moment 44. 6:30 p.m. Pop/Rock/Various. Free. SCHWARTZ’S POINT Society Jazz Orchestra. 8 p.m. Jazz. $10.

H

NEWPORT ON THE LEVEE - Summer Music on the Levee with Doghouse. 7 p.m. Rock. Free.

STANLEY’S PUB - The Qtet. 10 p.m. Jazz Fusion. Free.

NORTHSIDE YACHT CLUB - In Cold Blood with

SEASONGOOD PAVILION - It’s Commonly Jazz with Mandy Gaines and Friends. 6 p.m. Jazz. Free.

THOMPSON HOUSE - N3W Y3ar. 8 p.m. Hip Hop. $10.

FRETBOARD BREWING COMPANY - River City. 8 p.m. Pop/Rock. Free.

MEMORIAL HALL - Dailey & Vincent. 8 p.m. Bluegrass. $30-$45.

FRIDAY 30

HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Randy Villars Quartet. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free.

H

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL - Lagniappe. 8 p.m. Cajun. Free. THE AVENUE EVENT CENTER - Polo G. 10 p.m. Hip Hop. $30-$60. BLIND LEMON - Michael J. 9 p.m. Acoustic. Free. BREWRIVER CREOLE KITCHEN - Ricky Nye and Paul Ellis. 8 p.m. Blues. Free. BROMWELL’S HÄRTH LOUNGE - Steve Schmidt Trio. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free. CAFFÈ VIVACE - Brent Gallaher Trio. 8:30 p.m. Jazz. Cover. THE COMET - The Ape Tones. 10 p.m. Rock. Free.

JAG’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD - Two For Flinching. 9:30 p.m. Rock/Pop/Various. Cover.

MOTR PUB - Strobobean (single release show) with Forager and Sorry, Eric. 10 p.m. Indie Rock. Free. MT. HEALTHY CITY PARK Madrigal. 7:30 p.m. Santana tribute. Free.

JIM AND JACK’S ON THE RIVER - Michelle Robinson Band. 9 p.m. Country. Free.

NORTHSIDE TAVERN Leopold the Ghost. 10 p.m. AltRock. Free.

H

LUDLOW GARAGE Macy Gray. 8:30 p.m. Soul/Jazz/Pop. $45-$80.

PIRATES COVE BAR & GRILLE - Basic Truth. 8 p.m. R&B/Soul/Funk. Free.

THE MAD FROG - Colette. 9 p.m. Pop/Electronic/Dance. Cover.

PLAIN FOLK CAFE - Donna Frost. 7:30 p.m. Acoustic. Free.

MANSION HILL TAVERN - The Heaters. 9 p.m. Blues. Cover.

RADISSON CINCINNATI RIVERFRONT - Troy Tipton Experience. 8 p.m. Rock. Free.

THE REDMOOR - Fixx Band. 8 p.m. R&B/Dance/ Pop/Various. $10, $15 day of show. RICK’S TAVERN - Strange Love. 10 p.m. Rock. Cover. SCHWARTZ’S POINT - Ron Enyard Quartet. 8:30 p.m. Jazz. Cover. SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) - Ross Hollow with Matt Baumann and Jeremy Smart. 9:30 p.m. Americana/Various. Free.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (REVIVAL ROOM) - Will Payne Harrison with Chelsea Ford and The Trouble and My Brother’s Keeper. 9 p.m. Americana. $10.

H

STANLEY’S PUB - Live Sequence, Rehugnant and Space Agents. 10 p.m.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

MOTR PUB - Noah Smith’s Crooner Circus. 10 p.m. Singer/Songwriter showcase. Free.

URBAN ARTIFACT - Safety Squad and Fox Soxx. 9 p.m. Funk/Dance. $5.

|

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PHOTO: PROVIDED

A U G . 2 8 - S E P. 3 , 2 0 19

FRETBOARD BREWING COMPANY - The Davidsons. 6 p.m. Folk/Americana. Free.

Grungy L.A. indie rockers Ramonda Hammer play a free show Wednesday at MOTR Pub.

45


Alternative/Pop. Cover.

H

URBAN ARTIFACT Ringworm. 9 p.m. Metal.

SUNDAY 01

LATITUDES BAR & BISTRO - BlueBirds. 8 p.m. Rock/R&B. Free.

H

MOTR PUB - Lara Hope and the ArkTones. 8 p.m. Americana/ Rock. Free.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (REVIVAL ROOM) - Mike and the Moonpies with Coby Langham. 7 p.m. Country/Americana. $10, $12 day of show.

WESTSIDE VENUE - Blues Jam with Jimmy D. Rodgers and Lil Al Thomas. 7 p.m. Blues. Free.

MONDAY 02

MCCAULY’S PUB - Open Jam with Sonny Moorman. 7 p.m. Blues/Various. Free.

H

NORTHSIDE YACHT CLUB - Direct Hit. 8 p.m. Punk. $8, $10 day of show.

TUESDAY 03

BLIND LEMON - Nick Tuttle. 8:30 p.m. Acoustic. Free.

BREWRIVER CREOLE KITCHEN - The Twirlers. 7 p.m. R&B/Classic Pop/Standards. Free.

Country act Mike and the Moonpies perform Sunday at the Southgate House Revival. P H O T O : B E N J A M I N YA N T O P H O T O G R A P H Y

Jamtronica. Cover. THOMPSON HOUSE - Stalgic, Honey Creek and Friday Giants. 8 p.m. Alternative Rock. Cover.

H

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

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A U G . 2 8 - S E P. 3 , 2 0 19

URBAN ARTIFACT Human Heart, The Peaks, War on TV and Madqueen. 9 p.m. AltRock.

46

WIEDEMANN BREWERY AND TAPROOM - Jimmy Bays Big Band. 7:30 p.m. Swing/Jazz. Free.

SATURDAY 31

BROMWELL’S HÄRTH LOUNGE - Mandy Gaines with The Steve Schmidt Trio. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free. CAFFÈ VIVACE - Faux Frenchmen. 8:30 p.m. Jazz. Cover.

H

THE COMET - Bershy and Greer. 10 p.m. Alt/ Pop/Rock. Free.

FRETBOARD BREWING COMPANY - Stratus Reunion. 8 p.m. Classic Rock. Free.

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL - Warrick and Lowell. 8 p.m. Americana. Free.

HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Emily Jordan/Jordan Pollard Quartet. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free.

BLIND LEMON - Greg Chako & Barbara Bruce. 9 p.m. Acoustic. Free.

H

BOGART’S - Saved By The 90’s. 8 p.m. ’90s Pop/Rock. $10.

RISH HERITAGE CENTER - Eileen Ivers & Universal Roots. 7 p.m. Irish/ Roots/World. $23-$30.

JAG’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD - The Fun Size. 9:30

p.m. Rock/Pop/Various. Cover. KNOTTY PINE - Naked Karate Girls. 10 p.m. Pop/ Rock/Dance. Cover. LEGENDS BAR AND VENUE - Friday Giants. 7 p.m. Rock. $10.

H

THE MAD FROG - Nvrsoft. 9 p.m. Drum and Bass. $5.

MANSION HILL TAVERN - The Blue Ravens. 9 p.m. Blues. Cover.

H

MOTR PUB - Hissing Tiles (album release show) with Midwife and SKRT. 10 p.m. Post Punk/ Indie Rock. Free.

H

NORTHSIDE TAVERN - Pearl Crush, Britt and Brooklynn Rae. 9 p.m. AltPop. Free.

H

PLAIN FOLK CAFE Hickory Robot. 7:30 p.m. Bluegrass/Americana. Free.

RICK’S TAVERN - Dont Tell Steve. 10 p.m. Rock/Pop. Cover. RIVERSIDE MARINA BAR & GRILL - Trailer Park Floosies. 9:30 p.m. Rock/ Pop/Dance/Country/Rap/ Various. Free. SCHWARTZ’S POINT - BJ Jansen Quartet. 8:30 p.m. Jazz. Cover.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) - Grey Host, Ethicist, Daughters of St. Crispin with My Condolences. 10 p.m. Progressive/Metal/Various. Free.

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (REVIVAL ROOM) - The Steepwater Band. 9 p.m. Rock. $12, $15 day of show.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (SANCTUARY) - Steve’n’Seagulls with ClusterPluck. 9 p.m. Americana/Rock. $17, $20 day of show. STANLEY’S PUB - Beasts of Joy and Hathor’s Fire. 10 p.m. Progressive/Acoustic. Cover.

THE SYMPHONY HOTEL - Ricky Nye and Bekah Williams. 8 p.m. Blues/Jazz. Free.

CAFFÈ VIVACE - Lynne Scott, Lee Stolar and Lou Lausche. 7:30 p.m. Jazz

H

RIVERBEND MUSIC CENTER - Meek Mill and Future with YG, Mustard, and Megan Thee Stallion. 7 p.m. Hip Hop. $35-$109.50.

H

STANLEY’S PUB RumpRyder featuring members of Rumpke and Hyryder. 10 p.m. Bluegrass/ Roots/Jam. Cover.

THOMPSON HOUSE Lobby Boxer, Near Here, Captain Careless and Misonomer. 8 p.m. Rock. Cover.

THOMPSON HOUSE - Chris Jobe, Talia Stewart and Chandler Carter. 8 p.m.

SEE CITYBEAT.COM FOR FULL MUSIC LISTINGS AND ALL CLUB LOCATIONS.


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CityBeat needs contractors to deliver CityBeat every Wednesday between 9am and 3pm. Qualified candidates must have appropriate vehicle, insurance for that vehicle and understand that they are contracted to deliver that route every Wednesday. CityBeat drivers are paid per stop and make $14.00 to $16.00 per hr. after fuel expense. Please reply by email and leave your day and evening phone numbers. Please reply by email only. Phone calls will not be accepted. sferguson@citybeat.com

NIGHT GARDEN RECORDING STUDIO

Seamless integration of the best digital gear and classics from the analog era including 2” 24 track. Wide variety of classic microphones, mic pre-amps, hardware effects and dynamics, many popular plug-ins and accurate synchronization between DAW and 2” 24 track. Large live room and 3 isolation rooms. All for an unbelievable rate. Event/Show sound, lighting and video production services available as well. Call or email Steve for additional info and gear list; (513) 368-7770 or (513) 729-2786 or sferguson. productions@gmail.com.

Tattoo

Convention

Indiana’s Largest “Antiques & Vintage-Only” Market

Next Show – Sunday, Sept 1

Au g 3 0 th - S e p 1st 2 019

Every First Sunday May - October

Lawrenceburg, Indiana Fairgrounds

Duke Energy Convention Center

Celebrating 35 Years of Authentic NY-Style

52 5 Elm St , Cincinnati, OH 45202

Bagels • Sandwiches • Soups • Salads • Sweets

COME GET TATTOOED

Visit Any of Our 5 Cincy Locations Open Daily | 6am-5pm | www.brueggers.com

VillainArts.com WORK AT

WE’RE HIRING!

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

A U G . 2 8 - S E P. 3 , 2 0 19

Advertising Sales Executive

48

GOLD is over $1500 an Ounce!

If you have any gold or silver jewelry you no longer want or wear NOW is a great time to sell! Your old jewelry could be worth thousands of dollars! If you would like sell or if you have questions, call or text 513-205-2681 I am a local buyer, pay cash, have 39 years experience, and I guarantee the highest price!

If the following sounds like you, we’d love to speak with you: You are energetic, outgoing and passionate You live with integrity You are fearless and welcome challenges You have a track record of getting to the decision maker You conduct yourself with professionalism in person, in writing and over the phone Compensation: Base salary + commission + Bonus Paid Vacation/PTO Insurance + 401(k) Spiffs and prizes around special events Visit CityBeat.com/Work-Here to learn more and submit your resume. *Online submissions including resumes only. No other inquiries will be considered*

US 50, 1 mile west of Exit 16,I-275 (Cincinnati Beltway) 7am - 3pm EDST Rain or Shine (Earlybirds at 6am)

Admission: $3.00

513-353-4135 LawrenceburgAntiqueShow.com

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CityBeat | Aug. 28, 2019  

CityBeat | Aug. 28, 2019