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Your Proofness: Sarah Munir Master Storyteller: Sundar Waqar Creativity Analysts: Amna Iqbal, Essa Malik, Jamal Khurshid, Samra Aamir, Talha Ahmed Khan, Munira Abbas and Umar Waqas


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Hi light

2

It is widely said that a book can change your world, make you think in new ways and widen your imagination. You probably have parents and teachers constantly asking you to read and may be you do not elf. realise the importance of reading yet and find it boring, but reading is the best gift you can give to yourself. Children’s Literature Festivals promote children’s literature and the habit of reading in children. These festivals have been held in different cities of Pakistan since 2011 and will be held this year as well. Let’s take a look at Children’s Literature Festivals in Pakistan.

A literary festival, also known as a book festival or writers’ festival, is a gathering of writers and readers, typically on an annual basis in a particular city. A literary festival usually features a variety of presentations and readings by authors, as well as other events, over a period of days, with the primary objective of promoting the authors’ books and encouraging a love of literature and writing. Children’s Literature Festival (CLF) is a social movement to promote reading for critical thinking and unlocking the power of reading. The CLF started from Lahore in 2011 and has since held events in Quetta, Peshawar, Bahawalpur, Islamabad and Karachi. After holding seven extremely successful Children’s Literature Festivals all across Pakistan, attended by over 130,000 children, Idarae-Taleem-O-Aagahi (ITA), Oxford University Press (OUP) and Open Society Foundation (OSF) continue to host these festivals across different cities in Pakistan. 4TH KARACHI LITERATURE FESTIVAL, 2013 PHOTO: ATHER KHAN\EXPRESS

CLF is open to all children and all school systems, unlocking the power of reading through interaction and different techniques. Featuring talks and readings by famous children’s writers provide opportunities for children to listen to their favourite books being read and discussed. Theatre, cartoons and puppet shows, films, art/craft and pottery sessions and other children’s activities related to reading make these festivals entertaining as well as knowledgeable for children. The organisers are hopeful that such events will encourage children to ask questions, to think critically, to imagine, wonder and to read and write beyond textbooks. The festival encourages children to read and makes it enjoyable for them. Reading in turn will help the children to learn to write and gain information more easily.

INFORMATION: MAHAM ALI AND AROOSA SHOKAT

4TH KARACHI LITERATURE FESTIVAL, 2013 PHOTO: ATHER KHAN\EXPRESS


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Hi light

3 Children’s Literature Festival after doing holding events at national, provincial and district levels is now hosting events at school level. The first school based Children’s Literature Festivals were implemented in two boys government secondary schools in Kabal and Kanju Swat, Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa Pakistan. School-based CLFs are a response to an overwhelming demand across Pakistan to host CLFs, as a more economical, effective option that will also ensure change in classroom culture and schools.

In May 2013, CLF Islamabad presented celebrities, authors, publishers and well-known personalities. The event featured interactive readings, discussions and workshops by famous children’s writers, poets and resource persons. Activities for children (age group: 4-10 and 11-17) included readings and sing aloud sessions by well known writers. The festival also included book launches, book making and book binding as well as a book fair along with puppet shows and other fun activities.

Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA), Oxford University Press (OUP) and Foundation Open Society Institute (FOSI) Pakistan, held the 7th Children’s Literature Festival at Children Library Complex on 30th and 31st, October 2013 in Lahore. The festival included fun activities and reading and storytelling sessions and was extremely popular with a great turnout.

The two school based CLFs on December 19th and 21st, 2013 were sponsored by Social Welfare Academics and Training (SWAaT) for Pakistan in collaboration with CLF and ITA teams. The event took place in every space available; the classrooms, halls, grounds and even the rooftops. The students volunteered as ushers and felt special hosting the event. These two schools are a testimony to the strong desire of Pakistani students, educators and families for learning creatively and collectively.

The Children’s Literature Festival in Karachi is set to take place this on February 21st to 22nd at the Arts Council. Like previous festivals it gives children the chance to explore their imagination and to learn, all while being entertained. Children will be able to take part in activities like theatre, comic workshops, animation, creative writing, illustration of books, children’s films, puppet shows, story reading, song singing, book launches and book fairs. Be sure to visit. 4TH KARACHI LITERATURE FESTIVAL, 2013 PHOTO: ATHER KHAN\EXPRESS

What would you like to see in Hi Five? Send an email to hifive@tribune.com.pk and let us know!


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Activity

4 Dice it up

Supplies needed: • Paper • Scale • Marker • Scissor • Pencil • Glue Stick

Step 1 Make a grid of five squares measuring 2 by 2 cm.

Step 3 Cut the grid using a scissor.

Step 2 Mark an excess part of half cm.

Step 6 With a marker draw dots on the dice.

Step 4 Bend the excess part.

Step 5 Glue the sides to form a box.

Want to watch a video guide for this? Log onto Toffeetv.com and check out the activities section!

Step 7 Your dice is now ready.


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Get your weekly dose of the unusual and funny news from across the globe!

A bone won’t do A bone wasn’t good enough for this border collie spaniel cross, who decided instead to chew at the wheel arch of her owner’s £80,000 (Rs1,372,615) Aston Martin. Infuriated Royston Grimstead came home to find that the usually-obedient four-year-old Luce had munched her way through the fibreglass, and responded by finding her new owners. As reported by a local paper, the 42-year-old from Chedzoy in Somerset said: “I came home and saw her covered in white stuff and I thought she had got a bird and it was feathers — but it was the fibreglass from the car. She knew she had done something wrong because she had this guilty look on her face.” Grimstead had already been planning to sell Luce because she did not get along with his ten-year-old border collie Jess. “She must have overheard me talking about re-homing her because she’s normally friendly and never really chewed on anything before,”’ he said. He didn’t, however, tell her new owners what she’d done and joked that he may have her back when they find out. The builder had bought the Aston Martin DB9 Volante 15 months ago, and luckily, is insured for the £3,000 (Rs514,734) worth of damage. METRO.CO.UK

World wide weird

5

Unexpected visitor

What is the strangest visitor you have seen enter a restaurant. Well, a giraffe walked into a restaurant may sound like the start of a bad joke but diners in South Africa definitely saw the funny side when it happened for real. The giraffe, named Perdy, gave visitors to the Lion Park animal sanctuary in Johannesburg a surprise when he wandered into a restaurant and took a look around. But the adventurous 20ft tall animal didn’t appear too impressed with the food after walking out again in around 60 seconds. “How can you explain this to someone,”’ one shocked spectator was heard asking a fellow visitor in the video that has racked up thousands of hits online. Well, it was definitely an unusual and unexpected visitor and a story that is hard to believe. METRO.CO.UK

Snap me Where’d you go? A teenager woke up to find her car at the bottom of a hole that had appeared overnight in her family’s driveway. Zoe Smith, 19, fled to safety with her mother and stepfather after discovering her Volkswagen Lupo — parked right outside the window — had been swallowed up. The family were left fearing their home could also disappear after the 9m (30ft)-deep hole opened without warning. It may have been caused by heavy rain eroding earth used to fill in old clay pits in Walter’s Ash, Buckinghamshire. Zoe’s stepfather Phil Conran, a 59-yearold environmental consultant said, “We hadn’t heard anything at all. There was no indication whatsoever. Zoe went out the front door and instead of her car being there, there was a huge hole.” Firefighters were called to find that the car had vanished in a hole with a diameter of 15ft. Luckily nobody was in it at the time. A Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service spokesman said: “Firefighters placed a cordon around it and gave safety advice. The incident was handed over to building control at Wycombe District Council. Firefighters were at the scene for about an hour.” METRO.CO.UK

A pair of cheeky red squirrels went snappy-happy when they teamed up for an unplanned photoshoot. The duo moved in when photographer Peter Smith left his camera alone for a moment — with one of the squirrels clearly showing a preference for being on the other side of the lens. Smith was taking pictures in Formby, Merseyside, to add to his portfolio of wildlife shots, when he captured the amusing shot. Alan Wright, of the Wildlife Trust, said it was good to draw attention to the troubles of the red squirrel, which has been in serious decline in Britain since the introduction of the grey squirrel. He added: “We have a stronghold of these mammals on the Sefton Coast where they are showing signs of recovery after losing large numbers to a deadly virus. The exciting news is that this native squirrel is battling back and now spreading eastwards into areas of West Lancashire and Greater Manchester.” METRO.CO.UK


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Did you know?

6

Word Origins Where is the E in A-F grading? A majority of schools particularly beyond primary age, give grades of A, B, C, D, or F. Have you ever wondered why there is no E grade? Well, the simple answer for the missing alphabet from grading systems is that ‘F’ stands for ‘fail’. The other four grades are more or less considered ‘passing’ which is why they go in alphabetical order. The F is considered separate as it denotes a failing grade, and does not need to go in alphabetical order. It just so happens that ‘fail’ starts with a letter that skips one letter alphabetically on the scale. That said, E was used at one point. Years ago the grading scale was such that ‘A’ was anything from 95-100%, ‘B’ 90-94%, ‘C’ was 8589%, ‘D’ was 80-84%, and ‘E’ was 75-79%. Below that, they added in the dreaded ‘F’. Over the years, the letter grading scale became popular across colleges and high schools alike. A lot of schools skipped E and went straight to F. Apparently, some teachers were concerned that students and parents thought ‘E’ stood for excellent, though there is no evidence. In truth, any letter could stand in for ‘E’ or ‘F’ and still mean the same thing. Some schools use ‘U’ for unsatisfactory or ‘N’ for no credit. Educators could use just about any letter and it would amount to the same thing. It is simply an indicator of a non-passing grade. For one thing, there are variations across institutions and grading systems are different throughout.

How to say ‘food’ in different languages Afrikaans Albanian Azerbaijani Basque Bosnian Catalan Cebuano Danish Estonian Finnish German Norwegian Spanish Welsh

: : : : : : : : : : : : : :

Voedsel Ushqim Qida Elikagaien Hrana Menjar Kalan-on Mad Toit Ruoka Lebensmittel Mat Comida Bwyd

Cool facts The loud noise you create by cracking a whip occurs because the tip is moving so fast it breaks the speed of sound. Cranberries are tested for ripeness by bouncing them; if they are ripe they should have a bouncing quality. A person who studies dinosaurs is known as a paleontologist. The diameter of a full sized basketball is half the diameter of a basketball hoop. For every ton of recycled glass turned into new products, 315 kilogrammes of extra carbon dioxide that is released during the creation of a new glass is saved. There are 62,000 miles of blood vessels in the human body — laid end to end they would circle the Earth 2.5 times. The average person accidentally eats 430 bugs each year of their life. Polar Bears can run at 25 miles an hour and jump over six feet in the air. The giant squid has the largest eyes in the world. The strongest muscle in the body is the tongue.


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

7

Fun & games

Crossword

How carefully did you read this week’s issue of HiFive? If you think you are upto the task, try to solve our special crossword. The answers are all over HiFive! Put on your thinking caps, it is time to put the old noggin to work!

Across 1. Promoting children’s ------------— and the habit of reading in children, Children’s Literature Festivals have been held in different cities of Pakistan since 2011. 5. The giant -----------— has the largest eyes in the world. 7. CLF is a social movement to ------------— reading for critical thinking and unlocking the power of reading. 8. The strongest muscle in the body is the ------------. 9. For every ton of recycled --------— turned into new products, 315 kilograms of extra carbon dioxide that is released during the creation of a new glass is saved. 14. A person who studies --------------— is known as a paleontologist.

Find your Way!

Down 2. It is widely said that a book can change your world, make you think in new ways and widen your -------------. 3. The diameter of a full sized basketball is half the diameter of a -------------l hoop. 4. There are 62,000 miles of blood vessels in the ---------— body — laid end to end they would circle the Earth 2.5 times. 6. Cranberries are tested for ripeness by bouncing them; if they are ripe they should have a -----------— quality. 10. A literary festival, also known as a book festival or writers’ festival, is a regular gathering of writers and readers, typically on an ---------— basis in a particular city. 11. The loud noise you create by cracking a whip occurs because the tip is moving so fast it breaks the ---------— of sound. 12. The average person accidentally eats 430 ---------— each year of their life. 13. Polar bears can run at 25 miles an hour and jump over six feet in the -----------.


THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE, FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Notable Entries for the Liberty Books Card Competition

Fatima Ali Age: 8 Winner

Abdul Moeez Age: 7

Javeria Azeem Age: 6 Winner

Ramsha Azeem Age:4 Winner

Mariam Murtaza Age: 8

The Express Tribune hi five - February 9  

The Express Tribune hi five for February 09th 2014

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