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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2021

Out for a swim

Forever and Ever. Bedtime story turned into a hardcover kids book PAGE A10

THINGS TO

THINGS TO EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE THIS THIS

Bored to death? Check out Tourism Estevan’s 101 Things to Do. PAGE A11- A13

From left, Brent Ruckaber, Jovie Pratt, Reese Ruckaber, Roenick Pratt, Eva Ruckaber and Desiree Ruckaber enjoyed quality family time at the Family Day Swim offered by the Estevan Lions Club at the RM of Estevan Aquatic Centre on Feb. 15. Due to gathering restrictions and social distancing requirements, the Lions sponsored four different sessions that day, and will also have free Family Day evening swims on Feb. 17 and 19.

Estevan came together to help Larry Shaw get through hard times By Ana Bykhovskaia

Agri News. The latest update from Animal Protection Services of Sask PAGE A15

Future is here. Estevan opens first electric vehicle charging station. PAGE A17

Probably everyone in the community knows Lorna Coate, a petite grey-haired and incredibly friendly woman working at the pay window in McDonald's drive through in Estevan. Recently bad news came to her and her husband Larry Shaw's household, changing their life completely. Shaw, who retired after dedicating many years to the oilfield industry, started experiencing problems with his right leg last summer. The situation was progressively getting worse. Three out of four arteries in his leg were damaged, and on Jan. 28 the doctors said he had a very tough decision to make. "It was a scary thing to hear something like that … He had two options and he needed to make the decision," said Shaw and Coate's daughter Lisa Fitzpatrick. "On January 28 he was told that he needed

to make a choice between having a stent put in the fourth (only remaining) artery, but it was not recommended by the doctor. They said if you do that and it doesn't work, you could lose more of your leg. (The other option was) to amputate below the knee." Shaw had about a week to think it through. Following doctors' recommendations and not willing to risk it, he agreed to take more radical measures. And right after the decision was made, on Feb. 5, the Regina doctors called the family in. They amputated Shaw's right leg six inches below the knee on Feb. 8. "It was really fast, and it doesn't leave a lot of time to plan," Fitzpatrick said. The surgery went well, and now the time is needed for the recovery. Fitzpatrick added that her parents seem to be doing okay emotionally as well. "We are taking things day

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Holy Family praised for handling of COVID By Greg Nikkel of the Weyburn Review The administrators, staff and the Saskatchewan Health Authority have all done “an amazing job” so far in dealing with cases of COVID-19 in the Holy Family Roman Catholic Separate School Division’s schools, the board of trustees heard at their virtual monthly meeting on Feb. 10. Director of education Gwen Keith noted that three Holy Family schools have had to deal with COVID so far. While there haven’t been any cases at their two Estevan schools, St. Mary’s School and Sacred Heart School/École Sacré Coeur, there have been cases elsewhere. “I have to commend the staff and our principals that have done an amazing job, and

I would like to commend the health department in being able to work quickly and briskly, in a way that will allow us to understand what manpower we will have in dealing with a classroom or two,” she said, adding that the communications with the parents is also a major key to dealing with it. “We have a highly complex communication process that involves the children that are within that classroom, any staff such as teachers or EAs, anyone who may have been affected, and staff in the whole school, any visitors to the school, and answer any questions that’s involved,” she said. The contact tracing has to let anyone know who may have come into contact, such as any visitors to the school or class, plus answer the questions of parents of the school as they

seek to find out answers. “It’s like a big spider web, but it’s a very efficient one,” said Keith, adding that busing is another aspect if the student involved rides on one, as they have to look at the seating arrangements and attendance on the bus. “Parents are pretty mindful of the COVID rules and restrictions,” said Keith, adding Holy Family has also received funding to enable them to have remote teacher leads at every school.This enables a classroom to quickly be able to go into remote learning in the event a classmate has been diagnosed with COVID. “We calmly and strategically work through the process to keep everybody safe,” she added. “We continue to refine our process and keep learning as we go.”

“I’m amazed how quickly a school goes into action,” said board chair Bruno Tuchscherer, and trustee Jerome Sidloski agreed, noting “it’s critical” that the right information is getting to the parents right away. He added he gets questioned almost on a bi-weekly basis by one of the parents about what is going on. Sidloski said the cut-anddried way they’re able to lay it all out makes it very easy for him to tell parents, “Don’t worry, we’ve got this.” Keith said the system that’s set up is very efficient, and the process isn’t very complicated. “I was at St. Olivier (in Radville) recently and the principal said this is not that hard to do at all. We had a similar situation at St. Michael. We’re just trying to take care of people,

and keep education moving as quickly as we can, as normally as we can,” she said, noting the schools all have protocols and procedures that they’ve been practising, just like fire drills, to the point they know what to do. Keith noted that the school divisions have regular updates with the province on COVID, and the chief medical health officer, Dr. Saqib Shahab often sits in on those conference calls. “We get this information directly, and we can ask him straight questions,” said Keith, noting the issue of vaccinations has come up in these discussions also. “What we’re trying to do is to make these environments as safe as we can. As we go into the fall and budget, we still have to make sure of the physical safety of our schools are intact,” she

Gwen Keith added, including ensuring they have enough PPE for the staff so there isn’t any anxiety about how safe the schools are. “Seeing as it was in our area, I was totally impressed with how it was handled,” said Radville trustee Teresa Van De Sype. “Give yourselves a pat on the back, because as far as I’m concerned it was done great.”

Local company offered help Shaw with house rennovations « A1 located in the basement, which Shaw won’t be able to access. Guidelines Constrction Ltd. offered to donate all labour and materials to rebuild one of the main floor bedrooms into a bathroom. “Marty (Satkauskas) is going to donate all the labour and materials to do that for them! Absolutely incredible,” shared Fitzpatrick. The family is still left with a lot of expenses including travel, hotels, meals, aftercare and whatever other home renovations will still be needed. Once Shaw heals and can do so, he will get a prosthetic leg, but there is no time frame on that yet. Anyone who wants to support the family and donate can stop by the Affinity Credit Union and/or make

an e-transfer to larryshawmedicalfunds@gmail.com. Fitzpatrick said that the fundraiser has been going great, but she didn't have the numbers as of the time of the interview as it was her aunt who was taking care of that. Not only have many community members stepped forward to help financially, but the family also experienced a lot of personal support. "We had messages, all the shares on social media, all the prayers that were sent our way. It's been absolutely incredible that way," Fitzpatrick said. Last Wednesday night Shaw was transferred to St. Joseph's Hospital in Estevan and doctors were pretty happy with his condition. "He is doing reall y

good," said F itzpatrick. "Now he is able to have two visitors. It has to be the same two visitors the whole time he is in there, and only one is allowed at a time. So it will be my mom and I. "It's going to be easier

now that he is in Estevan hospital because she can be at home and go up during the day, and I can go in the evenings and visit and whatnot.” It's still hard to say how long Shaw will have to stay in the hospital, as it depends on

how the recovery will go. This time will allow the family to get the house ready for him. On behalf of the family, Fitzpatrick thanked the Estevan community for all they've done. "A huge thank you to

the community for stepping up and helping out, and thank you for all the sharing, and prayers, and donations. And a huge thank you to Guideline Construction for offering to help out with the renovations."

Arcola Health Centre services to resume on Feb. 19 ​The Saskatchewan Health Authority is advising residents of Arcola and the surrounding area that the disruption to emergency and acute care services at the Arcola Health Centre will be lifted, effective 7 a.m. on Feb. 19. Emergency services and

acute care patient admissions will resume at that time. In a news release, the SHA said that due to increased COVID-19 activity in the Weyburn area and required realignment of health services to support patient care, emergency and acute care services at Arcola Health

Centre were temporarily unavailable. Arcola physicians and staff members were redeployed to support the SHA’s pandemic response. The service disruption started on Jan. 15. It was initially slated to end on Jan. 30, but instead it was extended to Feb. 19.

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Laboratory and x-ray services have still been available in Arcola since Jan. 15. While the COVID-19 vaccine is distributed across the province in a targeted, phased approach, Saskatchewan residents are reminded that they are the first line of defence in stopping the spread of COVID-19 and their actions make all the difference in protecting all of our families, friends and neighbours. People are reminded to abide by physical distancing measure, wash h​ ands regularly, limit your bubble as much as possible, abiding by all public health orders, wear a mask whenever you are in public indoor settings, and stay home if you are feeling even the mildest symptoms as an increasing number of cases are residents going to work when sick. Download the Government of Canada COVID Alert App and use it to protect yourself and your loved ones.

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Do you know an outstanding local woman who is a leader, innovator, community builder, rising star or champion of equity and inclusion? Do you know an Estevan area woman who deserves to be recognized? Nominate them for International Women Day’s Estevan edition special. Tag your nominee and tell us in a few sentences why she deserves recognition (maximum 250 words per application). Nominations with links to nominee’s social media profiles can be emailed to abykhovskaia@estevanmercury.ca or posted in comments. Women of Estevan will be featured in the March 3 edition of the Mercury and celebrated throughout the month of March. Nominations with links to the nominee’s social media profiles can be emailed to abykhovskaia@estevanmercury. ca or posted in the comments.

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Customs officers and travellers alike are pleased with expansion at North Portal crossing By David Willberg While there is still some work to be done, the expansion and upgrades at the North Portal border crossing are largely complete, and have been well-received by officials and travellers alike. Scott Kienlen, the corporate chief for the southern Alberta and southern Saskatchewan district in the Prairie region for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), said the building constructions were completed in late December and border officials moved into their bilevel booths. As part of the project, there are now three lanes for traffic coming into Canada. “Previously coming into the country, we had one lane for cars, or small vehicles, and then one for commercial traffic, and there was a bit of a sharper left-hand turn to come in to be processed,” said Kienlen. Each of the three lanes have the capability of handling any type of vehicle. It means there could be three lanes with cars, pick-up trucks or other light vehicles, or three lanes occupied by commercial trucks. Since construction wrapped up, border wait times have dropped significantly, and everything is now within the service standards for CBSA, Kienlen said. There is also an oversized lane. “We did improve that a little bit, making it little bit wider, so that we can handle

any type of wide dimensional or long dimensional loads,’ said Kienlen. W hen motorists approach the crossing, it is more of a head-on approach. All of these changes have improved traffic flow. “ We’ve improved the signage and lighting and so on. Some of that still has to be done, but some has been done, so that’s helped as well,” said Kienlen. They also marked the opening of their commercial warehouse, where they have enhanced ability to conduct examinations on commercial carriers. “It’s working really, really well,” Kienlen said. “We changed the layout and the design here, and that’s working quite well with traffic flow.” The travelling community and the trade partners have been impressed. “We’ve been working out of some temporary structures for some time, and they’re glad to see the improvements,” said Kienlen. During the winter periods, there won’t be a lot of construction happening. Once the warmer temperatures return in the spring, there will be some roadwork in the area. “We need to continue working on some roadway and curbing and paving to tie into Highway 39 as you exit. Right now we have a temporary detour through our parking area to accommodate that, and then there will be some underground drainage pipes that need to

The reconfigured and expanded North Portal border crossing has been well-received thus far. Photo courtesy of Canada Border Services Agency be installed as well, and then to complete the staff parking area,” Kienlen said. The goal is to have them completed by November, if the weather co-operates. Overall, he estimates the project is about 80 per cent complete. Kienlen pointed out that the last time the facility was upgraded was in the mid1980s. Since that time, traffic patterns have gone through considerable changes. “It was time for an upgrade, and that’s what we’re doing. From time to time, there may have been some border wait times, particularly with our commercial flow, just only having one lane, and this has totally reduced or eliminated that problem.”

As part of the federal government’s green initiative, the CBSA has installed a large solar wall on their drive-thru examination facility. He believes it’s one of the first in the country to be on a wall instead of a rooftop. “We’re expecting to generate about 10-15 per cent for our commercial building with that,” said Kienlen. “So that’s kind of a neat feature that’s been added to this.” The project had an estimated completion time of 30 months when it started in the spring of 2018. It has run a little bit longer than that, as there were some undocumented structures that were buried, thanks to small foundations leftover from previous customs buildings that were

in place prior to the ones that were constructed in the 1980s. “ That did take some time to work through, some extra time, but for the most part, we’re doing okay,” said Kienlen. The COVID-19 pandemic did not represent a big setback for the project. Measures were put in place for contractors and staff to maintain social distancing. “For the most part, a lot of the construction, where there would have been close contact between contractors and staff, was prior to the pandemic, and anything after that, there are precautions that have been put in place,” said Kienlen. A date for a ribbon cutting or a celebration hasn’t

been set. It won’t happen until the project is complete or close to being finished, so it likely wouldn’t be until late fall. And obviously it would be dependent on any restrictions that might still be in effect. But they’re pleased to have knocked down a couple of milestones on the project. Kienlen is grateful to the travelling community, trade partners and the village of North Portal for their patience during construction. “From time to time, there has been the odd, minor delay just as equipment moves around or different things, but for the most part, we’ve been able to keep going here 24-7, 365 days of the year,” said Kienlen.

Kinette Club’s Telemiracle fundraiser was well supported The Estevan Kinette Club’s first attempt to have an online auction to support Telemiracle was a success. A Facebook auction was held from Feb. 9 to 13, with 67 items available. Kinette Angela Bresciani, who organized the auction, said it went well and raised more than $5,000. “Our numbers aren’t exact yet, because some people have donated more money than their actual purchase item cost,” said Bresciani. The amount of money raised exceeded the expectations, as she thought it might generate about $3,000. The auction had a variety of items from local businesses and individuals alike. The individuals donated some handmade items, cooking and more, while businesses provided merchandise and gift cards.

It meant that there were items for people of all ages, and even gifts for pets. Bresciani pointed out the Kinettes traditionally will have steak nights as a fundraiser for Telemiracle, but they couldn’t host those events this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Those steak nights are typically successful, and The Beef was always a great place to have them. So they considered other options, and that’s when Bresciani suggested a Facebook auction. “We are probably planning on doing this again next year,” said Bresciani. She pieced the initiative in just a week. “It turned out pretty well for only having a week to plan and organize it. I think with the team of people that I had helping me, that it really

This blanket was donated by Donna Heidinger for the auction. Photo submitted turned out well, and with the community helping out with donations.” Bresciani said other fundraisers will be happening in the community before Telemiracle. This year’s Telemiracle will happen on Feb. 27 and 28.

It’s going to be a week earlier than normal. It will still start at 9 p.m. on a Saturday night and wrap up at 5 p.m. on a Sunday afternoon. Proceeds from Telemiracle will be used to meet the needs of Saskatchewan people.

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EDITORIAL A4

| Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

Staff SERVING CANADA’S SUNSHINE CAPITAL Publisher / Sales

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Published weekly by Prairie Newspaper Group Limited Partnership, 68 Souris Avenue N., Estevan, SK S4A 2M3.The Estevan Mercury is owned and operated by Prairie Newspaper Group Limited Partnership, a subsidiary of Glacier Media Inc. Advertising rates are available upon request and are subject to change without notice. Conditions of editorial and advertising content: The Estevan Mercury attempts to be accurate in Editorial and Advertising content; however, no guarantee is given or implied. The Estevan Mercury reserves the right to revise or reject any or all editorial and advertising content as the newspaper’s principals see fit. The Estevan Mercury will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement, and is not responsible for errors in advertisements except for the space occupied by such errors. The Estevan Mercury will not be responsible for manuscripts, photographs, negatives and other related material that may be submitted for possible publication. All of the Estevan Mercury’s content is protected by Canadian Copyright laws. Reviews and similar mention of material in this newspaper is granted on the provision that The Estevan Mercury receives credit. Otherwise, any reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited. Advertisers purchase space and circulation only. Rights to any advertisement produced by The Estevan Mercury, including artwork, typography, photos, etc., remain the property of this newspaper. Advertisements or parts thereof may not be reproduced or assigned without the consent of the publisher.

EDITORIAL

We have lots to do in the winter We’re in the depths of winter. The temperatures have been about -15 C below normal as of late. And we’re still in the midst of a pandemic, with so many programs suspended and events cancelled. So what’s there to do in southeast Saskatchewan this winter? Turns out, there’s a lot we can do. And now that winter break is here and the kids are out of school for the week, there might not be a better time to explore our options. This week’s edition of the Mercury features our 101 Things to do in Estevan This Winter special, when we pay tribute to things you can do in Estevan during those delightful winter months. It’s the follow-up to our 101 Things to Do in Estevan summer special, which was a big hit and a celebration of the region. Granted, even during a normal year, the nature of the winter events are different than the summer months. Most of the summer events involve the outdoors to go with heat, the sunshine, long days and beautiful nights. Our winter activities involve being inside and finding a place to be warm. We still get lots of sunshine, but as we saw last week, the sunshine can often be accompanied by frigid temperatures. Many of us would normally spend lots of time at the arena during the winter, but that’s been out of the question for most of this year.

We might meet up for drinks or a meal at a friend’s place or in a restaurant, but that ranges from difficult to impossible this winter. If you want to do something outdoors during the winter – go ice fishing, play shinny, skate on an outdoor rink, or go for a snowmobile ride – then you need to dress warm most years, but the fun you can have is well worth the extra layer of clothes. It really is too bad that we didn’t get a couple of good dumps of snow this winter. It would have been a perfect winter to go for some nice, long snowmobile rides. It’s an activity that is perfect for social distancing. There are some good trails up around the Moose Mountain Provincial Park. Despite all of the challenges we’re facing, you can still have fun this winter. We have 101 ways listed. People think of the Woodlawn Regional Park as a summer destination, but it’s become popular in the winter with its trails that are perfect for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. Just be sure you dress accordingly. (Woodlawn isn’t the only area in the southeast that is ideal for activities on the trails). Ice fishing is always a popular activity, and with several large bodies of water in the southeast, it’s a great way to spend the day sitting out on the frozen lake. If it’s too cold,

then ice fishing shacks provide protection from the temperatures. You can go for a nice country drive and look at the fields in the winter. You can take the Back Roads of Estevan Tour offered by Tourism Estevan. Estevan has three great outdoor rinks for you to enjoy. A lot of towns and villages have a good outdoor rink, too. Many people have decided to construct backyard rinks as a way to give their kids something to do during the pandemic. Some of them are pretty elaborate. Crokicurl rinks have been built in some communities as well. You can enjoy some of the more conventional outdoor winter activities, such as tobogganing, building a snowman, making snow angels or getting in a snowball fight. Just make sure you have a willing opponent for the latter option. Or, you can stay inside, stay warm and enjoy your time away from the world. We recommend something good to read. Find a good book once you’re finished with this week’s edition of the Mercury. (And be sure to visit www. estevanmercury.ca a few times each day as well). So yes, you have lots to do in the final weeks of winter, regardless of whether you’re outside enjoying a nice late February or early March day, or if you’re trying to avoid being outdoors on a frigid day.

We are only as almighty as the weather allows I had so many plans for the Family Day long weekend. As the provincial holiday suggests, I hoped to have quality family time. As you may know, I always call for getting away from home to get the best of my time off. Otherwise, house duties, simple routines, work and some boring daily little things like monstrous parasites take over the long-awaited weekends and turn them into other meaningless calendar dates. So getting away every so often is a rule for me. Even following all recommendations and having the SHA safety measures in mind, I still found some options that would allow us to create new memories and come home renewed and happy. I started putting plans together in early February. Soon, when the frigid weather wave covered the area and my two big outdoor pooches first became temporary and then permanent residents of the house, filling it with beautiful dog's smell, I got the first doubts. But even though dogs were never trained for the house, they quickly learned the drill and figured out that to stay warm, cozy and close to us, they had to behave. We built them a den in the porch, and they seemed to agree to accept it as their new dog house. I don't think they like it in the house that much, but I know they absolutely didn't like it outside these days. Once dogs knew what to do in the house, I got back to planning the weekend. But it all came to an end when the little red light on our sewer system lit up bright red. The pipes froze. It took a few hours, many litres of water and

Ana Bykhovskaia Twenty Lines About… a kilo of salt to get the system going again. The first time. A couple of days later, the light came on again. This time it took us (and by us I mean my poor husband who was also frozen solid by the end of that project) over 24 hours to fix the system, thaw out the pipes and make it work again. The temperature hardly went above -30 C, and the wind made it even more extreme. The smell of sewer was the only thing that survived in that frozen air. It was tough, but despite all the challenges, a day later the little light was back to slightly shimmering, its normal state. I surrendered and agreed to a staycation with dogs, blankets and 15 more seasons of Grey's Anatomy that I've never watched before. But the entire situation once again reminded me of how teeny-weeny and powerless we are in the face of nature. We often feel that we conquered the world around us and are eager to explore and populate other planets, but the reality is we are now probably even weaker than we used to be in our relationship with the environment. People that were populating what's now Saskatchewan came here with no technologies, furnaces and heaters, gas or electric stoves. They had the fire. They knew how to

start and how to keep it going. They built shelters and they had furs of animals they could kill and skin with tools and weapons they made themselves. They had each other, and they had nobody else to expect help from or to blame for the challenges. They had all they needed to survive these frigid deadly-cold winters. People that originally lived on these lands were much tougher than we are now, but I tend to think that they also knew how helpless they were when moody nature changed. And they lived accordingly. We, on the other hand, are vain and proud, which so often makes us blind. We live from day to day, often forgetting that we are not the ones controlling the world. We are so developed, that in reality, it makes us way more underdeveloped than our predecessors. Most of us don't know how to start a fire, find our way if we are lost, provide for ourselves or find clean water. Some basic survival skills. We hunt from our vehicles using guns. Some people do use bows and arrows, but I don't think most of them would be able to make a good bow. We don't know anything about wild plants and mushrooms. We don't know how to read the signs of nature. Not only have we abandoned some of this basic knowledge, we often ignore simple safety tips that could help us face nature if we are forced to. (Most people even don't find it necessary to throw a survival kit into their trunk when travelling on these cold days.) We plan for our lives as if we were almighty. But quite often it takes nature to slightly move its pinky to ruin all our big plans.


OP-ED A5

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| Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

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It’s time for a (Tele)Miracle It didn’t take long for me to become a fan of Telemiracle. A few months after I arrived in Saskatchewan in September 2000, I started to hear of this great telethon, organized by the Saskatchewan Kinsmen and Kinettes, that seemingly brought out the best in so many in Saskatchewan, with people donated time, talents and money. That Telemiracle in 2001 marked the first time the 20-hour fundraiser had cleared the $3 million mark. Within a few years, it would eclipse $5 million for the first time. In 2018, the year that Estevan’s Susan Colbow was the Telemiracle committee chair, it surpassed $7 million. How impressive was that? The fundraiser has not made more than $6 million in any other year. The money raised through Telemiracle goes to meet the medical needs of Saskatchewan people. If someone needs to purchase a medical scooter, Telemiracle is there. If someone requires financial assistance for travel for a medical issue, Telemiracle helps. There are a lot of people who have benefitted from the money that we have donated to Telemiracle. And the Telemiracle Foundation assisted such projects as the dialysis unit at St. Joseph’s Hospital and the inclusive playground at Westview School. Telemiracle is going to take place Feb. 27 and 28 this year, a little earlier than normal (about a week) but you can be sure people will still be there to support it. Obviously Telemiracle this year is going to be very different. But the event organizers knew they had to do something.Too many people will need the assistance of Telemiracle for it not to happen. (It’s somewhat similar to what we saw with the United Way Estevan and its Telethon. With so many people in need, the United Way knew they had to have a telethon in 2020). We aren’t going to see large choirs on stage for a Telemiracle, or the many people in front of the camera that we would normally see. You won’t have the large number of people answering phones on camera during the knock-down. There will be the Saskatchewan and the national entertainers, but the Saskatchewan performers – all of those talented people from across the province who lend their talents to help others – will be sending in videos rather than performing live. (Virtual performances don’t have quite the same impact as live entertainers, but they certainly are great to have at your fingertips). And you’ll have the dedicated volunteers from the Kinsmen and Kinette Clubs, many of them working during the night to make Telemiracle a huge success. It’ll be a fun 20 hours that will serve as a way to escape the difficult times we have experienced during the past 12 months, while supporting those around us. Nothing makes me prouder to be a resident of this province than Telemiracle, because I don’t think there’s a cause in Saskatchewan that brings out the best in us. I’ll actually probably get to watch more of Telemiracle than I have in the past. Normally I miss the Saturday night portion because I have a hockey game or some other event to cover. Sunday is a writing day for me. Well, I’ll still be writing Sunday during the final hours of Telemiracle, but at least I should be able to watch on Saturday night. (My beloved Vancouver Canucks don’t play that night either, but I’m guessing Telemiracle will be more entertaining than a Canucks game). Reflecting on last year’s Telemiralce, it serves as a reminder of how quickly everything changed. It was held on March 7 and 8. Four days later, activities in this province started to be postponed and were later cancelled. Within 10 days of last year’s Telemiracle, we were in shutdown mode. When you watched last year’s broadcast, nobody was wearing a mask. We see people gathering together closely on the stage and it was another wildly successful and entertaining show. I think I speak for all of us when I say I hope we get to have that type of show next year, and we don’t have to worry about another Telemiracle, COVID-style, ever again. I’m also thankful that all of the COVID restrictions didn’t hit until after Telemiracle was finished and in our collective rear-view mirror.Too many people rely too heavily on this fundraiser; it would have been a major loss if it had been scheduled for a week later. I’m looking forward to watching Telemiracle once again this year. It’ll be different from the shows that we’ve seen in the past. But it will every bit as important as it’s ever been.

Liberals are failing to get Canadians vaccinated The editor: Justin Trudeau’s failure to deliver vaccines means another 213,000 Canadians lost their jobs in January.  There were to be no confirmed shipments of Moderna’s vaccine this week, and the Liberals’ plan to make vaccines in Canada won’t churn out doses until the end of the year.  Jobs, savings and lives are at risk. More unemployment means too many households will be forced to take on

staggering credit card debt just to get through the month. With businesses at risk in Souris– Moose Mountain, the federal Liberals must present a budget, their first in two years, that will bring our economy back to life.  Prime Minister Trudeau has left Canada with the lowest vaccination rate, a staggering deficit, and one of the highest unemployment rates in the G7. 

Members of Estevan city council attended the Municipalities of Saskatchewan convention virtually last week. File photo The annual convention for the Municipalities of Saskatchewan (formerly Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association) was different from any other in the past, but Estevan mayor Roy Ludwig said it was a good experience. The gathering of urban municipality leaders was held virtually from Feb. 7-10. All members of Estevan city council gathered to listen to presentations and discuss issues that are important to the province. Ludwig said the digital feed didn’t always work, but they heard the important information. About 400 people from across the province attended the convention, which Ludwig said is a smaller number than normal. Among the presentations they heard were from Doug Griffiths, who gave a talk about succession planning within municipalities, and Kendal Netmaker gave a keynote address on inclusive communities. Representatives of the cit-

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ies participated in a city sector meeting, and Ludwig said it went well. Only a few resolutions were voted on during the convention. Ludwig said normally there would be 20-24 concepts put before the members for a vote. A couple of motions dealt with environmental issues, but the big topic of discussion was for towns and villages to have elections every two years, like the RMs, rather than every four years. “There was lots of discussion back and forth, and at the end, it was pretty soundly defeated,” said Ludwig. The event also featured speeches by Municipalities of Saskatchewan representatives, Premier Scott Moe, numerous cabinet ministers and leader of the Official Opposition Ryan Meili. Ludwig noted that SaskPower president and chief executive officer Mike Marsh participated in the convention, and received lots of questions

about what will happen in Estevan, but Ludwig felt there weren’t a lot of answers. “With clean coal technologies, they’re looking at everything, with wind and solar and gas, and with the new regulations coming out, you couldn’t really say one way or the other, he definitely wouldn’t commit to what they’re going to make.” Gordon Barnhart was defeated in the election for the association’s president’s role. Barnhart was criticized early this year when it was discovered he travelled internationally during the Christmas break. Barnhart still made speeches during the event. Naicam Mayor Rodger Hayward was elected as the new president. Also on the executive is Torquay Mayor Michael Strachan, who is the vice-president for villages, resort villages and northern municipalities. Even though the number of people participating in the convention was down, Ludwig

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said there were challenges with so many people present online. “As much as we say technology’s a great thing, even in the live conventions there’s lots of hiccups with the technologies and intermittency with the signal. Of course, the same thing happened virtually. Quite a few times, the speakers would cut out. Although they did the best they could, you’re always going to have some of that, depending where you’re listening from.” A virtual component could be part of the convention in the future, he said, even if the experience isn’t the same. “You don’t get the same networking impact when you can visit with people face to face and share common problems, common issues,” said Ludwig. Municipalities are waiting for the pandemic to come to an end, and to have a return to normal, Ludwig said, and there is growing impatience with the time it is taking to roll out the COVID-19 vaccines.

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A6 February 17, 2021

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FLASHBACK – WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14, 1979 Eight girls received awards for their work as sunbeams at the Estevan Regional Nursing Home in February 1979. They are, back row, from left, Diana Plante, Barbara Walliser, Lori Cody, Alison Kolenz and Debbie Salaway. Front row, Shelly Perkins, Holly Nofield and Brenda Mainprize.

New Indigenous participation program for oil and gas The Government of Saskatchewan is delivering on its commitment to ensure that Indigenous communities and businesses in the province are provided meaningful opportunities to participate in the Accelerated Site Closure Program (ASCP), which was a key component of federal funding. The ASCP was designed to help manage the aban-

donment and reclamation of inactive oil and gas wells and facilities. As part of this program, the provincial government is introducing the First Nations Stewardship Fund and the Indigenous Business Credit Pool, two initiatives to support First Nations and Métis participation in the program. “Our Indigenous partners will play a crucial role in Saskatchewan’s economic re-

covery,” Energy and Resources Minister Bronwyn Eyre said. “The ASCP is expected to create thousands of jobs, and it is our hope that these two collaborative agreements will increase participation by First Nations and Métis contractors and workers in the oil and gas sector.” The First Nations Stewardship Fund will allocate $15 million in program funding

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to conduct abandonment and reclamation activities on First Nation Reserve lands across Saskatchewan. Eligible licensees (producers) with oil and gas sites on reserves will be able to access the fund by nominating sites for consideration. Licensees will engage with First Nations communities to ensure that their perspective is reflected in site closure work.  If nomination numbers

are sufficient, an additional $5 million will be made available to the fund. The Indigenous Business Credit Pool will create an incentive for eligible licensees to work with First Nations and Métis contractors to complete program work. If companies collectively spend $30 million of their existing ASCP allocations using Indigenous oilfield service companies, they will be

eligible to access an additional $15 million in ASCP funding for site closure work. The First Nations Natural Resource Centre of Excellence (COE), whose mandate is to create opportunities for First Nations communities for the sustainable, environmentally responsible development of natural resources within their lands, will review applicants for eligibility under the program.  For delivery of these programs, the provincial government is providing support to the COE, which will work with the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC), licensees, oil and gas service companies, and First Nations communities to administer the First Nations Stewardship Fund and the Indigenous Business Credit Pool.  “Working with Minister Eyre and the Government of Saskatchewan, we are creating jobs, cleaning up our environment, and supporting the hardworking people in our oil and gas sector – including in First Nations and Métis communities,” Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources Seamus O’Regan Jr. said.  Announced in May 2020 as part of the federal COVID-19 Economic Response Plan, the $400 million ASCP is overseen by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Energy and Resources and delivered in partnership with the SRC. The program prioritizes Saskatchewan-based oil and gas service companies and will support more than 2,000 full-time equivalent jobs and reclaim up to 8,000 inactive wells and facilities over two years.  “A critical focus for our Chiefs and leadership is increased inclusion with regards to initiatives such as the ASCP in Saskatchewan,” Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) vice-chief Heather Bear said. “The ASCP will assist in not only helping our First Nations businesses participate in well reclamation work, but also in alleviating environmental concerns within our treaty and traditional lands which is of paramount importance.”  “We see the Accelerated Site Closure Program (ASCP) as a welcome opportunity for our First Nations businesses,” president and CEO of the Saskatchewan First Nations COE Sheldon Wuttunee said. “We are pleased to be at the table to make first-hand decisions alongside our provincial and federal counterparts when it comes to the development and implementation of the ASCP, which will build capacity of our First Nations businesses and organizations.”  “As a 100 per cent First Nation-owned and operated corporation that maximizes Indigenous employment, we are excited to be a recipient in this program, which will help ensure economic stability for our people,” Beretta general manager Darrell Carter said.   “As true stewards of the land, we would like to thank the Government of Saskatchewan for not only recognizing the need to remedy our lands of inactive oil and gas infrastructure, but also recognizing the importance of integrating Indigenous businesses to help complete the work.” 


BUSINESS A7

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| Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

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Ronald McDonald House recognizes local restaurant owners for support over the years Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) Saskatchewan is saluting the franchisees of the Estevan McDonalds for their support over the years. Through their McDonald’s giving over the years, Tim and Chris Jenish have been able to support families from Estevan, and beyond, who have needed to travel for the medical needs of their child or children. In the past two years, 12 families from Estevan have stayed at the Ronald McDonald House in Saskatoon for a total of 58 nights – and the McDonald’s in Estevan has supported them. One of these families is Jolene and Raivyn Millions, who stayed at the Ronald McDonald House in both Saskatoon and Edmonton during Raivyn’s medical journey, which began in 2008 when she was four years old. “Most of our RMHC stays have been at the Saskatoon House and my favourite memory will always be the staff and volunteers, and the many things they have done for and with me – from their late night talks, to fresh baking in the kitchen, to their interest in my sports and well-being, and how my family and I are always welcomed with a

round of hugs. The Ronald McDonald House will forever be in my heart,” said Raivyn Millions. Tim Jenish said the local McDonalds finds a number of different ways to support RMHC. They have their coin boxes, with 100 per cent of money directed to the house. Right now they have the RMHC round-up, in which customers have the option of rounding up their bill. The difference between their actual bill and the rounded-up amount is donated. “For example, if your bill was $4.80, we would ask you if you’d like to round it up for the house, it would go up to $5, so 20 cents would go to the house,” said Jenish. Five cents from every cookie and 10 cents from every Happy Meal are donated as well. They have participated in a French fries program fundraiser. McHappy Day, which supports Ronald McDonald House, was cancelled in 2020, so instead there was a three-week promotion in which proceeds from the French fries they sold go to the house. T h e Pr a i r i e W i n d s Motorcycle Club has their annual Ride for Ronald McDonald House that raises thousands of dollars.

“We support their effort by giving them a place to register, and giving them a free soft drink or ice cream,” said Jenish. And they have had fundraisers at Estevan Bruins hockey games. The last one was in January 2020 that raised around $4,000. The Jenishes were part of the board of directors for the house from 2004-2007, and it was a great experience for them. “The house will forever be part of our lives, even post-McDonalds. It’s amazing to see what they do for families who are in a tough situation with their child being sick. We just loved the time sitting on the board, and seeing all of the different activities and the different work that goes into making the house a success.” Since 2010, the Jenishes have directly donated over $52,000. Other Estevan community support through 3rd party events and direct donations since 2010 has amounted to over $41,000. Each year over $500,000 is raised in Saskatchewan from McDonald’s operations and guest support. These contributions stay in the community to serve the people of Saskatchewan when they need it most.

Chris and Tim Jenish have been recognized for their support over the years by Ronald McDonald House Charities Saskatchewan. Photo submitted

DOING BUSINESS IN ESTEVAN

What You Can Expect When You Use Southeast Business Startup. Southeast Business Startup provides a number of resources to businesses and entrepreneurs in the area. When you visit Southeast Business Startup, you'll first get to meet manager, Jeff Taylor. Jeff's personal area of expertise is accounting and commercial law, but he also has access to a large network of people who can help with all different aspects of starting, growing, buying or selling a business. After meeting Jeff, you’ll learn about the services available at Southeast Business Startup. Southeast Business Startup provides entrepreneurs and new business owners multiple resources. The first, is the business resource centre, where entrepreneurs can learn about everything from how to start a business, to accessing loans, and asking for advice. Southeast Business Startup also provides a co-working space, which is a space to work either by the day or by the month. There is also a board room available to rent by the hour. The third facet of the Southeast Business Startup is the business incubator which is a structured program to help entrepreneurs take their business from an idea all the way to a business that they can launch or pitch to potential investors. For entrepreneurs interested in the Southeast Business Startup, Jeff says “I like to remind people that the service is free if you're not sure whether or not it's something that I can help with just feel free to reach out to me or come in.” He adds that “When starting or expanding your business, you should be looking at every free and cost-effective resource available to you and Southeast Business Startup is a great example of one of those resources.” If you're looking for more information on how Southeast Business Startup can help you, visit www.southeastbusinessstartup.ca. Here you’ll find detailed information about the programs and services available as well as contact information to get a hold of Jeff directly.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Unruly groups 5. Colorful flowers 11. December 25 14. Final stages of insects’ development 15. Breadmakers 18. Spanish man 19. In the middle 21. Bill 23. Noted editor Alexander __ 24. Swollen 28. Paddles 29. Cirrus 30. Seeped into 32. Skeletal muscle 33. Japanese traditional drama 35. Licensed practical nurse 36. Sibu Airport 39. Rebuff 41. Sun God 42. Astringent 44. Feeling of humiliation 46. A device attached to a workbench 47. Wood sorrel 49. Among 52. Horizontal passages 56. Father of Alexander the Great 58. Utter repeatedly 60. Linked together 62. Literary effect 63. Held onto

CLUES DOWN 1. One-time phone company 2. Units of electrical resistance 3. Hillside 4. Omen 5. Repetitions 6. Royal Mail Ship 7. Farm state 8. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.) 9. Dutch cheese 10. Japanese alcoholic beverage 12. Black powdery substance 13. Tokyo’s former name 16. Monetary unit 17. Bones 20. To avoid the risk of 22. Dry goods unit of volume (abbr.) 25. Megabyte 26. Unwell 27. Expresses disapproval of 29. Central nervous system 31. We all have it 34. Expression of bafflement 36. Tributary of the Danube 37. Flies over sporting events 38. Chinese city 40. College degree 43. Dispenser of first aid 45. Momentum (slang) 48. Red Sea port 50. Sloven 51. __ Turner, rock singer 53. Asian nation (alt. sp.) 54. Manson victim 55. Go forward 57. Primary Care Trust 58. Simpson trial judge 59. Sun up in New York 61. Exclamation of surprise


A8 February 17, 2021

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Long-time Oxbow principal Petlak is retiring By David Willberg W h e n J a s on Pe t l a k moved to Oxbow in January 1991, he thought he would be there for a couple of years, and then he’d move on. He never imagined he would still be in the community three decades later. “I enjoyed the community and I enjoyed the school and enjoy the staff and students,” he said. “Time just goes quick. I can remember things from the very first day I walked into the building.” “That’s the one thing about education – the students, the staff and the community can really have a bearing on where you’re at, because it really has an impact on decisions to move

and those types of things,” he added later. Petlak, who is originally from the east-central community of Goodeve, has announced that he is retiring at the end of the 2020-21 school year, bringing an end to a long career as an educator, most of it spent as a principal. “It’s always a difficult decision, but after 30 years, you’ve done what you wanted to do in the educational field, and there’s some other things in life that come up. You want to enjoy retirement while a person can, and I think that’s something with COVID that has popped up is to make sure the time that you spend with your family and those types of things

become quite important,” he told the Mercury. His career started by teaching Grade 9 students at the former Oxbow Prairie Heights School. In the fall of 1997, he became the school’s principal. When the town’s elementary and Prairie Heights were merged into Oxbow Prairie Horizons School in 2011, Petlak became its principal. “ There was always a new challenge that was right within Oxbow that presented itself,” said Petlak, who has a hard time believing it’s been nearly 10 years since Prairie Horizons opened. The building still looks brand new, he said. When he first started

teaching in Oxbow, it was still part of the old Oxbow School Division. A merger happened in the 1990s to create the Souris-Moose Mountain School Division, and then S ouris-Moose Mountain was amalgamated with five other school divisions to form the South East Cornerstone Public School Division in 2006. There was also the shift in going from being a teacher to a principal, and in guiding a Grade 9-12 school to being the principal of a pre-kindergarten to Grade 12 school. Technology has come a long ways, too, with what they’re able to bring to students. “When I first moved here, our computer lab had a Tandy 1000 with five and a half-inch floppy disks, with no hard drive space, and we were still using registers to do daily attendance.” Now they’re able to offer online learning for students. Vice-principal Mark Kosior now offers a robotics class to the students. Three of his former students are now on staff at Prairie Horizons, including Kosior. “It makes you feel good that people are going into the education field and going into administration, and it makes you feel good that they also want to come back and teach in the community they grow up in and went to school in,” he said. Not only has he taught the children of former students, but now grandchildren of his early students can be found at Prairie Horizons. There was some thought to remaining at the school for one more year, due to the un-

Oxbow Prairie Horizons School Jason Petlak has announced he is retiring at the end of the school year. Photo submitted certainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, but this seemed like the right time to move onto something new. “Teaching very much is not a job, it’s a lifestyle, and one’s identity is wrapped into the whole concept of being a teacher, so it’s never easy to walk away from that, but I wanted to have the opportunity to try different things,” he said. But it’s definitely not the way he envisioned his final year in education. COVID-19 has posed challenges, but it has also shown the quality of the students and staff in Oxbow to adapt and meet the chal-

lenges associated with the virus. “It just shows how resilient the staff and the students are,” he said. Petlak is looking forward to spending time with family. He knows of a lot of former colleagues who go into substitute teaching upon retiring, but it’s not something he plans to do at this time. He has a home in Goodeve, and he will likely return there for that extra time with his family. The South East Cornerstone Public School Division has started to search for Petlak’s replacement.

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Could Enbridge Line 5 trouble restart Energy East? By Brian Zinchuk, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter The Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors (CAODC) held a virtual town hall Feb. 9 with Saskatchewan Minister of Energy and Resources Bronwyn Eyre, speaking about items like how Enbridge’s Line 5 trouble with Michigan could restart discussion on an Energy East-type project, and recent energy developments in Saskatchewan. CAODC CEO Mark Scholz spoke from Calgary with Eyre, who was in Saskatoon, in an online format. Eyre said, “We all know we need pipelines and last year, the lack of Western Canadian pipeline access to tidewater cost Saskatchewan oil producers around $900 million; cost the government of Saskatchewan about $50 million in lost royalty tax revenue, and of course that's hospitals and highways and social services and schools.” She said the province has to continue to oppose federal policies that impose significant additional costs on the oil and gas sector,

Minister of Energy and Resources Bronwyn Eyre spoke with CAODC CEO Mark Scholz on Feb. 9. File photo with marginal environmental benefits in many cases. An example she gave was the Clean Fuel Standard, which she said will have a major impact on the energy, agriculture and manufacturing sectors. It will also impact regular Canadians, heating their homes and filling their cars. “The Clean Fuel regula-

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tions will result in an estimated increase in gasoline costs of up to 11 cents per litre, and diesel costs of up to 13 cents per litre by 2030. That clearly hits where it hurts on transportation, certainly. In Saskatchewan, based on current consumption volumes, that impact equates to roughly $710 million on Saskatchewan residents by 2030, and they’re huge numbers: $400 million from diesel consumption, $310 million from gas consumption.” Eyre said Saskatchewan is concerned about the “flawed data the federal government is relying on, and the utter lack of consultation taking place between provinces leading up to the gazetting before Christmas. “ On the court battle with the federal government regarding the carbon tax, Eyre said, “The federal carbon tax is another obvious, welldocumented challenge facing our oil and gas sector and as

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you know, our government is committed to fighting it. We're anxiously awaiting the decision from the Supreme Court.” Eyre spoke of how Saskatchewan is working its way through the periodic table. North American Helium is expected to complete its helium processing plant near Battle Creek, in the extreme southwest corner of the province. Prairie Lithium Corp. and LiEP Energy Ltd. are working together to produce lithium hydroxide from Saskatchewan oilfield brines. They have a two-stage pilot project underway, using produced water from a waterflood project. Work continues on the Deep Earth Energy Production Corp. geothermal project near Torquay, using oil and gas workers and services. Eyre provided an update on the Accelerated Site Closure Program, applying $400 million of federal funding

toward the abandonment and reclamation of up to 8,000 inactive oil and gas wells and facilities. “The program has engaged 98 licensees, 307 Saskatchewan-based service companies to date, and as of last month, the program had completed 724 well abandonments, 175 flowline abandonments, 39 facility decommissions and 1,434 site remediation and reclamation activities. So, that work goes on and certainly we're urging companies to work with us, work with the Saskatchewan Research Council to finalize invoicing, so that we can get that money out the door and continue to flow the program.” Scholz touched on the cold snap gripping the prairies, saying, “If we don’t have energy to heat our homes, we’re in a lot of trouble.” Eyre responded, “As I say, fossil fuels have to be our friends for a lot longer than maybe people realize. And on days such as this, when you actually have that sense of survival mode, you know, as the old weather advisory frostbite will occur within seconds. But really, you could freeze. It is true. It really brings home, what we can't be glib about, and can't take for granted. We understand that, you know, we're in climates where it gets really cold.” She touched on Michigan’s plan to shut down Enbridge’s Line 5, which takes Western Canadian oil and natural gas liquids through Michigan to supply Michi-

gan, Ohio, southern Ontario and Quebec. Eyre said, “Look at the Enbridge Line 5 discussion, and what theoretically is at risk there, and in terms of energy flow. But what that means is that we're actually cut off. I don't know if that's really settled in people, or if they've completely realized. “You know, it's the old turn off the taps thing, right? I mean, when you really think about what that would mean. And here we are seeing literal threats about that.” Scholz said, “It would be an absolute crisis.” He added, “If we don't get this, right, if we don't start thinking a little bit more critically and focused on Canada, and how we ensure we have energy, secure supply, things could get carried away.” Scholz wondered if the Line 5 issue could re-open the concept of an Energy East pipeline. Eyre said, “I think we were all very attuned to that all of a sudden. Whether Quebec is or not, I don't know. I mean, they're clearly alarmed. I would think about the risks to them. And there are certain ironies, I guess, to them, aren't there? I mean, in light of what they said about Western Canadian energy, not very long ago, and their position on Energy East, that they’re so dependent on the infrastructure they have, where that goes, in terms of restarting that discussion.” She said there’s certainly will within Saskatchewan and Alberta to get that discussion going.

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Estevan woman’s spontaneous story turns into a new illustrated children’s book By David Willberg An Estevan woman has taken a story that she came up with spontaneously, and turned it into a new illustrated children’s book. Forever and Ever is based on a tale that Raquel Klassen shared with her children one night. Swedish artist Emilie Wiklund is the illustrator. The genesis of the book came four months ago when Klassen was sitting down with her three little girls: Annorah, aged four, Hariett, two, Gracelynn, who is six months old. “They wanted a story, but instead of reading something off of their shelves, I just started talking, just some little lines, but with my heart towards them as a mom. They rhymed, and I thought it was cute. When I was done, they just loved it, and they wanted me to tell it again,” Klassen told the Mercury. She wound up writing the story on one of the utility bills in her kitchen; that utility bill is still in her possession. “My book is written in spreads … so each spread has a little rhyming thing.” Originally she had 12 spreads, but she needed to have at least 16. Klassen said coming up with four more was pretty easy.

After her mother, grandmother and a friend all heard Klassen tell the story, they encouraged her to get it published. Publishing a book had never crossed her mind, but she looked into it, and had a rough idea of what she needed to do. Klassen then found an illustrator, and they worked together for the next six weeks. She also found a publisher. “None of this was knowledge to me whatsoever,” said Klassen. “There was a lot of problems and a lot of hurdles and a lot more money than I thought.” But she has a beautiful hardcover book dedicated to her three daughters, and a story that is suddenly in hot demand. Klassen was also thrilled with how the illustrations turned out. She posted on a freelance illustrators’ website, looking for someone to supply the artwork for the book. Twenty hopefuls responded in about 10 minutes, saying they read her manuscript and wanting to illustrate her story. “I spent a whole day going through all these people’s portfolio, and I found this one illustrator, Emily Wiklund … and she was awesome to work with, I sent her my manuscript, and she did everything by hand initially. “It was a long process,

so she would draw something over each page, send it back to me, we went back and forth for six weeks, and eventually she put it into her computer.” Forever and Ever has a lot of personal details. All of the characters are designed to look like her girls, so she had to share pictures and videos. Klassen’s youngest is a rainbow baby, which means Klassen experienced a miscarriage in the pregnancy before Gracelynn. “On each page where Gracelynn is, she has rainbow somewhere on her, which is just a cute little detail.” Each page also has pink and blue butterflies. “Even though it’s dedicated to my kids and my three girls, it can be enjoyed by anyone, whether you have kids or not,” said Klassen. Initially she was going to keep the book for herself, but she promoted it on a Saskatoon mom’s group and the interest soared. Numerous copies have been sold in the pre-sale, and now it’s going to be carried at Chapters in Regina. “It’s been cool to see something that was meant to be a personal project actually mean a lot to other people. I wasn’t expecting it. I didn’t do it to get publicity or get any money or anything.” Klassen is also going to donate a couple of copies to

Raquel Klassen, pictured here with her daughter Annorah, has released a new illustrated children’s book. Photo courtesy of Raquel Klassen. the Estevan Public Library. Pre-orders of the book have closed, and she is waiting for the first shipment to arrive. Klassen hopes a local business will carry the book

in their store. Once she has the copies of the book in her possession, and she’s happy with the print job, then she will be announcing a release date.

It is hoped the book will be available in the next couple of weeks. Anyon e w h o wo u l d like a copy can email her at RDthiessen@outlook.com.

The front cover for Raquel Klassen’s new book. Photo courtesy of Raquel Klassen

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A12 February 17, 2021

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THIS

THINGS TO EXPERIENCE

Take the Backroads of Estevan Audio Tour and find historical sites, fantastic lookouts and local folklore

Go thrifting at the Salvation Army and Choose Life Ministry Second Chance Store

Get your kids to burn some of that energy off at the Energy Outlet Indoor Play Zone

Throw a strike at Estevan Bowl! Call ahead to book your lane

Pick up fresh, hot theatre popcorn to go

Go for a walk on the Preddy Trails at Woodlawn Regional Park

Get crafty with a take home craft kit from the Estevan Art Gallery & Museum

The Estevan Family Resource Centre is a friendly, safe place to let kids be kids!

Go Ice Fishing at Boundary or Rafferty Dam

Learn new healthy habits and join Encompass Fitness

Attend the programs at the Estevan Public Library

Attend a workshop at Jewels & Jems

Go skating at Parent & Tot Skating

Go cross country skiing

Have a bonfire and roast marshmallows

Go skating at the outdoor rink, Rusty Duce

Play disc golf in the snow in Torgeson Park

Go for a skate at the Audrey Fichter Memorial arena on George Street

Borrow a toy from the Estevan Public Library. During February.

Borrow a DVD TV series from the Estevan Public Library and binge watch it

Learn how to hand letter with a take home class from the Estevan Art Gallery & Museum

Expand your skills with the ceramics workshop at the Estevan Art Gallery & Museum

Give your kitchen a facelift and paint your cupboard with Fusion Paint from Jewels & Jems

Pretend you are travelling and stay at a local hotel

Refinish that old piece of furniture with Fusion Paint from Jewels & Jems

Visit the General Store, it’s like a local craft sale!

Get a new fish from Your Toy Store & More

Add some sparkle to your winter with a visit to A&A Jewellery

Stay warm and shop inside at the Estevan Market Mall

Get out of the house with 3 of your favourite people and dine at a local restaurant

Try ordering in from a restaurant you have not tried before

Start a book club, find a new title at Henders Drugs

Tired of looking at a screen? The House of Stationery has a great selection of classic and new board games

Archive your memories and make a beautiful scrapbook with supplies from The House of Stationery

Pick up a deck of Tourism Estevan playing cards at the Visitor’s Centre and learn a new game

Curl up with a new book from Pharmasave

Rent the Orpheum for a private viewing of a new movie or a classic

Check out the new vibes at Frank & Frankies

Go for a nature drive and look for wildlife

Build a snowman

Build a blanket fort

Go swimming at the RM of Estevan Aquatic Centre

Try a new hobby like macramé or knitting

Go for a walk on the beach at Boundary Dam and see the geese

Puzzle time! Challenge yourself with a new puzzle from The House of Stationery

Visit the exhibit “Wound Care” by Cindy Stelmackowich at the Estevan Art Gallery & Museum

Make sure you look cute all bundled up with mitts & toques from Jenny Joans

Take a drive to Roche Percee and explore the rocks

Have a luxurious bubble bath, with new bubble bath, bombs and salts from Pharmasave

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February 17, 2021 A13

www.estevanmercury.ca

THIS

THINGS TO EXPERIENCE

Challenge your mind with the weekly crossword puzzle in the Estevan Mercury brought to you by Scotsburn Dental

Like the ShopEstevan Facebook page and find exclusive deals

Enjoy a McDonald’s cup of coffee and help the St Joseph’s Hospital Foundation too

Get stronger and join the Studio 24 Gym

Print off colouring sheets and have a family colouring contest

Go sliding down the hill on First Street

Try the grilled cheese of the week at Eddie Websters

Have coffee and muffins from A&W Estevan

Add some sparkle to your winter with a visit to A&A Jewellery

Spend a day getting pampered at a local salon

Get a harness and have your dogs take you for a sled ride at Woodlawn

Print your pictures that are filling up your computer memory

Try a workout at The Gym

Build an igloo

Go shopping locally

Play Win Wednesday with KFC on the Estevan Mercury Facebook page

Warm up at the RM of Estevan Aquatic Centre in the hot tub or steam room

Buy some good wine and enjoy a good movie

Start you garden indoors with seeds and supplies from Canadian Tire

Spend some time at Soul Hideout and learn about crystals and find spiritual and holistic items

Find a picturesque background and spray some hot water at dusk at -30 weather for amazing pictures

Enjoy easy, homemade meals with the Freezer Meals from Black Beards!

Play Lodge Trivia at Mr Mikes Thursday nights

Try the new Chaffle & Keto menu at the Tower Cafe

Drive out to Forget for supper at the award-winning Happy Nun Cafe

Take the ski-doo out for a ride in Moose Mountain Provincial Park

Write and send a card to people living in senior homes in the community.

See what foods will freeze outside

Make an ice sculpture with food colouring

Clean out your closet and donate items

Warm up the house and bake cookies

Do some laps at the walking track at Affinity Place

Try homemade pierogies from the Polish Kitchen

Try your luck at Chase the Ace every Saturday night with the Estevan Bruins at the Beef Bar

Dress warm and try out geocaching, there are quite a few hidden little treasures that will help you explore the area

Chase the Ace with the Kinsmen Club at the Black Grasshopper every Thursday night

Read your local newspaper

Do a random act of kindness

Redecorate your house

Dive into a new series on Netflix

Volunteer at the Humane Society

Deep clean your house

Order a pizza, enter the #pizzamonth contest and you could win $500 Shop Estevan bucks, see details at www.estevan.ca

Grab some snacks from Pop Coolture and watch the sunset from the Wood End North West Mounted Police Post historical site

Too cold outside? Stay warm inside while you are turning your house into a dream home with help from a local home improvement store

Pick up a new Diamond Dotz picture from zsave, a great way to pass time and make beautiful art

Visit the Estevan Art Gallery & Museum and view the exhibit “Otherworldly Abundance” by Zoe Schneider

Read local! Maureen Ulrich is a local author that has written several books.  Pick up your copies of Power Plays, Face Off & Break Away from the Visitors Centre

Find a new recipe to try

Go tobogganing

Go for a winter walk on the Souris River

Visit Art Concepts Custom Framing and see original artwork, pottery and more

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306.634.6744 www.eagm.ca

Lori Carr, MLA

Estevan Constituency Office 306.634.7311 loricarrmla@sasktel.net

Otherworldly Abundance @ EAGM by Zoë Schneider Wound Care @ EAGM by Cindy Stelmackowich Inside/Out Outdoor Exhibition at Woodlawn Regional Park featuring Chantel Schultz

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A14 | Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

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Long-time coach Janice Grochalski celebrating 30 years of guiding Estevan’s young figure skaters By David Willberg Figure skating has been a part of Janice Grochalski’s life since she was seven years old, first as a competitor, then as a coach, and also the mother of a talented young skater. But most of her time in the sport has been spent as the head coach of the Estevan Skating Club. This season marks her 30th year with the club. “Estevan is recognized as one of the strongest clubs in the province at ever y single level,” Grochalski told the Mercury. “I’m really proud to tell people that I coach in Estevan, and I’m so fortunate to have great parents who work so hard at running the club, and have helped make it so great.” When she was growing up in Yorkton, Grochalski’s family lived about two blocks from the arena. She and her sister were entered in every sport that was available at that time. Grochalski stuck with figure skating and fell in love with it. “I did a lot of different sports, and this is the one that stuck with me,” said Grochalski. After graduating high school, she started coaching professionally right away, beginning with a stint in Langham, coaching part-time while she went to university. After she moved to Estevan with her husband Ken in 1989, Janice Grochalski coached in Midale and Oxbow for a year until a position opened in Estevan. “I’ve been coaching in Estevan here for 30 years, but a total of 38 professionally, and I’ve basically been on the ice right since I was seven years old.” There have been so many rewarding moments during her time in Estevan. She achieved her national coaching status, which is a source of pride. Eight skaters have qualified for Western Canadians,

Janice Grochalski has been coaching the Estevan Skating Club for 30 years. Photo submitted and many qualified several years in a row. Her daughter, Kristen, qualified for the Western Canada Winter Games in Whitehorse, B.C. Only four kids from the province make it to the event, which is held

every four years. Figure skating is a wonderful sport, except for the cold, Grochalski said. She loves kids, thanks to their creativity, energy, honesty and happiness, and they’re fun to be around.

“Every time I go to the rink, it’s a fun environment,” said Grochalski. “Kids are always happy. They’re always smiling, and it’s just a great place to be. “I also love going to all of the competitions and

stuff, and I’ve met a lot of coaching friends along the way. There is probably only a handful of us who have been in it this long, so we’ve gotten to be pretty good friends. We only see each other a couple of times every year, so it’s always nice to see them.” And she has found herself coaching the children of kids that she taught many years ago. Some of those second-generation skaters are already 12 years old. “They always come to me and say ‘You used to coach my mom,’ and sometimes the little ones like to guess how old I am, knowing that I taught their parents. The consensus, when they ask me that, they always think I’m 24, and that always makes me laugh.” Ten years ago, the club made the move from the Civic Auditorium to Affinity Place, which was also a step forward for the club. “I spent so many hours and early mornings in the Civic, and it was sad to see it go, but we’re so fortunate to have a new, beautiful facility in our city,” said Grochalski. “We are the envy of every skating club across the province.” When she first started, the club offered figure skating and ice dance. They skated at 6 a.m. just to get all of the disciplines enough time to practice. Now the sport has shifted more to the free skate, and the on-ice dance component has disappeared because partners might not be available. The judging system has also changed. “Our sport and our activity on the ice here in Estevan has evolved along with all those changes,” said Grochalski. Her tenure hasn’t always been easy. She suffered a broken arm early on in her career, and a broken femur sidelined her for part of a season. But at the first possible opportunity, she was back coaching from the

players’ box. And this year has been unquestionably unique. She praised the skaters for wearing masks while practising, and for coping with having just eight kids on the ice at a time. There haven’t been any competitions, but they get to focus on skills rather than competitions. “We’re fortunate to still be on the ice, actually, when so many activities for kids have been cancelled. But figure skating is mostly a practice sport. We spend very little time doing events, so our year, basically, hasn’t really changed.” The toughest part has been saying no to the CanSkate program. Based on enrolments during the season, and time spent coaching during the summer months, Grochalski believes she has coached about 3,000 different skaters over the years. Grochalski expects she will be coaching for a while yet. It doesn’t feel like work, and she still loves working with the kids and seeing their improvements. Each day she goes to rink it’s still different from the last. And there’s one more incentive to keep coaching: Grochalski’s daughter Kristen had a baby six months ago, and so it would be wonderful to coach another generation of skaters in the family. Kids can join the CanSkate program at age three. “It would be a whole cycle, another generation, as … the fall I started, I was actually pregnant with her (my granddaughter’s) mother,” said Grochalski. Grochalski is grateful for the support of the parents over the last 30 years who have allowed her to “share in the skating experience” with all of these kids, and it’s been a privilege and an honour for her to have met so many young people and their parents along the way.

Estevan woman named top female bowler in Canada Monique Ley can add another accolade to her list of accomplishments in bowling. The Estevan Bowl member and local resident has been named the Female Bowler of the Year for 2020 by the Canadian 10-Pin Federation. While last season had limited opportunities for competition due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she was still able to accomplish a lot on the lanes. She bowled a perfect game in January, placed 15th at the Manitoba Open, which Ley said is a really tough tournament, and she was also 15th in a field of 120 bowlers at the KFYR Open, a men’s competition in Bismarck, N.D. “I had the high average in the season in Estevan,” said Ley.

Just like every other sport, the pandemic brought her season to a halt in March. Once Estevan Bowl reopened, she would go in once or twice a week. “I got back into league in September, until November when they shut down leagues, so I’m just going in and practising when I can,” she said. Right now she practises twice a week, but she expects to be up to three times a week eventually. The perfect game she bowled in January wasn’t her first. She has three sanctioned perfect games, and has twice hit 800 for a three-game total. Her career high is 827, which would put her at an average of 274. Ley started bowling when she was seven years old, and began travelling

nationally through the sport at age 12 and internationally at 17. Bowling had allowed her to meet a lot of people she wouldn’t have encountered otherwise. She moved here in 2007, and continued with her success. Ley still hopes to be able to bowl competitively this year. “I am very anxious to get back at it. I’m hoping the borders will open at least by September so I can get down there and get some training down there as well,” she said. The award would typically be presented during the Canadian Team Trials in May, but those have been cancelled, so she won’t be receiving the award for 2020 until January of next year.

Monique Ley has been selected as Canada’s top female bowler for 2020. Photo courtesy Monique Ley

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AGRI NEWS A15 | Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

Frigid weather meant more calls to animal protection The frigid weather that settled in the province over the past couple of weeks resulted in an increase in calls for the Animal Protection Services of Saskatchewan (APSS). Since Feb. 5, they opened 23 investigations, with seven of them in the southeast. The Mercury talked to Don Ferguson, APSS executive director, about the nature of the calls and the proper care animals need during the winter. "As it typically happens when we get this extremely cold weather we do get an increased number of calls in a short period of time," Ferguson said. The calls came in from

all over, from Weyburn to the Manitoba border, however, there were no calls in Estevan specifically. Most of the calls have been for animals, specifically dogs or livestock, staying outside without adequate feed, water or shelter. Ferguson added that it's nice that the public is being proactive and pays attention to the condition in which animals are kept. Once the weather becomes extreme the number of reports usually goes up, but in many cases, the APSS officers find that minor measures need to be taken to improve the situation. Quite often owners just don't realize that the condition

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they created for their animals may work in one kind of environment but don't when the weather changes. "Although they had that same dog house and the dog has been using it well the beginning of the winter, at -40 and below it's not an adequate shelter anymore. (So we provide) them education as to how to improve that shelter so it would be adequate if the dog is being left out or if it's an outside dog. "And same with livestock. Livestock producers in Saskatchewan do an excellent job in making sure that they are taking care of their animals. But usually with the cold weather comes some added care concerns and sometimes people aren't taking those extra percussions that they need to. And we are just providing that education." There have been no animal seizures in the region so far this year. Ferguson said that if the

investigation shows that something is off, they educate owners about what needs to be done and usually people just implement the recommendations to ensure the wellbeing of animals. The Animal Protection Act is regulatory in nature, so the APSS are always looking for compliance, and taking animals into protective custody is the last resort. "In most cases, we are trying to do it by way of education and consent to make those improvements. But there is also an option of issuing a corrective action order in which the owner is given a specific period of time, in which they have to rectify the conditions that would likely lead to an animal being in distress. And if they don't take those measures, then we will take the animal into protective custody," Ferguson explained. He also noted that if compared to previous years, so far

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they've received fewer calls from the southeast Saskatchewan region. The tendency might be partially attributed to an example set by two significant livestock seizures that occurred in the Stoughton and Lampman areas in 2019. In both cases, criminal charges were laid. Ferguson provided a few tips that would help to ensure the well-being of outdoor animals during the rest of the cold winter days. "Livestock can tolerate these cold temperatures as long as they are acclimatized to it. But with the weather conditions being what they are, obviously, they need to have an increased amount of food to provide for

increased energy and liquid water, so that they don't have to use that energy to use snow as the liquid source. It's always better and definitely preferable, particularly with cattle. "Horses do require liquid water. And just making sure that you are checking on the animals daily. If people are going to use horse blankets in this weather, they need to remove those and check the horses' conditions at least once a week. "Dogs can remain outside, but they've got to have adequate shelter. We recommend that straw is used and making sure that straw bedding is clean and dry, obviously changing it out if it becomes moist."

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believes the hospital is a big addition to Saskatchewan.

Gage Goetz has had some wonderful experiences in 4-H.

Public speaking is another benefit of being in 4-H. This year he won first place in the junior age division and best overall speech at his club.

He has made some great friends, he’s won awards and competitions, and he has even raised some money for a great cause. “It’s even helped me to make my own cow herd,” Gage said proudly. “My mom gave me a heifer, and this year my heifer is going to be having a calf. And I bought a second heifer from my brother for $1,800, and she’ll be calving next year.” In 2019, he auctioned his 4-H steer off to support the Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital in Saskatoon. Gage, who has had two heart operations in Alberta when he was younger before the Saskatchewan hospital was open,

He also auctioned off his halter and show stick.

This year’s speaking contest was held virtually. He had to videotape his speech and send it in. Gage will now advance to the district level. “4-H has helped me a lot, because I’ve had my family and my friends help me with the speeches and help me get through them, and just be supportive for me. I was also pretty nervous when I first did my speech, but I still did well.” Gage says he would recommend 4-H for other people. It doesn’t matter if you live on a farm or in town, and there are lots of different types of clubs.

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A16 February 17, 2021

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Exhibition Association made it through tough year and looks forward to 2021 By Ana Bykhovskaia The Estevan Exhibition Association discussed the outcomes of 2020 during their annual general meeting on Feb. 10. Re-elected president Tamera Huber said that they now have a full roster of eight board members. Graham Collie was elected as the first vice-president and Al Biette will be the second vice-president. Crystal Ross was elected as the financial chair. During the meeting, the board also discussed some ways of development for the exhibition grounds. "We had a couple of members present some fabulous ideas to bring to our grounds," Huber said. Real Life XL Skills Inc. suggested bringing in a program, allowing youth and their families to work with horses even if they don't own one. Another person suggested bringing in some classes onto the exhibition grounds for a fundraiser. Due to the pandemic, the association wasn't able to host their annual fair and rodeo, which were supposed to happen on the same weekend for the first time in more than 20 years in 2020. And so far, they are not sure what's going to happen to their 2021 summer season. So, while still hoping for the best, the board started looking into other

opportunities. "Some of the ideas for fundraisers this year were perhaps bringing in an outdoor movie on our grounds. Or a food truck alley on our grounds. Those are some of the ideas that are being tossed around. And I think we are going to implement these this year in some way," Huber said. Huber has been in contact with West Coast Amusements, which traditionally brings in the fair to Estevan in early summer. However, no updates were available yet. "All we have right now is hope that we can proceed with the 2021 (program)," Huber said. She added that one way or the other, they are going to bring in some joy to the city. "We miss all of the smiles. That's the biggest thing that we get out of that is the joy that we bring to other people's lives through the fair and the rodeo. That's what we want to do, just bring some happiness to people." Once any decisions are made, they will be shared with the public through the media. "We are going to be planning," Huber said. "Plan A is proceeding with the Energy City Ex and the rodeo, midway and with everything else. But with the current government regulations, we plan to have plans B,

The Estevan Exhibition Association hopes to have events like its annual rodeo in 2021, but it says it will have something for the community. File photo C and D if we need to in case that can't happen. And what that picture looks like we don't know. "We'll work on it and we'll see where we can get. I think every agricultural exhibition society within our province and within our country is in the same boat." It was a rough year for the Estevan Exhibition Association. They

are a non-for-profit organization, and while they lost most of their income in 2020 due to the pandemic, they hope they'll be able to find a way to keep going in 2021. "Just like any other business, we are hurting from it," Huber said. She also noted that their hall is currently being booked for different events for this spring and summer,

but unless the government eases off the restrictions they won't be able to proceed with any activities. During the meeting, the board also took time to celebrate Laura Mantei for 35 years of her dedication to the Estevan Exhibition Association. She was the rodeo committee chairperson for a number of years and was involved in other aspects.

Cold weather resulted in calls for fire department Extreme weather conditions created some work for the Estevan Fire Rescue Service last week. Estevan fire crews were called to the report of a man stuck underneath a trailer and in need of rescue in Bienfait last Tuesday at about 7 p.m. The call was quickly updated, as the person was able to get out from underneath the mobile home. It was learned that the man was working on broken waterlines, and his spouse couldn't get any contact with him for over half an hour and called 911. The situation changed shortly after that, and the Estevan fire department stood down. However, the Bienfait fire department along with Estevan EMS attended the scene to make sure the man wasn't suffering from any injuries. And the family was grateful for the response.

"Huge rave to Bienfait fire department, Estevan RCMP and the ambulance attendants that attended my call for help when my husband Greg became unresponsive while working underneath our mobile home Tuesday evening. I was fortunate enough to be able to wake him and get him out before the crews arrived, but they didn't leave until they knew he was safe and dry. Could have been

very different with the temperatures that night. Thank you all for braving the cold to help," said Debbie Hochstein on social media afterwards. Earlier that day, Estevan firefighters responded to a report of a commercial fire alarm occurring in the south part of Estevan. There was no smoke or flame on the exterior, but the fire alarm panel was indicating that the sprinkler system was initiated. Staff members who were on scene explained that due to the cold weather the system failed as lines froze and burst. "Thankfully, there was no fire occurring at this occupancy and we isolated the branch lines for the sprinkler system, so the remainder of the occupancy would be protected. And then we returned to the fire station," said Estevan Fire Chief Dale Feser. The next call came in at

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about 11 p.m. on Wednesday. A concerned resident reported smoke coming out of a basement window of a building in the southcentral part of Estevan. Firefighters checked out the building and found out that it was just a horizontal venting that was releasing the normal exhaust gases, however, it looked abnormal due to cold weather. The scene was deemed safe and fire crews returned to the station. Feser reminded the pub-

lic to regularly check and free the venting systems to prevent potential emergencies. "Make sure that you are checking the ventilation for the furnaces and hot water heaters as well as your sewer venting. You may get some sewer smell into the home, they have a tendency to ice off as well. So you just want to knock the ice off without breaking the ventilation itself," Feser said. He added that while horizontal ventilation is easy

to work with as it's usually quite close to the ground, vertical ventilation also has to be carefully checked during extremely cold days. "Exercise extreme caution if you are going on top of the roof. It was brought to our attention that some local tree companies do have bucket trucks. So people can phone around and get them to take a look at their venting. And if it seems to be icing up to get that done for you guys as well."

Well below normal spring runoff expected The Water S ecurit y Agency (WSA) has released the preliminary spring runoff outlook for 2021, showing most of southern Saskatchewan with below to well below normal snowmelt runoff potential, and the northern areas looking at normal to above normal potential. Much of the southern areas of Saskatchewan experienced very dry conditions through the summer and into fall last year. The snowpack is generally below to near normal to date. An area covering Estevan and the rest of the southeast is looking at a well below normal runoff, according to the report. Moose Jaw and Regina are also expected

to have well below normal runoff. Meanwhile, an area covering Prince Albert, Saskatoon, Melfort and dipping as far south as Maple Creek and Val Marie is projected to have a below normal runoff. The far north, encompassing the areas of Uranium City, Stony Rapids and Cluff Lake, saw extreme wet conditions carr ying through the fall. This area also experienced historically high lake and river levels through summer 2020. There are indications that the snowpack is near normal, though data is limited. An above normal runoff is forecast. Areas of central and northern Saskatchewan in-

cluding Kindersley, Lloydminster, Meadow Lake and Nipawin are currently expected to experience a near normal runoff. While fall conditions were near to slightly drier than normal, a near to above normal winter snowfall season to date, including a heavy snowfall in early November, have been compensating factors. The far southwest corner of the province, from Cypress Hills to the US border, is also expected to experience a near normal runoff. The spring runoff outlook could change as there is potentially another 8-10 weeks of winter remaining. The first spring runoff forecast will be issued early in March.

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February 17, 2021 A17

Estevan’s electric plug charging station is open The Estevan Market Mall now has a fully equipped electric vehicle (EV ) charging station. The renovation of the parking lot near Peavey Mart included the construction of a two-vehicle electric plugin, which is now available for local EV owners as well as travellers passing through the Energ y City, free of charge. The EV charging station is the first and only one in Estevan. It's a level 2 charger, which is similar to charging a vehicle at home and takes about six to eight hours for a full charge. "With the support of Peavey Mart, we have now dedicated two stalls near the entrance of the Peavey Mart for electric vehicle parking and charging. The charging unit was activated at the end of January," said Martin Blair, who is managing director of First Aberdeen Properties Ltd., the owners of the Estevan Market Mall. There was a plug-in by the store before as the store network committed to offering customers free charging a while ago. But it was on the side of the building, and after the renovations, a new station opened at a more convenient spot at the lot. The Mercur y talked to Estevan's Mark Kroeker, who is a Saskatchewan Electric Vehicle Association (SEVA) board member,

about the new feature and the world of electro cars. There are currently two people who own EVs in the Estevan area, but Kroeker said the popularity of EVs in Saskatchewan is growing every year. As of December 2020, there were about 1,650-1,675 registered EV and plug-in electric-hybrid vehicle owners, and the team is steadily growing. "It's growing exponentially for sure. As of about April last year there was only about 350 electric cars registered in Saskatchewan," Kroeker said. Kroeker bought his new vehicle last year and said so far, he is happy with the decision. "We purchased our Tesla Model Y at the beginning of October. We ordered it online. Everything is done online with them, it's a different way to buy a car. We ordered it in July and took delivery in early October. "So far, we've been really happy … It has a really good range. On a summer day, we can drive from Estevan to Saskatoon without stopping. It has a 520-kilometre range. And in winter you lose, depending on how cold it is, on the worst day you lose up to 40-50 per cent of your range." Kroeker added that while in winter Tesla's performance is not as great as in summer, EV owners leave home fully charged every morning and usually have

no problem with charging their vehicles if needed. All a driver needs is a plug, similar to what a regular oven uses – 220V and 50Amp, and it costs way less to charge a vehicle than it is to fill it up with gas or diesel. Besides, the cold weather is not a challenge for EVs at all. "Anybody who owns one would tell you it's excellent (even during the cold weather), because you don't have to worry about whether it's going to start or not in the morning. It will always run. It's on all the time … It's almost like a cell phone. It goes to sleep, but it's still on. And when you get in, it comes back awake and you just drive away." Even now there are enough charging stations, especially in the Tesla system, to freely travel across Canada, and Kroeker said that the network keeps growing with a few serious players joining it as of right now. "I believe this summer Canadian Tire nation-wide has committed to installing chargers at all mini locations including Estevan and Weyburn. We are getting DC fast chargers, level 3 charging, which means a car like mine plugged into it can charge in 15-20 minutes." He added that Federated Co-ops started installing charging stations as well. And that's how Kroeker said he sees the development of the industry, with charging stations being an incentive and a courtesy of shopping centres and coffee shops. "Nobody wants to be left behind. This transition is happening. It's going to happen fast, I think," Kroeker said. Out of Kroeker's experience, buying an EV is more expensive than purchasing the same class of gas or diesel vehicle, however, owning one

Local electric vehicle owners and those passing through Estevan now can recharge their cars at Peavey Mart. Photo submitted is cheaper. "That's why we bought one because we had to replace our vehicle. And you sit down and you do the math. And even though they are more expensive to buy up front, they are cheaper to own over the life of the vehicle," Kroeker said. It cost their famil y about $15 in electricity last fall to get from Calgary to Estevan, and with more players joining the market it will get even better. Kroeker added he believes that the new free charging station will probably make more EV travellers stop in Estevan now.

Currently, Teslas with their more developed charging network are quite popular with Saskatchewan drivers, and the second person in the Estevan area also drives a Tesla, but a Model X. However, some SEVA members also own other brands including electric BMWs, Nissans, Hyundais and others, and every year more and more manufacturers join the market. Kroeker said that Ford, GM and Toyota are also working on electric vehicles. Kroeker added that if people have questions about electric vehicles and their performance in Saskatchewan, they can visit their website at sevaonline.ca.

CROSSWORD ANSWER

By Ana Bykhovskaia

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF MEETING DATE

The new electric vehicle charging station is located at Peavey Mart's rebuilt parking lot. Photo submitted

TAKE NOTE THAT the Regular (Public) Meeting of the Board of Education of South East Cornerstone Public School Division previously scheduled for March 24, 2021 has been rescheduled to March 17, 2021 commencing at 1:00 PM at the school division office located at 80A-18th Street N.E., Weyburn, SK.

"There is lots of great information there. There are a lot of myths that are propagated about electric vehicles that are really not true … We encourage people to go on our website and read and get some of the answers to their questions. " An d on c e COV I D stuff is over we are really hoping to actually have electric cars rallies, and have some of my friends off of Regina to give people rides and show them what it's like," Kroeker said. The new EV charging station is located at the southeast corner of the Estevan Market Mall's parking lot, by the antique tractor in front of the Peavey Mart.

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Southeast College named one of Saskatchewan’s Top Employers For the fourth year in a row, Southeast College has been named as one of Saskatchewan’s Top Employers.  The Top Employer designation recognizes Saskatchewan employers that lead their respective industries as exceptional places to work.  College president and CEO Patrick Stoddart spoke about the commitment and dedication of his staff over the past year.  “Southeast College is known for its ability to pivot and think outside of the box and that is exactly what our staff did this past year. The challenges the pandemic brought to our organiza-

tion were immense, but the strength, perseverance and persistence of not only our staff but our students have truly been inspiring.” Employers are evaluated using a variety of criteria and are compared to other organizations in their field to determine who offers the most progressive and forward-thinking employee programs.  Southeast College says its comprehensive health and family benefits and its commitment to lifelong learning have always been a strong point of selection. A renewed focus and commitment to employee wellness was the high point through 2020 and

into 2021. Board chair Janice Giroux said: “The board of governors of Southeast College is once again pleased to congratulate our staff on this year’s award. Their dedication, commitment and ongoing strength is a true testament to the success of our students. Through our management and staff ’s hard work, Southeast College was able to continue to offer much needed programming to the students and the communities that we serve.”  S askatc he wan’s Top Employers is an annual competition organized by the editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers. This year’s list

includes twenty-four top Saskatchewan employers. Among the other em-

ployers to make the list that have operations in Estevan were Access Communica-

tions, SaskPower, SaskTel and Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation.

Cornerstone highlights data-backed information One of the most important system goals embedded in the South East Cornerstone Public School Division is simply noted as System Goal No. 3. But, what comes with that No. 3 placement could arguably be a first-place priority. The school division is data driven by its own admission and Goal 3 describes to the effect they use information gathered to measure, monitor and report continuous improvement within the student body, and by design, the teams that deliver those educational standards. Superintendents Gord Husband, Kevin Hengen and Shelley Sargent were joined by director of education Lynn Little to deliver a package of

system Goal 3 information to board members on Feb. 10. The one-hour presentation was part of the board’s monthly public business meeting that was once again held in an online format due to the need to respect health and safety guidelines. Chair woman Audrey Trombley was in the division’s head office conference room along with a few administration personnel, and she called on Little to start the presentation that included a host of research-based information that is used by the educational leaders to provide system-wide improvements in the teaching and learning processes. “It shows us where targets are met and where there is room for improvement,”

said Little in her opening remarks. Husband explained the first strand of the data gathering system, entitled SKOPUS which is a warehouse for student information. The system allows for the gathering of student information from the schools and their achievement data. “This year has been significantly different. But we have the tools,” Husband said. Student profiles, reports and dashboard items such as attendance and other outcomes are gathered for each student. Report cards, previous report cards, data management and analysis are all within the SKOPUS embrace to help build the data wall, he explained. Husband said “we need-

ed to take a snapshot in time when schools closed,” referring to the mid-March 2020 closure of schools due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a Grade 3 sample, Husband showed how 80 per cent of the Cornerstone students were at or well above expected achievement levels and then indicated where and how those who needed and agreed to supplemental learning, were assisted by the gathering of vital information that could be used for introductions into a new grade level. A chart for middle years schooling was extrapolated to include supplemental learning and Husband noted that chart was a little deceiving since not all students chose to engage in the supplemental learning process after classes were

reverted to online messaging. The focus was on transitions so students could start the year off in a positive fashion, Husband said. A third chart showed the data gathering system as it was used in a high school (Grade 10) math program. Again, he noted the data was limited since some students had only engaged in about 20 in-class teaching days prior to the shutdown. The information gathered subsequently though, identifies the needs for school level instruction and student needs heading into the next academic year. “We identify the learning needs of our students,” Husband said in the concluding remarks for his opening segment of the presentation.

Hengen introduced the STAR or universal screen assessment system used by the division. Known as the Renaissance Assessments, Hengen said, “it’s an easy system to use,” and gives the principals and teachers a snap shot of student progress. Again, using charts and graphs, the system’s use for reading skills, early literacy and math were displayed and that helped educators lean into the diagnostics to discern, “what needs more attention or intervention,” he said. Assessments are carried out three times during the school year. An example chart of a Grade 5 math tracking system was shown, indicating a colour-coded sample for individual ranks. In response to a question, Hengen said this tracking can be done in an online system as well as within a classroom but “we haven’t assessed current results versus previous results yet.” Sargent spoke next and her subject matter was universal behaviour. She said all students from Grades 4-12 were assessed each fall, with students being asked to provide some self-assessments while homeroom, or other educators with a steady exposure to the student, are being asked to do an assessment of individual students. These assessments give leaders a look at potential risk levels regarding behaviour and emotions. “We compare how they see themselves with how the teacher sees them,” said Sargent. A data analysis sample was provided to the board members showing the various questions that are asked on the survey dealing with such things as mood changes, self-control, ability to work with others, tension, attention spans and abilities to reach out to help others or to accept help. “Again, the current year is unique so we re-evaluate how we identify students of concern,” Sargent added. The school counsellors’ caseloads are based on data like this and students are re-screened in the spring and often “this helps fill gaps in students’ mental health needs,” Sargent said. The colour-coded charts indicate that students situated in the yellow or red zones, signals that the school needs to dig into the data to discover where the educators can help. “It’s often just one step at a time,” she said. On this topic, Little said this segment of data gathering could be compared with a pothole in the highway. “We can drive carefully around it. It slows us down, but it will be repaired.” With that note, the trio of presenters were thanked by Trombley for the expertise and information they brought to the session.


CLASSIFIEDS A19 | Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

Feed & Seed

Obituaries Nola Christine Joseph (nee Peters) 1938 - 2021 It is with great sadness the Joseph family announces the passing of their beloved wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother and friend, Nola Joseph, on February 6, 2021 at Regina, SK at the age of 82 years old with her loving husband and daughters by her side. Nola was born in Fertile, Saskatchewan on February 22, 1938 but lived with her husband and raised their family in Estevan, Saskatchewan. Nola lived her life with love in her heart and raised her family to be just the same. She loved to volunteer her time to her community and made an impact on anyone who knew her. She had a love for birds, gardening, sewing and rug hooking just to name a few. Her greatest treasure was her husband and family. She will be deeply missed by all those who loved and knew her. Nola is survived by her loving husband of 64 years Bryan Joseph and their daughters, Marie Dukart (Brian), Sheryl Joseph (Barry Tschetter) and Colleen Dinsmore (Richard); grandchildren, Cory, Rob, Jessica (Matthew), Lori (Chase), Connie (Jeff), Kristin (Matthew), Lisa (Devin), Chelsey (Brent), and Tessa (Travis); great grandchildren, Kaitlyn, Hailey, Boden, Cohen, Maisie, Wren, Ty, Emery, Karson, Conner, Emily, Benjamin, Nathan, Claire, Tenli, Thompson, and Taves; sisters, Nita, Nada, and Brother Donald; 2 bothers-in-law, Ray Kress and Norm Pattyson. Nola is predeceased by her mother Vera and father George Peters; stepfather Don Mathieson; sisters, Georgia Kress, Nona Peters and Nina Pattyson; brothers, Clinton, Denis and Brad Peters; Her little Angels: grandchild Tyler Dinsmore and great grandchild Quinn Nameth who will be greeting Grandma with open arms. There was a public visitation on Thursday, February 11, 2021 from 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.at Hall Funeral Services, Estevan, SK. A private family Funeral Service was held on Friday, February 12, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Chapel at Hall Funeral Services, Estevan, SK with Marian Huber officiating. Interment took place following the service at Souris Valley Memorial Gardens, Estevan, SK. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to St. Joseph's Hospital Healthcare Auxiliary, 1176 Nicholson Road, Estevan, SK, S4A 0H3. Nola volunteered her time to the auxiliary for many years. She enjoyed giving back to her community and those in need. A special thank you to the Nurses at St. Joseph's Hospital Dialysis Unit. Also, thank you to the Pasqua Hospital's Palliative Care Unit for their compassion and kindness through Nola's last days. Hall Funeral Services, Estevan is caring for Nola’s family Yvonne Clark, Funeral Director. Al Liesch Mr. Al Liesch of Alameda, SK. passed away at the Galloway Health Centre in Oxbow on Friday, January 29, 2021 at the age of 89. Al is survived by his daughter, Brenda (Cliff) Wahlstrom; daughter-in-law, Jackie (Bob) Kosior; four grandkids, Andrew (Diana) Wahlstrom, Jodi (Leighton Wessel) Wahlstrom, Lisa (Mark) van Popta, and Brody Liesch; six greatgrandkids, Brian Liesch, Sam, Hank and Ethan van Popta, and Cage & Henley Wahlstrom; sister, Alvina Nichols; sisters-in-law, Kaye Hemus, Diane Marklinger and Carol Bazin. He was predeceased by his wife, Judy Liesch; son, Brian Liesch; grandson, Ryan Liesch; and three infant sons in 1963, 1971, and 1981. A private family graveside service at the Estevan City Cemetery will be held at a later date. Donations in memory of Al can be directed to the Souris Moose Creek Wildlife Federation, Box 1168, Oxbow, SK. S0C 2B0 smcwf50@sasktel.net or the Alameda Royal Canadian Legion #267, c/o Bonnie Thompson, Box 307, Alameda, SK. S0C 0A0.

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A20 February 17, 2021

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Annual facilities and transportation report filed The annual report on facilities and transportation within the South East Cornerstone Public School Division was filled with information that included not only the current state of affairs, but also a look into future needs and projects. Andy Dobson, the facilities and transportation manager, provided the report via an online presentation to the board during their virtual Feb. 10 monthly business meeting. He began with some numbers, showing the board members where and how the 217 staff members in that department were deployed as caretakers, bus drivers, maintenance technicians, electricians, carpenters and more. He cited the development of operations procedure manuals as being well-received and helped “make sure everyone gets home safely at the end of the day.” The facilities manager also oversees such items as property disposal and/or procurement and management along with proposed new building projects. Dobson noted that disposal of such items as former rural schools and school properties, other land parcels and former maintenance shops as well as oil and gas leases, all come under this facilities management banner. As a result, they work with rural and urban municipality

managers on a fairly regular basis, whether it be dealing with one or two-acre former school yards to current road maintenance issues. Licences for childcare spaces in any of the division’s 37 schools or 15 other education-related facilities, are also in their files as are five-year strategic business plans for all sectors. The report provided by Dobson indicated recent new builds within the division that included the completion of a new transportation garage and shop in Weyburn, and the large Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 6 Legacy Park Elementary School also in Weyburn that will open in September. He noted this new school enjoys many new benefits including 51 child-care spaces to go along with 23 classrooms and supporting spaces. The federally assisted Climate Action Incentive Fund to promote energy saving initiative projects sees $515,782 being directed to Cornerstone, Dobson said. That has allowed the facilities team to begin a project to switch schools to LED lighting systems. He said a dozen schools will have been switched by the end of March and possibly another dozen will be put in the program if it is extended. The continual need for roof repairs is now under a guided system with a desired benchmark of 20 per cent or

less, based on a 25-year life span expectation. The five-year average budget allocated for roof repairs or replacement is around $1.8 million, Dobson said. The newer system of carrying out regular repairs is now reaping benefits. “I was just thinking, 10 years ago we would have had 10 to 15 schools phoning us with roof or water issues due to weather. So far … none,” he said. He later took into account the devastating blizzard of Jan. 13 that tore the roof off Gladmar School and did significant damage to the new Weyburn Comprehensive School as well as more minor damages to six other schools. Events like that come under a different flag or file. He later noted that total estimated damages and insurance claims due to the January 13 event, amounted to about $1.8 million. The emptying of schools last March provided opportunities for construction crews to complete some school projects on a more rapid schedule and a significant amount of backlogged school bus maintenance work was completed. The pandemic responses also saw the transportation and facilities team erect 600 protective bar-

riers in schools, in preparation for the return to classroom instruction. They also installed hand sanitizers in each school. Drivers delivered technology equipment to students as well as meals to identified families during the shutdown. Upgrades for air systems and roofs in a variety of schools including MacLeod Elementary in Moosomin, Pleasantdale in Estevan and Lyndale School in Oungre as well as Redvers are among

a 19-year-old North Portal man being arrested and charged with impaired driving. The driver will make his first court appearance in Estevan Provincial Court on April 5 at 9:30 a.m. The col-

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have been denied. MacLeod, he noted was at 98.3 per cent capacity while Arcola was at 105.7 per cent. Major capital projects identified for the future include a major project for the Estevan Comprehensive School, a proposed joint project with Holy Family School Division in Estevan for a new pre-kindergarten to Grade 6 school and a new pre-kindergarten to Grade 12 facility in Carlyle if given the green light by the Ministry of Education.

Collision in Estevan results in an impaired driving charge A collision in Estevan on Feb. 13 led to an impaired driving charge. Members of the Estevan Police Service (EPS) were dispatched to the scene of the collision in north central Estevan, which resulted in

2021

Andy Dobson the more ambitious projects slated for this fiscal year. After that, schools in Ogema and Estevan (Hillcrest and Estevan Comprehensive School) are destined for major corrections. Dobson said with the exception of the Jan. 13 storm, the division has been fortunate since they have not had to deal with many emergency responses over a 10-year period. He noted that applications for relocated classrooms for MacLeod Elementary in Moosomin and Arcola School

lision remains under investigation with further charges pending. No injuries were reported, and no further information was immediately released. In other recent police news, police arrested a 31-year-old man from Rimbey, Alta., on Feb. 8 for possession of stolen property. The man also had warrants of arrest that were outstanding. He was released with a May court date in Estevan for possession of stolen property. He was further released to appear on the outstanding warrant charge as well. Police attended to a motor vehicle accident in a parking lot. No injuries were reported and minimal damage occurred. Officers attended to a local multi-dwelling unit on Feb. 9 to remove an unwelcome guest. The individual was transported home after being asked to leave. Police attended to a northwest Estevan residence on the report of a suspicious vehicle in the area on Feb. 11. The vehicle was found and stopped by police and the motorist was sent on their way, as there were no issues or concerns observed. Members attended to a central Estevan residence on the report of a domestic disturbance. All involved were spoken to and the matter was successfully dealt with by members. No further issues were reported.

Officers attempted a traffic stop in northeast Estevan on Feb. 12 as a vehicle was being driven at excessively high speeds. The driver of the vehicle refused to stop and fled. The vehicle is described as a smaller, dark-coloured four-door car. If anyone has any information regarding this matter, please call the Estevan Police Service. As a result of a traffic stop near the city, a 32-yearold woman from Estevan provided a sample of breath into an approved screening device, which resulted in a warn for alcohol. She was issued a 21-day driving suspension and the vehicle she was operating was impounded for 30 days. She will also appear in court in May to answer to a charge of driving while suspended under the Traffic Safety Act. A traffic stop was initiated in central Estevan on Feb. 13 that resulted in an Estevan man having his driver’s licence suspended for 21 days, following a roadside screening test for alcohol. His vehicle was also impounded for 30 days. This is his second driving suspension, which resulted in the increased length of suspension and vehicle impoundment. As a result of a traffic stop in the 400-block of King Street on Feb. 14, a 24-year-old man from Esterhazy has been charged with driving while prohibited and an allegation of breach of a conditional sentence order. The man was lodged in cells and was taken before a justice of the peace on Jan. 15. The vehicle he was operating was impounded for 30 days. Police and EMS also responded to an elderly woman in distress at a north Estevan department store. The woman was attended to with no life-threatening issues and was left in the responsibility of her husband. The EPS received reports of a couple of scams. One was the Canada Revenue Agency scam. The other was a person saying the potential victim was to receive an inheritance as they were the only next of kin of an individual that had died. The public is again reminded to be mindful of these and other types of scams and under no circumstance provide any information.


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CHEERS & JEERS A21 | Wednesday, February 17, 2021 | estevanmercury.ca

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MNP partners help Envision help others

Cheers Cheers to the tow truck drivers who were out in the frigid weather conditions to give people’s vehicles a boost last week. They definitely earned their wages. Cheers to those who offered rides to individuals who don’t have a licence, or those whose had vehicles that didn’t start last week. People still have places to go during the frigid temperatures. Cheers to the Estevan Lions Club for offering free swims at the Leisure Centre this week, and ensuring that the kids have another activity to enjoy during the week off school. Cheers to the Harris family for their efforts to help others during these trying times for so many. Their story that was in last week’s edition of the Mercury was a real inspiration for so many. Cheers to Tourism Estevan for their efforts to promote the different things that can be done in the Estevan area during the winter months. It’s good that we’re still able to have fun. Cheers to all of the long-time sweethearts out there who have served as inspiration and great examples for the younger generations. Hopefully they were able to find a way to enjoy Valentine’s Day this year.

Jeers Jeers to the provincial government’s vaccine rollout plan. Yes, there should be an emphasis on age, but professions like law enforcement personnel and teachers should also be priorities. Jeers to the litter bugs who are leaving their cigarette butts and food wrappers in the ditches. Since we don’t have much snow this year, the trash isn’t being covered up, and it’s an eyesore at the city’s entrances. Jeers to those who have been speeding through school zones or not obeying stopping arms on school buses. During the final four months of the school year, let’s resolve to do better to keep our kids safe.

To submit a cheer or a jeer, please email it to dwillberg@estevanmercury.ca, or visit www.estevanmercury.ca.

 NEW ARRIVAL 

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One of MNP’s senior managers Angela Stepp, left, and one of the MNP’s partners David Hammermeister, right, presented a cheque to Christa Daku, Envision Counselling and Support Centre's executive director. By Ana Bykhovskaia Envision Counselling and Support Centre has always been one of the vital community organizations in this area. The need for their services became even more pronounced over the past year, which resulted in more organizations stepping forward to make sure that Envision has the means to keep operating and helping the communities they serve. Wednesday morning southeast Saskatchewan MNP partners donated $10,000 to the Envision Counselling and Support Centre. One of the MNP partners David Hammermeister said that providing some help for Envision was aligned with their latest community initiatives. "In this past year, one of our focuses has been on mental health and addictions. And Envision, when we looked at their geographical overlap,

they primarily (work in) southeast Saskatchewan and that's where most of the partners from our group that have contributed to it are from as well," said Hammermeister. Envision does their best to ensure that people in the southeast corner of the province always have a place to come to and someone to lean on if they feel down. Executive director Christa Daku said last year they expanded their programs, but with the constant support from the community, they were able to get to the end of the year in a good shape. "We are at the end of our fiscal year, so I'm actually going to get board approval to move it into next year because we are in a healthy financial position right now," Daku said. "The money will help us maintain the programs that we expanded on like

Bridging the Distance … and there are other costs that have come up with COVID, so it will help us to maintain the virtual services that we are now able to offer. Even the business Zoom membership is almost $4,000 a year. So, to be able to meet the needs of our people, these types of expansions are really, really important to carry forward." Daku added that the calls for service for them went up about 30 per cent over the last year, but they also experienced a lot of support from the community. The help from MNP came in as a surprise and the organization is really grateful for it, as it will help them moving forward serving their goals. Daku added that they will be announcing the programming plans for 2021 in April. Follow the Mercury for the latest updates.

Enjoying the process of faith Digital cameras are amazing. You can see something that you like, capture an image, and evaluate it on the spot. If you are not satisfied, you can keep taking pictures until you get one you like.  Photography was not always this way though.  I remember when you had to buy film for your cam- delay from the time you took era. Typically, you were limited a picture until you saw it was to 12 or 24 exposures, so you often measured in months. had to use them wisely. When I still remember the thrill of you took a picture, you never coming out of McMaster’s knew exactly what you had. All Photography in Moose Jaw you could do was hope that it with an envelope of photos just waiting to be opened. turned out well.    Eventually, you took the There was something spefilm in to be developed, waited cial about a picture that you a week or so, and then you planned, took, and waited to could finally get your pictures.      receive.  Interestingly, faith works As silly as it sounds, part of the fun with film photog- in similar ways.   Some people are like raphy was the waiting. The

Tim Pippus of the Estevan Church of Christ digital cameras. When they hear the good news, they respond immediately and never look back. You might put the Apostle Paul in this category. He was an enemy of the faith when Jesus met him on the road to Damascus, but that one encounter changed him on the spot (Acts 9). Others are more like film photography. They respond more slowly, and their faith takes longer to develop. Peter is a good example here. When

Jesus calls, Peter follows but his journey is not without stumbles and missteps along the way. It takes some time for Peter to become the rock that Jesus predicted he would become (Matthew 16:18). Actually, when you think about it, both digital and film photography require a process. One is just much quicker than the other.  Therefore, the key is to commit to whatever process you are in.  Allow God to work and do whatever he needs to in, through, and by you. When we do that, something wonderful will develop.  “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight” (Proverbs 3:5-6). 

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“Spending time with my family and playing games.”

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A22 February 17, 2021

www.estevanmercury.ca

City Hall: 1102 4th Street 8 am to 4:30 pm | (306) 634-1800 Leisure Office: 701 Souris Avenue 8 am to 4:30 pm | (306) 634-1880

DROP IN RECREATION

SCHEDULE

ESTEVAN LEISURE CENTRE - FEBRUARY BREAK 2021

EFFECTIVE -February 15 - February 21, 2021 Monday, Feb. 15

Tuesday, Feb. 16 Wednesday, Feb. 17 Thursday, Feb. 18

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

AQUA AWE

AQUA AWE

AQUA AWE

AQUA AWE

SURF & SWIM 10:30 am - 11:30 am

REGULAR PROGRAMMING

REGULAR PROGRAMMING

REGULAR PROGRAMMING

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

AQUA AWE

AQUA AWE

AQUA AWE

AQUA AWE

FAMILY SWIM

FAMILY SWIM

FAMILY SWIM

FAMILY SWIM

RED CROSS LESSONS

RED CROSS LESSONS

RED CROSS LESSONS

RED CROSS LESSONS

REGULAR PROGRAMMING

LION’S FAMILY DAY SWIM

6:00 am - 6:45 am 7:00 am - 7:45 am 8:00 am - 8:45 am

CLOSED

6:00 am - 6:45 am 7:00 am - 7:45 am 8:00 am - 8:45 am

9:15 am - 10:00 am

LION’S FAMILY DAY SWIM 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm 1:45 pm - 2:45 pm 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm 5:15 pm - 6:15 pm

9:15 am - 10:00 am

12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

1:15 pm - 2:00 pm

1:15 pm - 2:00 pm

2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

CLOSED

Friday, Feb. 19

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

LION’S FAMILY DAY SWIM

REGULAR PROGRAMMING

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm 7:45 pm - 8:45 pm

6:00 am - 6:45 am 7:00 am - 7:45 am 8:00 am - 8:45 am

9:15 am - 10:00 am

12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

1:15 pm - 2:00 pm

2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

6:00 am - 6:45 am 7:00 am - 7:45 am 8:00 am - 8:45 am

12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

1:15 pm - 2:00 pm

2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

WEIGHT ROOM

6 am - 9 pm

6 am - 9 pm

6 am - 9 pm

GRIT

FITNESS SCHEDULE

CORE BARRE ABOVE

SPIN

9:10 am - 10:15 am

FOAM ROLLER

CLOSED

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

FAMILY SWIM

FAMILY SWIM

LANE SWIM

LANE SWIM

12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

6 am - 9 pm

6:00 pm - 6:45 pm

A Message From The Mayor

12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

6:00 pm - 6:45 pm

FAMILY SWIM FAMILY SWIM 7:15 pm - 9:00 pm

7:15 pm - 9:00 pm

9 am - 9 pm

9 am - 9 pm

Please have an enjoyable Family Day Week with your family

GRIT

6:10 am - 6:50 am

6:10 am - 6:50 am 9:10 am - 9:50 am 10:15 am - 10:55 am 5:30 pm - 6:10 pm 6:30 pm - 7:10 pm

CLOSED

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

9:00 pm - 9:45 pm

12 pm - 5 pm

Sunday, Feb. 21

9:15 am - 10:00 am

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm 7:45 pm - 8:45 pm

LANE SWIM

Saturday, Feb. 20

SPIN

6:10 am - 6:50 am 9:10 am - 9:50 am 10:15 am - 10:55 am 5:30 pm - 6:10 pm

10:30 am - 11:15 am

6:10 am - 6:50 am 9:10 am - 9:50 am

SPIN

9:10 am - 9:50 am 10:10 am - 10:50 am

EASY STRETCH 10:10 am - 10:50 am

SPIN

SKATING SCHEDULE

5:30 pm - 6:10 pm

PROGRAM RENTALS

PARENT & TOT SKATE

FAMILY SKATE

11:15 am - 12:00 pm

11:15 am - 12:00 pm

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

FAMILY SKATE

12:45 pm - 1:45 pm 2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Don’t see what you are looking for? Do you have an idea for something we should try? Please contact the Program Manager at 306-634-1880. We would love to hear your ideas!

PARENT & TOT SKATE FAMILY SKATE

FAMILY SKATE

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

PROGRAM RENTALS

PROGRAM RENTALS

12:45 pm - 1:45 pm 2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

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Schedule Subject to Change. Please visit www.estevan.ca for

updates on closures and cancellations. Proper footwear and Must be 16 years of age to participate in fitness and have a completed Par-Q exerciseclasses wear is required to participate. Please note during schoolquestionnaire breaks, (Teachers Conventions, Spring Breaks and Questionnaire prior to participating in classes. The lets our fitness instructors Christmas Breaks) Fitness, Aquatic Centre and arena schedules determine abilities and needs of each participant. may vary. Please visit our live schedules at www.estevan.ca

PLEASE NOTE - Due to the pandemic-related protocols fitness registration has moved to a PRERegistration process. Users must pre-register online or by calling the Information Desk. Patrons will be screened upon arrival and asked a few questions as per the Operational Health and Safety Guidelines. Drop in is available for the weight room. Space between workout stations have either increased or a machine has been put into 'not in use.' Water fountains are not available. Don’t see what you are looking for? Do you have an idea for something we should try? Please contact the Program Manager at 306-634-1880. We would love to hear your ideas!

Bylaw

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Schedule Subject to Change. Please visit www.estevan.ca for updates on closures and cancellations. Proper footwear and exercise wear is required to participate. Please note during school breaks, (Teachers Convention, Spring Break and Christmas Break) Fitness, Aquatic Centre and Arena schedules may vary. Please visit our live schedules at www.estevan.ca

Please help keep our sidewalks safe so all citizens can enjoy a safe walk assage

Bylaw 2016-1963 The occupier of property in the City of Estevan shall remove any snow, ice or other obstruction from the public sidewalk adjacent to such property within twenty-four (24) hours of the time such snow, ice or other obstruction appears on such public sidewalk.

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