Issuu on Google+

ISSUE #17 2014

The NORDIC Issue


royaldoulton.com.au 1300 852 022

Royal Doulton Australia


Contents

05 EDITOR’S LETTER

8 STYLE HUNTER

11 EDITOR’S PICK

Hello to the year of the Goat

Meet Alexandra from Decus

Inspired by Artist Esther Stewart

12 FASHION

15 TREND REPORT

22 ATELIER

Military Coup

Entertaining and celebrating

Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort

26 WILLIAMSBURG APARTMENT

36 HOUSE FERREIRA

Contained spaces

Cultivated chic in Capetown


No. 303 Wall Lamps by Lampe Gras

AP OTHIA LA • AY ILLUMIN ATE • AU TOBA N • B ROKI S • EI LERSEN • LA MPE GRAS • LAXSERIES • MAT T HEW HILTON MASS P R OD U CT ION S • MIS S ON I HOME • MI O KA RO • MODERNI CA • ORTI GI A • NATHA N YONG • PET LAMPS • PORCELUME • T EN10

184 Chalmers St Surry Hills NSW 2010

|

Ph: (02) 9212 6747

|

www.spenceandlyda.com.au


est ISSUE #17 2014

Editor’s Letter If you are a regular reader of Est you would be completely across the fact that we have a little bit of an appreciation for the Nordic look. So to round out the year we thought we’d end 2014 with this Nordic inspired issue to celebrate our northern cousins and their effortless knack for relaxed, stylish living that screams style without stress. As 2014 comes to an end, we are looking forward to revealing the exciting new changes that we have planned for Est in the new year. And while it seems like the past 12 months have been hectic for nearly every person we have spoken to, it looks as though we can all look forward

to the Year of the Goat in 2015 and its promise of a sense of peace, harmony and heavenly tranquility. Yep. I for one am ready to put this year to bed. Wishing you all happy Christmas, a happy holiday, and most of all, A HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Sian MacPherson EDITOR IN CHIEF

est MAGAZINE

Subscribe HERE to receive every issue delivered directly to your inbox every month!

SUBSCRIBE NOW


MANEL DAETZ Successful iscd graduate and Creative Director of Henry Corbett and Co. Certificate VI Associate Diploma of Colour and Design, Surface & Textile Design, Interior Styling, Interior Design Why did you choose iscd?

iscd encourages an individual creative path for students by creating the opportunity for them to explore different methods for their own personal growth. What did you like most about your time at iscd?

Whether you dream of a career as a stylist, designer, colourist, decorator or surface designer, or you simply want to unleash your creative side, the International School of Colour and Design (iscd) can help you realise your creative potential. Our design school is unique – every course is industry driven and run by successful design professionals who bring a wealth of real-world experience into the classroom. With both full and parttime courses on offer, plus on campus, online and distance study options available, thousands of iscd graduates have gone on to realise their design dreams. Sign up now to be the creative person you always wanted to be. Enrolments are now open for our February on campus intake (North Sydney), our innovative distance study program and our new iStyle and Decor online. Contact iscd for more information: www.iscd.edu.au or call (02) 8355 3838.

Learning from those around me who were either involved in the creative industry or in the middle of changing their careers proved to be pivotal for me and my chosen career. How did your time at iscd help you to get to where you are now?

Studying at iscd gave me the technical skills while at the same time encouraging me to push my individual creative limits. It was one of the best learning experiences I have had to date. What was the most valuable lesson that iscd taught you?

The business module taught me the essential lesson of how to combine creativity and commerce. As a design professional what do you predict will be the biggest design trend in 2015?

Our ever-changing, busy lifestyles are increasingly leading us to seek the simplicity and inner peace that a natural environment provides so we will see shift towards strong references to nature in our homes.


est GLOBAL LIVING WITH AN AUSTRALIAN TWIST

EDITOR IN CHIEF SIAN MACPHERSON sian@estmagazine.com.au

SUB-EDITOR YVETTE CAPRIOGLIO yvette@estmagazine.com.au

GRAPHIC DESIGNER GEORGIE MCKENZIE georgie@estmagazine.com.au

ADVERTISING LYNDSAY HUNTER lyndsay@estmagazine.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS

EDITORIAL STYLE HUNTER Alexandra Donohoe. FASHION Yvette Caprioglio. PHOTOGRAPHY Rick Carter, Greg Cox, Nicole Franzen, Carmen Kemmink, Michael Thomas. PRODUCTION Sven Alberding. WORDS Donna Duggan, Laura Twiggs, Sian MacPherson. STYLING Kate Jordan.

ON THE COVER

PHOTOGRAPHY Greg Cox. PRODUCTION Sven Alberding. LOCATION the South African home of Algria Ferreira-Watling. P 36.

ENQUIRIES

EDITORIAL editorial@estmagazine.com.au PRODUCTION production@estmagazine.com.au ADVERTISING advertising@estmagazine.com.au

CONNECT


ALPHA INT’L Pierre Paulin ‘Elysee’ Sofa

APPARATUS STUDIO ‘Censer’ Incense burner CALLUM INNES ‘Exposed painting Lamp Black’

JOSEF LEVY Mirrors


STYLE HUNTER

DEL POZO SS15 Collection

Meet Alexandra Donohoe from Decus Interiors

CARLO HAUNER Lounge Chair Brazil, 1950’s

I’m a black and white monochromatic girl at heart. With the tiniest dot of strong colour thrown in for good measure - I guess I have commitment issues with colour, however brass is my life-long friend along with 1950’s Brazilian furniture design, mid-century Italian lighting art design, art deco detail and provocative, abstract contemporary art.

RALPH PUCCI INTL. India Mahdavi Ceramics

JOAQUIM TENREIRO jacaranda & cane sofa - Brazil, 1950’s

Barefoot, but luxurious is my preferred mode of choice. I love texture on texture executed with the simplest of detailing. I start every day with a dance to tragically bad music. I think this ritual and being able to laugh out loud at myself regularly is the key to a happy life. You can’t take anything too seriously, ‘ain’t nobody got time for that’ as they say in the classics. I could happily bob up and down just about anywhere on the mediterranean forever ... with a glass of wine in one hand any form of greek cuisine in the other.


Named after the Finnish word for ‘new perspective’, Muuto represents the best of Scandinavian design today. Now available in store and online at Living Edge. livingedge.com.au


IT’S ALL IN THE DETAIL by Esther Stewart

MEXICO THE COOKBOOK by Phaidon

GOLD EARPHONES by Happy Plugs

DANUBE SHIRT by Ellery

THE ESSENTIAL BOX by Marble Basics

NUBO DESK by GamFratesi

95 GREENE by Greene Street Juice

editor’s picks Artist Esther Stewart’s ‘All in the Detail’ spotted at Melbourne’s Spring 1883 Art Fair forms the colour palette inspiration of this months wish list.

LEATHER BRACELET

BY Sian MacPherson

by Oly Lynggaard Copenhagen


ISABEL MARANT Downtown spiked hoop earrings

TOPSHOP Tie Front Zipped Shorts

ISABEL MARANT Jordan cottonsateen tapered pants

VALENTINO Camo Print Pump

military coup The fashion pack are standing to attention and out on parade in military colours. Army-inspired style in khaki and camouflage works well from cargo jackets to shoes while metallic hardware and accessories give a utilitarian nod to the must-have military chic list. Be armed and ready. BY Yvette Caprioglio

CUTLER AND GROSS Rainbow mirror aviator-style sunglasses


est REGULAR SHOP

VALENTINO Rockstud camouflage flat pouch in pink

CHUCK TAYLOR All star low sneakers

BALENCIAGA Le Dix leather bracelet

CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG the infantry jacket / army camo


royaldoulton.com.au 1300 852 022

Royal Doulton Australia


est REGULAR TREND REPORT

TREND REPORT ‘Tis the season for entertaining so get your inner picnicker on and take a sip of nordic inspiration for a relaxed, low-fuss, long languid lunch. PHOTOGRAPHY Oivind Haug, Rick Carter, Mikkel Vang WORDS Sian MacPherson


Photography Oivind Haug


Vintage Grain Sack Table Runner from Etsy

Blonde Elm Wood Stool

Plates from Royal Doulton

Table Reindeer from The Woodsfolk

Little Lamb Garland from Papier Damour

Kami Wooden Cups from Ode to Things

Braided Palm Leaf Pouff

Tolix Sidechair Chaise A at Thonet

Jett Flatware from Crate & Barrel


Bamboo Pendant at Spence & Lyda

Madam Stolz Porcelain Votive

Waterford Crystal Lismore Classic Goblet

Jack Chair at Complete Pad

Timber Star

Uashmama Bag for Plants

Silver Mercury Glass Votive

Danish tableware at Manon bis


Photography Rick Carter


Photography Mikkel Vang


Classic White Panama Hat from My Red Lippy

Lucy Salt + Pepper Grinder from Country Road

1815 Green Dinner Plate from Royal Dolton

Potato Basket from Miniam

White Oak Cutting Boards Quartet Flatware Set from Terrain

Oketo 156 Cushion by Missoni at Spence & Lyda

Rosemary Globe Topiary from Terrain Loto Italian Glassware from Nortitake IVV

Bleached Eucalyptus Wreath


est REGULAR ATELIER

ATELIER : LI EDELKOORT As one of the worlds most treasured and revered trend forecasters, Li Edelkoort’s insights into the fashion and design trends of tomorrow are much sought after worldwide. Robyn Lea caught up with Edelkoort in Milan this year and asked the design soothsayer the share her own creative processes. WORDS Robyn Lea


Explain your own creative process. Is it intuitive, instinctive, or intellectual? Or a mix of all three? It’s definitely a mix of all three, with my intuition as the precursor. My intuition is a companion that has become inseparable to my being and we work together as a team building scenarios, scripting ideas. The more I give it freedom, the more it becomes mobile, often living out of body for longer periods of time. The more respect I show for this amazing catalyst, the better it behaves, the more it wants to please me. It seems to be a skill that can be trained like a muscle, taught like a brain, challenged like memory. It has such independence that it can wake me up at night with the gift of insight, it can knock at my brain with a given word that is able to set in motion a train of thought. It is also an instrument that cannot be escaped. How important is stimulation, versus stillness and quiet, in the creative process? I am a living example of how more stimulation equals more creativity. My mind sometimes behaves like a running film reel; as soon as you expose it to a stimulus, I can envision a whole gamut of ideas for the future, right down to the finest details. Yet in today’s increasingly distractive world, we also need stillness and quiet as part of the stimulus: time for thinking, feeling, dreaming, meditating. Without this period for gestation, the stimulus has nowhere to go.

Photography by Marie Taillefer.

You have worked with many of the world’s most interesting creators and thinkers. What are the qualities that you find the most original thinkers have in common? Each of them are visionaries who trust their instincts and never ask too many questions. All of them are trend forecasters in their own way, because they always know how to precisely discern our period. Through their objects or ideas, we are given small glimpses of the future. From Thierry Mugler and Rei Kawakubo to Ettore Sottsass, Maarten Baas and even Philippe Starck , these designers have acted as oracles previewing the years to come. What drew you to forecasting and what is the underlying need that is met for you by working in this sphere?

Photography by Michael Thomas.


I guess that forecasting chose me rather than the other way around. If you look at my high school thesis from 1972, you can already see how the future of consumer culture could be laid out by my intuition, curiosity and drive. Today, these three elements are so imbedded in me that I am always working, observing, feeling and prefiguring concepts without even being conscious of it. So I guess that this force is what keeps me alive and inspired. I will never give up on my intuition and it has never let me down. Till death do us part! Can you take us through a typical day in your life?

Photo Courtesy of The Apartment

When I am travelling (which is two thirds of the year) I get up early to grab a plane or catch up on emails and writing for my trend books. I use the little time I have in each city to gather as much information and inspiration as possible before I find myself on stage giving a lecture or working with a client. The evening offers some time to relax over dinner, discussing new ideas or planning the months ahead. If I can, I escape for an hour or two to do textile shopping or work on a colour card, which unfortunately is not always confined to a hotel room – I have been known to bring my nomadic atelier into airplanes, airport lounges and anywhere else with a flat surface and good light! How does the aesthetic of an environment affect the way you work and think? Because I spend a lot of time in hotel rooms, I am very susceptible to architecture. My creative studios in Paris, New York and Tokyo each have a similar feel: converted spaces that are neutral blank canvases in which to feel and focus. On the road, the way a room espouses you can make a big difference; the light, the walls, the textiles and surfaces and then the emotional effects of interactions with other people – each of these elements influences the way we feel and therefore the way we think. It’s very hard to make beautiful things from within an unattractive environment and so I am always surprised by how companies continue to place their creative staff in administrative office buildings. This is something that architects will develop further in the future: how creative environments can be designed for a more intuitive and emotionally-driven society.

Kvadrat


Can you share with us some of the trends you see happening in design, photography and fashion over the next 2 years? After years of patient, stealthy progress, humanity is entering a new phase. A quest for wholeness, wherein opposites are envisioned as complementary entities rather than antagonisms, is taking root in our collective consciousness and opening up new perspectives. It is no longer about masculine versus feminine values or the past versus the future but about incorporating differences in order to think bigger. Architects embrace the creation of enveloping environments that grow with their inhabitants and continuously adapt to their needs, protecting and caring for them like an embryonic layer. Fashion and textile will reflect this trend, seeing the revival of cocooning and cosier tactilities. Colour-wise, hues are becoming lighter and more powdered or pastel. And our interest in the biological will see the initial emergence of greener palettes, even influencing photography, which I feel is also starting to shade itself in greener tints. Pebble alphabet by Clotilde Olyff

We are also becoming more nomadic: inspired by a wireless existence, we are able to live and work as we please, travelling and designing our life to suit our needs like never before. Furniture and objects become nomadic, evermore versatile and able to adapt to different situations. We are eating more nomadically too; reviving forgotten recipes, consuming wild meats, and exploring a burgeoning forager food movement that’s taking root around the planet. The idea that being local is global truly comes to the fore. What cities in the world today are the true ‘creative capitals?’ Where are the emerging creative cities of the future?

Photography Carmen Kemmink.

We live in a period where it’s no longer about New York, London and Paris but also about Dubai, Mumbai and Shanghai. So in fact, there is no longer just one centre of creativity, it’s a global movement of local phenomena that is changing constantly. I will forever love Japan as a true hotbed for new ideas and am very inspired when I go to exciting cities where young people are redefining the future, for example, Sao Paulo, Cape Town and Istanbul. These places embrace change and innovation as well as being sociallyconscious of the fact that we will need to share more in the future.


est REGULAR HOME FEATURE

WILLIAMSBURG APARTMENT Creative Director and Designer Ksenya Samarskaya has transformed an empty vessel into a home in the heart of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. STYLING Kate Jordan | PHOTOGRAPHY Nicole Franzen WORDS Sian MacPherson


Brand strategist and visual designer Ksenya Samarskaya knew at first sight six years ago that this one bedroom, Williamsburg based apartment had her name all over it. “When you see something that’s just right, you know it,” explains the founder of Samarskaya & Partners. “So I grabbed it as soon as I saw it.” Recognizing the buildings inherent character, Ksenya jumped at the opportunity to transform the space from looking like one long empty container into a home that feels layered and rich with history. It would seem that Williamsburg has also taken a hold on the designer. “The intelligence, creativity and gumption around me is constantly both riveting and humbling”, Ksenya explains of her love for the neighbourhood. Steel windows lining the entire width of the living room create a spectacular focal point as an everchanging artwork of sorts framing the cityscape tableau and the Manhattan skyline that lies beyond. Using her trademark ‘tongue in cheek’ humour and a preference for an absence of colour, Ksenya has embraced the semi industrial style space and created a home that is intimately considered.


DUNLIN

DWELL STUDIO

Chelsea Pendant Light

Faceted White Vase

FARRAH SIT Spora Ceramic & Cotton Rope Planter

OTOMYS Fleeting Free Way 4 by Lindsay Blamey

KULCHI Beni Ouarain Rug

BY LASSEN Frame Sideboard

ROYAL DOULTON Fable Mug

GET THE LOOK


est REGULAR HOME FEATURE

GREY ANATOMY Like a great work of art, this Victorian semi in Capetown, South Africa ignores all modern day conventions and trends while exerting a silent, captivating power over those who live here. PRODUCTION Sven Alberding | WORDS Laura Twiggs PHOTOGRAPHY Greg Cox


Makeup artist, Algria Ferreira-Watling’s semidetached Victorian home in one of Cape Town’s most historical suburbs is the very antithesis of mainstream. As one of the glossy magazine world’s most sought after makeup artists having worked with the likes of Solange Knowles and Charlize Theron, Alegria’s home is a contradiction to the world in which she works. It is neither ‘hipster’ nor ‘cutting edge’, but rather, if anything, positively monastic. Bare walls and floors are washed with white and grey cement, cretestone and beach sand. The original wooden features (such as floors and doorways) are bleached and sanded down to a smooth, matte finish. Indoors and out, there is not one distracting splash of colour to jar the committedly monochromatic palette. Everything, from storage containers to personal effects and even books, is muted. Looking around the home she shares with her husband, Derek, son, Dax and adorably complicated dog, Snowy, Algria explains the


provenance of her own honed style. ‘I come from a poor background and while there may not have been many material possessions, there was a lot of love,’ she says. ‘I’ve never needed “things”. I never dreamed of living in a palace. My dream was always to live in a little house with the peaceful feel of a monastery.’ That dream has been realised beyond doubt. The masterstroke is that the effect is far from bleak. It may be monastic, but it’s incongruously rich. This home is absolutely not about ‘what’s hot, right now’. What seeps through every inch of the home, from its ramshackle eaves and watermarked walls all the way through to the smallest detail of décor, is an unspeakably melancholic and serene beauty. ‘Things have to feel right in my fingers, says Algria. ‘I love curtains that look and feel like too-long skirts, old and very worn. I love living with things that have meaning and that I’ve had for a long time – like the cement cross in the fireplace that my mother made for me before

she passed away. As I child I made silk crosses with silkworms. She gave them on birthdays. She couldn’t afford cards.’ Asked about her philosophy, Algria takes a laminated card off the door of her fridge. It’s a 13th Century Zen fable, clearly much handled over many years. ‘This is how I see the world and everything I believe,’ she says.

A Zen Master lived the simplest kind of life in a little hut at the foot of a mountain. One evening, while he was away, a thief sneaked into the hut only to find there was nothing in it to steal. The Zen Master returned and found him. ‘ You have come a long way to visit me,’ he told the prowler, ‘and you should not return empty handed. Please take my clothes as a gift.’ The thief was bewildered, but he took the clothes and ran away. The Master sat naked, watching the moon. ‘Poor fellow,’ he mused,’ I wish I could give him this beautiful moon.


GET THE LOOK

LIVING DIVANI Extra Soft Sofa

DULUX

TOP3 BY DESIGN

Paint

Birds by Kristian Vedel COSTAL LUXE Ceramic Jug and Vase

THE DHARMA DOOR MARGARETE HAEUSLER Charcoal Cushion

Trio of Baskets

EPOCH DESIGN Wooden Table

LINEN HOUSE Flax Napkins



Est Magazine Issue #17