__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Future Forward The Design Issue

Issue #35.

Reimagining a 1980s Melbourne Home Explore a Minimalist Belgian Farmhouse Serene Curves Inside a Queensland Penthouse


www.cosentino.com


DektonÂŽ- Sogne. Designer - Nectaar


kingliving.com   1300 546 438


Discover the award-winning Neo The ultimate in contemporary luxury design. Neo, famous for its clean, minimalistic lines makes it the perfect sofa for any home.


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Editor’s Letter

Megan Rawson MANAGING EDITOR

@meganmayrawson

In this issue, we reflect on past, present and future design. Beginning with a minimalist interpretation of a rural Belgian farmhouse, we move on to the reinvention of a distinctive 1980s family home and a pared-down penthouse on Queensland’s coast. We look to the future with the ongoing evolution of everyday design through Kasper Egelund, from Denmark’s Vipp and a group of notable interior designers and architects who are turning their talent to furniture design. This marks my last issue in the role of managing editor and one that I’m proud to go out on. It has been an incredible and collaborative experience working with a dedicated team that is wildly talented. Happy 2020 from all of us at est.


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

The Latest An up-to-date look at what’s happening at estliving.com and @est_living

Swipe through Elsley Road designed by Al-Jawad Pike Architects

Instagram

Explore our list of Recommended Australian Designers, including Studio Esteta Recommended Designers

Take a closer look at the Thalie Console by Youth Éditions

Product Library

Walk through a Tamarama beach house designed by Akin Atelier Australian Interiors

Discover the Formentera Home by GCA Architects inside the est outdoor living edit

Spaces


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Meet the Contributors

Thomas De Bruyne | photographer Thomas De Bruyne is an architectural photographer and graphic designer based in Belgium. Best known for capturing the work of Belgium’s leading architects, Thomas has a love for unique vintage furniture, raw materials and imperfect finishes. In this issue of est magazine, Thomas photographs a Flemish farmhouse by close friend, interior architect Pieter Vanrenterghem. @cafeine

Kate Dixon | art direction + design Kate Dixon has brought her clear, unpretentious and timeless aesthetic to issue #35; her fifth magazine in the art director and designer’s seat. Kate is a stickler for detail, priding herself on a passion for design and imbuing a sense of fun in all of her projects. Where people always come first, Kate has evolved est magazine to include exciting new content opportunities and visual possibilities. @katedixondesign

Heather Nette King | stylist Heather Nette King is a Melbourne-based interiors stylist and writer. The hallmarks of her styling are colour and vibrancy, while she writes passionately about peoples’ homes and how they live in them. In issue #35 Heather Nette King brings her colourful vision to Doherty Design Studio’s reimagined 1980s abode and lends her expert styling hand to capture this monumental home in motion. @heathernetteking

Cassie James-Herrick | director of CJH Studio Cassie James-Herrick established her own interior architecture practice, CJH Studio in 2017. Cassie’s passion lies in creating personalised interiors that are warm, minimal and timeless, by celebrating natural materials and soft forms. In this issue Cassie shares her latest penthouse project, revealing her studio’s refined eye for detail and the importance of spatial arrangement and functionality for a growing family. @cjh____________studio


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Credits

est TEAM

CONTRIBUTORS

Managing Editor Megan Rawson

WORDS Megan Rawson, Sophie Lewis, Yvette Caprioglio, Melia Rayner

Sub Editor & Style Editor Yvette Caprioglio Managing Editor of estliving.com Sophie Lewis Art Direction + Design Kate Dixon Client Partnerships Mandy Loftus-Hills Astrid Saint-John Junior Producer Brigitte Craig Project Coordinator Jack Seedsman Editorial Assistant Lidia Boniwell Managing Director Miffy Coady

PHOTOGRAPHY The Latest Salva López, Thomas De Bruyne, Prue Ruscoe, Stale Eriksen Back to the Future Photography: Derek Swalwell Videography: Richard Lipp A Flemish Affair Thomas De Bruyne New Heights Cathy Schusler Denmark Report Jonas Bjerre Poulsen, Andreas Omvik, Søren Kristensen, wichmann + bendtsen, Irina Boersma, Line Klein, Jean-Francois Jaussaud, Ståle Eriksen The Library Courtesy of Verpan Where Architects Live Alicia Macias Design Driven Anson Smart, Michele Aboud, Derek Swalwell, Dylan Farrell, Jessica Lindsey, Lillie Thompson, Biasol

CONTACT editorial@estliving.com advertising@estliving.com

My Space Mark Seelen The Detail Prue Ruscoe, Martina Gemmola, Derek Swalwell ON THE COVER Design Penthouse M by CJH Studio

CONNECT

Photography Cathy Schusler Location Queensland


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Contents

Editor’s Letter

The Latest

Contributors

est Style

Back to the Future

A Flemish Affair

New Heights

Design Driven

Denmark Top 10

Where Architects Live

My Space Kasper Egelund

The Detail


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

est Playlist

Longer Days to Dance Experience est in sound Our balmy summer playlist features songs of a modern world wanting a getaway from the normal noises. Prolong the days of sun; faster moves, slow grooves, a sway and a smile as we hear the ocean sparkle in our ears.

Project St Andrews Design Whiting Architects Photography Š Derek Swalwell Music Curator Mark Wiesmayr


Future Proof BY YVETTE CAPRIOGLIO STYLE EDITOR

Every season designers present us with collections that shine a light on what’s new, setting the standard of what’s to come. So it makes sense to hit fast forward and future proof your wardrobe through a directional lens. Add reworked classics with a new spin, updated seasonal silhouettes and sustainable hero pieces while giving a nod to subculture through street style luxury. The road to becoming the ultimate fashion futurist starts now.

CARINI ASYMMETRICAL STORM FLAP TRENCH JACKET - NAVY JACQUEMUS

CHAÎNE TRIOMPHE GOLDEN HANDCUFF SMALL BRACELE IN VERMEIL CELINE

HIGH RISE LEVI’S RE/DONE

SHOP THE COLLECTION >

CORTEZ BASIC NIKE


ISSUE #35 / REGULAR FEATURE

est Style

DRAPED STRIPED SILK CREPE DE CHINE TOP JW ANDERSON

T EMBOSSED LEATHER POUCH LOEWE

SARONG SKIRT- BROWN NANUSHKA

MICA CAT-EYE SUNGLASSES SAINT LAURENT


ISSUE #35 / FEATURED HOMES

Tapping into its rich architectural past and 1980s New Wave bones, Doherty Design have skillfully commandeered an epic journey to reinvent this Melbourne family home.

back to the future INTERIOR DESIGN Doherty Design PHOTOGRAPHY Derek Swalwell VIDEO Richard Lipp WORDS Megan Rawson


Embarking on the significant redesign of a home by renowned Australian architect Peter McIntyre, Doherty Design, along with a team of talented collaborators set about honouring its architectural past, while adding a punchy modern twist. Tasked with capturing the existing presence of the original 1980s design while balancing the growing needs of a family of five; Mardi Doherty, director of Doherty Design, had her work cut out for her.

The kitchen showcases a four-metre Cote D’Azur marble bench, where a brass seam articulates the join in the stone beautifully. Deep navy blue cabinetry and a Lambert & Fils pendant light add another layer of 1980s glamour.

“The existing home had many wonderful original features from the 1980s when it was built, which informed so much of the renovation,” Mardi says. “In essence, we have added to the perimeter of the home and kept the central core of the home intact.” According to Mardi, the staircase and kitchen locations, as well as the new double garage, informed a lot of the spatial re-jigging.


While the relocation of the staircase and kitchen played a pivotal role in developing the new floor plan, upstairs was all about private bedroom quarters. Every family member has their own individually-designed private suite, differentiated through cabinetry, bathrooms and room layout. The inclusion of two more bedrooms has resulted in a more harmonious home while providing ample space for three teenage girls. Building designer Ari Alexander was tasked with the central spine of the home. Consisting of a twostorey void, the spine is complete with adjoining bridge and a pitched, glass roofline which creates an impressive atrium. “Maintaining the central void and the view from the front door all the way down to the pool was imperative,” Ari says. An impressive collection of bold and contemporary artworks curated by art consultant Georgie Bruce builds focal points against the bursts of block colour. The home’s palette paints a picture of fun, frivolity and personality, splashing about peachy pinks, peacock greens and more grounding greys which make reference to the home’s 1980s beginnings. A careful selection of iconic and contemporary furniture and objects further complement the home’s organic curves to deliver a modern revision.

Large scale photographs by Korean artist Lee Kyoung-Hwa presides over the space that is complemented by an iconic set of Togo sofas designed by Michel Ducaroy from Ligne Roset, Beaubien Wall Double Shade lamps, an open fireplace and limed oak floors.


“This enduring, inventive new design is a shrine to light, art and family life.” – Mardi Doherty

The cohesive design narrative continues with floor-to-ceiling windows and doors which provide an easy entertainer’s flow to outdoor areas. The outdoor areas include a sunken conversation and fire pit, lush tropical plantings and forest-like bamboo foliage by landscape designer Ben Scott. A bold tangerine geometric sculpture by Caleb Shea adds a dramatic element to the lawn.

A caramel-hued Bonnie Armchair designed by Pierre Paulin from Ligne Roset provides contrast between peacock green carpet and the custom terrazzo floor.

Drawing from the building’s architectural heritage, Doherty Design have crafted a contemporary version of the 1980s vernacular, filtered through a modernist glamour lens. Not only does this family home’s metamorphosis pay respectful homage to its storied past, but it’s also now primed for the next chapter of its life.


“Our clients are in the construction industry, and both have a great appreciation of architecture, and also spatial planning. We worked with them to create a floor plan that maintained most of the existing features of the home.” –M  ardi Doherty


“The underlying framework that informed the design of the home was to retain and embrace the incredible ‘skeleton’ of the home and create a workable layout around this.” – Mardi Doherty

Articolo Lumi pendant lights in grey provide a serene touch to the master bedroom.

Interior Design Doherty Design Building Designer Ari Alexander Builder North Building Group Landscape Designer Ben Scott Photography Derek Swalwell Video Richard Lipp Words Megan Rawson Styling Heather Nette King Art Consultant Georgie Bruce


DOHERTY DESIGN SIGNATURE STYLE BEAUBIEN WALL DOUBLE SHADE LAMBERT & FILS

“The existing house, although tired, amazing party vibe and so it was ou to rediscover the ‘disco’ in the hous

LARGE PALM SPRINGS PLANTER WHITE LIGHTLY

– Mardi Doherty SEE MORE PRODUCTS >

LARCH ALBA ADMONTER

AGRA RUG - DUCHESS ARMADILLO & CO

MANTOVA 05 NORTHSTONE

CANTANIA 05 NORTHSTONE


TOGO FIRESIDE CHAIR AND OTTOMAN LIGNE ROSET

had an ur role se.”

E

AGRA RUG - DUCHESS ARMADILLO & CO

MANHATTAN KITCHEN MIXER BRODWARE

MATITA SMOKE DI LORENZO

COTE D’AZUR CDK STONE

FRENCH NAVY LAMINEX


Frame Living System Furniture for walls. Frame integrates storage and technology into a seamless furniture solution for the home or office. Frame allows a personalised solution to furniture and joinery needs by offering a wide range of functions and finishes to complement each room. Designed by Justin Hutchinson for Kett | Designed & Made in Australia


Exclusive to

Melbourne| Sydney | Brisbane | Perth www.coshliving.com.au


ISSUE #35 / FEATURED HOMES

A FLEMISH AFFAIR

In a country that cradles its revered design aesthetic, Belgian interior architect Pieter Vanrenterghem affirms his hold on the Flemish rural vernacular through a minimalist estate.

DESIGN Pieter Vanrenterghem PHOTOGRAPHY Thomas De Bruyne WORDS Sophie Lewis


On Belgium’s Western Front close to the French border, lies the village of Adinkerke. Flanking the historic village and not far from the Belgian coast is a country estate; one of the last farms in the region to be walled by water. Local designer Pieter Vanrenterghem was asked to create a rural retreat, by bringing this former farmhouse and its cluster of outbuildings from beneath their agricultural veil. Offering an antidote to fleeting trends, Pieter asserts the hallmarks of modern Belgian design; simplicity, warmth and craftsmanship, bound by natural materials. While no longer a working farm, Pieter set out to accentuate its Flemish pastoral history when transforming the main house and the adjoining four buildings. The main house spans open plan living, three bedrooms and three bathrooms, together with an additional two bedrooms with ensuites in the surrounding structures. “Two of the buildings are designed as a bed and breakfast,” Pieter says. “The program of the main house needed to be able to adjust to this same purpose, in case it became too big in the future.”

By reducing elements down to the bare minimum, Pieter has ensured there is no tension between the classic and contemporary.


In creating a true destination of escape, Pieter converted the fourth building into a fitness space, complete with its own indoor swimming pool, while the fifth building became a dedicated party venue; a large, lofty hall designed to host large gatherings of more than 100 people. Across all five buildings, the owners wanted to reflect the best of Belgian interior traditions. “The owners requested an easy house to live in; distinguished by warmth and tactility, shaped by natural materials,” Pieter says. He proudly lists a number of natural surfaces from the Agripa Fine Muzillac Veine natural stone in the kitchen to the Travertine – both sourced from Belgian stone supplier Hullebusch. The Moroccan Tadelakt lime plaster technique lines the floors in the main house, topped with sisal rugs and Pieter’s signature walnut timber joinery. He also selected dark oak herringbone flooring for the party hall, under restored exposed timber beams. “The interiors are very clean and minimal and consist of specific alignments,” Pieter says. “The use of natural materials softens these lines, making the spaces feel more human.”

The wet room is enclosed by steel framing. These strong black accents are echoed in the Vola tapware throughout.


“The interiors are very clean and minimal and consist of specific alignments. The use of natural materials softens these lines, making the spaces feel more human.” – Pieter Vanrenterghem


When asked about his favourite space within the project, Pieter says he’s drawn to the open plan living, dining and kitchen area in the main house. A cosy, contemplative place to curl up by the custom fireplace, the living space plays host to a collection of design icons. From Michel Ducaroy’s Togo sofa for Ligne Roset, Pierre Jeanneret’s Easy Chair and Poul Kjærholm’s PK22 Easy Chair for Fritz Hansen, to the Austere Floor light by homegrown talent Hans Verstuyft for Trizo21. When we seek to define what luxury design means today, there has been a refreshing shift away from excess, to the quiet, simple and slow. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Belgium; a nation that continues to produce some of the world’s most renowned design aesthetes. Pieter Vanrenterghem joins this esteemed crowd, capturing the essence of rural timelessness in grand scale and stature.


Shaping Home Style


est living x rogerseller

WALL MIXER AND 200MM OUTLET ARQ ii BY ROGERSELLER

BASIN MIXER ARQ ii BY ROGERSELLER

WALL BATH OUTLET ARQ ii BY ROGERSELLER

Rogerseller’s latest Arq ii collection of bathroom tapware. A simple and understated mix of form and function. Much like its predecessor Arq, Arq ii draws on the same fusion between soft radiuses and clean lines and is a showcase of elegant dimensions. Improved balance and the addition of PVD finishes offer a more superior finish and luxurious feel in the bathroom.

SEE MORE PRODUCTS >


ISSUE #35 / FEATURED HOMES

new heights CJH Studio achieve penthouse perfection with this serene apartment redesign on the Queensland coast. INTERIOR DESIGN CJH Studio PHOTOGRAPHY Cathy Schusler WORDS Melia Rayner


Every now and again an apartment that reimagines the potential of a penthouse comes along, like this beautifully-modernised beachside apartment in Queensland by CJH Studio. Built in the late 1980s, the home had remained mostly untouched in the decades since. Purchased by a small but growing family, the design brief emphasised creating space and practicality with limited planning alterations. Add in the quick design period requirement, short build time, existing structural inflexibility and CJH Studio’s interstate location and it’s even more remarkable that the finished project excels in establishing a pared-back, renewed and confident family home.

The kitchen features Bosch appliances and Grazia&Co Iva stools.

The minimal and soothing material palette is both a foil to the home’s Queensland surrounds and a strong nod to its original building era. The travertine flooring was retained and restored, while the addition of new internal glass bricks pays homage to the building’s original foyer.


Soft curves and modernity begin with the incredible staircase, offset throughout the home and balanced with clean lines, creamy tones and an abundance of natural light, thanks to the striking double-height void and mezzanine. Using their expert eye for curation, CJH Studio completely refurbished the interior. Continuing the natural palette with touches of linen and oak, CJH Studio made key contemporary design acquisitions like the Flos 265 lamp by Paolo Rizzatto, Ligne Roset Pumpkin Armchair and the Thonet Bentwood chairs to add personality. Custom joinery offers the residents a place to showcase special pieces, while concealed storage provides space for both the practical and delightful. And of course, the inclusion of Linear Standard pieces – designed by CJH Studio principal Cassie James-Herrick – add polish and sophistication to even the smallest details, ensuring the timeless style of this penthouse for years to come.


CJH STUDIO SIGNATURE STYLE

FORMAKAMI JH3 &TRADITION FORMAKAMI JH5 &TRADITION

MURRAY HOOK LINEAR STANDARD

IRISH ELK PORTER’S PAINTS

ROMAN TRAVERTINE VEIN CUT SIGNORINO

RAW COTTON MATT LAMINEX


265 WALL LAMP FLOS THESE ISLANDS: A PORTRAIT OF THE BRITISH ISLES CEREAL

BRICK BOOKENDS VALERIE OBJECTS

PUMPKIN ARMCHAIR LIGNE ROSET

NATURAL WHITE ROYAL OAK FLOORS

RÉACTION POÉTIQUE COLLECTION CASSINA


TABOURET LOU © TIPTOE


ISSUE #34 / SPECIAL FEATURE

DEN MA RK

As a guest at Verpan Headquarters in Horsens, Denmark, est managing director Miffy Coady shares highlights from the country’s sublime design offering.


01. NOBIS HOTEL COPENHAGEN Checking-in at the Nobis Hotel, once the Royal Danish Conservatory of Music, you can’t look past the luxurious interior details. Photography: Søren Kristensen

02.

DANISH DESIGN MUSEUM In a country where design is embedded in their DNA, the Danish Design Museum is a lesson in what the Danes do best, featuring the work of integral designers such as Verner Panton.

03. LOUISIANA MUSEUM OF MODERN ART Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is a celebration of international art, landscape and architecture, overlooking the shores of Øresund Sound in Humlebæk, north of Copenhagen.

04. Located on the second floor off Copenhagen’s bustling shopping locale in Østergade, HAY House is a Danish retail experience not to be missed.

05.

YVONNE KONÉ COPENHAGEN STORE Head to the beautifullycurated flagship store of Danish accessories designer Yvonne Koné for a leather souvenir. Photography Line Klein


ISSUE #35 / SPECIAL FEATURE

AUDO CONCEPT STORE Designed as a living gallery, the Audo Concept space is a compilation of premium Nordic brands, where you can view everything from stationery to cushions and dining ware. Photography: Jonas Bjerre Poulsen

08. 06. STUDIO OLIVER GUSTAV Stop by Oliver Gustav’s famed gallery-style showroom, studio and boutique in central Copenhagen for unique and antique finds in a converted art museum. Photography: wichmann + bendtsen

07. REFORM SHOWROOM Reform presented the perfect place for a morning coffee and to appreciate their Aarhus kitchen showroom, located in an old train station. Photography: Andreas Omvik

9.

VIPP LOFT Located at the top of Vipp HQ, the Vipp Loft taps into the Danish concept of ‘hygge’, with its preserved timber beams, Dinesen timber and Vipp kitchen, furniture and accessories Photography: Jean-Francois Jaussaud

10.

NOMA RESTUARANT After a refurbishment by Studio David Thulstrup, Noma Restaurant affirms how cutting-edge design and revered culinary craft can create the ultimate sensory experience. Book in advance! Photography: Irina Boersma


Photography Courtesy of Verpan


ISSUE #35 / REGULAR FEATURE

Books

ANDY WARHOL POLAROIDS 1958-1987 ANDY WARHOL

THE SHAPE OF THINGS: PHOTOGRAPHS FROM ROBERT B. MENSCHEL QUENTIN BAJAC

LOS ANGELES: PORTRAIT OF A CITY KEVIN STARR & JIM HEIMANN

DREAM BABY DREAM JIMMY MARBLE

DECADE: 1980 – 2000 RENNIE ELLIS

HIPPIE MODERNISM: THE STRUGGLE FOR UTOPIA ANDRE W BLAUVELT

PETRINA HICKS: BLEACHED GOTHIC ISOBEL CROMBIE & MARIA QUIRK

LEE LEE RADZIWILL

PETER LINDBERGH: IMAGES OF WOMEN MARTIN HARRISON

Our edit of art photography books that are currently inspiring us.


ISSUE #35 / REGULAR FEATURE

where architects live: jorge soriano lรกzaro

ARCHITECT Jorge Soriano Lรกzaro PHOTOGRAPHY Alicia Macias WORDS Yvette Caprioglio


The home of architect Jorge Soriano Lázaro and his publicist wife Fátima Ateyeh in the Cabanyal district of Valencia immediately instils a sense of calm through light-filled transformative, open spaces and an inherently Mediterranean DNA. Light, connection and transformation are the three definitive hallmarks of Jorge’s design ethos and while he admits the most complicated thing is to design for themselves, the couple’s home is a testament to their discipline and creativity. Valencia is known for its light so it has been optimised at every turn. The openness and multipurpose function of the spaces makes for a natural sense of being connected and a feeling of being everywhere, wherever you are in the house, without tagging a specific place for a specific purpose. This is clear in the kitchen which also serves as a dual area for socialising and working, made for cooking, reading or having a glass of wine with friends.


“Light is the greatest design tool we have and is the one that helped us to develop our home.” – Architect Jorge Soriano Lázaro

A beautiful balance of fluid lines and angular forms are purposefully juxtaposed resulting in lines and shades, achieving a subtle balance that is representative of Mediterranean culture and the way the couple live. The intention from the outset was for the pool in the courtyard to naturally draw the eye outside and for the greenery in the home to bring the outside in. This is enhanced by uniform flooring from inside to out and through verticality, with greenery that cascades from the top floor down to the studio and on the shelves that line the stairs. The house keeps a neutral colour through its main structure and composition. Colourful and more intense touches in the details change according to the couple’s mood, experience and travels, so while the appearance of the house changes with them, its essence and personality never do. The transparency, sense of sharing and connecting in everything they do is key to the couple’s personality and it seamlessly weaves its way through this hidden oasis in the midst of a vibrant neighbourhood.


“There was no space delimitation as we normally understand it. It was conceived as a whole space and in line with it a natural transition between the spaces.” – Jorge Soriano Lázaro


ISSUE #35 / REGULAR FEATURE

Design Driven We highlight six renowned architects and interior designers who are applying their talent to custom contemporary masterpieces.

WORDS Sophie Lewis


TOTEM FIONA LYNCH director of Fiona Lynch Office Photography by Lillie Thompson Fiona Lynch revealed Totem with the launch of Work Shop; an exhibition space in the designer’s studio dedicated to celebrating collaborations with like-minded creatives. Totem explores the parallel practices of architecture and fashion design, combining a hand-finished steel structure with a translucent fabric veil. Openings at every angle offer opportunity to exhibit objects and artefacts.

MARBLE DINING TABLE MADELEINE BLANCHFIELD director of Madeleine Blanchfield Architects Photography by Anson Smart and Michele Aboud Madeleine Blanchfield’s custom marble dining table, designed for her own home, was inspired by the work of Italian architect and industrial designer Angelo Mangiarotti. The monolithic marble table reflects the simplicity and craftsmanship of their residential projects, where structural systems are honest and explicit, as in their architecture.


TRE MEZZO COLLECTION JEAN-PIERRE BIASOL director and founder of Biasol Photography courtesy of Biasol

“Tre Mezzo emerged from the need for a versatile stool that we could specify for indoor and outdoor use, particularly in residential and commercial projects that demand hardwearing, high-quality products.� As a strong supporter of Australian design, JeanPierre Biasol says they were constantly searching for products to easily customise, modify and specify in their projects. The studio decided to meet their own request with Tre Mezzo; a range of stools and tables for indoor and outdoor spaces. Offering more than 700 combinations, the stools come in three heights, multiple curated materials and colours.

ST VINCENTS PLACE WINE ROOM TABLE BRODERICK ELY director of B.E. Architecture Photography by Derek Swalwell

Broderick Ely conceived the St Vincents Place Wine Room Table as a juxtaposition of seemingly disparate elements. Featured inside est magazine issue #34, the table references artist Isamu Noguchi with its sculptural soft curves and rounded edges, while the simple interlocking slab construction is reminiscent of a 1970s kit furniture piece.


THE STILTS TABLE DYLAN FARRELL director of Dylan Farrell Design Photography by Dylan Farrell Dylan Farrell took inspiration from the fierce movements of models’ legs on the fashion runway to design the Stilts Table. The table appears as a balancing act with its splaying base, made from cured and laminated timber. Fabricated to fit like a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle, the Stilts Table can be specified in a variety of shapes and sizes.

THE PRINCE COLLECTION IVA FOSCHIA director of IF Architecture Photography by Jessica Lindsey

“The diversity of the Prince Table mirrors my own love of entertaining. It’s generous, it’s convivial and invites conversation and good times.”

Iva Foschia designed the Australian-made Prince Collection for Grazia and Co, to challenge the conventions of large, rectangular tables. The Prince Collection is inspired by Art Deco style and shaped by French architect and designer Charlotte Perriand’s approach to the ‘art of living’.


WWW.KLOKE.COM.AU


MY SPACE KASPER EGELUND

Architecture Mads Lund Photography ©Mark Seelen Design Studio David Thulstrup Words Megan Rawson


ISSUE #35 / REGULAR FEATURE


MY SPACE KASPER EGELUND Part of the Danish, family-run design firm Vipp, CEO Kasper Egelund lives a stone’s throw from Copenhagen in the leafy neighbourhood of Søvang, with his wife Heidi and their three children Mie, Karla and Otto. Nestled on the edge of the Baltic sea, Kasper and his family enlisted the talent of architect Mads Lund and interior architect Studio David Thulstrup to build their five-bedroom modernist villa. A core design element is the floor-to-ceiling glazing throughout the home ensuring the surrounding seascape and its definitive seasons inform the home’s interior.


MY SPACE KASPER EGELUND

WHERE IS YOUR HOME LOCATED AND WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD? We live in Dragør; a small, quiet suburb of Copenhagen. It’s a place by the sea and close to nature. The best part is the bicycle route to work – 18 km in pure nature without any cars. It’s the perfect start to the day and on the way home, it gives you time to reflect on the day, clear your head and listen to some good podcasts. HOW IS YOUR HOME A REFLECTION OF YOU AND YOUR FAMILY? It reflects simplicity. With three kids, we need to keep things neat and simple. The open spaces hopefully symbolise inclusivity for anyone visiting. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL INTERIOR STYLE? Simple and classic with a twist of colour, texture and design pieces. In the main living space, windows fill this area with an abundance of natural light which is important to us, since we really embrace nature. WHAT MAKES YOUR HOUSE A HOME? The fact that it’s ours. The combination of location, the exterior architecture and interior arrangement makes it unique to us.

WHICH SPACE OF YOUR HOME DO YOU GRAVITATE TO THE MOST AND WHY? The kitchen. This is where the family comes together, and the kitchen island makes room for everyone to attend the preparation of a meal. We have just installed the new Vipp sofa in the kitchen, which is a comfortable seating spot and gives the space a new dimension. HOW DOES YOUR HOME INSPIRE YOU AND THE WORK YOU DO? Working with design every day, I use and test a lot of our own designs which provides me with insight and inspiration. The value of a Vipp product is measured on how happy people are using it in their daily life; and by using them myself, I’m more aware. WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE PERSONAL POSSESSIONS? The built-in bookshelf. I love reading. WHICH SPACE DO YOU LIKE TO RELAX IN? I like to read books and newspapers in the evening on the sofa next to my bookshelf. It is my quiet moment when the rest of the family is asleep and I can look out to the ocean.


Project Villa Vora Design K-Studio Photography © Ståle Eriksen


the

detail Summer Life


THE DETAIL

Outdoor Armchairs

BUTTERFLY CHAIR CUERO

PILLOW LOUNGE CHAIR KUN DESIGN

ROLY POLY ARMCHAIR FAY TOOGOOD

LUNA CHAIR KING LIVING

PALISSADE LOUNGE CHAIR HAY

HUSK OUTDOOR ARMCHAIR B&B ITALIA

LC3 OUTDOOR ARMCHAIR CASSINA

DUNE CENTRE CHAIR SWISSPEARL

123 SERIES OUTDOOR ARMCHAIR TEN10

VIEW MORE OUTDOOR ARMCHAIRS >


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Future Forward

Project Californian Bungalow Design Pipkorn and Kilpatrick Landscape Design Kate Patterson Pool Design East Coast Swimming Pools Photography © Martina Gemmola


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Future Forward

Project The Clubhouse Architecture Wolveridge Architects Landscape Design Eckersleys Garden Architecture Photography © Derek Swalwell


THE DETAIL

Outdoor Fire Pits

ANGELINA FIRE PIT ROBERT PLUMB

MOLLY (MEL) DRUM ROBERT PLUMB

ELEMENT FIRE PIT DESIGNED BY ADAM GOODRUM TAIT

SHALLOW CAST IRON FIRE PIT BOWL WITH TRIVET BASE AUSSIE HEATWAVE

BRAD FIRE PIT ROBERT PLUMB

BOO OUTDOOR CANDLE AND FIRE BASKET SKARGAARDEN

VIEW MORE FIRE PITS >


THE DETAIL

Bar Carts

TRAYS KARTELL

JAMES BAR CART STELLA WORKS

PIPE BAR CART KUN DESIGN

TEA TROLLEY 901 ARTEK

BLOCK MOBILE SIDE TABLE NORMANN COPENHAGEN

TRUCK MAT TI KLENELL STUDIO

1966 SERVING CART KNOLL

CHARIOT CASAMANIA

MATEGOT TROLLEY GUBI

VIEW MORE BAR CARTS >


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Future Forward

Photography © Image courtesy of Tait


ISSUE #35 / THE DESIGN ISSUE

Future Forward

Project Wolseley Home Design Mrs Smith Styling © Claire Delmar Photography © Prue Ruscoe


THE DETAIL

Curated Table

BLACK MOON CUTLERY CUTIPOL

BLACK CM05 HABIBI TRAY E15

REVOLUTION CHAMPAGNE FLUTE FFERRONE DESIGN

BLUE JUG RAAWII

CHAMPAGNE COOLER BY ARNE JACOBSEN STELTON

OAK SALAD SET EVA SOLO

PALM GREEN ROTARY TRAY VITRA

MILK 3PC PLACE SETTING MUD AUSTRALIA

BLACK CARRIE LED LAMP MENU

V I E W M O R E C U R AT E D TA B L E P I E C E S >


ISSUE #35 ESTLIVING.COM

Profile for Est Magazine

est Magazine | Issue #35 | Future Forward