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In the Mood The Kitchen Issue

Issue #36.

Behind the doors of designers’ own kitchens Where the Pacific Ocean meets sublime design A Belgian-inspired inner-city collector’s home


STONE


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Visit Signorino Tile Gallery to find the perfect natural stone.

(03) 9427 9100 Photography: Timothy Kaye

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ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ ws/dekton-liquid-by-patternity/ Inspired by Liquid, each of the individual colours are aesthetically innovative and as a collection, touch on the future of global trends. True to the PATTERNITY ethos, the collection’s concept centres around the beauty of nature, environmental awareness and celebrating sustainable design practice.


Vola 94 Wellington St, Collingwood, Victoria Stockists www.vola.com Photographer Š Alex Wilson


Wellness and Wellbeing - Ilse Crawford The third in VOLA’s series of ’On Design’ films how design can enhance and support our daily interactions, behaviours and attitudes. Watch the full film below:

“Before design, there is empathy. Without it, there is no good design.” Ilse Crawford, StudioIlse We live in a time of hyper stimulation, so more emphasis must be placed on finding moments to slow down and feel grounded. As part of VOLA’s series of short films, Ilse Crawford explores how design can enhance and support our daily interactions, behaviours and attitudes. StudioIlse interiors choose pieces which are rigorously analysed for their material, durability, comfort, way of use and how it will make someone feel - not purely for their aesthetic qualities. Through small, everyday, simple actions - like turning on a tap - we can provide moments that layer upon others to make life that bit more special, contributing to a true sense of wellness and wellbeing.


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Team Letter Welcome to est Magazine Issue #36. It’s a letter from all of us, as more than ever, we’ve worked together as a team in an uncertain time to produce this special Kitchen Edition.

@est_living team

Given we’re almost all in some form of self-isolation by now, adjusting to a different kind of life, we’ve upped the ante to create a bumper issue with windows into a sublime home in our story By the Sea and a Belgian-inspired inner-city collector’s home as well as going behind the doors of designers’ own kitchens in Kitchen Confidential. There’s also our regular est Style page, our updated Product Library and our Spaces edit, all designed to feed your creativity, inspire you and be the resource you love, as you contemplate the idea of home in a whole new light. Even if you think you’re alone, remember we’re together. Stay with us here and on social @est_living #indoorswithest We hope you and the ones you love stay safe and well and let’s all go gently. The est Team. x


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

The Latest An up-to-date look at what’s happening at estliving.com and @est_living

Swipe through Project Mill 13 designed by am designs

Instagram

Explore our go-to Australian Designers, including James Garvan Architecture Recommended Designers

See the Vipp Kitchen in a new grey finish Product Library

Set foot inside Adam Kane Architects’ new studio space My Space

Discover the Monogram Kitchen by Nexus Designs in the est kitchen spaces edit Spaces


Iconic Jasper II The ultimate expression of King Living’s flexibility and long-lasting support is the luxuriously comfortable and iconic multi award-winning Jasper. Built around a superior steel frame that’s backed by a 25-year warranty, the Jasper can be effortlessly reconfigured into a number of configurations, even a heavenly guest bed for two.

kingliving.com   1300 546 438


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Meet the Contributors

Shannon McGrath | photographer Shannon McGrath has been photographing architecture and interior design works for 15 years. She is commissioned by pre-eminent architects and designers around Australia for her ability to get under the skin of a project, and not only capture its pure essence but also her client’s formal design intent. Passionate and professional, Shannon’s images are known for their beautiful portrayal of light and form, with a soft realism that celebrates the subject matter. @shannonmcgrath7

Kate Dixon | art direction + design Kate Dixon has brought her clear, unpretentious and timeless aesthetic to issue #36; her fifth magazine in the art director and designer’s seat. Kate is a stickler for detail, priding herself on a passion for design and imbuing a sense of fun in all of her projects. Where people always come first, Kate has evolved est magazine to include exciting new content opportunities and visual possibilities. @katedixondesign

Sophie Lewis | managing editor of estliving. com and contributing writer Sophie has recently moved into the role of managing editor of estliving.com. She was fortunate to find herself in Paris in January this year, sourcing inspiration from Maison & Objet 2020 and from the streets of Paris. See her top 10 highlights in this issue, as well as an intimate chat with architect Emma Templeton about her own East Melbourne Terrace, as part of the Where Architects Live series. @sophlew_says

Yvette Caprioglio | sub editor, style editor and contributing writer A long-standing est contributor, Yvette Caprioglio has worked for over 25 years across advertising and comms. With a highly-refined eye for aesthetics, Yvette has been known to say, “Don’t hurt my eyes,” and believes that while a picture tells a thousand words, some sassy word play never goes astray. @yvette_caprioglio


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Credits

est TEAM

CONTRIBUTORS

Managing editor of estliving.com Sophie Lewis

WORDS Yvette Caprioglio, Melia Rayner, Megan Rawson, Sophie Lewis

Sub Editor & Style Editor Yvette Caprioglio

PHOTOGRAPHY

Editorial Assistant Lidia Boniwell Art Direction + Design Kate Dixon Client Partnerships Mandy Loftus-Hills Astrid Saint-John Junior Producer Brigitte Craig Project Coordinator Jack Seedsman Market Editor Sian MacPherson Managing Director Miffy Coady

The Latest Katherine Lu, James Geer, Vipp, Thomas de Bruyne, Felix Forest By the Sea Prue Ruscoe, Nicholas Watt My Space Derek Swalwell Kitchen Confidential Nicole Franzen, Shannon McGrath, Annick Vernimmen, Stephen Kent Johnson, Andrea Papini Labour of Love Shannon McGrath Ahead of the Curve Prue Ruscoe Kitchen Edit Shannon McGrath, Alex Lesage, Kvänum, Thomas de Bruyne, Pablo Veiga, Peter Clarke, Chris Warnes Playlist Caroline McCredie Where Architects Live Sharyn Cairns The Library Thomas de Bruyne Paris Matthew Donaldson, Joanna Maclennan, Anne-Emmanuelle Thion, Louis Vuitton Fondation The Detail Jasper Carlberg, Thomas de Bruyne, Tom Blachford, Chris Warnes, Reform, Prue Ruscoe

CONTACT editorial@estliving.com advertising@estliving.com

MUSIC Playlist Will Pyett ON THE COVER Design My Space: Stephen Crafti by Robert Simeoni Photography Derek Swalwell Location Victoria

CONNECT


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Contents

The Latest

est Style

By the Sea

My Space

Kitchen Confidential

Ahead of the Curve

Labour of Love

Kitchen Edit

Where Architects Live

The Library

Maison & Objet

The Detail


Your Kitchen Your Style Your Choice

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SET THE SCENE BY YVETTE CAPRIOGLIO STYLE EDITOR

While the kitchen is the heart of the home, it’s also the place where you’ll find a throng of people rocking to a different beat when there’s a party. Up the ante in an asymmetric dress or opt for slick separates like a flat front leather pant or a sublime feather-trimmed tulle top. Turn the lights down low for covert conversations and keep to a palette of black and navy, adding slashes of gold to make sure you catch the light.

FEATHERTRIMMED TULLE TOP DRIES VAN NOTEN

MONICA ASYMMETRIC ONE-SLEEVE DRAPED JERSEY DRESS RETROFÊTE

BAR BAG CLOUD GOLD METALLIC A-ESQUE

SHOP THE COLLECTION >

RILEY PLEATED VOILE TURTLENECK BLOUSE CEFINN


ISSUE #36 / REGULAR FEATURE

est Style

CONNIE CORAL-BRANCH EARRINGS CHLOÉ

JERENI CINCHEDWAIST SINGLEBREASTED BLAZER ACNE STUDIOS

LULIANA BOOTS ISABEL MARANT FLAT FRONT LEATHER PANT BASSIKE


Be immersed. Abey Australia’s diverse range of sinks provides you with a selection from around the world. Visit an Abey Selection Gallery to immerse yourself in the collection. Chambord Henri 1 & 3/4 Bowl

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Selection Gallery 1E Danks St Waterloo Ph: 02 8572 8500

Selection Gallery 94 Petrie Tce Brisbane Ph: 07 3369 4777

Selection Gallery 12 Sundercombe St Osborne Park Ph: 08 9208 4500


www.abey.com.au


ISSUE #36 / FEATURED HOMES

BY THE SEA

When a young family returning to Australia from a bustling Asian city decided they wanted to be close to the ocean, they called on Luigi Rosselli Architects and Alwill Interiors to create a home that reflected their new environment on the cliffs of Bronte.

PROJECT Pacific View Point ARCHITECTURE Luigi Rosselli Architects INTERIOR DESIGN Alwill Interiors WORDS Emma-Kate Wilson PHOTOGRAPHY ©Prue Ruscoe ©Nicholas Watt


In the main living room the modernist sculpture by Morgan Shimmeld is offset by soft textures— a Robyn Cosgrove silk and wool rug, a Moroso Gentry sofa and Molinari Rondo chair in tobacco leather.


It was established that Pacific View Point needed to be a calm, family-friendly sanctuary that embraced the surrounding Pacific Ocean. Luigi Rosselli Architects were tasked with transforming the compact site into a home that is instantly welcoming, capturing and maximising views. Working within the boundaries of the site and the surrounding sandstone cliffs, architect Luigi Rosselli responded with geometric angles that provide every level of the ship-like house with an outdoor area, complete with glass screens; ensuring an organic flow to outdoor living. “We always think that a building should belong to the natural environment that it comes from,” Luigi Rosselli says. Over the home’s four storeys, clean lines are softened by organic curves and reoccurring treated oak finishes. Designer Romaine Alwill employed soft textures, modernist sculptures and a mix of Scandinavian furniture, providing a contrast to the sea-blue views, white walls and glass stairwell. The colour palette is in keeping with this, with aqua through to midnight blue colours mixed with sand and tobacco tones. “It feels natural and easy, not contrived or forced and this is really reflective of the clients too,” Romaine says.


The top floor makes the most of the shimmering vista framed with a curved, wrapped window, Balineseinspired timber lattice shutters and soft-hued linen curtains. Although the home’s style is minimal, artworks such as the angular Morgan Shimmeld sculpture, Triplex Honey Bronze from Otomys Contemporary gallery which sits at the crux of the view on the top level, give a modern interpretation on a coastal feel. The impressive glass staircase made from Obeco Glass Blocks, inspired by Maison de Verre in Paris, draws light throughout the house and gives the impression of an underwater scene, seamlessly transcending both the front and back terraces. The home’s rear garden opens to a pool set into the cliff, with its glass wall revealing a gaping blueness. Both architect and designer continually considered the sleek, minimal aesthetics of the surrounding ocean and sandstone cliffs, working harmoniously together in a ‘dovetail’ of joinery and finishes. The result is an oceanside home that provides a retreat from the world, allowing the family to build a nurturing, warm environment to raise their children.


An organic flow from internal to external spaces is ensured by thin, aluminium sliding glass windows. The back terrace is completed with timber decking, Teka dining table with a ceramic glazed top and Harp dining chairs looking out to the pool carved into the rock.


“We always think that a building should belong to the natural environment that it comes from.” – Luigi Rosselli

In the guest bedroom, rammed earth wall, oak joinery and flooring are complemented with a mix of textures from Romaine: a midnight blue rug from Armadillo and Co, the Swoon Lounge Petit Chair from Great Dane Furniture, and raw linen bedding from Bedouin Societe.


In the entrance, the glass staircase is enhanced by the warming sand and blue tones of the Ben Sheers abstract painting from Otomys Contemporary gallery, the circular Bottle Table from Specified Store, and the treated oak timber balustrade that continues throughout the home.


LUIGI ROSSELLI ARCHITECTS & ALWILL INTERIORS SIGNATURE STYLE


BRANCHING BUBBLE LINDSEY ADELMAN

The colour palette plays to the natural environment, with aqua through to midnight blue colours mixed with sand and tobacco tones.

AGRA RUG - MIDNIGHT ARMADILLO & CO

SILVER TRAVERTINE SIGNORINO

RONDO ARMCHAIR MOLINARI LIVING

SLIT TABLE HAY

CHAMOISEE (ETERNO) TONGUE N GROOVE


AUB

K

Atelier Vierkant Clay Planters and Pebbles, Made By Hand in Belgium.

Photography: Bart Van Leuven

AU


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MY SPACE STEPHEN CRAFTI The Belgian-inspired space in Melbourne’s South Yarra where renowned design and architecture writer-author Stephen Crafti lives with his wife and Harvey, the leonine ginger cat has been home for 10 years. Inspired by the materiality of Maison de Verre in Paris, Stephen saw the transformation of the 1930s duplex as an opportunity to work on what he calls a ‘fun project’ with architect Robert Simeoni, who he’d long admired. While retaining a lot of the house’s original structure and features, including many structural details, the result is distinctively European, immersive in its atmosphere and reflective of Stephen’s love of dark, moody spaces.

ARCHITECTURE Robert Simeoni Architects PHOTOGRAPHY © Derek Swalwell WORDS Yvette Caprioglio


ISSUE #36 / REGULAR FEATURE


Artwork, An invitation for Romeo Gigli’s Spring collection 1991


Artwork by Anne Karin Furnes


The European DNA of the house was also noted when Robert presented the home’s design at the World Architecture Awards where the observation and commentary was that the house was ‘so European.’ It’s obvious that Stephen’s home is personally curated by him and his partner as it immediately evokes a sense of provenance and memory with its objects and artwork from their extensive travels over the past 30 years. As a long-time design and architecture writer, Stephen has travelled frequently, leading architecture and design tours to Belgium, Japan and Finland as well as interviewing designers and attending notable design fairs. “I’m attracted to unusual things, like the hand-etched glass bottle from Poland I bought in London,” says Stephen. Aside from an impressive 40 books he has to his own name, Stephen has also amassed a great number of books, that are visible testament to his love of design and history.

Stephen Crafti with architect Robert Simeoni

A cabinet filled with Belgian crystal and photographs in the kitchen by Robyn Beeche who Stephen wrote a book on, are all personal reminders of countless trips and memorable interviews. A unique pair of hand-made tapestry chairs by designer Suzie Stanford who creates one off designs, are a reminder of a friendship and personal connection. “My space is my own,” says Stephen.


Screen created by artist Simeon Leah

“When people come into my space they say ‘this house is so you’.” – Stephen Crafti


Superior Italian Kitchen Efficiency: Logica Celata Logica Celata by Valcucine has just arrived: a sculptural unit with clean-cut, minimalist lines designed to conceal highly-functional kitchen organisation.   At the cutting edge of kitchen technology, a patented v-motion system with a single-handed gesture simultaneously switches on the lights and slides open the door to reveal all of the functional compartments within. Where cooking becomes an effortless ritual, Logica Celata is fitted with the best accessories developed by Valcucine in recent years. Bar and food preparation models are also available – each with their own purposely designed accessories.  To find out more about the premium Valcucine Logica Celata, visit your nearest Rogerseller showroom. Designed by Gabriele Centazzo


A custom dining table and built-in banquette by Mr & Mrs White form a sculptural centrepiece to the dining space.


AHEAD OF THE CURVE

Testament to time-honoured design, this Palm Beach family retreat showcases sensuous shapes and a nuanced palette to create a sense of calm.

DESIGN CM Studio | PHOTOGRAPHY © Prue Ruscoe EDITORIAL STYLING Alexandra Gordon | BUILDER BAU Group Construction WORDS Megan Rawson


It’s no secret that Palm Beach, nestled at the northernmost point of Sydney, is widely admired as one of Australia’s most spectacular and secluded white-sand beaches. It’s here, on a tree-lined hillside, that tranquil Woorak House by Sydney based practice CM Studio sits. Built as a young family’s holiday retreat, Woorak House fuses coastal design with a global focus, based around a series of lofty pavilions and open courtyards which lead to a design akin to a Mediterranean Summer home. “The client’s brief called for a casual, family-friendly home that was timeless in design,” Megan Burns, Principal of CM Studio says.


The guest bathroom opens onto an outdoor shower with a canopy of trees above.


The garage, bedrooms and private pavilion inform one zone while the main living, kitchen and dining pavilion create a public pavilion to the rear. This clever zoning ensures maximum privacy while also allowing “Various spaces to expand and compress both horizontally and vertically, creating joyful moments for the young family as they go about their everyday life,� Megan says. Thoughtful planning ensures spaces embody a spacious and airy quality with undulating, sculptural elements that speak to the coastal locale, while carefully considered outlooks draw in the neighbouring tree canopy. Generously designed and impeccably finished, Woorak House balances opposing elements including the masculine with the feminine, strength with softness and curves with clean lines.


“The Marrakesh render was another unique perspective. We had a clear vision of how we wanted the curves and finish to look to give a casual undulation that was soft to touch.” – Megan Burns, Principal of CM Studio


ISSUE #36 / SPECIAL FEATURE

Kitchen Confidential We step inside five unique kitchens and into the minds of designers to see how they conceptualise and create their own functioning spaces.


Athena Calderone: New York City, USA Photography Š Nicole Franzen


family creation workshop ATHENA CALDERONE Eyeswoon

WHAT INSPIRED THE DESIGN BEHIND YOUR KITCHEN? I knew I did not want any upper cabinets in the kitchen but rather a singular shelf that could be a foil to display both the utilitarian, functional objects I use every day coupled with decorative objects like sculpture, art, a lamp and a vintage mirror. I chose a light and bright textural plaster so that the bulky hood would recede. I also knew I wanted the lower half of the kitchen to be dark and grounding with a rich navy hue. I designed the kitchen cabinetry to resemble furniture and chose more decorative brass knobs and even raised the island off the floor with legs to give some levity and feel more like movable furniture. WHAT IS THE FAVOURITE DESIGN FEATURE OF YOUR KITCHEN? The square island as it engages friends and family to come together in the most communal way. I also love the bifold doors which open completely, making the kitchen an indoor / outdoor experience in the warmer months.


WHAT DESIGN ELEMENTS ARE AT THE TOP OF YOUR LIST FOR YOUR NEXT KITCHEN? I am so happy here with no intention of moving. But I did just redesign my Amagansett kitchen and used the softest grey-green colour on the cabinetry and on the fluted plaster surround of the island. The colour was chosen directly from the marble as I am always led by materiality. I have also recently been obsessed with table lamps in the kitchen too. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR KITCHEN IN THREE WORDS? Family — Creation — Workshop WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE COOKBOOK? Cook Beautiful of course! Followed by any recipe Alison Roman creates.

*For more swoonworthy inspiration Athena recently launched her second book Live Beautiful and podcast More Than One Thing, visit www.eye-swoon.com for details.


Photography © Shannon McGrath


calm communal linear HAMISH GUTHRIE Hecker Guthrie

AFTER WORKING IN A SPACE OF YOUR OWN DESIGN, WHAT ELEMENT WOULD YOU REPEAT IN YOUR NEXT KITCHEN? The dining table. Designing this kitchen, in the confines of a new and relatively small space, I had to reimage the table as more than just a dining space. The table was reconsidered as an island to the kitchen, workspace, meeting space and craft space.


WHAT WOULD YOU DESIGN DIFFERENTLY IN YOUR NEXT KITCHEN? Probably most things! Not because this one doesn’t work, but because this kitchen was a crafted and intimate response to that particular house, at that time in my family’s life. WHAT INSPIRED THE COLOUR PALETTE? The palette was driven by two ideas. Firstly, to create a freshness and warm neutrality in a space that supported the idea of de-tuning the kitchen as a feature of the home and secondly, to maintain warmth in a space that is south facing in orientation and is deprived of any direct sunlight. IS THERE A COMMON DESIGN ELEMENT YOU INSIST ON INCLUDING WHEN WORKING WITH CLIENTS? I would never insist on anything that wasn’t wholeheartedly embraced by the client as our clients are living in these spaces every day. My job as the designer is to work through our clients’ belief system of how they cook and live and give form to this brief in a unique and appropriate way. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR KITCHEN IN THREE WORDS? Linear — Calm — Communal WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE COOKBOOK? I’m less cookbook and more a collection of photos of recipes on my phone. I’m still not sure what it is that makes friends’ cookbooks much more appealing… and achievable.


Photography © Annick Vernimmen


warm functional beautiful MATHIEU LUYENS & JULIE VAN DE KEERE JUMA architects

WHAT LEAD YOU TO SELECT THE STONE YOU HAVE FOR BOTH THE KITCHEN BENCH AND THE FLOORING? We just love this type of stone. It was important that the floor needed to be the same as the countertop and the countertop needed to be resistant enough to be able to cook. We like the fact that you can use the stone filled and not filled. This gives a different dynamic. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR KITCHEN IN THREE WORDS? Warm — Functional — Beautiful HOW DOES YOUR KITCHEN REFLECT A BELGIAN AESTHETIC? I think we use a lot of natural stone in Belgian architecture and interior design.


HOW DO YOU USE YOUR KITCHEN? Daily use, but there is a hidden door that goes to the second ‘dirty’ kitchen. So if you need to do some dirty work or you want to hide dishes, you can always use the second kitchen. WHAT IS ONE THING YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT IN YOUR KITCHEN? Our V-Zug oven. WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE COOKBOOK? Het Ultieme Sportkookboek by Stephanie Sheirlynck.


bespoke brooklyn loft GIANCARLO VALLE New York City, USA

WHO LIVES HERE? Giancarlo Valle, Jane Keltner de Valle and their two young children. WHAT ARE THE CUSTOM FEATURES IN THIS KITCHEN? The custom-designed maple cabinetry, the marble kitchen island and the pine stools tucked underneath. WHAT ARE THE STANDOUT PIECES? Personally selected and curated vintage pieces fill the home, that also make an appearance in the kitchen, such as 1960s pendant lights from the Netherlands.


Photography © Stephen Kent Johnson


Photography © Andrea Papini


ambient embracing functional JEPPE DUEHOLM studio ARC & Nordiska Kök

WHAT INSPIRED THE RELAXED COLOUR PALETTE? With an eventful life balancing small children, work and activities it was important to create a calm backdrop. The effect of a tone-in-tone palette makes the interior seamlessly come together and appear evident in the space. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR KITCHEN IN THREE WORDS? Ambient – Embracing – Functional HOW DOES YOUR KITCHEN REFLECT A DANISH AESTHETIC? The kitchen is made with great craftmanship and attention to details, making it both simple, practical and beautiful to the eye. This might be a way of characterising a Danish aesthetic. I believe that what makes the design interesting is the playful use of old and new. The design is traditional yet it’s modern with seamless integrated technology such as built-in cooktop extractor and sparkling and boiling water from the tap.


HOW IS YOUR KITCHEN RESPECTFUL TO THE 150-YEAR-OLD TOWNHOUSE IT LIES WITHIN? We chose to work with sustainable materials and a colour palette that was already present in the house. It was important to create a kitchen that will age along with the house. The decision to use fumed oak was a way of connecting the ground floor with the exposed dark wooden beams on the second floor. The same goes for the frame cabinets that refers to the wooden beams in a classic yet playful way. The boxy wall cabinets are playing with the exterior brick façade and the rounded seating bench is mirroring the organic staircase connecting the three floors. WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE COOKBOOK? I truly enjoy cooking. Normally I don’t read cookbooks as I like to be creative and improvise with seasonal pescatarian ingredients. Although, I do get a lot of inspiration from looking at Mikkel Karstad’s Instagram feed (@mkarstad) and then do my own take of his beautiful dishes.


ISSUE #36 / FEATURED HOME

LABOUR O F LOV E The home of Beatrix Rowe and family is a reflection of the designer’s trademark design philosophy.

DESIGN — Beatrix Rowe Interior Design PHOTOGRAPHY — Shannon McGrath / WORDS —Melia Rayner


Custom ceiling mounted towel rail and Afteroom Coat Hanger in Black by Menu.


Having faced many design challenges over the years, the complete renovation of her own 1919 single-storey weatherboard home was perhaps Beatrix’s biggest yet. Taking more than six years to complete, the renovation was carried out by Beatrix and her builder husband over holidays and weekends. With the original home having no features worth retaining, Beatrix overhauled the home with a new, modern design including a complete replan to optimise flow and function.


Working from the mantra of ‘simple details, executed beautifully,’ the design is well-planned and thoughtfully considered, with every space maintaining connection to the rest of the home. Glass doors and windows offer an expanse of light, tracking the path of the sun through the day.


Beatrix designed custom joinery to conceal the television. A fervent collector, a Kerryn Levy ceramic sits on the top left shelf, while Beatrix’s J19 sculpture sits behind.


The home reflects Beatrix’s pared-back, modern approach to materiality, building on the neutral colour palette with quality natural materials used for visual impact as well as utility. “This is a good expression of my design philosophy, where aesthetics are important but are nothing if not teamed with functionality,” Beatrix says. “The black slatted joinery around the wine storage and adjoining the kitchen is a design feature to create texture in the room, carrying from the ground floor to become the balustrade for the floor above,” she adds. It’s also a functional use of space under the staircase to house a cellar and music hub, hidden away.” Delivering a composition of thoughtfully considered and connected spaces, the home is not only a reflection of Beatrix’s own design philosophy, but a functional family home for the long haul. As Beatrix says, “it’s taken patience, but we finally made it!”


Beatrix Rowe Signature Style

Above: Beatrix Rowe standing Sculpture, Robert Owen Wall Sculpture, Artwork Sophie Westerman


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SWAN CHAIR FRITZ HANSEN

PALM BEACH BLACK PORTERS PAINTS

DAMASCA VICTORIA STONE GALLERY

ANDY WARHOL. POLAROIDS 1958-1987 RICHARD B. WOODWARD

WHITE SMOKED ROYAL OAK FLOORS


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

est Playlist

est Living 4 | In the Mood Experience est in sound Curation Will Pyett

Photographer © Caroline McCredie Location Living Edge, Sydney


WWW.KLOKE.COM.AU


home.liebherr.com.au


.

Discover the Next Level of Cooling Technology – Monolith. A Technical Genius Manifests Itself in Impressive Design.

Quality, Design and Innovation


Kitchen Edit An up-to-the-minute global edit of noteworthy kitchens featuring the latest in materiality, fixtures and design details.

Photography Š Alex Lesage


.01 Atelier Barda Portland Residence


CHAMOISEE (CHEVRON PARQUETRY) TONGUE N GROOVE

GRIS DU MARAIS SALVATORI

PALM BEACH BLACK PORTER’S PAINTS

KITCHEN OVEN 200 SERIES GAGGENAU

“We are very attentive to feelings, especially those generated by the spaces and objects surrounding us. We imagine projects as stories, or at least as decors in which the stories take place.” – Atelier Barda founder Cecile Combelle


Robson Rak

.02

Batavia

Photography © Shannon McGrath


“Surrounded by glass on two sides, this kitchen is bathed in light and greenery. It’s a multipurpose hub of the home, designed with a zone for cooking, zone for sitting, zone for working, and a zone for eating.”

WHISK PORTER’S PAINTS

OAK CALLIS ADMONTER

– Robson Rak principal architect Kathryn Robson

NEW SAVIOR CDK STONE NORTH HANGING LAMP DESIGNED BY ARIK LEVY FOR VIBIA

PROTON KITCHEN MIXER GESSI SAN SELMO CORSO - BRENTA AUSTRAL BRICKS

DISTRESSED LEATHER SPINNEYBECK

THE RECIPE JOSH EMETT


Photography © Kvänum


.03

Liljencrantz Design NATURAL TEAK LAMINEX

Sibyllegatan

Interior designer Louise Liljencrantz collaborated with leading Swedish kitchen designer Kvänum to create Sibyllegatan.

MAURETANIA SPINNEYBECK

MATITA SMOKE DI LORENZO

VERA DEKTON

The kitchen comes with signature Louise Liljencrantz cabinetry; a thick, stained amber oak frame that allows for a recessed handle. Simplicity and craftsmanship are at the core of the design, right down to the nubuck leather-lined drawers and custom natural stone.


Studio Piet Boon ELEMENT Kitchen

.04

Dutch design practice Studio Piet Boon drew inspiration from surrounding barn-like structures to create the ELEMENT Kitchen inside their Office Brabant project. Renowned for their timeless and functional design, Studio Piet Boon showcase their KEKKE kitchen and bar stool at the kitchen island.

Photography Š Thomas de Bruyne


PIET BOON SET11 DECK MOUNTED BASIN MIXER COCOON

COLONIAL WHITE SENSA

OAK KORSO CALLIS DEKTON GAGGENAU

NUEVE (ETERNO) TONGUE N GROOVE

SLIM VIBIA COMBI STEAM OVEN 200 SERIES (ANTHRANCITE) GAGGENAU


Fiona Lynch Office Rose Bay

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Photography © Pablo Veiga


BERGEN DEKTON

YOKATO KITCHEN MIXER BRODWARE FRENCH BLUE PORTER’S PAINTS

DANISH WHITE ROYAL OAK FLOORS

DUAL FUEL RANGE SUB-ZERO WOLF

Fiona Lynch Office designed the Rose Bay kitchen for a high-profile chef with a love for entertaining. A thread of green runs prominently throughout, in the two-tiered stone island bench top and lacquered-oak kitchen cabinetry in eucalyptus. Here, family and friends can gather in a relaxed dining setting.


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Mim Design NNH

Photography Š Peter Clarke


HIGH LINE PENDANT RAKUMBA

Attention to detail is paramount in the NNH Residence kitchen by Mim Design. Solid marble slab forms a sweeping curve, married with streamlined cabinetry and contemporary black accents, to create a sculpturally-sophisticated kitchen space. This family kitchen is home to the director of McLaren Developments.

HINGE STOOL LIVING DIVANI

CALACATTA CDK STONE

ESSENTIAL METRO ELTON GROUP

ELEGANT GREY CDK STONE

M SERIES OVEN WOLF


Studio Prineas

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Longwood


Photography © Chris Warnes


I FRAMMENTI - WHITE DI LORENZO

MANHATTAN KITCHEN MIXER BRODWARE

PALM BEACH BLACK PORTER’S PAINTS

CALACATTA VIOLA SIGNORINO

GRENACHE PORTER’S PAINTS

Located in Sydney’s Darling Point, Longwood Apartment sits within an icon of its own; a modernist 1960s apartment building, reflectively captured by the period’s style. Mixing the key palette of warm timber and a wine tones, the Longwood kitchen by Studio Prineas is a celebration of its own refinement, bringing together quality materials, in a considered and elevated way. With the expansive integration of storage, the impressive stone is able to shine.


est living x abey feature

Project Classic Shaker Kitchen Design © Lo Bjurulf and Idaa Lauga for Nordiska Kök Photography © Osman Tahirh


LARGE SINGLE BOWL CERAMIC SINK ABEY CHAMBORD CLOTAIRE-1

DOUBLE BOWL CERAMIC SINK ABEY CHAMBORD CLOTAIRE-2W

SINGLE BOWL GRANIT SINK ABEY CHAMBORD PHILIPPE II

The desire for beautiful French craftsmanship is expressed through each product – from design to manufacturing and from raw materials to the finished product. Chambord have been using the same techniques and precision since 1896 and are proudly European made. When introducing their product into your own kitchen, you are introducing a piece of history and prestige. VIEW THE COLLECTION >


ISSUE #36 / REGULAR FEATURE

where architects live: emma templeton Entering the East Melbourne home of Templeton Architecture director Emma Templeton is a lesson in history, art and embracing a small footprint.

ARCHITECT Emma Templeton PHOTOGRAPHY Sharyn Cairns WORDS Sophie Lewis


“In a small house, every part has to work for you.” – Architect Emma Templeton

Emma needed to raise the kitchen cabinets above the height of the retained heritage sill. This compromise was resolved by creating a design feature; a recess in the bench that became a window box herb garden for the kitchen.

“The apparatus lighting has a timelessness that I just adore in the house,” Emma says. “People often ask if they came with the home; that would be lucky!” she laughs.


Emma Templeton solves puzzles; not in their conventional form, but the type of unique puzzles that small houses present. It’s a talent that brought her to a historically significant terrace in East Melbourne. When Emma and her partner Alex first discovered the Georgian terrace that was built in 1862 it was being used as an artists’ residency and was a time capsule from the 1950s, still in its original state. She says designing her own home was an exercise in tuning into the subtleties. “When you analyse the way people live in order to design a space specifically for their needs, you often ask questions that allow you to understand what will programmatically and aesthetically be suitable for this client,” Emma says. “But the important questions to ask reveal the true values and interests of the people so that you can discover small touches that bring joy and happiness to the home.”


The footprint of Emma’s family home isn’t the only relic of design resolution. The original, patinated wallpaper in each of the home’s four front rooms is a historic stamp that plays into the overall muted, textured palette. Emma says her favourite detail in the home is the bench seat and window where the oven used to be in the kitchen. She says they spend most of their time in the kitchen, separate from the living space; a design hallmark she favours in all of her projects. The architect also gravitates to the courtyard, where stripped-back high walls reveal the bluestone and brick. “We really miss it in the winter because it basically performs the role of another room in our small home.” It’s a tranquil spot; private and gently lit. Emma’s home grounds her in the conversation she regularly has with clients on how to challenge the parameters of small spaces. The architect’s home embraces all of its heritage design quirks, such as the ‘strangely located’ powder room off the formal dining space. “You can have moments where you think that toilet is in a really weird location, however, it’s a great place for a bar which is how we have disguised the powder room,” she says. “We had to be creative.”


Project The Neutral House Design Studio Niels Photography Š Thomas de Bruyne


ISSUE #36 / REGULAR FEATURE

Cookbooks

COOK MIKKEL KARSTAD

FLAVOUR OT TOLENGHI

SIMPLE FARE: SPRING AND SUMMER KAREN MORDECHAI

COOK BEAUTIFUL ATHENA CALDERONE

NOTHING FANCY ALISON ROMAN

POLPO: A VENETIAN COOKBOOK (OF SORTS) NORMAN RUSSELL

DISHOOM: FROM BOMBAY WITH LOVE KAVI THAKRAR, NAVED NASIR & SHAMIL THAKRAR

THE COMMONS MAT THE W EVANS

FROM THE OVEN TO THE TABLE DIANA HENRY


Richard, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com


ISSUE #36 / SPECIAL FEATURE

Sophie Lewis, managing editor of estliving.com pounds the Paris pavement and halls of Maison & Objet 2020 to seek out best-in-class design. Here are her highlights... Photographer Nicole Lily Rose


01.

A very Parisian dinner at the Art Nouveau restaurant Bouillon Julien designed by John Whelan.

An exclusive tour of the Charlotte Perriand exhibition Inventin a New World at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, led by Charlotte Perriand’s daughter Pernette Perriand and curator of the exhibition Jacques Barsac.

02.

04. 03.

Maison & Objet highlighted a new generation of homegrown design with this year’s rising talents. Wendy Andreu was one of the six designers picked for her material experimentation in standout works such as the Screen Shelf (2019).

Maison & Objet Designer of the Year Michael Anastassiades presented a mesmerising installation called Sixteen Acts: an unseen installation of 16 mobile chandeliers driven by motors, moving ever so slightly.


ISSUE #36 / SPECIAL FEATURE

A tribute to the turn of the last century, ex.t design presented their chic, circular NOUVEAU Bath, designed by Bernhardt-Vella.

09. 06.

05.

Valerie Objects added to their coveted collection with their latest tableware collaboration Inner Circle by Dutch designer Maarten Baas.

06. We visited our friends at Guillaume Alan for a big dose of design inspiration in their impeccably-detailed studio.

08.

cc-tapis presented an exciting installation of their latest colourful creations, including the Chard Rug by Bethan Laura Wood, inspired by the story of an Indian sculptor.

07. The Ligne Roset exhibit celebrated the return of the sumptuous modular Asmara sofa by Bernard Govin, designed in 1967.

10. The slender Cirque collection by Giopato & Coombes commanded attention in their glamorous lighting display.


Project Lilyfield Design Lane & Grove Photography © Prue Ruscoe


the

detail The Kitchen Issue


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Kitchen Confidential

Project Palos Verdes Estates Design Mandy Graham Photography © Jasper Carlberg


THE DETAIL

900mm Freestanding Ovens

BUSSY CLASSIC LACANCHE

PROFESSIONAL+ FXP DUAL FUEL RANGE COOKER FALCON

FREESTANDING COOKER MIELE

THERMOSEAL FREESTANDING COOKER SMEG

UPRIGHT COOKER GAS-ELECTRIC SCANDIUM

LE CHÂTEAU LA CORNUE

DUAL FUEL RANGE WOLF

FREESTANDING INDUCTION COOKER FISHER & PAYKEL

SINGLE OVEN FREESTANDING COOKER ILVE

VIEW MORE OVENS >


THE DETAIL

Limestone

SAHARA G-LUX

TURCO ARGENTO CDK STONE

MUZILLAC VEINE HULLEBUSCH

ELEGANT GREY CDK STONE

NEW SAVIOR CDK STONE

AMBER SIGNORINO

CREMA IMPERIALE VICTORIA STONE GALLERY

NEW GREY TUNDRA SIGNORINO

SLATE SIGNORINO

V I E W M O R E S TO N E >


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Kitchen Confidential

Project Project VV Design Pieter Vanrenterghem Photography © Thomas de Bruyne


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Kitchen Confidential

Project Storybook House Design Folk Architects Photography © Tom Blachford


THE DETAIL

Kitchen Essentials

SARPANEVA CAST IRON POT IIT TALA

PEDAL BIN VIPP

KETTLE 9091 ALESSI

BRONZED BRASS BOTTLE GRINDERS MENU

CHOP PADDLE BOARD TOM DIXON

4 SLICE BLACK MATTE LONG SLOT TOASTER KITCHENAID

ARTISAN CAST IRON BLACK TILT-HEAD STAND MIXER KITCHENAID

WHITE EM77 VACUUM JUG STELTON

MAARTEN BAAS BLACK DESSERT CUTLERY VALERIE OBJECTS

V I E W M O R E K I TC H E N E S S E N T I A L S >


THE DETAIL

Single Lever Taps

OMEGA COPPER MIXER FOSTER

NEMO RH / RH S MGS MILANO

LUCIA SIDELEVER MIXER GARETH ASHTON

ARQ KITCHEN SINK MIXER ROGERSELLER

KV1 VOLA

CITY KITCHEN MIXER BIANCHI RUBINET TERIE

YOKATO KITCHEN MIXER BRODWARE

TOI SINK MIXER 180MM SQUARELINE PHOENIX TAP WARE

EMPORIO PULL OUT KITCHEN MIXER GESSI

V I E W M O R E TA P S >


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Kitchen Confidential

Project The Finger Wharf Apartment Design Studio Prineas Photography © Chris Warnes


ISSUE #36 / THE KITCHEN ISSUE

Kitchen Confidential

Project Reform Showroom Aarhus BASIS Kitchen Design with lamp by Muller Van Severen


THE DETAIL

Kitchen Wall Lights

MYRNA WALL MOBILE LADIES & GENTLEMEN STUDIO

CELESTE WALL SCONCE TRAVERTINE DANIEL BODDAM

NOTA DEPADOVA

TRAPEZE WALL SCONCE APPARATUS STUDIO

PALMA WALL HORIZONTAL VIBIA

TEMPO SCONCE ATELIER DE TROUPE

HATTI WALL SCONCE ARTICOLO

RAKU-YAKI SCONCE EMMANUELLE SIMON

GRAS 214 WALL LAMP DCW EDITIONS

VIEW MORE WALL LIGHTS >


ISSUE #36 ESTLIVING.COM

Profile for Est Magazine

est Magazine | Issue #36 | In the Mood  

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