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EVOLVE Issue #38.

A SINGULAR ATTRACTION A Unified Approach by Kennedy Nolan EMERALD CITY A Series of Reveals by Studio Flack RETHINK A New Perspective on Existing Homes WHERE ARCHITECTS LIVE At Home with Madeleine Blanchfield


h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m h t t p s : / / w w w. c o s e n t i n o. c o m Khalo is inspired by Patagonia Natural Stone, one of the most renowned granites worldwide for its genuine formation and colours. Subtle spots of black, pale gold and coffee brown make up this innovative hue. Thanks to the polished finish with Dekton XGloss technology, the colourway achieves a spectacular shine and depth, boosting its complex and colourful structure. Click to find out more.


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CO S E N T I N O _ AU S T


VOLA 94 Wellington St, Collingwood, Victoria Stockists www.vola.com Photography Rory Gardiner


THE ORIGINAL

The Vola stainless steel collection is manufactured from solid, marinegrade stainless steel with high corrosion resistance. The collection features a hand-brushed finish that complements the high-quality materials, suitable for internal and external applications that demand durability and hygiene. For more than 50 years, the timeless Vola designs have been made to order, hand-crafted at the Vola factory in Denmark. Traditional Scandinavian craftsmanship and modern engineering technology combine for accurate bends and perfectly finished forms, ensuring their products will last for generations. Colour 40, ‘Brushed Stainless Steel,’ is one of the 28 colours and finishes available in Vola’s collection.

Explore the collection vola.com


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

Team Letter

This issue’s Evolve theme is timely as we continue to navigate our way through an uncertain global landscape, particularly here at est HQ where we’re still in strict lockdown. Yet there’s nothing like the unexpected to inspire, to satiate the craving for something new. We’ve found ourselves inspired and buoyed by colour in our featured homes by Flack Studio ‘Return to the Emerald City’ and Kennedy Nolan Architects ‘A Singular Attraction’. We’ve also evolved in the way we respond to our landscape through design, looking at Madeleine Blanchfield in her Tree House ‘Where Architects Live’ and ‘Rethink: A New Perspective’ looking at the renewed potential of an existing home. We discover ‘Resilient Architecture’ with Stephen Crafti, as he opens our eyes to the evolution of adaptive architecture in response to climate change and environment. As always, there’s est Style, Library and the Playlist which, in this issue, respond to the same theme of how music has influenced what we wear, read and listen to. We hope this issue inspires you, right when you least expect it. Enjoy. The est Team. x

See the Echo Long Bench by Kelly Wearstler Product Library


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

The Latest An up-to-date look at what’s happening on estliving.com and @est_living

Swipe through Annandale House by Baldwin & Bagnall

Instagram

Read our interview with Faulkner Architects director Greg Faulkner

Designer Interview

Learn more about Feldman Architecture

Recommend International Designers

Explore the Armadale Residence by Pleysier Perkins and Sanders & King Wander through the home of Mathieu Luyens and Julie Van de Keere

Where Architects Live

Spaces


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

Meet the Contributors

Derek Swalwell | photographer Shooting since 1999, Derek Swalwell always finds it a pleasure to capture the work of Kennedy Nolan. Working with the firm for almost 20 years, Derek photographed their latest project Erskine House - A Singular Attraction - in this issue. He says he’s watched Kennedy Nolan rise to be one of the most important designers in the country. Working both here in Australia as well as in other parts of the Asia Pacific, Derek says it’s always great to come home to the ingenuity and talent of local designers. @derek_swalwell

Melia Rayner | contributing writer Melia is a writer, editor and content strategist with a passion for telling the stories of innovative brands and people. With over a decade of editorial and content marketing experience, she is a former editor for est living and has written for a range of design and technology publications. In this issue Melia speaks with architect Madeleine Blanchfield on the design of her own home in Bronte, Sydney. @meliarayner

Stephen Crafti | contributing writer Stephen Crafti has always been drawn to architecture that has a sense of longevity rather than fashion. After writing for nearly 30 years, he can certainly tell the difference. For this issue, Stephen looks at resilient architecture, whether it’s the materials used or the sustainable qualities featured. Irrespective of the form it takes, Stephen says the ideas behind a design are as captivating as the built form. #stephencrafti

Willem-Dirk du Toit | photographer Willem-Dirk du Toit is a Melbourne-based photographer who splits his time between the outdoors and the great indoors both locally and internationally. Willem shot the Eastop Rose Street project, collaborating with architects and designers to create a visual narrative which offers the viewer a true sense of mood and place. @willem_dirk


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

Credits

est TEAM

CONTRIBUTORS

Managing Editor of estliving.com Sophie Lewis

WORDS Yvette Caprioglio, Stephen Crafti, Lidia Boniwell, Bronwyn Marshall, Melia Rayner, Emma-Kate Wilson, Sophie Lewis

Sub Editor & Style Editor Yvette Caprioglio Editorial Assistant Lidia Boniwell Design & Creative Jack Seedsman Client Partnerships Mandy Loftus-Hills Astrid Saint-John Junior Producer Brigitte Craig Managing Director Miffy Coady

ON THE COVER Design Kennedy Nolan Photography Derek Swalwell

PHOTOGRAPHY The Latest Annick Vernimmen, Joe Fletcher, Sharyn Cairns, Tom Ferguson Return to the Emerald City Anson Smart

Lena Residence Romello Pereira A Singular Attraction Derek Swalwell Playlist Irina Boersma Rethink: A New Perspective Katherine Lu, Rory Gardiner, Shannon McGrath, Ross Honeysett The Library Prue Ruscoe

Tucked Away Willem-Dirk du Toit Project Where Architects Live: Madeleine Blanchfield Erskine House Anson Smart Location Resilient Architecture Melbourne, Australia Derek Swalwell, Yaseera Moosa, Dave Kulesza, Tess Kelly, Shannon McGrath, Fraser Marsden CONTACT editorial@estliving.com advertising@estliving.com

The Detail Prue Ruscoe, Heidi Lerkenfeldt, Annick Vernimmen, Timothy Kaye, Shannon McGrath and Rory Gardiner MUSIC Playlist Will Pyett Music Director & DJ @blackscale_music

CONNECT


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

Contents

The Latest

est Style

Return to the Emerald City

A Singular Attraction

The Power of Five

Playlist | An Ode to Evolution

Rethink | a New Perspective

The Library

Tucked Away

Where Architects Live | Madeleine Blanchfield

Resilient Architecture

The Detail


Hit Repeat BY YVETTE CAPRIOGLIO STYLE EDITOR

One way to evolve your wardrobe is to curate a greatest hits list of wearable pieces that stand the test of time, whatever the decade. The sartorial influence of music is one of the great sources of inspiration.

ISIDE CRYSTAL-EMBELLISH ENVELOPE CLUTCH ROSANTICA

Think about the rawness and understated cool of Patti Smith, the streetwear edge of hip hop, the glamorous refinement of jazz, the skinny silhouette of rock and roll and the rich sexiness of soul. Find the pieces that work time after time and hit repeat.

WOOL TUXEDO JACKET SAINT LAURENT

DELICOTTE 100 SUEDE AND LEATHER ANKLE BOOTS CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

SHOP THE COLLECTION >


ISSUE #38 / REGUL AR F EATURE

est Style

BORDEAUX SILK SATIN MAXI DRESS ASCENO

HED

SILK MINELLI SHIRT BELLA FREUD WAVELENGTH SURF BRACELET ZIMMERMANN

LOW-RISE SKINNY WOOL TUXEDO PANTS SAINT LAURENT

POINTED CAT-EYE ACETATE SUNGLASSES SAINT LAURENT


RETURN TO THE

EMER CIT

FLACK S

A POTTS POINT PROJE PRESENTS A SERIES OF R A 1930s

INTERIOR DESIG PHOTOGRAPH WORDS Emm


E

RALD TY

STUDIO

ECT BY FLACK STUDIO REVEALS THROUGHOUT s HOME.

GN Flack Studio HY Anson Smart a-Kate Wilson


F

lack Studio principal and founder David Flack was tasked with ensuring a Sydney four-storey terrace had continuity with the history of the city while guaranteeing practical, contemporary living for its owners. The result is a love letter to Sydney; from the Opera House-inspired white curved staircase with its continuous carved wooden handrail running from the basement to the rooftop terrace, to the understated nod to 1950s beach lifestyle. As with many Flack Studio projects, Potts Points is testament to the integration of fine art and contemporary design, offset by hand-finished raw brass and marble, inviting a deco sensibility that connects the home with Sydney’s heyday years. The wine room painted in a deep eucalyptus green, balanced with the ‘Vati Cano Marble’ and ‘Verde St Devis’ floor tiles and the basement pool with its cinematic striped black and white tiles and pastel green walls, are immediately evocative of this deco period.

A practical device, the wine room was a way to create a separate, intimate, space from the long living room. The eucalyptus shades and marble flooring reflect the back alleyways of Potts Point with their glimpses of deco tiles, while the Lustre dining table by Bethan Gray and Feel Good Chairs by Flexform afford an opulent atmosphere.


This sitting space features the Glenn Barkley Scribble Pot, 2018, Blue and White Vase (2018) - both from earthenware - and Tim Silver Untitled (Oneirophrenia) Blue #6 (2015).


The union of art and design allows the eye to travel to focal points throughout the home, such as the Pierre Jeanneret Armchair and bench appearing in multiple rooms, or the Gubi coral-fringed small pouffe in both the lounge room and bedroom. Away from the walls, pieces like the cheeky monkey sculpture by Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran sit unexpectedly at ease atop places like the kitchen bench.

“From the wine room that is a subtle reference to the Emerald City from the Wizard of Oz, which Sydney very much represents to the staircase that encases this five-level home and references the sails of the Opera House.” – David Flack


The formal dining space features the Colette chairs by Roberto Lazzeroni for Baxter, Moon dining table by Space Copenhagen for GUBI, Forchette pendant by Materia Designs and custom credenza with caramel American Oak-stained veneer and marble base, designed by Flack Studio.


The kitchen’s material mix includes Calacata Vaticano marble, handmade Moroccan Zellige tiles, custom caramel American-oak stained veneer and brass in Scotch finish. Featuring the Mater High Stool by Space Copenhagen and anthracite Gaggenau appliances. The Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran artwork Monkey with Yellow Mask (2019) features on the benchtop.


“I wanted the kitchen to feel like a little jewel glycerine; the beautiful brass elements have a little sparkle, but then it’s got some rough and tumble, so we could capture the bit of both of those moods of Sydney.” – David Flack


In this project, Flack Studio honour the home’s simple and classic form, allowing finishes and materiality to create tangible depth. This can be seen in the kitchen where two different types of stone, together with timber and brass, are contrasted by handmade Moroccan tiles, while the bench reveals slivers of negative space that trap light. Similarly, the ‘Rosa Aurora Marble’ hand basin and floor in the powder room, connects to the custom pink scalloped timber panelling and is offset by a wall of fluted glass that belies a floating garden outside. One of Flack Studio’s favourite spaces in the home is the entrance, connecting the whole house through custom timber cabinetry, brushed brass and the gold-framed Sam Martin artwork; The Sun Myth (2017). You’re welcomed with a sense of the familiar, yet the considered detail gives a subtle hint that there’s more to come.

The casual living room off the kitchen is a nod to Sydney’s beaches with the Pillowchair by ASH NYC in yellow stripe; a coral small pouf with fringes by GUBI; navy blue Paul Sofa by Vincent Van Duysen for Molteni & C and Lianou Stool by neri&hu; and a tactile yellow hand-knotted wool rug by Robyn Cosgrove. The space also features Glenn Barkley’s artwork death defying (2019) and Ry David Bradley’s politic28Rhubarb13Talky (2020).


The staircase operates as a contemporary art and light well in a Waterstone polished plaster finish and textural artworks from Glenn Barkley, Peter Cooley and Troy Emery. A carved wooden handrail by Gary Timber Rails runs from the basement to the rooftop terrace.


ISSUE #38 / F EATURED HOME

The pink powder room is a perfect example of Flack Studio’s work that anchors each project and allows them to leave their little signature.


The master bathroom features a custom wall light by Anna Charlesworth and pink onyx and white vanity dolomite marble, visually softened by the waterproof render.


“It’s the sense of walking around the space and knowing that everything has been detailed and considered.” – David Flack

The Potts Point Residence has been shortlisted in The Design Files+ Laminex Design Awards Program, Interior Design Category. Winners announced November 5, 2020 https://www.tdfdesignawards.com/


FLACK STUDIO SIGNATURE STYLE

053 CAP ARMCHA CASSIN

WATERSTONE POLISHED PLASTER - WHITE 59 BISHOP MASTER FINISHES

YELLOW HAND-KNOTTED WOOL RUG ROBYN COSGROVE

VERDE ALPI CDK STONE

PUDDLE TINT


PITOL COMPLEX AIR NA

FORCHETTE PENDANT MATERIA DESIGNS

The Sun Myth (2017) Sam Martin

YOKATO KITCHEN MIXER BRODWARE

LUSTRE DINING TABLE BETHAN GRAY VATI CANO CORSI & NICOLA AUSTRALIA

LE CHIEN NOIR TROY EMERY

COR ASH BRUSHED GREY OIL MAFI

SEE MORE PRODUCTS >


Introducing the Gessi Officine Range The Officine V Kitchen Mixer by bespoke Italian tapware designer GESSI features an industrial design with a striking red handle & pull-out. Where innovation and style are in the detail, the design is available in three finishes, including chrome, brushed nickel and black metal brushed. The Officine Kitchen Mixer (below) is available in a variety of colours, such as chrome, matt black, black, brushed chrome (fenox) and brushed copper. Available at abey.com.au

VIEW MORE ABEY PRODUCTS >


ISSUE #38 / F EATURED HOMES

A SINGULAR ATTRACTION

A substantial Victorian family home is redefined and unified through a multi-faceted approach. DESIGN Kennedy Nolan PHOTOGRAPHY Derek Swalwell WORDS Yvette Caprioglio


Warm nostalgia pervades the living space, with the electric velvet mustard Strips sofas by Cini Boeri for Arflex, rattan armchair from Feelgood Designs and 9602 floor lamp by Paavo Tynell for GUBI. The Paloma coffee table by Sarah Ellison features at the centre with a Caleb Shea sculpture, on top of the hand-tufted Blossom rug by Annie Georgeson from Designer Rugs. The Nebulae wall lights by Ross Gardam and an artwork by Valerie Sparks feature on the Duck Egg walls.


ward-winning architects Kennedy Nolan approached the transformation of a gracious family home in Melbourne from a number of different angles. They saw their principal job as being to ‘make sense’ of the Victorian dwelling as a single entity, unifying the house visually by making a connection between disparate design expressions; high Victorian, high eighties and pragmatic spatial extensions that had been undertaken through the course of the home’s life. The design team’s mandate involved wrangling the plan of the home’s well-proportioned rooms to discipline the various parts into zones; a parents’ zone, a children’s zone and a social space for everyone to gather. Kennedy Nolan’s problemsolving approach came into play in the distinctive blue living room where the original room with its low ceiling and enclosed feeling made way for increased height by borrowing from unused parts from the first floor and opening it up to the outside with new windows. This same approach saw them carve out space to create the ‘RAP’ – the raised activity platform; an idea derived from the imagination of the client, with an upholstered cocoon for games and sleepovers.

The kitchen features the Applique de Marseille wall sconces by Le Corbusier for Nemo and Ridge vases by Studio Kaksikko for muuto on the shelf nearby. Brass vola tapware references the joinery handles and Nebulae pendant lights from Ross Gardam above the dining table. The dining area features a LIQUEUR dining table by Didier and No. B9 Le Corbusier chairs from Thonet.


ISSUE #38 / F EATURED HOMES

"We started with a colour palette which defined a particular mood - cool and quiet, but with some intensity and playfulness..." - Kennedy Nolan founding director Patrick Kennedy


The study features the rusty red Masculo Dining Chairs by GamFratesi for GUBI and the 4 Bowl Pendant with Arch by Anna Charlesworth.


This intensity is seen in the bold coral red used in the custom-designed shelving in the study, forming part of the complex tertiary colours used to reflect the dignity and scale of the beautiful Victorian proportions of the room. The response to the client’s brief also resulted in the distinctive Pierre Frey Shaman wallpaper in the front sitting room, which easily struck a chord with all parties, proposing itself as a mural, pictorial or even evocative of portraits which may hang on a wall. Much of the furniture was specified for the project, including the Arflex ‘Strips’ sofa and John Bastiras Design coffee table. The extensive use of velvet was also specified because of the way it projects colour, giving a very dense and nuanced sense of hue, working in with the complex palette that Kennedy Nolan were pursuing. There was also an inherent need to create cohesion between the home’s interior and exterior, where the green hues of a new garden are offset by an outdoor area in stone crazy paving and the large chimney of substantial fireplace. A wall of floor to ceiling glass allows a tangible connection from inside to out with a mutual exchange of light and colour between them. The home’s palette, combined with an emphasis on textured materials, playful platonic shapes and a disciplined, layered approach to furniture and lighting ensures the various elements of the house now feel like parts of a single expression. Kennedy Nolan has created a family house which is liveable, light, connected to nature, and is ultimately a sophisticated setting for playful adults and serious children.

The formal living space is brought to life by the Pierre Frey Shaman wallpaper from Milgate, matched with the forest green velvet Cleo armchairs from Jardan and PARE floor lamp 02 by Douglas & Bec.


SYDNEY | MELBOURNE | BRISBANE | PERTH | NEW YORK


Mermaid Waters Residence, Queensland | Designer: Jared Poole Design | Interiors: Beckspace | Photographer: Andy Macpherson

Freado Grande Eterno Keeping true to the original European oak colour, Freado creates a neutral backdrop for any application. Tongue n GrooveTM floorboards are designed with three solid layers of fine European oak for optimal finish, longevity and structural integrity. tngflooring.com.au


THE POWER OF FIVE A five-storey Victorian terrace in Sydney’s Paddington is transformed through a light-filled tower and modern addition.

ARCHITECT Smart Design Studio STYLING Alexandra Gordon PHOTOGRAPHY Romello Pereira WORDS Lidia Boniwell


S

ydney interior and architecture practice Smart Design Studio were entrusted with the sensitive renovation and extension of Lena, a grand 1880s home, undertaking their third project for their long-term client. The studio’s careful approach through scale and proportion creates a gentle dialogue between the existing and the new, with an underlying sense of quiet luxury. While appealing from the exterior, the home lacked adequate light, ventilation and flow - the key elements that informed the contemporary rear extension and light-filled circulation tower. Smart Design Studio founder and creative director William Smart says that he and his team took to the streets of Paddington to find a material that paired with the painted rendered walls of the suburb. “For us, there was no material other than brick for the new addition,” William says. “We felt this Corso brick had the softness that the street needed and perfectly complemented the simple blocky forms.”

A nod to the home’s history, the masonry wall adds warmth to the white Corian kitchen with Barazza cooktop, complete with ceramics from Ondene.


The living room features the Square 16 sofa and LC03 chairs by DePadova and the Husk Armchair, designed by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia. Artwork by Dale Frank.


ISSUE #38 / F EATURED HOME


“When you provide a void it makes that area feel twice the size. It’s something I really believe in – that the quality of space outweighs the quantity of space.” – Smart Design Studio founder and creative director William Smart


Inside the home, the studio have retained key period details like the ornate moldings, fireplaces and sculpted doorways, fusing them with a considered material palette of waxed rendered walls, grey terrazzo tiles and pale oak timber flooring, creating an easy transition between the old and the new. The kitchen, dining and living room are positioned in the new rear double-height extension, retaining the original layout of the terrace, while the bedrooms, bathrooms, music room and study occupy the old part of the house. The newly-added tower contains a grand sweeping staircase and a lift, connecting both parts of the home as one. William describes Lena as a building where old and new fit together like hand and glove. “You see remnants of old and parts of new together in a subtle way, so they aren’t playing against each other, where the shiny and new makes the old look crumbly,” he says.

Striking black pieces in the living ro the Applique 2 Bras Droit Pivotant d Serge Mouille and Glove Up Armch by Patricia Urquiola.

The bedroom features the AJ Table designed by Arne Jacobsen and 40 ‘Tank’, designed by Alvar Aalto for A


oom include designed by hairs designed

e Light 00 Armchair Artek.


Freestanding cavities in the bathroom are clad in marble, with Brodware City Stik tapware in Aged Iron.


ISSUE #38 / F EATURED HOME

“For us, there was no material other than brick for the new addition...We felt this Corso brick had the softness that the street needed and perfectly complemented the simple blocky forms.” – William Smart


Playlist six | An Ode to Evolution Experience est in sound Curation | Black Scale Music, Will Pyett

Project Vipp Chimney House Design Studio David Thulstrup Photography Irina Boersma


ISSUE #38 / REGUL AR F EATURE

Looking back | est in sound

The Dinner Party

In The Mood

Black Scale Music, Will Pyett

Black Scale Music, Will Pyett

Re-Imagining Now

Longer Days to Dance

Mark Wiesmayr

Mark Wiesmayr


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DESIGN Tribe Studio PHOTOGRAPHY Katherine Lu


Rethink: a New Perspective Four Australian architects and designers each pursue an existing home’s renewed potential through adaptive reuse and mindful reinvention.

WORDS Sophie Lewis PHOTOGRAPHY Katherine Lu, Rory Gardiner, Shannon McGrath, Ross Honeysett


DESIGN Tribe Studio BUILD Ballast Construction PHOTOGRAPHY Katherine Lu


ISSUE #38 / SPECIAL FEATURE

A Subtle Statement

Tribe Studio

Tribe Studio reshaped the identity of a single-storey 1940s Sydney home for a family of four into a far from ordinary suburban home. The Tribe Studio team focused on a courtyard-style addition to frame the garden, so the living spaces can spill from indoors to out. An antidote to poorly sewn box-like additions, Tribe Studio principal Hannah Tribe says they took the best parts from the existing home’s strong bones and put them in a modern context. “The clients were keen to preserve the character of the building while enlarging it, but not keen to simply graft a modern extension out the back,” Hannah says. This was a subtle undertaking, so from the street, the new addition is part of the layered gable terracotta-tile roof lines. The stepped roofline becomes faceted ceiling layers inside, highlighted by the void in the kitchen and dining space. Subtlety strikes again in the extension’s honest material palette, where recycled tuck-pointed bricks and walnut joinery call on the honest interwar palette.

01.


NORTH FLOOR LAMP VIBIA

“This project gave us the opportunity to add volume, with subtlety, while retaining heritage character. Repeating the tiled roof gable and stepping it up in layers allowed us to include a new first floor under it, without visually altering the roof logic.” – Tribe Studio principal Hannah Tribe

W40 FRENCH DOORS METRO STEEL WINDOWS

SIENNA (ETERNO) TONGUE N GROOVE

SPANISH CHAIR FREDERICIA

SAN SELMO RECLAIMED AUSTRAL BRICKS


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

Gold Standard Studio Bright

Without a heritage overlay, this post-war clinker brick home could have been demolished to start anew. But Studio Bright director Melissa Bright says homes that are well-loved are likely to have a longevity to them, so took to lovingly restoring this family home. A new black brick volume easily attaches itself to the existing clinker brick home, with a protected curved outdoor terrace adjacent to the internal living spaces. One of the central elements to the project was the concrete roof with ‘Scarpa-esque’ openings, where plants tumble through the voids. “The shadow plays of roof voids reach deep into the interior, where the path towards the most secluded depths is punctuated by the altar-like island bench, which appears glowingly sheathed in precious metal,” Melissa says. The metallic gold and concrete custom kitchen island bench backs onto the original clinker brick wall; an electrifying focal point on a bed of concrete floors and black cabinetry. The deliberately dark new addition is a dramatic chapter in the home’s history, promising a bright future through passive design intervention.

02.


DESIGN Studio Bright BUILD CBD Contracting Group PHOTOGRAPHY Rory Gardiner


“We’ve realised the potential of the site with a deflecting sweep of linked rooms that curl around the south edge and shaded interiors that benefit from an expansive, sunny northerly garden outlook.” – Studio Bright director Melissa Bright

AKARI 15A VITRA

LA PALOMA GAUDI AUSTRAL BRICKS

NEUTRAL TERRAZZO EM-1031 SIGNORINO


Pitch Perfect studiofour 03. studiofour approached a heritage-listed Art Deco home in Melbourne with a readiness to not only improve its functionality but create an immediate link with the landscape. Devising a two-storey addition with a residential scale amphitheatre, the team concentrated on a fluid connection between the new and the old, inside and out. studiofour co-director Sarah Henry says the value of this renovation lies in their ability to repurpose an existing home and sustainably conserve its built fabric. “The design response is an addition that is minimal in materiality and detailing, placing emphasis on the backdrop provided by the gardens beyond,� she says. Double-height interiors with a pervading sense of repose bask in the light and fresh air. Off the communal living area, the outdoor space unfolds under the pitched form to create space for integrated seating and dining in the warmer months beside the pool. Sarah says that while the heritage home’s legacy was retained, its purity and intent were strengthened through an addition that hits all the right notes.


.

DESIGN studiofour PHOTOGRAPHY Shannon McGrath


DOUBLE BOTTLE MATER

CALM WHITE LAMINEX

MINIMAX S SINK MIXER VITRA GLOBAL

“The pitched form of the new addition provides an over-scaled view, to experience the full breadth and height of the mature trees to the rear of the site. The architectural framework beyond the façade of the building provides a tangible element to draw inside, to further blur the boundaries from inside and out.”

BLONDE OAK EMBELTON

– studiofour co–director Annabelle Berryman

ELBA CIELO SIGNORINO

LEATHER APRON NATURAL MALLE W. TROUSSEAU

PORCELAIN SPOON INSTALLATION BY ELLEN COLE & NIELS DATEMA


DESIGN Smart Design Studio PHOTOGRAPHY Ross Honeysett, Katherine Lu


ISSUE #38 / SPECIAL FEATURE

Solid Geometry

Smart Design Studio

Smart Design Studio encouraged a Federation house in Clovelly, Sydney to turn over a new leaf without upsetting its neighbours. The studio found middle ground by going up, undoing a poorlyplanned addition and replacing it with a white geometric silhouette of the existing home, fit for its ocean outlook. Smart Design Studio founder and creative director William Smart says sustainability and durability were a driving force in the cohesive redesign. Their approach was simple: use honest materials made for the harsh seaside location and retain parts of the original home where possible. “The extension’s interiors are minimal and white, but they work with elements of the original building that have been retained,” William says. Working to the challenges of southern orientation has made way for a sunlit, airy kitchen and dining room with a deck overlooking the lower garden and beach; topped by a bedroom and ensuite above that also share unobstructed views.

04.


ISSUE #38 / SPECIAL FEATURE

“The design seeks to integrate and merge the old and new. This approach has created a cohesive outcome where the original fabric from the previous addition and the changes are unified as one. Rethinking original roof pitches and wall proportions has allowed this house to be harmonious with its neighbours.” – Smart Design Studio founder and creative director William Smart


OTTO – DOOR HANDLE 6820 PITTELLA

ATOLLO 235 OLUCE OAK GREY ADMONTER

ALEXANDER GIRARD: A DESIGNER’S UNIVERSE KRIES MATEO

NEUTRAL TERRAZZO EM-124-04 SIGNORINO


Project Bondi Bombora by Luigi Rosselli Architects with interiors by Alwill Interiors Design Architect Luigi Rosselli Project Architects Diana Yang & Sean Johnson Interior Design Alwill Interiors Pty Ltd Photography Prue Ruscoe Builder Building With Options Pty Ltd


ISSUE #38 / REGUL AR F EATURE

Library

DAVID BOWIE IS GEOFFREY MARSH & VICTORIA BROACKES

DAVID SCHEINBAUM: HIP HOP, PORTRAITS OF AN URBAN HYMN MICHAEL DYSON

BILL OWENS: ALTAMONT 1969 HARDCOVER BILL OWENS

PATTI SMITH 1969-1976 JUDY LINN

FACE IT DEBBIE HARRY

ALL THE SONGS PHILIPPE MARGOTIN, JEANMICHEL GUESDON, SCOT T FREIMAN & PAT TI SMITH

THE ROCK ‘N’ ROLL PHOTOGRAPHY OF KEN REGAN KEITH RICHARDS

BRUCE W. TALAMON. SOUL. R&B. FUNK. PHOTOGRAPHS 1972–1982 PEARL CLEAGE

THE JAZZ IMAGE: MASTERS OF JAZZ PHOTOGRAPHY LEE TANNER

Artists that evolved music forever.


Architect Cera Stribley Project Glyndebourne Photography Emily Bartlett


Signature Style with Cera Stribley and Metro Steel Windows

Cera Stribley managing principal Chris Stribley relies on steel windows as a design solution in a number of different projects. For Chris, steel frame windows can maximise the amount of glazing, with smaller frames than standard residential or commercial suits. The architect often leans on steel frame windows when undertaking a heritage renovation or extension onto an existing home. “Steel windows integrate an intervention coherently, while maintaining a clean contemporary look,” Chris says. “The detail of steel windows surpasses those achievable with aluminium or timber.” Chris introduced Metro Steel Windows in their original Glyndebourne building project for their fine profile, fitting with the interiors and existing fenestrations, and to let the maximum amount of light in.

metrosteelwindows.com.au +613 9354 1582


T U C K E D AWAY Neatly assembled in its modest Fitzroy milieu, Eastop Architects’ Rose Street is an exploration of scale and light.


ISSUE #38 / FEATURED HOMES

ARCHITECTURE Eastop Architects BUILD Prolifica Building LANDSCAPE Jamie McHutchinson PHOTOGRAPHY Willem-Dirk du Toit WORDS Bronwyn Marshall


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ithin its challenging setting, Rose Street emerges as an artfully crafted interplay of measured volumes and their engagement with natural light. The familiar story, like many neighbouring homes, sees the conversion of a heritage workers cottage framework into a liveable and emotionally evocative home. The ability to open up and connect the home to reflect contemporary living was key. It was originally designed and built with flanking adjoining walls, unfolding as a dark and narrow series of formal spaces. Injecting a sense of tangible quality became the grounding foundation from which all other elements unfold.

Two restored vintage leather Togo Fireside Chairs by Ligne Roset from Radar Furniture and an Austere floor lamp by Hans Verstuyft for Trizo21 enjoy the abundance of natural light on cooling concrete floors. The original exposed brick offers warmth, letting the house feel directly connected to its past. Artwork by Daine Singer.


Deconstructing the traditional home and exploring an alternate approach to living, heightened detailing and unexpected simplicity brings true weight to the outcome. Select materiality speaks to the desired spatial experience, where finishes are chosen to reflect an effecting response. Brick connects to the past and offers warmth through colour and composition, while the balance of frameless glazed elements lightens the transition between old and new, inside and out. Dark, muted timber leads from the entrance through to the kitchen island bench that creates a refined touchpoint in aged brass, designed to patina over time. Cooling terrazzo floors used in various formation create a sinuous flow throughout, while offering a reflective soundboard for incoming light. Integral to the conjured internal drama, slithers are carved away from vertical and horizontal planes to deliberately draw the outside inward, creating moments of contrast; emphasising shadows and light while defining spaces and reflecting their functions. The same can be said for a large skylight that creates an aperture for light to fall into the communal kitchen and dining space, as well as separating the old from the new. Through a measured approach, Rose Street is embedded in emotive cues. Eastop Architects have created a unique relationship with light, volume and materiality to generate a distinctive and contemporary home, one that challenges the typical and becomes a point of inspiration.

The kitchen features a curved island made from solid walnut that also converts to a dining table alongside a Brodware Yokato Organic Brass mixer and Miele cooktop.


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Where Architects Live:

Madeleine Blanchfield Home to Australian architect Madeleine Blanchfield and family, the affectionately named ‘Tree House’ rethinks the way a typical home is composed.

DESIGN Madeleine Blanchfield Architects PHOTOGRAPHY Anson Smart WORDS Melia Rayner


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hen Sydney architect Madeleine Blanchfield and her husband Guy decided to design their home on a challenging block in Bronte, it became an opportunity to showcase the influence of design on family life. And the results are nothing short of extraordinary. Known for a refined, elegant and modern design aesthetic, it’s no surprise that Madeleine’s own home exudes the same quiet sophistication. Affectionately named the ‘Tree House’ for the way it is immersed in its surrounding greenery, the design tactfully blurs the lines between interior and exterior, private and public spaces, resulting in a home that is a thoughtful backdrop to shared family living. The house also cleverly subverts expectations of a modern home’s composition. Living is on the top floor with flexible rooms for dining and lounging together offset by the beauty of the treetop outlook. A sculptural circular staircase leads to the bedrooms on the ground floor, where a hallway was shifted to make the most of the private spaces, particularly the parent’s retreat.

“We had the dining table made in Italy and eight men carried it up the stairs in pieces,” Madeleine says. “It weighs almost a tonne and its simplicity and monolithic nature are beautiful”. – Madeleine Blanchfield

The living room features the JohnJohn Sofa by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poltrona Frau and Circular Stools by BassamFellows. Madeleine paired the Era dining chairs by David Lopez Quincoces for Living Divani with her favourite piece, the custom marble dining table.


ISSUE #38 / REGUL AR F EATURE

“My personal architectural aesthetic is pared back and refined; this sensibility is visible in our house.” – Madeleine Blanchfield


Doubling as both a living and study area, this space features the &Tradition Little Petra Armchair by Viggo Boesen and Organic coffee table designed by Madeleine Blanchfield Architects. The Planet wall lamp by Mette Schelde for Please Wait To Be Seated and artwork by Tamara Dean join this esteemed crowd.


Having lived in the area for a decade before building their home, Madeleine knew how to integrate its natural characteristics into the design. “The kitchen and dining space is where all the action happens and is the most fun and active,” Madeleine says. “It has a view over the gully so there is always something to look at, adding to its energetic nature”. Conversely, the ‘quiet’ living room features a high ceiling and generous proportions to create a sense of calm; the blank wall, central fireplace and sweeping glass doors that open to the garden outside make it a space for talking, reading and resting. Another hallmark of Madeleine’s design aesthetic, the use of natural light, is prolific through the home. The architecture wraps the slope to allow light into the home with a glass void between the top eave and wall. Sliding glass panels are used to divide rooms, complementing the home’s warm colour palette while softening the distinction between spaces. The calm, uplifting quality of the home is further established in the finishes and furniture, many of which were designed by Madeleine. Warm tan leather is a recurring texture of the home from the sofa in the living room to the bedhead in the master bedroom, while marble is used in both the kitchen and dining space as well as in the standout custom ensuite, with all joinery finished to Madeleine’s custom designs.

The light and bright study space features the SB 101 chair by Susanna Bianchini for Henry Timi and ebony desk custom designed by Madeleine Blanchfield Architects, topped with the Atollo 233 lamp by Vico Magistretti for OLUCE.


ISSUE #38 / REGUL AR F EATURE

The Multi-lite pendant by Louis Weisdorf for GUBI hangs above the bath.


Reflecting both its surroundings and the expertise of its designers, this is a home designed to age gracefully alongside its inhabitants. From making pasta together on the concrete island bench to walks to nearby Bronte beach, it’s a home that celebrates the joys of modern family life and the role architecture plays in shaping it.

The parent’s retreat looks out onto its own private balcony garden and trees beyond, featuring the Eames Plywood LCW Chair.


The bedroom features a custom leather bedhead, Roy Tavolo bedside lamp by Mario Nanni for Viabizzuno and natural Ferm Living Insert bedside table.


“It takes a lot of work to achieve an elegant and calm design. The care goes into crafting spaces that feel good, rather than applying finishes or details that grab your attention.” – Madeleine Blanchfield


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MULTI LITE PENDANT GUBI

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MARSEILLE JE T’AIME JACQUEMUS


The Forrest collection responds to a distinctive Australian style. Crafted from a premium grade of plantation teak, Forrest rejoices in a natural, timeless quality. The form is curvaceous and inviting, and speaks to the expert hand of its maker. Woven details are refined and delicate, but incredibly strong - providing a functional support for the back of the dining chair. Designed by Justin Hutchinson for Kett.


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ISSUE #38 / SPECIAL FEATURE

Resilient Architecture

T

he word ‘resilient’ has such a broad interpretation. For some architects, this word suggests permanence, a sense of longevity that removes a design from the latest fad or fashion. Others refer to the materials used, plantation-grown sustainable timbers or using materials that respond to the local climate.

The devastating bushfires Australia has experienced, both in 2009 with ‘Black Saturday’ and more recently, over last summer across the continent, certainly make you pause and think about resilient architecture. The onset of COVID-19 has also made architects more conscious of factoring in working more from home. “It’s important to look at creating homes that last, rather than seeing temporary solutions,” says architect Albert Mo, director of Architects EAT.

PHOTOGRAPHY Derek Swalwell, Yaseera Moosa, Dave Kulesza WORDS Stephen Crafti


Architects EAT Architects EAT was one of hundreds of architects who registered with Architects Assist to give up their time to design houses for those who lost homes in the 2009 Victorian bushfires. Although Albert didn’t see one of his designs implemented in this venture, organised by the Australian Institute of Architects (Victorian Chapter), his practice has built a number of resilient homes that will continue to be enjoyed for decades to come. A concrete house in the Melbourne suburb of Kew, for example, is about as solid and monumental as one could hope for. “Concrete has been used for thousands of years, just look at the Pantheon,” Albert says, who was as mindful of the home’s thermal properties as much as its permanence and longevity. In winter, the concrete floors and walls function as a heat bank, absorbing the winter sunlight. And in summer, the home’s voids purge the hot air via the operable highlight windows. With COVID-19, Albert has noticed clients wanting not only two separate home offices, but in some cases, three, allowing the family the option of working from home going forward. “Resilient architecture needs to address issues such as COVID-19, not just in the short term, but well into the future. Spaces also have to be flexible if they’re going to relevant going forward,” he adds.

Project Kew Residence Photography Derek Swalwell


Project Long House Location Gardiners Creek, Blackburn, Victoria Photography Tess Kelly


Project Long House Location Gardiners Creek, Blackburn, Victoria Photography Tess Kelly

Clare Cousins Architects Architect Clare Cousins was also part of the Architects Assist program, responding to people who had lost their homes during the 2009 Victorian bushfires. Then, still a relatively new practice (established four years prior), Cousins put forward free concepts to those in need, with a relatively modest price tag attached should the owner/s wish to take it further and build. Referred to as the ‘Hinge House’, Cousins’ scheme centred on an elongated floor plan with a crank at the core that could be adjusted to respond to the site, the orientation, and/ or the topography. “Our design was essentially a series of modules as the family expanded,” Clare says, whose scheme was for a COLORBOND house, but was eventually adapted to be brick at the client’s request.

Project Christmas Hills House Photography Shannon McGrath

When the original design for Architects Assist was picked up by clients in the Yarra Valley, Cousins also offered to document the plans for the subsequent builder to achieve. “The recent bushfires make you even more acutely aware of designing resilient architecture. In the case of fire, there should be fire shutters on windows, integrated external watering systems and looking closely at the structural system, preventing fire from entering under a house,” Clare says.


FMD Architects FMD Architects director Fiona Dunin was also mindful of the bushfire zone for a new house along Victoria’s Great Ocean Road. The three-level house, including basement carparking, is clad in spotted gum and cement sheets, with the cement applied with a specific paint to prevent damage from the harsh salty condition. “I also wanted to make sure the house felt anchored to the elevated site,” Fiona says, who also used non-corrosive screws. The interior features a double-height stone wall, along with concrete floors, that act as a heat sink during the winter months. “I wanted the house to feel comfortable all year round,” Fiona says, who included protected outdoor terraces. Working with landscape architects Hansen Partnership, FMD Architects framed the house with appropriate native vegetation that would be resilient to the coastal environment.

Project Fairhaven Photography Derek Swalwell


“When you speak of resilient architecture, it’s about responding to the site and the unique climate. Materials have to last the distance.” – Fiona Dunin

Project Fairhaven Photography FraserMarsden


Project Peppertree Villa Design Luigi Rosselli Architects with interiors by Alwill Interiors Design Architect Luigi Rosselli Project Architect Jane McNeill Interior Design Alwill Interiors Pty Ltd Photography Prue Ruscoe Builder KCJ Constructions Pty Ltd


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ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

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Design Astep Photography © Heidi Lerkenfeldt Styling Pernille Vest Product Model 2109 by Gino Sarfatti


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Product Vervloet Lever Handle - Divergence Project HH 47 Design JUMA architects Photography © Annick Vernimmen


ISSUE #38 / Evolve

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Project The Alexandra Penthouse Design DITA Studio Photography © Timothy Kaye Flooring Tongue n Groove Oslo Herringbone Parquetry


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THE DETAIL

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ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

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Project Avian Apartment Design Alicia Holgar Styling Studio CD Photography © Shannon McGrath


ISSUE #38 / EVOLVE

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Project Armadillo Sydney Showroom Design Studio Goss Photography © Rory Gardiner


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est Magazine Issue #38 | Evolve  

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