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ISSUE 56

FREE MONTHLY FRIDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2019

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDIT: LUCY VINCENT @LOVECHILDS_


As Esperance locals, we’re passionate about our pristine coastline. The proposed exploration and drilling for oil in the Great Australian Bight by Norwegian company Equinox puts us at risk of oil spills and threatens the unique environment of the entire coastline. Join in on saying NO to any drilling and exploration in the Bight by coming down the Whale Tail on Saturday, November 23 from 8am. Bring along your surfboard, kayak, SUP, or inflatable flamingo. Bring your signs and banners, and a camera to put some pics on social media. Sign the petitions, and get involved. (Getting wet is optional but highly recommended! You can show your support from the land as well).

T IDE TASTES

18

Fervor Pop-Up Dining Experience

4

The Swan Effect Yoga Studio

8

Esperance’s Best Walk & Hike Trails

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The Tide is flying high and out this month and will be away for most of November for a much needed holiday. We will be contactable via email, but due to time differences, replies may be delayed. Tide & Co at the Museum Village will still be open, and fully stocked with secondhand clothing and accessories to fill your summer wardrobe. Until next month...

C a n yo u h e l p f in d S a m m y t h e s eal? He's hiding on one of our pages.

UP N EXT

T IDE GUIDE

4 - DAY W E AT H E R F O R E C A S T FRIDAY 1

SATURDAY 2

9

MAX

19

MIN

10

MAX

18

MONDAY 4

Sunday Session weather.

Outdoor shower.

Thunderstruck. MIN

SUNDAY 3

MIN

10

MAX

20

Ideal morning swim. MIN

9

MAX

24

W E ATH E R F O R E C AS T BR OUGHT TO YOU BY ELPHA

P U B LI SHER

A D V ER T ISIN G EN Q U IRIES

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

ES PERANCETIDE . CO M

Esperance Tide

hello@esperancetide.com

Bronte Vincent

/esperancetide

ABN 46 838 497 722

Shop 7, Museum Village

bronte@esperancetide.com

@esperancetide

CO N TR I BU TO R S

Karli Florisson

Kyron Smithson

Elaine Siemer

Sarah Hinton

Lucy Vincent

Antoinette Vincent


tagged in town FOLLOW @ESPERANCETIDE ON INSTAGRAM & HASHTAG #ESPERANCETIDE TO BE FEATURED

@ O FFT HEMO O RIN G

@ C O XY _ T HEW IL DT HIN G

The stoke is real!

Southern Ocean in the Spring time. Amazing colours.

Getting rock hard thinking about summertime adventures

@ OU TOF TH EBLU E .A U

@ NATASHA.L IL L EY

@ L IVY Y _ SMAL L Z

Esperance

Glorious

Kioo Jewellery coming soon!

TAG G E D I N TOWN I S S U P P O R T E D B Y

Gentle Dentistry with Your Comfort in Mind 8 Dempster St, Esperance 9071 5888

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@ L OC K Y . W ILS O N


UP NEXT

The Swan Effect Yoga Studio WALK-IN, FLOAT OUT

We spoke to founder Anna Swan to find out how the TSE experience came about. When was your v e r y f i r s t i n t ro d u c t i o n t o yo g a ? When I was 17, I would go to my Grandma’s yoga classes, sometimes once a month, sometimes weekly - it wasn’t very regular. I always felt amazing from it and by the time I was 22, it was 5-7 times a week.

Sta rting a new b u sine ss c a n b e v e r y da u nting . W ha t a re so me o f the thing s yo u ha v e disc ov e re d a lo ng the wa y? Do yo u ha v e a ny a dv ic e to g iv e tho se ju st sta r ting o u t?

I love the lifestyle in Esperance, especially the amazing coastline. I’ve always wanted to open a studio and had started to plan out opening a wellness centre in Perth. This year especially I wanted to move back home, yet still do something I love. I realised there was potential to open a studio down here and provide a lot of fun wellness events and mentoring, that is offered in Perth.

I’ve realised that you can’t wait for everyone to give your idea a tick of approval, or you’ll never do it. However, it’s important to get feedback and support from a select group so you can continue to improve the business. Basically, don’t listen to everyone’s opinions or it’ll become really tough making decisions. Get really clear on your vision and back yourself in 110%. There’ll be days where you doubt yourself and are unsure, but if you have chosen something you’re passionate about then you’ll create a life that lights you up.

Yo u pre v ious ly s t udi e d s p o r t s s c i e n c e a n d h i gh scho o l te aching at u n i v e r s i t y . D i d t h i s h e l p g uide yo u o n your j our ne y t o b e c o m i n g a yo g a te a c he r ?

W ha t is the mo st rewa rding p a rt o f b e ing a yo g a te a c he r , a s we l l a s b e c o ming a sma l l b u sine ss o wne r ?

Answer: It’s funny how skills I’ve picked up in previous courses and jobs have all intertwined together, in a way I never could have imagined, to help shape The Swan Effect. Teaching at a high school and at the Australian Institute of Fitness confirmed that I loved teaching and helping people. Yoga was a way to do this on a more personal level mentally, physically, spiritually and emotionally.

Being able to help others during a yoga class in a way that can help them throughout their day. Whether it’s breathing techniques, mindset, gaining clarity or accepting where you’re at, on any given day. It is so much fun being able to create, make decisions and plan events in a way that is authentic to myself and TSE, without having to ask anyone for permission.  ⟶

Wha t we re s om e of t h e d r i v i n g fa c t o r s f o r lea vin g Pe r t h and co m i n g b a c k t o yo u r h o m e to wn o f Esp e rance t o s t ar t T S E ?

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Esperance’s newest yoga studio, The Swan Effect, has opened and is well underway. With wooden look flooring, soft linen curtains, white walls and dim lighting, The Swan Effect is as aesthetically pleasing as they come, a stunning place to practice your downward dog. There are loads of classes on offer, from Asana Beats to Asana Sweat, Vinyasa classes that cater to all skill levels as well as classes aimed to rejuvenate and restore. Each session is complemented with a soothing cup of herbal tea and a chit-chat with fellow yogis. If you’re looking for something to do on a Friday night that’s a little more low key but also includes leaving the house, you must check out Tonic Fridays. A Friday night yoga session followed by nibbles and a tonic of Anna’s choosing such as alcohol-free gin or local honey wine - just an example of what we are yet to see at The Swan Effect.


U P N E X T : T H E S WA N EFFECT Y OGA S TU DI O

Afte r a tte nding a ha ndfu l o f yo u r c la sses , I mu st sa y the who le e xp e rie nc e fro m start to finish is v e ry a p p e a ling a nd e xtre me ly rewa rding . W ha t a re so me o f yo u r fa vo urite mo me nts in the stu dio ? Seeing the looks on everyone’s faces when we finish a class, whether they look more relaxed, energised or happier, it is so rewarding being able to serve others. I would definitely have to say having cups of tea with the TSE fam after class. We’re growing such a fun and supportive community at the studio. Community was at the forefront of my vision, having the studio as a space to connect with like-minded people. I c a n ima g ine the re a re a few new yo g is out the re . Do yo u ha v e a ny a dv ic e fo r so meone who se ju st sta rting o u t?

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Don’t worry about looking like you know what to do. Everyone’s so focussed on their own practice that they’re not looking at you. As long as it feels good for your body, then you’re doing it right. W ha t is re a l ly e xc iting yo u rig ht no w in your wo r k a nd in yo u r v isio n fo r T he Swa n Effect? Seeing the studio come to life and our beautiful TSE fam walking in the door every day. It’s been a dream of mine for so long that it’s such a surreal feeling. Having so many teenage girls join us for mentoring has been amazing. There are so many things I could say right now but also starting to create a dream team of teachers and mentors to support our community is really exciting. L a stly, if yo u we re a yo g a p o se , whic h pos e wo u ld yo u b e ? A headstand - life stays exciting when you look at it from a different perspective! PHOTOGRAPHY CREDIT: LUCY VINCENT @LOVECHILDS_

Locally made hair scrunchies by Phoenix Copeland

Available at Tide & Co, Bob and Jim’s General Store, Naturally Esperance and at the Museum Village Markets

Giveaway Enter VIA WEBSITE BELOW And receive 20% off (up To The value of $500) at SportSPower Esperance

saltyfitpersonaltraining.com.au ENTER TO WIN: (Terms & Conditions Apply) 1x 60-minute Personal Training Session with Salty Fit 3x Bootcamp Sessions with Salty Fit 3x Yoga Class Pass to The Swan Effect Yoga Studio 1x Class/Gym Pass to TNT Fitness Gym 1x Salty Fit Singlet 1x Fruit & Veg Box from Bob & Jim’s General Store 1x Full Body Massage & Deluxe Pedicure at Az’ure 1x Bag of Blossom Retreat Tea from Cloud 11 Coffee + Tea

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SURF REPORT Surf jagon Surf jargon has an interesting history, and every surfer would know several terms and probably have made up some themselves. Like a deepfried potato fritter after a surf, surfing slang can burn the tongue. The term ‘lago’ stands for ‘late afternoon glass off’ which means the wind drops out and the ocean takes on a glassy appearance a rare bird in Esperance surfing as once a sea breeze hits it usually stays onshore till the following day. A lesser-known term for a glass off is ‘Julio’ (pronounced Hoolio) as in Julio Iglesias the opera singer as in Hoolio en glass off.

‘Kook’ is usually someone who thinks they can surf or someone trying to surf but can’t, and the world is full of kooks. The term ‘kooked’ or ‘kooking’ is also used to express one’s effort when not at one’s best. ‘Leggie’ is the leg rope or ankle strap used as a board saver. These first came on the scene in the mid-seventies but weren’t allowed in competitive surfing initially it was considered that good surfers should be able to not loose their boards and be excellent paddler/swimmers to get to there board and back to the ‘lineup’.

‘Frothing’ or ‘froffing’ is like a starving dog about to get a meal. All surfers know that feeling of impending waves and the energy it creates. Grommets tend to froth a lot. ‘Man in the grey suit’ is Aussie surfing slang for seeing a shark. ‘Out the back’ is a cry for surfable waves approaching sometimes accompanied by ‘Everyones a winner’. ‘Drop-in’, ‘fade’ ‘paddling inside’ are terms to discribe what shouldn’t be done in the surf. ‘Layback’, ‘re-entry’, ‘cutback’, ‘floater’, ‘backdoor’, (side door doggie door) and ‘tube’ (the list goes on and on) are terms of manoeuvres and situations whilst surfing a wave. Slang from surfing transcends generations and bridges the gap between old and new socially. It’s not as black and white as it sounds in a home and away episode either but something they help us relate. Finally, the term ‘paddle out ‘is a sombre gathering of surfers to remember and celebrate the life of a fellow surfer lost. It also serves to peacefully show the world that a clean ocean is the lifeblood of a surfer and that human activity that threatens this sanctity is opposed (eg. Fight For The Bight). LEON

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A ‘grommet’ is a young kid that loves riding the waves. Australia has a great surfing culture, especially among kids. Grommets traditionally were made to earn their stripes in the ‘lineup’. The pecking order that develops amongst small knit surf communities. Unfortunately, the sharp rise in surfer numbers has killed off this once sacred ritual of the lineup.

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDIT: LUCY VINCENT @LOVECHILDS_


TIDE GUIDE

Esperance’s Best Walk & Hike Trails You Must Try This Summer WORDS BY KARLI FLORISSON

E SP E RA N C E H AS A N A B U N D A N C E O F FA N TAS TI C WA LKI NG TRAI LS . FOR TH OS E WH O ARE KEEN T O C H E C K OU T S O M E N E W S C E N E R Y , TA KE I N WORLD- CLA S S V I EWS , A ND GET S OM E GOOD EXERCI SE AT TH E S A ME T IM E , Y O U C A N ' T B E AT A WA LKI NG TRAI L. H ERE' S TH E TI DE' S PI CK OF TH E BES T TRA I LS TO C H E C K O U T , S O G E T Y O U R W ALKI NG S NEA KERS READY .


PHOTOGRAPHY CREDIT: @WANDERING_GUMNUTS

Helm's Arboretum

Esperance's Rotary Club established the Rotary walk over Dempster Head, leaving from the Rotary Lookout. This relatively gentle walking trail has spectacular views of the town and the bay, as well as a panorama from the top of the hill that cannot be beaten. For a more advanced walk, you can take the trail down to Lover's Cove, a steep but short hike that includes sections that can be slippery. Good shoes are advisable, but you'll be rewarded with a spectacular little beach that is only accessible by hikers or by boat.

While this is not a dedicated walk trail, Helm's Arboretum is a perfect spot for a stroll among the trees. With long gravel roads that extend between the stands of native trees, you can make your walk as long or as short as you choose. There are plenty of rest spots or picnicking spots among the trees, and plenty of wildflowers and birdlife to spot. Just be aware of cars, as the gravel roads throughout the arboretum are also used by vehicles.

Monjingup Lake Walk Trail Just 10 km's out of town, on Telegraph Road, Lake Monjingup is a beautiful sanctuary filled with birdlife and great walking trails. While the original boardwalks were destroyed in a fire, they have been recently rebuilt. There is an easy 1.2km walk trail that offers views of the bushland and of the lake, as well as plenty of wildflowers, birds, and other wildlife. Check out the bird hide if you want to spot birds on the lake. Very quiet and observant watchers may also spot kangaroos, emus, honey possums, and plenty of lizards and frogs.

Woody Lakes Nature Reserve The Woody Lakes Nature Reserve is also known as Kepwari, the local Aboriginal word for 'place of moving water'. The 7 km trail around the reserve has signs that provide information about the wetlands, and their significance. There are wooden boardwalks, as well as plenty of seating along the way, and two bird hides that you can use to check out the abundant bird life in the area. You can access the trail from either end, with entrances off Lake Road and Windabout Way, both just off Fisheries Road on the outskirts of town.  â&#x;ś

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Dempster Head Walking Trails


T ID E G U ID E : E S P E R ANCE’S BES T WALK & H I KE TRA I LS

Cape Le Grand Trails

Peak Charles

Cape Le Grand National Park is home to some of the most picturesque walk trails in the area. As most locals know, the hike up Frenchman Peak is not to be missed. While the walk is steep, climbers are rewarded at the top with panoramic views of the Cape Le Grand park. The Cape Le Grand coastal walk is also spectacular, with breathtaking views of the beaches from multiple vantage points. The entire coastal walk covers 17km's, from Rossiter Bay to Cape Le Grand Beach, with several challenging sections of trail. Walkers can do smaller parts of the trail, with access points at Rossiter Bay, Lucky Bay, Thistle Cove, Hellfire Bay and Cape le Grand beach. Check the signage in the area for walk distances for each section.

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Peak Charles For a more advanced walk, Peak Charles is a great challenge for hikers. The Peak Charles National Park is 174 km North-West of Esperance, off the Norseman Road. The hike to the summit of Peak Charles is 3.4 km, and is a fairly challenging walk, with some steep sections. The view from the top is worth the climb!

Great Ocean Trail No discussion of Esperance's walk trails would be complete without a mention of the Great Ocean Trail. Starting at West Beach, this 17km trail goes along the spectacular coastline to Twilight Beach. At Twilight Beach, the trail turns inland and goes through the native bushland to the Pink Lake Lookout. From here you can follow the path back into town. You can join the trail at any point, so choose a section to take rather than doing the whole trail. The views are unparalleled, and the trail is mostly bitumen. Watch out for cyclists, who share this path.

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDIT: @BLAZIA

DO N ’T FO RGET Always let someone know where you are going when you head off on one of these walk trails. Many of these trails will have patchy mobile coverage or none at all. Don’t forget a water bottle, hat, and sturdy shoes. As there is dieback in the Esperance area, it is advisable to stay on the trail so that you don’t spread dieback and clean your shoes in between walks. And don’t forget your camera – the views are amazing – and tag #EsperanceTide in your pics!


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A CRO S S

DOWN

1. Location for this year’s Edge of The Bay Festival

2. Florissons’ founder

7. Balmy Nights headliner

3. Beach at Dempster Head

8. Local Environmental Action Forum of Esperance

4. Challenging climb 174km north-west of Esperance

11. One of Shire Council’s newest councillor for town ward

5. The right surf break at West Beach

12. Cannery Art Centre’s upcoming workshop series

9. The Swan Effect’s Friday night class

6. Knots & Weaves Co. specialises in... 10. Pop-up dining experience

Open Weekdays 8:30am - 5pm & Thursdays until 6pm NEW PATIENTS & V ISITORS W E LCO M E S I N C E 201 5 Dr Graham Jacobs (GP) • Sharon Southall (Psychologist) Welcome back Dr Fawaz Tarawneh (Locum GP, Nov-Dec 2019)


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G ET TO KNOW

Local Environmental Action Forum of Esperance WORDS BY KARLI FLORISSON

ON E OF E S P E R A N C E ’ S M O S T D IL IG E N T COM M U NI TY ORGA NI S ATI ONS TU RNS 30 TH I S Y EA R. LE A F H A S BE E N Q U IE T LY W O R KI N G B E H I ND TH E S CENES S I NCE 19 8 9 . WI TH OU T TH E ACTI V I TI ES OF TH I S P A S S IO N AT E A N D C O M M IT T E D GROU P OF LOCA LS , ES PERANCE WOU LD BE A V ERY D I F F E RE N T P L A C E . A N D IT A L L S TA R T E D WI TH A M U LBERRY TREE. The iconic mulberry tree in question was located in the Museum Village, behind the Tourist Bureau, and was planted by the town’s pioneers. After a complaint about children with sticky mulberry hands coming into shops, the hundred-year-old tree was cut down, much to the outrage of some of the Esperance community. An advertisement was placed in the newspaper calling for locals who wanted to create a ‘voice for the environment’. At that meeting, the Local Environmental Action Forum, or LEAF, was born. LEAF sprang into action right away, putting in a submission to the Shire that would keep development 1km away from Lake Warden, to create a sanctuary for bird and animal life. LEAF also undertook tree planting projects and took part in a demonstration that saw wild duck shooting banned in WA.

In 1991, LEAF was prepared for action when the Sanko Harvest hit a reef off the coast of Esperance, and sank, leaking hundreds of tonnes of oil and fertiliser into the sea. Under the coordination of Ron Taylor, who was president of LEAF at the time, 200 volunteers were gathered and deployed to help clean up on the islands. They built pens on the islands to hold seal pups that were then scrubbed clean from the oil that covered them. Volunteers also helped to clean oiled sea birds and shovelled tonnes of oiled sand off the beaches. The Sanko Harvest insurance company gave LEAF a substantial donation in recognition of the enormous contribution LEAF made to the cleanup efforts.


GET TO KNOW

Another issue that LEAF became involved with was the proposal that tuna farms be established off the coast of Esperance. After some research, LEAF opposed the plan due to the risk of Esperance’s fish populations being affected by the farmed fish. There were also risks that the farmed areas would become ‘dead zones’ as the heavy contamination from the high concentration of fish in one area killed off the life on the sea bed,

and the risks of more sharks being attracted to the area. The tuna farm proposal did not go ahead. Despite this, Esperance’s stocks of pilchards suffered a mass die-off in the late 90s, from a virus that was thought to be introduced into the wild pilchard populations through tuna farms in South Australia. Later, in 2004, MG Kailis attempted to bring tuna farms to Esperance, but again, LEAF and other community groups opposed the proposal, and it did not go ahead. The causes that LEAF have been involved in are numerous and wideranging. Some of these projects include testing birds for lead during the lead contamination issues of 2007 and helping with the lead cleanup. LEAF was also involved with killing the invasive species boxthorn on Woody Island and building an observation platform on the island to observe the muttonbirds. LEAF worked for many years on the Lake Monjingup Park project. They have also put in significant work to monitor and protect the Leafy Seadragons of the Esperance area, and have carried out countless tree planting activities, building beach access stairs and boardwalks, erosion control, and protection of wild areas around our region. The work LEAF has carried out to protect

and enhance the Esperance environment is simply astounding, and it is no exaggeration to state that Esperance would be a different place without the efforts of this humble community organisation. LEAF is continuing to work to protect Esperance’s unique environment. As a founding member of LEAF Wendy Stewart stated, ‘As individuals and collectively, one cannot do enough to protect our precious environment. Now more than ever, we need to step up and defend it.’ Currently, LEAF has an alliance with Fight for the Bight, and is fighting the proposed drilling for oil in the Great Australian Bight, as well as helping with the management of Dempster Head, and raising concerns about the safe use of glyphosate in public spaces. For their 30th anniversary celebration on the November 10, LEAF will be presenting a display at the Museum Village Markets. They will be unveiling a plaque at 12 noon, which will be positioned where the fateful mulberry tree that started the whole movement used to stand. For more information on how you can join or support LEAF, you can contact Chairperson Jan Archer on 0420638851. You can also follow LEAF on Facebook to keep up with any events they are holding.

$1B0reaky wrap

e e f f o C d e c I &

Cut out & bring in this voucher to redeem 21 Norseman Rd • Open Mon - Fri 4am - 2.30pm

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In 1993, LEAF was instrumental in getting recycling programs happening in Esperance. LEAF ran Clean Up Australia Day for a period of time. They also vocally opposed the proposal of a nuclear reactor that would be established in the Goldfields, sending letters to politicians and newspapers about the risks of the plan. Around this same time, there was a proposal that Iron Ore be transported through the Esperance Port. LEAF took part in testing and sampling the area for dust contamination, and objected strongly to the proposition that the iron ore should be stored in the open area of the Esperance Port. As a result of LEAF’s actions and the concerns of other community groups, the shed was built at the Port which now houses the iron ore, protecting the town from iron ore dust.


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THE BRIDGE Grand Casual continues to move forward with steady progression. New tune Stationery is a little different from what you have heard thus far, it’s a super catchy tune and hard to put down once you’ve had your first listen, quite like chocolate in that sense. Recently I spent some time uploading the track to AMRAP, a service that makes original contemporary music available to over 300 broadcast stations Australia wide. I described the tune as such “Stationery is an easy-listening pop-rock track with reggae undertones. Catchy vocal melodies intertwine with intelligent lyrics related to overcoming procrastination in the creative process. The track finishes with a groove and catchy rock outro that leaves listeners feeling refreshed and in the most positive frame of mind”. That sounds about right to me anyway, I could carry on in an attempt to explain what this track is all about though I’m sure you’ll be able to find out for yourself. Stationery is the second single of our upcoming ep, recorded and mixed by Andy Lawson at Debaser Studio in Perth. Matt, Joe and Myself are wrapped with the tune, and we hope it’s an enjoyable one for yall. It is available now on Spotify, and everywhere else you find music. Summer is slowly finding its way to our doorstep, Esperance promising to deliver the goods again with some stunning days by the beach. Stoked to be firing up a few Sunday Sessions at the Esperance Bay Yacht Club. The first falls on Sunday, November 3, with doors opening at 3pm and music from 4pm. Featuring a tremendous local lineup including Michael Smith and Mel Wych’s, Bruce Fitzpatrick, Campbell Garratt and Demi Vandenberghe. If you enjoy a tasty beverage with a stunning ocean view, make sure to head on down.

Grand Casual

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDIT: JONTY SCOBLE

Tickets are selling well to Balmy Nights, our classy event set to be held on Saturday, November 16 at the Cannery Arts Centre. Looking forward to checking out the atmosphere set to be brought to life by local legends Haylee Thornton and Brodie Bratten. Decoration and event aesthetics are far from my strong point, and it’s an absolute pleasure to have Brodie and Haylee on board. With a fantastic lineup featuring Jamilla, Fieldsy, Rachel Vibart, Dr Tasty and Miss Genius and a vast collection of local business involved including Lucky Bay Brewery, Juncture Cart Pop Up Cocktail Bar, Esperance Tide, Love Childs, and Livvy at Rolled with Love this one promises to be stellar. Don’t miss out on tickets, available to purchase from the Cannery website. KYRON SMITHSON

ADULTS

Non-member / Member

SLAB BUILT PLATTERS

TUESDAYS, 2 WKS NOV 5 & 12 - 6-8PM

$130 / $80

SURF PAINTS

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24 - 2-4PM

$100 / $50

PRESERVES

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 - 6-9PM

RESIN HOMEWARES

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14 - 2-4PM

$125 / $75 $160 / $110

KIDS / YOUTH

Creative workshops for curious minds

COILY CHRISTMAS TREES

THURSDAYS, 2 WKS NOV 21 & DEC 12 - 3:30-4:30PM

$45/ $25

PORTRAITS IN CHARCOAL

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26 - 3:30-4:30PM

$35 / $15

ORNAMENTS IN CLAY

THURSDAYS, 2 WKS DEC 5 & 12 - 3:30-4:30PM

$45/ $25

FESTIVE MIXED MEDIA

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10 - 3:30-4:30PM

$35 / $15

Bookings canneryartscentre.com.au p. 9071 3599 m. 0400 399 505 e. admin@canneryartscentre.com.au *Non-member pricing includes an annual membership.


Culture Pops Sunday Sessions at the Esperance Bay Yacht Club is back! Such a stunning venue, you’ve gotta love that rolling lawn, looking out across the bay. The perfect setting to sink a few beverages while listening to quality tunes. A brilliant local lineup features Mel Wych and Michael Smith, Campbell Garratt, Demi Vandenberghe and Bruce Fitzpatrick. Doors open at 3pm.

NOV

Join Martine Perret, the artist behind the Cannery Art Centre’s latest exhibition Ngala Wongga (Come Talk), for an artist talk. Martine’s journey as an artist has seen her work as a freelance photographer, a photojournalist, and a photographer for the United Nations, where she documented scenes in areas of extraordinary conflict, such as South Sudan, East Timor, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Starting at 6.30pm and free entry.

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Head down to the Bijou Theatre for Robin Hood and the Babes in the Wood, a pantomime by UK playwright Ben Crocker. Pantomimes are bright musical comedies featuring dance, slapstick comedy, audience participation and over-the-top villains and heroes. Opening on Friday, November 15th at 7.30pm, plus another seven performances throughout November (see The Bijou Theatre’s website for details). Tickets available online or at the door.

NOV

The Cannery Arts Centre Round Garden lends itself to the creation of stunning vibes and Balmy Nights is the event set to do just that. Balmy Nights is a treat for the senses, an evening to welcome the coming Summer, a celebration of the creativity and drive of a fantastic group of local businesses set to the live sounds of five brilliant West Australian female artists. Tickets are $37.50+BF and available through the Cannery website.

NOV

Car enthusiasts must head down to this year’s EMG Collectors Fair. Displays of restored machinery, engines, blacksmithing, tractors, cars, trucks, motorbikes, a settler’s kitchen, model steam engines, military displays, veteran cars and much more. Grab yourself a bargain at the market stalls and car boot sales. Food and drinks are available to purchase. Gold coin donation entry.

NOV

The Shire of Esperance’s annual Edge Of The Bay Festival is back on again this year at the Esperance Skatepark. Kicking off at noon, there are four music acts set to perform as well as a new grassroots skate, scooter and BMX competition called Shredheads. Lucky Bay Brewing will be serving beverages from mid-afternoon with food and market stalls organised by the Museum Village Markets.

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Learn more about what’s on in Esperance by visiting esperancetide.com/whatson

Museum Village Markets SUNDAY MARKETS

Sunday, Nov 10 & 24 8.30am to 1pm

ESPERANCE MECHANICAL RESTORATION GROUP INC MCLEAN ROAD

Sunday 24th November 2018 9am -2pm

EDGE OF THE BAY MARKETS

Saturday, November 30 2pm to 9pm Contact Annie 0427 942 008 or Amanda 0415 388 420

ENTRY GOLD COIN DONATION

DISPLAYS • COLLECTIONS • STALLS DEVONSHIRE TEA • SAUSAGE SIZZLE

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FI VE M I N U T E S WIT H

Jamilla BY KYRON SMITHSON

I saw Jamilla perform for the first time at Wamfest 2018 on the Yagan Square stage. It was a warm November day with Grand Casual kicking things off around noon to a small crowd brave enough to stand solitary in the hot sun. Following our set, we began to sink a few tins, then a few more and a few more after that. Around six o'clock in the evening, I had a fair buzz on. Act after act, there was a relatively typical indie rock and roll style order to the day. That was until Jamilla took the stage. Through a haze of barley, hops and heat, I found my attention drawn back to the sound. Jamilla performed close to sunset, I was taken by her poise as much as anything else, performing solo following a procession of bands is no easy task. You couldn't help but be drawn in by her presence. The big open-stage setting melted away, and I felt I was standing within the most intimate of atmospheres, entirely engaged. JAM ILLA ' S P E RFORMAN C E W A S B R IL L IA N T , RNB I NS P I RE D B E ATS W I N D I N G S T E A D ILY O N AS J AMI LLA ' S W A RM V O C A L T O N E F IL L E D THE BALMY N I G H T. By now I have no doubt you have heard of November's event Balmy Nights to be held in the Cannery Arts Centre Round Garden. For those of you who already have a ticket or intend to buy one, you will have the pleasure of hearing Jamilla first hand. Jamilla is based out of Perth and produces her own RnB beats, blended with chillwave synths and haunting vocals to create an entirely captivating sound. On asking Jamilla a few questions, it did not surprise me in the least that Jamilla described her music as empowering and soulful. Certainly, my lasting impression following her live performance. I'm sitting here considering whether I should try to paraphrase her answers though I feel it's best to let Jamilla do the talking.


F IVE M I NU TES WI TH : J A M I LLA

Wh o a re your curre n t fa vo u r i te a r t i s t s ? I have so many favourite artists, it's really difficult to choose a few. But the people I've been listening to the most at the moment are Sonder, Mick Jenkins, IAMDDB and Tom Misch At wha t age did you d e c i d e t o f o c u s p r i m a r i l y o n m usi c? D id any t h i n g s p e c i f i c i n f l u e n c e t h i s d ecisio n ? I decided I wanted to primarily focus on music when I was about 20. It was after I'd just finished a Diploma in Music Performance at TAFE and had started attending Women Of Music Production Perth (WOMPP) meetings which inspired me to be a producer. As soon as that door was open and I had the skills to start making electronic music, I decided it was all I wanted to focus on. Do yo u fe e l your s ou n d h a s e vo l v e d ov e r t i m e?

Yo ur la te s t s ingle ' S h e .' h a s b e e n e x c e p t i o n a l ly wel l rec e iv e d, has t h e s u c c e s s o f t h e t ra c k o pe ne d new o pp or t unit ie s f o r yo u r m u s i c c a re e r ? I do feel like the success of 'She.' has lead me to some cool opportunities. It happened to chart on iTunes in Asia which was awesome for when I went and performed at 'Music Matters' in Singapore because it seemed as though there was some sort of interest around me over there. Also being a song that touches on my bisexuality, it's lead to some really nice conversations and connections with queer women who appreciate being represented.

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If I need a short break from music, a run or a swim at the beach will do. If I need a longer break, I'll take a few weeks off and focus on reading, spending time with my family/friends and partying - I tend not to go out when I'm in a recording/writing phase. C a re e r Hig hlig hts thu s fa r ? I've had so many highlights, but I'll try and keep it to a few! I supported Thelma Plum recently, which was an incredible and wholesome experience. Making and releasing the 'Bloom' music video was a huge highlight, plus having it nominated for Best Music Video by WAM. And lastly, my last headline show was the first show where people sang along to my lyrics with me - that was a pretty special moment. Ha v e yo u e v e r b e e n to Esp e ra nc e ? I've never been to Esperance! But I am so excited to come and experience it. SEE JAMIL L A PL AY Balmy Nights, on Saturday, November 16 in the Cannery Arts Centre Round Garden, is set to be a vibe, with an early kick-off at 4pm as the sun goes down. A great lineup featuring Jamilla, Fieldsy, Doctor Tasty, Miss Genius and Rachel Vibart coupled with a stunning atmosphere, honestly, I can’t wait. Grab your tickets at the Cannery’s website.

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I do feel like my sound has evolved. I experiment with my vocals a lot more than when I started making music, and I take much more time in the creative process to find interesting harmonies. Also, I'm constantly learning new things when it comes to production. There's an infinite amount of sounds to be created, and I know the more I learn, the more my music will keep evolving.

B e ing a b le to wr ite a nd re c o rd mu sic is a fu lfil ling c a re e r; p e r so na l ly, I c o u ldn't ima g ine do ing a nything e lse . Ev e ry no w a n d a g a in, I ne e d to ta k e a b re a k fro m mu sic , to c le a r my he a d a nd g e t re a dy fo r the ne xt p roje c t. W ha t do yo u lik e to do to c le a r your mind whe n yo u ju st ne e d a b re a k fro m it al l?


T I D E TAS T E S

Fervor Pop-Up Dining B Y S A R A H H I N TO N


TI DE TA S TES

Just like birthdays, Fervor only comes once a year, but unlike Birthdays I am increasingly getting more excited each time they make an appearance on the calendar. There are many unforgettable dining experiences offered around the world, but Paul’ Yoga’ Iskov and the Fervor Food crew bring an offering unique to us and the land on which we meet for this eight-course degustation dinner with an ingredients list of sustainably sourced Western Australia flora and fauna.

In the early evening, we met with Bree, our Maitre D, at the entrance to Karlkurla Bushland Park in Kalgoorlie’s outermost northern suburbs. This 200-hectare reserve is abundant with 2,000 species of native plants and trees providing the quintessential bush backdrop to our pop-up restaurant and contemporary styled 30 people long table arrangement. Bree requests that we don’t sit yet but find our name placeholder to deposit our eskis and coats. We then continue mingle and enjoy the canapes that are being passed around and to take them up on their offer of a welcome cocktail, a traditional Gin & Tonic garnished with bright green slices of Australian finger limes.

NOT ONLY A RE TH E CREW I NV ES TED I N S U S TAI NABLE S OU RCI NG I NGREDI ENTS , BU T TH EY A RE U S I NG TH EI R PRES ENCE TO S U PPOR T A ND ENCOU RA GE CA REERS I N COOKERY AND H OS PI TA LI TY TOO. The canapes are consistent, and it’s lovely to talk to the staff about what’s on the plate. Making their way around are five choices including puffy Koji crackers riding on eucalyptus leaves, Barramundi atop of wattleseed crackers and my standouts, the crocodile bacon in an edible cup, the pulled Kangaroo backstrap and the pictured cured Emu on crunchy toast sprinkled with wild Rosella dust. The sun is beginning to set, and it’s time to take our seat at the table. We introduce ourselves to our neighbouring diners and top up our glasses ready for the first course. Yoda introduces his concept and what we are to expect and then he introduces Debbie Carmody, an Anangu woman who lives in Kalgoorlie. Debbie provides an acknowledgement to country, paying respects to the traditional custodians past, present and emerging. It’s a strong theme consistent throughout our evening, and all Fervor team members acknowledge that the menu couldn’t be made possible without mutually beneficial connections to local Aboriginal elders, businesses and guides.⟶

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I had forgotten that there were going to be other diners in attendance as the booking process is personalised, efficient and welcoming, it felt like my own private dinner. Once you’ve booked your ticket, you will receive a call from Steph Pronk, the Fervor Food events administrator and given directions to your meeting place and which member of the crew will be there to welcome you. Oh, and she’ll also remind you that these events are BYO. In anticipation of Fervor visiting Esperance soon, I made a visit to boutique bottle-o, Peels Liquor in Boulder, to pick up some Lucky Bay Brewing beer to pair with canapes and opening courses as well as a nice red for the highly anticipated kangaroo course. Kaz from Peel’s Liquor recommendation was the Beaches To Boab Blond Ale which contains Esperance grown barley and Ord River Kimberly grown corn. A gorgeous mid-strength beer which was refreshing and paired perfectly with the crocodile bacon I’ll tell you about shortly.

The kitchen is housed in a truck which stores all sorts of modern cooking gadgets, the earthenware crockery and serving platters with a separate gasfired hot plate for preparing the hot courses. You are encouraged to visit staff at the serving pass, and they welcome questions about sources of ingredients and the preparation processes. The staff working tonight are led by head chef Paul ‘Yoda’ Iskov, and the Fervor crew are joined by a local chef and students from the Central Regional TAFE.


There’s some science at play here too. Ingredients you may recognise such as the scallop or Emu liver are served in ways you wouldn’t imagine and are through curious cooking experiments, turned into parfaits, ices and wafers. The Quandong fruit, typically used in jams are chopped, charred and served simply, providing a sweet smokey flavour nestled on a bed of creamy Sandalwood nuts. It’s the perfect first course, a gentle entry into Australian bush tucker and some of the stronger flavours yet to be served. The Fervor menus change for each destination around Western Australia. The team will use locally sourced ingredients and also introduce produce from the neighbouring farms and producers from their home in the South West of WA. Tonight we are honoured to sample the Youlk, a tuber similar to a kipfler potato which flourishes in sandy soil usually overlooked as unsuitable by wheat and sheep farmers. For the last few years, the Fervor crew have worked in partnership with Aboriginal

enterprises to promote the Youlk and encourage sustainable farming practices which diversify the economy and bring a financial return to the traditional custodians.

H OT DAM PER I S S ERV ED PI L ED

Both Bree and Yoda make mention when introducing each dish that it is hard to choose a favourite, but I’ve got mine. Our fifth dish is served in a wooden cup, and it is a standout in both flavour and nourishment. The thick silky Kangaroo broth has been infused with oil from a Bloodroot. Typically dried and pounded to be used as a powdered spice, Fervor have pressed the Bloodroot to make oil, and it adds a spicy chilli flavour which makes the roo all the more rich. The Bloodroot is related to the widely recognised Kangaroo Paw and is traditionally used to treat mouth sores and toothaches and is currently being investigated for it’s antibiotic and antitumor properties.

H OM E H U NGRY TONI GH T.

U P ON S H ARE PLATES WH I CH WE LATH ER WI TH S M OKED BU TTER AND DI P I NTO TH E CU PS OF BROTH. TH ERE I S NO FEAR TH AT WE’ L L G O

As expressed earlier in the evening, sustainability is essential to the Fervor team as is working with local Aboriginal people in the many regions they visit. The Fervor team do not forage without the appropriate licenses and permissions from landowners and Elders. Yoda met with a Tjupan woman earlier in the day, who herself has permission from local elders to forage for honey ants. Buodoon Edie Ulrich took Yoda to her special honey ant hunting patch which is about 35 kilometres from the Kalgoorlie city centre. Edie is a celebrated artist and the owner of Tjuapan Bush Tours which you can book for yourself when visiting Kalgoorlie via Wangka, the Aboriginal Language Centre on Hannan Street.


T ID E TA S T ES : FERV OR POP- U P DI NI NG

We’re all a bit slow-moving as try to pack up our belongings at the end of the night, we are sated. But it’s not over yet. Upon the pass are trays of petit fours featuring Riberry jubes, Quandong nougat and Miso & smoked butter fudge. I think they were for taking home but as I’m chatting to Yoda and the team about possible iconic locations for another Fervor visit in 2020 I’ve managed to pop one of every flavour in my mouth. The nougat is chewy and nutty, the fudge sticky and melts in your mouth and the jubes, little rounds of bright pink jelly sugared by a tart powder make my tongue tingle.

We are the last out of the park as we wait for our ride home under a blanket of stars, with full bellies and the scent of the bush on our clothes. I am very grateful for the opportunity to dine with Fervor in my neighbourhood and encourage other curious diners to make a booking as soon as you see the dates announced. The Saturday sitting was sold out within days! Yoda told me that he will be meeting with Esperance elder Doc Reynolds when they head South in November. The menu will contain many southern coast natives and possibly some locally sourced seafood. Esperance foodies and people interested in the Fervor pop-up restaurant events should not miss out on this one. The Tide would like to thank Sarah Hinton for attending Fervor in Kalgoorlie and giving us a taste of what we are yet to see here in Esperance. If you are interested in attending Esperance’s Fervor event, please head to their website.

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CHRISTMAS

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A burst of applause welcomes Yoda’s announcement that they were able to forage enough honey ants for us each to have one on our plates for the eighth course. This final dish of Muntrie berries, Geraldton wax and Lemongrass ice is full of citrusy flavours and would be more refreshing than a paddle pop on a hot summer day. I save my honey ant for last and will say the nectar that pools in your mouth after popping the ant’s honey sac is the best tasting honey I have ever had.


MERV E G U I DE

Waterwise Gardening 22 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

BY KARLI FLORISSON

Summer is just around the corner, so now is the perfect time to prepare your garden! With the hot, dry summers that we experience here in Australia, it is particularly important to consider how waterwise your garden is. A waterwise garden will not only thrive all year round, but it will help you to save one of our most precious resources, water. Australian households use up to 50 per cent of their water in the garden, so there are certainly savings that can be made. A garden will look better and will be much more resilient in the hot days of summer. You don’t need to have a dry, dull garden in summer – a little bit of planning will keep your garden looking great even on the hottest days. Here are our Tide Tips.

Build up your soil Preparation of your garden soil is key to retaining moisture in the soil. Esperance’s sandy soil needs plenty of organic matter added so that it will retain water, rather than just allowing the water to run off. Organic matter in the soil will also help to feed your plants the nutrients that they need. Mix good quality compost or manure through your soil for the best results. Manure can be too rich for native plants, so just stick to compost for them. And while you’re at it, why not get a compost pile going so that you have plenty of compost for the future? In addition to compost and manure, you may need to add some clay or a wetting agent to the soil, especially if you notice the water beading on top of the soil or running off without absorbing into the ground. Your local garden centre will be able to advise on the best wetting agents to use.


M ERV E GU I DE

Mulch

Water wisely

Mulching your garden is one of the most important ways to make your garden waterwise. Mulch helps the soil retain moisture, and can cut the water needs of your garden in half. You can use an organic mulch, such as pea hay or lucerne straw, which will break down quickly and help to feed your garden. Or you can use a woody mulch such as wood chips or garden prunings, which will take a lot longer to break down. Add a thick layer of mulch to your garden beds, 5cm - 10cm thick, making sure you don’t cover seedlings or small plants. Leave a gap in the mulch around the stems and trunks of already established plants, as mulch that is touching stems can cause rot in those plants.

The best time of the day to water is early in the morning so that less water is lost through evaporation. Watering less often, but thoroughly, is also important, as it will encourage the plants’ roots to go down deep in search of water. Hand watering can be more efficient than sprinklers, which can be hard to direct without losing some water to overspray. If you have a reticulation system in your garden, consider using drip or trickle irrigation, and make sure that you check your system regularly for leaks or broken sprinklers or pipes.

Choose your plants careful ly

Lawns require a huge amount of water to keep them looking nice in summer, so it is important to plan your lawn carefully. You may want to put in a smaller area of lawn, and consider putting in a hardy groundcover, a native garden, or some easy-care paving instead of lawn. Choose a hardy variety of lawn, such as Buffalo or Saltene lawn. Don’t forget the soil wetter for the lawn, so that the water absorbs into the ground rather than running off. Planning ahead and putting in a bit of effort will pay off hugely when it comes to having a waterwise garden. With just a few adjustments, you can have a delightful garden year-round, and save on water at the same time.

T HE B EST PL AN T S FO R A WAT ER-W ISE GARDEN • Australian natives such as Geraldton Wax or Bottlebrush • Native grasses and sedges • Succulents, such as native pigface, aloe vera, foxtail agave, and mother-in-law’s tongue • Old fashioned staples such as lavender, rosemary, statice, and geraniums • Hardy trees such as olives or eucalypts • Hardy vegetables such as sweet potatoes

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For a waterwise garden, it is important to choose your plants carefully, to ensure hardy plants that can survive dry conditions. Ideally, choose Australian natives that are suited to our local area. Old fashioned species such as rosemary, lavender, and geraniums are very hardy and can tolerate low water conditions. Succulents are also fantastic for dry conditions and look great even in hot, dry conditions. When planting new plants, be sure to pay attention to the conditions that the plants need, and provide plenty of shade if required. Having some trees and taller plants in your garden can help with protecting smaller plants from the direct heat of the sun. Plants that require more water, such as vegetables and flowering plants, should be grouped together in a place that is convenient for regular watering.

Re-think your lawn


Piet, Beryl and their four boys

5 M I N U T E H IS T ORY

Florissons of Esperance 2 4 / E S P E R A N C E T I D E / J U LY 2 0 1 9

BY KARLI FORISSON

In 1925, Piet Florisson was born in Rotterdam, Holland, one of seven children. His father was a cabinet maker with the Holland America line, and made high-quality furniture and fittings for ships, until he was laid off in 1930, as a result of the depression in America. Piet got into a lot of mischief with his older brother Johannes and left school at the age of 14 to work for a greengrocer. When Hitler invaded Holland in 1940, Piet and his brothers sat on the rooftop watching the planes dogfighting over the city and bombing the Military airbase in the distance. Under German occupation, Piet worked for a Dutchman called Kingma, on a barge on the Rhine River, until he was commandeered by the Germans and ordered to work on a German barge ‘Stroomvaart Eight’. The work was hard, and fifteen-year-old Piet lived mostly on bread and sugar and missed his family terribly. Johannes, an apprentice furniture maker until the factory was bombed, was taken to Berlin to work in Rheinmetall Borsig’s huge factories. On one wartime trip to Berlin in the barge, Piet was able to sneak away and meet up with Johannes - who was known as Jo - narrowly avoiding severe consequences. The family has Piet’s memoirs and many letters sent to Jo, telling of narrowly escaping death on several occasions.

The situation in Rotterdam became so desperate during the war, many people survived by eating cats, rats, and tulip bulbs, as thousands of others starved to death. Piet’s parents and young sister survived by walking hundreds of kilometres north to Friesland to stay with relatives. As the war drew to a close in 1945, Piet was on a barge taking a large cargo of luxury items like cheese, chocolate and spirits for German officers, to Berlin. They were the last barge to go up the canal before the advance of the allies, and all the canal bridges were blown up behind them. The skipper of the barge left during the night, and the next morning, two officers ordered Piet off the barge before blowing it up, sinking the precious cargo. Piet was left to walk home to Holland with some help from the Americans. Jo too made his way back home when liberated by the Russians’ advance on Berlin. Soon after being reunited with his family, 21year old Piet was conscripted into the October 10 Battalion of the newly re-formed Dutch army. He was sent to Indonesia in 1946, as the Dutch fought to retain control of the Dutch East Indies. As a driver and mechanic, Piet was hit in the leg by a sniper’s bullet in 1949. The wound lead to his discharge from the army and left him with a permanent limp. In hospital with recurring yellow fever, and dissatisfied with life in the city, Piet applied to emigrate to Australia from his hospital bed.


F IVE M I NU TE H I S TORY

In 1952, Piet leased a farm in Yealering for a year. Around this time he met Beryl Booth, working at Kingstons’ store in town. Piet and Beryl married in 1954. They lived in a shed while they built their own 3 bedroom kit home in Cunderdin, despite Piet breaking his ankle in a building accident, and unable to work for a time. After their first son was born, Piet and Beryl moved to Bridgetown. Piet started working in fruit packing sheds, then moved to Mackay’s furniture and floor covering store, where he learnt to lay carpet. Piet and Beryl had

four more sons while living in Bridgetown and eventually set up their own second-hand furniture and upholstery store. In 1963, with concerns that Bridgetown was declining, the family heard that Esperance was booming. They moved the entire family, including pet goats, down to Esperance, and leased a shop on Pink Lake Road from John Dickerson. Florissons Home Furnishers was born. After two years, the shop included floor coverings and new furniture. It expanded to larger premises in Dutton Arcade, then to the Wallace Way shopping centre. Later they moved again, to the Dempster Street property now occupied by Sportspower. After Piet’s father died in 1966, his mother came to Australia for 9 months, spending much of her time in Perth with Jo and his Dutch wife Femmy, and their family of four boys. Eventually touring the South-west with Piet, Beryl, their 5 boys and a friend, in one very crowded car! In 1970, Jo moved his boys to Esperance, and Piet and Beryl had a sixth son, Michael, bringing the Florisson total in Esperance to 10 boys. Piet, now known as Peter, invested in several boats over the years and gave his sons a love of the sea and boating life.

Peter and Beryl became Christians in Yealering, and in Esperance were founding members of the People’s Church, and later the Bay of Isles Church. Peter’s loud tenor voice could be heard singing enthusiastically during the Sunday services. In 1986, Peter and Jo, along with Beryl and youngest son Michael, went to Holland, seeing the family after 36 years. Both Piet and Jo and their families have been a considerable part of the Esperance community, running businesses such as Jax Snax and Florisson’s Autos. They also play a significant role at Wongutha, with Peter and Beryl being board members for many years and later son Steve the Principal for 20 years. Jo died in 2003, Piet in 2004 and then Beryl in 2008. Florissons Home Furnishers is still run by Michael and Gillian Florisson and is now the longest-running family business in town. Author’s note: attentive readers will notice that I’m a Florisson too. Piet was my grandfather, and I am fortunate to be a part of this big Esperance family.

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Gaining a position as a tractor driver, he arrived in Fremantle in May 1950. He was taken straight to a farm in Cunderdin, earning five pounds a week, and given a gun to shoot as many rabbits as he could eat! Later that same year Jo arrived, employed to do carpentry work for the Cunderdin co-op, with the rest of the family intending to follow later on. Not satisfied with the conditions on the farm, where he lived in a small tin room with an outback pit toilet, Piet eventually left to work with Jo, building sheds, repairing furniture and doing upholstery. The rest of the family never followed.


F I T N E S S & H E AL T H

Local Windsurfer’s Guide to ACL Reconstruction Recovery WE S P OK E TO L O C A L W I N D S U R F E R , J A M ES MC C A RTH Y-P R IC E , R E C E N T LY A B O U T H IS P E RSON A L E X P E R IE N C E W IT H A N A C L I N J U RY 26 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

A N D H OW I T I N S P IR E D H IM T O W R IT E A B OOK A LON G SI D E RE H A B IL ITAT IO N S P E C IA L IS T , DR JAY E B E RT, O F F E R I N G T H E B E S T T O O L S T O RE C OV E RY. When James tore his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) training for the Professional Windsurfing Association (PWA) tour he knew his competitive dreams were over for that season, but he had no idea he’d use his recovery experience to write a book to help dozens recover from Australia’s most common major sports injury. Growing up in Esperance James began sailing in the slow Pelican training class dinghies at Esperance Bay Yacht Club (EBYC). “We spent way too much time trying to think of ways to make them faster,” says James who was introduced by his father into windsurfing at 13. “Now suddenly he was trying to slow down, the speed was incredible and addictive.”

Every year international windsurfing brands make the pilgrimage to Esperance to photograph their team riders sailing the world-class conditions. “Most Europeans know Esperance, it’s on the international map,” says James who was competing at the national level by the time he was at university. James’ plan following graduation was to compete on the world windsurfing tour. “Then out of the blue, I tore my ACL trying an aerial manoeuvre similar to a motocross backflip while training at Lancelin" recounts James. “It was super windy, I hit a perfect ramp and it shot me straight up. You’re supposed to land softly nose first, but on the way down I let my legs extend and landed flat on my board from about 6 metres”. Upon landing James’ legs buckled, tearing his ACL. “I knew it was serious straight away, I knew this was a major injury and that I wasn’t going to make the tour,” says James.

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F ITNES S & H EA LTH

James quit his job as a Wave Energy Engineer and threw himself into addressing the issue. He partnered with Dr Jay Ebert, one of Australia’s top ACL rehabilitation specialists to build the ACL Recovery Guide. “I wanted anyone to access the latest world-class ACL recovery guidance, so that’s what we built.” The guide is not what you’d think, it looks and reads more like a lifestyle magazine. The biggest surprise to James during his recovery was the mental battle. “Nobody in medicine tells you about the mental game. ACL rehab is a long journey, it’s easy to get lost in the woods” says James. As a result, 30% of the guide is dedicated to sports psychology and strategies to promote people to return to sports and activity.

“ACL injuries have been described as an epidemic in Australia,” says James. He discovered that around 40,000 reconstructions are performed each year in Australia at a cost of approximately $142 million. Gender also has an impact with girls 15-20 years old two to six times more likely to rupture their ACL, and are less likely to return to sport after surgery. “Consider how effective sport is as a tool to bring communities together, to combat loneliness and encourage healthy lifestyles. If young sportspeople abandon sport early on in their lives, what impact does this have on their health and wellbeing, and on our community?” says James.

“The guide enables you to take ownership of your recovery and get the most out of working with your physio.” James lights up when he mentions that the guide concludes with physical tests shown to reduce ACL reinjury rates by an incredible 84%. “These tests are easy to do, massive in their impact, and not often included in rehab protocols. I’ve worked hard to ensure no repeat customers!” 3 years after his injury James is back windsurfing and surfing. “I placed 2nd at the 2018 Windsurfing Nationals and 7th on the UK tour. Countless sportspeople have gone on to achieve greatness after ACL tears,” says James. “If I can do it, anyone can.” James’ business is called Optimal Recovery Club and the ACL Recovery Guide can be found at aclrecoveryguide.com

27 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

Having studied engineering, James threw himself into the science of ACL rehabilitation. He discovered that the ACL injury is the most impactful sports injury and that ACL injuries have risen in Australia by 43% since 2015. It has risen by a worrying 74% in people under 25 years of age.


BUSH BANTER

28 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

When less is more The town looks like a bomb has exploded with all the Callistemon cv ‘Kings Park Specials’ flowering profusely all over Esperance. While these are a magnificent specimen and a fine example of what plant breeders are able to accomplish – let’s not forget the real Callistemon that grow naturally in our landscape. The Callistemon phoeniceus is only one of two species of callistemon that are endemic to Western Australia. They have a smokey green leaf the signature red flower and although they still catch your eye in flowering time they tend not take over the garden. Unlike the ‘Kings Park Specials’ they will produce seed pods which are not only great bird food but are able to regenerate. This bottlebrush is very hardy, medium-sized, grows in a variety of soils and can be planted in coastal positions. It can take a while to establish itself, but worth the wait as when it does flower it is a lovely plant. E S P E R A N C E FA R M T R E E S

MINDFUL MERVE Phone seduction

How to Regain Focus and Control of Your Attention

I always thought that unlike others, I was not addicted to my phone until I got a weekly message telling me my average daily scrolling usage actually was in hours and minutes! Seeing my timewasting was the wake-up call I needed. But how was I going to prevent my attention being seduced by my phone? So being the mindful chap I am, I did a little research on the wonderful people at Mindful into this common and growing addiction.

Notice. Noticing breaks the spell. So, begin to notice when you do these things. Notice what the feeling is like while you do them. What do you feel in your body? What are the stories in your head? What emotions do you feel? Is this what you actually want? A mindless diversion isn’t necessarily evil, but 6.5 hours of your life down the drain adds up to what?

Three Signs Your Attention Just Got Hacked 1. You experience “Lift-Off”: You are writing an important memo when midway through, your attention shifts to checking the footy scores or the weather. Lift-off is when your attention is focused on one thing and involuntarily moves to something less relevant. 2. You’re in Scrolling Zombie Mode: When you feel a low-level daze as your finger robotically swipes for the next hit of stimulation. 3. You’ve descended the Rabbit Hole: You are researching a new car purchase. You click on the brand you fancy and watch a video of the four-wheel-drive climbing a mountain in New Zealand. Then you start thinking about that trip you always wanted to take to New Zealand so you could ski. Before you know it, you are now looking at skis and accommodation. Sorry but you have just fallen down the rabbit hole!

Question and Shift. After noticing comes inquiring and shifting. Ask yourself, “Is this where my attention needs to be right now?” If what you’re doing isn’t what you intend to be doing, stop doing it and return to what’s important to you. Repeat. Building the habit of noticing, questioning and shifting strengthens your choice-making muscles. Gradually, you’ll begin to see how much of your attention you’re wasting away. Alternative pathways start to be forged, and you can step out of the seductions more easily. You can more quickly return from the rabbit holes of distraction and keep focused on what’s important to you. By taking a moment to slow down and consider what you really want, you can invest your limited attention resources in what’s important to you, and live the life you want. MERVE


horoscopes WHAT D OE S TH I S MON T H H AVE I N S T O R E FO R Y OU ? TH E S TA RS H AV E I T! WI LL Y OU BE L UCKY I N LOV E , H A RD AT W O R K, F I N D I N G N E W O PPORTU NI TI ES , OR S ETTI NG OU T ON BI G ADVENT U RE S? OU R TID E G U ID E H A S T H E B IG S C OOP FOR ALL OF TH E ENERGY TH AT I S CO M I NG YOU R W AY T H IS M O N T H .

S CO R P I O 

O CT 2 3 - NO V 21

It’s time to extend the horizons and think about some travel! It may have already been niggling at you for a while. While the timing may not have been right up until now, it’s time to dust off that map and get to planning. A change of scenery – no matter how small – will do you good!

NO V 2 2 - D E C 21

Ah, you’re in the mood for love, and the timing is right for you this month. Get out and mingle, and don’t forget to be your sincere and lovely self. A little light-hearted flirting can go a long way, whether you want to strike up a new romance, or just rekindle the flames with your current love. It’s the season for love, so take advantage of all the opportunities that love has to offer.

C APR IC O R N 

D E C 2 2 - J A N 20

Relationships can be risky, and you might be feeling that this month. Dropping your guard and being vulnerable can leave you open to getting hurt. It’s also the only way to really build relationships based on honesty, trust, and a real sense of yourself. It can be worth the risk – but choose wisely! Look for opportunities to build trust with people you are close to this month.

A QUA R I U S 

JAN 20 - FEB 17

Family relationships could cause a strain this month, so it’s time to pay attention. That’s not to say that you should always let others have their own way. There will be times that you need to stand your ground this month. Be firm but gentle, and remember that boundaries are there to protect your emotional life. Chose your battles wisely, as you’ll be setting up patterns for the years to come.

PI S CE S 

FEB 18 - MAR 19

Are your daily activities in step with the energy which is flowing in your direction this month? Rather than charging ahead, why not take a bit of time out to recalibrate and work out what is necessary and what needs to change. Things will come together efficiently when you’re focussing on the right elements! When you are working with rather than against your energy, everything else will just fall into place.

A R I ES 

MAR 20 - APRIL 19

Oh dear – are money woes ruining your life? Do you always feel like you’re counting pennies, and having to wait to satisfy your desires? No, don’t go running after get-rich-quick schemes. Instead, take a look at the way your core beliefs are dictating this area of your life. Deal with that, and you’ll find that the money issues take care of themselves.

APR 20 - MAY 20

Look out for a blast from the past this month! An unexpected connection from your past will want to reconnect. But not all old contacts are worth keeping in your life, perhaps you lost touch for a reason… Think about whether you might be better served by moving forward rather than backwards. There are many opportunities for making new friends and meeting new people just around the corner.

G EMINI 

MAY 21 - JUN 20

It’s time to see things from a new perspective! Change your point of view, and you can change your whole life… What is it that you are particularly dogmatic about? Do you need to rethink a few firmly held beliefs? Talk things through with a trusted friend, and you’ll be feeling clearer. It’s incredible how much difference a simple change in perspective can make.

CA NCER 

JUN 21 - JUL 22

If you feel like things are particularly tough at the moment, there’s a reason for that. You might feel like you’re pushing custard up a hill with a fork, but actually, you’re pushing your way to a breakthrough. Wherever things are hardest – relationships, finances, work, health – that’s where you need to keep working. A new level of success is coming, you just need to get through this rough patch, and you’ll be amazed at what’s to come.

LEO



JUL 23 - AUG 22

Work will throw you a curveball this month. Step up to the plate, you’ve got what it takes to hit that ball out of the park! Don’t be alarmed by a new challenge. Step out of that comfort zone and give it a go. The only thing that is standing in your way is a lack of confidence. There are new heights to achieve if you’ll only take the right steps.

V I RG O

AUG 23 - SEP 22

Feeling stressed? It’s time to pay attention to that feeling. Stress can be an indication that you need to reassess. Are you taking on too much? Are you taking responsibility for other people’s emotions? This month is the perfect time for you to evaluate where your emotional energy is being spent and make adjustments accordingly. Your stress levels (and probably those close to you!) will thank you for it.

LIBRA 

SEP 23 - O C T 22

Time to tune up your work/life balance! Life’s not all about work, even though work is essential. If you find yourself continually saying ‘things will slow down soon’, then it’s time to take control and put on the breaks! Make time for rest and recreation, and you’ll find yourself energised to give 100% when you are at work.

29 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

S AGI T TA R I U S 

TA U RU S 


community notices

30 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

TO SU BMI T A LI S T I NG G O T O E S P E R AN C ET IDE.C O M O R EMAIL HEL L O @ ESPERAN C ET IDE.C OM

LOCAL MARKETS The next Museum Village Markets will be held on Sunday, November 10 & 24 from 8.30-12.30pm as well as the Edge Of The Bay on Saturday, November 30 from 2-9pm. The next Esperance Growers’ Market will be held on Saturday, November 5 & 16 from 9am-11am at Nulsen Primary School.

CALL TO ARTISTS: SALVAGE - ART FROM THE SHED The Cannery is calling all artists for the next exhibition opening December 2019, which will showcase works made from scrap metal, recycled or repurposed materials & works that are inspired by or embody our connections with working on the land.

KEEP ESPERANCE BEAUTIFUL DAY Meet us on Sunday, November 3 at 8:45 am at the park on the corner of Fisheries Rd and Remark Drive, Castletown for signin, bag and glove collection. Stick around afterwards for an informal meet and greet with our newly elected & sitting Shire councillors. The Ratepayers association and LEAF group will be attending, for a casual discussion on community projects, as well as an open chat about drilling for oil in the Great Australian Bight.

MCHAPPY DAY AT MCDONALDS Year 10 students at Esperance Anglican Community School are organizing this year’s McHappy Day at MacDonald’s Esperance on Saturday November 16 to help raise money for Ronald McDonald House. The theme for the day is ‘Disney’, with students and staff dressing up for the day. Please come along to donate to the cause and join in on the fun.

UNDER THE BOARDWALK CLEAN-UP DAY Keep Esperance Beautiful invites you to come down to West Beach carpark at 10am on November 10. The surfing community has expressed concern about all the litter that is dropped over the fence which eventually ends up in our ocean. Surfers are encouraged to come down to lend a hand, with a paddle out to finish. This will be an annual event. More info, contact Noel 0412 279 181. WALK4BRAINCANCER Join us for an inspirational walk along The Foreshore on Sunday, November 10 in support people impacted by brain cancer. Meet at the Jetty Headland from 8.30am to collect your wristband. Cure Brain Cancer Foundation merchandise will be available to purchase on the day. HELP MAKE THE MAGIC OF THE CHRISTMAS PAGEANT Businesses, Groups and Clubs are invited to register floats and/or walking groups for the parade on Sunday 8th Dec @ www.esperance.wa.gov.au/community-christmas-pageant CREATING MARKETING VIDEOS WORKSHOP Creating marketing videos can be an overwhelming part of running a business, but a necessity to stand out from the crowd in the digital age. In this workshop you will learn the basics of editing a promotional video, using either still images or video footage. Workshop starts at 9am to 12pm on November 7 at Suite 7, 91 Dempster Street, Dutton Arcade. Call (08) 9071 5142 or email blocal@esperancecci.com.au for bookings. Cost is $30 per person including light refreshments and workbook ARTIST TALK: WITH VISITING ARTIST MARTINE PERRET Join us @ the Cannery Arts Centre on Wednesday, November 6th @6:30PM for an artist talk with Martine Perret - the artist behind our current exhibition Ngala Wongga (Come Talk), and ART ON THE MOVE touring exhibition. Free to attend, all welcome.

SENIORS WEEK @ SENIOR CITIZENS CENTRE Celebrations for Seniors Week starts on November 10. The Senior Citizens Centre will be hosting an art exhibition throughout the week with the Hobby Painters artwork in the main room. Other activities include Carpet Bowls, Exercise Groups, Chair Aerobics, Singalong, Wednesday Lunch (you will need to book), Cards, Mahjong and more. Phone 90712268 to find out more. THE SENIORS PREVIEW @ THE BIJOU THEATRE Seniors are invited to the dress rehearsal for “Robin Hood and the Babes in the Woods” at the Bijou Theatre on Sunday, November 10 at 2pm. Gold coin donation – all seniors welcome to form an audience for the cast. ESPERANCE MEN IN SHEDS INC AGM This year’s Annual General Meeting to be held on Wednesday, November 20 starting at 10am. All welcome to attend and have your say. HAVE A GO AT BADMINTON Games played at the Indoor Sports Stadium on Mondays from 7-9pm for high school ages and above. Wednesday social games from 9.30-11am. $5 per session. Contact Trish on 9071 1314. ESPERANCE PROBUS CLUB Meets on the 2nd Monday of every month at Esperance Bowling Club from 9.30am. New members are very welcome. COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS New to Esperance and wondering what leisure activities and facilities are available in town? Find out by having a chat with Jenny. Phone the Esperance Volunteer Centre on 9072 0346 to arrange a time. MORNING MELODIES @ ESPERANCE CIVIC CENTRE On the second Thursday of the month between 11-1pm. Bring your lunch and your mate, relax and enjoy the tunes over your lunch break. ESPERANCE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY We meet at the Museum every Wednesday from 1.30pm, or by appointment. Phone 9071 2484.


Lemongrass Pork San Choy Bow WARNING: IT’S SPICY AF Ingredients

Marinade

Method 1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Slice pork in half lengthways (about 3cm wide and 10cm in length). 2. In a mortar and pestle pound garlic, lemongrass, coriander roots, ginger and black peppercorns. Pound the mixture to a nice smooth paste. Add palm sugar by gently working into the mixture until it dissolves. Add fish sauce and oyster sauce.

2 cloves garlic 1 stick lemongrass, thinly sliced 5 coriander roots, washed well 6 black peppercorns 1 knob ginger, thinly sliced 1 tsp oyster sauce 1 tsp fish sauce 1 tsp palm sugar

3. Rub marinade over pork scotch fillet and leave in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to marinate.

Dressing

6. In a mixing bowl place sliced julienne apple, lemongrass, chilli, shallot, kaffir lime, mint and coriander.

3 green chillies 1 lime 2 tsp fish sauce ½ tsp oyster sauce ½ tsp sugar

4. Place pork on a rack and placed over a baking dish. Add a cup of water to the baking dish to allow for steam to cook the pork. Cook for 12- 15 minutes. Allow to rest for 2 minutes before slicing thinly. 5. Slice green chillies finely and place in a small bowl. Add lime juice, fish sauce, oyster sauce and sugar. Taste for seasoning.

7. Place washed and dried baby cos leaves on a serving dish. Place a few slices of pork on each leaf. Gently toss the ingredients together. Place a small amount of salad on sliced pork. Drizzle with dressing. Eat with your fingers!

ing...

uc Introd

Deliveries 0403 618 388 Open Monday to Saturday 9am-3pm

Paninis,Juices, Smoothies (Vegan options)

Located at Tide & Co in the Museum Village MON - FRI 10AM - 4PM, SAT 10AM-1PM & MARKET DAYS

The Tanker Jetty, Esperance Foreshore

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31 / ESPERANCE TIDE / NOVEMBER 2019

200g free-range pork scotch fillet 10 baby cos lettuce leaves 1 long red chilli, julienned 1 shallot, finely sliced 1 handful mint leaves, ripped 1 handful coriander, chopped 3 kaffir lime leaves, julienned ½ stick lemongrass, julienned ¼ Granny smith apple, julienned


AL M B Y N H TS S AT I G UR D AY N OV EM

Cannery Arts Centre Round Garden DOORS OPEN 4PM

BEVERAGES LUCKY BAY BREWERY & JUNCTURE CART POP UP COCKTAIL BAR

FOOD ROLLED BY LOVE TACOS & GOZLEMES

TICKETS $37.50+BF

Non Members

$32.50+BF

Cannery Members

Go to canneryartscentre.com.au

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