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AUGUST 2017 www.esemag.com

SPECIAL FOCUS

CLIMATE CHANGE & RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE ES&E’S ANNUAL GUIDE TO

Government, Associations & Academic Institutions


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CONTENTS

August 2017 • Vol. 30 No. 4 • ISSN-0835-605X COMING IN OUR OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE This issue will offer our 43,000 readers across Canada a strong and diverse range of articles: EDITORIAL FOCUS Water & Wastewater Plant Efficiency

20

FEATURED TOPICS • Wastewater treatment and collection systems • Stormwater management

32

• Drinking water supply, treatment and distribution systems

34

• Disinfection and filtration BONUS CONVENTION CIRCULATION AT:

FEATURES 6 8 10 16 20 22 24 26 30 32 34

Editorial Comment: An inconvenient sequel to a seemingly endless debate

SPECIAL FOCUS

36 38 42 44 46

Cornell tests “smart”, resilient underground infrastructure Monitoring and maintenance programs help protect infrastructure World Water Council calls on governments to focus on water issues Bridge project calls for major environmental protection and remediation Stormwater funding needs to be a priority in Ontario: Report

• Water Environment Federation (WEFTEC) • Eastern Ontario Water Works Association

Robots help extract valuable materials from e-waste

• Canadian Waste & Recycling Expo

Reducing the risk of Legionnaires’ disease from water systems Humic & fulvic acids can enhance wastewater treatment and reservoir quality

• National Drinking Water Conference

Innovative sludge mixer improves performance and cuts costs

• South Central Ontario Waterworks

Bringing affordable safe water to Alderville First Nation

• Northern Territories Water and Waste Association

Kelowna WWTP installs larger sludge pump to meet increased demand Evaluating water metering technologies for accuracy

• World Water–Tech North America – Toronto

Thermal mass flow meter helps improve chlorine disinfection system New hatches being installed on historic water plant’s settling basins Effluent sewer helps community rebuild after destructive fire

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DEPARTMENTS

ES&E’S ANNUAL GUIDE

58 61 61 66

48 Associations 52 Government 56 Education & Training

Product Showcase Environmental News Professional Cards Ad Index

STAY CONNECTED  ▶ 4 | August 2017

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@ESEMAG

On the cover: © panimoni / Adobe Stock

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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EDITORIAL COMMENT BY STEVE DAVEY

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER STEVE DAVEY steve@esemag.com MANAGING EDITOR PETER DAVEY peter@esemag.com SALES DIRECTOR PENNY DAVEY penny@esemag.com SALES REPRESENTATIVE DENISE SIMPSON denise@esemag.com ACCOUNTING SANDRA DAVEY sandra@esemag.com CIRCULATION MANAGER DARLANN PASSFIELD darlann@esemag.com DESIGN & PRODUCTION MIGUEL AGAWIN production@esemag.com

TECHNICAL ADVISORY BOARD Archis Ambulkar, Jones and Henry Engineers, Ltd. Gary Burrows, City of London Jim Bishop, Consulting Chemist, Ontario Patrick Coleman, Black & Veatch Bill De Angelis, City of Toronto Mohammed Elenany, Urban Systems William Fernandes, City of Toronto Marie Meunier, John Meunier Inc., Québec Tony Petrucci, Stantec, Markham

Environmental Science & Engineering is a bi-monthly business publication of Environmental Science & Engineering Publications Inc. An all Canadian publication, ES&E provides authoritative editorial coverage of Canada’s municipal and industrial environmental control systems and drinking water treatment and distribution. Readers include consulting engineers, industrial plant managers and engineers, key municipal, provincial and federal environmental officials, water and wastewater plant operators and contractors. Information contained in ES&E has been compiled from sources believed to be correct. ES&E cannot be responsible for the accuracy of articles or other editorial matter. Articles in this magazine are intended to provide information rather than give legal or other professional advice. Articles being submitted for review should be emailed to steve@esemag.com. Canadian Publications Mail Sales Second Class Mail Product Agreement No. 40065446 Registration No. 7750 Undeliverable copies, advertising space orders, copy, artwork, proofs, etc., should be sent to: Environmental Science & Engineering 220 Industrial Pkwy. S., Unit 30 Aurora, Ontario  L4G 3V6 Tel: (905)727-4666 Website: www.esemag.com

An inconvenient sequel to a seemingly endless debate

f

ormer U.S. Vice-President Al Gore’s 2006 documentary movie “An Inconvenient Truth” followed his personal campaign to raise public awareness of climate issues. It won two Oscars and earned Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for their work in educating the public about global warming. Timed well with the special focus in this issue of ES&E on climate change and resilient infrastructure is the release of “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power”, a new film by Gore about what progress has been made in staging a global energy revolution. As reported in the Toronto Sun newspaper, the movie shows that consequences from global warming have become worse. It cites disintegrating polar ice, increased extreme weather incidents, drought, crop failure, social upheaval, etc. One prediction in “An Inconvenient Truth” was that rising tides would eventually leave parts of Manhattan under water, including the 9/11 Memorial Site. In “An Inconvenient Sequel”, there is footage of the site being flooded during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, a mere six years later. In an interview with the Toronto Sun, Gore was asked: With all the evidence that has been gathered, why would anyone still be a climate change denier? “The large carbon polluters have a lot at stake, and they took the playbook from the tobacco companies, who years ago responded to the medical and scientific consensus linking cigarettes with lung cancer and other diseases. They hired actors and dressed them up as doctors and put them in front of cameras to falsely reassure people there was no health problem at all — and 100 million people died. These carbon polluters have hired the very same PR firms and they’re using the same techniques. And that’s why a lot of the climate denial has persisted”, he replied. “An Inconvenient Sequel” follows Gore as he continues to look at evidence of global warming. It also reports on positive progress being made as world leaders unite to reduce energy consumption and lower CO2 emissions. It is clear to ES&E that designers, builders, owners and operators of municipal infrastructure systems do see the real effects of climate change, manmade or otherwise. Articles in our annual climate change and infrastructure section have described the need for projects planned, under construction, or recently completed to deal with water shortages, severe stormwater loads, etc. As far back as the Mayans, Egyptians, Romans and other civilizations, we are learning about engineers who have had a great record of solving the obstacles the natural world throws at humanity. Today’s engineers are just as capable it seems.

A Supporting Publication of

Steve Davey is editor and publisher of ES&E Magazine. Please email any thoughts or comments to steve@esemag.com

6  |  August 2017

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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HAZMAT & REMEDIATION

LCD panels are first transported by a conveyor belt into a sealed processing chamber. The differently-sized units are centered by four separate locking-arm mechanisms, which then bring them into position for the final process. Erdwich Zerkleinerungssysteme GmbH

Robots help Extract valuable materials from e-waste

F

lat-screen monitors are made with up to seven layers. In addition to the valuable metal compound, indium tin oxide, they also contain mercury in their backlight components. Until now, the dismantling process has been too complex to be performed by machines, and has therefore been conducted manually. In particular, the dismantling of LCD screens with flat backlighting has been a complex and time-consuming process. However, recycling specialists, Erdwich Zerkleinerungssysteme GmbH, have now developed an automatic processing system that enables mercury and other valuable raw materials to be easily extracted and recycled in an environmentally-friendly way.

FOUR-STAGE TREATMENT PROCESS Erdwich’s facility system uses camera equipment and robots to automatically cut open and dismantle monitors up to 8  |  August 2017

55" in size, under safe working conditions. The process consists of four stages. First, the individual screens are placed on a conveyor belt and transported into a sealed processing chamber, where they are put into the required position. A robot fitted with four different locking-arm mechanisms centres each one and subsequently raises it into the final position for the treatment process. An articulated robot then measures the contours of the screen glass with a camera system. As soon as the coordinates have been calculated, the robot cuts open the housing. The chippings from the cutting process are automatically extracted through a filter system. After each cutting cycle, the tools are automatically examined by a camera to enable any breakage or damage to be promptly detected. The cameras also examine the degree of wear on the cutters. The system notifies the operator when it is

necessary to replace the units to maintain process reliability. In the third step, the various layers, such as the multi-ply polarization filter and the diffuser, are removed in a low-pressure chamber. The final step comprises the removal of the background lighting. A closed waste container is installed directly in the chamber for the gas discharge lamps that contain the mercury. At the same time, the exhaust air is extracted in a controlled process and collected by means of a mercury filter system, in which the harmful metal is converted into a non-toxic sulphide. Further processing continues in a downstream system. The valuable indium tin oxide, which is used in the production of printed circuit boards, is located in conductor tracks on two thin glass panels. As the global demand for this metal compound is increasing, and prices have risen in recent years, it makes particular sense to recycle this material. Up to 45 LCD panels can be handled per hour. For more information, email: infoline@erdwich.de

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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While Quebec’s regulations are the most visible and far-reaching, Canada has been at the forefront of Legionnaires’ disease prevention in other arenas as well. In response to clusters of 10–11 cases of legionellosis in 2006 and again in 2008, the City of Hamilton, Ontario, and Hamilton Public Health Service implemented mandatory cooling tower registrations in 2011. Throughout Canada, the Government Works and Public Services Standard MD 15161–2013: Control of Legionella in Mechanical Systems provides “minimum requirements for design, operation, maintenance, and testing to prevent legionellosis associated with building water systems in federal facilities.”

Legionella bacteria can be free-living, survive in a host amoeba, or be part of biofilm.

Reducing the risk of Legionnaires’ disease from contaminated water systems By Dan Broder

L

egionnaires’ disease, a severe and potentially deadly form of pneumonia, is increasingly a threat to public health. Canada made headlines when news surfaced of a major Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Quebec City in 2012. The outbreak infected 181 people and caused 13 deaths. Almost two-thirds of the affected were men, and the average age of those infected was 62. The determination that an outbreak was underway was made two weeks after the first reported case, and letters requesting all owners of buildings with three or more stories to disinfect their cooling towers went out shortly thereafter. After an extensive process of cooling tower mapping, sampling and disinfection, the source of the outbreak was finally identified, 67 days after the first case. During the investiga10  |  August 2017

tion, Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from area cooling towers were compared to the L. pneumophila isolate from patients until there was a conclusive match at one of the 16 buildings where L. pneumophila had been found. In response to this tragic outbreak, an inter-ministerial working group was convened and new cooling tower regulations were implemented in less than 18 months. These regulations include cooling tower registration, a requirement to maintain towers according to a professionally designed plan that is tailored to the individual system, and a recommendation for regular monitoring for L. pneumophila using a culture method. In 2014, monthly cooling tower monitoring for L. pneumophila with a culture method became mandatory in Quebec.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT LEGIONELLA Legionella bacteria can be free-living, survive in a host amoeba, or be part of biofilm. All three situations can be present in potable and non-potable water systems. People can become ill when Legionella organisms are aspirated and infect macrophages in the lungs. People at high risk for Legionnaires’ disease include those with chronic lung disease, those with compromised immune systems, and people 50 years of age or older. In addition to the susceptibility of the patient, other key risk factors include the extent of exposure and the virulence of the strain of Legionella. Of the more than 60 species of Legionella, L. pneumophila is the species responsible for the vast majority of Legionnaires’ disease cases. Further exacerbating the public health issue is the burgeoning threat of antibiotic resistance. According to a recent study at Tufts University, in Massachusetts, 1% – 2% of hospitalizations for infections from premise pathogens like Legionella show evidence of resistance, and those patients cost 10% – 40% more than patients with nonresistant infections. The study’s authors warn that the lack of regulation of premise plumbing systems can lead to inconsistent monitoring and reporting of potentially dangerous deficiencies in aging infrastructure. They call for policymakers and researchers to pinpoint public health interventions that continued overleaf...

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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WATER

could reduce the risk of infections caused by bacteria in plumbing.

GROWING DEMAND FOR TESTING Outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease have been traced to North American hospitals and chain hotels just within the last year. The good news is that the spread of Legionella can be successfully managed by following thorough water safety plans, which should include periodic testing to ensure the building water system is well controlled. The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) offers non-binding guidelines and standards establishing minimum Legionella risk management requirements for building water systems for all buildings (other than single-family residences) for potable and non-potable water. Building owners are responsible for determining whether their building water systems are at increased risk for growing and spreading Legionella and,

as needed, for developing and follow- tial part of measuring whether these ing Legionella water safety plans that are water management plans are effectively tailored to their specific water systems. controlling the building’s Legionella risk. Once in place, routine testing is an essenAccurate and reliable quantitative test

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


results are required for decision makers to understand where there are the greatest risks in a water system so they can reduce them. Water-quality engineers can help building owners and the public understand the value of looking at both the concentration of Legionella at a given point in the system and frequency of Legionella-positive outlets throughout the system to gauge risk and establish appropriate control measures. It should be noted that Legionella is virtually impossible to completely eradicate in complex water systems. However, it can be effectively controlled through proper monitoring and control measures. Focusing detection and control efforts on L. pneumophila, the primary causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, may increase the efficiency and efficacy of a water safety plan. L. pneumophila is the most common and clinically relevant species of Legionella. It thrives in low-nutrient conditions and grows as biofilms on the inner surfaces of pipes.

unnecessary shutdowns and/or treatment triggered by the detection of Legionella species that are far less virulent than L. pneumophila.

In 2014, monthly cooling tower monitoring for L. pneumophila with a culture method became mandatory in Quebec.

Biofilms allow these pathogens to resist disinfectants and environmental stressors, and they aid in the spread of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Water management plans that include measures to address these conditions and effectively control L. pneumophila will also control other species of Legionella at the same time. This focus may help building operators avoid the costs and dangers of

STATE-OF-THE-ART TESTING Historically, accurate testing for Legionella has been hard to do well without years of experience. Traditional membrane filtration culture methods are complex and often require more subjectivity and expert judgment than regulators and other officials would like. Even within the canon of standard methods, variations in technique and results are common from laboratory to laboratory and even from bench to bench. Testing protocols include many homebrew hybrids of standard culture methods that have evolved over the years as microbiologists seek to improve the precision of their counts. Indeed, some laboratories routinely run more than 11 plates to come up with a count for a single water sample. continued overleaf...

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WATER

Scientists at IDEXX have been studying the best way to detect Legionella for years. One of the difficulties in Legionella testing is to discriminate between Legionella and non-target organisms without inadvertently reducing the culturable Legionella organisms in the sample or having overgrown plates that are difficult to accurately read and count. Samples that are not readable must be retested, which often requires time-consuming resampling. Key opinion leaders in the fields of both water quality and human disease helped identify the need for a culture test that was simple to run, met or exceeded the accuracy of existing culture methods, and could specifically detect and quantify L. pneumophila, the primary causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. IDEXX Legiolert is a new culturebased method that simplifies the detection and quantification of Legionella pneumophila in potable and non-potable water samples. Legiolert has demonstrated accuracy equivalent to or greater

®

than standard culture methods, including ISO 11731, SM9260J, and the CDC Method, per studies conducted by independent laboratories and published in peer-reviewed journals (notably, the publication of ISO 11731 comparison). Legiolert produces a final, confirmed result for L. pneumophila in seven days and, since no confirmation steps are required, it can be up to seven days faster than traditional culture methods. Legiolert is also very simple to set up, with significantly reduced sample preparation and quality control time. After incubation, the Legiolert reagent produces an easy-to-read colorimetric signal in the presence of L. pneumophila, eliminating the need for laborious colony counting and removing subjectivity from the colony counting process. Because of its simplicity, Legiolert is highly repeatable and reproducible. When used with the Quanti-Tray /Legiolert method, Legiolert provides a confirmed Most Probable Number (MPN) count of

®

up to 2,272 L. pneumophila, compared to Petri plate counting ranges, which are ≤ 200 colony forming units (CFUs). MPN quantification is a measure directly comparable to CFUs.

BEATING LEGIONELLA Investigations performed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that almost all outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease in the United States over the past 14 years could have been prevented with more effective water safety management programs. Incorporating the ASHRAE standard into licensing and accreditation requirements and public health codes will substantially reduce the public health risk posed by Legionella. Dan Broder, PhD, is a scientist with IDEXX. Email: dan-broder@idexx.com

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WATER & WASTEWATER TREATMENT

When “complexed” by humic substances, heavy metals are generally considered less “bio-available” within an environment and thus less inhibitory to the microbial populations responsible for remediation and decomposition. This is important, as the inhibitory effects of heavy metals on microbial communities may have considerable negative impacts on the environments experiencing such contamination. In addition to heavy metals, other metals and excess levels of nutrients may be chelated and settled out by the large molecular weight humic acid molecules. This reduces the concentrations of nutrients and metals in the effluent.

Shactivate has been shown to reduce sludge volume and odours from wastewater lagoons. Photo: Triabarge, Wikimedia

Humic and fulvic acids can enhance wastewater treatment and water reservoir quality By A.S. Gavey

O

ne of the main concerns facing the wastewater treatment industry is the effect of aging infrastructure on system efficiency. However, improvements to efficiency can be made in many cases without incurring the cost of infrastructure upgrades. Oxidized lignite is a mined material originally derived from peat, and is usually found in conjunction with lignite coal. It typically contains a high proportion of humic substances in the form of organic acids. Humic and fulvic acids (sometimes referred to jointly as humic acids) are types of organic acids recognized as important environmental compounds. Humic materials have been widely studied for agricultural applications, such as stimulation of microbial communities within soil environments. However, the stimulation of microbial communities outside of the soil environment has received less attention. As a result, the

16  |  August 2017

potential benefits to other systems have been largely overlooked. There is evidence showing that treatment with humic substances stimulates the growth and proliferation of microbial communities responsible for the decomposition of organic material in sewage (Hartung 1992). In various types of sewage treatment systems, application of humic-based material has been found to increase volume capacity and improve effluent quality. Humic substances also play a role in the detoxification of certain compounds that are inhibitory to microbial populations. This mechanism encourages the growth of beneficial microbial communities responsible for decomposition. These benefits also extend to reservoir and lake environments, with industry research indicating that humic substances play a significant role in the detoxification of heavy metals (Linnik and Vasilchuk 2005).

WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT Shactivate, from SHAC Solutions Inc, is composed of liquefied oxidized lignite as a source of high quality humic acids. The product encourages decomposition of organic matter by stimulating beneficial resident microbial communities present in wastewater. Stimulation of these microbial communities results in digestion of organic solids at optimum rates, thereby reducing odours and increasing volume capacity within wastewater storage lagoons. While formulated to treat conditions found in municipal sewage, Shactivate may also be used in the treatment of decentralized wastewater treatment systems, including septic tanks, portable/ outdoor toilets, RVs and grease traps. There are various concerns associated with the use of such treatment in water or wastewater environments. In more complex wastewater treatment systems, the use of lignite-based products in combination with other physical and chemical treatments may be considered problematic. This is due to the potential formation of disinfection byproducts, as well as issues with fouling, BOD increases, etc. Therefore, it is understood that oxidized lignite and/or humic-based products may not be suitable for all water treatment systems. Their addition immediately prior to filtering, chlorination, or in conjunction with other chemical treatments, is not recommended. However, in product based studies, it was determined that, with the proper use continued overleaf...

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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WATER & WASTEWATER TREATMENT

Table 1: Solids Reduction over 2-month period in Lagoons #1 and #2. 5

Initial average of 4.5 ft of solids

4.5 4

Down to an average of 3 ft of solids

Solids / Sludge Level (feet)

3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

Lagoon #1 Prior to initial treatment

of the oxidized lignite products manufactured by SHAC, there were no increases in any trihalomethane (THM) precursors, THM concentrations, or suspended solids. In fact, improvements to clarity indicate that the potential for such problems was reduced as the suspended solids, which become absorbed to the high molecular weight lignite particles, settled out of suspension. Reservoirs, lagoons, anaerobic digesters and activated sludge systems are examples

of microbial communities, and increased removal of organic compounds via biodegradation. In one study conducted using Shactivate in a municipal lagoon system which services 2,800 people, reductions in accumulated solids were observed even as new effluent was added. The system consisted of five separate Initial average of lagoons. Lagoon #1 received raw sewage 2.5 ft of solids from the town and Lagoon #2 collected overflow from Lagoon #1. Odours were Down to an average not problematic, but there were concerns of 1.5 ft of solids with the levels of solids built up in both lagoons. Between 120 cm and 160 cm of solids had accumulated in Lagoon #1, and between 60 cm and 90 cm in Lagoon #2 prior to the first Shactivate treatment. Lagoon #3 and Lagoon #4 were empty at the beginning of the trial and were Lagoon #2 only used on an overflow basis. Lagoon 2 months post-treatment #5 functioned as a seepage site for water coming directly from Lagoon #2. The initial treatment of Shactivate was where treatment with oxidized lignite may applied at recommended rates in the early be of most benefit. summer to Lagoon #1. Meanwhile, incomBENEFITS TO LAGOONS ing raw sewage was diverted to Lagoon #2, Accumulation of organic solids can which was subsequently treated in the fall lead to odours and loss of storage capacity with recommended dosages. The aeration within sewage treatment systems/lagoons. unit in Lagoon #1 was taken out of operPeriodic dredging of solids requires expen- ation for the duration of the study and sive equipment, and results in high labour a maintenance treatment program was and disposal costs. However, the results established for both lagoons. of product case studies show reductions The first lagoon was monitored by in sludge volume and odours, stimulation municipal staff for approximately two

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18  |  August 2017

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


In one study conducted using Shactivate, reductions in accumulated solids were observed even as new effluent was added.

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months following treatment, with solids depth reduction of 45 cm reported during that time period. The second lagoon was also monitored after initial treatment, with a reported solids reduction of approximately 30 cm in less than two months. (See Table 1) Municipal maintenance staff also observed that odours had not become problematic during this time, even with the aeration system out of use. The cost benefit of treatment was found to be favorable, with a significant reduction in yearly budgeted operational costs.

LOWER CARBON FOOTPRINT Some engineering changes can add to the carbon footprint of a treatment operation, by requiring extra energy and added infrastructure costs. However, adding humic acids allows for improved reduction of odours and accumulated solids, without added energy expenditure. In fact, energy consumption is reduced in many cases. This is because aeration equipment may not be needed during treatment, and application of the product requires no specialized equipment. With reduced focus on energy-driven treatment systems, the product also helps users achieve carbon-reduction goals that are currently being implemented across North America. QUALITY OF HUMIC MATERIALS Humic acids are complex molecules that are formed by the breakdown of organic matter, and are defined collectively as the acid radicals or derivatives (including humic, fulvic and ulmic acids) found in humic matter. Many humic acid products on the market are actually humate products. Humates are the metal salts of humic acids. In practical terms, the material is termed an acid when the cation exchange sites on a humic molecule are filled mainly with hydrogen ions. The material is termed a humate when the cation exchange sites on a humic substance are filled mainly with cations other than hydrogen (metal complexes). Commercial humate products typically contain alkali-extracted humic acids, most often extracted by adding potassium hydroxide to raise the pH and allow for solubilization of the humic acid. SHAC products have not been extracted with alkali chemicals. The product contains both humic acid in suspension and fulvic acid in solution, and has a pH of 2.7 – 3 (similar acidity as vinegar). The presence of suspended humic acid and soluble fulvic acid in the product line makes for a highly bio-stimulatory product with a strong chelation/complexation capacity.

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August 2017  |  19


BIOSOLIDS

Solids suspension requires sufficient upflow in the tank. Solids can only be lifted when upflow velocity reaches a certain value. Traditional submersible mixers pump liquid forward, forming a high velocity plume. The velocity anywhere else in the tank is relatively low. Other mixing technologies push liquid downwards, where it spreads radially across the tank bottom and then upward along the tank side walls. If upflow velocity is not high enough, solids will settle at the bottom along the walls. This is not uncommon for facilities with traditional mixers installed. In most cases, to improve the mixing effect, much larger equipment was recommended. The motor power ranges from 3.7 kW – 17 kW. Dennis Jasinsky, utility supervisor of the Town, found the high performance centrifugal dispersing impeller (HPCDI) technology, developed by Revolmix, to be an effective solution to this application. HPCDI applies a new concept for mixing and a different mechanism. Its unique design creates a flow pattern well suited for solids suspension. HPCDI lifts water toward the impeller with a tornado-like swirling movement. At the tank bottom, this swirling movement sweeps the solids to the centre where they are suspended. Such a flow pattern leaves a completely clean tank bottom, even at the edge of the side wall. The vane configuration of the impeller allows HPCDI to pump more water at a ing solids suspended and a significant relatively low velocity. It provides effecamount settled at the tank bottom. The tive mixing by spreading solids outwards solids settlement problem was so severe with centrifugal forces. Combined with that the tank was taken out of service for the large impeller design, HPCDI creates more than four years. movement of the whole water body in Another problem with traditional the tank at an even velocity. Without mixers is the buildup of “ragging”, which high local turbulence, this flow pattern is comprised of such items as “flushable” provides significant energy saving. wipes. This can cause submersible mixer impeller imbalance and seal failures. Leak- RESULTS age into the motor further damages the The HPCDI was installed in 2015. It equipment. The plant had experienced provides sufficient mixing to the tank, frequent submersible mixer overhauls due with solids suspension capability. No to motor damage caused by seal failures. sludge buildup was observed after two In 2015, the Town decided to upgrade years of operation. Measured power draw its WWTP and bring the tank back into is about 1 kW. This is more than 80% less service. To address the solids settling energy compared to conventional mixing problem, different mixing technologies technologies. were evaluated. Energy saving is just part of the value

Banff's sludge tank mixer improves performance, cuts energy, maintenance costs By Li Wang and Greg Jackson

M

any municipalities have operation and maintenance problems with solids settlement in their wastewater treatment facilities, such as septage receiving tanks, sludge (storage) tanks, fermenters and digesters. This is especially true in those that accept sludge from primary clarifiers, which normally contain a certain amount of sand and grit. The sludge mixing tank at the Town of Banff, Alberta’s wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) receives sludge from its primary clarifiers and dissolved air flotation. Its design function is to mix received sludge and send it to the fermenters, where volatile fatty acid is produced for bio-nutrient removal. One 5 kW submersible mixer was originally installed for sludge mixing. However, it had difficulty keep20  |  August 2017

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


Sustainable Ecosystems

Soil retaining system helps urban trees reach provided to the plant. There is also a maturity By Eric Keshavarzi significant operation and maintenance

G

reen infrastructure and sustainability goals are of increasing importance, and achieving them requires technical knowledge and training in varied fields. Integration of soil and trees into urban areas substantially improves sustainability and helps alleviate some of our most pressing ecological challenges. These include air and water quality, rising temperatures, flooding and erosion from daily rainfall events. The West Don Lands, in Toronto, Ontario, is a community that is people focused, family friendly, environmentally sustainable and beautifully designed for living. It has a Stage 1 LEED ND GOLD certification under the pilot program established by the U.S. Green Building Council. One notable sustainable component, utilized in the design of the area’s streets, is a soil retaining system called Silva Cells™. Typical urban trees in the city core die after approximately seven years. However, Silva Cells help extend their life spans, thus promoting the growth of mature street trees. Although the City of Toronto had previously used Silva Cells as part of a stormwater management pilot program in The Queensway, their use as part of site

Installation of Silva Cells in Mill Street.

development is new. In fact, the West Don Lands streetsTop: areHPCDI the first in a toward Toronto lifts water subdivision tothebeimpeller designed this syswithwith a tornado-like At the tank tem installedswirling under movement. parking lay-bys and sidewalks. bottom, this swirling movement the centre Mill Streetsweeps was the the solids first tosubdivision where they are suspended. street in Toronto to be designed to include Left: The vane configuration this soil retaining system. As the lead of the impeller HPCDI to engineering consultant, allows R.V.Anderson pump more water at a relatively Associates coordinated all plans and speclow velocity. ifications with the landscape architect. About Silva Cells Silva Cells are a plastic/fiberglass structure of columns and beams that support paving above un-compacted planting

saving for the mixer. Previously, plant staff had to pull out the submersible mixer annually for cleaning and maintenance. In addition, the plant had to rebuild the submersible mixers every few years. The HPCDI is a top entry mixer and the only maintenance is an annual oil change for the gear box, which takes one operator about 20 minutes. This interval can be extended to four years if synthetic oil is used. The HPCDI was configured to create mixing under the impeller, with little disturbance to the water above it. There is no vortex at the water surface, which minimizes air/oxygen drawdown. This meant the sludge mixing tank could become a fermenter, producing volatile fatty biological removal. soil. acid The for structure has nutrient 92% void space It is estimated that about 40 kg – 100 and is a stable surface for the installation kg is produced daily, which is another of vehicle loaded-pavements. bonus from this upgrade project. When properly installed, they can achieve an AASHTO H-20 load rating.

Li Wang, M.Eng., M.Sc, is with Revolmix Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code Processing Ltd. www.revolmixing.com. loading can also be achieved through apGreg Jackson is with propriate design. ThisACG-Envirocan. is the required load (Revol Mixing is represented by ACGrating for structures such as underground Envirocan. For more information, Email: vaults, covers and grates in areas of trafgreg@acgtechnology.com) fic including sidewalks and parking lots.

The cell structure transfers the force to a base layer below the structure. Soil within the cells remains at low compaction rates, thereby creating ideal

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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine August 2017  |  21


WATER TREATMENT

Distributed treatment systems bring affordable, safe water to Alderville First Nation

A

Hallett’s vertical orientation and in-air UV lamp reduces space requirements and enables a quick change of the lamps without draining the system or risking damage to the quartz sleeve.

22  |  August 2017

joint Canada-Ontario pilot program is demonstrating the benefits of point-of-entry (POE) treatment and UV disinfection, to bring affordable, safe water to the First Nation community of Alderville, Ontario. The project is led by the Canadian unit of Arcadis, an engineering design consultancy firm based in the Netherlands. It provides a complete multi-barrier POE water treatment system for each of the 33 homes in the community, to improve water quality and protect residents from waterborne pathogens. The POE treatment systems are designed, assembled and operated by Arcadis to produce potable water that meets Ontario drinking water standards. Each residential POE system is installed outside of the home in an insulated and heated enclosure that combines water softening and filtration with an easy-to-operate UV disinfection system. A private well provides source water at each home, but water quality can vary depending on factors such as groundwater levels, soil conditions and hardness. This approach eliminates the need to build a central treatment plant and distribution system to serve the entire community. The installation of distribution pipes would have added significant economic and engineering challenges to this project, since many of the homes are separated by several kilometres. “We selected UV Pure Hallett systems for this project because they are simple to use, require very little maintenance and are certified to the NSF/ANSI 55 Class A standard,” says Yousry Hamdy, manager of water and wastewater for Arcadis. “The automatic cleaning system has prevented buildup of minerals on the quartz sleeves, which means we haven’t had to perform any manual cleanings, despite operating the units for more than a year.” Annual lamp changes are the only maintenance that the operator has performed

on the systems since commissioning in October 2015. “The vertical orientation and in-air UV lamp placement is also a big advantage. It reduces space requirements and enables us to quickly change the lamps without draining the system or risking damage to the quartz sleeve,” Yousry says. Hallett systems are also equipped with a 4-20 mA monitoring system and dual, smart UV sensors that provide continuous monitoring and display of UV intensity, net UV transmittance and UV dose. If any of the treated water parameters fall outside of the recommended ranges, the system will trigger an alarm, notify the operator, and shut down to prevent residents from using the water. Once the operator arrives, on-board data logging and self-diagnostic capabilities can help troubleshoot and quickly identify the cause. Arcadis is overseeing operations of the treatment systems, while simultaneously training a local operator from the Alderville First Nation community, who will assume full-time operation in December 2017. The firm was selected for the $1.1 million project by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, with assistance from the Ontario First Nations Technical Services Corporation and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change. This project is one of four pilots to determine the feasibility and suitability of using alternative, innovative and proven approaches, technologies and strategies to provide First Nation communities with safe drinking water. For more information, email: rvansant@uvpure.com, or visit www.uvpure.com

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


BIOSOLIDS

Kelowna installs larger sludge pump to meet increased demand

W

holesale changes are taking place at the Kelowna Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) in British Columbia. Construction is seemingly everywhere as the 42 million litres/day (MLD) facility undergoes the latest in a series of upgrades and modifications, all designed to better meet a demand that has grown steadily along with area growth. Some of those changes are major, such as nearly doubling capacity and switching from coarse bubble to fine bubble diffusion bioreactors. Others, like a smaller overall footprint and a reduction in electrical usage, are more subtle. In the face of all this change, facility officials had to make some serious decisions about how to deal with the equally-steady rising volume of biosolids – about a half-million litres per year. Every day, more than 60,000 kg of Class B biosolids are pumped from the dewatering operation to trucks for transport and eventual composting. When the plant’s expansion is complete, the existing Schwing Bioset KSP 17V(K) piston pump will be relegated to playing a backup role to a new Schwing Bioset Model KSP 45V(HD)L. The treatment facility, originally constructed in 1913, has undergone any number of overhauls to keep pace with population growth in one of the most desirable areas in all of Canada. According to Brian McAuley, Kelowna WWTF’s wastewater treatment foreman, the system itself has not been overwhelmed, but is approaching its limits. “The city is growing by about 10,000 residents a year, much faster than officials originally anticipated,” he says. “Granted, it has slowed a bit in the last couple of years, but, as economic conditions improve, that higher pace will most likely resume. With that in mind, and the fact that, during times of heavy rains and serious run-off from parking lots, we occasionally reach the 42 MLD peak, 24  |  August 2017

Schwing Bioset model KSP 45 V(HD)L piston pump and SD 350 screw feeder that pumps to truck loading station. (Shown during installation)

the decision was made to add capacity.” (which will employ fine bubble diffusion The latest round of changes costs technology), and the new, larger piston more than $60 million and includes pump to move dewatered solids to the a second set of secondary clarifiers, a trucks for transport. return activated sludge (RAS) room, a At a time when a majority of larger RAS splitter pump room to pump the wastewater treatment plants in North RAS back up to the new bioreactors, America opt to incinerate their dewaEnvironmental Science & Engineering Magazine


tered biosolids material, Kelowna, which at one point did just that, now collects, treats, transports and composts it, to create a saleable product. “To get to that point, we do an inline mix of primary sludge from the fermenter and secondary sludge from our number six bioreactor,” says McAuley. “We then add a small amount of polymer, send it to the centrifuge for dewatering, after which it drops down into multiple screw conveyors which route it to the Schwing Bioset pump for delivery to the trucks.” A pair of trailers, each capable of hauling 20,000 kg of sludge, transports it to a site near Vernon, roughly 46 km away. “Every day, we haul three trailers of sludge that has been dewatered to a point where it has between 17% and 21% solids content,” he says. “At the site, it is mixed with wood chips and aerated. After a month, it is totally decomposed. “But, to ensure the highest quality product, the site’s operators leave it to age another 60 days. At that point, what was once biosolid “cake” has become a soil additive called OgoGrow. It has proven so successful with area residents that the biggest problem the utility has is being able to make enough to satisfy demand.” Regardless of the end-product, McAuley says that having the ability to steadily and effectively pump dewatered sludge a decent distance, is for many their Achil-

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Dewatered sludge has to be pumped roughly 80 metres from the pumps to the sludge discharge ports at the loading facility.

les heel. At Kelowna, that distance is roughly 80 metres from the pumps to the sludge discharge ports at the loading facility. “That has not been an issue for us in the past and will not be an issue for us with the expanded system,” says McAuley. “The new Schwing Bioset pump has proven itself in applications much more demanding than ours and is rated to be

able to handle the loads even if we feed it from two centrifuges, which is a real possibility. Having the original Schwing Bioset pump as a backup affords us that much more peace of mind.” Schwing Bioset is represented in Ontario by Pro Aqua Inc. For more information, visit www.proaquasales.com, or www.schwingbioset.com

August 2017  |  25


WATER

Fine-tuning the meter installation protocol may provide more accurate measurements of water usage. lowest flow recorded at 30 L/min and the highest at 159 L/min. During the investigation, the department also reviewed the effects of different registers. They changed from mechanical to solid-state registers, and compared changes in registered usage.

VARIABLES AFFECTING METER ACCURACY The utility has the option of using digital encoders on the existing meters. A decision was made to replace mechanical registers with digital ones to determine their impact on meter accuracy. Digital solidstate registers are also capable of logging and transmitting data, but this option was not explored as part of this study.

Master Meter had provided a 75 mm Octave™ ultrasonic meter.

Evaluating water metering technologies for accuracy

O

ne water utility recently investigated methods to improve its strategic program for water meters. These improvements include updated testing equipment, a wider selection of approved metering technologies, and increased employee training. Their goal is to install the most appropriate meter for each specific use, and enhance customer service. The water utility serves approximately 240,000 residential and 20,000 commercial/industrial customer accounts through some 6,000 km of distribution mains. Improvements in this water meter program include updated testing equipment, a wider selection of approved metering technologies, and increased employee training. The utility is also testing radio modules, and considering a future with automated metering infrastructure (AMI). Historically, the utility installed meter types based on the application and size of the meter. As an example, commercial applications with water services 75 mm and larger would receive compound meters. Standardizing meter type installa26  |  August 2017

METER ASSEMBLY CONFIGURATION A “backflow condition” alarm occurred after the solid-state registers were installed on the compound meter. The team examined the installation configuration to determine what caused the alarm. A strainer bolted to the compound meter was apparently causing cavitation, which registered as backflow. The strainer was removed, which solved the cavitation/ A METER COMPARISON TEST CASE backflow condition. Testing meters for specific applicaThese changes resulted in an approxitions and flow rates is integral to the util- mate 3% – 4% increase in measured flow ity's strategic program. It selected one of for the compound meter. The increase their commercial customers with a chal- was likely due to the solid-state register’s lenging water demand as a test case. lack of moving parts and reduced drag, Master Meter had provided a 75 mm along with the indicated backflow condiOctave™ ultrasonic meter. The utility tion on the turbine register. installed this ultrasonic meter in-line with a 75 mm compound meter. This IMPROVED ACCURACY allowed them to compare performance OF METER TYPES FOR of both types of meters for a specific SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS application. Initially, manual readings were taken The 75 mm meters used in this test from the meters each day. These readserved an existing customer with a fairly ings indicated consistently higher usage continuous flow rate. The flow main- measurement from the ultrasonic meter. tained an average of 102 L/min, with the continued overleaf... tions is a common practice among water suppliers. However, a loss of accuracy can be accentuated at certain flow rates, depending on the meter type, and some meters lose accuracy over their years in service. Fine-tuning the meter installation protocol may provide more accurate measurements of water usage.

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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WATER

However, the utility needed more accurate data to fully understand how the meters performed at various flow ranges. To enhance the accuracy of the comparison, electronic data loggers were installed on both meters to transmit hourly usage logs. The logs allowed the utility to compute minimum, maximum and hourly flows. Overlaying the flow graphs from the two meters allowed more in-depth analysis. The ultrasonic meter consistently registered more usage on average. However, by expanding the low, mid-range, and high flow sections of the graphs, each meter’s performance at those ranges is evident. Looking at low flows from 0 L/min – 60 L/min, the ultrasonic meter consistently registered more flow than the compound meter. Analysis of the mid-range results showed that the ultrasonic meter also consistently picked up more accurate registration in the 91 L/min – 121 L/min flow range. This mid-flow range is called

Table 1: Sample Daily Comparison.

the “crossover range.” Compound meters are designed to measure a wide range of flow patterns by combining the efficiencies of positive displacement and turbine meters. In a compound meter, when the flow changes from the low flow (positive

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28  |  August 2017

displacement) chamber to the high flow (turbine) chamber, inaccuracies in registration may occur because the flow is split between the two measuring chambers. This compound meter’s crossover range is approximately 38 L/min – 114 L/min. Conversely, at ranges of 151 L/min and higher, the compound meter registered very close to, or even higher than, the ultrasonic meter. The similarity of the high flow accuracies corroborates the meter test results, which showed that both meters met industry standards. This also indicated that the data from lower flow ranges was accurate. Both meters met AWWA standards throughout the course of the testing. However, for this specific flow scenario the ultrasonic meter appeared to offer an improvement in overall accuracy compared to the compound meter. For the 370-day test period, the total additional flow registered by the ultrasonic meter was over four million litres. Improvements from replacing the registers would also need to be factored into this computation.

AWWA STANDARDS AND PERFORMANCE As previously noted, both meter types met AWWA standards throughout the course of the testing. However, in viewing Table 1 which shows assorted daily consumption totals in US gallons, the ultrasonic meter appeared to offer an improvement in overall accuracy as demonstrated by the additional flow Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


(shown in green), when compared to the compound meter. Table 2 shows the correlation between an average daily registration loss in US gallons, and the accompanying projected daily loss in revenue.

CONTINUED METER PROGRAM MODIFICATIONS The utility is strategically assessing various meters, register types and manufacturers. As part of the process, it plans to upgrade its testing and training facility to include gravimetric testing and data monitoring. These changes will provide more scientifically-based meter selections. Additionally, a continual evaluation process will help determine the best meter for each service use, flow range and fluctuations. After the test comparing the ultrasonic meter and compound meter, the utility purchased ten additional ultrasonic meters in order to analyze their performance in a variety of flow ranges and configurations.

Table 2: Compound vs. Ultrasonic Consumption Readings.

It is installing the ultrasonic meters specifications as one of the commercial/ at locations with various flow rates and industrial metering options. consumption types such as churches, schools and businesses. Based on this test For more information, case, the utility has added ultrasonic meter visit www.mastermeter.com

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August 2017  |  29


WATER

Thermal mass flow meter helps improve chlorine disinfection system By Steve Cox

A

fter experiencing gas measurement accuracy problems with their water treatment facility’s chlorine disinfection system, city staff recognized they needed a better solution. Wherever chlorine is in use, accurate measurement of the gas is essential for successful disinfection, water quality and for safety purposes.

THE PROBLEM Existing flow meters at the city’s plant were providing inconsistent gas readings that were causing multiple system problems. It was determined that the chlorinator system lacked suitable flow measurement turndown capability (measuring range) and was not repeatable at lower flow rates. This meant that the monthly totalized chlorine usage was not consistent with the actual treatment cycles. Unreliable control over the amount of chlorine being dispensed resulted in either excessive chlorine use or potentially hazardous and expensive re-treatment. The addition of too much chlorine affects water taste, wastes expensive chlorine gas and adds the cost of extra residual chlorine removal. With too little chlorine added, the disinfection treatment process is incomplete, and the water requires costly additional alternative treatment or re-treatment. For decades, the city’s water treatment facility had been in operation with many different types of equipment in use. The plant’s disinfection system originally relied on site-gauge rotameters for gas measurement. Differential pressure (dP) type orifice plate flow meters were added later for automated control purposes to increase the efficiency of operations. At the minimum low gas flow rates required by the system, the orifice plate dP meters were unable to measure accurately since there was little pressure differential available. The limited flow range of 30  |  August 2017

Installed ST100L flow meter with Vortab flow conditioner.

the dP meters also could not support the changing dose rates required with fluctuating water demand. Engineering staff decided a different gas flow meter solution was needed for use in a 25 mm diameter pipe at a flow rate of 68 kg/day – 907 kg/day. The facility geographic location required that the new flow meters for the disinfection system would need to function over an operating temperature range of 16°C – 38°C, at a pressure of 0 psig – 10 psig (0 bar(g) – 0.7 bar(g)). The engineering staff determined that the flow meter chosen would just measure chlorine gases. Adding to the accuracy challenge, however, the meter would be installed in a cramped equipment location, where inadequate straight-pipe run was present. Accurate, acceptable measurement would require the flow meter to function well in the transitional zone, where the gas flow profile was transitioning

from laminar to turbulent. A mass flow meter, instead of relying on dP technology, would provide an additional advantage of allowing a simple, direct means of reconciling monthly throughput, compared against the change in weight of the chlorine gas containers that were installed on load cell technology scales.

THE SOLUTION Plant engineers selected the Model ST100L mass flow meter with built-in Vortab® flow conditioner from Fluid Components International (FCI). This meter is an in-line, spool piece instrument that combines intelligent transmitter/electronics and a precision thermal sensor for accurate measurement in line sizes up to 50 mm, over a wide turndown range. The meter was installed in the water system’s chlorine gas inlet line to the chlorinator panel. To provide maximum corrosion resistance and longest

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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profile distortions produced by process equipment obstructions and/or inadequate straight run of pipe and ducting. It also mitigates temperature and media stratification, which can be present at low flow rates.

CONCLUSION The ST100L flow meters were installed and commissioned without any issues. They are in service on the chlorine gas inlet lines and achieving consistently accurate and repeatable flow measurement results. The treatment plant is Water treatment plant chlorine tanks. now achieving the desired disinfection results with proper dosing at significant To ensure smooth installation and cost savings due to reduced chlorine successful operation, the meter’s design use, avoiding re-treatment and lessened includes an integral Vortab flow condi- residual chlorine removal processes. tioner. This ensures optimal installed performance by overcoming the plant’s Steve Cox is with Fluid Components limited piping straight run and the International (FCI). Email: flow range occurring in the transitional eflow@fluidcomponents.com flow region. The in-line flow conditioner eliminates both swirl and velocity

P H O T O : L A C I T É , O N TA R I O

service life in the highly corrosive chlorine gas environment, the meter’s entire sensor assembly, including flow elements, flow body and Vortab flow conditioner elements, are fabricated entirely of Hastelloy C-276. Gas flow meters from FCI are typically calibrated in the manufacturer’s NIST traceable flow laboratory, using the actual gas to be measured and at the installation’s actual temperature and pressure conditions. However, chlorine gas presents safety concerns during the calibration process which renders that process unfeasible. It has also been established that air equivalency calibrations for chlorine gas are inaccurate, unrepeatable and simply inadequate. This problem is solved by combining a lab-based equivalency basic calibration with an on-site, in situ calibration adjustment against the site’s rotameters, all performed by an FCI field service technician. This achieved the highly accurate and repeatable measurement needed by the client. The on-site calibration matching proved to be the best solution, because the totalized flow readings from the FCI Model ST100L and the weigh scale comparison were now consistently aligned. The flow meter chosen by the plant engineers measures air/gas flow from 0.25 SFPS – 1000 SFPS (0.07 NMPS – 305 NMPS), with turndowns of 100:1 and accuracy of ±0.75% of reading, ±0.5% of full scale. To match present and future DCS, PLC or SCADA needs, plant engineers would be able to choose from multiple output options, including triple 4-20 mA analog, frequency/pulse, or certified digital bus communications of HART, Foundation Fieldbus, Profibus PA and Modbus RS485. The new meter’s features include graphical, multi-variable, backlit LCD readout, which provides a continuous display of all process measurements, alarm status and service diagnostics. Its four-button user keyboard is activated through the glass, which means the user never needs to remove lids or open the unit at the installation site. Low maintenance and long life were important decisions that the plant team took into consideration when selecting their new meter.

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August 2017  |  31


WATER

The R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant has been featured in numerous television shows and movies because of its incredible architectural design and Art Deco style.

New access hatches being installed on historic water plant’s settling basins

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he R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant provides 34% of the water supply for the City of Toronto – 113,450 million litres annually. Located along Lake Ontario’s shoreline in the Beaches neighbourhood, the plant may look familiar to some passersby. It has been featured in numerous television shows and movies because of its incredible architectural design and Art Deco style. Remember the final scene in the film, The Big Heist, where Donald Sutherland’s character is sentenced to prison? The film’s “prison” was the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant. The plant is the largest of four water treatment facilities in Toronto. Its construction began in 1932 to combat the shortage of clean drinking water for a growing population. The building was used to make an architectural statement and was constructed to resemble a royal cathedral with modern Art Deco influences. After nearly a decade of construction, the plant opened in November 32  |  August 2017

1941 and has been in continuous operation since. Named after the long-serving Commissioner of Public Works, Roland Caldwell Harris, the building’s regal exterior and marbled interior earned it the nickname, “The Palace of Purification”. The R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant has undergone several phases of construction since its introduction, almost 80 years ago. The latest phase began in 2015 to upgrade the interior and exterior structures, a large-scale project that is estimated to cost approximately $27 million. As part of the construction, the plant’s settling basins have undergone a rehabilitation process that includes upgrading the internal ladders, valves and access hatches. Associated Engineering was hired by the City of Toronto as the consultant for the plant’s rehabilitation process. Their work entailed creating detailed designs for the project, and managing the work on behalf of the City to ensure

the construction follows the design and stays on budget. MSU Mississauga Ltd. was selected by Associated Engineering as the preferred supplier for the new access hatches that would be installed over the plant’s settling basins. The City contracted Bennett Mechanical Installations, a major Canadian contracting company with 30 years experience working on water and wastewater treatment facilities throughout Canada, to perform the on-site construction. Construction on the plant’s settling basins began in 2016. Measuring 300 metres long by 100 metres wide, the basins are six times longer than a standard Olympic-size swimming pool. The plant contains two sets of three basins, located on opposite ends of the building. The basins on the east side were built in the early 1930s, and the ones on the west side in the 1950s. Upgrading the basins includes installing an automatic wash down system in each of the basins, a waterproofing system, and new hatch covers made by MSU Mississauga. “Over top of the settling basins there are dozens of access openings, which I believe are predominantly used for inspection, as opposed to access,” said Virginia Junkin, president, MSU Mississauga. “The plant is in continuous operation, which means only three of the basins can be worked on at a time so there’s no disruption to the treatment process.” To create the hatches, the team at MSU Mississauga prepared detailed shop drawings for Associated Engineering to incorporate into their project design in 2015. They were asked to integrate some special features into their designs for the access hatches. Associated Engineering requested that the access hatches take an occasional traffic load, which means they can be driven over. They also requested that the covers comply with an NSF 61 potable water standard. This meant the entire unit had to be coated with a specially applied paint that is NSF 61 compliant. An NSF 61 compliant product won’t allow contaminants to leach into the drinking water, which ensures it is safe

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


for consumption. A special heavy-duty lifting handle and gas strut were also requested on some of the hatches, to make them easier to open. MSU Mississauga also opted to design the hatches from aluminum because of its lightweight and corrosion-resistant qualities. They also included features such as stainless steel, tamper-proof hardware designed to prevent unauthorized access, and locking arms to hold the hatches open at 90 degrees vertical. The addition of locking arms on the hatches means they can be locked into an open position, so there is no risk of the hatch falling on a worker at the plant. Both features make the access hatches safer and more secure. “The average person might underestimate the amount of work that goes into designing an access solution,” said Junkin. “You have to take into consideration a variety of factors during the design process, such as the site conditions, the number of people using the

www.esemag.com

hatch and how often, the specifications, you'll have to redo everything to make the best materials to use, and the load it code-compliant. Working with a certirequirements.” fied supplier guarantees that everything For example, if pedestrians or cars will be code-compliant because the will be walking or driving over the Canadian Welding Bureau audits certihatches, the hatches need to be designed fied companies semi-annually to make to withstand that load. sure their products meet all safety stanThe R.C. Harris Water Treatment dards.” Plant was designated a heritage site in Once the final design for the new access 1998 under the Ontario Heritage Act. hatches was approved by Associated EngiThis presented some challenges during neering, MSU Mississauga began supplythe design process, as the Heritage Act ing their hatches to Bennett Mechanical makes preserving the plant’s unique Installations in 2016. appearance a priority. The rehabilitation of the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant is scheduled to CERTIFICATION be completed in summer 2018. It is an It is especially important to hire a important piece of Ontario’s history and certified supplier for infrastructure proj- maintaining it will ensure it continues to ects, where strict federal building codes operate for another 80 years. and safety regulations must be followed. "Products from non-certified suppli- For more information, visit ers won't comply with building codes, www.msumississauga.com, or email which means there will be structural virginia@msumississauga.com errors and safety concerns,” said Junkin. “It will ultimately cost more because

August 2017  |  33


WASTEWATER

effluent sewer helps community rebuild after destructive fire By William Hensley

I

n early 2009, a record-breaking heat wave struck the state of Victoria in southeast Australia, making already dry conditions even worse. In addition, strong winds and low humidity combined to create some of the highest-risk fire conditions ever experienced in the region. Fierce winds knocked down power lines, resulting in fires that quickly grew into the largest, most destructive firestorm in modern Australian history. The community of Kinglake West, home to about 1,000 residents, was dramatically impacted. Much of the town needed to be rebuilt, including its infrastructure. In particular, the community needed a collection system to transport wastewater from individual homes to a decentralized wastewater treatment plant. One of the primary goals of Yarra Valley Water, the local water and wastewater authority, was to construct an innovative collection system that would be affordable and effective and would also provide some environmental benefits. Challenges included small lot sizes, steep gradients and high rainfall. With support from the community, Yarra Valley Water chose an Orenco Effluent Sewer , a type of pressure sewer also known as a STEP/ STEG (septic tank effluent pump/septic tank effluent gravity) system.

®

A GRADUAL REBUILDING Kinglake West began the installation of its Orenco sewer in 2010. First, the watertight force mains and service connections to the community were installed. With nothing but effluent being pumped through the pipes, minimum flushing velocities, manholes and costly lift stations were unnecessary. This was especially important, because new homes would not be connected to the wastewater system all at once. Instead, individual residences were added gradually as homeowners were able to rebuild. Another unique benefit of effluent 34  |  August 2017

Kinglake West began the installation of its Orenco sewer in 2010, following a firestorm in 2009.

sewers is their use of shallowly buried, small-diameter transport lines that follow the natural contour of the land. These can be installed using light-duty equipment such as a trencher, directional boring machine, or small excavator. This dramatically reduced the time, cost and complexity of designing and installing the wastewater collection system. In contrast, a conventional gravity sewer system would likely have required deep excavations to install 200-mm mainlines, plus manholes and lift stations. Considering the hilly terrain around Kinglake West, the installation of an Effluent Sewer was estimated to cost about 40% less than that of a gravity sewer, a savings of some C$789,000. Next, a STEP pumping package was installed at each property. The package includes a watertight tank, a Biotube pump vault and filter, an Orenco highhead effluent pump, and a set of float

®

switches. Once connected to the force main, primary-treated effluent from each home is pumped to the community's wastewater treatment facility. The watertight, on-lot tank has a volume of 3,800 litres. Primary treatment takes place in the tank, reducing the strength of the organic waste being discharged to the wastewater treatment system. This allows designers to reduce the overall size and cost of the treatment facility. The tank’s volume is large enough for several days of retention time. It also has a minimum 24-hours worth of emergency storage volume that prevents unnecessary disruption to homeowners during power outages and routine maintenance. This alleviates the need for operators to make expensive after-hours maintenance calls in the event of a nighttime alarm. A Biotube pump vault was installed in each on-lot tank. The pump vault houses

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


the filter, the pump, and the float switches. The filter consists of 3 mm mesh, which prevents the discharge of any larger solids. The organic matter retained in the tank is anaerobically digested by naturally occurring bacteria. Undigested solids accumulate slowly in the tank, so pump-outs are typically needed only once every 10 years, depending on the number of residents in the home. The lightweight effluent pump is made of stainless steel and engineered plastics. The pump typically comes on only three to five times a day for a total of less than 30 minutes, and has a life expectancy of over 20 years. While these pumps are designed to be field-repairable using standard tools, they rarely require servicing beyond a simple cleaning of the intake screen. The float switches include a high-level alarm float, a pump on/off float, and a redundant off/low-level alarm float. Liquid is stored in the watertight tank until it reaches the float “on” level. The pump then engages until the liquid is reduced to the “off” level. In this way, an Orenco sewer collection system provides a more equalized flow to the treatment facility than that of a gravity sewer, in which all flow passes immediately into the collection lines. According to Andrew Gellie, community sewerage planning manager for Yarra Valley Water, “the Kinglake West project was undertaken to determine whether it was possible to deliver a more sustainable sewerage solution in a developed, unsewered ‘community sewerage’ area. We found the use of the STEP tanks to be a successful approach to extending wastewater services to this small community. The tanks allowed us to proceed with a staged approach to help Kinglake West rebuild.”

LOW OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS The operation and maintenance requirements of an Effluent Sewer are extremely low. Each residence and business connected to the system requires routine service only every other year. A typical service consists of measuring and recording solids accumulations in the on-lot tank, cleaning the filter and pump intake screen (if needed), and verifying proper operation of the pump, www.esemag.com

floats and control panel. The valves in the system are also inspected and tested to make sure they are in good working condition. Because solids aren’t pumped through the force main, flushing (or “pigging”) of the mainline isn’t required. An Effluent Sewer allowed Yarra Valley Water to provide a feasible, longterm solution to its customers in Kinglake West soon after a major crisis. Gellie

said: “We benefited from reduced capital and operating costs for the collection system and sewage treatment plant.” This cost-effective technology has gone a long way toward helping the community rebuild and recover from the devastating fires of 2009. William Hensley is with Orenco Systems, Inc. Email: bhensley@orenco.com

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August 2017  |  35


SPECIAL FOCUS: CLIMATE CHANGE & RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

Researchers from the Cambridge Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction attach sensors to a test pipe in Cornell’s Geotechnical Lifelines Large-Scale Testing Facility.

Cornell tests 'smart,' resilient underground infrastructure By Syl Kacapyr

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he future looks “smart” for underground infrastructure after a firstof-its-kind experiment was recently conducted at the Cornell University’s Geotechnical Lifelines Large-Scale Testing Facility. Like many of today’s household devices, modern infrastructure is gaining the ability to collect and exchange valuable data, using wireless devices that monitor the health of buildings and bridges, for example, in real time. But, wireless systems for underground infrastructure, such as utility pipelines, are much more difficult to test in the field, especially during rare and extreme events such as earthquakes. The Cornell facility tested several advanced sensors developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Cambridge Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction. The sensors, which can collectively measure strain, temperature, 36  |  August 2017

movement and leakage, were installed along a 13-metre section of a hazard-resilient pipeline being tested for earthquake fault-rupture performance. The pipeline is produced by IPEX, using a molecularly-oriented polyvinylchloride material engineered to stretch, bend and compress as it withstands extreme ground deformation, similar to that occurring during earthquakes, floods and construction-related activity. Engineers from Oakland, California, and Vancouver, British Columbia, traveled to Cornell to watch as the pipe experienced a simulated fault rupture, while buried inside a hydraulically powered “split basin” filled with 72 tonnes of soil. The test was the first use of the advanced sensors for the purpose of monitoring buried infrastructure, and gave an unprecedented look at the pipe’s ability to elongate and bend while being subject to ground failure.

“It was able to accommodate 50% more ground deformation than the last design, based on modifications Cornell suggested from our testing four years ago,” said Brad Wham, a geotechnical engineering postdoctoral associate at Cornell. In addition to the scores of instruments installed for the large-scale test, new technologies employed included: • Distributed strain sensing – A laser pulse is injected through an optical fibre cable glued to a pipe. By examining the interaction signal that is generated at every point of the fibre, it is possible to obtain strain values continuously along the pipeline. • Fibre Bragg grating sensing – A special fibre optic line that splits and diffracts light into wavelengths, allowing it to monitor bending and axial deformations accurately at discrete points, especially at pipe joints. • Frequency-domain reflectometry, wireless sensor network – Metal prongs that use an electric field to measure changes in soil moisture and detect leaks. The device is battery powered and can wirelessly transmit data through soil, using a coupled magnetic induction and electromagnetic wireless sensor network system. • Smart joint-opening detection – Small magnets are attached at pipe joint locations. Once a pipe has stretched or compressed to a specific limit, the magnets conjoin to trigger the wireless sensor network to initiate the monitoring. The sensors drew interest from the attending municipal engineers, who need new ways to monitor the performance of underground infrastructure. As cities begin to adopt sensor technologies, more data will exist, not just for infrastructure, but for the surrounding environment as well. “You can learn something about sources of subsidence or corrosion that affect other structures, or something about the geographic distribution of earthquake or hurricane damage, which then allows you to make improved decisions about emergency response,” said Tom O’Rourke, professor of civil and environmental engineering and principal investigator of the research project. The test also proved that sensors

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provide valuable feedback to companies like IPEX that want to advance the engineering behind new products and improve system-wide performance. “This is about having feedback and intelligence for underground lifeline systems, such as water supplies, electric power and telecommunications, which provide the services and resources that define a modern city,” O’Rourke said. “It’s pretty clear to me that within 20 years there will be intelligence integrated into every aspect of infrastructure.” “The vision we have is that future infrastructure looks after itself by sensing and adapting to the changing environment,” said Kenichi Soga, professor at Berkeley and principal investigator for the Berkeley and Cambridge teams. “Rapidly developing sensor technologies and data analytics give us the opportunity to make this happen.” The research team will excavate the pipeline and analyze the massive amount

The pipe experienced a simulated fault rupture while buried inside a hydraulically powered “split basin”.

of data collected by the sensors. “It’s To see a video of the test basin being going to be game-changing,” said Wham, prepared, visit: www.cornell.edu/video/ who added that some of the devices are smart-infrastructure-test capable of recording up to a thousand measurements per second or more. “We Syl Kacapyr is PR and content manager have many, many gigs of data right now for Cornell University Engineering. for measurements that were previously For more information, visit: www.engineering.cornell.edu unattainable.”

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August 2017  |  37


SPECIAL FOCUS: CLIMATE CHANGE & RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

Monitoring and maintenance programs help protect green infrastructure investments By Robert Dusenbury, Bridget Forbes, Sarah Minick and Mike Adamow

T

he San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) has invested significant resources over the past decade into developing its green infrastructure (GI) program, beginning with creating policy and regulatory requirements and extending through maintenance and monitoring of built facilities. Program objectives include stormwater runoff reduction, providing and maintaining community benefits, and collaborating and sharing information with other municipal GI programs. As part of the first phase of the 20-year, $6.9 billion citywide Sewer System Improvement Program (SSIP), the SFPUC is constructing eight green infrastructure early implementation projects (EIPs), one in each of San Francisco’s urban watersheds, to be completed by 2018. These include projects such as bioretention, permeable pavement, infiltration galleries, and creek daylighting. To protect their investment over the lifespan of these new EIP facilities, the

TABLE 1. GI monitoring program objectives.

Performance Evaluation

Knowledge Building

1. Measure stormwater runoff peak flow and volume reduction

1. Inform future project planning and design 2. Collaborate with City family and Bay Area stakeholders

2. Evaluate the impacts of land use and technology choice on GI cost & performance

3. Establish feedback loop incorporating lessons learned into standard operating procedures and planning/design

3. Determine if GI performs as intended and designed

4. Establish a long-term research and development strategy

SFPUC has put into practice a rigorous suite of maintenance protocols to maintain the appearance and function of GI facilities. Similarly, they have created a comprehensive GI monitoring plan to demonstrate that built projects are delivering the expected return on investment

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resource and budgetary planning, as well as maintaining and demonstrating continual facility performance over the decades following construction. Maintenance and monitoring each play a critical role in protecting and validating green infrastructure assets over their lifetime. Maintenance protects asset investment and ensures community support over the long term. Performance monitoring provides a validation tool to demonstrate that stormwater is being kept out of the sewer system, with the goal of meeting or exceeding model predictions from the design phase. Taking the long view of a life cycle perspective is critical for creating successful monitoring and maintenance programs that holistically contribute to the goals and objectives of the GI program.

The level sensors are low cost, low maintenance, and produce high quality data, thereby providing both a high level of confidence in the measured results and significant cost savings. by performance-based design standards. The SFPUC has identified specific performance- and knowledge-based monitoring program objectives used to evaluate the effective implementation of GI facilities. (See Table 1)

uous flow in the combined sewer mains were placed in the culverts draining the catch basins at the end of a block where GI had been installed. These flow meters required a minimum flow depth of 6.35 mm to 12.7 mm to successfully log flow measurements. A SHIFT IN MONITORING This is not conducive to measuring the TECHNIQUES lower range of flows that are importThe SFPUC is continually striving ant to evaluating GI performance at the to improve monitoring techniques in block scale. They were further hindered order to best evaluate the performance by exposure to constant wet-dry cycles PERFORMANCE MONITORING of implemented GI facilities. When the in the culverts due to San Francisco’s Performance monitoring is a valida- GI monitoring program was initiated in Mediterranean climate, which is not a tion tool to demonstrate whether a facil- 2009, the same area-velocity flow meters problem in the sewer mains where saniity is meeting expectations established that were being used to monitor contin- tary flows are constant. The low flow and dry weather periods resulted in low data quality. In response, the program’s preferred equipment is now sensors that are more reliable under such variable flow conditions. The predominant equipment configuration now being utilized is very simple, with a single level sensor placed in the catch basin at the downstream end of the block. Depth measurements can be converted into flow data, using a modified weir equation developed via a wet calibration performed in the field at the time of installation. Wet calibration establishes an empirical depth:discharge relationship by pumping a known flow rate into the catch basin and logging the associated depth readings. Paired depth and flow rate readings are used to build a curve that can later be used to translate depth measurements into flow rates. The level sensors are low cost, low maintenance, and produce high quality data, thereby providing both a high level of confidence in the measured results and significant cost savings. The site- and technology-specific nature of GI monitoring demands a variety of www.wcwc.ca monitoring methods be employed for the EIPs. However, level sensors were selected

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as the most reliable and lowest cost equipment, and they were the preferred option wherever compatible with site conditions. Other equipment choices include flow   meters in sewer mains and inline flow meters used to measure water reuse by a   rainwater harvesting system. In aggregate, the current EIP moni-   toring plan includes: 35 level sensors used to measure flow and/or ponding   depth; four flow meters; and one inline   mechanical flow meter.

       

                                         

MONITORING METHODS AND DATA QUALITY The three major components of the SFPUC monitoring program include   data collection, data processing/analysis, and report writing. To ensure high qual-   ity results from monitoring activities, the SFPUC has produced standard operating   procedures (SOPs) and Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities (QA/QC).   It has also established a feedback loop for information resulting from monitor-   ing and maintenance activities to inform   future project selection and design. The most cost-effective technologies   will be targeted for increased implementation in compatible settings. Monitoring   results will also be evaluated in consideration of revising the performance-based   design criteria that all new GI facilities must meet.   FACILITY MAINTENANCE   As with monitoring, the SFPUC has also established maintenance SOPs to   ensure facilities consistently stay in good repair, and a feedback loop to inform   design standards and revise standard details and specifications as appropriate.   To protect their investment and ensure   ongoing performance and community acceptance of their GI facilities, the SPFUC   has developed a schedule of activities for maintaining different types of GI facilities.   That information has been incorporated into a Maintenance Model software tool   that the SFPUC developed to plan and budget for maintenance of a GI project   over its full lifetime, and also into a Green Infrastructure Maintenance Field Guide   (SSIP-PMC, 2016) for field crews. The maintenance field guide provides   www.esemag.com

direction on routine maintenance activities for green infrastructure projects within San Francisco. It is intended to be used by anyone conducting routine maintenance on GI systems such as bioretention planters and permeable paving. The guide provides crews with checklists and instructions on how to properly document their visits with written descriptions and photographs.

CONCLUSIONS The main conclusions to date are in the form of lessons learned, which can inform future modifications to the monitoring and maintenance programs: • More proactive field reconnaissance and field verification measures to confirm the actual catchment area of each facility during the design phase can help prevent inadvertently undersized facilities. • Larger inlet forebays, perhaps in the form of a full catch basin just upstream with overflow directed to the facility, would help keep debris out of the facility interior where it is more visible to the public and can clog flows. • Coordinating labour activities by geographic proximity helps reduce monitoring and maintenance costs. • Providing training for maintenance staff may increase upfront labour costs, but will pay out in the long run by yielding higher quality results. The monitoring and maintenance programs established by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission help protect their investment in green infrastructure, ensuring that aesthetics and functionality are maintained and demonstrating that GI is providing the expected return on their investment. Robert Dusenbury and Bridget Forbes are with Lotus Water. Sarah Minick and Mike Adamow are with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. For more information, email: rdusenbury@lotuswater.com

 

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August 2017  |  41


SPECIAL FOCUS: CLIMATE CHANGE & RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

World Water Council calls on governments to focus on water issues

World Water Council President Benedito Braga

W

ith less than one year to go before the 8th World Water Forum takes place in Brasilia in March 2018, the World Water Council (WWC) calls on all governments to focus on water issues and prioritize water resources and management. This is

in accordance with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals to make water and sanitation for all a reality by 2030. According to the latest figures from the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme in 2015, 91% of the global population uses an improved drinking water source, up from 76% in 1990. There has been significant progress in access to drinking water, as 2.6 billion people, equivalent to one-third of the current global population, have gained access to an improved drinking water source since 1990. However, due to poor quality water and poor management, improved water sources do not equate to access to safe drinking water.

In addition, while access to improved sources has increased in all regions, rates of progress have varied. Coverage in Asia has increased dramatically, with over half a billion people gaining access in China alone. In Latin America and the Caribbean, 95% of the population now have access to improved drinking water sources. However, in Sub-Saharan Africa, approximately one-third of the population is still without improved access. There are significant rural and urban disparities. Four out of five people living in urban areas now have access to piped drinking water on premises, compared with just one in three people living in rural areas. Global progress achieved in access to

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• MOST EFFICIENT WELL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM AVAILABLE

42  |  August 2017

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


sanitation lags far behind water, as the Millennial Development Goal (MDG) for sanitation failed to meet its target. By the time the MDG reached its deadline   in 2015, it was estimated that 32% (2.4 billion) people globally still didn’t have   access to improved sanitation facilities.

tripled to the level of $600 billion a year to meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. A promising first step was that, during a meeting with the HLPW in Budapest last year, the World Bank and eight other multilateral development banks as well as the Green Climate Fund collectively pledged to work towards doubling the amount invested into water infrastructure over the next five years. However, public and concessional finances will not be enough to reach the investment level necessary for a water secure world. Private funds must have a role as well.” Kőrösi continues: “We have 15 to 20 years before facing a significantly bigger challenge emanating from climate change and regional water crises interlinking into a global one.” The World Water Council, founded in 1996, is comprised of over 300 member organizations globally, with the primary goal to catalyze action on critical water issues at every level so as to improve water security around the world. It is recognized as a key facilitator in water security finance discussions and a driving force for political change in the quest for water security. The World Water Council pioneers numerous exciting and innovative programs, working to promote adaptation measures for water usage in the face of imminent climate change, increase political investment, and create water-conscious cities. The 8th World Water Forum is expecting over 30.000 participants and will take place March 18 – 23, 2018, in Brazil. The World Water Council hopes to build on the success achieved during the 7th World Water Forum, which was held in Korea in 2015. This marked a step forward in international water cooperation by implementing a roadmap to guide work and by securing major political agreements.

IMPROVED WATER SOURCES ARE NOT ALWAYS SAFE WATER   SOURCES   Despite the global achievements in improved water sources, it is estimated   that at least 25% are essentially unsafe due to various reasons, including, among   others, the presence of fecal contaminants. World Water Council President   Benedito Braga states that “world leaders realize that sanitation is fundamental   to public health, but we need to act now. In order to make water and sanitation   universally available by 2030, we need commitment at the highest levels. Of   equal importance is that water sources are being optimized to ensure that they   are safe water sources.”   Braga continues: “For every dollar invested in water and sanitation, there   is an estimated $4.3 dollar return in the form of reduced health care costs   for individuals and society worldwide. And this does not take into account   the benefits to global development, which enable countries and societies   to progress economically, culturally and politically. For example, for every   $1 billion dollars invested in water and wastewater, an estimated 28,500 jobs   will be created.” It is important to invest in infrastruc  ture that improves water security and resil  ient management of resources, for populations, for economies, and for the envi  ronment. Businesses are also increasingly aware of the importance of investment in   sustainable water resources management, with 46% of CEOs agreeing that resource   scarcity and climate change will transform For more information, visit: their business in the next five years.   Csaba Kőrösi, Director of Environ- www.worldwatercouncil.org mental Sustainability at the Office of the   President of the Republic of Hungary and Sherpa of the High Level Panel on   Water (HLPW), states: “Global water investments must be   www.esemag.com

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COMMITTED TO SUSTAINABLE  PRODUCTIVITY  We  stand  by  our  responsibilities  towards  our  customers,  towards  the  environment  and  the  people  around  us. We make performance stand the  test  of  time.  This  is  what  we  call  –  Sustainable Productivity.  For  more  information  in  regards  to  our  Blowers  or  Low  pressure  compressors,  please  contact  Mrs.  Marie‐Josee  (MJ)  Quessy  at  514.464.7095  or  via  email  at  marie‐ josee.quessy@ca.atlascopco.com 

August 2017  |  43


SPECIAL FOCUS: CLIMATE CHANGE & RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

Bangladesh bridge project calls for major environmental protection and remediation By Jahangir Chowdhury

Top: Map of the Padma Bridge project in Bangladesh.

Right: The Padma River is the main distributary of the Ganges. It flows 120 kilometres to its confluence with the Meghna River near the Bay of Bengal.

EXISTING ENVIRONMENT The PMBP, including its components, covers an area stretching 6 km inland from the Padma River on the Mawa (north bank) and 4 km inland at Janjira (south bank). Bridge and river training works may affect an area 15 km upstream and 7 km downstream of the river. The third area is Char Janajat, which As such, the terrestrial ecosystem will be is located between the south bank and changed permanently. About 640 ha of the river. agricultural land will be lost, which will impact 8,525 farm families. Some 12 ha IMPACTS ON ENVIRONMENT of fish ponds and 24,000 kg of fish from During the pre-construction stage, them per year will be lost. Some 767 ha of about 201,273 mostly small trees and floodplain and 150,000 kg of fish will be 359,549 banana and bamboo trees will be lost from this area per year. Construction removed, as will huge amounts of topsoil. of yards near areas of high biodiversity 44  |  August 2017

T

he Padma Multipurpose Bridge project (PMBP) in Bangladesh will have considerable environmental impacts. An Environmental Impacts Assessment report has been conducted to determine the existing environment of the construction site, impact due to bridge construction, and possible plans for mitigation. The project is located about 35 km southwest of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. The Padma River enters Bangladesh from India, meets the Jamuna River, and finally meets with the Meghna River and adopts the name Meghna before flowing into the Bay of Bengal. The project includes a 6.15 km bridge across the Padma River, approach road and railway viaduct, major river training (the structural measures which are taken to improve a river and its banks) work, toll plaza and service area, and utility crossings, such as a high pressure gas pipeline and an optical telecommunication cable. Detailed design of the bridge is being delivered by a team of international and national consultants, headed by AECOM.

will cause ecological disturbance in them. During construction, transport of materials over land and river will cause tremendous traffic congestion, damage local roads, and increase pollution due to vehicle emissions and possible spillage. River dredging work will destroy the nursing and feeding grounds for fish and will increase turbidity in the river. Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


A completed pile group at the Padma Bridge.

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Photo courtesy of Padma Multipurpose Bridge Project.

Wildlife and aquatic fauna will be forced out of their preferred habitat and the migration of Hilsa fish will be blocked.  Vibration due to piling work will   disturb fish migration routes, as dolphins and fish are very sensitive to noise and   vibration. River training will further impact the floodplain, river ecology,   Hilsa fish migration, the natural drainage system, and the charlands (sandbars that   emerge as islands within the river channel or as attached land to the riverbanks   as a result of the dynamics of erosion and accretion in the river).  

• New fish ponds will be constructed in the resettlement areas. • A 1,000 ha protected area will be established for charland wildlife. A Charland Visitors Centre will be established to improve local and national knowledge about charlands and their biodiversity. • Dredging will be suspended during the main Hilsa fish migration period, and anti-turbidity technology will be used during dredging. • An emergency response plan has been prepared for unexpected events, such as flooding, traffic accidents (road and rail), leakage or spill of hazardous materials, civil disturbance/riot, terrorist attacks/ threats and gas leaks or explosions. In addition to all these initiatives, a plan has been prepared to monitor the contractor’s work during project implementation. This will be continued for five years after completion of the project.

IMPACT MITIGATION PLANS Having identifying the consequences   of this project, the following mitigation plans will be implemented:   • Stripped top soil will be stored and applied over dredging spoils.   • A total of 402,556 trees and 719,098 bamboo and banana trees will be   Jahangir Chowdhury, M.Sc., planted to compensate for the loss of the P.Eng., is with AECOM. Email: original trees.   • Water supply, sanitation, schools, jahangir.chowdhury@aecom.com mosques, health centres and other services   will be provided for each resettlement site. • Farmers will be trained on how to   increase productivity, through diversification of high-value horticultural and   agricultural crops, improved varieties   and better marketing. www.esemag.com

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COMMITTED TO SUSTAINABLE  PRODUCTIVITY  We  stand  by  our  responsibilities  towards  our  customers,  towards  the  environment  and  the  people  around  us. We make performance stand the  test  of  time.  This  is  what  we  call  –  Sustainable Productivity.  For  more  information  in  regards  to  our  Blowers  or  Low  pressure  compressors,  please  contact  Mrs.  Marie‐Josee  (MJ)  Quessy  at  514.464.7095  or  via  email  at  marie‐ josee.quessy@ca.atlascopco.com 

August 2017  |  45


SPECIAL FOCUS: CLIMATE CHANGE & RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE

Stormwater funding needs to be a priority in Ontario: Report By Peter Davey

A

ccording to a recent report, stormwater infrastructure in Ontario is in poor condition and under tremendous strain as the number of severe flood events increases. The Ontario Society of Professional Engineers (OSPE), the Residential & Civil Construction Alliance of Ontario (RCCAO) and the Ontario Sewer & Watermain Construction Association (OSWCA) partnered to assess the province’s ability to cope with the impending impacts of climate change and severe weather patterns, by looking at the condition of stormwater infrastructure and the type of asset management planning that is done in municipalities across Ontario. The joint report, released on July 5, 2017, and titled Weathering the Storms: Municipalities Plead for Stormwater Infrastructure Funding, found that resources and funding are extremely limited. The findings are based on a survey of Ontario municipalities conducted in February 2017. Based on the survey results and feedback, the report says: “Significant investments will be

required to maintain or bring municipal stormwater infrastructure up to a good or better condition rating.” Some key statistics in the report include: • 58% of survey respondents saying they have limited to no engineered stormwater infrastructure. • Only 15% have a stormwater monitoring plan, which collects data on the performance of existing systems. • Only 11% reported that their stormwater asset management plans accounted for climate change.

STORMWATER PRIORITIES Mark Hartley, a water resource engineer who worked on the report, said it’s important to recognize that most of the survey respondents represent towns with populations under 50,000 and that they have different infrastructure priorities from larger cities. “A small municipality may have one or two residential developments serviced by curb and gutter catch basins with stormwater sewers and ponds. Relative

to the other infrastructure they have, it’s not high on their priority list,” said Hartley. “In contrast, a more built-out municipality may have hundreds of parcels of land that have been developed. These municipalities might have already conducted stormwater pond cleanouts and retrofits, or experienced flooding events. They have a tremendous amount of experience with stormwater management, and are keenly aware of the infrastructure.” With this difference in stormwater priorities and experience, Hartley recommends that stormwater be recognized as a distinct utility with different treatment challenges and options from drinking water and wastewater. Stormwater guidelines and treatment priorities have changed in the past decades and continue to do so. Stormwater controls initially only addressed flooding in urban areas. Dry ponds were used to detain water for a short time before releasing it. The next iteration in treatment came about when water quality problems were identified. Contaminants from urban surfaces include winter sand and dust, oil and grease, metals and nutrients. “To manage these quality concerns, municipalities adopted wet ponds that have a treatment component as well as a quantity component,” said Hartley.

Surveyed municipalities rating the conditions of their stormwater infrastructure. Weathering the Storms report.

Assets -Very Poor (1)

Assets - Poor (2)

Assets - Fair (3)

Assets - Good (4)

Assets - Very Good (5)

Stormwater Pipes

2

4

16

26

0

Manholes

0

2

18

28

0

Stormwater Asset

Stormwater Ponds

0

2

15

20

4

Small Culverts (<1m)

2

6

29

12

1

Medium Culverts (1 to 3m)

1

8

24

16

0

Large Culverts (>3 m)

2

3

17

21

1

46  |  August 2017

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT According to Hartley, the importance of the “water balance” has been recognized in the last few years as a storm  water management priority. As part of the hydrologic cycle, water needs   to infiltrate the ground to recharge groundwater. Low impact development   (LID) stormwater management seeks to mimic this natural cycle in urban areas   by getting rainfall into the ground as   soon as it falls. By using rain gardens, permeable pavements, grassy swales,   etc., LID deals with rainfall before it gets into the stormwater conveyance system.   According to the report, 25% of the survey respondents have already imple  mented LID practices. However, several respondents said they are “concerned   about the costs that could be incurred as a result of the proposed Ministry of the   Environment and Climate Change LID standards.”  

porate credit programs to incentivize properties to implement water quality and flow reduction improvements. According to Rosanna DiLabio, senior client manager of Pinchin Ltd.’s emissions reduction & compliance division, credits can generally be categorized as follows: 1. Peak flow reduction: Storing precipitation on-site before allowing it to drain slowly into the municipal stormwater system. 2. Water quality treatment: Removing solids and other contaminates such as oil and grease from stormwater prior to discharge. 3. Runoff volume reduction: Capturing rainfall for irrigation or other non-potable use within the property. 4. Pollution prevention: Parking lot sweeping programs and deicing programs to minimize rock salt use. For industrial properties, spill prevention and contingency plans can qualify for pollution prevention credits. BRIDGING THE FUNDING GAP The specifics and use of these credit Funding, especially for smaller munic- categories can vary widely across jurisipalities, is a huge challenge when  it dictions, with different levels of complexcomes to stormwater, and the report ity. For municipalities investigating a dedicates a lot of attention to this issue.  It credit program, DiLabio says that it is recommends that “stormwater manage- important to offer enough of a financial   incentive so it makes financial sense for ment assistance needs to be considered a funding priority in the next provincial property owners to participate and not   Long-Term Infrastructure Plan, espe- view the program as just another tax. cially for municipalities with populations   CONCLUSION under 50,000.” An earlier call for addressing the Overall, the recommendations of the   funding gap came in November 2016, Weathering the Storms report centre on with the Environmental Commissioner   the importance of municipalities develof Ontario releasing a report, titled oping Stormwater Infrastructure Asset Urban stormwater fees: How to pay for   Management Plans (SIAMPs). Of the what we need. It argued that using prop- 55 municipalities that responded to the   survey, only 35% have a separate SIAMP erty taxes to fund stormwater management “simply has not worked” and, from their water/wastewater plan. The   report says that the Ontario government instead, municipalities should levy dedicated stormwater fees to provide stable should use incentives, guidelines and   regulations to ensure all Ontario municand equitable funding. A few Ontario municipalities have ipalities have the means to develop   adopted dedicated stormwater fees, SIAMPs. including London, Markham, Waterloo To read the full report online, visit:   and Aurora. Last year, Mississauga intro- www.ospe.on.ca/publications/reports duced a stormwater fee that bills residen  tial and non-residential properties based Peter Davey is managing and online on the size of their impermeable surfaces   editor of Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine. Email: rather than a flat or tiered rate. Some stormwater fee programs incor  peter@esemag.com www.esemag.com

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COMMITTED TO SUSTAINABLE  PRODUCTIVITY  We  stand  by  our  responsibilities  towards  our  customers,  towards  the  environment  and  the  people  around  us. We make performance stand the  test  of  time.  This  is  what  we  call  –  Sustainable Productivity.  For  more  information  in  regards  to  our  Blowers  or  Low  pressure  compressors,  please  contact  Mrs.  Marie‐Josee  (MJ)  Quessy  at  514.464.7095  or  via  email  at  marie‐ josee.quessy@ca.atlascopco.com 

August 2017  |  47


ES&E Annual Guide to: 48

p.

ASSOCIATIONS 

52

p.

GOVERNMENT 

56

p.

EDUCATION & TRAINING 

ASSOCIATIONS ABORIGINAL WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO PO Box 340, 41C Duke St, Dryden ON P8N 2Z1 Sara Campbell saracampbell@knet.ca T: 807-735-1381 Ext. 1660 F: 807-223-2572 www.awwao.org

AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 420 Fort Duquesne Blvd, One Gateway Ctr, 3rd Fl, Pittsburgh PA 15222-1435 Stephanie Glyptis sglyptis@awma.org T: 412-232-3444 F: 412-232-3450 www.awma.org

ALBERTA ONSITE WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 18303-60 Ave, Edmonton AB T6M 1T7 Chic Shaw dhshaw@aowma.com T: 877-489-7471 F: 780-486-7414 www.aowma.com

ALBERTA WATER & WASTEWATER OPERATORS ASSOCIATION 10806 – 119 St, Edmonton AB T5H 3P2 Dan Rites drites@awwoa.ca T: 780-454-7745 F: 780-454-7748 www.awwoa.ca

AMERICAN CONCRETE PIPE ASSOCIATION 350-8445 Freeport Parkway, Irving TX 75063-2595 Russell Tripp rtripp@concrete-pipe.org T: 972-506-7216 F: 972-506-7682 www.concrete-pipe.org

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS Fl23 – 120 Wall St, New York NY 10005-4020 June Wispelwey junew@aiche.org T: 203-702-7660 F: 203-755-5177 www.aiche.org

AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION 1400-1200 Main St, Kansas City MO 64105-2100 Scott Grayson sgrayson@apwa.net T: 816-472-6100 F: 816-472-1610 www.apwa.net

48  |  August 2017

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS 1801 Alexander Bell Dr, Reston VA 20191 Thomas W. Smith board@asce.org T: 703-295-6300 www.asce.org

AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION 6666 W Quincy Ave, Denver CO 80235-3098 David LaFrance dlafrance@awwa.org T: 303-794-7711 www.awwa.org

ASSOCIATED ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSORS OF CANADA INC.

ATLANTIC CANADA WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 28141, Dartmouth NS B2W 6E2 Clara Shea contact@acwwa.ca T: 902-434-6002 F: 902-435-7796 www.acwwa.ca

AUDITING ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 9 Forest Rd, Whitby ON L1N 3N7 Todd Hall admin@auditingcanada.com T: 905-404-9511 www.auditingcanada.com

BLOOM CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABILITY

PO Box 490, Fenelon Falls ON K0M 1N0 Erik Luzak erik@aesac.ca T: 877-512-3722 www.aesac.ca

213-1540 Cornwall Rd, Oakville ON L6J 7W5 Jeannie Freeborn jfreeborn@bloomcentre.com T: 905-842-1115 F: 905-842-1119 www.bloomcentre.com

ASSOCIATION OF CONSULTING ENGINEERING COMPANIES CANADA

BRITISH COLUMBIA ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

420-130 Albert St, Ottawa ON K1P 5G4 John Gamble jgamble@acec.ca T: 613-236-0569 F: 613-236-6193 www.acec.ca

504-999 Canada Place, Vancouver BC V6C 3E1 Brian White info@bceia.com T: 604-683-2751 F:604-677-5960 www.bceia.com

ASSOCIATION OF MUNICIPALITIES OF ONTARIO

BRITISH COLUMBIA GROUND WATER ASSOCIATION

801-200 University Ave, Toronto ON M5H 3C6 Pat Vanini pvanini@amo.on.ca T: 416-971-9856 F: 416-971-6191 www.amo.on.ca

1334 Riverside Rd, Abbotsford BC V2S 8J2 Ron Nelson secretary@bcgwa.org T: 604-530-8934 F: 604-630-8846 www.bcgwa.org

ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO LAND SURVEYORS

BRITISH COLUMBIA WATER & WASTE ASSOCIATION

1043 McNicoll Ave, Toronto ON M1W 3W6 Blain Martin blain@aols.org T: 416-491-9020 F: 416-491-2576 www.aols.org

620-1090 West Pender St, Vancouver BC V6E 2N7 David Main dmain@bcwwa.org T: 604-433-7824 F: 604-433-9859 www.bcwwa.org

ASSOCIATION OF POWER PRODUCERS OF ONTARIO

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ACCREDITATION INC.

1602-25 Adelaide St E, Toronto ON M5C 3A1 David Butters david.butters@appro.org T: 416-322-6549 F: 416-481-5785 www.appro.org

102-2934 Baseline Rd, Ottawa ON K2H 1B2 Charles Brimley cbrimley@cala.ca T: 613-233-5300 F: 613-233-5501 www.cala.ca

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ASSOCIATIONS

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF PETROLEUM PRODUCERS 2100-350 – 7 Ave SW, Calgary AB T2P 3N9 Jeff Gaulin jeff.gaulin@capp.ca T: 403-267-1100 F: 403-261-4622 www.capp.ca

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF RECYCLING INDUSTRIES 1906-130 Albert St, Ottawa ON K1P 5G4 Tracy Shaw tracy@cari-acir.org T: 613-728-6946 F: 705-835-6196 www.cari-acir.org

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION ON WATER QUALITY PO Box 5050 Stn LCD 1, 867 Lakeshore Rd, Burlington ON L7R 4A6 Dr Chris Marvin chris.marvin@ec.gc.ca T: 289-780-0378 www.cawq.ca

CANADIAN BROWNFIELDS NETWORK 2800-14th Ave Suite 210, Markham ON L3R 0E4 Alison Nash info@canadianbrownfieldsnetwork.ca T: 416-491-2886 F: 416-491-1670 www.canadianbrownfieldsnetwork.ca

CANADIAN CENTRE FOR OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY

jacqeline.jodoin@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca T: 819-956-0383 F: 819-956-5740 www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca Bay 3, 4905 – 102 Ave SE, Calgary, AB T2C 2X7 T: 403-244-7821 www.cnam.ca

University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1 Dr. Mark Knight maknight@uwaterloo.ca T: 519-888-4770 www.cattevents.ca

CANADIAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION

CHEMISTRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

CANADIAN NETWORK OF ASSET MANAGERS

1150-45 O’Connor St, Ottawa ON K1P 1A4 Scott Grayson sgrayson@apwa.net T: 202-408-9541 F: 202-408-9542 www.cpwa.net

CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING 521-300 rue St-Sacrement, Montreal QC H2Y 1X4 Jim Gilliland jim.gilliland @csce.ca T: 514-933-2634 F: 514-933-3504 www.csce.ca

CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION 178 Rexdale Blvd, Toronto ON M9W 1R3 Gianluca Arcari gianluca.arcari@csagroup.org T: 416-747-4000 www.csa.ca

CANADIAN WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION

135 Hunter St East, Hamilton ON L8N 1M5 Gareth Jones clientservices@ccohs.ca T: 905-572-2981 F: 905-572-4500 www.ccohs.ca

11-1010 Polytek St, Ottawa ON K1J 9H9 Robert Haller rhaller@cwwa.ca T: 613-747-0524 F: 613-747-0523 www.cwwa.ca

CANADIAN CONCRETE PIPE & PRECAST ASSOCIATION

CANADIAN WATER NETWORK (UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO)

200-447 Frederick St, Kitchener ON N2H 2P4 Gerry Mulhern gerry.mulhern@ccppa.ca T: 519-489-4488 F: 519-578-6060 www.ccppa.ca

CANADIAN COPPER & BRASS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

200 University Ave W, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1 Bernadette Conant bconant@cwn-rce.ca T: 519-888-4567 www.cwn-rce.ca

CANADIAN WATER QUALITY ASSOCIATION

210-65 Overlea Blvd, Toronto ON M4H 1P1 Stephen Knapp aknapp@coppercanada.ca T: 416-391-5599 F: 416-391-3823 www.coppercanada.ca

504-295 The West Mall, Toronto ON M9C 4Z4 Kevin Wong k.wong@cwqa.com T: 416-695-3068 F: 416-695-2945 www.cwqa.com

CANADIAN COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT LABORATORIES (CCIL)

CANADIAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION

PO Box 41027, Ottawa ON K1G 5K9 Francine Fortier-ThéBerge ccil@magma.ca T: 613-746-3919 F: 613-746-4324 www.ccil.com

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION APPROVALS BOARD 200-308 11th Ave SE, Calgary AB T2G 0Y2 Victor Nowicki geobacnb@nbnet.nb.ca T: 403-233-7484 F: 403-264-6240 www.cecab.org

CANADIAN GENERAL STANDARDS BOARD 6B1-11 Laurier St, Place Du Portage III Gatineau QC K1A 1G6 Jacqeline Jodoin

www.esemag.com

CENTRE FOR ADVANCEMENT OF TRENCHLESS TECHNOLOGIES

320-176 Gloucester St, Ottawa ON K2P 0A6 Sean Douglas executivedirector@cwra.org T: 613-237-9363 F: 613-594-5190 www.cwra.org

CANADIAN WIND ENERGY ASSOCIATION 710-1600 Carling Ave, Ottawa ON K1Z 1G3 Lejla Latifovic lejlalatifovic@canwea.ca T: 613-234-8716 F: 613-234-5642 www.canwea.ca

CEMENT ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 1105-350 Sparks St,Ottawa ON K1R 7S8 Michael McSweeney mmcsweeney@cement.ca T: 613-236-9471 www.cement.ca

805-350 Sparks St, Ottawa ON K1R 7S8 Nancy Marchi nmarchi@canadianchemistry.ca T: 613-237-6215 F: 613-237-4061 www.canadianchemistry.ca

COMPOST COUNCIL OF CANADA 16 Northumberland St, Toronto ON M6H 1P7 Susan Antler santler@compost.org T: 416-535-0240 F: 416-536-9892 www.compost.org

CONSERVATION COUNCIL OF ONTARIO 132-215 Spadina Ave, Toronto ON M5T 2C7 Chris Winter info@weconserve.ca T: 416-533-1635

CONSULTING ENGINEERS OF ONTARIO 405-10 Four Seasons Pl, Toronto ON M9B 6H7 Barry Steinberg bsteinberg@ceo.on.ca T: 416-620-1400 F: 416-620-5803 www.ceo.on.ca

CORRUGATED STEEL PIPE INSTITUTE 2A-652 Bishop St N, Cambridge ON N3H 4V6 Ray Wilcock rjwilcock@cspi.ca T: 519-650-8080 F: 519-650-8081 www.cspi.ca

COUNCIL OF THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ONTARIO 101-40 Sheppard Ave W, Toronto ON M2N 6K9 Scott Clark sclark@peo.on.ca T: 416-224-1100 www.peo.on.ca

CSA GROUP 178 Rexdale Blvd, Toronto ON M9W 1R3 Gianluca Arcari gianluca.arcari@csagroup.org T: 416-747-4000 www.csagroup.org

DUCTILE IRON PIPE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION PO Box 19206, Golden CO 80402 Patrick J. Hogan info@dipra.org T: 205-718-4218 www.dipra.org

ECO CANADA 200-308 – 11th Ave SE, Calgary AB T2G 0Y2 Kevin Nilsen info@eco.ca T: 403-233-0748 F: 403-269-9544 www.eco.ca

August 2017  |  49


ASSOCIATIONS

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA

MUNICIPAL WASTE ASSOCIATION

102-2528 Ellwood Dr SW, Edmonton AB T6X 0A9 Jennifer Keller info@esaa.org T: 780-429-6363 www.esaa.org

PO Box 1894, 11B Suffolk St E, Guelph ON N1H 7A1 Dr. Trevor Barton trevor@municipalwaste.ca T: 519-823-1990 F: 519-823-0084 www.municipalwaste.ca

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES ASSOCIATION MARITIMES 502-5657 Spring Garden Rd, PO Box 142, Halifax NS B3J 3R4 Scott Preston contact@esamaritimes.ca T: 902-463-3538 F: 902-425-2441

GEORGIAN BAY ASSOCIATION 18 Fenwick Ave, Toronto ON M4V 2J8 Bob Duncanson rduncanson@georgianbay.ca T: 416-219-4248 www.georgianbay.ca

INTERNATIONAL OZONE ASSOCIATION PO Box 97075, Las Vegas NV 89193 info3zone@ioa-pag.org T: 480-529-3787 F: 480-533-3080 www.ioa-pag.org

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SCIENCES 413-4246 Albert St, Regina SK S4S 3R9 Gordon Huang gordon.huang@uregina.ca T: 306-337-2306 F: 306-337-2305 www.iseis.org

INTERNATIONAL ULTRAVIOLET ASSOCIATION 207-6935 Wisconsin Ave, Bethesda MD 20815 Katherine Bell info@iuva.org T: 240-437-4615 F: 240-209-2340 www.iuva.org

MANITOBA ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION 100-62 Albert St, Winnipeg MB R3B 1E9 Margo Shaw mshaw@meia.mb.ca T: 204-783-7090 F: 204-783-6501 www.meia.mb.ca

MANITOBA WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 1600, 215-9 Saskatchewan Ave W Portage La Prairie MB R1N 3P1 Iva Last mwwaoffice@shaw.ca T: 204-239-6868 F: 204-239-6872 www.mwwa.net

MARITIME PROVINCES WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 28142, Dartmouth NS B2W 6E2 Clara Shea contact@mpwwa.ca T: 902-434-8874 F: 902-434-8859 www.mpwwa.ca

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERS ASSOCIATION 22-1525 Cornwall Rd, Oakville ON L6J 0B2 Alan Korell alan.korell@municipalengineers.on.ca T: 289-291-6472 F: 289-291-6477 www.municipalengineers.on.ca

50  |  August 2017

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CLEAN WATER AGENCIES 1816 Jefferson Place NW, Washington DC 200362505 Raymond J. Marshall info@nacwa.org T: 202-833-2672 F: 888-267-9505 www.nacwa.org

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL BALANCING BUREAU 8575 Grovemont Circle, Gaithersburg MD 20877 Jim Whorton jwhorton@vircocon.com T: 301-977-3698 F: 301-977-9589 www.nebb.org

NATIONAL GROUND WATER ASSOCIATION 601 Dempsey Rd, Westerville OH 43081 Todd E. Hunter ngwa@ngwa.org T: 614-898-7791 F: 614-898-7786 www.ngwa.org

NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION 207-90 O’Leary Ave, St John’s NL A1B 2C7 Kieran Hanley kieran@neia.org T: 709-237-8190 www.neia.org

NORTH AMERICAN HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

Mark Brosowski info@oasisontario.on.ca T: 877-202-0082 www.oasisontario.on.ca

ONTARIO COALITION FOR SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE Sam Sidawi executivedirector@on-csi.ca T: 905-546-2424 Ext. 4479 www.on-csi.ca

ONTARIO CONCRETE PIPE ASSOCIATION Fl2-447 Frederick St, Kitchener ON N2H 2P4 Gerrard Mulhern gerry.mulhern@ocpa.com T: 519-489-4488 F: 519-578-6060 www.ocpa.com

ONTARIO ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION 410-215 Spadina Ave, Toronto ON M5T 2C7 Alex Gill agill@oneia.ca T: 416-531-7884 F: 416-665-2032 www.oneia.ca

ONTARIO ENVIRONMENT NETWORK PO Box 192, Georgetown ON L7G 4T1 oen@oen.ca T: 905-925-9217 www.oen.ca

ONTARIO GROUND WATER ASSOCIATION 48 Front St E, Strathroy ON N7G 1Y6 KC Craig Stainton executivedirector@ogwa.ca T: 519-245-7194 F: 519-245-7196 www.ogwa.ca

ONTARIO MUNICIPAL WATER ASSOCIATION

700-12011 Tejon St, Westminster CO 80234 Victoria L. Hodge admin@nahmma.org T: 877-292-1403 F: 303-458-0002 www.nahmma.org

2593 Tenth Concession, Collingwood ON L9Y 3Y9 Ed Houghton ehoughton@omwa.org T: 705-443-8472 F: 705-443-4263 www.omwa.org

NORTHERN TERRITORIES WATER & WASTE ASSOCIATION

ONTARIO ONSITE WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION

201-4817 49th St, Yellowknife NT X1A 3S7 Crystal Sabel info@ntwwa.com T: 867-873-4325 F: 867-669-2167 www.ntwwa.com

NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO MUNICIPAL ASSOCIATION PO Box 10308, Thunder Bay ON P7B 6T8 Kristen Oliver admin@noma.on.ca T: 807-683-6662 www.noma.on.ca

ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS & TECHNOLOGISTS 404-10 Four Seasons Place, Etobicoke ON M9B 6H7 David Thomson dthomson@oacett.org T: 416-621-9621 F: 416-621-8694 www.oacett.org

ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF SEWAGE INDUSTRY SERVICES PO Box 184, Bethany ON L0A 1A0

PO Box 2336, 198 Sophia St, Peterborough ON K9J 7Y8 Anne Egan anne.egan@oowa.org T: 855-905-6692 F: 705-742-7907 www.oowa.org

ONTARIO POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATION (OPCEA) 6517 Mississauga Rd, Unit C, Mississauga ON L5N 1A6 Heather Tyrrell opcea@opcea.com T: 416-307-2185 www.opcea.com Our association is a non-profit organization dedicated to assisting member companies in the promotion of their equipment and services to the pollution control market sector of Ontario. Originally founded in 1970, the OPCEA has since grown to over 180 member companies whose fields encompass a broad spectrum of equipment and services for the air and water pollution control marketplace.

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ASSOCIATIONS

ONTARIO PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION 22-1525 Cornwall Rd, Oakville ON L6J 0B2 Brian Barber info@opwa.ca T: 647-726-0167 F: 289-291-6477 www.opwa.ca

ONTARIO RURAL WASTEWATER CENTRE University of Guelph, School of Engineering, Guelph ON N1G 2W1 Katherine Rentsch krentsch@uoguelph.ca T: 519-824-4120 F: 519-836-0227 www.orwc.uoguelph.ca

ONTARIO SEWER & WATERMAIN CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION 300-5045 Orbitor Dr, Unit 12, Mississauga ON L4W 4Y4 Giovanni Cautillo giovanni.cautillo@oswca.org T: 905-629-7766 F: 905-629-0587 www.oswca.org

ONTARIO SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 502-4950 Yonge St, Toronto ON M2N 6K1 Sandro Perruzza sperruzza@ospe.on.ca T: 416-223-9961 F: 416-223-9963 www.ospe.on.ca

ONTARIO WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 3-2005 Clark Blvd, Brampton ON L6T 5P8 Gord White gwhite@owma.org T: 905-791-9500 F: 905-791-9514 www.owma.org

ONTARIO WATERPOWER ASSOCIATION 264-380 Armour Rd, Peterborough ON K9H 7L7 Kaitlyn Leigh kleigh@owa.ca T: 866-743-1500 www.owa.ca

ONTARIO WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION 100-922 The East Mall Dr, Toronto ON M9B 6K1 T: 416-231-1555 F: 416-231-1556 www.owwa.ca

ONTARIO WATERWORKS EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATION www.owwea.ca The Ontario Water Works Equipment Association (OWWEA) is an organization that represents its membership within the waterworks industry of Ontario. Membership consists of manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, agents and contractors, dedicated to serving the Ontario municipal market.

PLASTICS PIPE INSTITUTE 825-105 Decker Court, Irving TX 75062 Tony Radoszewski tonyr@plasticpipe.org T: 469-499-1044 F: 469-499-1063 www.plasticpipe.org

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS ONTARIO 101-40 Sheppard Ave W, Toronto ON M2N 6K9 Gerard McDonald

www.esemag.com

gmcdonald@peo.on.ca T: 416-224-1100 www.peo.on.ca

PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 102-211 Columbia St, Vancouver BC V6A 2R5 Ashifa Dhanani info@pwabc.ca T: 877-356-0699 www.pwabc.ca

PULP & PAPER TECHNICAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 1070-740 Notre-Dame St W, Montreal QC H3C 3X6 Greg Hay ghay@paptac.ca T: 514-392-0265 F: 514-392-0369 www.paptac.ca

RESEAU ENVIRONNEMENT 750-255 Boul Cremazie Est, Montreal QC H2M 1L5 Maelle Beurier eau@reseau-environnement.com T: 514-270-7110 F: 514-874-1272 www.reseau-environnement.com

SASKATCHEWAN ENVIRONMENTAL INDUSTRY & MANAGERS ASSOCIATION PO Box 22009 RPO Wildwood, Saskatoon SK S7H 5P1 Al Shpyth ashpyth@ecometrix.ca T: 844-801-6233 www.seima.sk.ca

SASKATCHEWAN ONSITE WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 449 Haviland Cr, Saskatoon SK S7L 5B3 Travis Wolfe twolfe@sowma.ca T: 306-988-2102 F: 855-420-6336 www.sowma.ca

SASKATCHEWAN WATER & WASTEWATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 7831 Stn Main, Saskatoon SK S7K 4R5 Tim Cox info@sasktel.net T: 306-668-1278 www.swwa.ca

SOLAR & SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOCIETY OF CANADA INC. 1700 Des Broussailles Terrace, Ottawa ON K1C 5S9 Bill To president@sesci.org T: 613-824-1710 www.sesci.org

SOLID WASTE ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA 650-1100 Wayne Ave, Silver Spring MD 20910 Sara Bixby sbixby@swana.org T: 800-467-9262 F: 301-589-7068 www.swana.org

STEEL TANK INSTITUTE/STEEL PLATE FABRICATORS ASSOCIATION

THE GREEN BUILDING INITIATIVE 7805 SW 40th Ave, PO Box 80010, Portland OR 97219 Vicki Worden info@thegbi.org T: 503-274-0448 www.thegbi.org

WATER & WASTEWATER EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 304-540 Fort Evans Rd, Leesburg VA 20176-3379 Vanessa Leiby vanessa@wwema.org T: 703-444-1777 www.wwema.org

WATER ENVIRONMENT ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO 6517 Mississauga Rd, Unit C, Mississauga ON L5N 1A6 Heather Tyrrell heather@weao.org T: 416-410-6933 F: 416-410-1626 www.weao.org

WATER ENVIRONMENT FEDERATION 601 Wythe St, Alexandria VA 22314-1994 Eileen O’Neill eoneill@wef.org T: 800-666-0206 F: 703-684-2492 www.wef.org

WATER FOR PEOPLE – CANADA 400-245 Consumers Rd, Toronto ON M2J 1R3 Joan Conyers jconyers@waterforpeople.org T: 416-499-4042 F: 416-499-4687 www.waterforpeople.org Water For People-Canada is a charitable nonprofit international humanitarian organization, dedicated to the development and delivery of clean, safe water and sanitation solutions in developing nations.

WATER SUPPLY ASSOCIATION OF B.C. PO Box 22022, Penticton BC V2A 8L1 Toby Pike pike@sekid.ca T: 250-497-5407 www.wsabc.ca

WESTERN CANADA ONSITE WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION 18303 – 60th Ave, Edmonton AB T6M 1T7 Lesley Desjardins ldesjardins@wcowma.com T: 780-489-7471 F: 780-486-7414 www.wcowma.com

WESTERN CANADA WATER ASSOCIATION PO Box 1708, 240 River Ave, Cochrane AB T4C 1B6 Audrey Arisman aarisman@wcwwa.ca T: 877-283-2003 F: 877-283-2007 www.wcwwa.ca

944 Donata Ct, Lake Zurich IL 60047 Noel Zak nzak@steeltank.com T: 847-438-8265 F: 847-438-8766 www.steeltank.com

August 2017  |  51


GOVERNMENT

PROVINCIAL & FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCIES KEY GOVERNMENT WEBSITES: Government of Canada www.canada.ca

New Brunswick www2.gnb.ca

Environment Canada www.ec.gc.ca

Newfoundland/Labrador www.gov.nl.ca

Health Canada www.hc-sc.gc.ca

Nunavut www.gov.nu.ca

Natural Resources Canada www.nrcan.gc.ca National Research Council of Canada www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca Alberta www.alberta.ca

Northwest Territories www.gov.nt.ca Nova Scotia www.novascotia.ca Ontario www.ontario.ca Prince Edward Island www.gov.pe.ca

British Columbia www2.gov.bc.ca

Quebec www.gouv.qc.ca

Manitoba www.gov.mb.ca

Saskatchewan www.saskatchewan.ca

ALBERTA

www.alberta.ca

Ministry of Environment & Parks Main Floor, Great West Life Bldg, 9920–108 St, Edmonton, AB T5K 2M4 T: 1-877-944-0313

Upper Athabaska Region Floor 1-Provincial Bldg, 5020-52 Ave, Whitecourt, AB T7S 1N2 T: 780-778-7165

Local Offices: Camrose T: 780-679-1274

Information Centre Main Floor, Great West Life Bldg, 9920-108 St, Edmonton, AB T5K 2M4 T: 1-877-310-3773

Edson T: 780-723-8363

24-hour Environmental Emergencies Hotline T: 1-800-222-6514

Grand Prairie T: 780-538-5260

Regional Offices: Peace Region Floor 3-Provincial Bldg, 9261-96 Ave, Peace River, AB T8S 1T4 T: 780-624-7133 Lower Athabasca Region Floor 2-Provincial Bldg, 9503 Beaverhill Rd, Lac La Biche, AB T0A 2C0 T: 780-623-5240 Red Deer/North Saskatchewan Region Twin Atria Bldg, 4999-98 Ave, Ste 111, Edmonton, AB T6B 2X3 T: 780-427-7617 South Saskatchewan Region 303 Deerfoot Square Bldg, 2938-11 St NE, Calgary, AB T2E 7L7 T: 403-297-7602

52  |  August 2017

Fort McMurray T: 780-743-7472

High Level T: 780-926-5263 Lac La Biche T: 780-623-5394 Lethbridge T: 403-381-5322 Medicine Hat T: 403-529-3151 Red Deer T: 403-340-7052 Rocky Mountain House T: 403-845-8272 Sherwood Park T: 780-464-7955 Slave Lake T: 780-849-7282 Spruce Grove T: 780-960-8600

BRITISH COLUMBIA www.gov.bc.ca

Ministry of Environment Communications & Public Engagement PO Box 9360, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M2 T: 250-953-3834, 800-663-7867

Lower Mainland Region Floor 2, 10470-15 2nd St, Surrey, BC V3R 0Y3 T: 604-582-5200 Thompson Region 1259 Dalhouse Dr, Kamloops, BC V2C 5Z5 T: 250-371-6200

Report Pollution T: 1-877-952-7277 (RAPP)

Kootenay Region 205 Industrial Rd G, Cranbrook, BC V1C 7G5 401-333 Victoria St, Nelson, BC V1L 4K3 T: 250-354-6333

Environmental Appeal Board PO Box 9425, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9V1 T: 250-387-3464

Cariboo Region 400-640 Borland St, Williams Lake, BC V2G 4T1 T: 250-398-4530

Environmental Assessment Office PO Box 9426, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V9W 9V1 T: 250-387-9408

Skeena Region 3726 Alfred Ave, PO Box 5000, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0 T: 250-847-7260

Parks & Conservation Service Division PO Box 933, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1

Omineca Region 4051-18th Ave, Prince George, BC V2N 1B3 T: 250-565-6135

Environmental Protection Division PO Box 9339, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 T: 250-356-0121

Okanagan Region 102 Industrial Pl, Penticton, BC V2A 7C8 T: 250-490-8200

Monitoring, Compliance & Stewardship T: 250-354-6333

Peace Region 400-10003-110 Ave, Fort St.John, BC V1J 6M2 T: 250-787-3411

Environmental Emergencies (Toll Free) T: 1-800-663-3456

Environmental Sustainability & Strategic Policy PO Box 9339, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 T: 250-387-9997 Environmental Emergencies & Land Remediation Branch PO Box 9342, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 T: 250-387-9971 Environmental Standards Branch PO Box 9341, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M1 T: 250-387-9933 Water Strategies & Conservation PO Box 9362, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9M2 T: 250-356-2791

Regional Offices: Vancouver Island Region 2080 Labieux Rd, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6J9 T: 250-751-3100

MANITOBA www.gov.mb.ca

Ministry of Environment & Sustainable Development Public Information & Inquiries 200 Saulteaux Cres, PO Box 22, Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W3 T: 800-214-6497 Clean Environment Commission 305-155 Carlton St, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3H8 T: 204-945-0594 Conservation Agreements Board c/o Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corp 200-1555 St James St, Winnipeg, MB R3H 1B5 T: 204-784-4350 Office of Drinking Water Branch 1007 Century St, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0W4 T: 204-945-7084

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GOVERNMENT

Water Services Board 2010 Currie Blvd Unit 1A, PO Box 22080, Brandon, MB R7A 6Y9 T: 204-726-6076 Round Table for Sustainable Development (MRT) 160-123 Main St, Winnipeg, MB R3C 1A5 T: 204-945-4391 Manitoba Water Council 200 Saulteaux Cres, PO Box 38, Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W3 Environmental Emergency 24 hour Service T: 204-945-4888

Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 T: 506-457-4844 Drinking Water Source Protection Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 T: 506-457-4846

Corner Brook Floor 9, Sir Richard Squires Bldg, 84 Mount Bernard Ave, PO Box 2006, Corner Brook, NL A2H 5G2 T: 709-637-2035

Policy & Planning Divison Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 T: 506-453-3700

Grand Falls-Windsor Provincial Bldg, 3 Cromer Ave, Grand Falls-Windsor, NL A2A 1W9 T: 709-292-4997

Regional Offices:

Happy Valley-Goose Bay 2 Tenth St, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, NL A0P 1E0 T: 709-896-7981

Regional Offices:

Region 1 – Bathurst 159 Main St, Rm 202, PO Box 5001, Bathurst, NB E2A 3Z9 T: 506-547-2092

Eastern Region 284 Reimer Ave Unit B, Steinbach, MB R5G 0R5 T: 204-346-6346

Region 2 – Miramichi 316 Dalton Ave, Miramichi, NB E1V 3N9 T: 506-778-6032

Northwest Region 27-2nd Ave, Dauphin, MB R7N 3E5 T: 204-622-2153

Region 3 – Moncton 355 Dieppe Blvd, PO Box 5001, Moncton, NB E1C 8R3 T: 506-856-2374

Northern Region PO Box 28, 59 Elizabeth Dr, Thompson, MB R8N 1X4 T: 204-677-6704 Interlake Region 75-7th Ave, Gimli, MB R0C 1B0 T: 204-642-6134 Central Region 25 Tupper St N, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3K1 T: 204-239-3186 South Western Region 1129 Queen’s Ave, Brandon, MB R7A 1L9 T: 204-726-6563

NEW BRUNSWICK www2.gnb.ca

Ministry of Environment Head Office Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 T: 506-453-2690 Environmental Emergency 24 Hour Service T: 1-800-565-1633 Water & Air Quality Section Floor 2,Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 T: 506-457-4844 Assessment & Planning Appeal Board City Centre, PO Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1 T: 506-453-2126 Climate Change Secretariat Marysville Pl, PO Box 6000,

www.esemag.com

Regional Offices:

Region 4 – Saint John 8 Castle St, PO Box 5001, Saint John, NB E2L 4Y9 T: 506-658-2558 Region 5 – Fredericton Analytical Services Lab, 12 McGloin St, Fredericton, NB E3A 5T8 T: 506-444-5149 Region 6 – Grand Falls 65 Broadway Blvd, PO Box 5001, Grand Falls, NB E3Z 1G1 T: 506-473-7744

Ministry of Environment 600-5102 – 50th Ave, PO Box 1320, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9 T: 867-767-9055 ext. 53001

Cumberland County 71 E Victoria St, Amherst, NS B4H 1X7 T: 902-667-6205

24-Hour Spill Report Line T: 867-920-81301

Pictou County 20 Pumphouse Rd, RR 3, New Glasgow, NS B2H 5C6 T: 902-396-4194

NOVA SCOTIA

Western Bridgewater, Kentville, King, Annapolis & Yarmouth 136 Exhibition St, Kentville, NS B4N 4E5 T: 902-679-6086

www.novascotia.ca

Ministry of the Environment 1903 Barrington St, Ste 2085, PO Box 442, Halifax NS B3J 2P8 1894 Barrington St, Ste 1800, PO Box 442, Halifax, NS B3J 2P8 T: 902-424-3600 Emergency After Hours T: 800-565-1633

Regional Offices:

Environmental Protection Operations Directorate 6 Bruce St, Mount Pearl, NL A1N 4T3 F: 709-772-5097 Environmental Spill Emergencies (24 hr service) T: 709-772-2083

Antigonish & Guyborough Counties 205-155 Main St, Antigonish, NS B2G 2B6 T: 902-863-7389

www.gov.nt.ca

Ministry of Municipal Affairs & Environment

Water Resources Portal Floor 4, Confederation Bldg West, PO Box 8700, St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 T: 709-729-5743

Northern Amherst, Antigonish, Truro, Pictou 36 Inglis Pl, PO Box 824, Truro, NS B2N 4B4 T: 902-893-5880

Colchester County 36 Inglis Pl, PO Box 824 ,Truro, NS B2N 4B4 T: 902-893-5880

Environmental Monitoring & Compliance T: 902-424-2547, 877-936-8476

Environment & Conservation Head Office: Floor 4, West Block, Confederation Bldg, PO Box 8700, St.John’s, NL A1B 4J6 T: 709-729-5677

Sydney Suite 2-1030 Upper Prince St, Sydney, NS B1P 5P6 T: 902-563-2100

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

NEWFOUNDLAND/ LABRADOR www.gov.nl.ca

Hawkesbury, NS B9A 2J9 T: 902-625-0791

Central HRM, East Hants, West Hants Suite 115-30 Damascus Rd, Bedford Commons, Bedford, NS B4A 0C1 T: 902-424-7773 Eastern CBRM, Victoria County, Northern Inverness Suite 2-1030 Upper Prince St, Sydney, NS B1P 5P6 T: 902-563-2100 Port Hawkesbury & Sydney Suite 2-1030 Upper Prince St, Sydney, NS B1P 5P6 T: 902-563-2100 Richmond County, Southern Inverness, Mulgrave, Auld’s Cove Suite 12-218 MacSween St, Port

Digby,Yarmouth & Shelbourne Counties 55 Starrs Rd, Unit 9, Yarmouth, NS B5A 2T2 T: 902-742-8985 Lunenburg & Queens Counties 81 Logan Rd, Bridgewater, NS B4V 3T3 T: 902-543-4685

NUNAVUT www.gov.nu.ca

Ministry of Environment Inuksugait Plaza, PO Box 1000, Stn 1320, Iqaluit, NU X0A 0H0 T: 867-975-7700 24-Hour Spill Response Line: T: 867-920-81301

ONTARIO

www.ontario.ca

Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Floor 11-Ferguson Block, 77 Wellesley St W, Toronto, ON M7A 2T5 T: 416-325-4000 4905 Dufferin St, North York, ON

August 2017  |  53


GOVERNMENT

M3H 5T4 T: 416-739-4826

T: 416-314-6378

Public Information Centre Floor 2-Macdonald Block, 900 Bay St, Toronto, ON M7A 1N3 T: 416-325-4000, 800-565-4923

Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO) 605-1075 Bay St, Toronto, ON M5S 2B1 T: 416-325-3377, 800-701-6454

Corporate Management Division Floor 14-135 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 T: 416-314-8001

Environmental Review Tribunal 1500-655 Bay St, Toronto, ON M5G 1E5 T: 416-314-4600

Advisory Council on Drinking Water Quality & Testing Standards Floor 3-40 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1M2 T: 416-212-7779

District Offices:

Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA) Floor 17-1 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 T: 416-775-0500, 800-667-6292 Pesticides Advisory Committee Floor 15-135 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 T: 416-314-9230 Walkerton Clean Water Centre 20 Ontario Rd, PO Box 160, Walkerton, ON N0G 2V0 T: 519-881-2003, 866-515-0550 Drinking Water Programs Branch Floor 3-40 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1M2 T: 416-314-4475, 866-793-2588 Environmental Programs Division Floor 14-135 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 T: 416-326-7203 Environmental Sciences & Standards Division Floor 14-135 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5 T: 416-314-6358 Environmental Monitoring & Reporting Branch West Wing, Floor 1-125 Resources Rd, Toronto, ON M9P 3V6 T: 416-235-6300 Laboratory Services Branch 125 Resources Rd, Toronto, ON M9P 3V6 T: 416-235-5743 Standards Development Branch Floor 7-Foster Bldg, 40 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1M2 T: 416-327-5519 Climate Change & Environmental Policy Division Floor 11-77 Wellesley St W, Toronto, ON M7A 2T5 T: 416-314-6338 Operations Division Floor 8-135 St Clair Ave W, Toronto, ON M4V 1P5

54  |  August 2017

Central Region: Toronto District Office Floor 9-5775 Yonge St, Place Nouveau, Toronto, ON M2M 4J1 T: 416-326-6700 Halton-Peel District Office 300-4145 North Service Rd, Burlington, ON L7L 6A3 T: 905-319-3847 Ajax District Office 800 Salem Rd N, Ajax, ON L1T 0H4 T: 905-683-2951 Barrie District Office 1201-54 Cedar Pointe Dr, Barrie, ON L4N 5R7 T: 705-739-6441 West Central Region: Hamilton Regional & District Office Floor 9-119 King St W, Hamilton, ON L8P 4Y7 T: 905-521-7650, 800-668-4557 Guelph District Office Floor 4-1 Stone Rd W, Guelph, ON N1G 4Y2 T: 519-826-4256, 800-265-8658 Niagara District Office Floor 9, Garden City Tower, 301 St.Paul St E, Ste 15, St Catharines, ON L2R 7R4 T: 905-704-3900, 800-263-1035 Eastern Region: Kingston Regional & District Office Unit 3-1259 Gardiners Rd, PO Box 22032, Kingston, ON K7M 8S5 T: 613-549-4000, 800-267-0974 Belleville Area Office 345 College St E, Belleville, ON K8N 5S7 T: 613-962-9208, 800-860-2763 Cornwall Area Office 861 Second St W, Cornwall, ON K6J 1H5 T: 613-930-2787 Ottawa District Office 103-2430 Don Reid Dr, Ottawa, ON K1H 1E1 T: 613-521-3450, 800-860-2195 Peterborough District Office

Floor 2-300 Water St, Robinson Pl., South Tower, Peterborough, ON K9J 8M5 T: 705-743-2972, 800-558-0595 (within 705, 613 & 905) Northern Region: Thunder Bay Regional & District Office 331-435 James St S, Thunder Bay, ON P7E 6S7 T: 807-475-1205, 800-875-7772 (within 807 & 705) Kenora Area Office 808 Robertson St, Kenora, ON P9N 1X9 T: 807-468-2718, 888-367-7622 (within area) North Bay Area Office 200 McIntyre St E, North Bay, ON P1B 8V6 T: 705-474-0400, 800-609-5553 (within area) Sault Ste. Marie Area Office 110-70 Foster Dr, Sault Ste Marie, ON P6A 6V4 T: 705-942-6354 Sudbury District Office 401-199 Larch St, Sudbury, ON P3E 5P9 T: 705-674-5249, 800-890-8516 (within 705) Timmins District Office 4900 ON-101, South Porcupine, ON P0N 1H0 T: 705-235-1300, 800-380-6615 Southwestern Region: London & District Office 733 Exeter Rd, London, ON N6E 1L3 T: 519-873-5000, 800-265-7672 Owen Sound District Office Floor 3, 101-17th St E, Owen Sound, ON N4K 0A5 T: 519-371-2901, 800-265-3783

St, PO Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N8 T: 902-368-5024 Environmental Emergencies T: 800-565-1633

QUEBEC

www.gouv.qc.ca

Ministere du Developpement durable, de l’Environnement, et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques Èdifice Marie-Guyart, 675, boul Rene-Levesque Est, 30 etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 T: 418-521-3911 Riding of Viau 3333, Jarry Est, bureau 202, Montreal, QC H1Z 2E5 T: 514-728-2474 Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE)/Environmental Public Hearing Board Edifice Lomer-Gouin, 575 rue StAmable, bureau 2.10, Quebec, QC G1R 6A6 T: 418-643-7447 Kativik Environmental Quality Commission (KEQC) & Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC) Edifice Marie-Guyart, 675, boul Rene-Levesque Est, 6 etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 T: 418-521-3950 ext. 4810 Societe des etablissements en plein air du Quebec (SEPAQ) Place de la Cite, Tour Cominar, 2640, boul Laurier, 13 etage Quebec, QC G1V 5C2 T: 418-890-6527 Societe quebecoise de recuperation et de recyclage

Sarnia District Office 1094 London Rd, Sarnia, ON N7S 1P1 T: 519-336-4030, 800-387-7784

(RECYC-QUEBEC) – Head Office 300, rue St-Paul, bureau 411, Quebec, QC G1K 7R1 T: 418-643-0394

Windsor Area Office 620-4510 Rhodes Dr, Windsor, ON N8W 5K5 T: 519-948-1464, 800-387-8826

(RECYC-QUEBEC) – Monteal Office 141 President-Kennedy Ave, Floor 8, Montreal, QC H2X 1Y4 T: 514-352-5002

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND www.gov.pe.ca

Ministry of the Environment Floor 4, Jones Bldg, 11 Kent St, PO Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N8 T: 902-368-5028, 866-368-5044 Ministry of the Environment Floor 4, Shaw Bldg S, 95 Rochford

Analyse et expertise regionales et du centre de controle environnemental du Quebec/ Regional Analysis & Expertise Edifice Marie-Guyart, 675, boul Rene-Levesque Est, 30 etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 T: 418-521-3861 Bureau des changements climatiques/Climate Change 675, boul Rene-Levesque Est, 6

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


GOVERNMENT

etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 T: 418-521-3868 Direction generale des changements climatiques, de l’air et des relations intergouvernementales 675, boul Rene-Levesque est, 30 etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 T: 418-521-3861 Centre de controle environnemental du Quebec Ediface Marie-Guyart, 675 boul Rene-Levesque est, 30 etage, Quebec, QC G1R 5V7 T: 418-521-3861 De l’ecologie et du developpement durable T: 418-521-3861 Services a la gestion & au milieu terrestre/Administrative Services & Earth Environment T: 418-521-3861 Centre d’expertise en analyse environnemental du Quebec (CEAEQ) #E-2-220, 2700 rue Einstein, SteFoy, QC G1P 3W8 T: 418-643-1301 Centre d’expertise hydrique du Quebec T: 418-521-3866

Addresses du Ministere en Region: Bas-Saint-Laurent & GaspesieIles-de-la-Madeleine: Rimouski 212 ave Belzile, Rimouski, QC G5L 3C3 T: 418-727-3511 Sainte-Anne-des-Monts 124, 1re rue O, Ste-Anne-desMonts, QC G4V 1C5 T: 418-763-3301 Iles-de-la-Madeleine 125 chemin du Parc, Ste #104, Capaux-Meules, QC G4T 1B3 T: 418-986-6116 Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean: Saguenay 3950, boul Harvey, 4 etage, Saguenay, QC G7X 8L6 T: 418-695-7883 Capitale-Nationale & Chaudiere-Appalaches: Quebec 1175, boul Lebourgneuf, bureau 100, Quebec, QC G2K 0B7 T: 418-644-8844 Sainte-Marie 675, route Cameron, bureau 200, Ste-Marie, QC G6E 3V7 T: 418-386-8000

www.esemag.com

Montmagny 116, rue St-Jean-Baptiste O, bureau C, Montmagny, QC G5V 3B9 T: 418-248-0984 Mauricie & Centre-du-Quebec: Trois-Rivieres 100, rue Laviolette, bureau 102, Trois-Rivieres, QC G9A 5S9 T: 819-371-6581 Nicolet 1579, boul Louis-Frechette, Nicolet, QC J3T 2A5 T: 819-293-4122 Victoriaville 62, rue St-Jean-Baptiste, S-02, Victoriaville, QC G6P 4E3 T: 819-752-4530 Estrie & Monteregie: Sherbrooke 770, rue Goretti, Sherbrooke, QC J1E 3H4 T: 819-820-3882 Longueuil 201, Place Charles-Le Moyne, 2 etage, Longueuil, QC J4K 2T5 T: 450-928-7607 Bromont 101, rue du Ciel, bureau 1.08, Bromont, QC J2L 2X4 T: 450-534-5424 Salaberry-de-Valleyfield 900, rue Leger, Salaberry-deValleyfield, QC J6S 5A3 T: 450-370-3085 Montreal, Laval, Lanaudiere & Laurentides: Montreal 5199, rue Sherbrooke E, bureau 3860, Montreal, QC H1T 3X9 T: 514-873-3636 Laval 850, boul Vanier, Laval, QC H7C 2M7 T: 450-661-2008 Repentigny 100, boul Industriel, Repentigny, QC J6A 4X6 T: 450-654-4355 Sainte-Therese 300, rue Sicard, bureau 80, SteTherese, QC J7E 3X5 T: 450-433-2220

T: 819-772-3434 Abitibi-Temiscamingue & Nord-du-Quebec: Rouyn-Noranda 180, boul Rideau, 1 etage, RouynNoranda, QC J9X 1N9 T: 819-763-3333 Cote-Nord: Sept-Iles 818, boul Laure, Sept-Iles, QC G4R 1Y8 T: 418-964-8888 Baie-Comeau 20, boul Comeau, Baie-Comeau, QC G4Z 3A8 T: 418-294-8888

SASKATCHEWAN www.saskatchewan.ca

Ministry of the Environment & Stewardship 3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6 T: 306-787-2584, 800-567-4224 Environmental Emergency 24 hour Service T: 800-667-5799 Environmental Assessment Floor 4-3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6 T: 306-787-7603

Candle Lake T: 306-929-8400 Creighton T: 306-688-8812 Christopher Lake T: 306-982-6250 Cypress Hills T: 306-662-5435 Dorintosh T: 306-236-7680 Estevan T: 306-637-4600 Fort Qu’Appelle T: 306-332-3215 Hudson Bay T: 306-865-4400 Humboldt T: 306-682-6726 Ile-a-la-Crosse T: 306-833-3220 Kamsack T: 306-542-5511 Kindersley T: 306-463-5458 La Loche T: 306-235-1740

Environmental Protection 112 Research Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7K 2H6 T: 306-933-6542

La Ronge T: 306-425-4234

Environmental Compliance Division Floor 3-3211 Albert St, Regina, SK S4S 5W6 T: 306-787-5737

Lloydminster T: 306-825-6430

SaskWater – Head Office 200-111 Fairford St E, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 1C8 T: 888-230-1111

Maple Creek T: 306-662-5434

SaskWater – Saskatoon 103-2103 Airport Dr, Saskatoon, SK S7L 6W2 T: 306-933-1118 SaskWater – Prince Albert 800 Central Ave (McIntosh Mall), Prince Albert, SK S6V 6G1 T: 306-953-2250

Joliette 1160, rue Notre Dame, Joliette, QC J6E 3K4 T: 450-752-6860

Field Offices:

Outaouais:

Beauval T: 306-288-4710

Gatineau 170, rue de l’Hotel-de-Ville, bureau 7.340, Gatineau, QC J8X 4C2

Buffalo Narrows T: 306-235-1740

Assiniboia T: 306-642-7242

Big River T: 306-469-2520

Leader T: 306-628-3100

Loon Lake T: 306-837-2410

Meadow Lake T: 306-236-7557 Melfort T: 306-752-6214 Moose Jaw T: 306-694-3659 Nipawin T: 306-862-1790 North Battleford T: 306-446-7416 Outlook T: 306-867-5560 Pierceland T: 306-839-6250 Pinehouse Lake T: 306-884-2060 Porcupine Plain

August 2017  |  55


GOVERNMENT

T: 306-278-3540

Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 T: 800-661-0408 ext. 5652

Preeceville T: 306-547-5660

24 Hour Yukon Spill Report Centre T: 867-667-7244 – Collect calls accepted

Prince Albert T: 306-953-2322

Climate Change Secretariat T: 867-456-5544, 800-661-0408 ext. 5544

Regina T: 306-787-2080 Saskatoon T: 306-933-6240

Environmental Programs Branch 10 Burns Rd/PO Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 T: 867-667-5683, 800-661-0408 ext. 5683

Shaunavon T: 306-297-5433 Smeaton T: 306-426-2611

Water Resources Branch 10 Burns Rd, PO Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6 T: 867-667-3171, 800-661-0408 ext. 3171

Southend T: 306-758-6255 Spiritwood T: 306-883-8501

Yukon Fish & Wildlife Management Board PO Box 31104, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5P7 T: 867-667-5715, 800-661-0408 ext. 5715

Stony Rapids T: 306-439-2062 Swift Current T: 306-778-8205 Wadena T: 306-338-6254

Conservation Services Branch 10 Burns Rd, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 4Y9 T: 867-667-8005

Watrous T: 306-946-3233

Yukon Parks Branch Bldg 1271, 9029 Quartz Rd, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 4P9 T: 867-667-5648, 800-661-0408 ext. 5648

Weyburn T: 306-848-2344 Yorkton T: 306-786-1463

YUKON

www.gov.yk.ca

Environment Yukon 10 Burns Rd, PO Box 2703,

Yukon Environmental & Socio‑Economic Assessment Board (YESAB) 200-309 Strickland St, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2J9 T: 866-322-4040

COLLEGES, UNIVERSITIES & TRAINING CENTRES The following institutions offer diploma, degree and training programs in these areas: Environmental Biology • Environmental Control • Environmental Technician • Environmental Engineering/ Technology • Environmental Health and Science • Environmental Studies • Environmental Toxicology • Environmental Health Engineering

ALBERTA Concordia University of Edmonton................................................................Edmonton Keyano College............................................................................................ Fort McMurray Lakeland College....................................................................... Vermillion, Lloydminster Lethbridge College............................................................................................ Lethbridge Medicine Hat College....................................................................................Medicine Hat Mount Royal University..........................................................................................Calgary Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.....................................................Edmonton SAIT Polytechnic......................................................................................................Calgary University of Alberta..........................................................................................Edmonton University of Calgary..............................................................................................Calgary University of Lethbridge.................................................................................. Lethbridge The King’s University.........................................................................................Edmonton

BRITISH COLUMBIA British Columbia Institute of Technology........................................................ Burnaby Camosun College.....................................................................................................Victoria College of New Caledonia ......................................................................... Prince George Douglas College...................................................................................... New Westminster Kwantlen Polytechnic University........................................................................ Langley Okanagan College.................................................................................................. Kelowna Royal Roads University...........................................................................................Victoria Simon Fraser University....................................................................................Vancouver Thompson Rivers University............................................................................ Kamloops Trinity Western University.................................................................................... Langley University of British Columbia................................................... Vancouver, Okanagan University of Northern British Columbia............................................... Prince George University of Victoria..............................................................................................Victoria

MANITOBA Assiniboine College...............................................................................................................Brandon Brandon University...............................................................................................................Brandon Red River College................................................................................................................. Winnipeg

Water for People’s new Workplace Giving Program There are many reasons to host a workplace giving campaign. According to the 2014 Millennial Impact Study, “A company’s involvement with causes ranked as the 3rd most important factor when applying for a job.” And, “81% of employees decide where to work based on a company’s support of a cause,” from the 2013 Cone Communication/Echo Global CSR Study. A workplace giving campaign can be a great team builder and morale booster for a company when done right. Water For People has resources to help a campaign be a success for your company and employees. We are thrilled when organizations choose to conduct workplace giving campaigns because we are able to help more people access improved drinking water, sanitation and hygiene education services.

56  |  August 2017

Water For People has numerous resources to help you set-up a workplace giving campaign, including a staff member. Other resources include a workplace giving toolkit, quarterly conference calls, quarterly newsletter, annual workshop and website. The most successful workplace giving programs use payroll donations as their main avenue for gathering contributions. However, as support, checks can be accepted and Water For People-Canada has a credit card page to accept donations and individual companies can be added. For more information, visit: www.waterforpeople.org.

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


EDUCATION & TRAINING

University of Manitoba...................................................................................................... Winnipeg University of Winnipeg....................................................................................................... Winnipeg Canadian Mennonite University..................................................................................... Winnipeg

NEW BRUNSWICK Mount Allison University..................................................................................... Sackville New Brunswick Community College...............................................................Miramichi St. Thomas University.....................................................................................Fredericton Université de Moncton..........................................................................................Moncton University of New Brunswick.........................................................................Fredericton

NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

Royal Military College...........................................................................................Kingston Ryerson University................................................................................................. Toronto Sault College.............................................................................................. Sault Ste. Marie Seneca College........................................................................................................ Toronto Sheridan College................................................................................................. Brampton St. Lawrence College............................................................................................ Cornwall Trent University............................................................................................Peterborough University of Guelph................................................................................................Guelph University of Ontario Institute of Technology................................................. Oshawa University of Ottawa................................................................................................Ottawa University of Toronto............................................................................................. Toronto University of Waterloo......................................................................................... Waterloo University of Windsor............................................................................................Windsor

College of the North Atlantic..................................................................... Corner Brook Memorial University of Newfoundland.......................................................... St. John’s

NOVA SCOTIA Acadia University...................................................................................................Wolfville Cape Breton University.......................................................................................... Sydney Dalhousie University................................................................................................ Halifax Nova Scotia Community College.......................................................................... Various Saint Mary’s University........................................................................................... Halifax St. Francis Xavier University........................................................................... Antigonish University of King’s College................................................................................... Halifax

NUNAVUT Nunavut Arctic College........................................................................................... Various

ONTARIO Algonquin College.....................................................................................................Ottawa Brock University........................................................................................... St. Catharines Cambrian College.................................................................................................. Sudbury Canadore College................................................................................................ North Bay Carleton University..................................................................................................Ottawa Centennial College................................................................................................. Toronto

Walkerton Clean Water Centre Walkerton, Ontario Tel: 519.881.2003 or 866.515.0550 Fax: 519.881.4947 inquiry@wcwc.ca www.wcwc.ca The Walkerton Clean Water Centre (the Centre) is an operational service agency of the Government of Ontario established in October 2004 as part of the Province’s response to the Walkerton Inquiry Report. The Centre provides high-quality training for drinking water system owners, operators, operating authorities and postsecondary students across Ontario. The Centre’s Technology Demonstration Facility is an effective platform for hands-on training and pilot testing. Western University..................................................................................................London Wilfrid Laurier University................................................................................... Waterloo York University........................................................................................................ Toronto

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND Holland College........................................................................................... Charlottetown University of Prince Edward Island........................................................ Charlottetown

CICan Natural Resources Internships Tel: 613-746-2222 vbianchi@collegesinstitutes.ca www.collegesinstitutes.ca/NaturalResources Get up to $15,000 to find the skills you need to grow your business in the green economy. Hire a recent grad for 6-12 months through the Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) Natural Resources Internship program. Funding for this initiative is provided by the Government of Canada through Natural Resources Canada’s Green Jobs – Science and Technology Internship Program, as part of the Youth Employment Strategy. Collège Boréal......................................................................................................... Sudbury Conestoga College............................................................................................... Kitchener Confederation College.................................................................................. Thunder Bay Durham College....................................................................................................... Oshawa Fleming College........................................................................................................Lindsay Georgian College.........................................................................................................Barrie Lakehead University..................................................................................... Thunder Bay Laurentian University........................................................................................... Sudbury Loyalist College.....................................................................................................Belleville McMaster University.............................................................................................Hamilton Mohawk College....................................................................................................Hamilton Niagara College Canada (Niagara-on-the-Lake)...............................................Niagara Nipissing University........................................................................................... North Bay Northern College...................................................................................................... Various Queen’s University................................................................................................Kingston Redeemer University College.............................................................................. Ancaster

www.esemag.com

QUÉBEC Bishop’s University.......................................................................................... Sherbrooke Concordia University........................................................................................... Montréal École Polytechnique de Montréal..................................................................... Montréal McGill University................................................................................................... Montréal Université de Montréal........................................................................................ Montréal Université de Sherbrooke.............................................................................. Sherbrooke Université du Québec............................................................................................. Various Université Laval...............................................................................................Québec City Vanier College........................................................................................................ Montreal John Abbott College............................................................................................. Montreal Cégep de Saint-Félicien...............................................................................Saint-Félicien

SASKATCHEWAN First Nations University of Canada....................................................................... Regina Luther College........................................................................................................... Regina University of Regina................................................................................................. Regina University of Saskatchewan.............................................................................Saskatoon Saskatchewan Polytechnic ................................................................................... Various Lakeland College.................................................................................................. Vermilion

UNITED STATES American Public University System......................................................... Charles Town

YUKON Yukon College.................................................................................................... Whitehorse

August 2017  |  57


PRODUCT & SERVICE SHOWCASE Aerobic Granular Sludge System

The AquaNereda® aerobic granular sludge system is now available in Canada and the U.S., exclusively from Aqua-Aerobic Systems, Inc. The AquaNereda system represents an evolution in activated sludge treatment. This advanced technology replicates the same effluent quality as a well-designed, enhanced BNR facility, but without the use of chemicals. Additional advantages translate into a flexible, compact and energy-efficient process. T: 815-654-2501 E: solutions@aqua-aerobic.com W: www.aquanereda.com

Aqua-Aerobic Systems, Inc.

Cloth Media Filter The AquaPrime™ cloth media filtration system provides advanced treatment for primary wastewater and wet weather applications, due to its proven removal efficiencies and high quality effluent. The system utilizes OptiFiber PF-14™ cloth media in a disk configuration with three zones of solids removal to effectively filter high solids waste streams without the use of chemicals. T: 815- 654-2501 E: solutions@aqua-aerobic.com W: www.aquaprimefiltration.com

Aqua-Aerobic Systems, Inc.

58  |  August 2017

Diaphragm Metering Pumps The ChemPro® M MC-2 diaphragm metering pump is wellsuited for use with the often aggressive and viscous chemicals used in municipal water and wastewater treatment. MC-2 is equipped with a variable speed motor, offering smooth chemical dosing with no hard pulses, and full stroke every time prevents vapour lock. MC-2 handles high pressure applications up to 12 bar, and feed rates to 153 LPH. T: 714-893-8529 F: 714-894-9492 E: sales@blue-white.com W: www.blue-white.com

Blue-White Industries

Peristaltic Metering Pump The Proseries-M® M-2 peristaltic metering pumps are well-suited for small to mid-size municipal water and wastewater treatment systems. The self-priming, valve-less design of M-2 means it cannot vapour lock. Standard features include: advanced serial and Ethernet communications; simple to configure and operate; feed rates as low as .03 up to 65.1 LPH; pressures to 8.6 bar; NSF 61 listed; five-year warranty. T: 714-893-8529 F: 714-894-9492 E: sales@blue-white.com W: www.blue-white.com

Blue-White Industries

Corrosion Prevention Large diameter work being done? Time is money and with Denso Mastic Blankets as part of your Denso corrosion prevention system, you can get the job done right,

more efficiently. At 10” x 39”, the mastic blankets cover a large area, filling voids and profiling in seconds. Protect your assets and save time and money with the Denso Petrolatum System. T: 416-559-7459 E: stuart@densona-ca.com W: www.densona.com

Denso

Process Automation Products Festo’s process products, such as angle seat valves, hygienic ball valves and control panels, are perfect for clean- and sterilization-in place systems (CIP/SIP) and other processes where corrosion resistance is needed for harsh environments. Festo features ball valves, angle seat valves, pinch valves, quarter-turn actuators, NAMUR pilot valves, and open/close sensor boxes. For proportional flow applications, use the cost-effective CMSX digital positioner. W: www.festo.ca/process

Festo

Monitor Chemical Usage The Carboy-Scale™ from Force Flow allows operators to accurately monitor how much chemical is being used in their treatment process. The scale platform is 100% PVC plastic, making it immune to corrosion. The SOLO G2® digital weight indicator displays the remaining chemical in increments as small as 1/10 lb. Three platform sizes are available to accommodate drums from 5 to 55 gallons. T: 800-893-6723/925-686-6700 W: www.forceflowscales.com

Force Flow

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


Mixing Tank Contents

Water Level Data Logger

Biofiltration System

The JDV Nozzle Mix System is a dual zone mixing technology that provides uniform mixing patterns that produce even distribution and a stable environment. The system will optimize solids suspension and contact to promote efficiency in a wide range of applications. The high-velocity nozzles are mounted inside the tank and are oriented to discharge in a flow pattern that completely mixes the tank contents.

The HOBO B MX2001 Bluetooth Low Energy Water Level Data Logger features: compensated water level readings; Bluetooth LE data offload; integrated barometric pressure sensor; normal, multi-rate logging and burst-logging; durable ceramic sensor.

The Filterra® engineered biofiltration system is similar to bioretention in its function and application, but has been optimized for high volume/flow treatment and high pollutant removal. Its small footprint allows Filterra to be integrated into landscaped areas, parking lots and streets on highly developed sites. It is exceedingly adaptable and can be used alone or in combination with other BMPs.

T: 519-469-8169 E: jrodger@greatario.com W: www. greatario.com

GREATARIO Engineered Storage Systems

Chlorine Emergency Shutoff

E: salesb@hoskin.ca, Burlington, ON E: salesv@hoskin.ca, Burnaby, BC E: salesm@hoskin.ca, Montreal, QC W: www.hoskin.ca

Hoskin Scientific

Confined Space Vertical Screen Oostburg’s Black River Falls facility is a lean operation, with limitations in space for screening technology and in the staff resources available to manage, maintain and report on the Village’s processes. Even though space was limited, Oostburg knew that putting a headworks screening solution in place would improve their operational efficiency. Oostburg found the perfect solution using the Huber Technology RoK4 confined space vertical screen.

T: 416-960-9900 E: info@imbriumsystems.com W: www.imbriumsystems.com

Imbrium Systems

High-Pressure Multi-Stage Pumps

T: 925-686-6700 W: www.halogenvalve.com

T: 704-949-1010 E: huber@hhusa.net W: www.huber-technology.com

KSB’s Multitec series of high-pressure multi-stage pumps has been expanded with the introduction of two new higher capacity models. The new Multitec 200 and 250 models have discharge flange diameters of 200 mm and 250 mm and can deliver flow rates of up to 1,500 cubic metres per hour and developed heads as high as 400 m. These pumps are specifically designed for water supply applications where high pressures are needed to move water over extended distances.

Professional Water Analysis

Stormwater Treatment

Myron L Ultrapens pen-style pocket testers deliver accurate and reliable measurements. They feature: anodized aircraft aluminum casing; waterproof, fully encapsulated electronics and LCD displays. Parameters include: pH, temp, ORP, conductivity, salinity, DO.

The Jellyfish Filter is a stormwater quality treatment technology featuring high flow membrane filtration in a compact stand-alone system. Jellyfish removes floatables, trash, oil, debris, > 80% TSS and a high percentage of particulate-bound pollutants, including phosphorus, nitrogen, metals and hydrocarbons.

KSB Pumps

The Hexacon III Emergency Chlorine Valve Shutoff System adds a new level of safety to your chlorine feed system. Stop a chlorine leak within seconds of detection by automatically closing the ton container or cylinder valve. Halogen Valve Systems are the only shutoffs that confirm the valve was actually torqued closed to the Chlorine Institute recommended standard. Halogen Valve Systems

E: salesb@hoskin.ca, Burlington, ON E: salesv@hoskin.ca, Burnaby, BC E: salesm@hoskin.ca, Montreal, QC W: www.hoskin.ca

Hoskin Scientific www.esemag.com

Huber Technology

T: 416-960-9900 E: info@imbriumsystems.com W: www.imbriumsystems.com

Imbrium Systems

T: 905-568-9200 E: avezina@ksbcanada.com W: www.ksb.ca

Folding Handrailing Extension MSU has developed a new safety feature for underground stairways – a folding handrailing extension!! For more information on this exciting development, call Paul at 1-800-2685336 x 27. T: 800-268-5336 F: 888-220-2213 W: www.msumississauga.com

MSU Mississauga

August 2017  |  59


PRODUCT & SERVICE SHOWCASE Filtration Products

Experience – that is what sets ORIVAL Water Filters apart from competitors. Thirty years under one ownership, with long-term application engineers on staff, make ORIVAL, Inc. your reliable provider of filtration products. ORIVAL, Inc. has hundreds of automatic self-cleaning screen filter models, with a filter for nearly every application. T: 800-568-9767 E: filters@orival.com W: www.orival.com

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Engineered metal doors USF Fabrication, Inc. manufacture a complete line of engineered metal doors for underground utility access. They have been fabricating solutions since 1916 with over 160,000 sq ft of manufacturing space. This allows them to offer the best lead times in the industry. Their friendly and knowledgeable staff is committed to providing customers with the right product for their application and shipping it when they need it.

installation complexity compared to threaded rod installations of the M11 harness and C219 bolted sleeve-type joints. It is pre-engineered by Victaulic for its customers to determine the spatial requirements and number of coupling pairs needed. T: 905-884-7444 E: rhys.jardine@victaulic.com W: www.victaulic.com

Victaulic

Disposable groundwater filter The unique, open pleat geometry and 600 cm2 surface area of Waterra’s High Turbidity FHT-45 offers the most surface area available in a capsule-type filter today. High quality polyethersulphone 0.45 micron filter media provides maximum exposure and excellent particle retention above the target micron size range, while ensuring that you will not lose filtration media to blinding. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

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Accommodate Dynamic Movement Victaulic released the Style W257 Dynamic Movement Joint as a more efficient solution to accommodate differential settlement and seismic movement in large diameter piping systems. The pre-assembled, AWWA M11 compliant joint reduces 60  |  August 2017

Waterra WS-2 Water Level Sensors are advanced products that utilize the most recent electronic technology. The WS-2 features innovative design as well as compactness, portability and reliability

— all at a competitive price. Available in imperial/metric and open/closed reel formats. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps

Oil/Water Interface Sensor Waterra HS-2 Oil/ Water Interface Sensors utilize the most advanced technology available today for hydrocarbon product layer measurement. These sophisticated ultrasonic sensors are more sensitive in a broader range of hydrocarbon products than conventional optical systems. The HS-2 line includes innovative design features, compactness, portability and reliability — all at a competitive price. Available in imperial/ metric and open/closed reel formats. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps

High Performance Automation Waterra’s portable, electrically operated Hydrolift-2 inertial pump actuator will eliminate the fatigue that can be experienced on large monitoring programs and will result in a big boost to your field sampling program. The Hydrolift-2 gives you the power and endurance you need — without breaking a sweat. T: 905-238-5242 F: 905-238-5704 E: sales@waterra.com W: www.waterra.com

Waterra Pumps

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ES&E NEWS ES&E NEWS ES&E ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER CONTRIBUTES TO OXFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA

Archis Ambulkar, an environmental expert with Jones and Henry Engineers Ltd., and a member of ES&E’s technical advisory board, recently contributed to the Oxford Research Encyclopedia, which is a global reference database for professional communities on advanced topics. Ambulkar provided detailed insights into the pressing topic of present times, “Nutrient Pollution and Wastewater Treatment Systems” in the environmental science section of the encyclopedia. The narrative covers aspects such as nutrient cycles in the environment, polluted waterways in the world, point and non-point pollution sources, pre-treatment programs, wastewater systems, nutrients removal technologies, resource recovery systems, pollution reduction strategies and waterways remediation processes. He is also the author of “Guidance for Professional Development in Drinking Water and Wastewater Industry”, a book published by the International Water Association (United Kingdom). For more information, visit: environmentalscience.oxfordre.com

SOME CANADIAN PROVINCES HAVE ALREADY MET THEIR 2030 GHG EMISSIONS TARGETS

Under the Paris Agreement, Canada committed to reducing its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. However, according to the Canadian National Energy Board (NEB), some Canadian provinces have already reduced their emissions by 30% compared to 2005 levels, namely Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. In 2015, Canada’s total GHG emissions were 722 Mt CO2e, which implies that Canada must reduce its GHG emissions by 28% within the next 14 years to meet its commitments under the Paris Agreement. According to the NEB, factors such as population size, energy sources, and economic base contribute to highly variable emissions among the provinces and territories. continued overleaf…

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August 2017  |  61


ES&E NEWS According to the NEB, climate policies targeting the electricity sector accounted for most of the GHG reductions in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. A legislated emissions cap for Nova Scotia Power led to increased electricity generation from natural gas and renewable, while reducing coal-fired generation. In addition, electricity demand in Nova Scotia decreased 15% from 2005 to 2015 because of decreased manufacturing activity, while a shut-down of the Dartmouth refinery further reduced emissions by 1 MT over the same period. In New Brunswick, emissions fell by almost 31% during this time frame because of policies that reduced oil- and coal-fired power generation in favour of imported hydro from Quebec and increased wind generation. The NEB said that, among the larger provinces, Alberta and Ontario experienced the largest changes in GHG emissions between 2005 and 2015. During that time period, Alberta’s population grew by 26%, significantly higher than the national rate of 11%. This population growth, coupled with increased

62  |  August 2017

oil and gas production, led to Alberta’s shops in Pointe-Saint-Charles, Quebec, GHG emissions growing more than in to include stormwater management. other provinces and territories. The site now houses a new commerOntario’s GHG emissions declined cial complex, which required a complete by almost 20% between 2005 and 2015. storm sewer system using more than This was largely driven by the phase-out 1,675 linear metres of Soleno corruof coal, which helped reduce emissions gated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) from Ontario’s electricity sector from 31 pipe. The installation took place under MT in 2005 to 5 MT in 2015. In addition, a 300-space parking lot and was able to the economic downturn in 2009 heavily comply with the municipality’s requireaffected Ontario’s manufacturing sector ments. Chemically-inert HDPE pipe does and resulted in declining emissions not react with contamination in the soil from heavy industry. which was found on the site. www.neb-one.gc.ca

QUEBEC COMMERCIAL STORM SEWER PROJECT HONOURED

www.plasticpipe.org

FEDS INVEST $25.7 MILLION IN THE LAKE WINNIPEG BASIN PROGRAM

The Plastics Pipe Institute (PPI) recently announced this year’s winners for its The Government of Canada will invest Members and Projects of the Year Awards. $25.7 million in the Lake Winnipeg Basin Winners were selected based on outstand- Program, with a focus on reducing nutriing service contributions to the industry, ent pollution, enhancing collaboration to and exceptional achievements showcasing protect freshwater quality and strengthen beneficial uses of plastics in pipe applica- collaboration and engagement of Indigetions. nous people. One winning project was the redevelThe announcement was made by opment of the former CN railway work- Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, as part of the $70.5-million funding allocated for freshwater protection in the 2017 federal budget. According to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), Lake Winnipeg is the tenth largest freshwater lake in the world and the sixth largest in Canada. Its watershed covers almost a million square kilometres, encompassing four provinces and four U.S. states. Water quality in Lake Winnipeg has deteriorated due to multiple sources of excessive nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) that have increased the frequency and magnitude of algal blooms, including blue-green algae. In September 2006, an algal bloom covered almost the entire surface of Lake Winnipeg. The Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative (LWBI) was first launched in 2008 with $18 million in funding for a five-year period. The program was renewed in 2012 for a second five-year phase, with an additional $18 million in funding. Evaluation of phase II has been finalized and the report can be read on www.canada.ca. ECCC said it will continue to conduct Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ES&E NEWS ES&E NEWS science-based initiatives to reduce the effects of excess nutrients in the lake and its basin. It will also increase engagement and collaboration with Indigenous peoples, the Government of Manitoba, and all other levels of government in Canada and the U.S. regarding shared water resources in the basin.

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SUPPORT ANNOUNCED FOR AGRICULTURAL WATER AND FERTILIZER MANAGEMENT

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The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food announced a contribution of Consulting • Engineering • Construction • Operation more than $2.9 million for two McGill University projects aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions caused by water and fertilizer use in agriculture. Black&Veatch_ND.14_ProCard_TP.indd 1 The announcement was made on June 12, 2017, in Sainte-Anne-De-Bellevue, Quebec. According to Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, this funding comes from the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program (AGGP). It will enable McGill University to develop policies, models and new practices for water management systems, and to assess the effectiveness and the impact on soils of using municipal biosolids as fertilizers in three different Canadian climate zones. The AGGP is a $27-million initiative intended to help the agricultural sector adjust to climate change and improve soil and water conservation.

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ONTARIO INTRODUCES NEW WATER BOTTLING FEE

Beginning August 1, 2017, water bottlers in Ontario will pay $503.71 for every million litres of groundwater taken. The announcement was made by the Ontario government as part of the province’s plan to strengthen groundwater protection for future generations. According to the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC), the new fee will help recover costs associated with managing groundwater taken by water bottlers, including supporting scientific research on the environmencontinued overleaf…

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ES&E NEWS tal impacts, as well as enhanced data analysis on groundwater taken for water bottling. In Ontario, water bottling facilities must apply for permits to take water from groundwater sources if the facility takes more than 50,000 litres of water on any day. Other elements of Ontario’s groundwater protection include: • A moratorium on all new and expanded permits to take water from groundwater sources for water bottling. To remain in effect until January 1, 2019. • The introduction of new, stricter rules for renewals of existing bottled water permits. • Research to ensure long-term water protection, including considering the impacts of climate change and future demand on water sources. • Engaging Indigenous partners, communities and industry on changes to water quantity management practices. The MOECC estimates that bottled water produces about 180 times the greenhouse gas emissions of tap water, due to the use of plastic and fossil fuels used for transportation. www.news.ontario.ca

CONTRACT AWARDED FOR STAGE TWO OF HAMILTON’S RANDLE REEF CLEANUP

Work on the second stage of the Randle Reef remediation project in Hamilton, Ontario, has been awarded to Milestone Environmental Contracting Inc. and Fraser River Pile & Dredge Inc., in a $32.9 million joint-venture contract. The Stage Two contract is part of the three-stage $138.9 million project to clean up a heavily contaminated area of Hamilton Harbour known as Randle Reef.

According to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), Randle Reef is approximately 60 hectares in size and contains 695,000 cubic metres of contaminated sediment at the bottom of the harbour. The Bay Area Restoration Council said Randle Reef is the largest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated sediment site in the Canadian Great Lakes. Stage One of the project involved re-constructing an adjacent harbour pier wall and constructing an engineering containment “box”, which uses double steel walls to seal in approximately 6.2 hectares of the most heavily contaminated soil. Stage Two involves dredging contaminated sediment from the surrounding areas and placing them in the containment facility via an underwater pipeline. This stage is expected to begin in the spring of 2018 and take two years to complete. In Stage Three, the contained sediment will be dewatered and compacted, with an impermeable cap being placed over the containment facility. This final stage is expected to be completed in 2022. Remediation of Randle Reef is the last remaining environmental restoration project in Hamilton Harbour. According to ECCC, its completion will help remove the harbour from the list of Great Lakes Areas of Concern, and spark development along Hamilton’s waterfront and increase tourism. www.canada.ca or www.randlereef.ca

TRASH-PICKING SEAGULLS CAN CAUSE WATER QUALITY ISSUES

also a threat to the health of nearby waters, a new Duke University study finds. “We estimate these gulls transport and deposit an extra 240 tons of nitrogen and 39 tons of phosphorus into nearby lakes or reservoirs in North America each year through their feces,” said lead author Scott Winton, a 2016 doctoral graduate of Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment. Research was done at landfills near two major drinking water reservoirs, Jordan Lake and Falls Lake that serve the Raleigh-Durham region of North Carolina. Nitrogen and phosphorus loading data from these two lakes were then scaled up to estimate total loading at water bodies near landfills across North America, using a well-established model for measuring the nutrient transport of carnivorous birds. “The idea that gull feces can be a major water quality problem may sound comical, until you look at data from an individual lake,” Winton said. “In Jordan Lake, for instance, we found that a local flock of 49,000 ring-billed gulls deposit landfill feces containing nearly 1.2 tons of phosphorus into the lake annually.” That amount, he said, is equivalent to roughly half of the total phosphorus load reduction target established for the New Hope Creek watershed of Jordan Lake. Offsetting this added phosphorus costs local governments about $2.2 million annually, largely through long-term programs aimed at reducing other sources of inflowing nutrients such as urban stormwater or agricultural runoff. www.nicholas.duke.edu

At least 1.4 million seagulls feed at landfills across North America, which, aside from the nuisance it might pose, is

COMPANY SENTENCED TO PAY $3.5 MILLION FOR OBED MOUNTAIN MINE SPILL

Prairie Mines & Royalty ULC (formerly known as Coal Valley Resources Inc.) has pleaded guilty in Alberta Provincial Court to two counts of violating the Fisheries Act. According to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), on October 31, 2013, a dike that was holding back a large volume of wastewater at the Obed Mountain Mine failed, resulting in more than 64  |  August 2017

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


ES&E NEWS ES&E NEWS 670 million litres of contaminated water and sediment (made up of coal, clay and sand) spilling into the Apetowun Creek and Plante Creek and additionally impacting the Athabasca River. ECCC said $1.15 million of this sentence will be put into a trust to be managed by the University of Alberta to create the Alberta East Slopes Fish Habitat and Native Fish Recovery Research Fund. The remaining $2.15 million will be directed to the Environmental Damages Fund. This case was a coordinated multiyear joint investigation by Fisheries and Oceans Canada, ECCC and the Province of Alberta. www.ec.gc.ca

KINSMEN CLUB FINED FOR SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT VIOLATIONS

The Kinsmen Club of Stratford Incorporated pleaded guilty to one offence and was fined $2,000 for failing to ensure that no drinking water was supplied after a shutdown period of seven or more consecutive days until samples were taken and tested, contrary to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). The Kinsmen Club is located at a property on 31st Line, Embro, Township of Zorra, in the County of Oxford. At the site, the Kinsmen Club operates a camp called Kamp Tanner, and also rents out campgrounds to groups throughout the year. Between early January and April 21, 2015, the drinking water system was shut down at the camp. According to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, on July 5, 2015, the camp became operational and water was supplied to various locations within the camp. However, the Kinsmen Club had not collected distribution samples for testing until July 14, 2015, and the results of the test were not received until July 16, 2015.

(Use in Dry Cleaning and Reporting Requirements) Regulations made pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Peter’s Drive-In Cleaners Ltd. was fined $4,000 for each offence. In addition, an owner of the company pleaded guilty to one count of contravening the regulations, and was fined $2,000. The $10,000 in fines will be directed to the Environmental Damages

Fund. According to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), in June 2015, ECCC enforcement officers inspected the facility. The inspection revealed that wastewater containing tetrachloroethylene had not been transported to a waste-management facility and that records had not been maintained. Both acts are in contracontinued overleaf…

WEFTEC is the one event for professionals, industry experts, and the most innovative companies from around the world. Learn from the very best thought-leaders in water quality. Attending WEFTEC connects you to the pulse of the water quality sector and provides the tools, knowledge, and knowhow for professional success.

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www.news.ontario.ca

LONDON DRY CLEANER FINED FOR ENVIRONMENTAL OFFENCE

Peter’s Drive-In Cleaners Ltd., located in London, Ontario, pleaded guilty in the Ontario Court of Justice to two counts of contravening the Tetrachloroethylene www.esemag.com

MCCORMICK PLACE CHICAGO CONFERENCE SEP 30 – OCT 4, 2017 EXHIBITION OCT 2 – 4, 2017

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August 2017  |  65


Advertiser INDEX

ES&E NEWS Get listed in ES&E Magazine’s

Consultants, Products & Services Guide Register your company at esemag.com/directory

Company Page ACG Technology.........................................67 Associated Engineering...........................25 Atlas Copco Compressors Canada......................................41, 43, 45, 47 AWI.................................................................15 Blue-White...................................................11 Cancoppas...................................................39 Colleges and Institutes Canada............31 Denso ...........................................................21 Endress + Hauser.........................................5 Engineered Pump......................................28 Envirocan ...................................................67 Hoskin Scientific................................. 23, 33 Huber Technology.....................................19 Imbrium Systems........................................2 IPEX................................................................27 Kemira...........................................................14 Master Meter ................................................3 Minotaur Stormwater Services ............38 MSU Mississauga.........................................7 Ontario Clean Water Agency..................68 Parsons.........................................................18 Pro Aqua.........................................................9 SHAC Solutions..........................................12 Siemens AG International.......................17 Stantec..........................................................12 Thomas Nutrient Solutions....................35 USF Fabrication..........................................28 Walkerton Clean Water Centre..............40 Waterra.....................................13, 29, 37, 42 WEFTEC........................................................65 66  |  August 2017

vention of the Tetrachloroethylene (Use in Dry Cleaning and Reporting Requirements) Regulations. According to ECCC, tetrachloroethylene, also known as perchloroethylene or PERC, is a chemical used in Canadian dry cleaning. Tetrachloroethylene can enter the environment through the soil, where it can damage plants, and it can find its way into groundwater. It has been listed as a toxic substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act since 2000. www.ec.gc.ca

WEF COMMITS TO INTELLIGENT WATER SYSTEMS, SMART WATER NETWORKS

The Water Environment Federation (WEF) has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Smart Water Networks Forum (SWAN), agreeing to jointly promote the development of best industry practices for more efficient and sustainable smart water networks. Smart water networks have a range of applications, from detecting system leaks to managing energy. As technological advancements continue to change the water sector, the qualifications for water sector jobs change too, presenting an opportunity to equip water professionals with new skill sets and knowledge. SWAN’s focus on smart wastewater network management enables efficiencies and improvements in three categories: customer, environmental, and operational benefits. This complements WEF’s attention on the value of integrating intelligent water practices into the water sector, determining common barriers of implementing intelligent water practices, technology trends, and new solutions. www.wef.org

WRF RELEASES GUIDANCE ON SOCIAL MEDIA USE FOR UTILITIES

The Water Research Foundation has published a suite of deliverables to help water and wastewater utilities utilize social

media to engage with their customers. Social Media for Water Utilities explores the business case for utilities and board members to invest in, and engage their customers through, social media. The project offers clear, practical guidance on how utilities can integrate social media engagement into their day-to-day operations and provides resources and templates that staff can customize and use at any time. It also helps utilities answer strategic questions, such as: • When and how should utilities restructure staff, policies, and budgets to begin using social media? • How do utilities best harness social media to alert customers during crisis events? • Is it worth it for utilities to expose themselves to this hyperbolic debate, and is there any alternative? “When used effectively, social media provides water and wastewater utilities with another communication tool to ensure customer satisfaction,” said Rob Renner, CEO of the Water Research Foundation. In addition to the Executive Briefing, which summarizes key findings and best practices, the project produced several additional deliverables: • Literature Review: Summarizes what has already been discovered about utilities’ use of social media. • Getting Started FAQ: Answers key questions for utilities and links to helpful resources. • Case Studies: Eight water, wastewater, and combined utilities shared insights about their social media experiences. • Social Media Posting Skills Checklist: Web tool with how-to videos and stepby-step guidance on crafting an effective social media post. • Utility Benchmarking Results: Analysis and comparison of the social media profiles of 60 small, medium, and large U.S. utilities. • Survey Results: Four hundred adult Facebook users were asked to share their thoughts on connecting with their water utility on social media. A recent webcast previewed results of the project and can be viewed online at www.awwarf.org. www.werf.org

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine


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Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine (ESEMAG) August 2017  

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine’s August 2017 issue. Featuring a special section on Climate Change & Resilient Infrastructure a...

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine (ESEMAG) August 2017  

Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine’s August 2017 issue. Featuring a special section on Climate Change & Resilient Infrastructure a...

Profile for esemag