Issuu on Google+

Publications Mail Sales Agreement #40050382

June/July 2012


Jessica and Team, Congratulations on Your Magnificent Wins. Merial Canada is proud to salute Jessica Phoenix on her brilliant Gold medal finish, and the Canadian Eventing Team for their outstanding Silver medal finish at the Pan Am Games

Jessica Phoenix on Pavarotti, Pan Am Gold Medallist

in Guadalajara, Mexico. As a long-time supporter of the sport, we are thrilled that GASTROGARD plays a role in your victories. ®

Canadian Eventin g Team: Hawley Bennett-Awa d, Jes sica Phoenix, James Atkinson, Rebe cca Howard, Selena O’Hanlon

How Champions Are Made As top riders know, the pressures of training, travel and competition can bring out the best in your horse. But a stressful environment can also bring on gastric ulcers, a common, under-diagnosed condition that affects even leisure horses and foals. Symptoms include reduced appetite, dullness, attitude change and colic. GASTROGARD is the only proven preventative aid and treatment for this performance-robbing health condition. That’s why champion riders ask for GASTROGARD. ®

Ask your veterinarian how GASTROGARD paste can help improve your champion.

® GASTROGARD is a registered trademark of the AstraZeneca Group of Companies. © 2011 Merial Canada Inc. All rights reserved. GAST-11-7005-JA-5 MERH-2098 ®

www.merial.ca


June/July 2012

Equine Canada is pleased to recognize the following sponsors DEPARTMENTS

5 6 36 39 40 42 44

Equine Canada Sport Health & Welfare

Preferred Vaccine of Equine Canada and the Canadian Equestrian Team

Coaching Industry Recreation Canada Hippique

28 Official Helmet of the Canadian Equestrian Team

Official Supplier to the Canadian Equestrian Team

© Susan J Stickle.com

30

© Shannon Brinkman Photo

16

Official Joint Therapy of Equine Canada and the Canadian Equestrian Team

20

© Lindsay Yosay McCall 2011

Note: on the following pages the

© Cealy Tetley

symbol signifies a Canadian-bred Horse.

On the cover: (clockwise from top left) Ian Millar & Star Power (© Cealy Tetley), Ashley Holzer & Pop Art (© Susan J Stickle.com), Lauren Barwick & Off to Paris (© Lindsay Yosay McCall 2011), Rebecca Howard & Riddle Master (Photo— Shannon Brinkman) En page couverture : (dans le sens horaire, à partir du coin supérieur gauche) Ian Millar et Star Power (© Cealy Tetley), Ashley Holzer et Pop Art (© Susan J Stickle.com), Lauren Barwick et Off to Paris (© Lindsay Yosay McCall 2011), Rebecca Howard et Riddle Master (Photo— Shannon Brinkman)

Official Supplement Supplier Equine Canada and the Canadian Equestrian Team


2685 Queensview Drive, Suite 100 Ottawa, ON, K2B 8K2 Tel: (613) 248-3433, Toll Free: 1-866-282-8395 Toronto local: (416) 848-6334 Fax: (613) 248-3484 www.equinecanada.ca

Directors

President

Secretary

Tony La Giorgia

Treasurer

Cheryl Denault

Directors at Large

Mike Gallagher

Dave Myers/Kerri McGregor/Tony La Giorgia

Industry Division

Provinces & Territories Division

Recreation Division

Sport Division

Health and Welfare Committee

Acting Chief Executive Officer/Chief Financial Officer

Chief Operating Officer

Coaching—Manager

Competitions/Officials/Stewards— Program Coordinator

Megan Rochon, ext. 140, mrochon@equinecanada.ca

Competitions/Officials/Stewards— Program Coordinator

Kathy Strong, ext. 141, kstrong@equinecanada.ca

Competitions Program Assistant, Weekend Support

Equine Medications—Program Coordinator

Dr. Edward Kendall

Equine Canada’s Member Discount Program Check out http://bit.ly/qVqKgU for details

Rosaire Houde/Geri Sweet Jack De Wit/Bonnie Simpson John Harris Dr.Mary Bell

Equine Canada Professionals Michael Arbour, CMA, ext 108, marbour@equinecanada.ca Craig Andreas, ext 145, candreas@equinecanada.ca Heather Sansom, ext. 115, hsansom@equinecanada.ca

Kathryn Lefrancois, ext 112, klefrancois@equinecanada.ca Kari MacGregor, ext. 117, karimacgregor@equinecanada.ca

Dressage—Manager

Christine Peters, ext 138, cpeters@equinecanada.ca

Peggy Olivier, ext 142, polivier@equinecanada.ca

Dressage—Program Coordinator

Eventing—Manager

Fleur Tipton, ext 110, ftipton@equinecanada.ca

Eventing—Program Coordinator

Sandra de Graaff, ext. 109, sdegraaff@equinecanada.ca

FEI Passports—Program Coordinator

Jennifer Mahoney, ext. 101, jmahoney@equinecanada.ca

FEI Passports—Program Coordinator

Sandra de Graaff, ext. 109, sdegraaff@equinecanada.ca

Finance Program Coordinator

Megan McCormick, ext. 137, mmccormick@equinecanada.ca

Human Medications—Program Coordinator

Sandra de Graaff, ext. 109, sdegraaff@equinecanada.ca

Information Systems—Manager

Information Systems—Programmer

Bonnie Vallentyne, ext. 122, bvallentyne@equinecanada.ca Pavel Robinson, ext. 122, probinson@equinecanada.ca

Jumping—Manager Karen Hendry-Ouellette, ext 102, Khendry-ouellette@equinecanada.ca Jumping—Program Coordinator

Jumping—Program Support

Jennifer Mahoney, ext. 101, jmahoney@equinecanada.ca

Margaret Harvey, ext. 133, mharvey@equinecanada.ca

Marketing and Communications—Manager

Cheryl Tataryn, ext. 111, ctataryn@equinecanada.ca

Media Relations/Communications Coordinator/ Athlete Bios/News Releases

Julie Cull, ext. 136, jcull@equinecanada.ca, cell: 613-858-7562 Gerry van Blokland, ext. 123, gvanblokland@equinecanada.ca

Graphic and Web Designer Non-Olympic FEI Disciplines and Breed Sports— Program Coordinator Para-Equestrian—Director

Wendy Gayfer, ext 125, wgayfer@equinecanada.ca Amie O’Shaughnessy, ext. 134, aoshaughnessy@equinecanada.ca

Para-Equestrian—Program Coordinator

Para-Equestrian—Program Support

Sport Licences/EC Passport —Administrator

Crystal Labelle, ext. 114, clabelle@equinecanada.ca

Sport Licences/EC Passport —Administrator

Jennifer Odin, ext. 106, jodin@equinecanada.ca

Sport Licences/EC Passport —Administrator

Kim Perry , ext. 116, kperry@equinecanada.ca

Choice Hotels Canada Official Hotel Service of Equine Canada Up to 20% off your next stay! www.choicehotels.ca/equine or 800.4CHOICE—Quote Client ID #00088256

Jamie-Ann Goodfellow, ext. 143, jgoodfellow@equinecanada.ca Ashley Raaymakers, ext. 144, araaymakers@equinecanada.ca

The Official Magazine of Equine Canada is published bimonthly Editor 1-866-282-8395 Cheryl Tataryn, ext. 111, ctataryn@equinecanada.ca Assistant Editor Julie Cull, ext. 136, jcull@equinecanada.ca Design and Layout Gerry van Blokland, ext. 123, gvanblokland@equinecanada.ca

4 www.equinecanada.ca

BMO Mosaik Master Card Official Credit Card of Equine Canada www3.bmo.com/mosaik/equine

Ashley Raaymakers, ext. 144, araaymakers@equinecanada.ca

Marketing and Communications—Director Industry, Health & Welfare, Recreation Divisions—Liaison

Call 1-800-965-6872 to start saving!

Micheal Bryce, ext. 107, mbryce@equinecanada.ca

Finance—Assistant

Call 1-800-965-6872 to start saving!

Save 15% at any PARK’N FLY location across Canada. Visit www.parknfly.ca and quote corporate membership code: 205458.

Visit http://bit.ly/ojPPr1 to find out how to save 10%!


| EQUINE CANADA |

President’s Message Our competition season is now in full swing with dozens of competitions scheduled for this month! Recreational riders are exploring the beautiful trails all across Canada with wonderful summer weather. The Thoroughbred racing sector was thrilled by the performances of Canadianowned “I’ll Have Another”. Our membership and sport license numbers are once again at record high levels. It seems more and more people are getting involved with horses while we see participation levels in other sports decreasing, some due to tough economic times. On the administrative side of the business, we have several major projects underway. We have had a thorough review of our Bylaws and how they link into a new system of electing our Board of Directors. These will be ready for approval by the membership by the end of the summer. At the same time, we have launched the largest review in our history of Equine Canada’s Strategic Plan. Many sessions were planned and well attended with great feedback provided to the Strategic Planning Review Committee. An online survey had an outstanding response of over 2,000 hits and 1,300 direct responses. Normally members do not take such an interest in this type of project. And if all of that is not enough, we also have a major competition system review taking place examining, among other things, how our competition system integrates with the Long-Term Athlete Development model. We have retained a Human Relations expert to assist with creating a new CEO a job description. We want to be sure the job description is accurate before we hire a new CEO. Right now our estimated timing is that interviews for the CEO position will take place in September following the Olympics. In May, Canada was honoured to host the International Sport Accord held in Quebec City. This is a major annual event that is attended by all of the International Sport Federations including our own FEI. I was able to attend the record breaking Canadian Olympic Committee luncheon of 4,000 people which raised

over $800,000 for Canadian athletes. I was also able to join up with the FEI CEO, Ingmar de Vos, and give him a tour of the Pan Am 2015 site in Caledon, Ontario. This was a great opportunity to spend some one-on-one time with Ingmar and we discussed several topics of interest to Equine Canada. My next stop is London to cheer on our Olympic and Paralympic teams. This is our time to shine! Between 2008 and 2010, all of our disciplines attained some of, if not the best performances in our history. We know we can win, and while that does not guarantee success, it certainly puts us in a stronger position knowing it can be done. I wish our teams all the best in London and I know we will all be proud of them! As always, you are invited to contact me with any comments or questions. Michael Gallagher, President, Equine Canada president@equinecanada.ca equinecanada equinecanada June June/July | July 2012 5


| SPORT |

Caledon Equestrian Park Named Host Venue for

2015 Pan American Games Caledon Equestrian Park in Palgrave, Ontario, was the first sport venue to be named for the Toronto 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games in a special groundbreaking ceremony held May 18. TO2015, the Toronto 2015 Pan/ Parapan American Games Organizing Committee, the Government of Canada, the Province of Ontario and the Town of Caledon joined together to announce Caledon Equestrian Park as the official venue for equestrian sport, while also unveiling plans for facility improvements and community legacy. Held during the Caledon National show jumping tournament, competition was halted to allow athletes and their families and friends to gather for the groundbreaking ceremony. Canadian Equestrian Team members Yann Candele of Caledon, ON, and 2008 Olympic Team Silver medalist Jill Henselwood participated in the on-site announcement. “After years of preparation and planning, we are honoured not only to have Caledon Equestrian Park named as the official host of equestrian sport for the 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games, but to also be selected as the very first sport venue announced by the TO2015 Organizing Committee,” said Craig Collins of Equestrian Management Group (EMG), a funding partner and the operating group of Caledon Equestrian Park. “To make the announcement in front of hundreds of our competitors, whether they are children on ponies or junior riders with international aspirations, really underlines the legacy that hosting the Pan Am events will create for the future of our sport. I am sure many Photo Credit—ShootPhoto.ca

of these young riders will remember gathering together on the hill for this momentous announcement, and possibly start dreaming of one day standing on the podium to claim a medal for our country.” Mike Gallagher, President of Equine Canada, echoed those sentiments, recognizing the impact hosting the Pan/Parapan American Games will have on equestrian sport both locally and nationwide. “This investment ensures that Caledon Equestrian Park will provide an accessible public legacy for the region to develop and train elite athletes and recreational riders for decades to come,” said Gallagher. “As the National Sport Federation representing, promoting and developing horse sport and interests in Canada, Equine Canada fully supports the suitability of Caledon Equestrian Park as a venue for the Toronto 2015 Pan American Games.” Caledon Equestrian Park is a municipally owned facility that will host dressage and show jumping competitions during the Games, as well as the dressage and show jumping portions of the three-day eventing competition. A nearby venue in Orangeville is currently under review for the cross-country portion of the eventing competition.

President Mike Gallagher (far right) and CET Team Leader Kerri McGregor (third from right) represented Equine Canada at the official announcement naming Caledon Equestrian Park as Host Venue for the 2015 Pan American Games. Also in the photo are, left to right: Lisa Lazarus, FEI General Counsel, Cally Ashby, TO2015, Town of Caledon Mayor Marolyn Morrison, Bob O’ Doherty, TO2015 VP of Sport, Craig Collins, EMG Partner and TO2015 Chair Sport Organizing Committee - Equestrian, Ian Troup, CEO, TO2015, Ingmar De Voss, CEO and Secretary General, FEI, John Weir, EMG Partner, Roger Garland, TO2015, Chair Board of Directors, and Rob Carey, EMG Partner.

6 www.equinecanada.ca

TO2015’s venue selection process is based on standards set by International Sport Federations (IFs), approval of the sport program by the Pan American Sports Organization (PASO), and consultation with the National Sport Federations (NSFs).


| SPORT |

“Caledon Equestrian Park is a worldclass facility with a well-earned reputation in the international equestrian community,” said TO2015 Chief Executive Officer, Ian Troop. “What’s more, it’s a publicly owned facility so the investments we’ll be making for the Pan Am Games will benefit the public for many years to come. That’s one reason why we are calling Toronto 2015 the ‘People’s Games,’ because the investments we’re making are aimed at making events accessible to the public, and will create a rich public legacy.” “The Harper Government is pleased to announce Caledon Equestrian Park as the official equestrian venue for the 2015 Pan American Games,” said the Honourable Bal Gosal, Minister of State (Sport). “Our Government’s significant investment in these Games for sport infrastructure, legacy and essential federal services will not only result in economic prosperity for Caledon and the Greater Toronto Area, but will leave a lasting sporting legacy here in Canada for years to come.” In preparation for the Toronto 2015 Games, the Caledon Equestrian Park will receive capital investment from the Government of Canada, Town of Caledon, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and Equestrian Management Group for upgrades and improvements, which will include: • A new main stadium building. • Permanent spectator seating areas and areas for temporary Gamestime seating. • Relocation of, and improvements to stabling areas. • A new Grand Prix ring, warm-up rings and training areas.

• A new indoor riding arena. • Infrastructure improvements such as services and grading. • Other related amenities such as blacksmith area and veterinary area. Ontario will be supporting the cost of venue overlay and Games operations through its $500 million contribution to the TO2015 budget. The improvements and upgrades will be overseen by Equine Canada and TO2015 with John MacDonald Architect Inc., a local firm that was awarded the contract in January 2012 through a public tendering process led by the Town of Caledon. Construction is targeted to begin in fall 2012 with completion by the spring of 2014. The participation of Caledon Equestrian Park in the Toronto 2015 Pan American Games will have a significant economic impact on the Town of Caledon. A study conducted by the Canadian Sport Tourism Association for the Town of Caledon found the annual economic impact of these improvements estimated at $15.1 million. “I am very proud that Caledon will be part of the 2015 Pan American Games by hosting equestrian events at our world-class Caledon Equestrian Park,” said David Tilson, Member of Parliament (Dufferin–Caledon). “We are looking forward to welcoming athletes and spectators from across Canada and the Americas to Caledon in 2015.” “The ‘People’s Games’ will create jobs, support the community, and keep the local economy in Caledon on track for our children and grandchildren,” said Charles Sousa,

Ontario Minister responsible for the Pan/Parapan American Games. “The Town of Caledon looks forward to working with the TO2015, its partners and ours, the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, Equestrian Management Group and Region of Peel to ensure that collectively we host the most successful Pan Am Games yet,” said Mayor Marolyn Morrison, Town of Caledon. “We are very proud that the Caledon Equestrian Park was selected for the Toronto 2015 equestrian events, and our team is committed to ensuring that the facility will serve our community for years to come.” “We are very confident that Toronto will deliver a great competition and we are looking forward to working on the 2015 Pan Am Games together with the Organizing Committee and Equine Canada,” said Ingmar de Vos, Chief Executive Officer and Secretary General of the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), in a statement supporting the announcement. Attracting more equestrian athletes annually than any other competition venue in Ontario, Caledon Equestrian Park has hosted four Pan American Games selection trials, two Olympic selection trials, 15 World Cup qualifying events, and more than 150 Grand Prix events. Currently hosting 16 equestrian events annually, Caledon Equestrian Park will close out its 2012 season with the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament held September 19 to 23 for the benefit of the Children’s Wish Foundation of Canada. For more information on Caledon Equestrian Park and Equestrian Management Group, please visit www.equiman.com.

equinecanada June | July 2012 7


| SPORT |

Harper Government Supports

Bromont International Three-Day Event On behalf of the Honourable Bal Gosal, Minister of State (Sport), the Honourable Christian Paradis, Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture), today announced the Government of Canada’s contribution to Equine Canada Hippique. The funding supports the 2012 Bromont International Three-Day Event, which is being held in Bromont from June 7 to 10, 2012. “Our government is proud to provide support to Equine Canada Hippique for the hosting of the 2012 Bromont International Three-Day Event,” said Minister of State Gosal. “This exciting competition will provide our top equestrian athletes with the opportunity to face off against the world’s best right here on home soil. I wish our equestrian athletes the best of success on the road to the London 2012 Olympic Games.” “I am pleased to welcome visitors and equestrian athletes from around the world to Quebec for this very exciting equestrian competition,” said Minister Paradis. “This prestigious event will showcase both the tremendous talent of our athletes and our beautiful region, while bringing about a welcome economic boost to the local community.” “The organizing committee is grateful to the Government of Canada for the financial support to the Volvo Bromont CCI,” said Mrs. Sue Ockendon, Event Organizer. “This event will offer our Canadian Olympic hopefuls the world-class venue they need to prepare and compete at the highest levels.” Equine Canada Hippique is the national governing body that oversees equestrian sport, the Canadian Equestrian Team, as well as issues related to equine welfare, breeding and the industry. The Government of Canada is the single largest contributor to sport in Canada and supports participation and excellence from playground to podium. The Government of Canada has provided $50,000 from Sport Canada’s Hosting Program for the 2012 Bromont Three-Day Event. It also provided almost $2.6 million to Equine Canada Hippique during the 2011-2012 fiscal year through Sport Canada’s Sport Support Program.

8 www.equinecanada.ca

Ben Asselin Named CAVALOR ‘Athlete of the Month’ for May Asselin opened with a win on the first stop on the Young Rider European Tour, CSIOY Bonheiden, BEL, held May 17-20, 2012. Asselin, 18, of Calgary, AB, rode Rush, an 11-year-old Belgian Sport Horse owned by Attache Stables, to the only clear round out of 53 starters to win the 5000 € 1.45 m Prijs Ashford Farm. Asselin also posted a clear round for the Canadian team in the Nations’ Cup held on May 19 riding Lolita, a 14-year-old Oldenburg mare also owned by Attache Stables. A week later at the CSIOY Lamprechtshausen, AUT, Asselin rode Rush to a third place finish in the 4,500 € Young Rider Grand Prix Big Tour Final. The pair incurred four faults with only a foot in the water jump during the opening round, which saw only one rider finish the course fault free. With Lolita, Asselin had eight faults in the first round and were fault-free in the second during the Nations’ Cup to help secure Canada’s fourth place finish out of nine countries. “It’s truly a great honour to be named athlete of the month for May,” said Asselin. “My two horses Lolita and Rush were absolutely phenomenal in Europe on the tour. Lolita jumped her heart out every time she stepped into the ring, and she was a true team player in the Nations’ Cup competitions, posting clear rounds. “Rush is a new mount for me and really proved to us that he has what it takes to be a contender in the sport,” added Asselin. “I originally intended for him to be my second horse but he stepped up to the plate and won the Grand Prix in Belgium and then had a solid third place finish in the Grand Prix in Austria. They both feel ready to be a competitive duo over the summer at Spruce Meadows.” As the CAVALOR ‘Athlete of the Month’ for May, Asselin receives a gift certificate from title sponsor CAVALOR Inc.


| SPORT |

Wembley Stadium, 1948 Greenwich Park at the Olympic Test Event in 2011

Š Kit Houghton

10 www.equinecanada.ca


| SPORT |

Fascinating Facts About The 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

100 YEARS

Waylon Roberts finished in 13th place in the Greenwich Park Eventing Invitational CIC 2*, held July 4–6, 2011 in London (GBR) the LOCOG equestrian test event for the 2012 Olympic Games (Photo Credit—Kimberley Gallagher)

of Equestrian Sport at the Olympic Games Reprinted courtesy of FEI Focus

Since 1912…

Since 1912 dressage, jumping and eventing have been part of the Olympic program. Competition was open to men only, until:

• There have been 22 equestrian participations at Olympic Games with 2,062 riders from 65 countries competing approximately 4,000 times.

• 1952 where four of the 27 Dressage riders were women. Lis Hartel was chosen to represent Denmark at the Helsinki Olympic Games. Even though she had to be helped on and off her horse as she had suffered from polio eight years earlier and was paralysed below the knee, she responded by winning the silver medal. Four years later, she won another silver in Stockholm. Lis Hartel died on 12 February 2009, aged 87.

• Mostly one-time Olympic participations, although there are 43 riders that have competed in five or more Olympics—Ian Millar (CAN) has nine participations to his name; the D’Inzeo brothers (ITA) eight; and Michael Plumb (USA) a healthy seven!

• 1956 when Pat Smythe (Patricia Rosemary Smythe) of Great Britain was on the British jumping team in Stockholm (SWE) and won team bronze. • 1964 in Tokyo when Lana du Pont (USA) competed in eventing. Twenty-seven years later, as Mrs. Wright, she won a team gold medal at the Paris Driving World Championship.

• Germany leads the medal count with 81 medals, followed by USA (49), Sweden (40), France (29) and Great Britain (27). • Individually, the Dressage riders Reiner Klimke (GER), Isabel Werth (GER) and Anky van Grunsven lead the medal count with eight Olympic medals each, followed by Hans Günter Winkler (GER) with seven Olympic jumping medals and the USA’s Michael Plumb for Eventing with six Olympic medals.

equinecanada June | July 2012 11


| SPORT |

In 1996, when Para-Equestrian Dressage made its debut on the Paralympic program, the competition was run on borrowed horses with 68 athletes from 16 nations qualified to compete. In 2008, the number of countries competing at the Equestrian events of the Paralympic Games had swelled to 28 with 78 partnerships and no borrowed horses. Integrating Para-Equestrian into the competitive equestrian world has been best demonstrated in Great Britain, where the coordination, management and systems in place work in complete unison. In the arena they are the all-time record and title holder for ParaEquestrian Dressage and outside the arena, lottery funding and integrated administration mean that the sport is constantly evolving and new talent is appearing at every championship.

Since 1996… • Great Britain has picked up 33 medals, followed by Germany on 14, and Denmark on 11. Ian Millar in 2008, his ninth Olympic participation

• No horse has competed in more than three Olympic editions; there are however, 21 horses with three Olympic starts: — Gigolo leads the horse medal count with six Dressage medals — Bonfire with five for Jumping — Meteor, Halla, Posilippo and Ratina all have three medals and in the world of Eventing, Marcroix is in the lead position with four medals. • It’s a family affair, since 1912 over 100 family combinations (brother/brother, father/son, mother/ daughter, etc.) have competed at Olympic equestrian events.

16 Years of Equestrian Sport at the Paralympic Games 2012 will be the fifth edition that includes equestrian on the Paralympic program with Para-Equestrian Dressage.

12 www.equinecanada.ca

• Lee Pearson leads the medal count with nine gold medals (six individual and three team). • For the first three editions, competitors were classified into four Grades (I, II, III and IV) and in 2008 this was increased to 5 (Ia, Ib, II, III, IV). • Women have the individual medal edge, 82 versus 20 for the men. • Anne Dunham (GBR) and Angelika Trabert (GER) are the only Para-Equestrian competitors to have competed at every edition of the Paralympic Games since 1996. • In 2008, Lauren Barwick (CAN) double medalled, receiving a gold medal in the Freestyle and silver in individual competition.

London, London, London Other than being a song by Caetano Veloso, London, London, London refers here to the third edition of the Olympic Games to be held in London. The 1908 Olympic Games were originally awarded to Rome, but the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 1906 meant another host city was needed. London stepped in


| SPORT |

and despite the time constraints; the city’s offer to host the Games was accepted by the International Olympic Committee. The London 1908 Games were officially opened on 27 April 1908 by HRH King Edward VII and stretched out over a three-month period. A total of 22 nations sent 2,008 athletes—1,971 men and 37 women—who competed across 110 events. The majority of the sports at London 1908 remain central to the Games today and will be featured at London 2012. However, there were also those—including motor boating and tug of war—which have long since ceased to be on the Olympic program. And then there are those, such as equestrian, that became a part of the program at the following edition in Stockholm.

In 1948, London again stepped in at the last minute to host the first Games after World War II. Despite a shortage of time and resources, the city rose to the challenge to host another fine, morale-boosting Games. The Opening Ceremony took place at Wembley Stadium on 29 July 1948, with HRH King George VI officially opening the Games. The Olympic Flame was lit by athlete John Mark, and the Olympic Oath taken on behalf of all competitors by Donald Finlay. One hundred and thirty-six events were contested by 4,104 athletes from 59 nations. At the end of the Games, the USA topped the medal table, taking away a total of 84 medals. They were followed by Sweden with 44, and France with 29.

The Olympic Stadium, White City, was built especially for the Olympic Games. Taking less than a year to build, it was widely regarded as a technological marvel. It held 68,000 people and contained a running track that was enclosed by a cycle track. When the Games closed on 31 October 1908, Great Britain topped the medal table with a total of 145 medals. The United States was second with 47, while third-placed Sweden claimed 25. Despite the short notice, the Games were widely declared a success and lay the foundations for London’s Olympic legacy as a host city.

New in 1908… • Athletes paraded under their national flags at a ceremony at the start of the Games. • Every competitor had to be registered with their Olympic Association and entered as a member of a national team. • Qualifying standards were laid down and a set of rules for each of the sports was agreed by the majority of the competing nations. • The distance of the Marathon was fixed at 26.2 miles, which was the distance from Windsor Castle to the Royal Box in the Olympic Stadium.

equinecanada June | July 2012 13


| SPORT |

For the equestrian events, 17 nations sent riders and horses to London with competition spread over six days. Mexico took Jumping team gold, France the Dressage team gold and USA the Eventing team gold.

New in 1948… • Starting blocks were deployed for sprint races. • A volunteer program was created to help run the Games. • The Empire Pool was the first covered Olympic pool in history, although its length exceeded the regulatory 50 metres so had to be shortened with a wooden platform. • The competition was also shown on home television for the first time, although few people actually owned television sets at the time. The London 2012 Olympic Games will feature 26 sports, which break down into 39 disciplines. There are 20 sports in the Paralympic program, with Paralympic cycling broken down into two disciplines: Road and Track. The Olympic Games start on 27 July and run until 12 August, followed by the Paralympic Games from 29 August to 9 September. “We are really proud to be celebrating 100 years of Olympic equestrian sport at the London 2012 Games and it’s wonderful that we will be doing that at an iconic venue like Greenwich Park right in the heart of the Games,” said FEI President HRH Princess Haya. “Greenwich Park is the second largest venue in London 2012 and tickets for the Cross Country were one of the fastest to sell out. Demand has been so high for our sport that tickets for all the equestrian disciplines were sold out in a matter of weeks, establishing us as one of the most popular sports in the Games. “This is a real milestone for our sport and is worthy of celebration as it confirms that we are really competing with the other top sports on the number of spectators we can pull in. We’re aspiring to provide one of the top quality products of the Games and we can really say to the big international federations, watch out, we’re here now!” HRH Princess Haya

14 www.equinecanada.ca

The Opening Ceremony of the Games of the XXX Olympiad on 27 July will be followed by 12 days of equestrian competition and, for the first time in Olympic history, the final equestrian event will be the Dressage Grand Prix Freestyle to Music held on 9 August. Two hundred riders and horses will compete for individual and team gold, silver and bronze medals in Eventing, Dressage and Jumping. There will be 11 sets of medals up for grabs in the Para-Equestrian Dressage events of the Paralympic Games. At London 2012, Greenwich Park will host the Olympic and Paralympic Equestrian competitions, plus the combined running and shooting event of the Modern Pentathlon. Greenwich Park is on the south bank of the River Thames in south east London and is a great place to see views of central London and the Docklands. Greenwich Park is London’s oldest Royal Park, dating back to 1433. Greenwich Park includes the Old Royal Naval College and National Maritime Museum, which, together with Greenwich Park, are part of a World Heritage Site since 1997. Within the Park is The Royal Observatory and the home of Greenwich Mean Time. A temporary Cross Country course is being designed for the Park, while a temporary main arena will also be built within the grounds of the National Maritime Museum. For Para-Equestrian Dressage, 2012 will mark the largest crowds ever assembled at a Para-Equestrian event. More than 40,000 tickets were sold before Christmas last year, dramatically overtaking the previous record of 33,000 for the 2008 Paralympic Equestrian events held in Hong Kong.

New in 2012… • Wenlock and Mandeville—the official mascots for the 2012 Games. • The rest remains to be seen. There is little doubt in anyone’s mind that London and the iconic Greenwich Park will be a most fitting venue for spectacular sport and new records. Thanks to the official website of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, www.london2012.com, the comprehensive and fact finding book Equestrian Sport at the Olympic Games 1912–2008 by Max E. Amman and FEI Archives.


| SPORT |

Horses on their way to the 1912 Olympic Games James Atkinson’s horse Gustav arrives at the 2011 Pan American Games in Mexico (Photo credit—Kerri McGregor)

equinecanada June | July 2012 15


| SPORT |

OH! Canada’s Contribution to Olympic History 1952 – Helsinki Finland Dressage Capt. M.L.R. Lafond & Pierrette Three-Day Eventing L.J. McGuinness & Tara Stewart Treviranus & Rustrum Thomas Gayford & Constellation Individual Medal Results Gold: Capt. Hans von Blixen-Finecke & Jubal, Sweden Silver: Guy Lafrant & Verdun, France Bronze: Wilhelm Busing & Hubertus, Germany Team Medal Results Gold: Sweden Silver: Germany Bronze: USA

1956 – Stockholm, Sweden Dressage Capt. M.L.R. Lafond & Rathpatrick Three-Day Eventing Brian Herbinson & Tara John Rumble & Cilroy James Elder & Cottage Colleen Individual Medal Results Gold: Petrus Kastenman & Illuster, Sweden Silver: August Lutke—Westhues & Trux von Kamax, Germany Bronze: Lt—Col. Frank Weldon & Kilbarry, Great Britain Team Medal Results Gold: Great Britain Silver: Germany Bronze: CANADA

1960 – Rome, Italy Three-Day Eventing Brian Herbinson & Roma James Elder & Canadian Envoy Thomas Gayford & Pepper Knowes Norman Elder & Royal Beaver Individual Medal Results Gold: Laurence Morgan & Salad Days, Australia Silver: Neale Lavis & Mirrabooka, Australia Bronze: Anton S. Buhler & Gay Spark, Switzerland Cont’d on page 17

16 www.equinecanada.ca

How Canada Left its Mark on Olympic and Paralympic History • Canada sent its first equestrian team to the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki. Competing in dressage was Capt. M.L.R. Lafond (Pierrette), and L.J. McGuinness (Tara), Stewart Treviranus (Rustrum) and Thomas Gayford (Constellation) in eventing.

• Michel Vaillancourt (Branch County) is the only Canadian equestrian to earn an Olympic medal on Canadian soil!

• In 1956, Canada earned its first Olympic medal. Brian Herbinson (Tara), John Rumble (Cilroy) and James Elder (Cottage Colleen) proudly brought home a bronze medal in team eventing. Canada’s first equestrian team (eventing–1952) • Now that’s an entrance! In 1964, Christilot Hanson (Bonheur) Barbara was Canada’s Kemp youngest and first female equestrian competitor. Because of her young age, the To then 17-year-old dressage rider make had to acquire special permission this to compete. historic

• Canada first presented a show jumping team at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Mexico. Our world class team was comprised of James Elder (The Immigrant), Thomas Gayford (Big Dee), and James Day (Canadian Club) who launched this integral part of our Olympic history with a GOLD medal performance! As if this achievement wasn’t significant enough, show jumping’s medal would end up being Canada’s only gold medal, in any sport, of this Olympiad.

Michel Vaillancourt (Branch County) James Elder

event even more special, Michel and his mount Branch County earned their Show Jumping silver medal in their home province of Quebec at the 1976 Montreal Olympics. • In the 1976 James Day competed in both the show jumping (Sympatico) and three day eventing (Viceroy) competitions.


| SPORT |

• In 1976 in Montreal, Barbara Kemp (CAN) became the first woman to design an Olympic cross-country course. The first woman to design an Olympic Jumping course was Linda Allen at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Eric Lamaze (Hickstead )

• Collectively, brothers James and Norman Elder have participated in nine Olympic Games. James with seven and Norman with two!

© Cealy Tetley

• Arthur von Pongracz remains to this day the oldest equestrian competitor at an Olympic event, he competed in Dressage aged 72 at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. Ian Millar takes the honours for Jumping, aged 61 at the 2008 Olympic Games in Hong Kong, on par with Bill Roycroft for Eventing, also aged 61 at the 1976 Games in Montreal. • That’s not Mr. Millar’s only achievement! His participation at the 2008 Olympics tied him with Austrian sailor Hubert Raudaschl for most Olympic appearances. Will 2012 see him hold the record?

Lauren Barwick Ian Millar (Big Ben) Martina Pracht (Emirage)

© Lindsay Yosay McCall 2011

• Family participation doesn’t stop there! Eva-Maria Pracht and daughter Martina Pracht competed in three Olympic Games. Eva-Marie wore Canada’s colours in 1984 and 1988, and Martina in 1992.

Eva-Maria Pracht (Emirage)

• Canada equestrians first participated in Paralympic competition in 1996.

• Our first Paralympic medals were earned in 2004, when Karen Brain (Dasskara) earned a bronze medal in the Grade IV Championship and Grade IV Freestyle.

• In 2008, Eric Lamaze (Hickstead) won Olympic gold in show jumping, as well as being a valued member of show jumping’s silver medal team with Ian Millar (In Style), Jill Henselwood (Special Ed) and Mac Cone (Ole). • 2008 was also a fabulous year for Paralympian Lauren Barwick (Maile) who also double medalled, receiving gold in the Freestyle and silver in individual competition.

Team Medal Results Gold: Australia Silver: Switzerland Bronze: France

1964 – Tokyo, Japan Dressage Christilot Hanson (Boylen) & Bonheur Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Switzerland Bronze: Soviet Union

1968 – Mexico City, Mexico Dressage Inez Fischer-Credo & Marius Christilot Hanson (Boylen) & Bonheur Zoltan Sztehlo & Virtuoso Individual Medal Results: Gold: Ivan Kizimov & Ikhor, Soviet Union Silver: Josef Neckermann & Mariano, West Germany Bronze: Reiner Klimke & Dux, West Germany Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Russia Bronze: Soviet Union Show Jumping James Elder & The Immigrant Thomas Gayford & Big Dee James Day & Canadian Club Individual Medal Results Gold: William Steinkraus & Snowbound, USA Silver: Marion Coakes & Stroller, Great Britain Bronze: David Broome & Mr. Softee, Great Britain 6th: James Elder & The Immigrant Team Medal Results Gold: CANADA Silver: France Bronze: Germany Three-Day Eventing Robin Hanh & Taffy Barry Sonshine & Durlas Eile Allan Ehrlick & The Nomad Norman Elder & Questionnaire

Cont’d on page 18

equinecanada June | July 2012 17


| SPORT |

Canadian Repeat Contenders

Individual Medal Results Gold: Jean-Jacques Guyon & Pitou, France Silver: Derek Allhusen & Lochinvar, Great Britain Bronze: Michael Page & Foster, USA Team Medal Results Gold: Great Britain Silver: USA Bronze: Australia

Check out which Canadian human athletes have made more than one Olympic or Paralympic appearance

1972 – Munich, Germany Dressage Christilot Hanson (Boylen) & Gaspano Cynthia Neale (Ishoy) & Bonne Annee Lorraine Stubbs & Venezuela Individual Medal Results Gold: Liselott Linsenhoff & Piaff, West Germany Silver: Yelena Petushkova & Pepel, Soviet Union Bronze: Josef Neckermann & Venetia, West Germany Team Medal Results Gold: Soviet Union Silver: West Germany Bronze: Sweden 6th: CANADA Show Jumping James Elder & Houdini James Day & Happy Fellow Terrence Millar & Le Dauphin Ian Millar & Shoeman Individual Medal Results Gold: Graziano Mancinelli & Ambassador, Italy Silver: Ann Moore & Psalm, Great Britain Bronze: Neal Shapiro & Sloopy, USA 4th: JAMES DAY & STEELMASTER* *Prior to the commencement of individual competition, James Day’s horse Happy Fellow was deemed unsound. Day then used teammate Terrance Millar’s reserve horse Steelmaster to compete in individual competition. Team Medal Results Gold: West Germany Silver: USA Bronze: Italy 6th: CANADA

Cont’d on page 19

18 www.equinecanada.ca

Brian Herbinson

1956—eventing 1960—eventing

Eva-Marie Pracht

1984—dressage 1988—dressage—Team Bronze

Gina Smith

1988—dressage—Team Bronze 1996—dressage

Jay Hayes

1992—show jumping 2000—show jumping

Karen Brain

2004—para-equestrian 2008—para-equestrian

Lauren Barwick

2004—para-equestrian 2008—para-equestrian

Leslie Reid

2004—dressage 2008—dressage

Mac Cone

1996—show jumping 2008—show jumping—Team Silver

Michel Vaillancourt

1976—show jumping— Individual Silver 1980—show jumping (Alternate Games)—Team Gold

Norman Elder

1960—eventing 1968—eventing

Ashley (Nicoll) Holzer

1988—dressage—Team Bronze 2004—dressage 2008—dressage

Robin Hanh

1968—eventing 1972—eventing 1976—eventing

Thomas Gayford

1952—eventing 1960—eventing 1968—show jumping

Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy

1972—dressage 1988—dressage—Team Bronze 1992—dressage 2004—dressage

James Day

1968—show jumping 1672—show jumping 1976—show jumping 1976—eventing

Christilot (Hanson) Boylen

1964—dressage 1968—dressage 1972—dressage 1976—dressage 1984—dressage 1992—dressage

James Elder

1956—eventing 1960—eventing 1968—show jumping 1972—show jumping 1976—show jumping 1980—show jumping (Alternate Games)—Team Gold 1984—show jumping

Ian Millar

1972—show jumping 1976—show jumping 1980—show jumping (Alternate Games) — Team Gold 1984—show jumping 1988—show jumping 1992—show jumping 1996—show jumping 2000—show jumping 2004—show jumping 2008—show jumping — Team Silver

Check out which Canadian equine athletes have made more than one Olympic or Paralympic appearance Tara

1952—eventing (L.J. McGuinness) 1956—eventing (Brian Herbinson)

Bonheur

1964—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen) 1968—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen)

Gaspano

1972—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen) 1976—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen)

Big Ben

1984—show jumping (Ian Millar) 1988—show jumping (Ian Millar) 1988—show jumping (Ian Millar)

Emirage

1988—dressage (Eva-Marie Pracht) 1994—dressage (Martina Pracht)


| SPORT |

Ian Millar and Countdown in 1976, his second Olympic participation

Three-Day Eventing Jim Henry & Harper Robin Hanh & Lord Jim Wendy Irving & High Wind Clint Banbury & Paladin Individual Medal Results Gold: Richard Meade & Laurieston, Great Britain Silver: Alessandro Argenton & Woodland, Italy Bronze: Jan Jönsson & Sarajevo, Sweden Team Medal Results Gold: Great Britain Silver: USA Bronze: West Germany

1976 – Montreal, Canada Dressage Christilot (Hanson) Boylen & Gaspano Lorraine Stubbs & True North Barbara Stracey & Jungherr II Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Switzerland Bronze: USA 5th: CANADA Show Jumping James Day & Sympatico Michel Vaillancourt & Branch County Ian Millar & Countdown James Elder & Raffles II Individual Medal Results Gold: Alwin Schockemohle & Warwick Rex SILVER: MICHEL VAILLANCOURT & BRANCH COUNTY, CANADA Bronze: Francois Mathy & Gai Luron, Belgium Team Medal Results Gold: France Silver: Germany Bronze: Belgium 5th: CANADA Three-Day Eventing Juliet Graham & Sumatra Cathy Wedge & City Fella Robin Hanh & L’Esprit James Day & Viceroy

Cont’d on page 20

equinecanada June | July 2012 19


| SPORT |

Individual Medal Results Gold: Edmund Coffin & Ballycor, USA Silver: John Plumb & Better and Better, USA Bronze: Karl Schultz & Madrigal, West Germany Team Medal Results Gold: USA Silver: West Germany Bronze: Australia 6th: CANADA

1980 – Moscow, Russia* Due to the unstable political climate in 1980, the United States initiated a boycott against the Moscow Olympics following the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. As a result of this boycott, western nations arranged alternate competitions, which became known as the “Alternate Olympics”. Show jumping was Canada’s only team in 1980. Rotterdam Show Jumping Festival Ian Millar & Brother Sam Mark Laskin & Damuraz James Elder & Volunteer Michel Vaillancourt & Chivas Team Results 1st: CANADA 2nd: Great Britain 3rd: Austria

1984 – Los Angeles, USA Dressage Christilot (Hanson) Boylen & Anklang Bonny Chesson (Bonnello) & Satchmo Eva-Maria Pracht & Little Joe Individual Medal Results Gold: Reiner Klimke & Ahlerich, West Germany Silver: Anne Grethe Jensen & Marzog, Denmark Bronze: Otto Hofer & Limandus, Switzerland Team Medal Results Gold: West Germany Silver: Switzerland Bronze: Sweden

Cont’d on page 21

20 www.equinecanada.ca

Paralympic Games Equine Canada nominates four riders to the Canadian Paralympic Committee for its

2012 London Paralympic Team Equine Canada

is pleased to announce that Lauren Barwick, Eleonore Elstone, Ashley Gowanlock, and Jody Schloss have been nominated to the Canadian Paralympic Committee for its 2012 London Paralympic Team. The selection process for the Canadian Paralympic riders was based on their performances at international events throughout a qualification period, which ended on June 1, 2012.

Barwick, Elstone, and Gowanlock are each returning Paralympians who have competed together at both the 2004 and 2008 Paralympic Games, while Schloss will be making her Paralympic debut in London. The Canadian Para-Equestrian team riders have had remarkable success over the past 12 months, achieving podium performances at numerous international events, and finishing 4thin the world on the FEI Paralympic Team Ranking List heading into the Games.

List of nominated riders/horses: Rider Name

Hometown

Lauren Barwick

Aldergrove, BC

Eleonore Elstone

Langley, BC

Ashley Gowanlock

Surrey, BC

Jody Schloss

Toronto, ON

Horse(s) Off to Paris (owned by Equine Canada Ferdonia 2 (owned by Lauren Barwick) Zareno (owned by Elisabeth Posmus-Penterman) Why Not G (owned by Kelleigh Kulcsar and Eleonore Elstone) Ferdonia 2 (owned by Lauren Barwick) Maile (owned by Lauren Barwick) Inspector Rebus (owned by Jody Schloss)

At the Paralympic Games, individual medals are awarded to athletes in the individual and freestyle tests, as well as an overall team medal. Seventy-eight athletes will compete at the Paralympic Games, which will be held from August 29 – September 9, 2012 in London, England.


| SPORT |

Canada’s Paralympic SupporT Team Amie O’Shaughnessy Team Manager

Behind our athletes, horse and human, stands our support team which is comprised of specialists focused on ensuring that our world-class athletes are fully prepared to achieve greatness at the 2012 Games.

Show Jumping Ian Millar & Big Ben Hugh Graham & Elrond James Elder & Shawline Mario Deslauriers & Aramis Individual Medal Results Gold: Joseph Fargis & Touch of Class, USA Silver: Conrad Homfeld & Abdullah, USA Bronze: Heidi Robbiani & Jessica V, Switzerland 4th: MARIO DESLAURIERS & ARAMIS Team Medal Results Gold: USA Silver: Great Britain Bronze: West Germany

ElizabeTh Quigg Chef d’Equipe

Andrea Taylor National Team Coach

Mary Longden Assistant Team Coach

Jennifer Miller Team Veterinarian

Three-Day Eventing Kelly Plitz & Dialadream Edie Tarves & Mandrake Martha Griggs & Jack the Lad Liz Ashton & Ossian Individual Medal Results Gold: Mark Todd & Charisma, New Zealand Silver: Karen Stives & Ben Arthur, USA Bronze: Virginia Holgate & Priceless, Great Britain

Caroline ArchambaulT

Registered Massage Therapist (Human & Equine)

Dr. April L. Clay Psychologist

Alice BeaTTy Stable Manager

Anne Van SilfhouT Groom

Team Medal Results Gold: USA Silver: Great Britain Bronze: West Germany

1988 – Seoul, Korea Dressage Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy & Dynasty Eva-Marie Pracht & Emirage Gina Smith* & Malte Ashley Nicoll (Holzer) & Reipo * 2012 Olympic Chef D’equipe (Dressage)

Zoe Boyles Groom

Kerry-Anne Bourne Groom

Caroline Samson Support Personnel

Vanessa Lurie Support Personnel

Individual Medal Results Gold: Nicole Uphoff & Rembrandt, West Germany Silver: Margit Otto-Crépin & Corlandus, France Bronze: Christine Stueckelberger & Gauguin de Lully CH, Switzerland Team Medal Results Gold: West Germany Silver: Switzerland Bronze: CANADA

Tori Ellen-Murray Support Personnel

Suzie Brown Support Personnel

Ozzie Sawicki Performance Consultant

Julie Cull Media Attaché

Cont’d on page 22

equinecanada June | July 2012 21


| SPORT |

Birthdate: September 12, 1977 Birthplace: Langley, BC Hometown: Aldergrove, BC Team Coaches: Andrea Taylor & Mary Longden

Show Jumping Ian Millar & Big Ben Lauran Balisky & Lavendel 48 Lisa Carlsen & Kahlua Mario Deslauriers & Box Car Willie Individual Medal Results Gold: Pierre Durand, Jr. & Jappeloup, France Silver: Greg Best & Gem Twist, USA Bronze: Karsten Huck and Nepomuk 8, West Germany Team Medal Results Gold: West Germany Silver: USA Bronze: France 4th: CANADA

Off to Paris 2001 chestnut Oldenburger mare, 16.1 by Welthit 01 Owner: Equine Canada Ferdonia 2 1999 dark brown Oldenburger mare by Don Gregory Owner: Lauren Barwick

Lauren Barwick International Competition Highlights Score

Test

Horse

Show

Three-Day Eventing Nicholas Holmes-Smith & Espionage Mary Tudor & Sparrow Hawk II

78.750%

Freestyle

Maile

2010 WindReach CPEDI3*

75.000%

Team

Off to Paris

2012 WCD Sunshine Challenge CPEDI3*

74.286%

Team

Maile

2010 WindReach CPEDI3*

Individual Medal Results Gold: Mark Todd & Charisma, New Zealand Silver: Ian Stark & Sir Wattie, Great Britain Bronze: Virginia Leng & Master Craftsman, Great Britain

72.776%

Team

Off to Paris

2012 Houston Spring Classic CPEDI3*

72.698%

Ind Ch

Off to Paris

2011 CPEDI3* Del-Mar, CA

71.952%

Team

Off to Paris

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

71.750%

Team

Off to Paris

2011 Bishop Burton CPEDI2*

71.667%

Team

Off to Paris

2012 Gold Coast Dressage Opener CPEDI3*

Team Medal Results Gold: West Germany Silver: Great Britain Bronze: New Zealand

Birthdate: May 15, 1952 Birthplace: Duesseldorf, Germany Hometown: Langley, BC Personal Coach: Leslie Reid National Team Coaches: Andrea Taylor & Mary Longden

1992 – Barcelona, Spain Dressage Christilot (Hanson) Boylen & Biraldo Martina Pracht & Emirage Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy & Dakar Individual Medal Results Gold: Nicole Uphoff & Rembrandt, Germany Silver: Isabell Werth & Gigolo, Germany Bronze: Klaus Balkenhol & Goldstern, Germany Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Netherlands Bronze: USA Show Jumping Beth Underhill & Monopoly Jennifer Foster & Zeus Jay Hayes & Zucarlos Ian Millar & Big Ben Cont’d on page 23

22 www.equinecanada.ca

Zareno 2004 Dutch Warmblood gelding Owner: Franklin Posmus Why Not G 2003 brown Dutch Warmblood gelding by Quite Easy Owners: Kelleigh Kulcsar & Eleonore Elstone

Eleonore ElsTone International Competition Highlights Score

Test

Horse

Show

72.150%

Freestyle

Zareno

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

70.645%

Ind Ch

Zareno

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

70.625%

Team

Zareno

2012 CPEDI3* Mannheim, GER

70.344%

Team

Zareno

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

67.903%

Ind Ch

Donatello

2011 CPEDI3* Del-Mar, CA

67.688%

Ind Ch

Zareno

2012 CPEDI3* Mannheim, GER

67.240%

Team

Why Not G

2011 Bishop Burton CPEDI2*

67.204%

Ind Ch

Why Not G

2010 WindReach CPEDI3*


| SPORT |

Birthdate: March 31, 1987 Birthplace: Surrey, BC Hometown: Vancouver, BC Team Coaches: Andrea Taylor & Mary Longden

Individual Medal Results Gold: Ludger Beerbaum & Classic Touch, Germany Silver: Piet Raijmakers & Ratina Z, Netherlands Bronze: Norman Dello Joio & Irish, USA

Ferdonia 2 1999 dark brown Oldenburger mare by Don Gregory Owner: Lauren Barwick Maile 1994 bay Dutch Warmblood mare by Ijsselmeer Owner: Lauren Barwick

Ashley Gowanlock International Competition Highlights Score

Test

Horse

Show

76.900%

Freestyle

Ferdonia 2

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

74.320%

Team

Ferdonia 2

2011 Bishop Burton CPEDI2*

73.696%

Ind Ch

Ferdonia 2

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

70.985%

Team

Ferdonia 2

2012 Gold Coast Dressage Opener CPEDI3*

70.072%

Ind Ch

Maile

2012 WCD Sunshine Challenge CPEDI3*

70.000%

Team

Ferdonia 2

2011 Arruda dos Vinhos CPEDI3*, Portugal

68.986%

Ind Ch

Ferdonia 2

2012 Gold Coast Dressage Opener CPEDI3*

68.860%

Team

Donnymaskell

2011 Bishop Burton CPEDI2*

Team Medal Results Gold: Netherlands Silver: Austria Bronze: France Three-Day Eventing Stuart Black & Von Perrier Nick Holmes-Smith & Sir Lancelot Rachel Hunter & King Plantagenet Rob Stevenson & Risky Business Individual Medal Results Gold: Matthew Ryan & Kibah Tic Toc, Australia Silver: Herbert Blöcker & Feine Dame, Germany Bronze: Blyth Tait & Messiah, New Zealand Team Medal Results Gold: Australia Silver: New Zealand Bronze: Germany

1996 – Atlanta, USA Dressage Evi Strasser & Lavinia Leonie Bramall & Gilbona Gina Smith & Faust

Birthdate: November 19, 1972 Birthplace: Toronto, ON Hometown: Toronto, ON Personal Coach: Jessica Rhinelander Team Coaches: Andrea Taylor & Mary Longden

Individual Medal Results Gold: Isabell Werth & Gigolo, Germany Silver: Anky van Grunsven & Bonfire, Netherlands Bronze: Sven Rothenberger & Weyden, Netherlands

Inspector Rebus 1998 grey Dutch Warmblood gelding by Sambertino Owner: Jody Schloss

Jody Schloss International Competition Highlights Score

Test

Horse

Show

71.667%

Freestyle Inspector Rebus

70.583%

Ind Ch

Inspector Rebus

2012 Gold Coast Dressage Opener CPEDI3*

68.417%

Ind Ch

Inspector Rebus

2011 CPEDI3* Saugerties, NY

67.941%

Team

Inspector Rebus

2012 Houston Spring Classic CPEDI3*

67.667%

Ind Ch

Inspector Rebus

2012 Houston Spring Classic CPEDI3*

67.255%

Team

Inspector Rebus

2012 WCD Sunshine Challenge CPEDI3*

67.157%

Team

Inspector Rebus

2012 Gold Coast Dressage Opener CPEDI3*

66.860%

Team

Inspector Rebus

2011 Bishop Burton CPEDI2*

2012 WCD Sunshine Challenge CPEDI3*

Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Netherlands Bronze: USA Para-Equestrian Gregory Honour Karine Meador Margaret Payne Maria Simpson Show Jumping Mac Cone & Elute Christopher Delia & Silent Sam Ian Millar & Play It Again Linda Southern-Heathcott & Advantage Chrysler Cont’d on page 24

equinecanada June | July 2012 23


| SPORT |

olympic Games Special Message from Olympic Team Leader Kerri McGregor and Assistant Team Leader Tina Collins

A

t the time of writing this, we are less than eight weeks away from the Olympic Games starting in London. And preparations are definitely ramping up, getting busier on a day-by-day basis both for the athletes, their personal support teams and for the Canadian Olympic Support Team. 2012 marks a significant year for the Olympic Games. Not only is it the first time that an Olympic Games has been held three times in the same city (1908, 1948, 2012), it also marks the 100th anniversary of equine competition at the Olympics. While the 1900 Games in Paris was the first time equestrian was part of the Olympic program, in the form of Polo, Jumping and High Jump, it wasn’t until the 1912 Stockholm Games that Dressage, Eventing and Jumping formed the equestrian events of the Olympic program. And did you know that until the 1952 Helsinki Summer Olympics, only commissioned military officers were permitted to compete in Olympic equestrian disciplines? Wow! We sure have come a long way since then. And today we still enjoy the distinction of being the only sport where men and women compete as equals, and where age does not necessarily give you a competitive edge one way or the other. I don’t know how I would have fared had my sport of choice been gymnastics, where if you haven’t taken up the sport by the time you are six years old you can forget it. Over the course of several weeks, Greenwich Park – the venue for all equestrian, the equestrian portion of pentathlon, and para-equestrian - will see 400 athletes (200 rider/horse combinations) competing on its historic grounds representing anywhere between 22-26 nations. And the setting to all of this will be the impressive Queen’s House - built between 1616-1619 and situated on the Thames. The fact that the equestrian events are being held at Greenwich Park is exciting for two key reasons:

1. It will provide a spectacular backdrop for both television and photographic coverage. Can you imagine having a picture of yourself doing an amazing extended trot, or soaring over that triple oxer with the London skyline in the background!

2. Equestrian will be at the heart of the Olympics instead of tucked away somewhere in the countryside. This second point is one that I think will make these Olympics really stand out, both for our equestrian athletes as well as the sport itself. More often than not, due to the infrastructure required to host equestrian competition at this level, the equestrian events are held outside of the host city. Typically it means a long commute for those athletes who are staying at the Olympic Village. And similarly it also means a significant commute for spectators wanting to attend.

Individual Medal Results Gold: Ulrich Kirchhoff & Jus De Pommes, Germany Silver: Wilhelm Melliger & Calvaro, Switzerland Bronze: Alexandra Ledermann & Rochet M, France Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: USA Bronze: Brazil Three-Day Eventing— Individual Medal Results Gold: Blyth Tait & Ready Teddy, New Zealand Silver: Sally Clark & Squirrel Hill, New Zealand Bronze: Kerry Millikin & Out and About, USA Team Medal Results Gold: Australia Silver: USA Bronze: New Zealand

2000 Olympics/Paralympics, Sydney, Australia Dressage—Individual Medal Results Gold: Anky van Grunsven & Bonfire, Netherlands Silver: Isabell Werth & Gigolo, Germany Bronze: Ulla Salzgeber & Rusty, Germany Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Netherlands Bronze: USA Show Jumping Jonathan Asselin & Spirit of Xerox Jay Hayes & Diva Ian Millar & Dorincord John Pearce & Vagabond Individual Medal Results Gold: Jeroen Dubbeldam & De Sjiem, Netherlands Silver: Albert Voorn & Lando, Netherlands Bronze: Khaled Al Eid & Khashm Al Aan, Saudi Arabia Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Switzerland Bronze: Brazil Cont’d on page 26

equinecanada June | July 2012 25


| SPORT |

Photo—Kerri McGregor

Three-Day Eventing— Individual Medal Results Gold: David O’Connor* & Custom Made, USA Silver: Andrew Hoy & Swizzle In, Australia Bronze: Mark Todd & Eyespy II, New Zealand *2012 Olympic Canadian Chef d’equipe (Eventing) Team Medal Results Gold: Australia Silver: Great Britain Bronze: USA

2004 Olympics/Paralympics, Athens, Greece Dressage Leslie Reid & Mark Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy & Proton Belinda Trussell & Royan II Ashley Holzer & Imperioso Individual Medal Results Gold: Anky van Grunsven & Salinero, Netherlands Silver: Ulla Salzgeber & Rusty, Germany Bronze: Beatriz Ferrer-Salat & Beauvalais, Spain Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Spain Bronze: USA Para-Equestrian Dax Adam & Copper Rose Lauren Barwick & Dior Karen Brain & Dasskara Judi Island & Whirlwind Individual Medal Results (Grade IV) Gold: Ann Cathrin Lubbe & Zanko Silver: Philippa Johnson & Burgmans Benedict, Republic of South Africa BRONZE: KAREN BRAIN & DASSKARA, CANADA Individual Medal Results (Grade IV Freestyle) Gold: Ann Cathrin Lubbe & Zanko Silver: Philippa Johnson & Burgmans Benedict, Republic of South Africa BRONZE: KAREN BRAIN & DASSKARA, CANADA Show Jumping Ian Millar & Promise Me Cont’d on page 27

26 www.equinecanada.ca

Canadian Olympic team support members at XVI Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico

It also means that mainstream media have little incentive to “pop in” to check things out because of the time commitment involved with the travel distances. But this summer, we will be a 15 minute train ride from the Olympic Village and main Olympic Stadium. We’ll also be surrounded by other sport venues such as Gymnastics, Shooting, Boxing and Fencing to name just a few. Not only will it be easy for spectators and media to access equestrian events (if the former have tickets…but that’s another story!), but our athletes and support team members will truly feel like they are part of the Olympic family and be able to experience all that is special and unique to an Olympic Games. LOCOG (the organizing committee for the Olympic Games) is also planning on offering free tickets to local schools, giving city schoolchildren, who have never seen a horse up close, a chance to see one of the greatest sports of all. Now that’s what I call a legacy! And speaking of unique, that is definitely an accurate word to use when describing the Olympic Games. While it can be argued that a World Championship is often at a higher technical level – particularly for Eventing and Jumping in order to include as many competing nations as possible – I think at the heart of every athlete and aspiring athlete is the dream of standing on the Olympic medal podium. It’s the spark that starts a child’s dream; it’s the goal that keeps athletes striving to give their everything. Being part of the Olympic movement is being part of something which is bigger than yourself, and bigger than your sport. It is an experience that our athletes will always cherish, and they will forever be referred to as Olympians – a title that in one word encapsulates their dedication, perseverance, sacrifices and a steadfast belief that one is always able to push oneself to further heights than they ever thought possible. By the time the qualification period ends, the Canadian Olympic Team for the sports of Dressage, Eventing and Jumping are going to London and will boast 14 riders, 14 horses, 14 grooms, 28 owners and 17 support staff – a total of 73 people (excluding the horses!). And that doesn’t even factor in the family and friends who will be making the journey to ‘get their Canada on’ and cheer for the maple leaf. The incredible support staff who work tirelessly behind the scenes include not only the grooms and personal veterinarians, farriers and therapists of our athletes, but also each discipline’s chef d’equipe and assistant, team coach/technical advisor,


| SPORT |

team vet, team farrier, team therapist, team stable manager and team manager. The hard work of this key core group of individuals ensures that our athletes’ focus can remain on putting in the performance of their lives right when it counts the most. And within our roles as Assistant Team Leader and Team Leader, Tina and I do whatever we can to be the ultimate performance protectors. We control the controllables to help our support team members so that their focus can be solely on their athletes. Be it helping to work out any kinks with accreditations, organizing outfitting sessions with the Canadian Olympic Committee (for our official Team Canada Olympic HCBC gear), to coordinating ground logistics for all team members, horses and equipment and helping to ensure the entry and exit strategies for Greenwich Park go as smoothly as possible – Tina and I do our best to deal with both the expected and unexpected. And believe me, no matter how well prepared one is, the unexpected is the one thing you can expect! On behalf of all Canadian equestrian fans, I wish to extend a huge congratulations and good luck to all of our Canadian Olympic Team athletes, grooms, horse owners and support team members at the 2012 Olympic Games. For our athletes, I know that your Olympic journey is a culmination of years of dedication, hard work, sacrifice and achievements. And while the focus during your weeks in London will absolutely be laying down a performance of a lifetime and leaving nothing behind, I hope you also soak up every Olympic moment to the fullest. Go Canada!

Canada’s Olympic SupporT Team

Individual Medal Results Gold: Rodrigo Pessoa & Baloubet du Rouet, Brazil Silver: Chris Kappler & Royal Kaliber, USA Bronze: Marco Kutscher & Montender 2, Germany Team Medal Results Gold: USA Silver: Sweden Bronze: Germany Three-Day Eventing Hawley Bennett & Livingstone Bruce Mandeville & Larissa Ian Roberts & Mata-Riki Garry Roque & Waikura Michael Winter & Balista Individual Medal Results Gold: Leslie Law & Shear L’Eau, Great Britain Silver: Kimberly Severson & Winsome Adante, USA Bronze: Pippa Funnell & Primmore’s Pride, Great Britain Team Medal Results Gold: France Silver: Great Britain Bronze: USA

2008 Olympics/Paralympics, Beijing, China

Kerri McGregor Team Leader

Tina Collins Assistant Team Leader

Cheryl TaTaryn Media Attaché

2012 Olympic Equestrian Nominees to be Announced at Spruce Meadows The Canadian Olympic Committee will be announcing the athletes nominated to the 2012 Canadian Olympic Team for the sports of dressage, show jumping and three day eventing during a press conference at Spruce Meadows on Thursday, July 5. Members of the Show Jumping team will be available for comment on site. The public will have a chance to see our Olympic-bound Show Jumping team on Saturday, July 7 during celebrations prior to the Queen Elizabeth II Cup competition. Visit www.equinecanada.ca for more details.

Dressage Ashley Holzer & Pop Art Jacqueline Brooks & Gran Gesto Leslie Reid & Orion Individual Medal Results Gold: Anky van Grunsven & Salinero, Netherlands Silver: Isabell Werth & Satchmo, Germany Bronze: Heike Kemmer & Bonaparte, Germany Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Netherlands Bronze: Denmark Para-Equestrian Lauren Barwick & Maile Eleanore Elstone & Lutke Ashley Gowanlock & Donnymaskell Jennifer McKenzie & Valentine II

Cont’d on page 28

equinecanada June | July 2012 27


| SPORT |

Individual Medal Results GOLD: LAUREN BARWICK & MAILE, CANADA – Grade II: Individual Freestyle SILVER: LAUREN BARWICK & MAILE, CANADA – Grade II: Individual Show Jumping Eric Lamaze & Hickstead Jill Henselwood & Special Ed Ian Millar & In Style Mac Cone & Ole Individual Medal Results GOLD: ERIC LAMAZE & HICKSTEAD, CANADA Silver: Rolf-Göran Bengtsson & Ninja, Sweden Bronze: Beezie Madden & Authentic, USA Team Medal Results Gold: USA SILVER: CANADA Bronze: Switzerland Three-Day Eventing Sandra Donnelly & Buenos Aires Kyle Carter & Madison Park Selena O’Hanlon & Columbo Michael Winter & Kingpin Samantha Taylor & Livewire Individual Medal Results Gold: Hinrich Romeike & Marius, Germany Silver: Gina Miles & McKinlaigh, USA Bronze: Kristina Cook & Miners Frolic, Great Britain Team Medal Results Gold: Germany Silver: Australia Bronze: Great Britain

Sources Equestrian Sport at the Olympic Games 1912–2008, Max E. Amman; International Three-day Event: Results & Records From 1912, Rhydain WynnWilliams; The Complete Book of the Olympics, David Wallenchinsky; Canadian International Equestrians, Zita Barbara May; FEI archives; Equine Canada archives.

london

CALLING

28 www.equinecanada.ca

Nominated AThletes 2012 olympic games Equine Canada is pleased to announce the names of the rider/horse combinations who will be nominated to the Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) for review and naming to the 2012 Canadian Olympic Team for the sports of Dressage, Eventing and Jumping. The riders and horses nominated have successfully completed the team selection process of their respective High Performance Committees. Nominated team entries will be submitted to the COC no later than July 4. The COC will officially name the Canadian Olympic Team for the sport of Dressage, Eventing and Jumping on July 5 during a news conference at Spruce Meadows, Calgary, Alberta.

Dressage

The rider/horse combinations to be nominated are as follows (listed in alphabetical order) Rider

Hometown

Horse(s)

Jacqueline Brooks Cedar Valley, ON D Niro (owned by Brookhaven Dressage Inc.) Ashley Holzer

Toronto, ON

David Marcus

Campbellville, ON

Breaking Dawn (owned by Ashley Holzer and P.J. Rivzi) Pop Art (reserve) (owned by Rusty Holzer and Maureen Nicoll) Chrevi’s Capital (owned by Deborah Miculinic)

If for any reason one of the selected horse/rider combinations is unable to compete in the Olympic Games, the following Team Alternate Nominees may be named as a substitute to the Dressage Team: Diane Creech (1st Reserve)

Caistor Centre, ON

Devon L (owned by Douglas and Louise Leatherdale, Leatherdale Farm)

Pia Fortmuller (2nd Reserve)

DeWinton, AB

Orion (owned by Pia Fortmuller and Dagmar Fortmuller)

Dressage Support Team

CHRISTINE PETERS Team Manager

Gina Smith Chef d’Equipe

Markus Gribbe Technical Leader

Geoff Vernon Team Vet


| SPORT |

Ashley Holzer and Breaking Dawn

David Marcus and Chrevi’s Capital

Jacqueline Brooks and D Niro

Pia Fortmuller and Orion

Diane Creech and Devon L

equinecanada June | July 2012 29


| SPORT |

EvenTing

The rider/horse combinations to be nominated are as follows (listed in alphabetical order) Rider

Hometown

Horse(s)

Peter Barry

Dunham, QC

Kilrodan Abbott (owned by Peter, Susan and Dylan Barry)

Hawley Bennett-Awad

Langley, BC

Gin & Juice (owned by Hawley Bennett-Awad and Linda Paine)

Rebecca Howard

Salmon Arm, BC

Riddle Master (owned by Blithe Hill Farm)

Michele Mueller

Port Perry, ON

Amistad (owned by Julie Anna Pring)

Jessica Phoenix

Uxbridge, ON

Exponential (owned by Jessica Phoenix)

If for any reason one of the selected horse/rider combinations is unable to compete in the Olympic Games, the following Team Alternate Nominees may be named as a substitute to the Eventing Team: Shandiss Wewiora

Oakville ON

Rockfield Grant Juan (owned by Amanda and Jorge Bernhard )

Eventing Support Team

Fleur Tipton Team Manager

Graeme Thom David O’Connor Christina Ober Randy Pawlak Debbie Furnas Jo-Ann Wilson Chef d’Equipe Team Coach Team Vet Team Farrier Stable Manager Therapist

Jessica Phoenix and Exponential

30 www.equinecanada.ca


| SPORT |

Shandiss Wewiora and Rockfield Grant Juan

Peter Barry and Kilrodan Abbott

Hawley Bennett-Awad and Gin & Juice (Š Cealy Tetley)

Michele Mueller and Amistad

Rebecca Howard and Riddle Master

equinecanada June | July 2012 31


| SPORT |

Jumping

The rider/horse combinations to be nominated are as follows (listed in alphabetical order) Rider

Hometown

Horse(s)

Yann Candele

Caledon, ON

Carlotta Singular La Magnifica (owned by Susan Grange)

Tiffany Foster

Schomberg, ON

Victor (owned by Torrey Pines Stable and Artisan Farms)

Jill Henselwood

Oxford Mills, ON

George (owned by Brian Gingras)

Eric Lamaze

Schomberg, ON

Ian Millar

Perth, ON

Derly Chin de Muze (owned by Ashland Stables and Torrey Pines Stable) Verdi (owned by Artisan Farm and Torrey Pines Stable)

* *

Star Power (owned by Team Works) The Jump Canada High Performance Committee has the liberty of changing the combinations prior to the final submission to the COC July 4.

*

If for any reason one of the selected horse/rider combinations is unable to compete in the Olympic Games, the following Team Alternate Nominees may be named as a substitute to the Jumping Team: Jonathan Asselin

Calgary, AB

Showgirl (owned by Attache Stables)

Jenna Thompson

Calgary, AB

Zeke (owned by Jenna Thompson)

Lisa Carlsen

Spruce Grove, AB

La Boom (owned by La Boom Syndicate)

Jumping Support Team

Karen Hendry- Terrance Millar Ouellette Chef d’Equipe Team Manager

Mark Laskin Chef d’Equipe

Lori Green Stable Manager

Sylvie Surprenant Team Vet 32 www.equinecanada.ca

Reigning gold medalist Eric Lamaze returns to defend his Olympic title (Photo © Cealy Tetley)


| SPORT |

Tiffany Foster and Victor

Yann Candele and Carlotta Singular La Magnifica

All photos Š Cealy Tetley

Jill Henselwood and George

Jonathan Asselin and Showgirl

Jenna Thompson and Zeke

Lisa Carlson and La Boom

Ian Millar and Star Power

equinecanada June | July 2012 33


| SPORT |

Building Better Habits for More

Consistent Dressage

By Erin Patricio

It is our duty as captains of the ship to build up the good habits in the horse’s regular movement and muscle development as well as our own. This article will touch on the importance of building correct habits as well as what we can do out of the saddle to improve the quality of our daily dressage sessions.

Forming Good Habits How do we build good habits? There are two sides to the coin. Firstly, the more times that you travel over the same path mentally, the deeper and more established the habit becomes, good or bad. If you repeatedly ride a lopsided 20-metre circle, allowing your horse to travel too long on the rail for example, that will become your mental habit. If you have ever participated in sports psychology, there are visualization or morphing techniques designed to help anything from removing fear to establishing good competition habits. These are all based around the theory of developing specific neuro-pathways in the brain by repeating good mental habits. The second is the corresponding body habit which, of course comes from the brain. The habits that we teach the horse come from our bodies, such as traveling in straightness and balance regularly. Perfect practice makes perfect. Habits make us and we make our habits.

34 www.equinecanada.ca

Cross Training

So how do we deal with this in relation to our riding habits? When you look at other sports you can see that cross training plays a huge role in developing both good mental and physical habits for traveling in balance. There are virtually no sports that only do their sport to improve in their sport. This is something that we have learned in riding as the inclusion of Pilates, yoga and other crosstraining options have come to light for riders. Working on our own body helps us all become more effective in directing the horse’s body. My choice for cross training is Muay Thai Kickboxing. In Muay Thai you have to use both sides of your body equally; have well-developed fast twitch muscle response; cardio combined with the ability to think creatively, problem solve on your feet and stay calm in high-pressure situation. Of course balance is a huge part of it too, the ability to kick over your own head while standing on your toes helps stay in the saddle effortlessly. Rhythm and flexibility are also huge factors. Athletes cross train not only to develop specific muscles that improve their performance in their sport, but also to increase their stamina so that they do not gas out or fade in competition or training sessions.

The Dangers of Gassing Out or Fading When we gas out or fade, our muscles tire, which leads to inconsistent and unclear signals as our riding session progresses. We start to slouch, hang on a rein, drop our toes or tighten

in our back as we tire. Not only does ‘fatigue training’ affect our aids to the horse, it also results in endless repetition. Having to keep repeating an exercise to get it ourselves, we tire our horses, who then form their own bad habits. Tired muscles lead to incorrect compensation in horse and rider. This can all lead to behavioral problems, miscommunication, lameness or just endlessly unsatisfying rides with very little progress. For horses it is doubly important. They do not have our motivation to undo a bad habit. I wish my horses were worrying about how not to build asymmetry in their muscles, but alas that is not to be, so the best way to keep your daily training effective is to reduce the development of bad habits due to fatigue.

Biomechanics and Good Habits Now horses, being naturally crooked, need regular work on the training scale to keep them straight and balanced. Horses do not have our motivation to travel straight, so it is up to us to keep our regular training sessions as effective as possible. We see this in other sports. Position and use of your body with the correct biomechanics is the difference between hitting a golf ball 200 yards and two feet. It is also the difference between a sound or chronically injured body. For dressage riders it is of even greater importance to have correct biomechanics and good daily training habits because we are affecting the body of the horse as well.


| SPORT |

Out of the Saddle When we don’t ride in balance, our horse can’t travel in balance. What out-of–the- saddle exercises can positively affect your good daily training habits to keep yourself and your horse in straightness and balance? What exercises will reprogram your habits and strengthen your dressage skills for more effective and satisfying rides? Here are some suggestions: • Yoga • Pilates • Muay Thai (or other fighting sports) if this is your level of comfort • Dance • Exercises that use both sides of your body equally and develop your flexibility as well as your strength and rhythm Stick to whatever level of athletics that you are comfortable with after consulting your doctor. If you overdo it and can’t ride, the purpose is lost.

The Rhythm of Athletics All movement has rhythm. From dance to the fighting sports, rhythm is the most important step in any athletic pursuit. In dressage, it is the first step in the training pyramid. By cross training in other athletics, you enable your body to fall in to the habit of moving in rhythm with greater ease regardless of what you are doing. I believe that paying attention to the straightness and balance of our own bodies and building the correct muscle development through cross training out of the saddle will make riders able to spend less time trying to ‘get it’ and lead to more correct repetition and less struggle. Developing a mind-body connection off the horse will improve your ability to ride more effectively. Correspondingly, when you develop these habits, you can ‘reprogram’ yourself to become a more effective rider and maximize your time in the saddle on a daily basis. A horse travelling in straightness and balance with impulsion, using all aspects of the training pyramid together, is the responsibility of the rider. This starts with the rider’s ability to carry themselves in straightness and balance — and that begins with fitness. Erin Patricio is a Canadian dressage rider and trainer living in the Sacramento California area. She presented “Reprogramming” at a California Dressage Society Adult Amateur Camp in 2011.

2013 Equine Canada

Director Elections

Call for Nominations Each year the Equine Canada Nominations Committee has the responsibility of presenting a slate of candidates to the membership for election to the organization’s Board of Directors. The Nominations Committee is composed of a Chair who is appointed by the Board of Directors, and representatives from each of the three Division Councils (Sport, Recreation and Industry) and the Provincial Advisory Council. The Nominations Committee is seeking candidates with passion and drive to serve on the Equine Canada Policy Governance Board, working with other committed volunteers to build and enhance equine activities in Canada. The Board meets monthly via conference calls and face-to-face twice a year. Equine Canada wishes to recruit and develop Directors who bring a range of needed-professional skills, background, and diversity that is reflective of the community it serves. Knowledge in equine activities and strategic expertise in various aspects of non-profit governance are deemed desirable attributes. Additional assets include being logical, innovative, forward thinking, and able to work well in a team environment. Application packages for the 2013 Director Elections will be available on Equine Canada’s website on October 1, 2012. Nominees, nominators and seconders must all be Equine Canada Individual Members in good standing. We invite interested candidates to learn more about Equine Canada at www.equinecanada.ca or write: info@equinecanada.ca.

FEI Rule Change: Dressage—Equipment The SmartClix integrated spur has been approved by the FEI for all FEI Dressage events, initially for a trial period of one year, starting 1 July 2012. Please be aware that spurs must fulfil the requirement for the shank as described in Dressage Rules Article 427.3.

equinecanada June | July 2012 35


| HEALTH & WELFARE |

A Letter of Appreciation

36 www.equinecanada.ca


| COACHING |

A

English Competition Coach Specialist Certification Program Launches

n exciting new coaching certification program is now available for English coaches in Canada. The Competition Coach Specialist is a highly accessible certification program designed for those working with intermediate or more advanced riders in furthering their students’ basic riding, horsemanship and safety skills, as well as advancing competition experience from provincial to national level competitions. Photo © Cealy Tetley

“The specialist program is really important because it fills the gap between the Competition Coach and High Performance Coach,” explains Grant Field, chair of the National Coaching Committee and a Master Evaluator. “It’s perfect for coaches who might have been at the old Level 2, but were specialists, not generalists and therefore never became certified. It’s a totally new program that will serve the community needs better. “It’s the starting point for becoming a specialized coach in your discipline at a very attainable level—now coaches can just apply directly to this program if it meets their experience. They don’t have to go through a previous coaching level,” he adds. “I feel really proud of the English Coaching Committee for having finalized this last step in the competition coaching stream. We have created a great opportunity for the athletes and the coaches that coach them.” Additionally, the Competition Coach—Specialist will be certified to evaluate a horse and its suitability for a student, to supervise stable operations and routines, and to have demonstratable experience training and preparing horses for competition. Though candidates will specialize in one discipline, they are expected to be conversant in all English disciplines. To be eligible for certification candidates must: • Have competition experience

Chair of the Equine Canada Eventing Coaching Committee Peter Gray, rider Peter Barry— named to the London 2012 Canadian Three-Day Eventing Team—and his coach Roberta ByngMorris, Competition Coach Specialist candidate, following the Competition Coach Specialist ‘in competition evaluation’ pilot in June during the Volvo CCI3* Bromont Three Day Event.

38 www.equinecanada.ca

• Be at least 20 years of age as of January 1 of the current year • Hold an Equine Canada Sport license (membership) and provincial membership, in good standing


| COACHING |

Acquiring certification requires the following steps: • Submission of sample lesson and seasonal training plans • Participating in a single evaluation day with two evaluators where you are evaluated on coaching skills while giving lessons • Evaluation of your coaching skills during competition “The Competition Coach Specialist program ensures that coaching professionals value national teaching standards, safety and quality horsemanship,” states Gillian Ross Erasmi, education coordinator with the Ontario Equestrian Federation (OEF). “We proudly worked alongside Equine Canada to develop the training that was necessary to launch the Competition Coach Specialist program, including managing various training pilots instrumental in attaining Coaching Association of Canada program approval. Thanks must be extended to the many dedicated individuals who provided their time and expertise during this process. “Quality coaching is vital to equestrian sport and the Equine Canada’s coaching program - this new format increases accessibility for those who coach riders from the beginner level up to the elite competitor,” concludes Ross Erasmi. Complete details on the English Competition Coach Specialist Certification program can be found on the Equine Canada web site under Coaching — How to Become Certified. equinecanada June | July 2012 39


| INDUSTRY |

The Slots at Racetracks Program launched Ontario into the gaming business, at a time when there were very real concerns about extending gambling beyond racetracks and into Ontario communities. The solution developed in the late 1990s was to establish slot machines at racetracks in Ontario, where there was already an existing customer base, facilities and capital investment in place.

Horse Racing in Ontario –

is it heading into the home stretch?An Interview with Vel Evans

V

el Evans is a business analyst and principal consultant for Strategic Equine. Evans and her company have produced more than a dozen research studies on the horse industry, the most recent being the 2010 Canadian Horse Industry Profile Study – The State of the Industry. In March 2012, Equine Canada contracted Strategic Equine to compile statistics, analyse and publish a report on horse racing in Canada – The Economics of Horse Racing in 2010, the third in a series of national studies published by Equine Canada. There is a crisis in the Ontario horse racing industry. Can you explain what’s going on? The Ontario government has announced that the Slots at Racetracks Program, in place since 1999–2000, will end in April of 2013. This has been a highly lucrative program for both the Province of Ontario and the Ontario racing and breeding industry. Through a revenue-sharing agreement with the Province of Ontario, the Slots at Racetracks Program provides commissions to racetracks that host slot machines and purses for horse racing in Ontario.

40 www.equinecanada.ca

The agreement was not entered into lightly by the horse racing industry – they had very legitimate concerns that slot machines at their tracks would cannibalize wagering on horse racing. The agreement for revenue sharing that was reached – 20 per cent share of revenue to the racing industry, 5per cent to the local municipality where the track is located, and 75per cent to the Province of Ontario – was intended to offset losses on wagering on horse racing, while providing an instant customer-base on which the Ontario Lottery & Gaming (OLG) could build its business. Each of the host municipalities received a share of the revenues as well (approximately 5 per cent) – a win-win all around. For more than 10 years, the Slots at Racetracks Program has been a highly successful partnership. The racetracks have used their portion of slots commissions to upgrade sites to include the slots gaming facilities, upgrade track facilities, and pay the bills for live horse racing in Ontario. Local municipalities have used their portion of commissions to build community centres, hockey arenas, and provide services in the local communities across Ontario with racetracks. The share of commission allocated to purses for horse racing has built Ontario into probably the best horse racing centre in North America. The Ontario horse racing and breeding industry has grown from about 10,000 paid FTE (full-time equivalent) jobs in the 1990s to more than 34,800 paid FTE jobs in 2010. Since a lot of the jobs in the racing and breeding sector are seasonal or part time, it is estimated that the 34,800 FTE jobs means that about 55,000 individual people are employed in the sector. But it has come at a price. The industry’s early concerns about the cannibalization of wagering on horse racing to support slots machine gambling was dead-on the mark. Year-over-year the share of revenue that comes to horse racing from betting on the races has been shrinking, and the share that comes from commissions on slots at racetracks has increased. In 2010, more than 60 per cent of the revenue funding purses for racing in Ontario was coming from the commissions on slots at racetracks.


| INDUSTRY |

The government’s announcement could effectively cut the Ontario racing and breeding industry by more than 60 per cent, in a single chop. This will affect everyone in the sector – instantly devaluing the investment in the breeding sector (breeding stock and young horses on the ground), and thousands of jobs in Ontario. How does this impact the broader horse industry in Ontario, and in the rest of Canada? Through all our 15 years of research for provincial, national and international horse industries, it has been apparent that where there’s a healthy horse racing industry, there’s a strong horse industry. In Canada, the racing sector represents a small percentage of the total number of horses, but a significantly higher percentage of the overall economic contribution that comes from horses in Canada. The 2010 national horse industry study reported 963,500 horses in Canada. In 2010, approximately 45,000 horses were active in the racing sector – 5% of the total Canadian herd. The Ontario racing industry is the economic engine for both the Canadian racing industry and the Ontario horse industry. Expenditures in Ontario racing represent 26 per cent of the total expenditures for the entire Canadian horse industry, and a total $5.7 billion annual economic contribution.

Racing in Ontario represents the largest provincial sector for the national racing industry, with more than 68% of the total racing opportunities and 86 per cent of the total purses earned in 2010. Of the 78,000 FTE paid jobs in the Canadian horse industry, more than half (38,400) are supported by the Ontario racing and breeding industry. If someone is interested in a paid career in the Canadian horse industry, the Ontario racing industry offers lots of opportunities. The annual expenditure on products and services for race horses is significantly higher than for most other horses. Horse racing drives demand for specialist equine veterinarians, and equine health products and services that add to the total infrastructure for the horse industry. The racing sector in Canada has been the leading sponsor for equine research related to performance health issues (lameness, respiratory ailments, endurance and performance issues), as well as reproductive health for stallions, mares and foals. Demand for offspring of successful racing stock drives leading-edge research for reproductive technologies and techniques. The results of equine research are available to all sectors of the equine industry to enhance the health and productivity of horses.” Significant shrinkage in the Ontario racing industry would have a devastating domino effect throughout the Canadian industry. What can horse owners and the Canadian horse industry do to help? The Ontario Horse Racing Industry Association (OHRIA) has been pressing forward with a broad public awareness campaign in an effort to educate the public on the potential consequences of the government’s action. It has launched Value4Money.ca, a website which provides facts on the Slots at Racetracks Program and the horse racing industry. Visitors can find regular news updates and links to additional industry information. There is also a ‘Take Action’ section in which visitors can participate in a petition to support the Ontario horse racing industry. The best thing you can do is educate yourself on the issues so that you can share in meaningful dialogue. By understanding how the racing industry is a driver for the Canadian horse industry, you are showing your support. More information can be found in the 2010 Economics of the Horse Racing published by Equine Canada. Copies of the study are available for download at www.equinecanada.ca. Printed copies can be purchased by contacting Equine Canada at 1-866-282-8395, x 133.

equinecanada June | July 2012 41


| RECREATION SPORT | |

A Recreation Celebration in British Columbia

L

ast summer, Horse Council British Columbia, together with Back Country Horsemen of British Columbia (BCHBC), officially opened the Headwaters Corral Equestrian Campsite in Manning Park Resort. It was a special day, as it not only marked the realization of a dream for trail riders, but the 100th Anniversary of BC Parks and the 20th Anniversary of the Back Country Horsemen. The successful development of this pre-existing campground required many hands, and a special Memorandum of Understanding between BC Parks, Manning Park Resort and BCHBC. The site was once a commercial trail riding stable but it had since been turned into a small, unadorned equestrian campground by the Yarrow and Aldergrove Chapters of BCHBC accommodating just six visitors. There were a number of enhancements BCHBC wanted to make to the campsite, including enclosing the area so that horses were not at risk of getting out onto the roadway or disappearing

42 www.equinecanada.ca

Posing at the campground’s beautiful new sign is (left to right) HCBC President Orville Smith, HCBC Executive Director Lisa Laycock, RCMP Sergeant Dave Smith and ConstableTrevor Irvine. (Photo credit: Hugh Martell)

into the mountains. Though a lot of volunteer labour was provided, a circular driveway for the trailers and back-in sites required aggregate and the services of a heavy equipment operator. Horse Council BC and their BC Equestrian Trails Fund supplied the majority of the dollars needed to get the work done, along with help from the Yarrow and Fraser Valley Chapters of BCHBC, the Hope Riding Club, TD Canada Trust, Tamahi Logging and some private donations. Generous in-kind help was provided by BC Parks, Manning Park Resort and several others. Facilities at the campsite, though still having that rustic charm, include: individual and double, back- in sites, high lining posts and trees, a pit toilet, manure collection


| RECREATION |

bin, central fire pit and water tap. Just a short walk away, campers can take advantage of the amenities at Manning Resort, such as a restaurant, showers, indoor pool, hot tubs, workout facilities, sauna, pub and country store. For equestrian tourism enthusiasts, Headwaters Corral Equestrian Campsite should be added to your list of

fabulous places to ride and camp. For trail groups wanting to learn more about developing their own equestrian campsites, we urge you to contact your provincial equestrian federation for information on potential grant programs and services. To contact the Back Country Horsemen of British Columbia, please visit: www.bchorsemen.com

Manitoba Horse Council Recreation Grant Grows in Popularity In 2011, Manitoba Horse Council, together with Equine Canada, was able to assist four community equestrian groups with just over $3500 in joint Recreation Grants for non-sport projects in Manitoba. The funding program was a joint initiative between the national and provincial organizations in order to fund trail development and refurbishments, as well as education and safety programs for recreational riders.

Winter Grooming Association The association was granted $580 to offset the costs to groom an eight kilometer trail for riders and drivers, including trail markers and gas for the groomer.

The Horse Connection

Manitoba Hunter Jumper Association The Manitoba Hunter Jumper Association requested grant monies to replace the tarp used to protect outdoor stalls at the Birds Hill Park Centre. Recreation riders make use of the stalls to rest their horses during lunch breaks and to get cover during periods of inclement weather. The association was granted a $1000 towards the cost of the new cover. Executive Director Bruce Rose reports that the recreation grants program is proving very popular and is seen as a terrific way to promote and support recreational riding activities. Manitoba Horse Council will again be offering the grants program in 2012. Outdoor stalls at the Birds Hill Park Centre

The Horse Connection serves over 30 students in grades 6 to 9, helping to keep them connected to school through equestrian activities. The group was granted $1000 to refurbish a therapeutic mounting ramp to serve the mildly disabled and seniors and to enable CanTra training.

Pony Club The Pony Club requested assistance for costs running a summer camp which introduces children to recreational riding, including trailing riding skills and practice, horse care and safe riding techniques. The club was granted a $1000 for its camp program. equinecanada June | July 2012 43


| CANADA HIPPIQUE |

Le message du président La saison de concours bat son plein avec des douzaines de compétitions au calendrier de ce mois-ci ! Les cavaliers de loisir profitent du beau temps estival pour explorer les magnifiques sentiers qui sillonnent les différentes régions du Canada. L’industrie des courses de Thoroughbred a vécu des moments excitants grâce aux victoires du cheval de propriété canadienne I’ll Have Another. Le nombre de membres et de détenteurs de licences sportives atteint encore une fois un niveau record. Il semble qu’un nombre croissant de personnes s’adonnent aux activités équestres, malgré les niveaux de participation à la baisse pour d’autres sports, parfois attribuables à des raisons d’ordre économique. Sur le plan administratif, plusieurs projets importants sont en marche. Nous avons effectué une revue minutieuse de nos règlements administratifs et de leur interaction avec le nouveau système d’élection des membres du Conseil d’administration. Ces règlements révisés seront prêts à être présentés aux membres pour approbation d’ici la fin de l’été. Simultanément, nous avons entamé la plus importante révision du plan stratégique de toute l’histoire de Canada Hippique. De nombreuses séances de travail ont eu lieu, le taux de participation est bon, et le comité de révision du plan stratégique a reçu d’excellents commentaires sur la question. Notre sondage en ligne a été accueilli de manière exceptionnelle puisque 1 300 des 2 000 personnes qui ont visité le site ont répondu aux questions. Il est rare de voir les membres montrer autant d’intérêt pour ce type de projet. Et qui plus est, nous sommes en train de réévaluer la structure des concours; notre analyse porte, entre autres, sur la manière d’y intégrer le modèle de développement à long terme de l’athlète. Nous avons retenu les services d’un conseiller en ressources humaines qui créera avec nous la description du poste de chef de la direction. Nous désirons nous assurer de l’exactitude de cette description de tâches avant d’embaucher un nouveau dirigeant. Nous prévoyons réaliser les entrevues en septembre, après les Jeux olympiques. 44 www.equinecanada.ca

En mai, la Ville de Québec a eu l’honneur de recevoir le congrès SportAccord. Il s’agit d’un évènement annuel majeur auquel participent toutes les fédérations sportives internationales, y compris la FEI. J’étais présent au déjeuner du Comité olympique canadien qui accueillait 4 000 personnes; ce nombre record de donateurs a permis d’amasser plus de 800 000 dollars destinés aux athlètes canadiens. J’ai rencontré le chef de la direction de la FEI, Ingmar de Vos, et nous nous sommes rendus à Toronto afin de visiter le site des Jeux panaméricains qui se dérouleront en 2015 à Caledon. Ce fut une belle occasion d’échanger en privé avec Ingmar et nous avons abordé plusieurs questions chères à Canada Hippique. Mon prochain déplacement sera pour Londres, où j’irai encourager nos équipes olympiques et paralympiques. Nous sommes trop souvent allés aux grands jeux sans entretenir l’espoir d’une victoire. Cette année, je m’aperçois que l’attitude a complètement changé. Entre 2008 et 2010, toutes nos disciplines ont réalisé certaines de leurs plus belles performances, sinon les meilleures, de l’histoire du sport équestre canadien. Nous savons désormais que nous pouvons gagner et quoique nous n’ayons pas de garantie sur ce plan, nous nous retrouvons assurément en position plus forte, car nous savons maintenant que c’est possible. Je souhaite à toutes nos équipes la meilleure des chances à Londres et je sais d’ores et déjà qu’elles feront notre fierté! Michael Gallagher, Président, Canada Hippique president@equinecanada.ca


Le Wembley Stadium en 1948

| SPORT |

Le Wembley Stadium en 1948 Greenwich Park lors d’une épreuve préparatoire olympique en 2011

© Kit Houghton

equinecanada June | July 2012 45


| SPORT |

Faits fascinants sur les Jeux olympiques et Paralympiques de 2012

100 ANS

Waylon Roberts a terminé au 13e rang du Greenwich Park Eventing Invitational, un CIC 2* présenté du 4 au 6 juillet 2011 à Londres (GBR). Il s’agissait de l’épreuve équestre préparatoire aux Jeux olympiques de 2012. Photo : Kimberley Gallagher

de sport équestre aux Jeux olympiques Avec l’aimable autorisation de FEI Focus C’est en 1912 que le dressage, le saut d’obstacles et le concours complet ont été intégrés au programme olympique. Seuls les hommes étaient alors autorisés à concourir, jusqu’en : • 1952, où quatre des 27 cavaliers de dressage furent des femmes. Lis Hartel avait alors été choisie pour représenter le Danemark aux Jeux olympiques d’Helsinki. Elle remporta la médaille d’argent, et ce, en dépit de l’aide requise pour monter et descendre de cheval en raison d’une paralysie sous le genou causée par la polio dont elle avait souffert huit ans auparavant. Quatre ans plus tard, elle raflait une autre médaille d’argent à Stockholm. Lis Hartel est décédée le 12 février 2009 à l’âge vénérable de 87 ans. • 1956, lorsque Pat Smythe (Patricia Rosemary Smythe), de Grande-Bretagne, se joignit à l’équipe britannique de saut d’obstacles à Stockholm (Suède) et remporta la médaille de bronze en équipe.

46 www.equinecanada.ca

• 1964 à Tokyo, où Lana du Pont (États-Unis) participa aux épreuves de concours complet. Vingt-sept ans plus tard, sous le nom de Mrs. Wright, elle ramena au pays une médaille d’or remportée en équipe aux Championnats mondiaux d’attelage de Paris.

Depuis 1912… • Les Jeux olympiques comptent 22 participations équestres de 2062 cavaliers de 65 pays, qui ont concouru environ 4000 fois. • La plupart ont été des participations uniques, mais 43 cavaliers ont concouru à au moins cinq reprises, parmi lesquels Ian Millar (Canada), avec neuf participations, les frères D’Inzeo (Italie) à huit reprises et Michael Plumb (États-Unis), avec sept présences! • L’Allemagne domine le compte des médailles avec 81, suivie des États-Unis (49), de la Suède (40), de la France (29) et de la Grande-Bretagne (27).


| SPORT |

16 ans de sport équestre aux Jeux paralympiques Les Jeux olympiques de 2012 seront les cinquièmes où le programme paralympique inclura le para-dressage. En 1996, lorsque le para-dressage apparut au programme paralympique, le concours fut disputé par 68 athlètes de 16 nations qualifiées pour une participation, et ce, à bord de chevaux empruntés. En 2008, le nombre de pays participants à ces épreuves s’est accru à 28, avec 78 partenariats et aucun cheval emprunté.

Ian Millar en 2008, lors de sa 9e participation olympique

• Sur le plan individuel, les cavaliers de dressage Reiner Klimke (Allemagne), Isabel Werth (Allemagne) et Anky van Grunsven sont à la tête du compte des médailles avec huit distinctions olympiques chacun, suivis de l’Allemand Hans Günter Winkler avec sept médailles en saut d’obstacles et de Michael Plumb, des États-Unis, détenteur de six médailles olympiques en concours complet. • Aucun cheval n’a concouru à plus de trois éditions olympiques. Toutefois, 21 chevaux comptent trois départs olympiques, notamment : — Gigolo règne au compte des médailles équines avec six distinctions en dressage; — Bonfire en dénombre cinq en saut d’obstacles; et — Meteor, Halla, Posilippo et Ratina en ont remporté trois respectivement. En concours complet, Marcroix domine avec quatre médailles. • La participation olympique est aussi une histoire de famille : depuis 1912, plus de 100 combinaisons familiales (frère/frère, père/fils, mère/fille, etc.) ont concouru aux épreuves équestres des Jeux olympiques.

L’intégration du sport para-équestre au monde de la compétition équestre n’est nulle part mieux démontrée qu’en Grande-Bretagne, où la coordination, la gestion et les systèmes en place fonctionnent en parfaite harmonie. Dans la carrière de concours, les Britanniques sont détenteurs des records et des meilleurs titres de tous les temps en para-dressage et, hors carrière, le financement par loterie et l’administration intégrée illustrent la constante évolution de ce sport et l’apparition de nouveaux talents à chaque championnat, ce qui apporte un cheminement fluide à travers les structures établies.

Depuis 1996… • La Grande-Bretagne s’est emparée de 33 médailles, suivie de l’Allemagne avec 14 et du Danemark avec 11. • Lee Pearson est au sommet du compte des médailles avec neuf médailles d’or (six en individuel et trois en équipe). • Lors des trois premières éditions, les compétiteurs étaient classés en quatre catégories (I, II, III et IV); en 2008, le nombre de catégories est passé à cinq (Ia, Ib, II, III et IV). • Les femmes surpassent les hommes en nombre de médailles remportées en individuel, soit 82 contre 20. • Anne Dunham (Grande-Bretagne) et Angelika Trabert (Allemagne) sont les seules compétitrices paraéquestres ayant participé à toutes les éditions des Jeux paralympiques depuis 1996. • En 2008, Lauren Barwick (Canada), double médaillée, a gagné l’or en reprise libre et l’argent en individuel.

equinecanada June | July 2012 47


| SPORT |

Londres, Londres, Londres En plus d’avoir inspiré la chanson de Caetano Veloso, London London, Londres réfère ici à la troisième édition des Jeux olympiques dans cette cité… Les Jeux olympiques de 1908 devaient d’abord avoir lieu à Rome, mais l’éruption du Vésuve en 1906 a exigé la recherche d’une autre ville hôtesse. Londres s’est offerte et, malgré les contraintes de temps, le Comité olympique international a accepté l’invitation de la ville. Sa Majesté Édouard VII a proclamé l’ouverture officielle des Jeux de Londres de 1908, lesquels se sont déroulés durant trois mois. Un total de 22 pays a délégué 2008 athlètes, soit 1971 hommes et 37 femmes, qui se sont affrontés dans 110 épreuves. La majorité des sports présentés à Londres en 1908 forment le cœur des Jeux contemporains et seront à nouveau de la partie à Londres cette année. Cependant, il y a ceux qui, depuis, sont disparus depuis un bon moment du programme olympique, tels que le motonautisme et la souque à la corde. Mais il y a aussi ceux qui se sont ajoutés, comme le sport équestre, un nouveau venu à l’édition suivante de Stockholm. Le stade olympique White City a été construit en moins d’un an exprès pour les Jeux olympiques. Il fut alors considéré par tous comme une merveille technologique, avec ses 68 000 places et sa piste de course entourée d’une piste cyclable. À la clôture des Jeux le 31 octobre 1908, la GrandeBretagne occupait le sommet du tableau avec un total de 145 médailles, suivie des États-Unis avec 47 et la Suède avec 25. En dépit du court préavis, ces Jeux furent communément considérés comme une réussite et jetèrent les bases de l’héritage olympique de Londres à titre de ville hôtesse.

Les innovations de 1908… • Les athlètes ont défilé avec leur drapeau national à la cérémonie d’ouverture des Jeux. • Chaque compétiteur devait être enregistré auprès de son association olympique et inscrit comme membre d’une équipe nationale. • On a établi des normes de qualification et la majorité des nations concurrentes ont convenu d’un ensemble de règles pour chaque sport. 48 www.equinecanada.ca

• La distance du marathon a été fixée à 26,2 miles, soit la distance entre le château de Windsor et la loge royale du stade olympique. En 1948, Londres est à nouveau intervenue à la dernière minute pour accueillir les premiers Jeux suivant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Malgré un manque de temps et de ressources, la ville a relevé le défi de tenir d’autres Jeux remarquables, moraux et stimulants. Sa Majesté le roi George VI a déclaré les Jeux officiellement ouverts au cours de la cérémonie d’ouverture qui s’est déroulée au stade Wembley le 29 juillet 1948. L’athlète John Mark a allumé la flamme olympique et Donald Finlay a prêté le serment olympique au nom de tous les compétiteurs. Un total de 4104 athlètes de 59 pays se sont affrontés dans 136 épreuves. À la fin des Jeux, les États-Unis occupaient la première position du tableau grâce à 84 médailles. La Suède suivait avec 44 médailles, puis la France avec 29. Pour les épreuves équestres, 17 nations ont délégué des cavaliers et des chevaux à Londres pour un concours réparti sur six jours. L’équipe mexicaine a raflé l’or en saut d’obstacles, tandis que l’équipe de dressage de la France faisait de même et que l’équipe de concours complet des États-Unis remportait les honneurs.


| SPORT |

Les innovations de 1948… • Des blocs de départ ont été installés pour les courses de vitesse. • On a mis en place un programme de bénévolat pour aider la tenue des Jeux.

Pour le para-dressage, 2012 sera marquée des plus grandes foules jamais réunies pour des épreuves paraéquestres. Plus de 40 000 billets ont été vendus avant Noël l’an dernier, écrasant indubitablement le record précédent de 33 000 spectateurs aux compétitions paraéquestres de 2008 à Hong Kong.

• La piscine Empire a été la première piscine olympique couverte de l’histoire. Toutefois, sa longueur excédait les 50 mètres réglementaires; elle a donc dû être raccourcie à l’aide d’une plateforme de bois.

Les innovations de 2012…

• La compétition a également été retransmise à la télévision pour la première fois, même si peu de gens possédaient un téléviseur à cette époque.

• Pour le reste, il faudra attendre…

Les Jeux olympiques de Londres de 2012 offriront 26 sports divisés en 39 disciplines. Le programme paralympique de cette année comptera pour sa part 20 sports. Le cyclisme paralympique sera divisé en deux disciplines : route et piste. Le Jeux olympiques auront lieu du 27 juillet au 12 août, suivis des Jeux paralympiques du 29 août au 9 septembre. La cérémonie d’ouverture des Jeux de la XXXe Olympiade se déroulera le 27 juillet, suivie de 12 jours d’épreuves hippiques, se terminant pour la première fois dans l’histoire olympique, par les reprises libres de dressage en musique, le 9 août. Deux cents cavaliers et chevaux s’affronteront pour les médailles d’or, d’argent et de bronze en individuel et en équipe en concours complet, en dressage et en saut d’obstacles. Les concurrents para-équestres, quant à eux, se disputeront 11 ensembles de médailles en dressage aux Jeux paralympiques. Le parc Greenwich accueillera les compétitions équestres olympiques et paralympiques, ainsi que les épreuves combinées de course et de tir du pentathlon moderne. Ce site repose sur la rive sud de la Tamise dans le sud-est de Londres et la vue du centre de Londres et des Docklands y est à couper le souffle. Le parc Greenwich est le plus ancien parc royal de la ville, datant de 1433. L’Old Royal Naval College et le National Maritime Museum y sont situés et, avec le parc lui-même, ils forment un site du patrimoine mondial depuis 1997. Dans le parc se trouve également le Royal Observatory et le siège du temps moyen de Greenwich. Un parcours temporaire de cross-country y est construit et un manège principal temporaire sera aménagé sur les terrains du National Maritime Museum.

• Wenlock et Mandeville, les mascottes officielles des Jeux de 2012.

Tous admettront que Londres et l’emblématique parc Greenwich seront les sites les plus appropriés pour du sport spectaculaire et de nouveaux records. Nous avons pu vous communiquer ces renseignements grâce au site Web officiel des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de 2012, www.london2012.com, à l’ouvrage complet et très documenté de Max E. Amman, Equestrian Sport at the Olympic Games 1912-2008 et aux archives de la FEI.

« Nous sommes vraiment très fiers de célébrer 100 ans de sport équestre olympique aux Jeux de Londres de 2012 et la tenue de cet événement dans un lieu aussi symbolique que le parc Greenwich, au cœur même des Jeux, est formidable », souligne SAR la princesse Haya, présidente de la Fédération équestre internationale (FEI). « Le parc Greenwich est le deuxième plus important site de Londres 2012 et les billets du cross-country ont été les plus rapides à s’envoler. La demande est tellement élevée pour notre sport que les billets pour toutes les disciplines équestres se sont vendus en à peine quelques semaines, faisant du sport équestre l’un des plus populaires des Jeux. « Il s’agit d’un jalon incontestable dans notre sport, qui mérite d’être célébré. En effet, cet événement atteste que nous nous mesurons réellement aux autres sports de prédilection, comme le démontre le nombre de spectateurs attirés. Nous aspirons à offrir l’un des meilleurs produits des Jeux et nous pouvons assurément lancer aux grandes fédérations internationales : attention, nous sommes là maintenant! SAR la princesse Haya

equinecanada June | July 2012 49


| SPORT |

Ô l’historique des Jeux olympiques 1952 – Helsinki, Finlande Dressage Capitaine M.L.R. Lafond et Pierrette Concours complet de trois jours L.J. McGuinness et Tara Stewart Treviranus et Rustrum Thomas Gayford et Constellation Médailles en individuel Or : capitaine Hans von Blixen – Finecke et Jubal, Suède Argent : Guy Lafrant et Verdun, France Bronze : Wilhelm Busing et Hubertus, Allemagne Médailles en équipe Or : Suède Argent : Allemagne Bronze : États-Unis

1956 – Stockholm, Suède Dressage Capitaine M.L.R. Lafond et Rathpatrick Concours complet de trois jours Brian Herbinson et Tara John Rumble et Cilroy James Elder et Cottage Colleen Médailles en individuel Or : Petrus Kastenman et Illuster, Suède Argent : August Lutke – Westhues et Trux von Kamax, Allemagne Bronze : lieutenant-colonel Frank Weldon et Kilbarry, GrandeBretagne Médailles en équipe Or : Grande-Bretagne Argent : Allemagne Bronze : CANADA

1960 – Rome, Italie Concours complet de trois jours Brian Herbinson et Roma James Elder et Canadian Envoy Thomas Gayford et Pepper Knowes Norman Elder et Royal Beaver Médailles en individuel Or : Laurence Morgan et Salad Days, Australie Argent : Neale Lavis et Mirrabooka, Suite à la page 51 50 www.equinecanada.ca

L’empreinte laissée par le Canada dans l’histoire olympique et paralympique • Le Canada a délégué sa première équipe équestre aux Jeux olympiques de 1952 à Helsinki. Le capitaine M.L.R. Lafond (sur Pierrette) et L.J. McGuiness (sur Tara) ont concouru en dressage et Stewart Treviranus (sur Rustrum) et Thomas Gayford (sur Constellation) ont participé en concours complet.

County) est le seul athlète équestre canadien à avoir remporté une médaille olympique en sol canadien! Et pour rendre cet événement historique

• En 1956, le Canada a remporté sa première médaille olympique. En effet, Brian Herbinson (sur Tara), John Rumble (sur Cilroy) et James Elder (sur Cottage Colleen) ont fièrement rapporté au pays le bronze en concours complet en équipe. La première équipe équestre du Canada • Et voici toute une première! En 1964, Christilot Hanson (sur Bonheur) fut la plus jeune athlète et la première femme canadienne à concourir en sport équestre aux Jeux olympiques. En raison de son jeune âge, la cavalière, alors âgée de 17 ans, a dû demander une permission spéciale pour concourir. • Le Canada a présenté sa première équipe de saut d’obstacles aux Jeux olympiques de 1968 qui se déroulaient à Mexico, au Mexique. Notre équipe internationale, formée de James Elder (The Immigrant), Thomas Gayford (Big Dee) et James Day (Canadian Club), a signé la toute première page de notre histoire olympique en lettres d’OR en accédant à la première marche du podium ! Et comme si cette réalisation n’était pas suffisamment éclatante, ce fut la seule médaille d’or remportée par le Canada à ces Jeux olympiques, tous sports confondus. Michel Vaillancourt (sur Branch

(conccours complet, 1952)

Michel Vaillancourt (Branch County) James Elder

Barbara Kemp

encore plus particulier, Michel et sa monture Branch County ont gagné leur médaille d’argent en saut d’obstacles dans leur province d’origine, le Québec, lors des Jeux olympiques de Montréal en 1976. • En 1976, James Day a participé à la fois en saut d’obstacles (sur Sympatico) et en concours complet de trois jours (sur Viceroy).


| SPORT |

• Toujours en 1976 à Montréal, Barbara Kemp (Canada) fut la première femme à concevoir un parcours olympique de cross-country. La première femme à concevoir un parcours olympique de saut d’obstacles fut Linda Allen, aux Jeux olympiques d’Atlanta en 1996.

Eric Lamaze (Hickstead )

• Ensemble, les frères James et Norman Elder ont participé à neuf Jeux olympiques : James à sept et Norman à deux!

il a concouru en dressage à l’âge de 72 ans à Berlin en 1936. Ian Millar détient actuellement le titre en saut d’obstacles, alors qu’il était âgé de 61 ans aux Jeux olympiques de Hong Kong en 2008, de pair avec Bill Roycroft en concours complet, également âgé de 61 ans aux Jeux de Montréal en 1976. • Il y a beaucoup plus au palmarès de M. Millar ! Sa présence aux Jeux olympiques de 2008 le place à égalité avec le navigateur autrichien Hubert Raudaschl pour le nombre le plus élevé de participations.

© Cealy Tetley

Lauren Barwick Ian Millar (Big Ben) Martina Pracht (Emirage)

© Lindsay Yosay McCall 2011

• Mais la participation familiale ne s’arrête pas ici! Eva-Maria Pracht et sa fille Martina Pracht ont participé à trois Jeux olympiques. Eva-Maria portait les couleurs du Canada en 1984 et 1988 et Martina, en 1992. • Arthur von Pongracz demeure à ce jour le concurrent équestre le plus âgé en épreuve olympique; en effet,

Eva-Maria Pracht (Emirage)

Australie Bronze : Anton S. Buhler et Gay Spark, Suisse Médailles en équipe Or : Australie Argent : Suisse Bronze : France

1964 – Tokyo, Japon Dressage Christilot Hanson (Boylen) et Bonheur Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Suisse Bronze : Union soviétique

• Les athlètes équestres canadiens ont participé pour la première fois aux épreuves paralympiques en 1996.

1968 – Ville de Mexico, Mexique

• Nos premières médailles paralympiques ont été remportées en 2004, lorsque Karen Brain (sur Dasskara) a obtenu le bronze en championnats de catégorie IV et en reprise libre de catégorie IV.

Médailles en individuel Or : Ivan Kizimov et Ikhor – Union soviétique Argent : Josef Neckermann et Mariano – Allemagne de l’Ouest Bronze : Reiner Klimke et Dux – Allemagne de l’Ouest

• En 2008, Éric Lamaze (sur Hickstead) s’est emparé de la médaille d’or olympique en saut d’obstacles, tout en jouant un rôle majeur au sein de l’équipe de saut d’obstacles médaillée d’argent, formée d’Ian Millar (sur In Style), de Jill Henselwood (sur Special Ed) et de Mac Cone (sur Ole). • L’année 2008 fut également une année fabuleuse pour la cavalière paralympique Lauren Barwick (sur Maile), grâce à ses deux médailles, soit l’or en reprise libre et l’argent en individuel.

Dressage Inez Fischer—Credo et Marius Christilot Hanson (Boylen) et Bonheur Zoltan Sztehlo et Virtuoso

Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Russie Bronze : Union soviétique Saut d’obstacles James Elder et The Immigrant Thomas Gayford et Big Dee James Day et Canadian Club Médailles en individuel Or : William Steinkraus et Snowbound, États-Unis Argent : Marion Coakes et Stroller, Grande-Bretagne Bronze : David Broome et Mr. Softee, Grande-Bretagne 6e position : James Elder et The Immigrant Médailles en équipe Or : CANADA Argent : France Bronze : Allemagne

Suite à la page 52 equinecanada June | July 2012 51


| SPORT |

Concours complet de trois jours Robin Hanh et Taffy Barry Sonshine et Durlas Eile Allan Ehrlick et The Nomad Norman Elder et Questionnaire Médailles en individuel Or : Jean-Jacques Guyon et Pitou, France Argent : Derek Allhusen et Lochinvar, Grande-Bretagne Bronze : Michael Page et Foster, États-Unis Médailles en équipe Or : Grande-Bretagne Argent : États-Unis Bronze : Australie

1972 – Munich, Allemagne Dressage Christilot Hanson (Boylen) et Gaspano Cynthia Neale (Ishoy) et Bonne Année Lorraine Stubbs et Venezuela Médailles en individuel Or : Liselott Linsenhoff et Piaff, Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : Yelena Petushkova et Pepel, Union soviétique Bronze : Josef Neckermann et Venetia, Allemagne de l’Ouest Médailles en équipe Or : Union soviétique Argent : Allemagne de l’Ouest Bronze : Suède 6e position : CANADA Saut d’obstacles James Elder et Houdini James Day et Happy Fellow Terrence Millar et Le Dauphin Ian Millar et Shoeman Médailles en individuel Or : Graziano Mancinelli et Ambassador, Italie Argent : Ann Moore et Psalm, Grande-Bretagne Bronze : Neal Shapiro et Sloopy, États-Unis 4e position : JAMES DAY ET STEELMASTER* Avant le début de la compétition en individuel, le cheval de James Day, Happy Fellow, a été jugé inapte à concourir en raison de problèmes de santé. Day a alors monté le cheval de remplacement de son coéquipier Terrance Millar, Steelmaster, pour participer à la compétition en individuel. Suite à la page 53 52 www.equinecanada.ca

Les Canadiens plusieurs fois prétendants au titre olympique Découvrez quels athlètes humains canadiens ont fait plus d’une apparition olympique ou paralympique : Brian Herbinson

1956—concours complet 1960—concours complet

Eva-Marie Pracht

1984—dressage 1988—dressage—bronze en équipe

Gina Smith

1988—dressage—bronze en équipe 1996—dressage

Jay Hayes

1992—saut d’obstacles 2000—saut d’obstacles

Karen Brain

2004—para-équestre 2008—para-équestre

Lauren Barwick

2004—para-équestre 2008—para-équestre

Leslie Reid

2004—dressage 2008—dressage

Mac Cone

1996—saut d’obstacles 2008—saut d’obstacles— argent en équipe

Michel Vaillancourt

1976—saut d’obstacles— argent en individuel 1980—saut d’obstacles (Jeux alternatifs)—or en équipe

Norman Elder

1960—concours complet 1968—concours complet

Ashley (Nicoll) Holzer

1988—dressage—bronze en équipe 2004—dressage 2008—dressage

Robin Hanh

1968—concours complet 1972—concours complet 1976—concours complet

Thomas Gayford

1952—concours complet 1960—concours complet 1968—saut d’obstacles

Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy

1972—dressage 1988—dressage—bronze en équipe 1992—dressage 2004—dressage

James Day

1968—saut d’obstacles 1672—saut d’obstacles 1976—saut d’obstacles 1976—concours complet

Christilot (Hanson) Boylen

1964—dressage 1968—dressage 1972—dressage 1976—dressage 1984—dressage 1992—dressage

James Elder

1956—concours complet 1960—concours complet 1968—saut d’obstacles 1972—saut d’obstacles 1976—saut d’obstacles 1980—saut d’obstacles (Jeux alternatifs)—or en équipe 1984—saut d’obstacles

Ian Millar

1972—saut d’obstacles 1976—saut d’obstacles 1980—saut d’obstacles (Jeux alternatifs)—or en équipe 1984—saut d’obstacles 1988—saut d’obstacles 1992—saut d’obstacles 1996—saut d’obstacles 2000—saut d’obstacles 2004—saut d’obstacles 2008—saut d’obstacles — argent en équipe

Découvrez quels athlètes équins canadiens ont fait plus d’une apparition olympique ou paralympique : Tara

1952—concours complet (L.J. McGuinness) 1956—concours complet (Brian Herbinson)

Bonheur

1964—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen) 1968—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen)

Gaspano

1972—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen) 1976—dressage (Christilot Hanson (Boylen)

1984—saut d’obstacles (Ian Millar) Big Ben 1988—saut d’obstacles (Ian Millar) 1988—saut d’obstacles (Ian Millar) Emirage

1988—dressage (Eva-Marie Pracht) 1994—dressage (Martina Pracht)


| SPORT |

Ian Millar et Countdown en 1976, lors de sa 2e participation olympique

Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : États-Unis Bronze : Italie 6e position : CANADA Concours complet de trois jours Jim Henry et Harper Robin Hanh et Lord Jim Wendy Irving et High Wind Clint Banbury et Paladin Médailles en individuel Or : Richard Meade et Laurieston, Grande-Bretagne Argent : Alessandro Argenton et Woodland, Italie Bronze : Jan Jönsson et Sarajevo, Suède Médailles en équipe Or : Grande-Bretagne Argent : États-Unis Bronze : Allemagne de l’Ouest

1976 – Montréal, Canada Dressage Christilot (Hanson) Boylen et Gaspano Lorraine Stubbs et True North Barbara Stracey et Jungherr II Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Suisse Bronze : États-Unis 5e position : CANADA Saut D’obstacles James Day et Sympatico Michel Vaillancourt et Branch County Ian Millar et Countdown James Elder et Raffles II Médailles en individuel Or : Alwin Schockemohle et Warwick Rex, Allemagne ARGENT : MICHEL VAILLANCOURT ET BRANCH COUNTY, CANADA Bronze : François Mathy et Gai Luron, Belgique Médailles en équipe Or : France Argent : Allemagne Bronze : Belgique 5e position : CANADA

Photo : les archives de Canada Hippique.

Concours complet de trois jours Juliet Graham et Sumatra Cathy Wedge et City Fella Robin Hanh et L’Esprit James Day et Viceroy Suite à la page 54 equinecanada June | July 2012 53


| SPORT |

Médailles en individuel Or : Edmund Coffin et Ballycor, États-Unis Argent : John Plumb et Better and Better, États-Unis Bronze : Karl Schultz et Madrigal, Allemagne de l’Ouest Médailles en équipe Or : États-Unis Argent : Allemagne de l’Ouest Bronze : Australie 6e position : CANADA

1980 – Moscou, Russie En raison du climat politique instable de 1980, les États-Unis ont entrepris un boycottage des Jeux olympiques de Moscou à la suite de l’invasion de l’Afghanistan par l’Union soviétique. Ce boycottage a donné lieu à l’organisation, par les nations occidentales, de compétitions alternatives, lesquelles sont connues sous le nom de « Jeux olympiques alternatifs ». L’équipe de saut d’obstacles fut la seule déléguée par le Canada en 1980. Festival de saut d’obstacles de Rotterdam Ian Millar et Brother Sam Mark Laskin et Damuraz James Elder et Volunteer Michel Vaillancourt et Chivas Résultats en équipe 1re position : CANADA 2e position : Grande-Bretagne 3e position : Autriche

1984 – Los Angeles, États-Unis Dressage Christilot (Hanson) Boylen et Anklang Bonny Chesson (Bonnello) et Satchmo Eva—Maria Pracht et Little Joe Médailles en individuel Or : Reiner Klimke et Ahlerich, Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : Anne Grethe Jensen et Marzog, Danemark Bronze : Otto Hofer et Limandus, Suisse Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : Suisse Bronze : Suède Saut d’obstacles Ian Millar et Big Ben Hugh Graham et Elrond James Elder et Shawline Mario Deslauriers et Aramis Médailles en individuel Or : Joseph Fargis et Touch of Class, États-Unis Argent : Conrad Homfeld et Abdullah, États-Unis

54 www.equinecanada.ca

Bronze : Heidi Robbiani et Jessica V, Suisse 4e position : MARIO DESLAURIERS ET ARAMIS Médailles en équipe Or : États-Unis Argent : Grande-Bretagne Bronze : Allemagne de l’Ouest Concours complet de trois jours Kelly Plitz et Dialadream Edie Tarves et Mandrake Martha Griggs et Jack the Lad Liz Ashton et Ossian Médailles en individuel Or : Mark Todd et Charisma, NouvelleZélande Argent : Karen Stives et Ben Arthur, États-Unis Bronze : Virginia Holgate et Priceless, Grande-Bretagne Médailles en équipe Or : États-Unis Argent : Grande-Bretagne Bronze : Allemagne de l’Ouest

1988 – SÉOUL, CORÉE Dressage Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy et Dynasty Eva—Maria Pracht et Emirage Gina Smith* et Malte Ashley Nicoll (Holzer) et Reipo *Chef d’équipe olympique de 2012 (dressage) Médailles en individuel Or : Nicole Uphoff et Rembrandt, Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : Margit Otto et Crépin et Corlandus, France Bronze : Christine Stueckelberger et Gauguin de Lully CH, Suisse Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : Suisse Bronze : CANADA Saut d’obstacles Ian Millar et Big Ben Lauran Balisky et Lavendel 48 Lisa Carlsen et Kahlua Mario Deslauriers et Box Car Willie Médailles en individuel Or : Pierre Durand jr et Jappeloup, France Argent : Greg Best et Gem Twist, ÉtatsUnis Bronze : Karsten Huck et Nepomuk 8, Allemagne de l’Ouest Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : États-Unis

Bronze : France 4e position : CANADA Concours complet de trois jours Nicholas Holmes—Smith et Espionage Mary Tudor et Sparrow Hawk II Médailles en individuel Or : Mark Todd et Charisma, NouvelleZélande Argent : Ian Stark et Sir Wattie, GrandeBretagne Bronze : Virginia Leng et Master Craftsman, Grande-Bretagne Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne de l’Ouest Argent : Grande-Bretagne Bronze : Nouvelle-Zélande

1992 – Barcelone, Espagne Dressage Christilot (Hanson) Boylen et Biraldo Martina Pracht et Emirage Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy et Dakar Médailles en individuel Or : Nicole Uphoff et Rembrandt, Allemagne Argent : Isabell Werth et Gigolo, Allemagne Bronze : Klaus Balkenhol et Goldstern, Allemagne Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Pays-Bas Bronze : États-Unis Saut d’obstacles Beth Underhill et Monopoly Jennifer Foster et Zeus Jay Hayes et Zucarlos Ian Millar et Big Ben Médailles en individuel Or : Ludger Beerbaum et Classic Touch, Allemagne Argent : Piet Raijmakers et Ratina Z, Pays-Bas Bronze : Norman Dello Joio et Irish, États-Unis Médailles en équipe Or : Pays-Bas Argent : Autriche Bronze : France Concours complet de trois jours Stuart Black et Von Perrier Nick Holmes—Smith et Sir Lancelot Rachel Hunter et King Plantagenet Rob Stevenson et Risky Business Médailles en individuel Or : Matthew Ryan et Kibah Tic Toc, Australie


| SPORT |

Argent : Herbert Blöcker et Feine Dame, Allemagne Bronze : Blyth Tait et Messiah, NouvelleZélande Médailles en équipe Or : Australie Argent : Nouvelle-Zélande Bronze : Allemagne

1996 – Atlanta, États-Unis Dressage Evi Strasser et Lavinia Leonie Bramall et Gilbona Gina Smith et Faust Médailles en individuel Or : Isabell Werth et Gigolo, Allemagne Argent : Anky van Grunsven et Bonfire, Pays-Bas Bronze : Sven Rothenberger et Weyden, Pays-Bas Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Pays-Bas Bronze : États-Unis Sports para-équestres Gregory Honour Karine Meador Margaret Payne Maria Simpson Saut d’obstacles Mac Cone et Elute Christopher Delia et Silent Sam Ian Millar et Play It Again Linda Southern et Heathcott et Advantage Chrysler Médailles en individuel Or : Ulrich Kirchhoff et Jus De Pommes, Allemagne Argent : Wilhelm Melliger et Calvaro, Suisse Bronze : Alexandra Ledermann et Rochet M, France Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : États-Unis Bronze : Brésil Concours complet de trois jours Médailles en individuel Or : Blyth Tait et Ready Teddy, NouvelleZélande Argent : Sally Clark et Squirrel Hill, Nouvelle-Zélande Bronze : Kerry Millikin et Out and About, États-Unis Médailles en équipe Or : Australie Argent : États-Unis Bronze : Nouvelle-Zélande

Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de 2000, Sydney, Australie Dressage Médailles en individuel Or : Anky van Grunsven et Bonfire, PaysBas Argent : Isabell Werth et Gigolo, Allemagne Bronze : Ulla Salzgeber et Rusty, Allemagne Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Pays-Bas Bronze : États-Unis Saut d’obstacles Jonathan Asselin et Spirit of Xerox Jay Hayes et Diva Ian Millar et Dorincord John Pearce et Vagabond Médailles en individuel Or : Jeroen Dubbeldam et De Sjiem, Pays-Bas Argent : Albert Voorn et Lando, Pays-Bas Bronze : Khaled Al Eid et Khashm Al Aan, Arabie saoudite Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Suisse Bronze : Brésil Concours complet de trois jours Médailles en individuel Or : David O’Connor* et Custom Made, États-Unis *Chef d’équipe olympique pour le Canada en 2012 (concours complet) Argent : Andrew Hoy et Swizzle In, Australie Bronze : Mark Todd et Eyespy II, Nouvelle-Zélande Médailles en équipe Or : Australie Argent : Grande-Bretagne Bronze : États-Unis

Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de 2004, Athènes, Grèce Dressage Leslie Reid et Mark Cynthia (Neale) Ishoy et Proton Belinda Trussell et Royan II Ashley Holzer et Imperioso Médailles en individuel Or : Anky van Grunsven et Salinero, Pays-Bas

Argent : Ulla Salzgeber et Rusty, Allemagne Bronze : Beatriz Ferrer et Salat et Beauvalais, Espagne Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Espagne Bronze : États-Unis Sports para-équestres Dax Adam et Copper Rose Lauren Barwick et Dior Karen Brain et Dasskara Judi Island et Whirlwind Médailles en individuel (catégorie IV) Or : Ann Cathrin Lubbe et Zanko Argent : Philippa Johnson et Burgmans Benedict, Afrique du Sud BRONZE : KAREN BRAIN ET DASSKARA, CANADA Médailles en individuel (catégorie IV en reprise libre) Or : Ann Cathrin Lubbe et Zanko Argent : Philippa Johnson et Burgmans Benedict, Afrique du Sud BRONZE : KAREN BRAIN ET DASSKARA, CANADA Saut d’obstacles Ian Millar et Promise Me Médailles en individuel Or : Rodrigo Pessoa et Baloubet du Rouet, Brésil Argent : Chris Kappler et Royal Kaliber, États-Unis Bronze : Marco Kutscher et Montender 2, Allemagne Médailles en équipe Or : États-Unis Argent : Suède Bronze : Allemagne Concours complet de trois jours Hawley Bennett et Livingstone Bruce Mandeville et Larissa Ian Roberts et Mata—Riki Garry Roque et Waikura Michael Winter et Balista Médailles en individuel Or : Leslie Law et Shear L’Eau, GrandeBretagne Argent : Kimberly Severson et Winsome Adante, États-Unis Bronze : Pippa Funnell et Primmore’s Pride, Grande-Bretagne Médailles en équipe Or : France Argent : Grande-Bretagne Bronze : États-Unis

equinecanada June | July 2012 55


| SPORT |

Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de 2008, Pékin, Chine Dressage Ashley Holzer et Pop Art Jacqueline Brooks et Gran Gesto Leslie Reid et Orion Médailles en individuel Or : Anky van Grunsven et Salinero, Pays-Bas Argent : Isabell Werth et Satchmo, Allemagne Eric Lamaze et Hickstead (© Cealy Tetley)

Bronze : Heike Kemmer et Bonaparte, Allemagne Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Pays-Bas Bronze : Danemark Sports para-équestres Lauren Barwick et Maile Eleanore Elstone et Lutke Ashley Gowanlock et Donnymaskell Jennifer McKenzie et Valentine II Médailles en individuel

OR : LAUREN BARWICK ET MAILE, CANADA – catégorie II : reprise libre en individuel ARGENT : LAUREN BARWICK ET MAILE, CANADA – catégorie II : en individuel Saut d’obstacles Éric Lamaze et Hickstead Jill Henselwood et Special Ed Ian Millar et In Style Mac Cone et Ole Médailles en individuel OR : ÉRIC LAMAZE ET HICKSTEAD, CANADA Argent : Rolf-Göran Bengtsson et Ninja, Suède Bronze : Beezie Madden et Authentic, États-Unis Médailles en équipe Or : États-Unis ARGENT : CANADA Bronze : Suisse Concours complet de trois jours Sandra Donnelly et Buenos Aires Kyle Carter et Madison Park Selena O’Hanlon et Columbo Michael Winter et Kingpin Samantha Taylor et Livewire Médailles en individuel Or : Hinrich Romeike et Marius, Allemagne Argent : Gina Miles et McKinlaigh, États-Unis Bronze : Kristina Cook et Miners Frolic, GrandeBretagne Médailles en équipe Or : Allemagne Argent : Australie Bronze : Grande-Bretagne

Sources Equestrian Sport at the Olympic Games 1912-2008, Max E. Amman; International Three-day Event: Results & Records From 1912, Rhydain Wynn-Williams; The Complete Book of the Olympics, David Wallenchinsky; Canadian International Equestrians, Zita Barbara May; les archives de la FEI et de Canada Hippique.

56 www.equinecanada.ca


| SPORT |

Des chevaux en route vers les Jeux olympiques de 2012 Gustav, le cheval de James Atkinson, à son arrivée aux Jeux panaméricains de Mexico en 2011. Photo : Kerri McGregor

equinecanada June | July 2012 57


| SPORT |

Lancement du programme de certification des entraîneurs spécialisés en compétition d’équitation classique

Pour être admissible à la certification, le candidat doit : • posséder de l’expérience en compétition; • être âgé d’au moins 20 ans en date du 1er janvier de l’année courante; • détenir une licence sportive de Canada Hippique (adhésion) et une adhésion provinciale en règle.

Un nouveau programme de certification des entraîneurs tout à fait passionnant est maintenant offert aux entraîneurs en équitation classique au Canada. Ce programme, destiné aux entraîneurs spécialisés en compétition, est conçu pour les personnes qui travaillent avec des cavaliers intermédiaires ou plus avancés afin d’améliorer leurs techniques de base à cheval, leurs connaissances équestres et leurs compétences en matière de sécurité, dans l’objectif de porter leur expérience compétitive de l’échelon provincial à l’échelon national.

L’acquisition d’une certification exige de franchir les étapes suivantes : • Fournir un exemple de plan de leçon et de plan annuel d’entraînement; • Participer à une évaluation d’une journée avec deux évaluateurs, où les capacités du candidat à enseigner sont évaluées dans le cadre d’une leçon. • Subir une évaluation des capacités à enseigner dans le cadre d’un concours.

« Le programme de spécialisation est très important car il comble une lacune entre l’entraîneur de compétition et celui de haute performance », explique Grant Field, président du comité national de Formation des entraîneurs et maître évaluateur. « Il est parfait pour l’entraîneur anciennement de niveau 2 mais qui était spécialiste et non généraliste et qui, par conséquent, n’a jamais pu obtenir sa certification. Ce programme est totalement nouveau et il répondra davantage aux besoins de la communauté. »

« Le programme de certification des entraîneurs spécialisés en compétition veille à ce que les professionnels de l’enseignement valorisent les normes nationales d’enseignement, la sécurité et des connaissances équestres de qualité », souligne Gillian Ross Erasmi, coordonnatrice de la formation à la Fédération équestre de l’Ontario.

« Il s’agit d’un point de départ pour devenir un entraîneur spécialiste dans votre discipline à un niveau très accessible; dorénavant, l’entraîneur peut présenter directement une demande de participation au programme si celui-ci correspond à son expérience. Il n’a pas à franchir tous les niveaux précédents d’entraîneur », ajoute-t-il. « Je suis très fier du comité de Formation des entraîneurs d’équitation classique, qui a enfin finalisé cette dernière étape du processus de formation des entraîneurs de compétition. Nous avons créé d’intéressantes perspectives pour les athlètes et pour les entraîneurs qui les guident. » De plus, l’entraîneur spécialisé en compétition sera certifié pour évaluer un cheval et si celui-ci convient à un élève, pour superviser les opérations et la routine d’une écurie et pour démontrer son expérience en entraînement et préparation d’un cheval pour la compétition. Les candidats seront spécialistes d’une seule discipline, mais ils devront tout de même être à l’aise dans toutes les disciplines d’équitation classique.

58 www.equinecanada.ca

« Nous avons fièrement travaillé en collaboration avec Canada Hippique afin de développer la formation nécessaire au lancement du programme pour les entraîneurs spécialisés en compétition, et notamment gérer divers projets pilotes de formation lesquels étaient exigés pour obtenir l’approbation du programme par l’Association canadienne des entraîneurs. Les nombreuses personnes dévouées, qui ont consacré leur temps et leurs compétences à cette démarche, doivent absolument être remerciées. » « Une formation de qualité est cruciale pour le sport équestre et le programme de formation des entraîneurs. Cette nouvelle formule accroît l’accessibilité des personnes qui entraînent les cavaliers depuis leurs tout débuts jusqu’au niveau d’élite », conclut Ross Erasmi. Les renseignements complets sur le programme de certification des entraîneurs spécialisés en compétition d’équitation classique sont publiés sur le site Web de Canada Hippique sous Formation des entraîneurs – Pour devenir entraîneur certifié.


1,000 Bonus AIR MILES®† reward miles!

OR

400 Bonus AIR MILES reward miles!

How can I reward myself and support the equine industry? Get the BMO® Equine Canada Gold AIR MILES MasterCard®* and you’ll earn 1,000 Bonus reward miles on your first card purchase1 – enough for a return short-haul flight2! Or get the no fee BMO Equine Canada AIR MILES MasterCard and you’ll earn 400 Bonus reward miles on your first card purchase1 – enough for movie tickets, a gift card or the latest merchandise3.

Hurry! Bonus AIR MILES reward miles offer ends August 31, 2012. Apply online at bmo.com/getmycard/en/equine

1. Bonus offer is limited to new accounts and is awarded after your first BMO AIR MILES MasterCard purchase. Applications must be received by August 31, 2012. Limit one Bonus offer per Account. The Bonus reward miles will be applied to your Collector account within 45 days after your first card purchase. If you cancel your card within 30 days of opening your account and your annual fee is rebated, the Bonus AIR MILES will be cancelled. 2. A short-haul flight is a return flight with origin and destination within the same province having a departure date during low season of Jan. 8–Feb. 28; Apr. 1–May 31; Sept. 16–Dec. 15. All Rewards offered are subject to the Terms and Conditions of the AIR MILES Reward Program, are subject to change and may be withdrawn without notice. Some restrictions apply. To redeem for Travel Rewards, you must have accumulated sufficient AIR MILES reward miles in your Dream Balance. Collectors must pay taxes, fuel surcharges and other applicable charges and fees on air travel Rewards. Travel Rewards may be subject to a minimum advance booking and availability from participating Suppliers. For complete details, see current Program Terms and Conditions available at airmiles.ca or call the AIR MILES Customer Care Centre at 1-888-AIR MILES (in Toronto 416-226-5171). 3. Merchandise Rewards include all taxes, shipping and handling costs. All Rewards offered are subject to the Terms and Conditions of the AIR MILES Reward Program, are subject to change and may be withdrawn without notice. Quantities may be limited and some restrictions may apply. No cancellations, exchanges or refunds for tickets, certificates or merchandise once booked or ordered. See www.airmiles.ca for details. Manufacturers warranties apply to merchandise Rewards. ™/® Trade-marks/registered trade-marks of Bank of Montreal. ™*/®* Trade-marks/registered trade-marks of MasterCard International Incorporated. ™†/®† Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Bank of Montreal.


Let Omega Alpha

WIN YOU OVER Find out just how much better your horse can be on our health and performance formulas.

Effective Supplements Through Science

We guarantee you will be pleased or your money back.

"We had our pleasure horses on Sinew-X this past winter. There was a noticeable improvement in their movement and performance when they were started back in work this spring. I am sure this product would be valuable in enhancing the athleticism and well-being of any horse." Terrance Millar

Tip of the Day:

Sinew-X promotes sounder joints, muscles & ligaments. 30ml daily is all your horse needs. Try 30ml post workout for better recovery.

Betsy and Terrance (Torchy) Millar Photo: Shannon Smith

www.OmegaAlphaEquine.com Proudly Canadian

Canada 1-800-651-3172 • USA 1-877-436-1221 Visit our website at www.OmegaAlpha.ca to view our wide range of human and pet health products.


Equine Canada Magazine June/July 2012