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EHS • SPRING 2011

Non-Profit Organization

THE MAGAZINE OF EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL • Spring 2011

www.episcopalhighschool.org

Change Service Requested

REUNION

2011

JUNE 10 AND 11

Board Chairman John Townsend ’73 A Decade of Board Leadership

RETURN TO EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL Reunion 2011 will be held June 10 and 11 for the Classes of 1956, 1961, 1966, 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006.

Episcopal’s Chapel Talks CAM PAI G N U PDATE:

Inspire! A Celebration of Academics at EHS


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The Roll Call Makes it Possible Each year, Episcopal alumni, parents, and friends give generously to the Roll Call, the School’s annual fund. Because of their support, students are able to enjoy the wide variety of opportunities offered at EHS, allowing them to live, learn, and grow in a place that is like no other. Gifts to the EHS Roll Call affect each student on a daily basis. Last year, the Roll Call helped purchase: • New books and online databases in the library • New roof and carpeting for Callaway Chapel • New digital cameras for student photographers • Uniforms, equipment, travel, and tournament fees for athletic teams • Dorm improvements, including new laundry systems, carpeting, and dorm snacks • Approximately 375,000 meals served in Laird Dining Hall

Your gift makes a difference. Support Episcopal by: • Sending a check • Donating online via Episcopal’s secure website: www.EHSRollCall.org • Calling toll-free at 877-EHS-1839

______________________________________ For more information about the Roll Call, please contact: Elizabeth Woodcock, Director of Annual Giving 1200 N. Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302 Phone: 703-933-4148 E-mail: rollcall@episcopalhighschool.org www.episcopalhighschool.org

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MS GRA PRO PHOTOGRAPHY

MUSICAL THEATER

Is Unlike A Day Anywhere Else...

SUMMER

A Day At Episcopal

MATH AND SCIENCE

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

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2011

LEADERSHIP LANGUAGE YOUNG Be a part of the Episcopal High School WRITERS experience this summer, as a day or overnight

EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL

student. These special summer programs offer students entering grades seven through nine the opportunity to enjoy days and nights on Episcopal’s campus, learning from exceptional teachers and alongside talented peers.

YOUNG WRITERS WORKSHOP June 26-30, 2011 BROADWAY BOUND MUSICAL THEATER CAMP June 26-30, 2011 FIELD EXPERIENCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE June 26 – July 1, 2011 EHS LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE July 10-14, 2011 For additional information, please contact: Damian Walsh Director of Summer Programs summer@episcopalhighschool.org Episcopal High School 1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302

FUN WITH MATH AND SCIENCE July 11-15, 2011 July 18-22, 2011 DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY: A CRASH COURSE IN PHOTOGRAPHIC PRACTICE July 17-24, 2011 THE LANGUAGE CAMPS AT EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL July 24-28, 2011

REGISTER ONLINE To register for the Episcopal High School 2011 Summer Programs, just visit

www.episcopalhighschool.org/ summerprograms


the magazine of episcopal high school volume 63, no. 1 • spring 2011

A CELEBRATION OF ACADEMICS AT EHS

A CELEBRATION OF ACADEMICS AT EHS

One significant project remains: the renovation of the 24 Academic West Wing, an important building on campus housing the English and Social Studies departments.

The EHS Promise is an $85 million campaign that aspires to strengthen the core of the Episcopal experience. Our alumni reflect that their character, their qualities of integrity, honor, and trust, were nurtured and honed during their years at EHS. Today, we strive to deliver these indelible standards in all aspects of school life, so that tomorrow’s alumni, too, have the strength and comfort that such a firm foundation provides. We invite all alumni, parents, and friends to help Episcopal fulfill The Promise and be part of the great tradition of stewardship that has enabled this institution to pursue excellence in all areas of school life for generations.

A CELEBRATION OF ACADEMICS AT EHS

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To learn more about The Promise, including opportunities for recognition of unrestricted capital gifts, please call, write, or e-mail:

Contents

THE EHS PROMISE CAMPAIGN

ROBERT C. ECKERT

Episcopal High School 1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302 Toll free at 877-EHS-1839

Director of Development 703-933-4056 RCE@episcopalhighschool.org

or go to www.episcopalhighschool.org/thepromise

highlights of this issue 24

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A Decade of Board Leadership Honoring the dedication of Board Chairman John L. Townsend III ’73

From the Headmaster

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U.S. Postage Pa i d alexandria, Va

The Magazine of episcopal high school • Spring 2011

Change Service Requested

Reunion

2011

June 10 and 11

37

In Memoriam

Board Chairman John Townsend ’73 A Decade of Board Leadership

RetuRn to episcopal HigH scHool Reunion 2011 will be held June 10 and 11 for the Classes of 1956, 1961, 1966, 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006.

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Class Notes

On the cover: Board Chairman John Townsend ’73 with the members of his 2010 Diamond Acre Trip climbing group. From left: Clarence Clanton ’12, Corina Benitz ’11, Quinn Caslow ’12, and Townsend.

ehs • Spring 2011

Non-Profit Organization

Permit No. 105

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Around Campus

Chapel Talks A look at the chapel talks that inspire the EHS community The EHS Promise Campaign priorities focus on the Academic West Wing

1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302 703-933-3000 1-877-EHS-1839

departments

Episcopal’s Chapel Talks ca m pa i g n u p dat e :

Inspire! A Celebration of Academics at EHS 4/4/11 1:11 PM

Episcopal High School admits students of any race, gender, color, sexual orientation, and national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students. EHS does not discriminate in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship programs, or other School-administered programs.

Headmaster: Rob Hershey Director of Development: Bob Eckert Director of Communications: Christina Holt Editor: Kathy Howe Contributing Editors: Rebecca Carelli-Sennett, Christi Wieand Class Notes: Elizabeth Watts Cover Photography: Elizabeth Watts Photography: Elizabeth Watts, Bill Denison, Michael Gunselman Printing and Design: Fannon Fine Printing, LLC

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Published by Episcopal High School for alumni, parents, grandparents, and friends of Episcopal High School. © 2011, Episcopal High School Please send address corrections to: Alumni Office Episcopal High School 1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302 or by e-mail to dwr@episcopalhighschool.org


From the Headmaster

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We launched a fresh round ne of the delights of of strategic planning for EHS my career choice to during this school year. This engage in the life of schools is process, led by the Board and the wonderful rhythm of the actively supported by the facschool year and the seasonality ulty, will once again identify that so significantly impacts priorities and goals for the our shared lives. It is exciting School’s future. Having added to be a part of campus life in so many significant facilities the spring, with students and over the last decade, this round faculty alike greeting the new of planning will focus more hopes and possibilities that Headmaster Rob Hershey holds a lunch meeting with the Senior Monitors, including Connor Gallegos ’11 (left) and Shantell Bingham ’11. specifically on “people and arrive with the season. Spring programs” – academics, student life, faculty, and teaching. This is integral to the idealism of a school community, and there is no is a fascinating process, calling first for us to identify those place in the world better than Virginia and EHS to experience it! “essentials” that distinguish the uniqueness of EHS. It always In this same seasonal theme, the EHS community now bids starts with the centrality of the Honor Code, the importance adieu to the incredible Board leadership of John Townsend ’73. of the chapel program and spiritual development, and the comHis decade of service as chairman of the EHS Board has been mitment to maintain and support the faculty, who are so vital remarkable, evident in virtually all aspects of school life. During to each student’s experience. As a part of our strategic planning his tenure, there has been a dramatic increase in applications for effort, we researched the original mission statement of the School enrollment; he led two critical rounds of strategic planning, calling and subsequent revisions through the years. The old adage, “the for transformation of the School’s facilities; and he spearheaded more things change, the more they stay the same,” absolutely two major capital campaigns, resulting in gifts totaling $170 fits at EHS, and this is what uniquely defines our School – our million, and presided over a 60 percent growth in the School’s clarity of mission. endowment. Most importantly, however, he brought thoughtfulI consider my leadership role at EHS to be one of holding the ness and devotion to every issue, establishing an atmosphere of institution in trust, to ensure that we keep the School true to its trust and confidence as the foundation for everything we do. The purpose, which strives to strengthen the delivery of our mission Board announced its intention to nominate Bailey Patrick ’79 to our students. As we keep our focus on preparing students and to succeed John as chairman. Bailey has served as a member of program for the future, we will work hard in the coming year to the Board for six years and is known to virtually everyone in the complete the exciting $85 million campaign, The EHS Promise. EHS family. He and his wife, Mimi, have served the School in Thanks to all of you who have done so much to advance and myriad ways, not the least of which is entrusting the education support EHS. Best wishes for a glorious spring! of their children, Bailey ’11, Wells ’12, and Carter ’14, to us!

Sincerely,

F. Robertson Hershey Headmaster


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Around Campus Three Attend Lecture Series, “Viral Outbreak: The Science of Emerging Disease”

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n Dec. 2 and 3, EHS students Ross Higgins ’12, Julian Lockhart ’12, and Bailey Thomas ’11 attended the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s 2010 Holiday Lectures on Science. This year’s topic was “Viral Outbreak: The Science of Emerging Disease.” The lectures were delivered by Dr. Joseph DeRisi, an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a biochemistry and biophysics professor at the University of California, and Dr. Eva Harris, president of the Sustainable Sciences Institute and professor of infectious diseases at the University of California - Berkeley. DeRisi discussed the diversity of viruses and new sequencing techniques, including the ViroChip, a DNA microarray that can be used to detect and identify new viruses. Harris described dengue fever, a rapidly emerging viral disease that has spread through Central America and into the United States, and the ways in which she uses molecular biology and field work to study and fight this virus. “The lecture series offered an exciting supplement to the work we’ve been doing in AP Biology class this year. It

From left: Ross Higgins ’12, Bailey Thomas ’11, and Julian Lockhart ’12 with their AP Biology teacher, Joe Halm.

was thrilling to see the concepts that we have been studying applied to research in the field, which is literally changing people’s lives,” said Bailey Thomas ’11. “I really enjoyed the opportunity to meet the two keynote speakers: Joseph DeRisi and Eva Harris. They both provided an engaging example of successful biologists who are not only at the top of their

respective fields, but who are also so passionately dedicated to biology. I was especially impressed with Harris’ ability to blend her viral research and academic interests with social policy. Hearing about her research in Central America, coupled with her personal involvement in the rural communities where she conducts her studies was truly inspirational and encouraging.” n

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Touring Company Brings Shakespeare to Campus

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his January, the American Shakespeare Center on Tour brought the Bard’s work to life on the stage in Pendleton Hall. The company of actors, the touring arm of the American Shakespeare Center and the Blackfriars Playhouse in Staunton, Va., visited Episcopal as part of their 201011 Restless Ecstasy Tour. On Jan. 19, the troupe staged “Macbeth” for Episcopal’s students and faculty, and on Jan. 20, they put on a performance of “Measure for Measure” that was open to the public. Both plays were presented in the original staging conditions, using simple sets and keeping the house and stage lights on throughout the performance so that actors and audience use the same light. “The performances were unlike any Shakespeare plays I had seen,” said Maria Cox ’11. “Their inclusion of modern songs set the tone thematically for each play, whether the tone was creepy (‘Macbeth’) or bacchanal

(‘Measure for Measure’). The company’s use of constant light and lack of scene changes also gave insight for the audience to how one of Shakespeare’s plays might have been viewed in its original performance: on a minimalist stage with no lighting changes whatsoever.” All of Episcopal’s students attended this event in lieu of the annual trip each class takes to watch a performance of the Shakespeare play their class studied that year. For example, each student reads “Macbeth” as part of their sophomore English studies. “We invited the American Shakespeare Center to campus in order for the entire community, students and faculty, to share the experience of watching professional theater,” said Mason New, chair of the English Department. “Since all students read ‘Macbeth’ in the sophomore year, it made great sense to feature a play that three of our grades had studied. ASC also held workshops for many of our students to understand the

The American Shakespeare Center on Tour performed “Measure for Measure,” starring Kelley McKinnon as the prostitute and Dennis Henry as the pimp, in Pendleton Hall this January. (Photo by Michael Bailey.)

complicated themes – ambition, greed, jealousy, duty, and honor – depicted in the play.” n

Gallery Opening: “Ron Lambert, Sculpture and Digital Works”

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rom Feb. 14 through April 4, Episcopal welcomed the exhibition “Ron Lambert, Sculpture and Digital Works” to the Angie Newman Johnson Gallery in the Ainslie Arts Center. The show combined physical artwork with digital, audio, and video projection pieces, some of which invited interaction with the viewer. “Culture aims its efforts toward a sense of perfection. I see this in how we construct the landscape: by making it manicured we believe it is under control. The more we try to force our environment into submission, the more we are faced with the futility of imposing a system,” wrote Lambert in his artist’s statement. “My work is an attempt at beauty and perfection that understands the failure of that effort. I equate it to the way in which we start a process and once we are invested in it we find a problem. Instead of starting over and admitting the idea was unsuccessful, we put a patch over the issue. We start putting patches on patches and after a while the process is more about the attempts to repair than the original goal. In the end, it might be the patches are more beautiful than the goal of the original plan.” Lambert is an assistant professor at Watkins College of Art and Design. He has had other solo exhibitions in Nashville, Tenn., Lexington, Ky., and Seattle, Wash., and he has been a part of group exhibitions across the country. n

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Each of the images in Ron Lambert’s piece “Stopping Smell” was taken in Alfred, N.Y., at temperatures so cold that humans lose their sense of smell.


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Students Present “Ferdinand the Bull,” a Theatrical Reading and Recital B O R D E R S B E N E F I T D AY P RO G R A M S U P P O RT S T H E E H S S E RV I C E C O U N C I L ' S G R E E N E N E RG Y I N I T I AT I V E

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n Feb. 5, students and faculty from the Episcopal Arts Department presented a special theatrical reading and recital of the classic children’s story “Ferdinand the Bull,” by Munro Leaf, at a Borders bookstore in Arlington, Va. Chuck Leonard, Episcopal’s theater director, narrated the story, while theater students Abby Halm ’13, Lauren Johnson ’14, and Liz Spoehel ’14 acted out scenes from the story. Episcopal piano students, under the direction of EHS piano instructor Liz Lane, performed pieces by Spanish composers, inserting music into the reading to reflect the emotions of the story. A beautiful mural painted by Eunice Mok ’13, Evelyn Patlan ’12, Holly Reynolds ’13, and Kaitlyn Ugoretz ’13, members of Episcopal’s Student Association for Visual Arts, provided scenery for the performance. This event was held in conjunction with Borders Benefit Days, a program designed to support schools, libraries, nonprofits, and charitable organizations. EHS community members nationwide were provided with a special Borders coupon voucher for use with purchases on Feb. 5 or 6 at any Borders bookstore or Borders.com. A portion of the proceeds from purchases made with these vouchers was donated to the School to support the EHS Service Council’s green energy initiative. The goal of the green energy initiative is to supply Episcopal’s partner school, the Moding School in Amogoro, Kenya,

EHS Theater Director Chuck Leonard (center) narrated the story of “Ferdinand the Bull,” which was acted out by theater students Liz Spoehel ’14, Abby Halm ’13, and Lauren Johnson ’14 (seated). They were accompanied by EHS piano students, including Frances Ainsworth ’11 (pictured).

with reliable free energy through EHS-student-made solar panels. These panels will enhance Moding’s technology and lighting, thereby improving students’ study. “It was truly a gift to be able to perform in such a uniquely informal setting, among children that is, and to be able to perform with the knowledge that each note being played would have a direct, very tangible impact on the tale being read. The children’s animated reactions to the performance were a breath of fresh air that brought smiles to everyone’s faces and made

the experience deeply memorable,” said Episcopal piano student Wonhee Lim ’12. “For me, the appeal of creating the ‘Ferdinand the Bull’ story and recital program was having the chance to combine talented EHS student pianists, actors, and artists together in a community service project,” said Liz Lane, Episcopal piano instructor. “Being involved in the Borders Benefit Day program and reaching out to Episcopal’s Kenya partner school was a magical bonus. With a little teamwork, everyone comes out a winner.” n

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Episcopal Students Attend Regional and National Conferences

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his winter, groups of Episcopal students had the opportunity to expand their on-campus classroom studies by attending three regional and national conferences. Student Diversity Leadership Conference An EHS delegation of six students, including Marina Barsoum ’12, Taylor Kelly ’12, Marie Thomas ’13, Jonathan Pryor ’13, Clarence Clanton ’12, and Foster Joseph ’12, accompanied by three EHS faculty members, joined the nearly 1,500 high school students from across the country who met in San Diego, Calif., from Dec. 2-4, 2010, to discuss issues of diversity and equality at the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) Student Diversity Leadership Conference (SDLC). Held annually, SDLC is a multiracial, multicultural gathering of student leaders in grades 9 through 12 and focuses on selfreflecting, forming alliances, and building community. Through intense training and group sessions on cross-cultural communication skills, effective strategies for social justice, networking principles, and expression through arts, the students were taught how to be better leaders and spokespersons for issues of diversity and justice in their school. “In those two days, I learned not only the language of power, but also that I can make a difference. We learned that it takes one person to start a reaction, and that the first follower is just as important, because he turns that one person into a leader. I never thought it was possible to form a family bond with 50 plus kids in just two days, but I did and was able to learn from all of them. My group taught me that the cycle of oppression is never ending and must be stopped. Anyone can stop it, and it starts with one person,” said Foster Joseph ’12. D.C. High School Diversity Leadership Conference In February, six EHS students attended the D.C. High School Diversity

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2010 NAIS Student Diversity Leadership Conference attendees and faculty chaperones include: (left to right) math teacher Dave Collins, social studies teacher Rachael Flores, Marie Thomas ’13, Jonathan Pryor ’13, Marina Barsoum ’12, Clarence Clanton ’12, Taylor Kelly ’12, visual arts teacher David Douglas, and Foster Joseph ’12.

Leadership Conference, which drew public, charter, and independent high school students from Philadelphia, Pa., to Richmond, Va. EHS attendees included Jasmine Jones ’11, Aliyah Griffith ’11, Nyantee Asherman ’11, Rashawn Ince ’12, Nicoya Taylor ’13, and Taylor Kelly ’12. Carolyn Lewis, Episcopal’s dean of multicultural affairs, accompanied the students to the conference. The conference theme was “Looks Can Be Deceiving: Appearance vs. Reality,” with the goal to engage students in authentic dialogue about the ever-changing notion of diversity. Conference highlights included ice breakers about current events, case studies in small groups, and questionand-answer sessions with distinguished panel guests. Students also had a unique opportunity to network with groups from other schools and to establish new friendships around the topic of diversity. National Clean Technology Outlook Conference Episcopal science teacher Ashley McDowell accompanied six science students, including Maria Cox ’11, Lanier Olsson ’11, Sarah Hulbert ’11,

Jasmine Jones ’11, Reid Nickle ’11, and Amanda Acquaire ’11, to the National Clean Technology Outlook Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., the first major clean technology event of 2011 organized by The Clean Technology Leadership Forum. Bringing together congressional, agency, military, and business leaders, the conference highlighted the latest projections on clean technology funding in 2011; program priorities of the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency; clean energy federal contracting opportunities; clean energy and environmental clean-up priorities; and national and international environmental clean-up business opportunities. “It was incredible to be in the same room as different environmental leaders explained their present successes and future plans to one another. The presentation by the U.S. naval officer was the most fascinating to me. I didn’t know that almost all U.S. naval operations use some kind of biofuel or nuclear power to augment traditional fuel usage. Our armed forces are very environmentally conscious, which is so impressive,” said Maria Cox ’11. n


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EHS Students Learn About a Different Type of Intelligence

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n Jan. 6, honors government students in EHS social studies teacher Peter Goodnow’s class experienced a lesson they will not soon forget from two very special guests. During a Wednesday tour period, Goodnow’s students met with Episcopal parent Bob Deitz and his close friend and former boss, Gen. Michael Hayden, to review and discuss a class project on intelligence gathering. Deitz, the father of Alex ’12 and Nick ’14, is currently a distinguished visiting professor and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) officer-in-residence at the George Mason University School of Public Policy. From 2006 to 2009, Deitz served as senior councillor to Hayden, the director of the CIA. Appointed by President George W. Bush in 2006, Hayden served as the director of the CIA until his retirement in 2009. Previously, he served as the principal deputy director of National Intelligence, the first person ever to serve in that position, and as the director of the National Security Agency. Goodnow created a fictional scenario for his students to analyze prior to their meeting with Hayden and Deitz. The students analyzed the situation, conducted research, asked questions, documented their findings, and came to a projected conclusion regarding the scenario. During the days prior to the visit, the class summarized their findings and conclusion in a final report that was sent to Hayden and Deitz to review prior to their visit to campus. Deitz and Hayden joined the honors government class in Bryan Library for an afternoon discussion. Commending the class on their report, the visitors engaged the government students in discussions, posing questions and presenting them with additional viewpoints. The guests also discussed their own backgrounds in intelligence gathering, giving the students an in-depth view and greater understanding of the intelligence field in real-world practice.

Gen. Michael Hayden (right), former director of the CIA, visited campus with Bob Deitz (left) to speak to Episcopal’s honors government students. They are pictured with Deitz’s son, Nick ’14, and daughter, Alex ’12.

“Meeting the former director of the CIA, Gen. Hayden, and Mr. Deitz was a true privilege. I enjoyed learning about their experiences in the NSA and CIA, plus their advice on our fictional scenarios that we made in class. There is no better way to learn about foreign policy than talking to the professionals who have made it to the top,” said Amaury Dujardin ’11.

“It’s meetings like this that can make the EHS experience truly special. I believe our students are empowered intellectually by having real-world experts like Gen. Hayden and Mr. Deitz comment substantively on work they completed in class. For some, it may even motivate them to eventually seek out a career in public service,” remarked Goodnow. n

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Rep. John Lewis, Civil Rights Leader, Visits Campus

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n Feb. 28, the Episcopal community welcomed Rep. John Lewis, civil rights leader and the representative from Georgia’s 5th Congressional District, to Pendleton Hall. He was first elected to the U.S. Congress in 1986, and he has served continuously since then. He is currently senior chief deputy whip for the Democratic Party in the House. Lewis has received more than 50 honorary degrees from colleges and universities, as well as numerous awards for his civil rights work, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. Non-Violent Peace Prize and John F. Kennedy “Profile in Courage Award” for Lifetime Achievement, the only one of its kind ever granted by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. In February 2011, President Barack Obama awarded Lewis the Medal of Freedom, the highest honor a civilian can attain. He was invited to campus by Jordan Rose ’13, who wrote a letter Lewis called “very appealing and moving” and said he could not refuse. “I invited Rep. Lewis to celebrate Black History Month,” Rose said. “I thought that having someone of his experience would help to educate everyone on the struggles African-Americans went through in the past and the work we still have to do.” Lewis spoke to the EHS community about his involvement with the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s, including his relationship with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Lewis first met King as a freshman in college, traveling to meet King in Montgomery, Ala., during his spring break. He continued to work with King as a civil rights activist, earning a place in history as one of the “Big Six” leaders of the civil rights movement.

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Rep. John Lewis, congressman and civil rights leader, visited campus to address the EHS community at the invitation of Jordan Rose ’13. After his speech, Headmaster Rob Hershey presented Lewis with an Episcopal sweatshirt. From left: Hershey, Lewis, and Rose.

He studied nonviolence and embraced it not only as a tactic, but as a way of life. Lewis helped found and lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organization that involved students in the civil rights movement. He participated in many memorable peaceful protests, such as the Freedom Ride, and he led the first Selma-to-Montgomery march that ended in violence on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., on March 7, 1965, now known as “Bloody Sunday.” Lewis has been arrested more than 40 times in his life and has remained a staunch supporter of civil rights not just in America, but around the world. His most recent arrest was in 2009; he and five other members of Congress were arrested for protesting the expulsion of aid groups from Darfur at the Sudanese

Embassy in Washington, D.C. Lewis first became involved with the civil rights movement as a teenager – after hearing about the actions of Rosa Parks and the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Lewis was inspired to take action, to “get in the way” of the segregation that was then an accepted part of everyday life. He encouraged Episcopal’s students to continue what he calls the “non-violent revolution” and to do what they can to make the world a better place. “We’re one people; we’re one family; we’re one house. Not just an American house, but a world house,” Lewis said. “You will be the ones that have to lead not just America, but the world toward the creation of what I call the beloved community, a community at peace with itself. Keep the faith, and keep your eyes on the prize.” n


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Fall Varsity Athletics Award Winners

Front row: Bailey Thomas ’11, Coach’s Award for girls’ cross country; Maria Cox ’11, Coach’s Award for volleyball; Taylor Covert ’13, Most Improved Player for girls’ tennis; Jake Love ’11, Coach’s Award for boys’ cross country; Alex Henry ’11, Moncure Award for Most Valuable Player for football; Armour Shaw ’12, Most Improved Player for football; Johnny Bond ’12, Alexander Spotswood Award for football; Reid Nickle ’11, Parker Reed Carr Award for Most Valuable Runner for boys’ cross country; and Haley Lyerly ’13, Most Improved Player for girls’ soccer. Back row: Caroline Andress ’11, Ruth K. Rainey Award for Most Valuable Player for field hockey; Erin Montz ’13, Coach’s Award for girls’ soccer; Alessandra Gavin ’12, Most Valuable Runner for girls’ cross country; Buck Armstrong ’12, Winniett Peters Award for football; Caroline Henderson ’14, Most Improved Player for volleyball; Charlotte Hunt ’14, Coach’s Award for girls’ tennis; Elizabeth Buyck ’12, Most Improved Runner for girls’ cross country; Angie Phillips ’11, Most Valuable Player for girls’ tennis; Liz Helm ’12, Most Valuable Player for volleyball; Tier Gibbons ’11, John Strubing Coach’s Award for football; Anthony Deriggs ’11, Most Improved Player for boys’ soccer; Henry Lawson ’13, Most Improved Runner for boys’ cross country; Trevor Bobola ’11, Coach’s Award for boys’ soccer; Cary Hairfield ’11, Coach’s Award for field hockey; Schillo Tshuma ’12, Peyton S. Hawes III Award for Most Valuable Player for boys’ soccer; Taylor Wilson ’11, John J. and Mary Turner Tilman Corson Award for Most Valuable Player for girls’ soccer; and Elle Wilson ’13, Most Improved Player for field hockey. n

Gallery Opening: “Phillia Yi: Works on Paper”

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his winter, the Angie Newman Johnson Gallery in the Ainslie Arts Center hosted the exhibition “Phillia Yi: Works on Paper.” Composed of woodcut prints and drawings, the exhibition was on display from Nov. 30 through Dec. 17. “Yi’s work slings us into their torqued spaces. The unwound visual energy relates to and joins with systems of nature and orders of human life. When other abstracted work can turn us to confusion, Yi’s drawings and prints connect us with what we innately know and find in our own core,” wrote arts teacher Frank Phillips, curator for the exhibition. Yi is an arts professor at Hobart and William Smith Colleges and has also been a visiting artist at many schools and organizations, including Syracuse University, Colgate University, and Tyler School of Art. She has received a number of awards, including the Fulbright Senior Research Scholar Grant to Korea, and her work has been displayed in galleries around the country, including New York, Baltimore, New Hampshire, Georgia, Ohio, and Delaware. n

Phillia Yi’s exhibition in the Angie Newman Johnson Gallery featured woodcut prints and drawings, including “Untitled.”

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Headmaster’s Challenge: Dorms Successfully Lower Energy Usage

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his winter, Headmaster Rob Hershey issued his annual challenge to the student body – if the dorms could collectively reduce their energy usage by 2.5 percent, then the students would be rewarded with an additional Headmaster’s Holiday. From Jan. 17 through Feb. 17, energy usage for each dorm was monitored and reported to the community. Led by the EHS Environmental Club, the students all worked hard, and it paid off with a final reduction of 10.38 percent, much more than the original goal.

“This year the Headmaster’s Challenge became about more than just reaching our energy reduction goal. It brought to light an increased self-awareness and a new environmentally conscious attitude spreading across campus,” said Austin deButts ’12, co-president of the Environmental Club. “Now with our well-deserved day off, we can get outside to enjoy ourselves and see firsthand exactly why it is so important that we continue to be good stewards of the Earth.” n Eleni Hadjis ’12 enjoys the surprise Headmaster’s Holiday on Feb. 24.

Eight Students Earn Musical Honors

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his winter, eight of Episcopal’s student musicians earned places in honor ensembles for Virginia District 10, which encompasses more than 400 students from Fairfax County, Alexandria City, and area private schools. Han Jun Bae ’12, Alessandra Gavin ’12, Soo Keun Ra ’12, and Amy Ren ’12 earned positions in the District 10 Band Festival, while Stuart Agnew ’12, Wonhee Lim ’12, Jenny Mok ’14, and Melissa Park ’13 performed in the Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors’ Association District 10 Honor Orchestra. n

Episcopal’s student musicians earned seats in district honor bands this year. From left: Han Jun Bae ’12, Alessandra Gavin ’12, Jenny Mok ’14, Soo Keun Ra ’12, Amy Ren ’12, Melissa Park ’13, and Stuart Agnew ’12. Not pictured: Wonhee Lim ’12.

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EHS Represents Bosnia and Herzegovina and Sweden at Model United Nations

Members of this year’s Model U.N. team include: Front row (left to right): Ambler Goddin ’11, Amanda Acquaire ’11, Olivia Black ’12, Claire Kemp ’11, Maria Cox ’11, and Jake Meredith ’11; second row: Lucas Ford ’11, Sophie Helm ’11, Elizabeth Henderson ’11, Ryan Bennert ’12, and Amy Ren ’12; third row: Jack Janes ’11, Elisabeth Merten ’13, Sara Kathryn Mayson ’12, Collin Wiles ’11, Emma Holt ’12, and Amaury Dujardin ’11. Not pictured: Cary Hairfield ’11, Matt Fisher ’11, and Christian von Hassell ’12.

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his February, 20 EHS students traveled to the 34th Old Dominion University Model United Nations High School Conference in Norfolk, Va. They joined almost 900 other high school students from Virginia at the conference, which is run by Old Dominion students and provides a venue for high school students to learn about international affairs. This year Episcopal represented the countries of Sweden and Bosnia and Herzegovina, with teams of two

representing these nations on five different committees and one non-governmental organization (NGO). Two of the EHS teams, both representing Bosnia and Herzegovina, presented resolutions that were passed by the Model U.N. The committees prepared in advance to address the wide range of topics discussed, which included biological weapon proliferation, immigrants’ rights, child mortality and slavery, piracy, the South American arms race, cyber terrorism, gender equality, democracy in Rwanda, HIV/AIDS, endangered

species, response to flooding in Pakistan, political instability in Nepal, and universal primary education. “The Model U.N. trip was a very rewarding experience. It was interesting to learn about how the U.N. works. It was also fun to get to know the different people that we met on the trip and to get other people’s perspectives on current issues that are facing the world today. Although it was hard work, it all paid off in the end and was a great experience!” said Elizabeth Henderson ’11. n

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Episcopal Students Inducted into New French Honor Society

This year’s inductees to the new EHS chapter of the Société Honoraire de Français. Front row, from left: Sophie Helm ’11, Taylor Covert ’13, Arnaud Adala Moto ’12, Weeza Miller ’12, Nyantee Asherman ’11, Amanda Acquaire ’11, and Alex Deitz ’12; back row: Emma DiFrancesco ’12, Olivia Black ’12, Marion Williams ’12, Sarah Hulbert ’11, and Sophie Dick ’11.

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his year, Episcopal established a chapter of the Société Honoraire de Français. Founded in 1949 by the American Association of Teachers of French, the organization recognizes high school students who have attained and maintained excellence in French language courses, as well as all other academic coursework. The first 12 members of the Episcopal chapter were chosen based on achievement in academic

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coursework through May 2010, and students must have completed the second year of French language study to be eligible for membership. This year’s inductees were Amanda Acquaire ’11, Arnaud Adala Moto ’12, Nyantee Asherman ’11, Olivia Black ’12, Taylor Covert ’13, Alex Deitz ’12, Sophie Dick ’11, Emma DiFrancesco ’12, Sophie Helm ’11, Sarah Hulbert ’11, Weeza Miller ’12, and Marion Williams ’12.

“It was definitely an honor being inducted into this unique society. I am hoping that the society will enhance the French program at Episcopal and encourage future opportunities to speak and learn about the language,” said inductee Alex Deitz ’12. “French has always been my favorite subject in school, and when I learned about this new society, I was honored (and also a bit surprised) when chosen to be a part of it.” n


around campus F RO M T H E A RC HIVES

Episcopal’s First Chinese Students

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n 1892, Episcopal High School reached far beyond its traditional southern source of students for the first time with the enrollment of the School’s first Chinese student, Theodore Wong. The son of a Chinese missionary, Wong was enrolled shortly before the start of the school year by the Rev. Francis Lister Hawks Pott, a missionary to China and president of Saint John’s College of Shanghai. EHS was a natural fit for the sons of Chinese missionaries. The School was well known and respected by the missionaries sent forth from the adjacent Virginia Theological Seminary. The Episcopal Church’s interest in Chinese missionary work reflected a larger fascination with Chinese culture at the time. Headmaster Launcelot Blackford capitalized on his access to Chinese missionaries to arrange lectures about China for his students, and the EHS Missionary Society provided modest financial support of missionary activity in China. Blackford reported on Wong’s adjustment to his sponsor, Pott, in a letter dated Sept. 21, 1892. “Theodore seems to be getting along finely in making friends among our household and renders himself agreeable. He shows such evidence of careful previous training that I indulge good hope of his profiting well…” Likely influenced by Wong’s experience, other Chinese students, notably the three Yen brothers, enrolled at Episcopal. In response to an 1895 inquiry from the Yen family regarding the suitability of EHS for their sons, Blackford proudly referenced Wong’s success at the School and beyond. Blackford was pleased to welcome the other sons of Chinese missionaries, and he reported on the 1896 transition of Episcopal’s second Chinese student, Williams Yen, to the student’s father, the Rev. Yung King Yen. “I am glad to tell you of the favorable impression Williams has made; and of his good beginning in his studies. His competent

Theodore Wong (back row, left) posed with fellow staff members of the 1893-94 Lightning Bug, an early EHS student publication.

knowledge of English and his spelling and his handwriting surprise us. In every class he seems already to have taken a high stand, and I shall be greatly surprised if he does not reflect credit on you and his former instructors, as well as on ourselves. He seems cheerful and much liked by his school mates.” Theodore Wong and his fellow students from China followed a familiar path from EHS to the University of Virginia, a progression fully supported by the School’s administration. Blackford believed that his Chinese students held many advantages in matriculating at U.Va., notably their friendships formed at Episcopal and his introduction. In advance of Wong’s enrollment at U.Va., Blackford wrote to his former student, “You have great advantage in knowing some nice fellows to begin with and will no doubt make other agreeable acquaintances.” Blackford also expressed pleasure at Williams Yen’s decision to attend his alma mater. Blackford wrote Yen’s father regarding U.Va., “I hear from him (Williams) this week with peculiar satisfaction that you favor the Virginia University, my own alma mater, and am confident it is the best place for him.

One of Episcopal’s first Chinese students on dorm (photo circa 1895).

Among other advantages, he will there meet some of his old school mates and will not be exactly a stranger; particularly as I can and will give him letters to my friends among the professors.” Our earliest Chinese students paved the way for the international students, who have attended Episcopal over the School’s long history. This year, Episcopal is proud to have 28 international students on campus from countries including Cameroon, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Nigeria, China, South Korea, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Canada, Thailand, and Zimbabwe. n

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Theologian in Residence: Petero Sabune

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he Rev. Petero Sabune, Episcopal’s 2010-11 Theologian in Residence, visited campus from Jan. 17 to 21. He is the dean of the cathedral in the Diocese of Newark, N.J., and was recently appointed as the church’s partnership officer to Africa. Additionally, Sabune serves as pastor and protestant chaplain at Sing Sing Penitentiary and associate pastor at Trinity Church in Ossining, N.Y. He is a member of the executive council of the Episcopal Church and on the board of Forward Movement. While on campus, Sabune spoke in chapel, including a special Vespers service on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, visited classes, and held informal discussions with the Vestry and other students. “Rev. Sabune’s visit to campus brought a refreshing change of pace to the chapel and to the many classes which he visited during the week. His engaging speaking style seemed to successfully connect with almost everyone who listened to him. His visit was a pleasure, and I’m sure I speak for many students when I say that we were all very grateful for the opportunity to hear from and get to know Rev. Sabune,” said Senior Warden of the Vestry Sutton Alford ’11. Born in Uganda in 1952, where his father was an Anglican Priest, Sabune came to the United States through the American Field Service (AFS) exchange program in 1969. He returned to

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This year’s Theologian in Residence, the Rev. Petero Sabune, with the Vestry on the steps of Callaway Chapel. Front row, from left: Sallie Glover ’11, Junior Warden Frances Ainsworth ’11, Eleni Hadjis ’12, Sabune, Alessandra Gavin ’12, Bethany Gordon ’12, Abby Halm ’13, and Virginia Wright ’13; second row: George Thorne ’11, Reid Nickle ’11, and Catherine Lambert ’11; back row: Wonhee Lim ’12, the Rev. Thom Hummel, Director of Counseling Jeff Goodell, the Rev. Gideon Pollach, Senior Warden Sutton Alford ’11, and the Rev. Heather Vandeventer.

Uganda for a short period before fleeing the country due to the dictator, Idi Amin, who killed Sabune’s brother in 1976 and whose men killed Sabune’s sister in 1977. Sabune continued his education in the United States and was ordained into the Episcopal Church in 1981. He has visited 28 African countries and 10 of the 12 Anglican provinces on the African continent. For the past 30 years,

he has focused his ministry on justice, reconciliation, and helping people live out faith through service. “Rev. Sabune’s visit to Episcopal was a great gift to the community. He engaged the students immediately, had a great sense of the culture of The High School, and engaged both faculty and students alike in the core questions about purpose, vocation, and vision,” said EHS Chaplain Gideon Pollach. n


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EHS Latin, Greek Students Compete in Certamen

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his winter, Episcopal’s Certamen team continued to triumph in competitions with high schools from across Virginia. Certamen is a verbal Latin competition – a Roman-themed, quiz-bowl style event designed to test students’ knowledge in a variety of subjects, including language, grammar, myth, and history. On Jan. 9, Episcopal’s team competed against 26 other schools at Flint Hill School in Oakton, Va. The team battled through three rounds to compete in the finals, eventually taking third place overall. On Feb. 26, EHS students traveled to the nearby Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology to take on 17 other high school teams. Episcopal’s level-two team finished in 10th place, and the level-three team finished in seventh place. “Everyone’s done a great job this year. We’ve done remarkably well all across the board, especially when you consider the tough competition we’ve encountered from other schools,” said Collin Wiles ’11, team captain. n

Members of the 2010-11 EHS Certamen team include: Front row (left to right): Cathy Bai ’11, Catherine Lambert ’11, Aliyah Griffith ’11, Lauren Mealy ’12, Barrett Wagner ’12, and Tyler Kennedy ’11; second row: Amanda Acquaire ’11, Stuart Agnew ’12, Ashton Yarnall ’13, Sydney Fenstermaker ’12, and Jenny Mok ’14; back row: Latin teacher Jeff Streed, Jackson Zyontz ’13, Logan Sandor ’13, Pen Agnew ’11, Collin Wiles ’11, and Maria Cox ’11. Not pictured: Quent Fox ’11, Lauren Johnson ’14, Savannah Lambert ’14, Eunice Mok ’13, Chu-Chi Oka-Zeh ’11, and Michael Vance ’12.

Nancy Walker ’11 Receives Community Service Award

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n Feb. 8, the Rotary Club of Alexandria presented Nancy Walker ’11 with its monthly Rotary Community Service Award. Walker is the co-chair of Episcopal’s Service Council, helping to lead the School’s community service and outreach efforts, and has participated in Episcopal’s annual Orphanage Outreach spring break service trip to the Dominican Republic. She traveled to West Virginia to learn about and help install green energy initiatives for the area’s rural poor, and she attended last year’s United Nations’ Commission on the Status of Women. “Nancy is a great leader on campus in

service, and in many other ways as well. I was thrilled to be able to nominate her for this award,” said the Rev. Gideon Pollach, faculty advisor to the EHS Service Council. “I have been moved by her constant commitment to service in our community and outside of it; her leadership of the Service Council, her work in Appalachia, her dedication in the Dominican Republic, and her advocacy on behalf of women in the developing world at last year’s U.N. Commission on the Status of Women meeting are all imbued with her inimitable spirit and determination. She is just a force for good, and I am so proud of her.” n

Nancy Walker ’11 receives the Rotary Community Service Award from Joan Holden, a member of the Rotary Club’s school committee.

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Winter Sports Highlights B OY S ’ VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L

The boys’ varsity basketball team had an extremely successful season, culminating in the School’s first IAC championship since 1998. The boys were also champions at the IAC Tournament and the 55th Annual Sleepy Thompson Tournament. The team finished the season ranked No. 2 in Virginia and competed in the state championship. Kethan Savage ’12 was named as the Most Valuable Player in the IAC tournament, and Savage, Sadiq Abubakar ’11, and Arnaud Adala Moto ’12 were all named to the Sleepy Thompson All-Tournament Team. Adala Moto was also named Sleepy Thompson Tournament MVP and made the IAC All-Tournament Team, and Head Coach Jim Fitzpatrick received his third Frederick Templeton Coach’s Award at the Sleepy Thompson Tournament.

SHANTELL BINGHAM ’11 S E T S S C H O O L , S TAT E RECORDS

Shantell Bingham ’11 set new school records this winter in the 55-meter dash and the 55-meter hurdles, as well as setting new state meet records and ranking No. 1 in the state for both of those events. She was unbeaten in Flippin Fieldhouse this year in the 55-meter hurdles and the 55-meter dash, and she is ranked No. 4 in the country for the 55-meter hurdles. Bingham is the first female EHS athlete to qualify for the indoor track and field nationals. On Feb. 2, she committed to continue her track and field career at the University of Virginia.

A L E X H E N RY ’ 1 1 I S S TAT E , IAC CHAMPION

Alex Henry ’11 finished his final wrestling season by winning his third IAC championship and his second state championship. He holds the Episcopal records for both career wins (127) and career pins (80), and he set the EHS single season record for pins. With a record of 48-6, he also set the school record for the highest single season total. Henry had his second runnerup finish at the St. Albans Wrestling Tournament, and he finished fourth place at both the National Prep and the “Beast of the East” tournaments, regarded as one of the most significant accomplishments by any EHS wrestler. Henry will continue his wrestling career next year at Franklin & Marshall College.

R E I D N I C K L E ’ 1 1 , B OY S ’ 4 X 8 0 0 - M E T E R R E L AY T E A M S E T N E W R E C O R D S

From left: Solomon Thomas ’11, Will Cauthen ’11, Reid Nickle ’11, and Vishal Patel ’11.

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Reid Nickle ’11 set a new school record this winter for the boys’ mile, as well as a new state meet record for the 1,000-meter event. He was the first EHS athlete ever to compete in the Millrose Games Trials, was the first double winner in the state championships (1,000- and 1,600-meter events), and won the 1,000-meter Prep Invitational hosted at Georgetown Prep. He was also a member of the All-State 4x400-meter

relay team. This February, Nickle committed to run track and cross country at Wake Forest University. The boys’ 4x800-meter relay team, composed of Nickle, Will Cauthen ’11, Vishal Patel ’11, and Solomon Thomas ’11, broke the school record at this year’s St. Christopher’s Invitational meet. The boys broke the record as Buz Male looked on; he was Episcopal’s head track coach when the former record was set in 1986.


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Science Olympiad Team Earns Medals at Finals WINTER RECORDS

Girls’ Varsity Basketball 11-15 Girls’ JV Basketball 2-14 Girls’ Varsity Squash 4-6 Girls’ JV Squash 10-1 Girls’ Track and Field Hoxton Invitational – 2nd Place Boys’ Varsity Basketball 25-3 Boys’ JV Basketball 2-13 Boys’ Junior Basketball 1-11 Boys’ Varsity Squash 12-7 Boys’ JV Squash 14-1 Boys’ Track and Field Hoxton Invitational – 3rd Place Boys’ Varsity Wrestling 14-10 Boys’ JV Wrestling 0-2

The 2010-11 Science Olympiad team. Front row, from left: Andy Bai ’13, Melissa Park ’13, Mike Phulsuksombati ’11, and Bethany Gordon ’12; back row: faculty advisor Kim Olsen, Ji Hong Min ’12, Julian Lockhart ’12, Collin Wiles ’11, Sang Chung ’12, Jesse Ling ’12, and Amy Ren ’12. Not pictured: Cathy Bai ’11 and Jack Janes ’11.

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Arnaud Adala Moto ’12 of the boys’ varsity basketball team was named as Alexandria Sportsman’s Club’s Athlete of the Month for December 2010. He was also named as the Capital One High School Athlete of the Week by ABC News. n

n Feb. 26, Episcopal’s Science Olympiad team competed against 26 other public and private high school teams in the Northern Virginia Regional Science Olympiad Finals. EHS finished ninth overall and was the highest-ranked independent school in the competition. The team competed in 21 events, earning three medals and one fourthplace finish, as well as placing well in five other events. Bethany Gordon ’12 and Amy Ren ’12 earned gold medals for their balsa helicopter, which was powered by a rubber band and stayed aloft for 1 minute and 25 seconds. Julian Lockhart ’12 and Jesse Ling ’12 earned silver medals for their Rube Goldberg machine, which the judges called the most creative and complex entry in the competition. Lockhart also earned a bronze medal with Andy

Bai ’13 in Chemistry Lab, a fourstation, round-robin lab test. Finally, Team Captain Collin Wiles ’11 and Jack Janes ’11 finished fourth place in the Write-It Do-It event, in which one partner has 20 minutes to write a description of an object, and the other partner must then create the structure using their partner’s written instructions. “I’m really proud of how hard the students worked this year, especially in the construction events,” said Science Department Chair Kim Olsen. “They put a significant amount of effort into developing creative designs, and several judges were very impressed with the complexity of their work. Overall, this group has also been one of the most positive and energetic that I’ve ever worked with. I’m so happy with the results.” n

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Episcopal’s Winter Carnival

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n Feb. 9, Episcopal held a Winter Carnival to provide students with a break from the winter weather and inject some fun into the daily routine of school life. After a modified schedule that moved study hall into the afternoon, students donned their finest tropical gear and headed to Centennial Gymnasium to cheer on the players in the senior-faculty basketball game. After a close game, which the faculty won by only three points, students headed to the main event. Laird Dining Hall had been transformed into a tropical paradise, and students danced to a live band, enjoyed refreshments, and played games. Originally conceived by the Monitors and faculty members Stacie Williams and Tim Jaeger, the event expanded to encompass students from different clubs and organizations across campus. The Admissions Office also provided a Winter Carnival T-shirt for each student.

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“The idea of winter carnival originated from asking ourselves, ‘What can we do to provide the entire community something fun and unexpected to break up winter a bit?’ We loved the idea of doing it mid-week so that it really stood out as something out of the ordinary!” said Stacie Williams, associate dean of students. “What was really fantastic was

Artwork by Robert Amico ’11

watching so many student groups work together to contribute; from the initial videos that were made to advertise it, to the student-designed T-shirts, the musical performances, and all the ‘behind-the-scenes’ work that went into organizing the carnival itself. Actually, my favorite memory from the night was at the end of the event; I was expecting it to take hours to clean up, but so many students willingly volunteered to stay behind and help that we were done in no time! It was a great example of Episcopal students at their best.” n


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Winter Musical: “Lucky Stiff”

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his February, Episcopal’s theater program staged a production of the musical farce “Lucky Stiff,” with book and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens and music by Stephen Flaherty. The musical tells the story of Harry, who has just inherited $6 million from his uncle and must travel to Monte Carlo to claim it. The catch is that he must bring along his deceased uncle in order to claim the inheritance. Add in his uncle’s almost blind and insanely jealous mistress, her optometrist brother, and a determined representative from the Universal Dog Home, and hilarity is bound to follow! n

Caroline Hagood ’12 plays Rita LaPorta, the nearsighted and jealous mistress of Harry’s deceased uncle. Harry (right, Baker Patton ’12) has just inherited $6 million from his dead uncle (center, Sam Falken ’12). However, dog enthusiast Annabel Glick (Sarah Hulbert ’11) wants to make sure some of that money goes to the Universal Dog Home. (Artwork by Robert Amico ’11)

The cast and crew of “Lucky Stiff.” For a complete listing of names, visit Episcopal’s website at www.episcopalhighschool.org.

No trip to Monte Carlo would be complete without a show. This one stars Dominique DuMonaco (Tamika Jones ’11), backed by showgirls (from left) Virginia Wright ’13, Savannah Lambert ’14, Joslyn Chesson ’13, and Mackenzie Nichols ’11.

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Episcopal High School Chamber Singers Selected to Perform at Carnegie Hall

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he Episcopal High School Chamber Singers traveled to New York City Feb. 25-28 to perform with the National Youth Choir at Carnegie Hall. They were selected to be a part of the National Youth Choir along with eight other choirs from public and independent high schools across the U.S. and one school from British Columbia. This is the second time the EHS Chamber Singers have received this honor, having made their debut in the National Youth Choir in 2006. “At first, I was intensely overwhelmed by the knowledge that I was performing on the same stage that the greats, such as Heifetz, Perlman, Horowitz, and even Tchaikovsky, had stood on; then I was vastly humbled to finally realize that standing on the stage didn’t signify my personal achievement, but the giving of my gift to both the listeners and the performers next to me,” said Wonhee Lim ’12. The singers had an extremely hectic and challenging schedule with more than nine hours of intense rehearsal over three days for the Carnegie Hall performance. However, they managed to cram in plenty of fun as well, attending the Broadway musical “Jersey Boys” and even bumping into two of the “Jersey Boys” actors at Lindy’s Restaurant, where the EHS singers performed for them an impromptu rendition of “Little David, Play On Your Harp.” The Chamber Singers also had the privilege of singing at the Sunday Eucharist service at The Cathedral of St. John the Divine along with Todd Fickley, EHS organist and accompanist, who was asked to play all of the St. John morning’s services that day. “Singing with that huge organ at the cathedral was a new experience, but very cool, especially because it was played by

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The EHS Chamber Singers were excited to perform at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

our Fearless Fickley!” remarked Holly Reynolds ’13. On Feb. 28, before returning home, the Chamber Singers visited and gave a special lunchtime performance at the Bowery Mission homeless shelter, which has served homeless and hungry New Yorkers since 1879. “The part about the New York trip that inspired me the most was performing at the Bowery Mission. I think that we all learned the true influence and powerful messages that music can have on our lives. The crowd differed from the one in Carnegie Hall. Many were deeply troubled, trying to figure out how to change their lives. Our performance changed the atmosphere in the Bowery Mission and gave new energy to the place,” said Erik Skytting ’12. “Performing at Bowery Mission taught me that it doesn’t matter where

or who you are singing for; what matters is why you are singing and the message you are sending through the power of music. Singing at the mission was as, if not more, powerful as singing at Carnegie Hall,” said Elle Wilson ’13. n

The singers also performed at the Bowery Mission homeless shelter in New York.


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Jay Walker Symposium: Elizabeth Eckert

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his March, Nashville singer/songwriter Elizabeth Eckert returned to campus for the 2010-11 Jay Walker Symposium. Eckert has a special place in her heart for Episcopal, as she moved to campus in 1992 when her father, Bob Eckert, joined the EHS faculty as director of development. A classical pianist since early childhood, she was an honor student at The Levine School of Music in Washington, D.C., before receiving a scholarship to the prestigious Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. There Eckert received many honors and performed at The Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall. However, repercussions from a childhood injury required her to have extensive surgery on her left arm, effectively ending her classical career. Unable to play the piano, Eckert started writing in order to have an emotional outlet. When she noticed rhyming patterns in her journal entries, she began composing melodies to accompany them, and a new career path opened up to her. After graduation, Eckert moved to Nashville, playing successively larger venues and teaching at Vanderbilt University. She signed with SlugFest Records Nashville in 2009, and in 2010 she released and toured in support of her first album, “Bloomington.” She is now working on her independent sophomore album. Eckert gave an introductory “unplugged” concert to the community on March 1, and then worked with Episcopal’s student musicians to rehearse the title track from her first album, as well as several new songs. For two days she visited classes and worked with the orchestra and chamber singers to prepare for the final concert. On March 3, Eckert was joined on stage by her band and the EHS student musicians. Each instrument was professionally wired to give the audience the experience of a fully produced song.

Singer/songwriter Elizabeth Eckert performed her original pieces in Pendleton Hall with accompaniment from Episcopal’s orchestra and chamber singers.

Eckert’s vocals and music joined with the sounds of the choir and orchestra to fill Pendleton Hall. “It’s been a real pleasure to be on the student side of things for a change and to get to work with the students in a one-on-one setting,” Eckert said. “They brought a lot of energy to the whole symposium, which was really fantastic. That was my main goal – to get them involved and get them feeling it, and

they definitely were.” The Jay Walker Symposium was established in 1992 by family and friends of the late John Luther Walker, Jr. ’54 to memorialize and share with the Episcopal community his love of music. Each year, this program brings talented musicians to campus to work with students, enhancing the School’s musical tradition. n

Elizabeth Eckert (center) grew up on campus. She is the daughter of EHS Director of Development Bob Eckert and pianist Beth Eckert.

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EHS Students Perform with the National Chamber Players

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n Nov. 30, the Episcopal High School Concert Choir and Chamber Singers had the unique opportunity to perform on stage in Pendleton Hall with the National Chamber Players. Jim Lee, artistic director of the National

Chamber Players, proposed the idea of joining with the EHS Choirs to perform an all-Vivaldi program. The signature piece of the evening was Vivaldi’s “Gloria,” the perfect selection to usher in the holiday season. n

Former Presiding Bishop Visits Campus

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n Feb. 17, the Episcopal High School community enjoyed a unique chapel service with Bishop Frank Tracy Griswold III, the 25th presiding bishop and primate of the Episcopal Church. Griswold served as presiding bishop from 1997 until 2006, and he previously served as bishop of Chicago from 198797 and as bishop coadjutor from 198587. Ordained in 1963, he is a graduate of the General Theological Seminary. Griswold received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree in theology and a master’s degree from Oxford University. During his visit to Episcopal, Griswold

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spoke in chapel, sharing the story of his journey through the Episcopal Church and how he became bishop. He told the students that he did not regularly attend church until his days as a student at St Paul’s School in Concord, N.H. During his second year, he was confirmed and “the tradition took hold of him.” Soon after, a teacher told him that he should become a priest. Griswold and many others laughed at the thought, and he began to tell people he wanted to be a priest for the shock factor. However, he remained an avid churchgoer, and as Griswold said, “the rest of my story in the church is history. Watch out, this stuff is dangerous. You, too, could become presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.” n

Bishop Frank Tracy Griswold III, former presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, spoke in chapel this February.


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hen Director of Alumni Affairs Lindsay Whittle Comstock ’99 contacted Lyle Farrar ’04 to ask that he join the Episcopal High School Advisory Council, his response was a quick and resounding, “yes!” “I became involved because it gave me a chance to truly give something back to the EHS community, in addition to my recurring Roll Call gift, and the occasion to build new relationships with current parents and other alums. The opportunity to be part of healthy and productive discussions that ultimately will improve and guide the community at EHS was one I could not pass up,” said Farrar. Aside from having EHS alumni in his immediate and extended family, Farrar chose to attend Episcopal because he found it to be a welcoming and close-knit community embodying all of the qualities he looked for in a school and in a home away from home. “My Episcopal High School experience meant so much to me. The Honor Code greatly helped my moral development. Academically, EHS helped ready me for college. Perhaps the most important part of my experience was the relationships I forged in my four years. I still keep in very close touch with many of my friends and teachers from EHS,” remarked Farrar. Since graduating, Farrar has consistently stayed connected to EHS and is frequently seen on campus attending basketball games and wrestling matches or meeting with his former teachers. “Staying connected has enabled me to maintain friendships and draw guidance and encouragement from my former teachers and coaches. Similarly, it has also afforded me the opportunity to make new friends. I still feel as if I am a part of what’s happening on campus at EHS. I realize that it is now up to me and my fellow alumni to set the same example for the current students that others set for me: that alumni involvement is critical,” said Farrar. His father, Jim Farrar ’70, taught at EHS after college and also worked in

Lyle Farrar ’04 in his EHS issue T-shirt, which he received by becoming an 1839 Society Young Associates recurring Roll Call donor.

the Admissions Office. Farrar has followed closely in his father’s footsteps, working just down the road from EHS as a foreign language teacher and coach at St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes School. “As a student at EHS, I saw the commitment from the faculty, but now as a teacher and a coach myself at a similar school, I can fully understand and appreciate the time and effort the faculty put into their students,” stated Farrar. Farrar has enjoyed returning to the D.C. area, not only because he is close to the EHS campus, but also due to the strong EHS alumni network. “It seems almost as if I can’t go out anywhere in D.C. without seeing someone I know from EHS, and I love it! I have been very impressed with the showing of support at games and reunions by alumni living in the D.C. metro area. The alumni community in this area seems almost as strong as the community on campus at EHS,” said Farrar. As a member of the EHS Advisory Council and now a teacher himself, Farrar has a greater appreciation for

teaching young people the value of giving back to their community, including their school community. “Giving back helps one realize that a community is only as strong as the people who are in it and those who support it, which is why I feel it is important for me to lend my financial support to the School. For EHS to remain consistent in its mission, the School needs constant financial support. I give a recurring Roll Call gift with monthly installments to show my undying support for the School, and from a practical standpoint, to help ensure annual support,” Farrar expressed. “Donating time to Episcopal is perhaps just as important as donating money. As a student, I often saw alums on campus donating their time to different activities and projects to help better our school. It helped me to realize that the people before me were so influential in making EHS the place I attended and it encouraged me to do the same after I graduated. Episcopal will always have a place high on my list for helping shape who I am and where I am today.” n

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This April, John Townsend ’73 will preside over his final meeting as chairman of the Episcopal High School Board of Trustees. In the 10 years that Townsend has served in this role, he has generously given of his time, resources, leadership, and vision to help advance Episcopal. He leaves the Board with a School that is poised to enjoy many future decades of strength and success.

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John Townsend ’73 Steps Down After 10 Years As Board Chairman Townsend first joined Episcopal’s Executive Council in 1992, and in 1996 he transitioned to the Board of Trustees. He said he was excited by the opportunity to serve on the Board, to reconnect with the School, and to serve alongside the Trustees he viewed as “great friends and great role models.” When he was asked to succeed Menard Doswell ’62 as chairman, Townsend said he was very surprised, but flattered. He thought he would enjoy the job and looked forward to working with Episcopal’s new Headmaster, Rob Hershey. “I knew that Rob was going to be a great headmaster, that was already clear, and he and I had already established a good working relationship in that first year that he was there. So I thought the opportunity to partner with him and work with him was something that had potential to be a lot of fun and satisfying, and hopefully successful,” Townsend remembered.

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“It always feels like John has the best interest of the School at the top of his list.” MARY KEEVIL, TRUSTEE

Left: John Townsend ‘73 (top left) with the first group of EHS students to accompany him on the Diamond Acre trip during the summer of 2008. Right: Each year Townsend leads one of the climbing groups on the student trip. This year he teamed with Clarence Clanton ’12 (left), Corina Benitz ’11, and Quinn Caslow ’12.

Trustee Emeritus John Burress ’54 (Board member 1974-77 and 1995-2001) describes Townsend as an intent listener with an engaging personality, someone who doesn’t shirk responsibility and never finishes any project in less than “great style.” “As a Board member, he was always quite active and involved, and after he became chairman he instilled a great deal of confidence in the Board members,” Burress said. “His tenacity and hard work, his willingness to do any task – he appeared to me to operate at the highest level. He never asked any of us as Board members to do anything that he wouldn’t do or wasn’t already doing.” Burress also said that Townsend always seemed to have the time needed not only to do the job, but to do it right. Trustee Mary Keevil (Board member since 1999) echoed those sentiments, saying that no matter what else he was doing, Townsend always had time for EHS. “It always feels like John has the best interest of the School at the top of his list,” Keevil said. “He does so many other things, but when he’s at Episcopal he’s totally focused.” And there have been plenty of projects at EHS on which to focus in the last 10 years. In addition to leading the Board through two rounds of strategic planning, during Townsend’s

tenure the endowment has increased, the applicant pool has expanded, and the campus has been transformed. Townsend spent 20 years as an investment banker, and he continues to be successful in the financial arena. He brought his financial expertise to bear on the Board, and during his time as chairman Episcopal’s endowment has increased by 60 percent. This was no small feat, considering that this decade included the financial crisis that gripped the country during 2008-09. However, with prudent financial management the Board was able to guide EHS through the storm. In addition, Townsend and the Board have put into place systems that will continue to guide future Trustees in financial decision making. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve tried to find the balance between being on the cutting edge of endowment management and asset allocation, but doing it in a way that was prudent and conservative and that could weather difficult times,” Townsend explained. “Now, we never imagined that we would encounter anything quite like the events of 2008 and 2009, but when you look back at it, the endowment weathered that pretty well. And I think that’s something we should feel good about, that we’ve been able to endure and

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“He consistently wanted to focus on the long-term benefit of the students, faculty, and the School...” JOHN BURRESS ’54, TRUSTEE EMERITUS

hang on to the financial strength, which is a really important part of the foundation of the School.” Another area the Board targeted was the applicant pool. Episcopal had long been considered a Southern boarding school, but the Board saw no reason why it should not be seen as a national and international school, attracting the best and brightest from across the country and around the world. Former Trustee Woody Coley ’73 (Board member 200109), classmate and lifelong friend of Townsend, said that the Board wanted to put the School on the national stage. While many applicants may still come from the Southern states, national and international applicants have expanded over the last decade. For example, students from New York and New Jersey have increased from 10 in 2001-02 to 57 this year. “We’re proud to attract a lot of Southern kids and to have a heritage that began like that, but to build a foundation that’s going to last for another 100 years, we needed to be considered as a national alternative for kids from all over the country and all over the world,” Coley said. Townsend wanted to increase the number of applicants each year to better compete with peer boarding schools. He knew that if more people learned about Episcopal, then they would want to be a part of the institution. After 10 years of expanded marketing and focusing on the national stage, applications have increased by 26 percent, from 432 applications in 2001-02 to 546 applications for the 2011-12 school year. “I really think that your applicant pool – both the strength of the pool and the size of the pool – is critical to the longterm success of the institution. If you are going to enroll approximately 120 students a year, and you’ve got five times that many applicants, that makes a statement about the demand for the institution that’s very, very different than if you just have two or three times the applicants,” Townsend said. “The more people hear the story, it seems more people are interested, and applications continue to grow.” Perhaps the greatest impact during the past 10 years, however, has been the transformation and modernization of the campus. The Board has touched nearly every building on campus in the last decade, renovating and expanding current facilities and constructing new ones. The amount of building

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square footage on campus increased to 170,000 in the last decade, an increase of more than 30 percent. “We probably have touched every building and every square foot of that campus on his watch. The primary components have been brought to a contemporary standard. That by itself is a phenomenal accomplishment,” Coley said. When Townsend first joined the Board, the School was planning the renovation of the existing dorms and construction of Hoxton Dormitory (completed in 2001). The first project Townsend was involved with as chairman, however, was the Ainslie Arts Center (2003). The arts facility was identified by Hershey and the Board as an important priority for both new and existing students, and this was the first significant fundraising effort led by Townsend. “It was very clear to us that we needed substantial new arts facilities to be competitive in the marketplace,” Townsend remembered. “We were just woefully inadequate there and we couldn’t pretend that we were good. The result was a great, great facility.” Once the Ainslie Arts Center was completed, the Board turned its attention to other construction projects – first the Crosland Alumni Cottage (2004), and then the Baker Science Center (2005). Townsend said the success of the efforts to fund the Ainslie Arts Center showed the Board it could undertake the significant effort to construct the new science center. “Again, it was an obvious need – our facility needs for the sciences were really visible and obvious, and it wasn’t hard to make the case that for Episcopal to be regarded as one of the elite boarding schools we just needed to have a much more significant science complex. The Baker Science Center was the result of that. I think that we got an extraordinary building from an architectural point of view, but also a building that serves the needs of the School incredibly well,” Townsend said. Townsend’s final construction and fundraising efforts have revolved around The EHS Promise, Episcopal’s current capital campaign (see article on page 37). Though the effort was slowed by the economic troubles in 2008 and 2009, Episcopal’s loyal supporters rallied to help complete the construction of the new Athletics Center and the renovation of March Library and Penick Hall, all in 2010. In addition, the campaign has helped create the Middle-Income Financial


A Decade of Board Leadership

Headmaster Rob Hershey and John Townsend ’73.

Aid Initiative, which provides significant support to deserving students who enrich the EHS community. Much of the School’s success over the last decade can be attributed to the excellent working relationship between Townsend and Headmaster Rob Hershey. “He and Rob Hershey are Episcopal’s dream team,” Keevil said. “They complement each other, they work beautifully together, and they found a way to use every good idea that came their way, regardless of whether it came from faculty, or students, or parents, or Board members. If it was a good idea, they ran with it.” Townsend said that he and Hershey work so well together because they are friends and colleagues. This allows them to work together to advance the best interests of Episcopal and its students, alumni, parents, and friends. “It’s a friendship as well as a professional relationship,” Townsend said. “We each have our own opinions; we tend to feel strongly about our views, but we almost always find a way to agree, even if we start out at a different place in terms of a particular issue or a particular decision.” “It is every headmaster’s dream to have the opportunity to work closely with a board chairman like John,” Hershey said. “John has a real clarity of purpose and sees clearly the issues that are of greatest importance to the well-being of the School. The highest compliment I can extend to him is that my respect for and trust in him are absolute. This foundation

“Whispers” 1973.

Dick Rutledge ’51, Josie Robertson, Julian Robertson ’51, and John Townsend ’73 at the dedication of the Baker Science Center in 2005.

of trust is such an important part of John’s leadership and has meant the world to me personally.” As chairman of the Board, Townsend is described as an inclusive and insightful leader, engaging each member and valuing the important contributions each Trustee makes to the School. He is also credited for recruiting talented Board members who have made significant contributions to the Board’s many projects in the last decade. Keevil said Townsend was always aware of what each committee was doing, and

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A Decade of Board Leadership “...It’s been a lot of fun, and it’s been a great privilege to be associated with Episcopal during this chapter of its history.”

JOHN TOWNSEND ’73

the Trustees felt confident moving forward with their efforts because they knew Townsend was looking ahead. Burress agreed that Townsend took a longer view of Episcopal’s needs. “He consistently wanted to focus on the long-term benefit of the students, faculty, and the School. He never seemed to have a quick fix for things – he had a longer-term view,” Burress said. This long-term approach to governance has definitely paid off for Episcopal, though Townsend himself would not accept credit for the School’s success. “John is not one who likes to impose his ego on the group. I would measure his effectiveness by the accomplishments of the group which he has led, and I think that’s exactly the way John would want to measure it,” Hershey said. “Frankly, I can’t think of a school that has met the challenge of the last decade more successfully than EHS. The strategic leadership of the Board under John’s personal direction has made this challenging decade one of clear growth and increasing strength for the School.” Townsend said that he has gotten much more from his time as chairman than he could ever give, and that he’s made lifelong friends that he might never have met if not for the Board. “I think it’s often too easy just to say no, and my experience is that you almost always get more out of these opportunities than you could possibly give, and that’s certainly been the case in terms of my EHS experience. It’s been a lot of fun, and it’s been a great privilege to be associated with Episcopal during this chapter of its history,” Townsend shared. Even though his tenure as Board chairman will end this summer, Townsend’s involvement with Episcopal is far from over. In 2008, he established the Diamond Acre Expedition, a yearly trip for EHS students. Named for Townsend’s Diamond Acre Ranch, student participants hike, camp, go whitewater rafting, and climb the Grand Teton in Wyoming. Townsend accompanies the group each year, and he said that he started the trip so that these young people could grow to love the outdoors as much as he does. “If we gave a group of young people the opportunity to spend part of the summer out West, doing a variety of different experiences, then if two or three of those young people developed a lifelong love of the outdoors that would be worth the cost of that trip many times over,” Townsend said.

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Donna Chapman, Max Chapman ’62, and John Townsend ’73 at the 2010 Spirit of The High School dinner.

Rob Hershey, Marree Townsend, John Townsend ’73, Kathleen Hershey, Herb Donovan ’49, and Mary Donovan at the Episcopal Charities Annual Tribute Dinner in Novermber 2010.

As he concludes his time on the Board, Townsend said that his involvement during the last 15 years has indelibly changed his relationship with the School for the better. However, he hopes that when people look back at this era in Episcopal’s history, they won’t attribute the School’s success to him. “I hope they would say this is a Board of Trustees that’s just been extraordinarily productive, an incredibly talented and committed group of people that as a group had a special relationship with the Head and the administrative team,” Townsend said. “Working together, we were all able to accomplish some important things in the School’s history.” n


Chapel Talks A forum for students and faculty to share with and inspire the Episcopal community

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n most Fridays during the school year, the entire Episcopal community gathers in Callaway Chapel at 11:30 a.m. Although chapel services are a regular part of the school week, the Friday chapel services are unique because of their chapel talks, which have become an integral part of the EHS experience. EHS The Magazine of Episcopal High School

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At Episcopal, the phrase “chapel talk” refers to a speech given by a student or faculty member at Friday chapel. Organized and run by the student members of the Vestry, the Friday chapel services provide a forum for community members to speak to the entire School about a topic that has special meaning to them. “It is a moment where I feel like the community is really present and open and focused on listening to each other and being willing to hear new things,” said Head Chaplain Gideon Pollach. “They are remarkable moments of deep, deep sharing for the whole community, and I think the students and faculty recognize that. They listen differently on Fridays.” These chapel talks can be funny, insightful, challenging, moving, and often deeply personal. Each topic resonates differently with the community, but all leave a lasting impression, one that stays with the listener long after graduation. For example, recent graduate Josh Ashworth ’10 remembers vividly a chapel talk given by one of his classmates last year.

“My favorite chapel talk was during my senior year when one of my close friends, Vincent Mariano ’10, surprised us all with an incredibly passionate speech about legacy,” Ashworth reflected. “Episcopal High School itself is denoted by the legacy of past professors and students who helped form the moral and intellectual values, which represent EHS so proudly today. Vincent challenged students to continue with the growth of that legacy, ‘casting their own footprints’ in the history that will always be in the making. Vincent’s contribution to the Class of 2010, as well as the EHS community, will always hold a special place in my heart and in the hearts and minds of his peers.” The 2010-11 senior warden of the Vestry, Sutton Alford ’11, said he is often approached by students who either want to speak or know someone who does. Alford is responsible for maintaining and organizing the calendar To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, ple of speakers, whichvisit canour range from freshmen to seniors. website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapelt

To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, please visit our website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapeltalks.

Catherine Lambert ’11 My brother Caleb, who will be turning 17 this October, was diagnosed with autism, a mental disorder, at 2 years old when he began to have obsessions with stacking cans, flushing building blocks down the toilet, and spending 30 minutes sitting on the ground spinning a wheel. He will never talk and will function at the level of a 2-year-old for the rest of his life. Growing up with an autistic brother was not easy, to say the least. Although there were some happy times, my childhood experience with Caleb was primarily negative. I was always jealous of the attention he received from my mom and his special aides. Being about 6 or so, I constantly said phrases such as “Mom, why don’t you love me as much as Caleb?” or “Mom, just because Caleb has autism doesn’t mean you have to spend every second with him.”… …During the fall five years ago, I came home from school to my now-single mom. She was sitting on the couch with a blank expression on her face. I walked upstairs, wondering why the house was so quiet. I dumped my backpack on the floor and went into Caleb’s room. I stood staring at his sheet-stripped bed, an empty bookcase, and a vacated Catherine Lambert ’11 (bottom right) room. He was gone. and her brother Caleb (top). They are Sure, I’d overheard my mom and dad talking on the phone about moving Caleb to a pictured with their sister, Savannah ’14 facility for help, but I never thought that it would actually happen. I learned later that (bottom left), and their brother, Caleb had been moved to a place called Grafton in Berryville, Va., to live with other Nathaniel. autistic boys. Nearly all of the aspects about Caleb that I disliked were the trademarks of his autism. Every time he hit me and all the hand motions and noises were side effects of his severe autism, and not his fault. God creates us all unique, with probably more differences than similarities. Some differences, such as autism, can’t be controlled or fixed. God has given us the power to love one another, despite our differences, and only the strong minded have the ability to look beyond the differences and see what truly matters: the person’s character.

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Chapel Talks

He and the other Vestry members also keep an eye out for speakers that might have something to say that would be interesting to the community, or who might be able to teach something. Alford said that the best chapel talks are ones that describe situations to which most of the students can relate. “Students recognize the courage required for people to get up there and share often very personal experiences. I think there’s something about hearing from your peers that is easy to connect to; people respect what you have to say, that you have conviction about something,” Alford said. Pollach works with each student speaker during the week leading up to their chapel talk, helping them to refine their speech. He also works with them to improve their public speaking abilities, working on pacing, tempo, and ways to convey humor, which is often difficult when moving from the written word to the spoken word. One of this year’s memorable and moving chapel talks was delivered by Elisabeth Merten ’13. Before coming to EHS this year, Merten lived with her family in Haiti, where her father is the United States ambassador. She survived the

devastating earthquake that hit Haiti on Jan. 12, 2010, and this year she gave a chapel talk on the anniversary of that catastrophic event. Merten detailed the earthquake from start to finish, as well as her experience caring for the wounded and waiting for news in its aftermath. She also talked about her belief that Haiti will rebuild, describing the improvements she sees every time she returns home. Merten said she shared her story because she felt it needed to be told to help people understand the magnitude of what happened, and that as a new student she appreciates the insight chapel talks give into students’ lives away from EHS. “The chapel talks really help give you a perspective about what goes on in somebody’s life at home. You don’t necessarily get that kind of picture when you’re just talking to a person at Episcopal, because you’re only talking about life here. It’s really inspiring, what some of these people have been through, and how they share it with people,” Merten said. On the opposite end of the spectrum, one of the year’s funniest chapel talks was given by Swedish exchange student Erik Skytting ’12. Before Christmas break each year, several

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students give chapel talks about their individual holiday traditions and experiences. This year Skytting described a traditional, snowy Swedish Christmas, contrasting it with the holiday he would be spending in the Bahamas – both of which involved “pretty blond girls.” “You often don’t discuss those subjects that come up in chapel talks while you’re with your friends, so it’s a great way to get to know your fellow students better. For me it was a great way to give something back, to show a little of my Swedish personality,” Skytting said. Students will often open up about their families in a chapel talk. Many current students still remember a talk given by Catherine Lambert ’11 during her sophomore year, in which she discussed her tumultuous childhood growing up with her autistic brother, Caleb. Lambert said that the experience was something she wanted to share for herself, but that she really felt her talk resonated with the community. “Hearing personal stories from other students, you start thinking about how their story relates to some personal

experience you yourself had,” Lambert said. “Every time I hear a talk that moves me, or is humorous or witty, it always brings me back to the idea that our community is so deep. There are so many interesting individuals, and chapel is just the perfect forum for unique ideas. Students can express really whatever they want in the Friday chapels.” Sometimes the subject of a chapel talk is life at Episcopal; students may discuss roommate relations or educational struggles. With some subjects, the points of view may not be shared by the majority of listeners. However, Pollach said that this is an important part of the philosophy behind chapel talks. “In general, we probably see one or two talks per year that really challenge some of the core assumptions that the community holds. It’s irregular, but sometimes people will come to chapel and deliver a talk from a place of real To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, ple struggle, a place ofvisit some that they feel because they’ve ourhurt website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapelt

To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, please visit our website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapeltalks.

Erik Skytting ’12 When you think about Swedish Christmas, you probably think about snow, skiing, cold weather, and polar bears walking on the streets. Some of you might even think that Christmas in Sweden is all about pretty blond girls in Christmas dresses. This is partly true, but a Christmas in Sweden is much more than that. For me, Christmas is all about me and my brothers, Niklas and Axel. In a family with three boys, all sorts of stuff happens all the time, and even though Christmas is supposed to be all about sharing and helping each other, it doesn’t always end up that way. The Christmas mood usually sets when the snow starts falling, and the days are getting shorter. Christmas is a light in a dark world where the Erik Skytting ’12 (center) with his brothers, Niklas sun rises at 9 a.m. and sets at 2 p.m. Some people complain about the (left) and Axel. cold weather and how much snow it is, but for me it’s the exact opposite. There is no Christmas without snow. The snow usually starts falling down in late September, so when Christmas comes around, the snow is usually up to my waist. Me and my brothers have never complained about snow, because there is nothing like building snow forts and having a snowball fight. It always ends up with someone angry because he got snow underneath all his clothes and Niklas, my older brother, pressing Axel’s face in to the snow… in the Christmas spirit of course… … Christmas in Sweden is all about family, giving and sharing, which probably is evident everywhere. When I thought about what I love about Christmas, I realized that for me it’s the endless waiting for Santa to come and the feeling that you haven’t completed your wish list yet. I’m not going to lie, nothing beats getting all your presents and playing with your brothers, but what really is the fun part is the waiting, the snow, and doing stuff with your family. This year I won’t be home at Christmas. Instead, I will be in the Bahamas. I think it will be a very different Christmas experience for me, without the snow, the snowball fights, the skiing, and all my family. Instead, this time maybe I will celebrate Christmas at the beach. With a pretty blond girl…of course. 32


Chapel Talks

been members of the community or they feel that this is something that they’ve experienced here that was unpleasant that they want to share. It’s not just things that occur off campus,” Pollach said. “And when we welcome those talks, it always provokes a response from students, but that’s part of being challenged. Part of listening as a community is being open to the voices that we don’t necessarily agree with.” One such challenging talk was given by Cathy Bai ’11 during the 2009-10 school year. She addressed gender issues and relations at EHS, a subject that Bai said she and others felt at the time the School needed to talk more about. Bai said she wasn’t concerned about receiving criticism for her views, and though she got mixed responses to her talk, it definitely started discussion, which was her ultimate goal. “That’s one thing I love about this school: they give you a voice,” Bai said. “When you have a peer that’s the same age as you, on the same level as you, who is up there speaking to the whole school community about something that they’re passionate about, that really says a lot.” Faculty members also give chapel talks on Fridays. Although faculty talks are not as frequent, the students value

and appreciate them just as much as the student talks. “Whenever I see a teacher go up there, I really, really listen carefully. The chapel is quiet, everyone’s tuned in,” Bai said. “A teacher giving a chapel talk really gives us insight to their personal beliefs, and that’s really special.” Two years ago, English teacher Brad Park gave a memorable chapel talk about the 10 things he loves about EHS, opening up to the community about his faith and giving shout-outs to many Episcopal people and activities. “When I started thinking about the aspects of this place that really make it feel like home to me, I thought ‘Well, that would be a nice thing to share with the community.’ So to me, it was a way of thanking the community for offering this world to me and to my family,” Park said. “I hope that the students see us as members of the community that are in many ways on the same level as them. I think that it’s an equalizer, to some extent. Of course, our experiences and our perspectives are going to be different, but I hope that they understand that my interaction with them, my experience with the community, isn’t just limited to the time we see each other on dorm or in the classroom.”

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Another memorable faculty chapel talk that is remembered by many recent alumni was given in 2007 by Mason New, chair of the English Department. Earlier that year, New had trained for and completed the New York City marathon in honor of many friends and family members, both New’s and others, who had lost the fight to cancer. By turns humorous and moving, New’s talk inspired all who heard it, including alumna Frances deSaussure ’06, who, while no longer an EHS student, read the text of New’s speech and was inspired to also run a marathon. “I almost thought that this would be the last lap of the marathon, that the actual experience couldn’t be understood by me until I had synthesized it, that I had analyzed it, that I had put it into some form of writing,” New said. “So when I was training, I was thinking about how I would speak about this, what I would tell the students about it. It seemed to me that that was a really important part of actually running the marathon.”

New said that the most important thing he wanted to convey was that the marathon was a struggle for him, and that he was only able to complete it because he was running for a cause in which he believed strongly. His hope was that it would inspire the community to take on their own struggles in order to benefit others. By sharing his experience with the students and faculty at Episcopal, he closed the loop for himself. “I’ve seen faculty members really bare all of their weaknesses over the years, and I’ve seen students bare their weaknesses, too. The faculty – we’re not superhuman beings. We’re just like every other human being. So I think when students see that humanity, when those barriers come down, that’s what makes it memorable,” New said.

To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, ple visit our website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapelt

To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, please visit our website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapeltalks.

Elisabeth Merten ’13 I used to think that people who lived through major catastrophes were destined to do so, to tell the story afterward. Every day on TV or in the newspaper, we hear at least one tale of survival told by someone who witnessed some kind of disaster; whether natural, political, or accidental. I never thought that I could be that person with a story to tell. Not just any story; a story of extreme change that altered my life and so many others forever. I remember the day clearly: Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2010, was my first day of semester exams as a freshman in high school. Not only that, but it was also my first day of exams at my new school in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where my dad works for the embassy. I came home that day feeling quite irritable, Elisabeth Merten ’13 (second from right) with her parents, Ken and not wanting to deal with the guests that were due to come at Susan Merten, and her sister, Caryl. 4:30, let alone study for exams the next day. Finally, after cramming for my French exam for two hours, I started on world history. I had just laid down on my bed to review my index cards when I felt a slight shuddering coming from somewhere far below, accompanied with a strange rumbling sound. Initially, I thought it was a generator malfunction and tried to focus on studying. But the shuddering snapped abruptly into a violent shaking, and the low rumble transformed into an earsplitting roar. I watched in disbelief as I saw my bedroom walls move rapidly back and forth, knocking over my bookshelf and sending all the books tumbling. The porcelain lamps shattered as they hit the floor, the framed pictures on the wall crashed to the ground, while my mirror swung in circles on its nail. My bed slid away from the wall, on a collision course with my desk on the other side of the room, making me incapable of moving. I screamed for my sister in the next room until my voice was hoarse, but all I could hear was the roar of the earth shifting. Time slowed to forever, and the thunderous noise of the earthquake filled my head until I could think of nothing safer to do than squeeze my eyes shut and bury my face in my quilt. The seconds dragged on, until finally it stopped.

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Chapel Talks

Brad Park, Faculty Member since 2007 So then, this chapel talk exists as a meld of the thinking, observing, and list making I have done about my understanding of God since that moment when Lloyd Floyd stared back at me with his wonderful grin. I wanted to entitle it “God. Love. Episcopal. Mr. Park’s Checklist of the Proof of the Life Force Running Through Us All Everyday If We Are Willing To Open Our Eyes and Hearts,” but Mrs. Park said that was stupid. So instead, I’ll just call it “10 Things I Love Here…” …10. I love chapel and everything that goes on here. The chill that runs down my spine when Gideon wraps up Brad Park in chapel with his 2010-11 advisory group. another terrific allegorical anecdote with an “amen” that hovers perfectly in the silence, coursing through and connecting us all. The electricity that shoots from you as you shout the triumphant verses of “On Our Way Rejoicing” before returning home to your other families. Holding Mrs. Park’s hand and crying with Doc and so many of you as we said goodbye to Mrs. Hoisington. Then, being steadied by Mrs. Epes’ wonderful understanding of life. Friday chapels that serve as the metaphor for why I teach: a celebration of students’ talents and gifts. To hear, to experience, to be lifted and inspired by your voices, your music. Jasmine Jones’ impassioned a cappella. Russell Pierson channeling Aretha Franklin. Drew Dugan’s rhythmic rolling of the cabasa. Cathy Bai tickling the ivories and belting out another soulcrushing original piece of her art. Then, just when I think it cannot get any better, I lean forward in my back row pew and soak in the intelligent, funny, touching musings of thoughtful young people as they share where they’ve been and where they’re going. So, my answer to the question “What is your personal relationship with God?” is really quite simple. This place is my church.You are all my religion. Through you I see the life force, the God that makes life so beautiful, so worth living. And for this, my friends, I am indeed thankful.

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Chapel Talks

To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, ple visit our website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapelt

To read these and other chapel talks in their entirety, please visit our website: www.episcopalhighschool.org/chapeltalks.

Mason New, Faculty Member since 2001 So when Scott announced that he would not run, that the marathon exacted too great a toll on his body, I felt that an injustice had occurred. As I am wont to do occasionally, I announced the contrary, “Well, someone has to run it; I’ll do it.” Now, you all need to know something. I am not an athlete like Mrs. Ferrell or Mr. Walsh. I’m not a former college athlete like Mr. Watts or Ms. Gregory. In fact, there are few activities that I HATE more than running. So when all of my friends heard me announce that I would run a marathon, they laughed. “Are you serious?” one asked. “I just told you I would do it. I’ll run it,” I said. When I began to train, it was 25 degrees outside. My first run was 20 minutes, and I stopped not because of the cold, but because I couldn’t run anymore. 20 minutes. At my pace, that was probably just over a mile. I thought, “Well, only 26 times this, and I’m there.” But that wouldn’t help my worry... …But I will tell you now, that a marathon is not about running. It is not about legs, and heart, and lungs. It is about mind, and the battle, the struggle to finish is waged there. A marathon has no time limit: you begin and you may not end. There is no buzzer announcing the end of the game. Instead, there are only you and your thoughts and how you can put one foot forward, and then the other, and repeat for over 20,000 times. Thus, I learned much on this day about how limits do not exist in the mind, and how anyone, with enough determination, can run 26.2, even if the only person he passes has “The Turtle” written on the back of his jersey. I learned that an entire community, New York, is not a cold and distant place. African-American churches, Latino men and women dancing in the street, Irish musicians, young professionals in Manhattan all join on this one day to celebrate the human struggle, to share the pain, and delight in the triumph. As poet John Donne wrote, “No man is an island. Ask not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee.” We are all together in this life. n

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A C A M PA I G N F O R E P I S C O PA L H I G H S C H O O L

SPRING 2011

The EHS Promise is a campaign that aspires to strengthen and secure the very core of the Episcopal experience.

The new Academic West Wing will provide a beautiful space for students to study literature, history, theology, and world cultures.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

INSPIRE! ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AT EHS

Plans for the new and renovated Academic West Wing advance the study of the liberal arts at Episcopal.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER

Center will provide coordinated support to help all Episcopal students reach their full academic potential.

CELEBRATE SQUASH AND WRESTLING AT EHS Advancing two of the most beloved sports on The Hill.

THE PROMISE CONTINUES

An opportunity for the full EHS community to sustain the phenomenal campaign progress.

Significant priorities of The Promise include the construction of a new athletics complex to meet the needs of 43 interscholastic teams, the transformation of the David H. March Library into a true hub of intellectual life on campus, and the renovation of the West Wing as the academic center of campus. In addition, this effort acknowledges the School’s greatest assets – students and faculty – with an innovative expansion of financial aid support for middle-income families and an increase in the availability of campus housing for Episcopal’s outstanding faculty. Lastly, The Promise includes a high priority of environmental and fiscal sustainability that includes the care of our campus, a commitment to LEED certification for all new construction, and the Roll Call, our annual fund that provides critical yearly support of the School’s program and mission.

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INSPIRE! CELEBRATING ACADEMICS AT EHS

The EHS Promise campaign has made great strides. The magnificent new athletics facility is a constant center of activity and energy; the beautifully renovated and expanded March Library is exceeding all expectations as the new academic hub of campus; the renovated Penick Hall is welcoming prospective families in a comfortable and spacious setting; and the MiddleIncome Financial Aid Initiative has provided critical support to deserving students who enrich our community. One significant project remains: the renovation of the Academic West Wing, an important building on campus, housing the English and Social Studies departments. ADVANCING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

At the heart of the Episcopal High School experience is an exceptional liberal arts education. Episcopal’s English and Social Studies departments are where some of the School’s most revered masters have taught and where timeless, life-shaping lessons are learned. Today, the classrooms in which Episcopal students study literature, history, theology, and world cultures simply do not provide the inspiring environment in which students learn best. Through The EHS Promise, a carefully planned and thoroughly renovated Academic West Wing will not only address the current classroom shortcomings, but it will provide an enhanced and proper entrance for the building that serves as the academic center of campus and houses the School’s exemplary Social Studies and English departments. Classrooms in the renovated space will be larger and brighter, inviting open

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discussions and captivating presentations. Assistant Head for Academics Mary Fielder said, “A renovated Academic Wing, one with more expansive, light-filled teaching and learning spaces, will create the ideal environment in which students and teachers can explore ideas, stretch themselves intellectually, and work collaboratively to solve problems.” In addition to increasing in size, classrooms will increase in number, which will allow more faculty to have rooms of their own. Given the opportunity to create a “home base,” faculty take ownership of larger classrooms, lend them personality with their belongings, and enhance the space

for inspired learning. “When humanities teachers have teaching spaces they can call their own, the aesthetics inspire both teacher and student alike to critical, creative thinking,” added Fielder.


A C A M PA I G N F O R E P I S C O PA L H I G H S C H O O L

THE ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER

In addition to providing dramatically improved classroom space, the Academic West Wing will bring learning specialists, faculty, students, and independent tutors together in the new Academic Support Center (ASC). Recognizing that students excel and struggle in unique ways, Episcopal has developed services geared specifically toward addressing the many and wideranging areas of support that enable students to reach their full academic potential. EHS Learning Specialist Anita Doyle looks forward to bringing these services together. “The Academic Support Center will be a more efficient and effective resource for both teachers and students,” Doyle explained. “Students will have a designated place to go to get help with homework, find a quiet study space, or meet a tutor. The new group and individual work spaces will allow more flexibility to better address the diverse needs of students.We can work with a student individually, in small groups, or just supervise students who are ready to work independently.” Episcopal’s three learning specialists provide 20 percent of the student body with direct academic support. Of those, more than half follow programs that are developed specifically for them and include support with study skills such as organization and time management, diagnostic teaching, and subject area tutoring.

THE ACADEMIC WEST WING (BUILT IN 1929)

A significant renovation will maximize the use of the academic wing, creating flexibility so that faculty can better deliver a dynamic and challenging curriculum. Improvements will include: • Updated classroom configurations and furnishings; • Expanded wireless laptop technology and audio-visual capabilities; • Reconfigured third-floor “study hall,” allowing expansion of undersized classrooms; • Redesigned and dedicated space for learning specialists; • Increased handicap accessibility; • Replacement of the HVAC systems; and an • Enhanced and proper entrance.

In addition to the learning specialists, students have access to professional and peer tutors as well as the EHS Writing Center. Tutors are coordinated through the learning specialists and work with input provided by faculty on an individual basis. The Writing Center is led by a faculty member and staffed by paid students, who are recommended by AP English teachers. The Writing Center typically assists a remarkable 175 students at some point throughout the year with organization, composition, and editing.

• Sufficient and flexible accommodations designed for facilitation of group study sessions, as well as supervised individual study; • Spaces appropriate for one-on-one sessions with learning specialists and tutors; • Meeting space to accommodate conferences among tutors, learning specialists, faculty, and students to plot the best course for meeting students’ individual academic needs, as well as small group training sessions for faculty; • Designated adaptive technology space, configured to allow for technology training; and • Office space for learning specialists that accommodates meetings with students, parents, and faculty.

The Academic Support Center will integrate these services, strengthening them through increased coordination and collaboration. The space will include:

“Having a space specifically designed to offer academic support to any student needing services will send a message to the community about the School’s

commitment to the academic success of all EHS students,” said Anne Carver, EHS English teacher and assistant learning specialist. To learn about how leadership gifts to The Promise Campaign may be recognized in the Academic Support Center, contact Bob Eckert in the EHS Development Office at 703-933-4056 or RCE@episcopalhighschool.org.

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CELEBRATE SQUASH AND WRESTLING AT EHS ADVANCING TWO OF THE MOST BELOVED SPORTS ON THE HILL

Two of the most prized sports at Episcopal are squash and wrestling. The Maroon has competed on the mat since 1913 and on the squash court since the 1920s. Both sports have only increased in popularity over the years, and The EHS Promise has responded to students’ enthusiasm with significant enhancements to facilities. The Cage, home to EHS wrestlers, has been completely renovated and now features two full-size mats, a new ventilation system, and an electronic mat lift. It is a brighter and more exciting venue in which EHS can host tournaments and dual meets, and one that provides Coach Steve Castle and his team with greater flexibility during practices as they advance one of Episcopal’s most time-honored sports. The Goodman Squash Center was simply, and literally, not large enough to contain the passion for the game that continues to build among Episcopal students, so four new courts were added in time for the 2010-11 season. The additional courts and new lobby area make the center an

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ideal venue for matches, tournaments, and large-scale events. “Our squash center is the best in the greater D.C. metro area,” said Frank Phillips, head coach of boys’ varsity squash. “You would have to travel two hours to find anything that matches the top-flight quality, and quantity – nine – of our courts.” Because squash and wrestling have been of great importance to many EHS families and alumni, leadership gifts to The Promise Campaign may be recognized prominently in these beautiful, newly renovated spaces. For more information, please contact Bob Eckert in the Development Office at 703-933-4056 or RCE@episcopalhighschool.org.


A C A M PA I G N F O R E P I S C O PA L H I G H S C H O O L

THE PROMISE CONTINUES The focus of The Promise Campaign has turned fully to the next and final phase: the renovation of the academic wing and the full funding of the MiddleIncome Financial Aid Initiative. Only by embracing the dedication and loyalty of the full EHS community will the remaining $19 million of the $85 million goal be achieved.

To learn more about The EHS Promise and become part of the great tradition of stewardship that has enabled Episcopal to pursue excellence in all areas of school life for generations, please call, write, or e-mail: THE EHS PROMISE CAMPAIGN

Episcopal High School 1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302 Toll Free 877-EHS-1839

Robert C. Eckert Director of Development 703-933-4056 rce@episcopalhighschool.org

WWW.EPISCOPALHIGHSCHOOL.ORG/THEPROMISE 85 M 80 M 70 M

66M

60 M 50 M 40 M 30 M 20 M 10 M 0M

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John Melvin and Frank Dusch enjoyed their annual get-together for a Carolina Panthers football game. Editor’s Note: My thanks to Brad Tazewell for his service as class correspondent. He is ready for a break from the duties, and I would welcome a new volunteer to take over the position. Please contact me at 703-933-4046 if you are interested.

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There are several ways to submit news for Class Notes:

Ned Bailey continues to assist the chaplain at the Chapel of the Transfiguration in Penick Valley in Southern Pines, N.C., and he is still chair of the grounds committee. He had major surgery in October but says, “It didn’t stop this ole hoss.” Ned says, “God bless The High School and all of you!”

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Class Correspondent Needed. Please call Elizabeth Watts, class notes editor, to volunteer: 703-933-4046.

1947

Class Correspondent Needed. Please call Elizabeth Watts, class notes editor, to volunteer: 703-933-4046.

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Hugh Richardson 1819 Peachtree Road, NE #200 Atlanta, GA 30309-1850 (O) 404-351-0941 It has been said that getting into an elite boarding school today is almost as difficult as being admitted to an elite college from an elite boarding school. Depending on the applicant, legacies may or may not carry as much weight as they formerly did in the admissions process. The Class of ’48 had at least seven sons of Old Boys, a couple of grandsons, and even a great-grandson. George Denny was the great-grandson of the Rev. Kinloch Nelson 1858; Phil Hammond’s grandfather was Henry Edmunds 1888; and Holland Wilmer’s granddad was William Holland Wilmer 1882. Staige Blackford 1916 was the father of Staige Blackford; Thomas H. Fox, Jr. ’20 was the dad of Tom Fox; Ed Gregory’s father was E.D. Gregory 1890; Chris Holland was the son of C.V. Holland 1917; Burwell Manning’s dad was B.D. Manning 1916; Charles Plummer 1916 was the father of Bill Plummer; and Al Trout was the son of Hugh Trout 1898. (All the errors and omissions are mine.) Frank Meade, the 1948 tennis captain, is still winning on the courts, but his home base is no longer Hilton Head, S.C. He and wife Joby have relocated to a Charleston, S.C., retirement complex called Bishop Gadsden. And, Frank has already won the South Carolina state and southern championships in the 80-year-old category. In moving, the Meades said so long to Hilton Headers like Merrill and Paul Barringer and

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Shirley and Norris Broyles, who have second or third homes there, and will say hello, if they haven’t already, to the Ben Moores, the Henry Fairs, Rufus Barkley’s widow, Nella, and Dolly and Jim Small. Reached in Charleston, Jim was busy working on his taxes. Unfortunately, Dolly broke her hip about a year ago and so did Jim. Now, Jim has busted the other hip as well as an arm. Let’s hope Dolly and Jim’s bones mend quickly so they can enjoy their second home in Cashiers, N.C., near David Higgins and his wife, who hail from Birmingham. Jim said Mollie and Henry Fair’s son, Henry III, is an aerial photographer and has done himself proud. Last spring, he took pictures of the Gulf oil spill, and his spectacular photography has been displayed and received rave reviews at The Gibbs, Charleston’s main art gallery. Alex “Flash” Hamilton came from real horse country, Warrenton, Va., and his family owned a thoroughbred named Blue Aster. Yet Alex kept it a secret how Blue Aster performed on the tracks. One thing everybody knew was that Alex was the best caricaturist on the Holy Hill. His sketches of faculty members in “Whispers” were matchless. And his column, “Smoke Rings,” in The Chronicle rivaled that of Bill Dunn and Gus Middleton’s “School Bull.” Alex could be the father of the ’48’s class baby. Master Byron Hamilton was born 10 years ago to Alex and his second wife, Donna. Alex has recently been taking chemotherapy for lung cancer at his Corinth, Miss., home, and he is in our thoughts and prayers. The names are almost the same: Julius Garfinckel, the now-defunct department store in D.C. near the Lowe’s Capitol Theater where many classmates would take in movies, which occasionally featured John Garfield (“The Postman Always Rings Twice”), who was born Julius Garfinkle. Bill Hodges reports, “Upon turning 80, I find myself in good health, still married, and active. I am in charge of restoring a steam engine and caboose, and I sing in a church choir and in the Lynchburg College Choral Union. I also participate in a writers group and

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Winston Holt ’49 (left) and his son, Winston ’82 (right), traveled to Scotland for a hunting trip.

am in charge of the garden beds at the Summit Retirement community, where I live.” From other classes: Beverly and Frank Talbott ’47 have moved from Danville, Va., to Richmond, where Frank has reconnected with his EHS Boullie buddy, Eddie Leake ’47. Frank and Beverly are living in the same retirement community, Westminster Canterbury, as former Danvillian Eddie “Skinny” Meade ’43, our Frank’s older brother and husband of the lovely Lucy Meade.

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Winston Holt 209 Nottingham Road Richmond, VA 23221-3114 (H) 804-359-1634 (O) 804-780-2030 wholt@davenportllc.com Your scribe has mustered enough phone time to have some very good conversations with fellow classmates as follows: John Brown is still active with doctor of veterinary medicine and doctor of philosophy in toxicity degrees, having also served as professor at the University of Alabama. Some time back he was state toxicologist in South Carolina. John mentioned that his son, Dexter, is in the restaurant business in Richmond. Hopefully, Lulee and I can sample some of his expertise soon. All is well with John’s family, and he sends his best to The High School. I caught Ned Conquest while bedridden with the flu at his home in the D.C. area. Ned is busy as an adventure/ Westerns author and had just completed his latest book, “Soldiers of The Southern Cross.” Another recent oeuvre is “Lost Shepherd” – all of which should

make for imaginative, active reading. Kent Ford is living the life of a planter/pioneer/Western he-man in the western part of Virginia where he grew up. Kent has a doctor of philosophy in physics and recently retired from his physics/astronomy work for the federal government. Kent and his wife, Ellen, ran into George Thompson ’48 and his wife, Rab, in Marshall, Va., when George received a Conservation of Watersheds award at Vint Hill Station. Kent III ’75 lives in Colorado, another son is in Vermont, and his daughter is in North Carolina. Kent and Ellen have three grandchildren, ages 10, 12, and 20, the last being in Lehigh University’s engineering school. A chip off the old block! Herb Donovan is enjoying his duties as a retired Episcopal bishop, now serving as deputy to the presiding bishop for Anglican communion relations, whose office is on Second Avenue in New York City. Knowing Herb, he will be a very effective communicator. The Donovans live in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Herb retired as bishop of Arkansas, I believe, in 1997, though obviously not from good work on the Church’s behalf. Herb’s PR work for the Episcopal Church takes him to London at least once a year. He mentioned that he was at EHS to confirm and preach last spring. In November last, Herb and Mary sat with EHS Board Chair John Townsend ’73 and family at John’s tribute dinner from the Episcopal Charities of New York, along with Kathleen and Rob Hershey. Herb related to me the sad news about our old Sunday place of worship, Emmanuel On-the-Hill Church at the Seminary. It burned recently. Of course, Callaway Chapel

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had long since replaced it for EHS, but it still is a loss. Dick Boyd served in the U.S. Army’s Security Agency after schooling, and then entered his family’s hardware business in North Carolina. Dick and his wife have two children – no grandchildren yet. He stays in shape with tournament tennis, during which he ran into Frank Meade ’48, another tennis star. Dick remembers fondly his early days of athletics in track and field events at EHS. Lou Benedict left EHS and moved with his family to South Africa, where he completed his education as an engineer. Lou returned to the U.S. after flight school to serve in Tucson, Ariz., as a pilot in the Air Force for three years. After service, he got into the mining business and then the manufacture of construction machines. Lou married his college sweetheart; they have four children, who produced 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren! Lou drove through the EHS campus 20 years ago and was surprised – I told him he should see it now! Lou keeps up with Gordon Leggett ’50 and sees him often. Dick Hobson was in the Virginia Legislature after finishing Princeton and Harvard Law School. After his legislative service, Dick did some lobbying at the Virginia Legislature. Dick and Kay are impressed by the School’s facilities, especially the Callaway Chapel. Son Lee Hobson ’83 formerly worked with Julian Robertson ’51 and now has his own hedge fund in Dallas. My son, Winston ’82, worked with him previously and stays in touch. Kay and Dick have a daughter, Huntley. The Hobsons now are proud grandparents of eight total! Doug Mackall is trying to retire as a successful “country” lawyer but stays active as the Commonwealth’s attorney for Clarke County. Doug has a son and daughter and sees a lot of Eddie Leake ’47, Judge Jack Clarkson ’48, and Charlie Gamble ’50, all former football teammates at EHS. Doug tells a wonderful story of the EHS-VES football game in 1948 in which, backed up on his own goal, the VES center, in punt formation, snapped the ball over

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the punter, who was standing on his goal line. The situation precipitated a hard rush for the ball by both Doug and Buck Boxley ’50 in the end zone. An “altercation” between the two stalwarts ensued, whereupon the referee threw a flag but immediately reversed the call when the combatants turned out to be teammates, giving the ball and the “jealously guarded and won” six points to Doug! John Ball Nichols is in the insurance business in Louisville, Ky. His wife is from Gallatin, Tenn. He served as county clerk for 32 years and has three children – two boys and one girl – no grandchildren yet. A son teaches at the Episcopal School in Jacksonville, Fla. Bodley Stites earned an M.D. at Columbia University after college at Williams in Massachusetts. He has two boys and a girl, plus several grandchildren. Bodley has retired from practicing internal medicine, but spent some “hard” years in the late ’50s at Camp St. Barbara in South Korea in I Corps, U. S. Army. The going was rough there, but Bodley loved Japan, where he took some leave. Along with an active family, Bodley has a Labrador dog, who is “raising hell” all the time – a true dog whose actions are well-known to us other canine lovers! Lou Showalter spent three years after U.Va. as an officer in the U.S. Navy, after which he received his M.B.A. from Harvard. Lou then worked for the Young President’s Organization, then for W. R. Grace in petro-chemicals at its Waynesboro plant. Lou’s busy business life then embarked into the wholesale hardware business, then the Old Virginia Brick Co. in Salem that sold brick to U.Va. for restoration projects. Lou keeps his considerable mind active by stock trading online with several firms. He and his wife have five grandchildren, and they live in Roanoke. Lou’s younger brother, Nelson, went to Virginia Episcopal School and then Hampden Sydney. Jimmy Massie stays busy as a gentleman farmer in cattle and grain at his farm in Goochland County. His namesake, Jimmy III, is active in the Virginia legislature; son Alex is in real estate;

and daughter Sarah is married to Stuart Grattan, whose father, George, many of us remember a very good hurdler at WFS and U.Va. There are 10 Massie grandchildren. Hulett Sumlin, the “Count,” knows my wife Lulee’s older brother in Atlanta and was CEO of Piedmont Hospital in that city. Hulett received a pharmacy degree at the University of Georgia, after which he spent several years in the Air Force and then got a master’s degree in hospital administration from Georgia State University. He has three sons, all in Atlanta, with five grandsons and one granddaughter. Hulett last saw EHS in 1985 – needless to say, I told him of the great growth since then. John S. Warner is a retired neurologist, with both undergraduate and medical degrees from Vanderbilt University. He knew my wife, Lulee, while she was in the college and he was in medical school. Johnny is a professor emeritus at Vanderbilt School of Medicine and gives four lectures a year to the medical school senior neurology class. He and his wife, Peggy, have six grandchildren, and they have a lawyer and two doctors of medicine amongst their children. Son-in-law Paul Goldstein works at Maverick, a hedge fund run by Lee Ainslie ’82 and my son, Winston ’82. Pete Whitlock is heavy into horses and cattle on his western Virginia farm with wife Susan, who is a fellow financial advisor at the Charlottesville office of Davenport and Co. LLC. Pete enjoys fox hunting and many outdoor activities. We remember Pete as a track star at EHS. He only ran one year at W&L University, after which his track coach was drafted into the Korean War. Pete has one stepdaughter at W&L now. Fred Miller took the large corporate road by joining IBM, from which he retired as a strategic planner for the company. Fred graduated from Dartmouth and then joined the Air Force as an officer. His first wife died in 1988. He then moved to California in 1992 where he met his second wife. Fred is working on a family history, and tells me he and his wife each have a son and daughter with several grandchildren. A grandson is a Presidential

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Scholar at Northwestern University, where he is a classical tenor sax player. I asked Fred if his grandson had any jazz interest. The answer was an emphatic “No, he is aiming at the classics! Paul Wiedorn enjoys good health. He grew up in Bryn Mawr, Pa., and was a Navy “junior” while at EHS. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in industrial management, after which he served in the U.S. Navy as a commissioned officer. Paul’s hobby is hunting rabbits with French basset hounds, which he pursues in Loudon County. He does not shoot them, just enjoys the sport and chase. Paul said our late classmate Bennett Crain’s sister’s husband is a veterinarian who keeps a pack of foxhounds near Paul’s home. Paul’s two sons have produced six grandsons and one granddaughter – way to go, Paul! Peter Worthy – I couldn’t speak to Pete, but gathered he is doing well in Plantation, Fla., from whence he applies his engineering skills in Miami on some part-time endeavors. A skilled and dedicated golfer, Pete plays the various Homestead, Va., courses in good weather, where he keeps another home. As for myself, I am still working at Davenport in Richmond. My family consists of Winston ’82, wife, Jen, and three daughters who live in Darien, Conn., plus Ghillie, a German pointer, and Baxter, an English hunting spaniel (he works as mentioned before in N.Y.C. at Maverick); plus daughter Neely, who with husband Richard McNulty lives in Hanover, N.H., with their son, daughter, and poodle, Cisco. Richard is an associate professor at Tuck Business School of Dartmouth, and Neely works at the Hood Museum using her artistic talents inherited from Lulee. Life has been good. We travel often, up and down the Eastern seaboard as well to Europe and faraway places, having great fun and adventures. This year Winston ’82 and I enjoyed trips within the U.S. and abroad. First we headed south to New

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Orleans in late April. We spent two days and two nights exploring the bayous outside the city and the nightlife downtown, especially the famous Bourbon Street, where we enjoyed excellent dining, wandering up and down the street. One day we took a motor skiff tour of some bayous nearby. Our guide showed us where the critters hang out, especially the alligators who would take food from his hand and behaved like spoiled house pets. The guide’s keen eye spotted eagles, herons, and turtles, as well as mammals on the canal banks. Nightlife was a treat with outstanding food and drink in places recommended by friends. Before and after dinner we visited Bourbon Street. The action was noisy and pretty tawdry but free of the roughness and meanness sometimes evident in such a venue. Jazz and its heritage are still big down there. The BP oil spill had just taken place, so the gloom that event put on the area had not yet taken hold. We also visited the World War II Museum, which author Stephen Ambrose had a big part in getting started. It was financed locally as well as nationally and was well worth the visit. It played up the beachhead landings in Europe and the Pacific as a tribute to the famous Higgins boat that was invented and built in that area. On the whole, New Orleans is an attractive, well-run city with much to see and do, fine restaurants, and a new, first-class airport. Later in the year, Winston told me he had been invited by a good friend and client to his annual red deer hunting trip on the Island of Lewis in the Hebrides Islands off the west coast of Scotland. I had met his friend in London on one our previous trips, and when invited to join the group, I immediately accepted. Our host’s lodge was a big Victorian-era country home with lots of land, a loch (lake), and a bevy of servants, ghillies, maids, cooks, and the bleakest terrain one has ever seen. Winston and the other hunters went out two days. I could only join them on the last day since my luggage got lost with all my

“tromping” gear inside. This turned out to be a godsend, as it allowed me to tag along on an auto tour of the island with our hostess and one of the other guest’s wives. We saw a lot of the island, including old Norwegian and Celtic ruins and ceremonial spots similar to Stonehenge. We also visited some homes where crafters were making Harris Tweed from the wool of the ubiquitous Cheviot sheep, which are the only wild animals on the island other than the red deer. Winston had no shooting luck the first day, but on the second day, when I could walk with him, his ghillie, and a local commercial fisherman who was hired to bring along Frank, a Shetland pony, who would bring out carcasses of the stags when shot, Winston took an old stag with a 200-yard shot. The stag’s antlers were worn down, which is desirable from the viewpoint of preservation of the herd. A routine return back to the boat and the house through hills, water, and marsh was marred by a near fatal (for Frank the pony) accident, when the pony got stuck up to his belly in some quicksand. After pushing, Winston hit on the idea of offering a mint candy to Frank just out of reach, so he kept lunging for it. His sweets appetite and will to live, plus the ghillie’s pushing, finally got him out, saving his life. The carcass of the deer was treated at the house and the meat is used for food for the locals who work on the place. There were 13 couples in the party, all British but for the two Holts. We left after a glorious three-night and two-day house party, where we were feted with fabulous English (Scottish!) breakfasts, packed lunches, afternoon tea, and first-class dinners with two wines and which featured, on the last night, a dozen kinds of ice cream for dessert since our host, Nick, not only had a great cellar and taste in wines, but had a giant sweet tooth! On the way home, we enjoyed a night in London at a very posh hotel, the Royal Aero Club, and a visit with Winston’s family, before returning to Richmond.

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Gish Anderson 109 Oak Hill Lane New Bern, NC 28562 (H) 252-635-6562 gishgay@earthlink.net and John Ritchie 1848 Westview Road Charlottesville, VA 22903 (H) 434-984-4729 jritchiejr32@yahoo.com You all are too modest. Your news was so sparse that I tried Googling and quickly found that Louise Maybank, who attended our 60th Reunion with David last summer, received South Carolina’s highest civilian award, The Order of the Palmetto, last fall for her work as a champion for conservation. The governor cited her guidance of Charleston County’s Greenbelt Fund, which has preserved 13,000 acres across the county; her leadership in establishing the Wadmalaw plan, which has been key to the retention of the rural character of that sea island; and her efforts on behalf of other conservation initiatives such as the Lowcountry Open Land Trust. Congratulations, Louise, and thank you for all you have done to preserve South Carolina’s Lowcountry. Carol and Don Scott’s Christmas card briefly described an extraordinary birding trip that they took to the rain forests of New Guinea and the wet tropics of northeast Australia. They have now covered seven continents in pursuit of their birding hobby and say this may be their last big trip. I hope not. Jim McNeely reports that he and his wife, Bobby, just bought their first pair of snowshoes, which he has tried out in a forest near his house in South Freeport, Maine. When his note was written, he was looking forward to the arrival of three grandchildren, whom he was planning to put on his ancient sixfoot toboggan. I am impressed by how a young man from Marietta, Ga., has assimilated so well into New England and hope that my daughter, who reported a few nights ago that her home in Lexington, Mass., had received 70 inches of snow, can do as well.

Julian Robertson ’51 hosted the New York regional campaign event in April 2010. From left: Robertson, Rob Hershey, Gaston Caperton ’59, and Landon Hilliard ’58.

Uh-oh, just heard a snow prediction for Charlottesville! Madeline and Gordon Leggett walked segments of the distance from Grange-over-Sands in Cumbria, England, to Whitby, Yorkshire, with three friends in September and spent several days touring Edinburgh after the walk.

1951

Walter Reed (H) 707-448-3347 waltnloli@earthlink.net 60th Reunion: Nov. 11, 2011

Dear Classmates and Friends: This has been a busy time for me as I am not only reporting on us as individuals, but also doing my best to get you all to gather on Nov. 11 at The High School for our 60th (and possibly last) Reunion. Of course, we will continue to gather in small numbers from time to time, and I (and my successors) will keep the rest of us posted, so be of good cheer. And now for the details: Helen and Harry Arnold – Harry is pretty busy in real estate right now and said that, though he should be retired by now, he just can’t seem to do it. It was some time before I could get him on the phone, but had a nice chat with his most efficient secretary who told

me that she has worked for Harry for 42 years! Harry still lives and works in Monroe, Ga., though he admitted that they really love going on cruises, usually to the Caribbean area. When pressed, he allowed as how they also have been to the Mediterranean area and other places, also, so they are really professional travelers. Harry said they rarely leave home except for cruises and probably won’t make the 60th, but I assured him the door stays open until November, which makes him a maybe. Kay and Bill Blake – Bill sounds hale and hearty and assured me that they will attend, hence their answer is a definite yes. We had a nice chat. Bill is still very active in High School affairs and remembered his time with Julian Robertson playing football. Betty and Frank Boxley – Frank sounds pretty good, though he shares back problems with many of us. His trips to a fitness center and good old Tylenol enable him to play tennis a couple of times a week. He also plays cards but not the game Loli and I play in our daily routine (cribbage). I promised to teach him when we are in Roanoke next. Frank gave me a definite maybe on the 60th, but should know more when I make my mid-August follow up. Marilyn and Tom Buist – Tom is a retired lawyer, but keeps involved for

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the fun of it. They will be gathering with close friends soon, including Dave Maybank ’50 and Bob Page. He promised to see if he could get a definite yes from Bob, which I appreciate as Bob was my first friend at The High School our rat year. I was really surprised when Tom told me that he and Marilyn were playing cards as we spoke and that it was called “spite and malice.” It just so happens we play the same game every time our little family gathers. The kids are especially keen on it because they accuse Loli of cheating! (Of course she denies it, but always palms a card from time to time just to hear them shout and point.) Tom gave me a definite maybe on the 60th, which I will follow up on in mid-August (and who knows, maybe we’ll find time for a little spite and malice). Marion and Bill Calvert – Marion continues to be fine while Bill, though okay now, just had a stent placed in his heart to correct a half-blocked blood vessel. He and Marion have started daily walks to ensure healthy bodies. Bill’s brother, Sam ’47, recently passed away, a source of deep sadness for them. Bill finds solace in his barbershop singing group and in visiting their fast-growing family. He has given me a definite maybe on the 60th, but I believe that he may change his mind by mid-August. Mary Wayne and Kelly Dixon – A brief chat with Kelly, who still has many irons in the fire, including some duck hunting (Kelly, you’ve got to touch base with Jim Hickson). However, he gave me a positive yes on the 60th and asks for the details, which I promised will be forthcoming. Sibyl and Bob Fishburn – They have moved to a newly built home some seven blocks away from the old home. Sibyl says that despite the closeness, it’s quite a wrench after spending 42 years in the in the old, familiar place. Bob has discovered e-books, but I told him that personally I just have to have a real book on the shelf to review what I have forgotten. Bob promised to come to the 60th, if Pegram does. (Note: Pegram said yes, so Bob will come, right?) Ann and Pegram Harrison – Yea, Pegram said definitely yes, so that settles

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the Fishburn issue, right? We had a nice chat and Pegram says they will be vacationing in Latin America soon, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where they plan to take tango lessons, and then to Chile for some of that good wine, but definitely avoiding any mine tours. I told him that next time he must let us know earlier so we can join up and provide them with Spanish interpreters for free. Isabelle and Tom Hunter – Tom says positively yes. He is winding up work on his fascinating biography, entitled “Memoirs of a Spaghetti Cowboy,” which contains a chapter about his High School days focused on the loners (and who of us can forget A.Y. Bryan ’48 from Texas?). As soon as I know it is published, I will let you know. Mildred and Jim Hickson – I had another grand chat with Jim and he tells me that he has downgraded his skiing and hunting and replaced much of them with two new loves, duplicate bridge and munitions loading for his own guns. He even has a small target range in his basement. I forgot to ask if he has a sign outside his house saying “House Insured by Smith and Wesson.” Jim has given me a definite maybe for the 60th, but since he will be at his Virginia property in October for bird hunting and in November for deer hunting, I believe we just might get a definite yes at my mid-August follow up; fingers are crossed. Barbara and Fred Hutchins – Fred gave me a definite maybe but promised to talk to Charlie Merriman, which means that we might see them both, isn’t that great? We discussed the state of today’s youth and agreed that we should have mandatory military service for all. This would surely result in the spread of discipline and a sense of responsibility at a much earlier age. I am reminded of our watchwords at VMI, which stated “I will not lie, steal, or cheat and I will report the one who does.” Pat and Otto Lowe – It was good hearing from Otto again. His has been a most successful life, and he has given a great deal to The High School. I will miss his presence in November, but

he kindly offered to spend next winter with us in sunny Northern California. Thanks, Otto, the guest room is ready when you are. Bettye and John Maddox – I received a definite yes from John and Betty, and that is really good news. John was busy, so our chat was brief, but we’ll do more in November. Sylvia and Lee Marston – A definite yes from Lee and Sylvia and, as usual, interesting things going on in his family. Good things include the fact that he is still playing squash and also that he and Sylvia are going to celebrate their 50th anniversary in Bermuda. Not satisfied with that, they are taking along their 17 children and grandchildren with them. Lee is on the Seminary Board and reported the sad fact that the lovely little church, where we worshipped (and checked out the pretty girls), has burned. Part of our reunion plan is a tour of the Seminary grounds and discussions with their students. Judy and Nigel MacEwan – A big yes from Nigel, a good friend for so long. I can hardly wait to see them and talk about their travels. Charlie Merriman – Charlie gave me a definite maybe, pointing out that there were many things to do, and he could not make a decision until later. He suggested mid-August as a better decision date, and I agreed to contact him at that time. Fingers crossed, Charlie. Sandra and Jake Mitchell – All’s well here and a definite maybe for now. Since they live nearby, I have high hopes. Hardy Patten – I caught Hardy at a bad time, well into a two-day power outage amid the snow and ice and just getting out of a cold shower. However, he quickly warmed up to how well The High School’s basketball team was doing (ranked No. 2 in the D.C. metro area) and reported that he’s never seen such attendance nor heard such cheering as at the team’s games. Oh, and by the way, he gave me a definite yes on his making the 60th. Jim Rumsey – Jim is still suffering from the loss of his brother but, being the man that he is, is spending much

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time helping his sister-in-law with all the difficult actions that come from such a tragedy. Jim is committed to family now so I have him down as a possible maybe. We all send our deepest sympathy to you and Bill. Loli and Walt Reed – Needless to say, we both are planning to be there at the 60th, and we are doing our best to improve our health. My Loli is an extraordinary cook and Weight Watchers expert who provides us with meals emphasizing fruits, veggies, fish, and chicken limited to about 1,200 calories. We also spend three to five days a week at the nearby Travis Air Force Base gym improving our physical fitness. We are feeling better, but it’s all in God’s hands, and we speak to him often. Fleming and Dick Rutledge – Dick continues to have many irons in the fire, especially his new strategic conference business, but he has again stepped forward to help me with the reunion. While I stay in touch with the class, Dick will handle the logistics there in Alexandria. Hence, between him, me, and The High School staff, we should be able to keep everyone informed and all questions answered. Julian Robertson is still on the top of his game and has recently formed a new investment partnership that includes John Townsend ’73, Episcopal’s chairman of the Board of Trustees. Frank Shoup – I have a possible maybe from Frank because he works and flies all over the place, but since he lives near The High School, I am hoping for a definite yes in August. Frank plays in the over-75 tennis tournaments and most recently made it to the finals, losing 10-8 in the third set (the other guy must have lied about his age). Both of his children are now back from Afghanistan, and I am sure we all know how relieved he is now. Patricia and Palmer Stearns – A definite yes from them. We compared notes about living in Africa (our daughter, Patricia, is still there after 12 years) and ended up discussing American buffalo (our Patricia works for the Wildlife Conservation Society, which saved the buffalo back in the 19th century). Palmer told me that Ted Turner owns

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the largest buffalo herd in the world, but says there’s too much fat in the meat. Mary Anne and Pete Van Blarcom – Pete had indicated his interest in attending, but his recent stroke means that I must wait a while to see how his recovery progresses. Mary Anne says he is home now and resting. Rosie and Doug Whitlock – Another definite yes from Doug, which is great news. Doug and Rosie now have a great-granddaughter plus several grandchildren. Doug is a graduate of Duke University and a member of ATO fraternity (which was founded at VMI, my alma mater, in 1865!). He spent eight action-packed years in the Marine Corps, followed by George Washington Law School and a successful career as a lawyer. Like most of us, he has had to soldier on despite knee and eye problems and now recently discovered prostate problems as well. I must add that my enjoyable chat with Doug was highlighted by my brief chat with his Rosie, who is absolutely delightful. Well, that’s how it stands this day in February 2011. Once again, I thank you all for making the time to talk with me and to seriously consider reuniting once again to revive those happy times we all shared so many years ago. Affectionately, Walt Reed.

1952

Fred Cleveland (H) 817-870-2087 FredClev@sbcglobal.net

1953

Ed Mullins (H) 803-782-3027 (O) 803-733-9401 ewm@nmrs.com Austin Moore is retired and lives with his wife, Plum, on the family property – Glenco Farms. It is a beautiful tract of land situated on the shores of Lake Murray, which is a few miles from Columbia, S.C. The son of a noted orthopedic surgeon, Austin did not carry on the tradition of practicing medicine, but founded the Palmetto Boot and Brace Shop in multiple

locations, as well as managed an egg farm that his father had begun. He has six children, three of whom reside in separate homes on Glenco Farms. He has just finished a grand 2,300-squarefoot addition to his house, which has a great view over the pasture to the lake. He and Plum are working on a garden party for this spring. Besides his recent work as an amateur architect, Austin has for years and continues to study and participate in many parts of the financial markets. He is wired into the futures market, NASDAQ, the New York Stock Exchange, and most every financial index. Mayo Read has now retired and lives with his wife, Ellen, in Charleston, S.C. In addition to his professional work, he and his wife opened a travel agency, which became quite successful. They took many EHS alumni on exotic trips. Some of those involved were Berno Hamilton ’55, Charles Merriman ’51, Luke Simons, and Landon Hilliard ’58. Although they have sold it, they still, on occasion, plan trips outside of the United States. Most recently, they supervised a barge trip in Alsace-Lorraine, which Nelson Weston ’54 enjoyed. Also on that trip was Clare Stewart, widow of Van Stewart ’54. Fred Hand and his wife, Frances, live on their 600-plus-acre pecan grove just outside Pelham, Ga. Fred retired from the practice of law three years ago. He was the district attorney for the South Georgia Judicial Circuit for eight years and, for the rest of his career, represented mostly plaintiffs in civil suits and also did criminal defense work. He practiced all over South Georgia and outside the state, from New Orleans all the way to D.C., where he argued a case before the U.S. Supreme Court, which is a rare feat for a lawyer. Bailey Patrick and wife Rose are doing well. He continues to practice law with the mega firm, K&L Gates, but not at a furious pace. They spend most weekends during the summer in Linville, N.C., a small mountain community. Their oldest daughter and her husband have a son, Patrick Mealy ’09, who graduated from EHS, and they have a daughter, Lauren Mealy ’12, who is now in her third year

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at The High School. His son, Bailey ’79, who also graduated from EHS, has three children enrolled at Episcopal – a daughter, Carter ’14, who is in the freshman class; a son, Wells ’12, in the junior class; and a son, Bailey ’11, in the senior class. All of his grandchildren have great things to say about The High School. He has visited Episcopal several times recently to witness a graduation and athletic events. The expanded campus facilities and the new athletics center are truly impressive and worth a visit back to The High School. He is happy to report that Charlotte is once again sending a number of new students to EHS. Peter Page has been retired since 1998 from a 30-plus-year career in the law in Alaska, where he resides with his wife, Donna. His stint included service as an Alaska district judge, state and federal prosecutor, and many years in private practice in Juneau. They spend more than six months there every year. He designed and built a house on some land in Oakland in Hanover County, Va., in 2000 and spends part of the winter and spring there. For more than 30 years, he has participated with his brother, Bob ’51, and a diverse group of a dozen or so others hunting moose on the Canadian side of the Stikine River for the meat, which has long been a staple of their diet. This past October, there were no moose to hunt, so he and Donna made the “Great Crossing” from New York to Southampton on the Queen Mary 2. They spent three days in London, which included a visit to the National Air Museum in Duxford, where a number of the airplanes he flew during his Air Force career were displayed. He maintains regular contact with Fred Hand, who has visited him in Alaska. He also has seen David Maybank ’50 and the Charleston crowd on occasion. They have a granddaughter, Anne Caperton Page ’13, at Episcopal and a grandson, Bobby Locke, who will interview for admission soon. On April 1, 2010, Greig Cummings retired as a senior vice president at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney after 50 years in the investment industry.

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Thirty-eight years were spent with Legg Mason. Travel and family (seven grandchildren) now consume his time and energy. As for myself, Ed Mullins, Jr., I continue to labor on the rock pile in Columbia, S.C. I am of counsel to Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, a law firm not near the size of Bailey Patrick’s, but which has grown considerably in size for a firm with its origin in Columbia, S.C. The firm was founded in 1886 by P.H. Nelson, the grandfather of Nelson Weston ’54, who was a very distinguished lawyer, and had four lawyers when I joined: my father; Pat Nelson, Nelson’s uncle and my mentor; and two other attorneys. It went from four lawyers to now 414 lawyers and 16 policy advisors with 12 offices in Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, West Virginia, D.C., and Boston. I expect any day, when I come in, to see a gold watch prominently displayed on my desk. Over the years, my law practice has brought me in touch with such legal luminaries as Jay Corson, Charles Tompkins ’54, Bailey Patrick, and Robert “Bee Bop” Baker ’54. My wife, Andrea, and I reside in Columbia as do our two sons, Wade and Andy, one of whom is a lawyer in another firm in Columbia, and our four granddaughters. HALL OF FAME

HALL OF FAME

Nelson Weston ’54 will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

1955

Sandy Wise (H) 614-766-1511 (O) 614-447-0281 hawppmd@aol.com

1956

Class Correspondent Needed. Please call Elizabeth Watts, class notes editor, to volunteer: 703-933-4046. 55th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

Fielder Israel retired for the second time in December 2010. He has been the chaplain at Williamsburg Landing retirement community. His new ministry will be taking community Bible study to France.

1957

Louie Gump (O) 423-282-3933 lhg703@yahoo.com 55th Reunion: June 2012

HALL OF FAME

The undefeated 1953 football team will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

1954

Charlie Covell (H) 352-336-0127 (O) 352-846-2000 Ext 251 covell@louisville.edu

Hunter Faulconer ’57 will be posthumously inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

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The Class of 1956 at their 50th Reunion in 2006.

1958

Carl Ragsdale (H) 252-726-3811 Crags1234@aol.com 55th Reunion: June 2013

Dabney and Tim McCoy still live in Richmond and look forward to their 45th wedding anniversary this summer. They are lucky to have their daughter, one son, and three of their grandchildren living close by. They do a lot of babysitting, which means Dabney does all the work, and Tim gets to enjoy them. Their other son lives in Charlotte with his three children. They have six grandchildren – all boys! Tim plays golf often and spends time working in his yard, which is immaculate. They also spend much of their summer in their home in Maine. Fortunately, we see them frequently on trips back and forth to EHS and generally get together a couple of times a year at Atlantic Beach, N.C. Dan Smythe and Gayle spent a week in the Galapagos Islands in October. They traveled more than 500 miles and visited eight of the islands. Dan says it was an eye-opening course in evolution, geology, etc., but fortunately there was no test at the end. They snorkeled with sharks and giant sea turtles. His pictures are available at http:// www.flickr.com/photos/anntavan/ sets/72157625488294749/ Hayne Hipp hopes to hike the last 50

miles of the Appalachian Trail this summer, or at least by our 60th Reunion. As you know, Hayne is very modest and retiring, but he did send some links to his accomplishments: http://oea.citadel. edu/newsclips/archive20082009/24047. pdf. This is actually an article about his induction into the South Carolina Hall of Fame. He is doing really good things for his community and state. This is proof that people change – who woulda thunk it. Carter Cornick writes, “The unfettered freedom of retirement this past six years has been a joy long sought and too long delayed. Nancy and I will celebrate our 50th wedding anniversary this spring in England. With a son, Carter ’80, retired from government but still in the area with his family, we remain in Northern Virginia – our home for 35 years. This past fall I completed a book, ‘The Cornicks of Princess Anne,’ a Virginia county that no longer exists but has happy memories.” My senior-year roommate, Moncure Crowder, writes that he is still hiking in mountains, but now mostly confined to the eastern United States. He did Mt. LeConte recently and has completed the Peachtree Road Race 10k in Atlanta 31 times. In the interest of full disclosure, he says that his wife accuses him of merely walking fast and waving his arms back and forth rapidly. As he gets older, Moncure finds himself going to church

more often, and he attributes the market’s recent rise to this. If so, I encourage him to redouble his attendance. Moncure, Hayne Hipp is looking for someone his age to accompany him on the last leg of the Appalachian Trail. Interested? Bill Moffett reports, “I am a member of the board of directors of the Washington Center for Psychoanalysis. I have been lecturing on counterinsurgency issues at senior U.S. military schools on the west coast and in the southwest and Tidewater, Va. Things have changed since my Vietnam days, but the basics still remain the same. I have a daughter in Santa Cruz, Calif.; another daughter in Evergreen, Colo.; a son in Vail, Colo.; and our oldest son is in Richmond, Va. (two grandchildren there, too). I retired from the federal government in 1995 – for a few days – it didn’t take. I have ever since been back on contract with the U.S. government working with the intelligence community. I’m glad to still be vertical. I owe that to my wife’s good care (we just celebrated our 29th anniversary) and to regular exercise here in Alexandria and kayaking off Lewes, Del., on the Delaware Bay, as often as we can get down there. It was a terrific reunion we all had on the Holy Hill a few years back.” Since retiring to Charlottesville in the late ’90s, after a career as a hospital CFO in four different academic medical centers, Saunders Midyette has started his own company to identify hospitals with financial healthcare consulting needs. While working from his home, he sets aside a lot of time for playing tennis year round at the Boar’s Head and downhill skiing at nearby Wintergreen in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Saunders and his wife are thoroughly enjoying five grandchildren from ages 1 to 10 with their son in lower Manhattan and daughter in Chapel Hill. Surry Roberts is involved in production of the movie “Abandoned Allies,” which tells the story of bonding between Americans and Montagnards during the Vietnam War, how the U.S. government turned its back on the

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Montagnards both in the U.S. and back in the Central Highlands of Vietnam after the war, and how the same circumstances may happen to our allies in both Afghanistan and Iraq. Sandy Sierck writes, “Last June our 12-year-old twin grandchildren, Serena and Henry Shapard of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, took a one-week writing course at EHS. They liked everything about the program: great (young) EHS English teacher and interesting fellow-students from all over. I am still practicing international trade law with a small firm here in Washington, D.C. I have also completed 12 years as an adjunct professor at Georgetown Law School and am continuing to do some pro bono work for the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights as well. Susan and I (and three children and spouses and six grandchildren total) spend time in the summer at our place in Brooklin, Maine. Thanks to technology, I spend about eight weeks there while periodically doing some law work.”

1961

1959

Rob Wright has been in banking for more than 40 years. He has a 22-yearold son who went to Hampden-Sydney and now lives in Charleston, S.C. Rob also has four grandchildren.

J. D. Simpson (H) 501-663-8631 (O) 501-377-2110 jdsimpson@stephens.com 55th Reunion: June 2014

HALL OF FAME

Bill Julian (H) 434-202-8859 (O) 757-983-0190 waj43@msn.com 50th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

HALL OF FAME

Vinny Giles ’61 will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

1962

Bev Eggleston (O) 804-359-4840 bevegg@cavtel.net 50th Reunion: June 2012

1963

Cotten Alston (H) 770-434-2212 (O) 404-310-0541 rca3@mindspring.com 50th Reunion: June 2013

Bill Flippin ’59 will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

1960

Bill Drennen (H) 304-876-1236 (O) 304-876-6400 bill@billdrennen.com 55th Reunion: June 2015

Well, the mass e-mail had a decent return by direct mail standards (if you missed yours, please send me contact information). Jim Maddox, Will Jordan, John Joyner, George Logan, Walter Buddy “Piglet” Nicklin, and Kent Higgins all checked in to greater or lesser degrees! Thank you all. How about a phone call? Real time? What a concept. I’ll get to it. If 65 is the new 50, then we have a little more time to discuss matters, but time is of the essence. Inquiring minds want to know…what happened to some of our assorted characters? Are they in Brazil

living the dream…maybe in one of those Internet clips? Are they still slugging it out 9-5? Who are they now? Where? Did we even know them way back then? Keep those e-mails, texts, and letters coming…we’re on to something…the following is for your reading enjoyment [lightly edited]. John Joyner went on to Yale and now lives in California…[responded to some of my questions] “…just passed annual physical (first annual physical I’ve had in six years)…I am a database programmer (independent) since ’88, now mostly retired, and in retirement am creating websites with a friend… I am the stepfather of Marcella Lee Munson, professor of French literature at FAU in Boca Raton, Fla., and the step-grandfather of Eric Anders Kolstad, Marcella’s first son, and soon to be of Marcella and husband Ben’s second son, to be born March 14. Marcella is the daughter of my wife, Cecile. I have been in California since late 1969. It’s less humid here. And you can park your car at 10,000 feet before you set out for a backpacking jaunt ... not possible in New York where I was born.” “Any connection with Carl Zapffe? Strange you should ask that, because his name is one of the extremely few from EHS that I have heard in last 50 years ... it came from Jim Morgan, who was our classmate until he became Class of ’64. Jim called me about something a few years ago, and in the course of the conversation he mentioned that Carl was something like head of the Chicago Board of Trade or something (notice my disclaimers ... I didn’t say he was that). Jim called me a year later, because he was planning a visit to the West Coast. He and his wife, Melissa, and son, Theodore, were our guests for a delightful evening in March 2008.” “I have never enjoyed a day of school in my life, from preschool through graduate courses, and so EHS is not a particularly pleasant memory for me, but that is in no way a negative reflection on EHS ... I have very positive memories of the persons there – the masters and the students ... I just don’t like the activity called school. (I enjoyed basic training a lot more). Any word from King Tut?

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George Logan ’63 enjoyed the Spirit of The High School dinner this fall. From left: Rob Hershey, Logan, and EHS parent Steve Shaw.

Last contact May 1963. Boules/petanque/bocce: [a great game…] I played in Florida last month when visiting my daughter, and I volunteered to make them a sorely-needed web page, which you can view at http://bocapetanque2000.com/.” Walter Nicklin went to W&L, did some Army time, and now lives in Alexandria…“To keep my few remaining brain cells going, I currently work as publisher of the weekly newspaper Rappahannock News (Little Washington, Va.) and the quarterly magazine The Piedmont Virginian (Warrenton, Va.). One of my partners in the Rappahannock News is Mike Massie ’74. Before that I worked with George Logan’s son, Willis ’96, in creating a Virginia food and wine retail and catalog business called The Virginia Company. Like his father, Willis has a finely honed business mind, and he ran the company much better than I ever could. In addition, he’s a natural politician; but last I heard he’s going into the ministry. And, George is a grandfather, as Willis and his lovely wife, Ashley, have a daughter, now over a year old. “My own older daughter, Mary Winston, also has a new daughter, named Jane, after her mother. Unfortunately, Mary Winston and her sister, Emmy, have both followed in

their father’s footsteps as ‘starving writers.’ But at least Mary Winston lives in Paris, which is as good a place to be as any if you want to be a starving writer. Her husband is named, naturally enough, Pierre. “Although I couldn’t convince either daughter to go to EHS (they said they did not want to be ‘guinea pigs’ as some of the first co-eds), my 13-yearold son is contemplating applying. But the School now seems a bit fancy and country-club-like, particularly for a prospective student whose father was called Pig or Piglet and remembers fondly the Spartan values of the old High School and the ‘arrogantly shabby’ chic of Pawley’s Island. “My son is young enough, of course, to be my grandchild, and Cotten says I need to explain this. So, yes, I confess: My children have different mothers; I’ve had two, non-simultaneous wives. Actually, three if you insist on counting the very first ‘starter marriage’ right after I got discharged from the Army. I think Van MacNair ’62 may still have me beat, however, in this competition? “Talking about classmates like Van, even older than ourselves – the Class of 1962 – I recently had e-mail correspondence with Arch Hoxton ’62 in Shepherdstown, W.Va. And the idea of a re-enactment, like with the Civil

War Sesquicentennial, occurs. Back when Arch and I were students, we had talked about it for, it seemed like, years: slipping notes to each other in Riley Deeble’s class, or on the athletic fields whispering when we should have been listening to coaches – we would drop out of school and work our way around the country, if not the world. In the summer of 1963, shortly after graduation, it actually happened. Arch and I headed west toward places unknown in his Ralph Nader ‘unsafe at any speed’ Corvair. When we couldn’t afford gas (though only around 20 cents a gallon), we hopped freights and hitch-hiked. We camped out and slept, among other places, in the Cody, Wyo., jail and the Eureka, Calif., Salvation Army. We also bummed room-and-board from schoolmates like Menard Doswell ’62 and Van MacNair ’62 (in California), Ed Carrington (Texas), Winton Blount ’62 (New Orleans), and Tucker King (Florida). To pay for gas, not to mention other necessities, we picked peas in Washington State and strawberries in Oregon; dug postholes in California; and flipped hamburgers in New Orleans. Now, 50 years older but no wiser, we’re threatening to do the trip again. We know we’ve changed, but what about America? Maybe there’s a book deal in it?!” George Logan went on to U.Va. and points north for a successful publishing career, then back to the hometown in Salem, Va., in the frozen food biz, and now back to Charlottesville, where he teaches at the Darden Business School at U.Va. “We had quite a fine time at a 90th birthday for Howdie Goodwin ’38. He and Alice spawned quite a bunch of winners, in every respect. Howdie died this past July, and we attended the memorial service at University Chapel. Lots of people, followed by a real wake, per his wishes, at Farmington. It was a real celebration – I saw people I had not seen for 20-30 years. I am so glad I saw enough of him here when he was alive…he was always good company, full of humor and alert as could be. I had a marvelous conversation with him two days before he died; he was lucid, energetic, and wouldn’t let

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me leave until he almost fell out of bed and I had to call the attendants. This was a great moment for me, because he talked about every football game you and I and Howdie ’62 ever played in, plus his grandson Howdie ’91, and so on, but not one detail was lost in his recall, along with lots of other subjects. He was buried in the cemetery at Bruton Parish Church in Williamsburg, alongside his parents, the Bishop W.A.R. Goodwin who persuaded John D. Rockefeller to restore Williamsburg in the 1930s. Alice Goodwin had Alzheimer’s for the past 10 years or so, and we knew she wouldn’t stay long after Big Howdie was gone. He faithfully went to her extended-care place twice a day to feed her – no one else could feed her. Harmon [GWL’s wife] said she would know when he was no longer coming, even though her condition was total blown circuits, and that she would then have no reason to live any longer. So right she was. I went by to see Breck (the sister of Howdie ’62 and Squinch ’64 from Seattle) a couple of times during this period – she was getting everything in order for her father and waiting for her mother to move on. Alice died in October and after a small family service, which included Menard Doswell ’62, she was buried next to Big Howdie. It was indeed the end of an era. Hard for me to believe that either of them lasted until I am past 65, some 50 years after I first met them. Truly remarkable people. As you noted, a great gene pool, which lives on! “My take on EHS today is highly favorable…the School has never been in better shape, great faculty morale and a highly talented student body… “Son Willis ’96 has a wife named Ashley, and she is a pediatrician. She went to U.Va. Medical School, did her residency in pediatrics there, and this past year was head pediatric resident. She and Honour Alston ’06, (Cotten’s daughter, a recent U.Va. nursing school graduate) have surely passed in the halls, not knowing that we know one another. Honour must see a lot of Dr. Jaw-Reece Craddock ’60, which has to brighten both his and her days.

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“Granddaughter is Mary Neveille Logan, the Neveille being a very old family name – pronounced ‘Neville’ as you would suspect. She’s walking and therefore into everything that’s not nailed down. She is 17 months old now, a great little girl! Harmon is chief babysitter in residence as Ashley is working for the university hospital three to four days a week, and Willis is applying to four seminaries. How ironic if he should end up, again, on the Holy Hill – on the other side of the fence, as it were. “Darden keeps me busy two to three days a week for about 30 weeks a year. The rest of the time, I am still taking risks that I shouldn’t at my age, except I think I would just wither away if I weren’t in some challenging situation. I will say that being the board chair of a $780 million community bank these past two to three years has been a real roller coaster. We are in very, very good shape, but the various regulators have taken no prisoners and continually change the rules as well…it is a very tough environment. I see in this morning’s Wall Street Journal that two more banks have failed in Georgia, bringing the total to something like 22. Not pretty, as the phrase goes.” Kent Higgins went on to Haverford College…four years of U.S. Army time and back to the University of West (by God) Virginia… “Remembering my days at Episcopal is mostly a happy experience. There is the lingering memory of those who chose to say my name with a vowel other than ‘e,’ which was not pleasant, but then no one said that being with 250 young men who were living in a closed community would be all joy. And there was joy, for which I am grateful. “It took five years for me to graduate from EHS, and my college career was longer if you count the four years I spent in the Army between my two years at Haverford and my two years at West Virginia University, from which I graduated in 1972 with, of all things, a magna cum laude degree in broadcast journalism. My thought had been that I would go to law school, but when the time came, I simply was unwilling to spend another three years in a

classroom. Perhaps others can relate to that. [Your correspondent can certainly identify…I was supposed to go to law school, but after 2.3 years in the U.S. Navy I was in Kent’s frame of mind…it has been a long and winding road since then, but never dull!] “I did have the good sense to marry my wife, Gail, with whom I am celebrating our 39th anniversary today (Jan. 28). We have two grown sons, one of whom is married, both of whom managed to graduate from college absent student loans. This had a lot more to do with their innate smarts and the scholarships they obtained than any financial achievement of mine, but it remains good news that they are wellstarted in their lives and not laboring to repay huge loans. “Over the course of the nearly 40 years of our married life, I have worked in the cable television industry (where I was recognized as a pioneer); as an officer of a couple of software-related companies, where I typically was in charge of product development; and for the past 11 years, I have been director of information services for the law firm in Charleston, W.Va., where my brother Dave ’66 is a founding member. “This year I will observe the fourth anniversary of my ordination as an Episcopal priest, and I am about to begin a new ministry as priest in residence for St. Matthews Episcopal Church in Charleston. That’s a descriptor for a bi-vocational priest who serves the church part time. I am truly excited to be here in Charleston and would welcome hearing from anyone passing through. [Wow! Congratulations…] Peace!” Chad Young reports that he retired in 2009 from his career as administrative law judge for the Commonwealth of Virginia. To celebrate, he took a trip to Alaska up the Dalton Highway to Prudhoe Bay and the Artic Ocean. Jim Stallworth sends this news: “William ’00 lives in Atlanta and will be married down here in Beaufort, N.C., in June. Son Joe ’03 is running a branch of Zingo, a designated driver service, in Raleigh. We had a marvelous trip to Australia in January. After

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William’s wedding, we hope to head to Scotland. We sold our Burlington house in December. We visited with Mary Carol and Jeremy Taylor and Susan and Richard Wight ’64 before we left on our January trip. We serve the best seafood on the North Carolina coast and have a great view – so come one and come all!”

1964

Alex Jones (O) 617-496-2582 (H) 617-497-2387 JonesAlex@aol.com 50th Reunion: June 2014

I fear we are now in the zone in which these notes are more often going to take on something of an elegiac tone. This is one of those times. As many of you probably know, Blackie Davis died in October of cancer. I remember Blackie as the embodiment of the idea of a big-and-gentle man, with a kind of goofy grin that went with a goofy sense of humor that found a lot to not take seriously. Nothing mean or bitter in him, but rather a sweetness which I am told by close friends such as Humphrey Tyler ’65 that he had all his life. He could be bruising on the football field, but as a classmate he was one of the truly nice guys. His obituary told the tale of how he went from EHS to Dartmouth to an M.B.A. at Wharton, then into the Army, followed by a few years of here and there, including a time in San Francisco of all places. How he then returned to his home turf in Jefferson County, Va., where he spent the rest of his life, apparently in great contentment. His life had lovely grace notes. For instance, he planted more than 2,000 trees in the county, and contributed more than 50 times to blood banks. When he came home to stay, he bought an abandoned 18th-century farm house and reconstructed it virtually single handed. The picture that accompanied the obit is of a man with an amused, goofy grin. Same guy we all knew, I’m glad to say.

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There are two more that I must mention and morn. First is Ann Keith, the ever-young and smiling wife of John Keith, who also died of cancer last fall. She was John’s girlfriend from his EHS days, and if you had the pleasure of knowing her then, you will remember that she had eyes that literally sparkled. She had those eyes until the very end. John sent me some pictures taken at our 2004 reunion with all of us looking shockingly decrepit – and that wasn’t even the most recent reunion. But geezers though we clearly were, we were also able to demonstrate that we still knew how to dance and laugh, and Ann was there, smiling and lovely and dancing with joy. And finally, my own wife, Susan. She died, also of cancer, on April 1, 2010. She was also in those 2004 pictures, smiling and dancing. Those of you who knew her knew that I married far above myself. I miss her terribly. Finally, some good news. Tom “Joe Crow” Hall has once again stood Tampa on its ear by taking over the effort to lead a major expansion of the aquarium that he was instrumental in building years ago. It was the aquarium that led to the revival of downtown Tampa. Crow, who as you know is so shy and retiring that he is barely ever noticed, has repeatedly managed to take Tampa by the throat and lead it where it needed to go. He has done a lot of that sort of thing beyond Tampa as well. Imagine what might have happened if he had not been such an utter wallflower. By the way, in John Keith’s reunion pictures, Crow is in full cry. It’s a thing of wonder! And I also heard from Ernie Williams, who has long been a distinguished biologist (M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton) at Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y. EHS sent two freshmen to Clinton this year – Cal Bobola ’10 from Jamestown, R.I., and Sarah Cauthen ’10 from Greensboro, N.C. – and they had a bit of an EHS reunion at Ernie’s home. He had the guts to show them his old yearbooks. “The old photos make it look like a place of a different era,” he wrote. I suppose that

is increasingly true of those in the photos, too. Other news: Buz Male reports that he is midway through his 38th year of coaching. His Albemarle boys’ 4x800 relay team set an American indoor/outdoor record and a world record indoors and won the championship of America at the Penn Relays. Buz was elected to the U.S. High School Cross Country Hall of Fame.

1965

Jim Sullivan (H) 615-665-4423 (O) 615-327-5759 jsullivangrayson@gmail.com and Mole Lee (H) 617-497-4523 dlee60@verizon.net 50th Reunion: June 2015

After some serious arm-twisting, we finally heard from several of our classmates. They are aching and complaining more than most early baby-boomers. Since we were cloistered at EHS (and then Bobby Seibels, Mole, Timbo Hubbard, and I at Sewanee – “EHS without Bradlee Shopping Center” according to Son Trask ’64), old age has crept up on us more unexpectedly than it has for those who really experienced the ’60s, and know that they are getting old. Humphrey Tyler is the one ranting and raving about age. (“Over the past week, I have come to accept an inconvenient truth: that I am too old to shovel snow for more than 60 minutes in one 48-hour period. And now it’s time for a nap.”) He laments long waits filling out forms in doctors’ offices. Clinton Laird remains in the computer records business, and is doing his best to perform the same task electronically for us all. Humphrey and his wife, Susan, were relieved to have their son, Chad, back safe and sound this fall from Afghanistan, where he flew helicopters. Will Haltiwanger, ever the Iron Man (or is it titanium?), will be taking his new prosthetic hip out for a spin down the Colorado River this spring, and he invites members of the Class of ’65 to

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Friends and family gathered when Amy Sibley, daughter of Jim Sibley ’65, married Chris Underwood in Highlands, N.C. Left to right: Quintus Sibley ’73, Jack Sibley ’66, Humphrey Tyler ’65, Dave Thompson (WFS ’92), Jim Sibley ’92, Lexa Sibley Remmes ’97, Jim Sibley ’65, Clark Howell (another from Woodberry, but a dear cousin), Evan Remmes ’96, and Croft Thomas ’96.

Ward Carr ’65 and his family in China in December 2009.

join him. We shall need photos. I accused Ben Martin of having published a book. As it turns out, he has written five books on modern French history, the last of which was featured by the History Book Club, and he holds an endowed chair in the Department of History at LSU. Ben corresponds with Jim Seidule still. He was corresponding with Courty Bryan ’52, who died last year and was in the same class as

John McCain ’54 at EHS, about 10 years ahead of us. (You may have seen McCain’s campaign ad filmed at EHS about how much the School and Willie B. had meant to him.) Courty had written a book, “P.S. Wilkinson,” which I am sure that I read at one time – maybe with you all in a class at EHS. Speaking of Bobby Seibels, he writes that after 41 years of marriage, his wife still speaks to him. Bob retired four

years ago after a distinguished career as the bird curator at the zoo in Columbia, S.C. He was in a program to rehabilitate the Bali Mynah Bird (WFS ’55), and in so doing made multiple trips to Indonesia. This begs the question: Does the bird still speak to him? And from the retired military wing of our class, Ward Carr remains in Germany and teaches English at numerous academic sites. He has three athletic children and continues work on his history of the Bismarck. Ward sent this picture of them all in Beijing on a minus-5-degree day. Hunter Robinson, last seen in these pages with a remarkable salmon, reports a fine reunion with his helicopter door gunner in Vietnam after 37 years. And a special nod of thanks to retired Army Major Jim Totten, a master of situational awareness and fulsome reportorial detail. [Mole wrote that, not me!] He notes spotting Ned Johnson ’66 in a Nashville bar. When asked if he spoke with Ned, Jamie’s response was, “Yup.” I last saw Jim Sibley at the Adirondack Wilderness Camp in 1966, where we were camp counselors working for B.I. Johns and Sandy Ainslie ’56. Several other Old Boys were there – Perry Epes, Phil Terrie ’66, Beetle Smith, perhaps others. Jim sent this photo of his daughter’s wedding last June where there were many Old Boys and Old Girls – surely the Alumni Office has a better moniker. Now retired, he is working for Atlanta Habitat for Humanity. Google helped with some who won’t correspond. Phant works where the sun don’t shine (change to Phannie?), and David Albertson is an endocrine surgeon on the faculty at Bowman Gray. (I spend weeks finding which glands are malfunctioning, and he fixes them in an hour…) The next deadline for news will be Sept. 1. It’s never too early to start beating the drum. And the tempo will quicken as we approach our 50th Reunion in 2015 – a disturbing prospect for those of us still unclear on the concept of half a century since leaving the Hill. If anyone knows a good mariachi band, let us know.

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a gap year for English students was unheard of, as everybody went from school to university and then straight to work. Having spent nearly a year with Southerners, when I got back to England, I had a mid-Atlantic drawl and a lot of people thought I was Canadian!” Does anyone know what’s become of Chip Childs, Greg Cruze, John Genet, Scott Bergland, Val Jackson, or Patt Naul? I would love to contact them about joining us at our next reunion.

1970 Marine Captain Charles C. Tyler is welcomed back onto American soil at the Bangor, Maine, airport last November by his parents, Susan and Humphrey Tyler ’65.

1966

1969

Jack Sibley (O) 404-614-7551 (H) 404-237-2803 jsibley@hplegal.com

Kinloch Nelson (H) 585-385-3103 (O) 585-264-0848 kinloch@rochester.rr.com

45th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

45th Reunion: June 2014

1967

From Marty Martin: Michael Webb ’04, T. Lad Webb’s youngest son, is getting married in March in Ft. Myers, Fla. The Webb family will have a busy spring. His other son, Ladson ’97, is getting married in May and daughter Katherine Webb Easterling ’95 is expecting her fourth child in June. Roger Brown-Hovelt responded by e-mail to my reunion outreach in 2009. Part of his e-mail included the following story: “Coincidentally, last weekend I was using my new scanner to transfer negatives and transparencies from years ago to my PC and one section of pictures was from my eight-week camping trip with Charlie Glenn and Rick “the Funniest Man of the Year” Bardolph. We drove and camped from Richmond, Va., across to Los Angeles, north to San Francisco, further north and then east to Montana and Wyoming, and then over Lake Superior down to Toronto, just in time to watch the first man land on the moon! Back in those days

David Clarke (H) 703-938-8577 (O) 703-293-7223 (O) 703-691-1235 dclarke@bklawva.com 45th Reunion: June 2015

1971

Class Correspondent Needed. To volunteer, please call Elizabeth Watts, class notes editor, at 703-933-4046. 40th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

Charles Coppage (H) 252-473-3893 (O) 252-480-2568 charles@nccoppagelaw.com 45th Reunion: June 2012

Wren Hudgins closed his private psychology practice a few years ago and now consults part time for the Washington State Parks, volunteers in disaster mental health for the Red Cross, and travels for pleasure.

1968 45th Reunion: June 2013

Class Correspondent Needed. To volunteer, please call Elizabeth Watts, class notes editor, at 703-933-4046.

1972

Beau Wilson (H) 212-588-9363 (O) 212-603-6185 beau.wilson@mssb.com 40th Reunion: June 2012

The highlight of the season was the wedding reception for Margery and Andy Brown on Jan. 8, which was held in the Deacon Tower at the BB&T Stadium at Wake Forest University. “Zero” and Margery were feted by Mary and “Preacher” Wilson, and Lucy and “Goober” Patton. (See photo.) I continue to organize a golf outing every July 4th weekend at the Blowing Rock Country Club in Blowing Rock, N.C., and attendance is growing! Regular attendees include Howell Morrison, Scotty Farrar, Pinkney Herbert, Sterling Kelly, Andy Brown, Chuck Patton, Vince Dobbs, Jamie Coleman, Heath Alexander, and Elliott Wood. This July 1st,

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Left to right: Beau Wilson ’72, Mary Wilson, Chuck Patton ’72, Lucie Patton, Margery Brown, and Andy Brown ’72 celebrate Margery and Andy’s wedding.

we’re expecting Charlie Bagley, Billy Bell, Louis Prichard, Bill Swinford, Reid Murchison, Bruce Faurot, Kirk McAlpin, and Charlie McKamy. And more are welcomed! Finally, I spoke with Chip Brackett recently, and he is living in West Palm Beach after his year at Vanderbilt. I’ve invited him to Blowing Rock this July, and we all truly hope to see him.

1974

Bill Stokes (H) 919-493-7481 (O) 919-490-7141 billstokes972@yahoo.com and Gilliam Kittrell (H) 919-788-8171 (O) 919-876-7411 Gilliam3rd@aol.com

Margaretjane Preston Prevatt is the daughter of Bethany and Robert Prevatt ’73 and the granddaughter of Preston Prevatt ’44.

40th Reunion: June 2014

HALL OF FAME

The undefeated 1972 lacrosse team will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

1973

Porter Farrell (H) 817-732-4315 pfarrell@farrellcompany.com 40th Reunion: June 2013

1975

Willie Moncure (H) 703-836-2596 (O) 703-836-9755 wmoncure@scottstringfellow.com and Hunt Burke (H) 703-768-1705 (O) 703-684-1645 huntandmolly@verizon.net 40th Reunion: June 2015

1976

Boota deButts (H) 703-998-1487 (O) 703-933-4092 whd@episcopalhighschool.org 35th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

1977

John Baicy (H) 336-774-8086 (O) 336-722-7768 jbaicy@ImmediaPrint.com 35th Reunion: June 2012

Future EHS students Julia Clardy (Class of 2025) and James Clardy (Class of 2027) are the children of Leesa and Jim Clardy ’78.

1978

Jim Clardy (H) 704-332-4195 (O) 704-339-2015 Jim_ClardyJr@ml.com 35th Reunion: June 2013

Harry Archer writes that two of his sons, Charlie and Ned, attend a certain all-boys boarding school in Orange, Va. Ned is a sophomore, and Charlie, a senior, was named one of the nation’s top-20 senior lacrosse defenseman by ESPN Rise Magazine and will play Division 1 lacrosse next year at Jacksonville University. The Archer boys

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Staige Hoffman ’80 (left) and Tom Garland ’80 ran into each other at the 150th anniversary of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Greenwood, Va.

Left to right: Charlie Archer, Charles Winston ’78, Charlie Winston, and Harry Archer ’78.

are joined by Milt Barber, also a senior and the son of Gus Barber. Harry’s oldest son, Harry IV, is a sophomore at N.C. State University. Harry said that he keeps in touch with many of his EHS classmates, including Archer “Monk” Green on Facebook.

1979

Bill Hughes (H) 203-861-1641 hughesbill@aol.com 35th Reunion: June 2014

Jason Bohrer sent this report: “Our family divides our time between Greensboro, N.C., and Tappahannock, Va., where we have our family home. If anyone from our EHS era is in either place, please give me a call so we can get together (336-740-4079). “My son, Price, graduated from Woodberry Forest in the Class of 2010, and he is a freshman at Washington and Lee University. My daughter, Emily, is a sophomore at St. Margaret’s School in Tappahannock. With both children out of the house, Carol and I and our black lab, Gracie, are adapting to being empty nesters. “I have spent the last 25 years in various positions with large financial institutions with a concentration on mortgage finance. After leaving the role of president of United Guaranty

Residential Insurance Company in 2009, I joined Newbold Advisors, which is a management consulting firm focused exclusively on the mortgage finance industry. I was elected partner in 2010 and am enjoying the new opportunity very much. In addition, I have been appointed professor of practice at the Bryan School of Business and Economics at UNC-Greensboro, where I teach strategy in the M.B.A. program. “I recently caught up with Brian Peele ’78, who is doing well, owns a real estate business in Swansboro, N.C., and is enjoying life at the beach. I also have reconnected with a bunch of EHS guys who had their sons at Woodberry the last few years, including Gus Barber ’78, Harry Archer ’78, Frank Holding, Marsh Pierce, and Jock Liles ’78. It was nice to see these guys and many others at The Game each year.”

1980

Staige Hoffman (H) 813-287-9887 (O) 813-781-3184 staigehoffman1@aol.com 35th Reunion: June 2015

Dear Old Boys, I hope all is well and that those residing in the areas that have been snowed on this year been able to thaw out. I

am writing this on Feb. 4, so I know we could still have some more bad weather in the coming month or so. I think I will stay with the e-mail blast method that allows for a good response. As always, pictures are welcome and you can feel free to contact the Alumni Office directly. King Smith writes, “I was able to spend the weekend with Lucas Fleming in Gainesville, Fla., this fall for the South Carolina-Florida game. I have also kept up with John Dixon by phone and hope to see him soon. Our middle school team was undefeated (8-0-0) this year. We scored 236 points and gave up 38 points for the season. We sent three players to the Eastbay Middle School All-American game in San Antonio, Texas, including two of my linemen, 6-foot-1-inch, 310-pound nose guard Brian Williams and 6-foot-1-inch, 278pound center AJ Barton. Hope you are well and hope to see you in the near future.” David White writes: “Hope you’re doing well. I’m a sports writer/author in Birmingham and have written four books, the latest of which is ‘A Stroke of Genius,’ a golf novel. I am working on a fifth and have a blog, www.davidhwhite. com. I’d appreciate any ink.” I heard from Jeff Flynn. He and wife Becka took the family to St Croix for the week between Christmas and New Year’s. His oldest son, Jeffrey, Jr., is in his second semester of his junior year in high school. I see college on the near horizon!

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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1982

Dave Coombs (O) 804-934-4707 david.c.coombs@sprint.com 30th Reunion: June 2012

1983

Frank Vasquez (O) 888-343-6245, ext. 5249 (H) 804-767-5096 rfvasquez@yahoo.com 30th Reunion: June 2013

1984

Sam Froelich (H) 336-288-5711 samfroelich@aol.com 30th Reunion: June 2014

Left to right: Lucas Fleming ’80, Staige Hoffman ’80, and John Dixon ’80 at the Outback Bowl in Tampa, Fla., on New Year’s Day.

Chris Rogers writes in response to my request for news and/or complaints: “I’ve got many complaints. I’ve lost most of my hair, I’ve never been to the Super Bowl, and Carter Burgess never calls me anymore. Does that count?” Chris is associate creative director for Bose Corporation. Chris, I think its time that you join us for the next reunion! David Ingle writes: “My oldest daughter, Addison Ingle ’14, is a freshman at EHS this year!” I received a Christmas card/e-card from Greg Green. Greg’s e-mail address is greenyland@hotmail.com. Greg had written in previously, and he is between the Outer Banks and Virginia Beach, I believe. As I had written previously in a separate e-mail, Billy Watt had informed me of the death of our classmate Nick Shannon. There is a photo and remarks about Nick in the fall 2010 EHS magazine, “In Memoriam” section. I was in Charlottesville this past fall for a Davis Family Reunion, as well as to attend the 150th anniversary of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Greenwood, Va. My great-grandfather, Dabney Carr Terrell Davis, was the first rector there, so many family members

have lived in the immediate area over the years. T Bird Garland was there, and we definitely hooked up. Tom and his wife, Diana, live in the area and have attended Emmanuel Episcopal over the years. The photo (page 58) is from the reception held at the King Winery after the church service. John Dixon was in Tampa this past New Year’s for a visit to Lucas Fleming on his way down to the Orange Bowl to see his Hokies. The three of us attended the Outback Bowl in Tampa on New Year’s Day – Florida Gators vs. Penn State, with a Gator victory. Lucas is a Florida graduate, Class of 1984, and, I might add, my oldest son, Staige, Jr., is a freshman there now. The photo is from the tailgate, of course. I know you don’t want to see any more pictures of me, so do your best to send in some of your own so they can be included in future publications.

1981

Seward Totty (H) 859-268-8673 (O) 859-514-6434 sewdog@insightbb.com

Ken Hodges has joined the firm of Ashe, Rafuse & Hill, LLP as a litigation partner following his campaign for Georgia attorney general. Ken practiced at the Baudino Law Group’s Atlanta office prior to his move to Ashe, Rafuse & Hill. Prior to that, he served as district attorney for 12 years in Albany, Ga. “The campaign gave me a great opportunity to reconnect with classmates here in Georgia, as well as outside of the state, and with other Old Boys from different classes. I really appreciate the support they gave to the campaign,” says Hodges. He and his wife, Melissa, along with big sister Margaret, welcomed their second child, John Bryant (“Jack”), to the family in September 2010. HALL OF FAME

Coach Ed Rice will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

30th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

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Coast. Charlie (2 ½) loves his little sister and is adjusting to his new world.” Brett Siegrist is a vascular surgeon in the Phoenix area. He is married with two children.

Clint McCotter (H) 843-568-0282 dcmccotter@yahoo.com 30th Reunion: June 2015

Chris Bickford is a successful professional photographer. He is working on a project for National Geographic. Check out his photographs at www.chrisbickford.com.

1990

Zan Banks (H) 404-252-7848 (O) 404-467-6384 zan@innovolt.com 25th Reunion: June 2015

1986

Worth Williamson (H) 864-421-9089 (O) 800-354-4205 wwilliamson@tsihealthcare.com

1991

25th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

20th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

Jim Forsythe was elected to the state Senate seat from New Hampshire’s fourth district. Congratulations, Jim!

Greetings to the Class of 1991! We are very excited about celebrating our upcoming 20th Reunion, June 10-11, 2011. Reunion Weekend is a great time to reconnect with classmates, faculty, and the School. The two-day event takes place on campus and is filled with family-friendly activities. We hope to get many of our classmates back to celebrate. Highlights of the weekend include the Headmaster’s Cocktail Party on Friday night, followed by our class dinner at the Fish Market in Old Town; alumni sporting events; Convocation; campus tours; and the Saturday night Reunion Celebration with dinner and dancing under the tent on Hoxton Field. Many of us have decided to stay on dorm so we can truly experience some good old-fashion “fellowship!” The airconditioned dormitory rooms, with basic linens provided, are a fun and easy way to visit with friends. Each room has two single beds and the rate is $30 per night. Dormitories will be divided by gender, and couples and families will stay on dormitories with designated men’s and women’s bathrooms. This being said, there are a number of us who have decided to come without significant others and kids, but for those of you who want to bring your families, you are welcome to do so. Log on to the Episcopal website to check out the Reunion Weekend schedule of events. If you have not logged on before, or if you have forgotten your

1987

David Haddock (H) 703-403-8760 (O) 703-854-0334 dshotr@yahoo.com 25th Reunion: June 2012

Robert Hurt was elected to the House of Representatives from the 5th District of Virginia. Congratulations, Robert!

1988

Will Burdell (H) 912-638-1790 (O) 912-638-3611 WillBurdell@seaisland.com 25th Reunion: June 2013

1989

William Townsend (H) 919-664-8401 townsendjk@earthlink.net 25th Reunion: June 2014

Jeff Clarke reports, “My wonderful wife, Nina, and I were very excited to welcome our daughter, Blaine Burkham Clarke, into our family. Blaine was born on Sept. 28, 2010, in Stamford, Conn. She weighed 7 pounds and 4 ounces. Nina and I are happy to report that Blaine is a good sleeper and enjoyed celebrating her first Christmas on the Gold

Will Coxe (O) 803-404-0984 williecoxe@gmail.com

Frank Yon ’91 (left) married Rose Catherine Mitchell on Aug. 14, 2010, in Portland, Ore. David Thomas ’91 (right) was in attendance for the festivities.

password, click the “retrieve password” link and a password will be sent to you. If you have not done so already, please fill out the online reunion participation form. Follow Reunion plans on Facebook! If you are on Facebook, please become a fan of Episcopal High School. On the EHS fan page, under the events tab, you will find an event page for the Class of 1991 20th Reunion, where we will post updates for the weekend. Watch out for registration information so you can register early to attend! If you have any questions about the weekend, please feel free to contact Lindsay Comstock ’99, the director of alumni programs, lwc@episcopalhighschool.org or 703-933-4023. We look forward to seeing you in June! HALL OF FAME

Derek Fitzgerald ’91 will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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EHS friends enjoyed a bachelorette weekend on Figure Eight Island, N.C., in honor of Carter Hancock ’97. Left to right: Katie Rose Trotter ’95, Jennifer Cochran ’95, Temple Forsyth Basham ’96, Carter Hancock ’97, Hampton Moore Eubanks ’96, Jane Pope Cooper ’96, and Tyler Bates Novak ’96. “I Totally Meant to Do That” by Jane Borden ’95. Anyone who has moved away from home, lived, or dreamed of living in New York, will appreciate the hilarity of Jane’s musings on the intersections of and altercations between Southern hospitality and Gotham cool.“I Totally Meant to Do That” is a memoir in essays of Borden’s transformation from Southern Belle to Brooklyn hipster to somewhere in between, and also a love letter to the two homes she wanted and between which she ultimately had to choose. Jane’s book is available on Amazon.com.

1992

Cal Evans hotcarlevans@gmail.com (O) 706-425-3444 20th Reunion: June 2012

Todd Siegrist is in Atlanta working for Resources as an IT analyst.

1994

Emily Fletcher Breinig (H) 602-288-9168 (O) 214-234-4242 fletchee@hotmail.com

we are all eagerly awaiting his arrival. We hope to hear from more of you soon!

1995

20th Reunion: June 2014

20th Reunion: June 2015

Geoff Kane and his family just moved to Reston, Va., and would love to reconnect with people in the area. Please drop him a line when you have a chance: geoffreyr.kane@gmail.com. Topher Patterson and his wife, Ashley, live in New York City. During his free time, Topher teaches squash as a volunteer at Street Squash in Harlem. My family just moved within Dallas, so that makes for excitement. Also, my brother, Fletch ’91, and his wife are expecting their third son in February, so

Editor’s Note: Thanks to Helen Lambeth Wells for her service as class correspondent. She is ready for a break from the duties, and I would welcome a new volunteer to take over the position. Please contact me at 703-933-4046 if you are interested. Christine Siegrist is a counselor for atrisk youth in Santa Fe, N.M.

HALL OF FAME

1993

Walker Lamond (H) 202-885-9676 (O) 212-496-9195 walkerlamond@mac.com

1996

Randy Shelley (H) 843-346-7950 (O) 843-577-3396 randyshelley@hotmail.com and Garland Lynn (H) 843-991-2150 garland@alumni.virginia.edu 15th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

20th Reunion: June 2013

Amy Fannon ’94 will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

Well Class of ’96, I have little news to report this time. Everyone must be saving themselves for the big reunion this summer. That’s right, it’s been 15 years! I’ll get started with what was shared. Jane Pope Cooper is a mother! Thomas “Wade” O’Neall Cooper was

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this position. I adore my new job.” As you can see from the photo, a whole bunch of lovely ladies got together for a bachelorette party for Carter Hancock ’97 on Figure Eight Island. Congrats, Carter! I am officially nominating Temple Forsyth Basham to be my co-correspondent for the Class Notes. She always goes to great lengths to help me out with updates. Thank you, Temple! Happy trails, “Maroon Machine!” I hope this arrives in time for you to find a babysitter for the reunion.

1997 Thomas “Wade” O’Neall Cooper is the son of Tyler and Jane Pope Cooper ’96.

born this past October. Congratulations to Jane and Tyler on their new family! Laura Morton Michau and her husband, Court, are expecting a baby this May. Laura reports that they love living in Santa Barbara. Seventy-three degrees in January would be suitable for me, too. Great news about the baby, Laura! Congrats! Brian Knutson got an iPad for Christmas. Menard Doswell became an uncle. Congratulations, “Uncle Nard!” Luke Zehner is excited about the Phillies’ new pitching rotation. Sarah Pugh Kadish and her husband, Mike, are living in Seoul, Korea, with their 1-year-old son, Henry. Meg Furlow Parker “is just living the life with two kids, William (3) and Maggie (15 months), and working.” She joined Merrill Lynch as a vice president and financial advisor in August from a previous brokerage firm. Claiborne Guy has been back in D.C. for a few years now trying to ride out the economy, lobbying for a trade association. Apryl Grasty writes, “A month after the EHS article, I accepted the position of assistant director and consulting psychologist for the Chelsea Day School in New York City. I’m the first person in the 29-year history of the school to hold

Bill Allen (H) 919-781-0805 (O) 919-716-2195 williamwallen@gmail.com 15th Reunion: June 2012

Greetings from the frozen Tundra of Raleigh, circa February 2011! Actually, while most of the country was covered in a sheet of ice and snow, we had a mild 65-degree weekend, so not too shabby. I hope the new year has gotten off to a great start for everyone so far, as it certainly has for us around here. We had a couple of babies born in the class last fall and winter. In October, Becky and Scott Harris welcomed their daughter, Brooke, who is their second child. Additionally, Devie and J.W. Perry are enjoying life with their first, Jack, who was born in December. J.W. said that so far Jack’s favorite activity is to get hung from their balcony, Michael Jackson-style. (Too soon?) Tad McLeod writes in to say that he and his wife, Catherine, are expecting their first child in May, and that he’s looking forward to seeing everyone in 2012 for our 15-year reunion! By the same token, Jim Goodwin is expecting a baby boy (his wife is also involved, however dubiously) in April. Congratulations to all of you! Jim reports from Raleigh that he runs into Scott Harris and Bill Allen (who?) quite a bit; he’s also going on a ski trip with a group that includes, but is not limited to, George Gummere ’98. In engagement news, Carter Hancock is getting married to a Woodberry graduate and Richmond native, one

Claiborne Johnston. Despite his alma mater, I presume he is a wonderful fellow. Ladson Webb is also getting married this spring; after the wedding, he and his new wife will live in Arlington. He still works for Aon, and EHS alumnus Lauren Robertshaw ’05 works in the trenches with him. Additionally, Nate Collier is getting married in May, and he says the wedding will be in Hilton Head. In one of those small-world situations, he said that he was at a wedding over New Year’s Eve in Charleston, W.Va., where they randomly ran into Chris Shepherd’s dad. He told them that old Malk was in town over the holidays, and they were able to catch up for a few beers at the airport before heading back home. Big news on all fronts, and congratulations to Carter, Ladson, and Nate! Speaking of Malk, Chris is still in West Virginia, working in renewable energy development as a wind farm project manager. Continuing that theme, he is a renewable energy and sustainable development lobbyist in Charleston, while at the same time attending law school at WVU to be an energy and economic development lawyer. That is quite a series of tasks, but all very important these days. Chris, however, failed to mention that he shared cold pops at the Charleston airport with Nate. Clearly, this encounter had a much more profound impact on Nate than it did on Chris. I can always count on a good update from Shriti Patel, and she is digging out of the deep snow of New Haven (somehow in a Prius) and interviewing for psychiatry positions in Norfolk, Va., where her boyfriend lives. She said things look pretty promising, which is great to hear. I’m sure it will be nice to get out from underneath the more than 56 inches of snow they’ve gotten up there. Our other budding medical professional, Claire Kirkpatrick, has recently moved to Denver with her fiancé, Daniel. He is in internal medicine residency at the University of Colorado, while she is working as a P.A. at an urgent care facility. The wedding is in

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Charleston, S.C., in March. She has extended an open invitation to any classmates to come out there and use their spare bedroom as a base camp for a ski trip, although by the time this is published, there won’t be much snow left. Fly fishing and mountain biking would be the activities of the season, but her invitation is only for skiing and snowboarding. Sorry, folks. Josh Webster is in his second semester of grad school, working towards his M.A. in history. He said he had a great football season at Harrisonburg High School, where he coached the team to a 13-1 record, their only loss coming in the state championship finals to the hated Briar Woods. He’s also coaching wrestling there; the kids have really embraced the piledriver, DDT, suplex, and Boston crab moves that Josh has taught them. Caldwell Clarke reports that he is currently training for the World’s Strongest Man competition, in which he’ll have to pick up giant iron balls and move them to other places, pull tractor trailers from one place to another, and chop wood at a furious pace. He’s bulked up to a rock-solid 300 pounds, but it’s all in his neck and forearms. He’s doing great but will face stiff competition from about a dozen people named Magnus from Scandinavia. Ladson Webb writes, “On Oct. 17, 2010, Ms. Xandria Fleurke, of Virginia Beach, accepted my proposal of marriage while hiking in Sky Meadow State Park in Delaplane, Va. We have not yet set a date, but are hoping for a late spring/early summer wedding.” That’s all I know this time around, but if I’ve left anything out, it is only because I’m a member of the Einstein Club. I look forward to seeing everyone at our reunion in 2012, if not sooner!

1998

Katherine Houstoun Schutt (H) 804-788-8981 katherine.schutt@gmail.com 15th Reunion: June 2013

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Kate Watson ’99 and Brad Danowski were married on May 29, 2010.

1999

Davis White davis.c.white@gmail.com 15th Reunion: June 2014

Lots of news from the Class of 1999, so here goes: I caught up with Katie Kaufman in Palo Alto, Calif., last week and had lunch with Jamie McNab ’00. Katie was returning from a business trip in Tokyo and stopped over in California for a few days to see friends and enjoy the nice “winter” California weather. She caught me up on seeing Walker Inman at Eric Zeckman’s wedding on Dec. 30. Wynne Liedtke Brown is expecting twins (a boy and a girl), which makes four children under 4 years old for a few months. Congrats to you and Lewis. Phil Cox is getting married in May, and Alex Schultes will be the best man. Alex was married in October, and Phil was his best man. Phil is “still living in Tennessee and working in commercial development. I currently spend most of my time managing 10 extended-stay hotels called Value Place. Other than that, I’m just enjoying life in Tennessee and waiting for it to get warm so I can get back on the golf course.” Blair Taylor checks in, saying that she

Carlie Hooff ’00 and Dan Casella were married in October.

is “working like a mad woman on my first solo project due out sometime this year. I’m keeping mum on the actual date, LOL! As a result, I am running around for writing sessions, recording time, photo shoots, band auditions, and all that great musical stuff. I also teach voice part time and am enjoying the kids. Oh yes, and I am now owner of Size of a Mustard Seed Publishing, LLC!” Kate Watson married Brad Danowski on May 29, 2010, and they are living on St. Simons Island with their lab, Lily. A great wedding photo is above. Great to hear from everyone. Please keep the updates coming. I live in San HALL OF FAME

Bryson Spinner ’99 will be inducted into the EHS Athletics Hall of Fame on Nov. 11, 2011.

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Elizabeth and Elliott Conklin ’01 were married in October in Staunton, Va. Episcopal family and friends gathered when Leah Kannensohn ’01 and Dre Tennille ’00 were married in Lexington, Ky. Front row, left to right: Leah Kannensohn Tennille ’01 and Dre Tennille ’00; second row: Sara Caughman ’03, Massie Payne ’03, Lee Tennille Carson ’01, and Beverly Mebane Helms ’02; third row: Ken Hodges ’84, Jordan Hadwin ’01, and Caitlin Kannensohn Elam ’03; fourth row: Nick Gillis ’00, Avery Miles ’00, Bill Cocke ’88, and Taylor Gillis Clement ’01; back row: Keays Bass ’01, Bryan Wisner ’00, Everett Mattox ’05, Libby Seaton Porter ’01, and Sihler Branch ’01.

Francisco and just started a new job at Google, so please look me up if you’re in the Bay Area. Best, Davis.

2000

Schuyler Williams schuyler13@gmail.com and Maisie Cunningham maisie.cunningham@gmail.com 15th Reunion: June 2015

From Maisie: I hope 2011 is off to a great start for everyone. I am still living in Venice Beach, Calif., and working in wealth management. Seventy and sunny every day is yet to get old, but I still make it back to the east coast pretty often. In October, Carlie Hooff married Dan Casella, and I was one of

Lacy Baldwin ’01 married Joey Noble on May 29, 2010, in North Palm Beach, Fla. Emily Klim ’01, Crandall Close Story ’01, and Beezie McLaughlin Sayers ’01 were bridesmaids.

her bridesmaids along with Elizabeth Hossfeld, who was maid of honor. The reception was held at Carlie’s grandmother’s home on Quaker Lane, the very same place many of us gathered to celebrate our graduation 10 years ago. Carlie was a stunning bride, and it was a magical night set to music performed by the Gordon Winn Band. EHS alums in attendance included Brittanny Wildman, Becky Arnesen Jenkins, Schuyler Williams, Lauren Kemp Bonapfel, Willy Nash, and of course the father of the bride, Charlie Hooff ’58. Schuyler Williams moved to Dallas this winter and is now working as a

digital account executive at The Wall Street Journal. She has already made a ton of new friends, no surprise there, and is acclimating to life away from N.Y.C. – although the EHS power lunches will be missed! Schuyler rang in the New Year with Elizabeth Hossfeld and Philip Nuttle in Palm Beach and reports it was lovely seeing them as always! Elizabeth is the proud mother to a new puppy…so new that when class notes went to print, she did not yet have a name. Also in Texas, Will Blocker is living in Forth Worth and working in land management. He will be starting his M.B.A. at Texas Christian University this fall, but will

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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continue to work full-time – a very impressive feat. Anne Perry Swift is living in Austin and working in leasing for Live Oak-Gottesman. Betsy Watts Metcalf and her husband, David, bought a house in Atlanta last summer. David has retired from the law and is working as a consultant at McKinsey & Co. Betsy is tutoring and coaching lacrosse at Lovett School, as well as freelance writing. She has written for Living Without and Atlanta’s Finest Dining magazines and is still maintaining her fantastic blog www.glutenfreedomatlanta.com. This winter she and her mom visited her brother, Rob ’98, and his family, who are living in Hayama, Japan. I had the chance to catch up with Lucy and James Doswell at a wedding in Charlotte, Lucy’s hometown. They are doing great and loving life in New York. Lillian Smith reports that life is great in Charlotte, where she is working for the town of Davidson as HR coordinator and town clerk. She has also been attending classes at UNC School of Government for public administration. She recently saw Alicia Ravenel Boyd and was a bridesmaid in Allison Jones Hubbard’s wedding in November, where she caught up with Hattie Gruber and William Stallworth. She also went to EHS-WFS game in November and saw Willy Nash. Just another note on Willy: At Carlie’s wedding he demonstrated that he can definitely still cut a rug – I couldn’t keep up with him on the dance floor. Frances Cade graduated from the Cumberland School of Law and Brock School of Business (Samford University) in May. In August, she married Kexuan Wang. Kex is an internal medicine resident at Tulane. They were married in both Birmingham, Ala., and again in Changzhi, China. After their second wedding, Frances and Kex spent three weeks traveling from Beijing to Guilin. When they returned to the States in September, the newlyweds moved to New Orleans where Frances works at Liskow & Lewis in commercial litigation. Yoon Lee is finishing his final year in medical school in Korea and is

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completing a clerkship at Yonago Tottori Hospital in Japan. He hopes to visit the U.S. sometime before he begins his residency. Dennis Clancey started his e-mail with “nothing new to report”…however, he in fact has a lot going on. Dennis is continuing Army Special Forces training to be a Green Beret, while also working for Amazon.com. He was on HBO March 21, in a documentary about the Triangle Factory Fire in N.Y.C., 1911, and he was one of the main interviewees: http://www.hbo. com/documentaries/triangle-remembering-the-fire/index.html. Congratulations to John Simons and his wife, Kelley, who are expecting a baby girl in mid-February! Thanks to everyone who wrote in and please keep Schuyler and me apprised of anything new!

2001

Taylor Gillis Clement (O) 910-693-0032 tgclem@gmail.com and Leah Kannensohn Tennille (C) 859-229-7645 lktennille@gmail.com 10th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

Happy 2011, everyone! Leah and I have taken over class notes. We can’t believe we’ll be celebrating our 10-year reunion this year and are looking forward to seeing everyone in June! There’s lots of big news this time around. Kim Obradovich Holman writes, “Life is good in Montgomery. I don’t see EHS faces much except for Facebook, though I’m going to Birmingham in a couple of weeks when Hannah Ellington ’03 has her senior recital at Birmingham-Southern. I won’t be at the reunion this year; we’re going to Piedras Negras, Mexico, just across the border from Eagle Pass, Texas, at almost the same time. We’re following the State Department and keeping in touch with our contacts there and it should be safe for travel. It isn’t anything like what’s been going on over in Egypt! I’ll try to send pictures this summer after we get back. No other major

Ashlee and Tim Hidell ’01 with their son, Brock.

news. I’m working as an engineering graduate for the Alabama Department of Transportation by day and being a youth leader/roller derby girl by night. Somewhere in there I work in being a wife! Life is good.” Ashley McGrane is living in Birmingham and planning to start medical school in the fall; she’ll be spending the spring deciding which school she will attend. Campbell Henry and wife Meagan are expecting a baby girl on April 1. His boss is the chairman of the Super Bowl committee, so work has been comingling with football lately. He also reports that Bo Richardson is engaged and is getting married this summer. Billy Han is now living in London and says for anyone who visits London to give him a shout! Leah Latella was there recently. Beau Johnson and his wife, Denise, recently purchased a house in Wilmington, N.C., and look forward to moving in soon. They report that business (Johnson Custom Boats) is doing well, and they are enjoying the coastal lifestyle and spending time out on the water. From Morgan Akers: “I quit my banking job in May to spend the summer traveling southeast Asia with my

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brother. I was able to meet up with William Akridge ’99 for a wild week in Vietnam. Riding through the streets of Hanoi on the back of a motorbike with Akridge driving is an experience I would recommend to anyone seeking a good thrill. I have just recently started work again at the Brand Banking Company, which is run by Paul Morgan’s older brother. I am still living in my hometown of Atlanta, where I regularly see Gene Hooff, Nat Hendricks, Dre ’00 and Leah Kannensohn Tennille, P.X. Head ’00, William Stallworth ’00, Farra Alford, Raymond Singletary ’02, Wilkes Evans ’02, Everett Mattox ’05, Sally Clark, Andrew Dorman, and Will Lombard. We also had visits from Jack Halloran and Will Corbitt ’02 for the SEC Championship and Alexander Cochran for New Year’s Eve. If you make it to Hotlanta for a visit, look me up!” Liz Tylander writes: “I am currently living in Lincoln, Neb., with the love of my life, Kat. I’ve been biking to work in sub-zero-degree weather this winter and enjoying the snow-covered corn fields. During the growing season I’ve been working on a small family farm that produces organic veggies, flowers, and goat cheese. I’m also preparing myself for nursing school and work as a nurseaide part-time at a long-term-care facility. Living the good life!” Austin Bryan is living in McLean, Va., working at Telecom, and pursuing his M.B.A. at American University. He has a chocolate lab named Alabama, who is learning how to drive stick and do advanced algebra. Virginia Leavell loves living in D.C., juggling what feel like a million projects and pursuits! She travels a lot organizing for the Laborers International Union in the worlds of construction and green jobs. She also helps run a popular education center in Nelson County, Va., called the Wayside Center for Popular Education, and hopes to do so for a long time. Since EHS, Virginia’s worked a few years in Thailand, but pretty much calls D.C. home sweet home. She had a fun year living with Liz Tylander and a few friends above an Indian restaurant near Adams Morgan.

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Lindsay Soyars is finishing up her master’s at U.Va. this summer. Margaret Harris is still in Lexington, Ky. She is now assistant to Mike Ryan Bloodstock, an established, local-based bloodstock agent. She primarily works in sales (buying and selling thoroughbreds for clients), appraisals, pedigree analysis, etc. Elliott Conklin is happy to announce that he is married! The ceremony took place at a vineyard in Staunton, Va., in October. They moved into D.C. and are both in school. His wife, Elizabeth, is working on her doctoral degree in piano performance, and he is doing the same in clinical psychology (picture on page 64). Crandall Close married Roddy Story on June 26, 2010, at her family’s home in Rhode Island. Sihler Branch, Lee Tennille Carson, and Lacy Baldwin Noble were bridesmaids. Lacy Baldwin married Joey Noble on May 29, 2010, in North Palm Beach, Fla. Emily Klim, Crandall Close Story, and Beezie McLaughlin Sayers were all in her wedding party (picture on page 64). Ashlee and Tim Hidell report that their son, Timothy Brock Hidell III, was born Jan. 10, 2011, at 9 p.m. Brock weighed 7 pounds and 4 ounces and was 20 inches long. Timing can be everything in life, and Brock got off to a great start arriving hours before a snowstorm shut down most of Delaware. Tim writes that, “Ashlee, Brock, and I are enjoying the winter at the beach, and look forward to seeing former classmates this summer at our reunion.” From Taylor: “I ran into Clair Clark ’99 at a new Raleigh restaurant and recently visited New Orleans and ran into Devon O’Donnell ’99, who was there for a friend’s wedding. I also keep in touch with Jordan Hadwin, who is doing better than ever and keeps promising to visit Southern Pines!” From Leah: “I married Dre Tennille ’00 on May 22, 2010, in Lexington, Ky. (picture on page 64). Taylor Gillis Clement was matron of honor and Lee Tennille Carson and Beverly Mebane Helms ’02 were among the bridesmaids. Sara

Caughman ’03 and Jordan Hadwin were readers. Everett Mattox ’05, Avery Miles ’00, and Bryan Wisner ’00 were among the groomsmen. We’ve been in Atlanta for almost two years now and love it.”

2002

Anne Arnold Glenn (H) 540-371-6370 anne.a.glenn@gmail.com and Millie Tanner Rayburn (H) 919-370-7496 millierayburn@gmail.com 10th Reunion: June 2012

This past summer, Wilkes Evans took a job with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney in Atlanta doing wealth management. He says he plans to stay for quite a while, depending on the market, of course. Kathy Weglein Zito is married with two adorable little boys, Matthew (4) and Michael (3). She says, “I live in Pennsylvania, just north of Gettysburg. I have been working for a local home builder, Charter Homes & Neighborhoods, for the past two years. I help people select, design, and build their new home. The market in this area is better than most, and I really enjoy the entire construction process. My husband and I also own several properties in the York City area that we have bought, rehabbed, and are now holding on to as rental properties. I actually hope the market holds prices down for a few more years, as it has made investing in real estate incredibly affordable.”

2003

Matt Berry (H) 914-235-5303 matt.s.berry@gmail.com and Alden Koste (H) 443-783-4659 alden.koste@gmail.com 10th Reunion: June 2013

From Alden: I hope everyone is doing well. I want to apologize for the minimal class notes in the last issue. This year has been

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Annabell Jones McNew ’03 (left) with her bridesmaid, Becka Parker ’03.

Family and friends enjoyed the festivities when Katie Perry ’03 and Oliver Pryor ’03 were married on June 27, 2009, in Sea Island, Ga. Front row, left to right: Hannah Baldwin ’03, Elizabeth Pope ’03, and Clarence Mills ’03; second row: Graye Pelletier ’03, Charles Pryor ’99, Oliver Pryor ’03, Katie Perry Pryor ’03, Anne Perry Swift ’00, and Joe Stallworth ’03; third row: Lauren Pirrung ’03, J.W. Perry ’97, Wilkie Colyer ’03, Marla Woodford ’03, Jack Sibley ’03, and Alex Perry ’04.

absolutely nuts. I recently finished law school, took the bar, and moved to New York to study tax law for another year. Despite all the craziness, it has been wonderful to check out a new city. Also, I have to give Case Anderson a gold star for helping me out with the notes for this issue. I love hearing from everyone, so please feel free to e-mail updates, news, or just random asides! Though school has been challenging, I was happy to get to celebrate New Year’s in New Orleans with fellow classmate Michael Barraza. We were both in town celebrating the marriage of one of our mutual Vanderbilt friends. Both Barraza and Sanford Zeigler are finishing up medical school in Charleston. Barraza hopes to specialize in radiology, whereas Sanford is on the surgery path. They will learn their residency placements in March. In the meantime, Barraza will be traveling to Vienna to present research at the European Congress of Radiology, and Sanford will journey to the mountains of northern

Rwanda to assist at the Shirya Hospital, a mission hospital operated through the Rwandan Episcopal Anglican Church. Cord Smythe lives with Sanford in Charleston and captains merchant vessels out of Charleston Harbor. Case Anderson caught up with him over New Year’s, and he says he loves what he does. After working in consulting for nearly three years (specializing in torpedo sales), Case has gravitated back toward the independent school arena and is teaching high school English and writing at Commonwealth Academy in Alexandria. Case reports that the most shocking thing about the job for him has been realizing that, inexplicably, many of his students have seen “The Matrix” and thus insist on pronouncing his name “Mr. Anderson” with a vocal inflection previously reserved for Keanu Reeves. He lives in D.C. with Lee McLaughlin, who teaches science at St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes and still holds the No. 1 ranking in the Mid-Atlantic

for stringing lacrosse sticks. Lee also enjoys spending quality time with his English Setter, Harlan. David Schoen is also in the District and lives with classmate Jack Sibley. David reports that he played for his company softball team this past summer and enjoyed a season that would have made Coach Brock proud! Ginny Moore also joined the fun in our nation’s capital, having moved to D.C. from New York last June. Ginny currently works at Episcopal as the assistant director of annual giving. Brad Tubesing, also in the D.C. area, reports that all is well and sends his best to everyone in the Class of 2003. Will Fedora and Steve Nash are enjoying life in D.C. as roommates in the always fashionable Glover Park neighborhood. Stuart Hartley recently finished his master’s degree in civil engineering and is currently working as an engineering consultant for KCI Technologies in Nashville. Gray Murray finished his master’s in accounting at Appalachian State last December and, after passing the C.P.A. exam, began working at Deloitte and Touche, LLP in Charlotte. Chris Joseph recently began M.B.A. studies at UT in Austin and reports that all is well. Courtney Kershaw has been living in Bogota, Colombia, teaching English and learning Spanish for the past year. She will remain there for another year and writes that she would be happy to have any visitors who may be down that way.

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Sally Mebane is a licensed title insurance underwriter for North Carolina and South Carolina. She is currently working in the real estate industry in Charlotte, N.C. Jane Clifford is abroad in London, working for the World Cancer Research Fund. Becka Parker, who is currently residing in Baltimore, was recently a bridesmaid in Annabell Jones McNew’s wedding. Annabell was married in San Antonio, Texas, on Dec. 11, 2010. She and her husband, Steven McNew, now live in Uvalde, Texas. Congratulations!

2004

Caitlin Smith caitlin.ann.smith@gmail.com and Harrison Gilchrist (H) 804-443-5247 chgilchr@gmail.com

Jennifer and Eamon Coy ’04 at the christening of their daughter, Andy. Riddick Beebe ’04 (left) is Andy’s godfather.

10th Reunion: June 2014

Thanks to everyone for writing in! It’s always great to hear from you. It sounds like many people from our class have celebrated important events recently, or will be soon. Congratulations to everyone for the graduations, engagements, and babies! James Kurek and Taylor Blades were married on Dec. 4, 2010, at the Half Moon Resort in Jamaica. James also has completed his first semester of the University of Maryland M.B.A. program. Congratulations, James! Alex Perry will be graduating with a law degree from University of MissouriColumbia in May. Dorothy Hutchison writes, “I have recently moved to Charlotte, N.C., and I’m loving it. I started nursing school at Queens University this past January, and have really enjoyed the program thus far. Before school began, I had a great visit to D.C. over the New Year celebrating with Katharine Ragsdale, Allie Tanner, Mary White Martin, Caroline Mathison, and Elizabeth Ladwig. It was a great reunion, especially before Biz relocated to Thailand and Caroline went back to Shanghai.” Elizabeth Ladwig and her boyfriend, Allen, received their TESOL certificates in Bangkok in February and will

James Kurek ’04 and his bride, Taylor Blades, were married on Dec. 4, 2010.

be traveling throughout Thailand, Vietnam, China, and Laos for several months. They hope to see Caroline Mathison along the way in Shanghai, and after their travels Biz and Allen will be placed in a city or town to teach. Katharine Ragsdale is currently interning for the Washingtonian Magazine in the advertising department. She says, “It’s a great

publication, and I’ve really enjoyed working here so far!” Kalee Stuart Blackburn lives in Houston, Texas, with her husband. She teaches biology and chemistry at Episcopal High School, and loves it! Brittany Bell had a whirlwind 2010! She traveled to Italy, organized a fundraiser for Haitians pursuing healthcare education, began working at Rex Hospital in Raleigh, and got engaged.

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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Best wishes, Brittany! Peggy Albertson is still living in Raleigh, N.C., and just accepted a new position with the CDC, working in the physical activity and nutrition branch as a part of a grant to fight obesity, and she loves it! She visited Calvert Coley in New York City, where Calvert is still working for Citibank. They had a great time catching up and taking in all New York has to offer. Clarissa Chenoweth was supposed to meet them in the city but has been so busy in her second year in Duquesne University’s law program that she had to miss the event. Sissie Strope writes, “I’ve been living in Durango, Colo., since last June and am enjoying my first ‘real’ winter. My brother, Will ’05, moved out west last November, and we’ve been having a great time living together and skiing the mountains. I’ve been studying wine for the past six months, and after passing the introductory sommelier course last November, I landed a job as a self-contracted sales representative for Vinture Distributing, an artisan wine distributing company. The job offers me the opportunity to meet some of the best restaurant/bar owners in Southern Colorado whilst continuing my viniculture studies, and so far I love everything about the industry. I’m working on expanding my territory into Telluride by the summer, and plan to stay in Colorado for the next few years at least.” Lilly Haywood is in her second year at veterinary school at U. Penn. She has a busy spring and summer planned, working at equine clinics in Charlottesville and Middleburg, Va., and Tryon, N.C. She will also travel to two Indian reservations: first spending a weekend near Phoenix working with small animals, and later returning for a week to Pine Ridge, S.D., where the group provides free health care to horses on the reservation. Kevin Stevens updated me on what he has been up to the last couple of years: “After the reunion I returned to Chicago to work at various small theater companies and continue touring with a production called ‘Letters Home’ about the war in Iraq. After taking

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some time to travel with my little sister, Ashley ’10, in Europe to celebrate her EHS graduation this past summer, I auditioned for and earned a fellowship with the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, D.C. So, I am back in D.C. until at least next fall and loving every minute. L.P. Scott and I are still as close as ever (though not as close as high school rumor always believed). Since graduating from Hobart and William Smith, L.P. has been living and working in Madison, Wisc. In fact, last October, before returning to the fold, I gave L.P. away in her wedding to college sweetheart Nick Daly.” Jennifer and Eamon Coy and their daughter, Andy, live in Purcellville, Va., where Eamon still works as a sound engineer. The Coys were blessed with Andy’s arrival on June 9, 2010! Riddick Beebe still works at Marist School in Atlanta, where he is a member of the English Department and serves as head wrestling coach. In addition, he coaches seventh-grade football in the fall and acts as the assistant strength coach in the spring. This Christmas, he became engaged to Callie Ellis, his girlfriend of five years who he met at Washington and Lee. They plan to get married on Oct. 1 in Atlanta. Also, Riddick was recently accepted into Middlebury’s Bread Loaf School of English. Finally, this year Riddick attended the baptism of his goddaughter, Andy Coy, daughter of Eamon Coy and his wife, Jenn. Congratulations to Riddick for his engagement, and to Eamon and Jenn for their baby girl! Parker Woltz writes, “I will be attending Harvard Business School next year, and am excited to move up to Cambridge in August. If anyone is currently living in the Boston area, please let me know!”

2005

Chris Mixon (H) 212-249-2432 cmixon.mxn@gmail.com and Lila Warren (H) 540-592-3609 lilawarren@gmail.com

Sydney Hess ’05 working in Taiwan.

Lewis Clark is engaged to Catherine Jakubowski. He proposed in December in the Dominican Republic, where Lewis is serving in the Peace Corps. Sydney Hess reports, “For the last two months, I’ve worked as an intern at a developmental center in Taiwan. The center is based in a rural area in western Taiwan and caters to adults with intellectual disabilities. As an intern, I maintain a blog of my experiences, help out with the students, and develop marketing strategies for their homemade crafts. So far, my time spent at Hwa Yen Developmental Center has been an adventure. I’m looking forward to enjoying my first Chinese New Year in the coming week. When I return to the states at the end of February, I will be preparing for a two-year teaching position in rural China with CEI (China Education Initiative). I will be teaching first- or second-year English to middle school students. I can’t wait to start this amazing opportunity!”

2006

Margaret von Werssowetz (H) 843-607-5788 margaretvonw@gmail.com and Jack Pitney (H) 610-649-7471 pitneyjack@gmail.com 5th Reunion: June 10-11, 2011

10th Reunion: June 2015

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Class of 2006, I hope this issue of the magazine formerly known as The High School finds you all well. We have lots of updates from the post-college world to be shared. After graduating from Sewanee in June (along with Miller Cornelson, Jackson Tucker, Daniel Gottwald, Kiki McCaslin, Dorsey Clarke, and Eric Utermohlen), I moved up to D.C., where I am now working in the marketing department of a law firm. And there is no shortage of EHS alums around here! First and foremost, Fletcher Dunn and Mason Tillett live here. I’m pretty sure they have jobs and definitely sure that they play softball. Fellow W&L grads Molly Wheaton and Sarah Montz live right in the same neighborhood in a house full of girls and permanent Christmas decorations. Sarah is gainfully employed and working on becoming a C.P.A., and Molly is an associate at DHR International. Her carpool buddy and co-worker, Chris Williams, drinks beers and lives in the same general area. He can most often be found looking downtrodden outside of Smith Point. Mark Battin, who lives in Alexandria, provides a good shoulder to cry on. Kingsley Trotter and Peyton Killeen are also around the same ’hood. Kingsley is living with Chapel Hill friends, and – after finishing a great internship that lasted through the summer and fall – she quickly landed a job as a research associate for the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. Peyton finally gave up the sweet life of nannying, hitting the beach, and being cooked for in Delaware to move to the city and begin work at a hospital here in D.C. Maturing! The list goes on. Katharine Pelzer writes, “I work at the National Wildlife Federation on the global warming policy team. I work mostly with underserved and low-income communities on climate and public health issues and getting their voices out to congress. In D.C., I have hung out with Elias Bitar and have seen Julia Rowe and Susanna McElroy

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from time to time. I try to get up to N.Y.C. to see EHS and UNC friends when I can. Otherwise, I live in Columbia Heights in D.C. near the 9:30 Club, where I’ve enjoyed attending entire shows and not having to worry about sign-in.” Julia Rowe and Susanna McElroy are living together in D.C.’s Chinatown. After graduating from Boston University this spring, Suz started working at the Council of Insurance Agents and Brokers, where she is a meetings and member services associate. After graduating from UGA, Julia started working for the House Committee on Natural Resources as a press assistant and has recently been transferred over to the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure as a staff assistant to the Aviation Subcommittee, as well as a press assistant. Other classmates in D.C. area include Caroline Koste, who is working in interior design and living in Glover Park; Mac Amos, who is a paralegal and lives around the corner from me; Teddy Grover, in Alexandria; Dorsey Clarke, in Annapolis; and Tatiana Morrow, in Maryland. On that note, it’s a little late notice, but I had the pleasure of catching up with Tatiana at an Episcopal happy hour earlier this year and would like to offer two very belated congratulations on her marriage and, more recently, her beautiful baby boy. If I remember correctly, Tatiana and her family are living in Maryland, where she is part of the Army and working with radiation patients. Speaking of marriages, two of our other classmates are engaged! Honour Alston, after finally finishing her grueling years of nursing school at U.Va., is engaged to John Thornton, a slightly older and very cute U.Va. alum. They are set to be married this coming June, shortly after our reunion. Ina Dixon is also engaged, but she has lots of news, so I’ll let you hear it in her words. Ina writes: “Currently I’m living on the island that is Hyde

Park (in Chicago), just around the corner from alumnus Alex Jameson ’00. We made The High School connection when I was wearing one of my many EHS T-shirts and Alex stopped to ask me what year I graduated! I definitely did not come to Chicago for the weather...instead, I moved here in September because my fiancé, Joao Santa-Rita, whom I met at St. John’s in Annapolis, is in his second year at the University of Chicago Law School. I recently began working at the University of Chicago as an executive secretary in the offices of the president and provost. I also volunteer with Doc Films, a movie society at the university, so I’ve been getting to see a lot of eclectic movies lately. Chicago has been fun so far. There are great restaurants in the area, and Hyde Park is a neat place, though a little isolated from downtown. I also have roots in Chicago! My great-great uncle, Richard James Oglesby, who was governor of Illinois from 1865-69, is duly honored with a statue in Lincoln Park. I visited the statue, and you can see the family resemblance (kind of ).” In other big city news, New York has also become a haven for post-college Episcopal alums. Jack Pitney finished an internship with a small record label in Brooklyn, went on tour with the band Yeasayer for two weeks, and is now working as an editorial intern at Rolling Stone. Holly Casey is also in the magazine world. She writes: “I live in New York and work in advertising and sales at Condé Nast for Women’s Wear Daily. The atmosphere is definitely intense, but I absolutely love my job. I am really busy with New York Fashion Week coming up, but I love living with Carrie Coker and having Elizabeth Harrison as an honorary roommate – some things never change!” Carrie is working at an ad agency and “learning tons of German,” by which she means calling me randomly for translation help with the ill-conceived notion that I speak fluent German and that, at home, my family all wear lederhosen. Fellow U.Va. grad Paul Light is also up in

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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N.Y.C., though I’m not sure what he’s doing other than co-hosting swanky New Year’s Eve parties. Harrison Jobe and Eleanor Cooper are roommates up in the big city as well, where Harrison is at NPR and Eleanor has joined the ranks of Wall Street big-shots. Stephen Westerfield is living in N.Y.C. and working on Wall Street, too, and sometimes sees Eleanor around work at Morgan Stanley. Last but not least, Frances deSaussure is in New York working for Blue Engine, a new education non-profit. During the one-year fellowship, she is working as a teaching assistant in an eighth-grade algebra classroom in a public school. Across the pond, we have a few classmates writing from London. Nea Fowle writes: “I’m currently living in London as a lady of leisure. I’m looking for a job in the party industry (attention alums). I’m bumping into Eliza Hopper a bit and Eleanor Galloway ’08 and Lily Fowle ’08 have come to visit me. I recently became a godmother to a young baby girl.” Sounds terrible. Eliza Hopper writes: “As of now, I’m living in London getting my M.A. in art history at University College London. Not sure what I’m doing next, but pretty positive I’ll be staying in the U.K. for at least a year or two longer. I live about a 15-minute walk from Nea, which is really fun! All in all, life is great.” Apparently Eliza is a socialite about town, because we have one final London resident who mentions her. Hendrik de Zwart “somehow graduated from the University of Colorado in four years” and is now living in London and working for an online start-up. He writes that he saw Eliza Hopper a little while back at the pub, where he used to work, and also saw Caroline Koste in D.C. quite briefly. He skied over the holidays and dropped his first 30-foot cliff and landed it – “pretty stoked.” Another outdoor enthusiast, Harper Cullen, writes: “I am living in San Francisco working for a

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foreign currency broker, Forex Capital Markets. I have been spending a lot of time surfing and snowboarding in California. I am playing club lacrosse for the Olympic Club this spring.” Also reporting from the West Coast, Bobby Arnot: “I graduated from Pepperdine University in May, where I played rugby and worked for the vice chairman of Lionsgate, Michael Burns. Summer of my sophomore year, I worked on a Kevin Spacey/Robin Williams film in L.A, which made it into Sundance in 2009. I got to act in it as well. My junior year, I worked on a documentary for Tom Shadyac, who directed such films as ‘Ace Ventura,’ ‘The Nutty Professor,’ and ‘Bruce Almighty.’ I went abroad on Semester at Sea during the spring of 2009, where I traveled around the world to 12 different countries for three and half months, which has been a highlight of my life so far. After graduating in May, I went to Michigan and South Africa to work on a Lionsgate film, directed by Marc Forster, with Gerard Butler, called ‘Machine Gun Preacher.’ I was in Johannesburg for two and half months, working as an assistant director. Currently, I’m living in L.A. but flying up to Vancouver to work a TV pilot for the month.” Others have chosen even more exotic destinations than the mystical land of California. Cate Smythe writes, “I have moved to Cordoba, Argentina, and am working for a premier wing-shooting company (dove hunting) called David Denies Wingshooting. I am managing one of the six lodges called Pica Zuro and will hopefully be down here for the next few years. Just got down here on Jan. 5, after I graduated in December from UGA and am in the middle of some intense training. So yeah, that’s about it. I’m in the boonies.” The boonies in Argentina sound like your version of heaven, Cate. David Lambeth is currently living with a friend in St. John, USVI, and working in a restaurant for a few months. “If anyone is ever down this way, send me an e-mail,” he says. Julia Cammack reports, “I am

currently serving a nine-month assignment as a language and culture assistant in Spain. I work with the bilingual program at a public secondary school just outside of Sevilla and am really enjoying the experience thus far. I have had the opportunity to travel in Spain and other parts of Europe during my time off and enjoyed spending Christmas in Rome with my family, including Martha Cammack ’09 and Alice Cammack ’11.” Also getting a taste of life in Spain, Christian Broyhill writes, “I graduated from Furman in May with a double major in music and Spanish. I spent the month of May touring Spain with my choir, while also serving as the group’s translator! Currently, I serve a family back home in Hickory, N.C., working as a nanny. I’ve also had opportunities to help out the Hispanic community in town and sing in a few shows! I am currently debating whether or not I will attend seminary next year to study counseling, and am applying to various programs. In fact, while interviewing at a seminary in Seattle, I ran into Will Canine and got to eat dinner with him! I can’t wait to go to the reunion this summer and learn about how everyone is doing!” From Peter Dunbar: “After June graduation, several Mississippi friends came up to New Jersey, and we cycled back along the Appalachians to Oxford over the course of two weeks. Skyline Drive and the Blue Ridge Parkway really brought back EHS memories. I am now in Cordoba, Argentina, through 2012 doing social work and some course work. In my spare time, I am doing a good bit of trekking in the Andes and also plotting a way to make it to Alexandria this summer to see y’all.” Mary Lane is currently a Fulbright journalism fellow, writing in Berlin for the The Wall Street Journal. She wrote for the Associated Press through January, covering current events and culture – from German-Chinese relations to Berlin Fashion Week. Mary spent Christmas with Ashley Litzenberger ’07 and her family in Serbia, where Ashley’s dad is in the

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2007

Catherine Coley (H) 407-629-1787 catherinegcoley@gmail.com and Warner Blunt (H) 804-784-0233 wlb5m@virginia.edu 5th Reunion: June 2012

Friends from the Class of 2007 celebrated the New Year in Charleston, S.C. Left to right: Allison Ledwith, Claire Schmitt, Annabel Rose, Jane Arnold, Sallie Madden, Jess Alfaro, and Anderson Hackney.

diplomatic corps. Ryan Jackson is currently finishing up classes and his master’s thesis, after which he will be taking a position as product manager for a firm either in California or Boston. He had an amazing summer, working in Barcelona, Spain, and traveling to over 16 different countries with both friends and family. Closer to the EHS vicinity, Miller Cornelson and Steve Shaw are living together in Charlottesville. Miller works at SNL Financial as an energy research analyst, and Steve is set to graduate from U.Va. in May. They see a good deal of Thomas Light, whom I believe is working in finance in Richmond, Va. From Texas, Spencer Brown writes, “After graduating from SMU in May, I pursued a career in coaching football. I moved to Denton, Texas, to join the staff at the University of North Texas as the defensive quality control. UNT went 3-9 with wins over Florida Atlantic, Middle Tennessee State, and Western Kentucky and tough losses to Clemson and Kansas State.” Daniel Gottwald is also out in Texas, living in Houston. Anne Womble graduated in December with high honors from N.C. State University. She writes, “I enjoyed bringing in the New Year with my fellow EHS folk in D.C. at the Capital City Brewery. Now I am living with my sister in Atlanta. I am working as a full-time nanny for the

next six months and plan to find a job in the communication field in the near future!” Though that was the extent of “appropriate” information Anne could share, she noted that Jackson Tucker has just moved to Atlanta, where he is working in healthcare IT consulting at Cumberland Consulting Group. Kyler Carr, who is finishing up his last semester at UGA this spring, claims that he sees Jackson frequently, “every time he comes to see his girlfriend here at Georgia.” He also has spent a good bit of time with Sloan Battle since Sloan returned from his NOLS trip out west. Zack Hoisington was named a preseason All-American by InsideLacrosse. com. Zach is a senior defender for Colorado College. Last season, his team won the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference championship, and Zach earned Defensive Player of the Year honors. Caitlin Dirkes graduated from College of Charleston in December with a B.A. in arts management. She is currently in Charleston trying to find an interior design job. She and her family had a great vacation in Colorado over Christmas. I’m glad to hear from so many people, but I hope to hear from even more next time. Many people have new e-mail addresses as our college e-mails slowly die away (depressing), so please be sure to e-mail me your latest info. Can’t wait to see everyone in June!

Class of 2007 brought in 2011 with a posh gathering in Charleston, S.C. EHS celebrities included Clark Barber, Annabel Rose, Kidder Williams, Drew McGowan, JT Jobe, Griffin Johnson, Jeb Leva, Hunter Coffey, Frank Stern, Sallie Madden, Sally Channell, Anderson Hackney, Jess Alfaro, Allison Ledwith, Claire Schmitt, Jane Arnold, and Zach Glubiak ’08. Ross Vizard reports that he has been hunting and hanging out with Brandt Gess ’09 at Ole Miss, while he is studying business administration and Spanish. Mountain man David Glaize had the chance/honor to shred some great snow with Vlad Roosevelt several times in Vail, Colo. Seeing the Hoisington brothers around the CC campus, with Zack ’06 as his neighbor, he sure sounds like he is living the pura vida even while working on his senior thesis. Other exciting news, though it seems a bit out-dated, my apologies for not reporting this breaking news: Nikki Ferland got engaged to Colin Regan last August. He was the leader of a rock climbing trip she took her freshman year and the two are planning for a summer 2012 wedding. Post-graduation, Nikki will be heading to Atlanta for her M.P.H. at Emory University, where she will be studying epidemiology. Congratulations, Nikki and Colin! Also, Victoria Friedman was proposed to over winter break by Robbie Fitzgerald, and the two are thinking May 2012 for the big day. He is a Sewanee graduate and currently in law school in Charleston. Congratulations, Victoria and Robbie! Lindsey Dorman accepted a job

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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at BlackRock in their financial markets advisory group in N.Y.C. for post-graduation. She also had a mini EHS reunion this summer for her 21st birthday with Kelsey Montz, Katharine Farrar, Caroline Kelso, Kidder Williams, Aimee Barraza, Ansley Stewart, Julie Zambie, Taylor Robison, Fritz Reuter, Zach Kendall, Warner Blunt, and Teddy Peterson. News from the Tarheels is slim. I still pal around with that redheaded freshman year roommate of mine, Kristina Fondren, which is pretty remarkable. Claire Schmitt also remains a buddy, though her whereabouts this semester have been unknown. As for the next step, I will be returning to Hong Kong in August 2011 as an analyst with Morgan Stanley’s sales and trading division, but I look forward to running into some familiar faces while training in N.Y.C. this summer. Congratulations on college graduations and best of endeavors in your future! Keep in touch! E-E-EHS!

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Eliza Coker ’08 (left), Spencer Graves ’08, and Amanda Weisiger ’08 in Rome.

2008

Lucy Glaize (H) 540-667-3097 lglaize@gmail.com 5th Reunion: June 2013

It’s scary to think that most of the Class of 2008 is closer to the end of our college career than to the beginning. Many classmates are making plans for internships and more formal jobs as we all creep closer and closer to college graduation. An abundance of ’08 members took advantage of the wonderful opportunity to study abroad this past fall semester. Grace Fenstermaker spent the semester studying in Belgium and traveling around Europe. She had an amazing time and is looking forward to going back. Juli White also spent the semester in Europe, traveling in England, Scotland, Turkey, Italy, and France in the Sewanee European Studies program. Eliza Coker and Amanda Weisiger studied in Rome with a program through Vanderbilt.

Tommi Coxe ’08 with her students in Tanzania.

Amanda wrapped up her experience saying, “It wasn’t real life.” Eleanor Galloway studied in Scotland. She, Eliza, and Amanda are all loving being back in Nashville this semester. The three of them live on the same hall now, bringing them back to the glory days of living on Harrison. Leigh Ainsworth studied abroad in China during the semester. She says it was a ton of fun, and she really misses it. She’s now back at Trinity University, busy rushing and trying to get used to American college life again.

If she does not work in D.C. this summer, she’ll be doing an internship in Europe with a friend’s company. Tommi Coxe participated in an internship through Cross Cultural Solutions in Moshi, Tanzania, during the semester. She volunteered with a very small non-profit organization called Upendo Artist Association. She was studying the Tanzanian education system, so she mostly taught pre-primary school (ages 2 to 7). Tommi also worked with Upendo on women-empowerment projects by

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Spencer McKenna ’08 (left), Graham Jones ’08 (right), and friends at the Atlanta Braves playoff game.

helping to teach the groups of women how to manage their finances and form budgets for their small businesses that Upendo helped them get started. Upendo teaches women and youth from nearby, impoverished villages different art types and techniques in order to help them learn ways to generate income for their families. Tommi says working with children who are so genuinely happy, full of love, and always eager to learn was and incredible and humbling experience. She plans on staying in very close contact with Upendo, and is trying to go back within the next year to do more work with them. Meghan Howard is abroad this semester in Costa Rica doing a tropical medicine and global health program through Duke’s Organization for Tropical Studies. She is busy trekking around research stations in the rainforests of Costa Rica, learning from researchers and doctors with a small group of 12 other students from universities all over the country. All of these experiences are certainly making our classmates more cultured and aware of everything happening all over the globe!

Tess Waldrop celebrated the new year in D.C. with Sewanee friends. She also traveled out to Aspen over winter break with them. Tess is being inducted into The Order of the Gownsmen this semester at Sewanee. She described The Order of the Gownsmen as Sewanee’s version of The High List. Tess and Parham Barber are working on getting a house for senior year together. Sounds like quite the exciting living situation! Ali Shepard left CNU and is now a horse trainer and riding instructor. She trains horses, teaches riding lessons, and coaches the show teams at Hideaway Horse Center in Brandywine, Md. Ali says she couldn’t be happier doing anything else! Trina Brady is currently working as a sales and marketing intern in SoHo with Brant Publications for Modern Magazine and the magazine Antiques. This sounds like an incredible experience and a great way to take advantage of going to school in N.Y.C. Elly Montague has been extremely successful with road races this past semester. She ran the Outer Banks Marathon in November and qualified for the Boston Marathon with a time

of 3:33. She was third in the 20-24 age group! She plans on running Boston in April 2012. She recently ran the Frostbite 15K in Richmond and placed third of all the females with a time of 1:04:18. Right now, Elly is focusing on training for three spring races, including the Charlottesville 10-miler, the Monument 10K, and the Charlottesville Marathon. That’s quite a lot to look forward to! In the middle of all of her training, she is focusing on school, majoring in kinesiology with a concentration in exercise physiology. As always, many people are getting together for mini-reunions with fellow classmates from Episcopal. It’s not always easy considering we do not go home for breaks to the same places. Tom Weaver, Dylan Harry, Lee Carter, Eliza Carter ’10, Patrick Hardy ’09, Clay Schutte ’06, and Liz Schutte ’10 all spent two weeks during winter break in Winter Park, Colo., for a “super, awesome, happy, fun time” party. Carson Roberts is looking forward to a little reunion in Charleston, S.C., on Feb. 18 to celebrate Clay Dunnan’s 21st birthday with Liz McLean, Liz Elliott, Ann Gordon Pelletier, Leah Andress, and Marguerite Kleinheinz. They are all planning to live in N.Y.C. this summer, along with Amanda. Spencer McKenna met up with Graham Jones and Taylor Robison ’07 in Atlanta for the Braves’ playoffs games. This is just a small example of the great job we are doing at keeping in touch since graduation. The first semester of my junior year at UVM flew by faster than any other. Morgen Rogers ’10 and Jordan Nulsen ’10 joined Dylan, Avery, and me as Episcopal graduates here. It’s fun seeing these familiar people around campus! I was very busy with schoolwork and other activities, such as being a leader of the UVM Student Dietetics Association. I am still studying dietetics and am doing two internships this semester as field experience. I am working with the Vermont Dietetics Association and also doing post-natal nutrition counseling for

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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new mothers and infants. I had a great time briefly meeting up with Lindsey deButts for lunch in D.C. during winter break. I am planning on running the Mad Marathon in the Mad River Valley of Vermont in July. If all goes well, Elly and I will be running the Boston Marathon together in 2012! Right now I am enjoying skiing a couple times a week in Vermont at Sugarbush Resort and Mad River Glen. My brother, Philip Glaize ’04, comes up from N.Y.C. to ski with me every now and then. I am looking forward to more EHS mini-reunions this semester in the New England area!

2009

Billy Hackenson (H) 703-757-0445 bihackenson@davidson.edu 5th Reunion: June 2014

Based on the response I got for my call for updates over the holidays, it is safe to say everyone must have been too relaxed to e-mail me with news! Those I spoke to did have a great holiday season and shared many of their plans for the summer and coming semester. David Block is one of those who is planning to spend part of the year abroad. He will be in London at LSE for the summer and then he will be off to Hyderabad, India, for the fall semester. Before that, however, he is excited for another season of lax this spring. Katie Rozelle and Kathleen Hullinger spent the tail end of winter vacation basking in the Palm Beach sun and celebrating Kathleen’s birthday. Katie also reports that she sees a great number of EHS alumni in Dallas, including Paula Pavlova, Tay Smith-Kiawu, Katie Horton, Carter Voss ’08, Cory Dugan ’10, and Adam Stowe ’10. Kathleen also had a good time last semester and over break. She now studies financial management at Clemson and became the recruitment chair for Chi Omega. She, along with Olivia Vietor, Haley Morgan, and Kelsey Knutson, toured the impressive new gym on campus during the quiet

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of the holidays. Haley told me she is now majoring in human and organizational development at Vanderbilt. Over the new year, she hosted several classmates for the ringing in of 2011, including Bess Trotter, Catherine Harrison, Stefan Graff, Greg DiNardo, Will Ryan, Shadow Sebele, Brandt Gess, and Jamie Utt. Lauren Marshall also spent New Year’s in Washington, where she met with Lindsey Fay ’08, Andima Umoren ’08, and Emily Fay ’10. They had a “great, if not slightly sketchy, time” in downtown D.C. She sees Ik Soo Kwon from time to time and she is actively preparing to travel to Ghana. After two semesters of taking Twi, she’s ready to head off to Africa. As in the last update, Baobao Zhang had quite the exciting semester and shared that she had an all-access field pass to the annual Yale-Harvard game as a video reporter. While in Boston, she saw Khadijah Hall ’08 and Barbara Bai ’08 for a mini-reunion. She also reported that she is becoming a deacon at the Yale University Church while working as an assistant in Yale’s political science department. It’s through this work she met a fellow alum, Harry Blair ’56. The two shared different stories on the more than 50-year gap between attending The High School. Baobao is off to Beijing this semester and will be working again with PBS in New York for the summer. Liz Ward spent time in Wake Forest over the fall visiting Kate Stover and Martha Cammack, who came up from Wofford to see everyone. Martha also took a European vacation for Christmas to visit her sisters and fellow EHSers, Julia ’06, who teaches English classes in Spain, and Alice ’11, who is doing her senior year abroad in Italy. Drew Johnson had her debutante ball in Chicago over the break and many classmates made the trip to the Windy City to celebrate with her. Liz Ward, Jeila Martin Kershaw, Claire Channell, Elle Czura, Sarah Chase Webber, Olivia Vietor, and Austin Miller all were in attendance.

Carly Linthicum is gearing up for her second season of lacrosse at Vanderbilt and is planning to spend the summer living and working in Washington. I will be joining Carly in D.C. for a Davidson summer political science program and hopefully a number of you will be in the area to say hey. That’s all for now, folks. Enjoy the spring. I hope to hear from you and whatever lies ahead for you. Be well, Class of 2009.

2010

Will Frazier (H) 540-886-8634 wtf4wc@Virginia.edu 5th Reunion: June 2015

For the majority of the Class of 2010, this fall marked their first semester in college! After spending several months at institutions across the country, many reunited for the WoodberryEpiscopal game in November. After fall semester in Morocco, Stewart Cory has continued her gap year interning for Brenda Bertholf, an artist consultant in Paris. She is also studying French at the Sorbonne and coordinating events for several artsrelated non-profits. Follow Stewart’s Parisian adventures on her blog, www.laviegap.com. Benjamin Baldwin finished his first semester at Sewanee, where he is pledging SAE. Benjamin enjoyed spending Christmas with his family and celebrated the New Year in Debordieu, S.C., with fellow former classmates James Dorsett, Charles Gillock, Barry Hughes, and Anthony Juker. Juliette Crowther completed her first semester at Tulane, where she is studying French and political science. She went through rush and went Kappa Kappa Gamma! Juliette is looking forward to the spring in New Orleans and Mardi Gras. Frances Brandley has enjoyed her first semester at Trinity College, where she has continued her study of French and art history. Frances made a trip down to Washington, D.C., over

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break and visited Jordan Nulsen. Lily Merrill has also loved her first semester at Trinity College. Over break, Lily debuted at the Junior Assemblies Ball in New York, and Alex Smith and Will Frazier had a great time as her escorts for the evening. Kelsey Wall, currently attending Washington and Lee University, also debuted at the ball. Emma Wiltshire has been having a great time at the University of Richmond! Over break, Taylor Ibrahim and Cricket Roberts enjoyed visiting Emma in Richmond. Jeannie Burke has had a busy first semester at East Carolina University. She has spent time volunteering at both an animal shelter and a center for teaching English. She is going to major in business and minor and Spanish, and she hopes to travel abroad sometime soon. Martha Perez-Sanz loved her first semester at Colorado College with fellow EHS Class of 2010 alum Liza Carter. The two love living in the mountains and have been doing a lot of camping and skiing. Martha is looking forward to some warmer-weather activities when she goes to Florida for spring break with Cameron Hawkins. Danielle Molina had an amazing first semester at Parsons. She finds New York City to be a “campus like no other!” She frequently sees Paige Weber, who is also attending Parsons, and says that it is nice to see a familiar EHS face. The two have had many guests drop by since they began their time in N.Y.C., with Rachel Hurley, Vincent Mariano, Sarah Cauthen, and Courtney Lewis all coming to visit.

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marriages

births

Henry Andrew Brown III ’72 to Margery Brown, Jan. 8, 2011

Margaretjane Preston Prevatt to Bethany and Robert Prevatt ’73, May 4, 2010

Anton Joslyn Bueschen, Jr. ’85 to Alison Carpenter, July 10, 2010 Calvin A. Evans, Jr. ’92 to Ivey Cargill, Dec. 31, 2010 Dabney Langhorne Doswell ’93 to Robert Stanley Jewell, May 15, 2010

Virginia Mashburn to Allison and Paul Mashburn ’97, July 17, 2010 Peter Shields Watts to Alden and Rob Watts ’98, March 2, 2011 Xavier Michael Ginyard to Therese and Ron Ginyard ’99, Feb. 24, 2011

Caroline Carter Hancock ’97 to Francis Claiborne Johnston, Feb. 26, 2011

Timothy Brock Hidell III to Ashlee and Tim Hidell ’01, Jan. 10, 2011

Kathryn Jane Watson ’99 to Brad Danowski, May 29, 2010

Andy Coy to Jennifer and Eamon Coy ’04, June 9, 2010

Allison Estes Jones ’00 to James Ryan Hubbard, Nov. 6, 2010

Justin Isaiah Bennett to Michael Bennett and Tatiana Morrow ’06, July 24, 2010

Elizabeth Lyons Baldwin ’01 to Joey Noble, May 29, 2010 Crandall Frances Close ’01 to Roddy Lee Story III, June 26, 2010 Elliott L. Conklin ’01 to Elizabeth Hill, Oct. 8, 2010 Leah Sieb Kannensohn ’01 to Andre Townsend Tennille III ’00, May 22, 2010 Annabell Ellen Jones ’03 to Steven McNew, Dec. 11, 2010 James Ross Kurek ’04 to Taylor Blades, Dec. 4, 2010 Tatiana Rochelle Morrow ’06 to Michael Bennett, Nov. 9, 2009

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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In Memoriam

GEORGE MOFFETT COCHRAN ’30

of Staunton, Va., died Jan. 22, 2011. At Episcopal, Mr. Cochran was a member of the Fairfax Literary Society, Missionary Society, and the Chronicle and “Whispers” boards. He was a member of the track team, and he received the Laird English Composition Medal. Mr. Cochran attended the University of Virginia, where he received his bachelor’s and law degrees. At Virginia, he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity and Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity. As an alumnus, he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and the Raven Society. After serving in the U.S. Navy and obtaining the rank of lieutenant commander, Mr. Cochran practiced law with his father. In 1964, Mr. Cochran founded the law firm of Cochran, Lotz, and Black. He served as president of the Virginia Bar Association from 1965-66 and was a fellow of the American Bar Foundation and the American College of Probate Law; a charter fellow of the Virginia Bar Foundation; and a member of the Judicial Council of Virginia. He served as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1948-66, and, during his last term, served as chairman of the Courts of Justice. He served in the Virginia State Senate from 1966-68 and was a member of the Supreme Court of Virginia until his retirement in 1987. He is survived by his wife, Lee; two sons, including G. Moffett Cochran ’69; four grandchildren, including Harry C. S. Cochran, Jr. ’99 and Alexander Cochran ’01; and two great-grandchildren.

PHILIP P. STEPTOE, JR. ’31

of Chevy Chase, Md., died Nov. 30, 2010. As a student, Dr. Steptoe was a Monitor, a librarian, and a member of the choir. He received the Whittle Prize twice and the Meade Prize. Dr. Steptoe received his bachelor’s degree from Haverford College and his medical degree from the University of Virginia. After an obstetrics residency at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Steptoe served in the Army Medical Corps for three years, earning the rank of captain. An obstetrician and gynecologist, Dr. Steptoe had a private practice in Washington, D.C., and was an associate at Columbia Hospital for Women. He was a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and was an associate professor at Georgetown University’s School of Medicine. He is survived by a son, a daughter, and four grandchildren. EHS relatives include his brothers, Thomas W. Steptoe ’32 and Robert M. Steptoe ’38, and nephew, Thomas W. Steptoe, Jr. ’70.

DAVID MILTON FRENCH ’32

of Alexandria, Va., died Jan. 1, 2011. On the Hill, Mr. French was a librarian, a member of the varsity track team, and a recipient of the Whittle prize. Mr. French continued his education at the University of Virginia, where he received his bachelor’s and doctorate degrees in chemistry. During World War II, he worked for the U.S. Rubber Company on the development of synthetic rubber. Mr. French also worked at Wyandotte Chemical Company in Detroit. In 1959, he moved his family to Alexandria, Va., and began work at the Naval Surface Weapon Center. Mr. French served as a branch head and mentor there until he retired. His papers on polymer chemistry were published in professional research journals and he patented a number of processes for the development and treatment of synthetic materials. Mr. French was an emeritus member of the American Chemical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Sigma Xi scientific research society, and Alpha Chi Sigma, the fraternity of chemists. Mr. French spent his later years exploring his passion for genealogy. Some of his writings can be found in the Virginia Room of the Alexandria, Va., library. He is survived by his wife, Molly, three sons, six grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

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ROBERT EDWARD LEE STRIDER, JR. ’35

CHANNING W. DANIEL, JR. ’36

of Jamaica Plain, Va., died Nov. 28, 2010.

of Wilmington, N.C., died Sept. 21, 2010.

At EHS, Mr. Strider was a member of the Blackford Literary Society, Chronicle board, and choir. He placed first in multiple reading, reading at sight, and declaiming contests. After Episcopal, Mr. Strider continued his education at Harvard, where he received his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he joined the English Department at Connecticut College and taught there for 11 years. In 1957, Mr. Strider became dean of faculty and a professor of English at Colby College. He was elected president of Colby College in 1960, where he remained until his retirement in 1979. Mr. Strider was involved in multiple organizations, including the National Commission on College Work, Governor’s Advisory Committee on Education, Modern Language Association, and American Association of University Professors. He also was chairman of The Association of American Colleges. He is survived by four children, three grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. EHS relatives include his cousins, I. H. Strider ’25, J. W. Strider ’28, and R. E. L. Strider ’36.

While at EHS, Mr. Daniel was a member of the Fairfax Literary Society, Chronicle board, Missionary Society, and “E” Club. He was a Monitor and on the varsity track and football teams. Mr. Daniel attended the University of Virginia and was a member of St. Elmo Hall fraternity. He received his master’s degree at the ABA Stonier Graduate School of Banking, hosted by Rutgers University. During World War II, he served in the Army as a captain in the Pacific. He worked for Trailways Bus System in Wilmington, N.C., and American Air Filter Co. in Louisville, Ky. In 1955, he and his family moved to Charlottesville, Va., where he worked for Citizens Bank and Trust Company as a trust officer. In 1963, Mr. Daniel began working for Jefferson Bankshares, where he was senior vice president, trust officer, and a member and secretary of the board of directors. He worked there until his retirement in 1983. While in Charlottesville, Mr. Daniel was a member of the American Society of Automotive Engineers, president of the Chamber of Commerce and the United Way, and chairman of the Trust Committee of the Virginia Bankers Association. Mr. Daniel is survived by two daughters; a son, Channing W. Daniel III ’72; two grandchildren; a great-grandchild; a sister; a brother; and a nephew, William V. Daniel, Jr. ’76. EHS relatives include his father, Channing W. Daniel, Sr. 1908, and brother, William V. Daniel ’46.

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G. ARTHUR HOWELL ’36 of Austell, Ga., died Nov. 27, 2010.

On the Hill, Mr. Howell was a member of the Blackford Literary Society, the “Whispers” and Chronicle boards, the “E” Club, and the Missionary Society. He was a Monitor, played varsity football, and was an alternate captain for basketball. He received the Johns Prize, the Shakespeare Medal, and the Latin Medal. After graduation, Mr. Howell matriculated at Princeton University and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He received his law degree from Harvard and relocated to Atlanta, where he formed the law firm Bird & Howell. In 1982, the firm merged with Alston, Miller, & Gaines, becoming Alston & Bird, one of the largest firms in the South. Mr. Howell was on the board of directors for Atlantic Steel, Summit Industries, Watkins Industries, and the Alpha Fund. He was general counsel for the Georgia Tech Athletic Association, the University Systems of Georgia, and the Georgia State Building Authority. He was the president of the Atlanta Lawyers Club, the Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Atlanta Community Services, and the Community Planning Council, and he was chairman for the United Appeal and the Atlanta Advisory Commission on Parks. He served on the Board of Trustees at Episcopal High School, Oglethorpe University, Morehouse College, The Westminster Schools, The Atlanta Speech School, the Institute of International Education, and Princeton University. He is survived by his wife, Jenny; three sons; two daughters; two stepsons; 24 grandchildren; and multiple great-grandchildren.


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EDWARD TRIGG BROWN ’36

EDWARD KNOX POWE III ’40

of Richmond, Va., died Jan. 26, 2011.

of Durham, N.C., died Feb. 6, 2011.

At Episcopal, Mr. Brown was Head Monitor, president of the Missionary Society and Fairfax Literary Society, and in “E” Club. He was head office boy, captain of the varsity track team, and an alternate captain for football. After graduation, Mr. Brown continued his education at the University of Virginia and began working with Morgan Bros. in Richmond, Va. In 1946, he entered the Anti-aircraft Division and graduated from officer candidate school, where he also was an instructor. He was promoted to captain and sent to Panama, where he held multiple staff positions and served as a battery commander in the jungles. After the war, Mr. Brown received an engineering degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He worked with the Charlottesville Lumber Company and was in charge of the construction division. He later joined John W. Daniel & Company and retired in 1983 after 34 years of service. Mr. Brown was on the board of the Associated General Contractors of Virginia. He was a member of and served on the vestry of the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany in Danville, Va. He was on the board of the Danville Golf Club, the Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History, and the Y.M.C.A. He is survived by his wife, Aurelia; three sons, including Edward T. Brown, Jr. ’70 and Thomas R. Brown ’73; a daughter; and seven grandchildren.

While at EHS, Mr. Powe was a member of the Blackford Literary Society, Missionary Society, and “E” Club. He was a Monitor and on the varsity football and track teams. Mr. Powe received his bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of North Carolina. During the war, he was wounded while serving in France with the U.S. Army and received the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star for bravery. He was honorably discharged as a captain in 1946. Mr. Powe was the founding partner of Powe, Porter, Alphin, and Whichard, which became the largest law firm in Durham, N.C. He also served in the North Carolina House of Representatives from 1955-57. In 1996, Mr. Powe was inducted into the General Practice Hall of Fame of the North Carolina Bar Association. He was the recipient of the Evelyn Coman Award for Lifetime Achievement in construction, and he served as the president of the North Carolina State Bar Association and the Durham County Bar Association; vice chairman of the North Carolina Judicial Standards Commission; and served as the chairman of the North Carolina Bar Association’s Appellate Rules Study Commission. He is survived by his wife, Lucia; three daughters; six grandchildren; two sisters; four stepdaughters; and three step-grandchildren. EHS relatives include his nephews, Victor Grainger ’70, Mark B. Gardner ’71, John A. Gardner ’73, and Stuart Grainger ’75; and great-nephew, William A. Stokes ’10.

ROGER GANT, JR. ’42

of Burlington, N.C., died July 26, 2010. As a student, Mr. Gant was a member of the Fairfax Literary Society, Chronicle board, and choir. After graduation, Mr. Gant continued his education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his bachelor’s degree in commerce and later attended the University’s Executive Program. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army in the European theater. Mr. Gant began working for Glen Raven Mills in 1948 and helped develop solution-dyed acrylic fabric. At Glen Raven, he served as president, chief executive, and chairman of the board. He was director of the board from 1946 until his retirement in 2001, when he became director emeritus. Mr. Gant was a member of the Private Industry Council, National Foundation for the Study of Religion and Economics, and Strategic Planning Institute. He was one of the founders and the first president of the North Carolina Foundation for Research and Economic Education. He also was an associate director of the Industrial Fabrics Association, International (IFAI). He received both the IFAI Chairman’s Award and the IFAI Lifetime Achievement Award. He is survived by his wife, Rose; two daughters; a son, Roger Gant III ’75; five grandchildren, including Jordan E. Gant ’06; a brother, Edmund R. Gant ’48; three sisters; and many nieces and nephews.

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memoriam

EDWARD COLHOUN SUHLING ’42

FRANCIS EDWARD WINSLOW, JR. ’43

CURTIS CHANDLER WILLIAMS III ’43

of Lynchburg, Va., died Nov. 28, 2010.

of Raleigh, N.C., died Jan. 11, 2011.

of Houston, Texas, died Jan. 29, 2011.

At EHS, Mr. Winslow was a member of the Blackford Literary Society, Missionary Society, and “E” Club, and he was a librarian. He played varsity football and was on the track team. Mr. Winslow was drafted into the Navy and served on a minesweeper in Charleston, S.C., and on the USS North Carolina. He attended Bates College, lettered in crew, and graduated cum laude from Harvard in 1946. He continued his education in pre-law and pre-medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and graduated Phi Beta Kappa. He attended Duke University Medical School and was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society. He completed pediatric training at the University of Maryland Hospital. Mr. Winslow opened his practice in Raleigh, N.C., now known as Blue Ridge Pediatrics. He served as chief of pediatrics at Rex Hospital and Wake Medical. He was a member of The Raleigh Academy of Medicine, The Wake Medical Society, American Academy of Pediatrics, North Carolina Medical Society, and the Society of the Cincinnati. He served on the board of Rex Hospital and was a founding board member for the Tammy Lynn Center for Developmental Disabilities. He was also a member of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church since 1961. He is survived by a son, Francis E. Winslow III ’79; a daughter; two grandchildren; a sister; and many nieces and nephews.

At The High School, Mr. Williams was a member of the Fairfax Literary Society, “Whispers” board, and track team, and he served as Monitor. After graduation, he matriculated at Yale University, where he graduated with honors and was a member of Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. During his time at Yale, he served as an instructor in the Navy. In 1953, he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a master’s degree in chemical engineering and a doctorate degree in science. Mr. Williams worked for Shell Oil Company for more than 40 years until his retirement in 1997. During his time there, he managed the design and construction of the Westhollow Research Center for the Shell Development Company in Houston, Texas. Mr. Williams was very involved with the Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church (MDPC) and Global Missions. He participated in multiple service trips to Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica, and his final trip was to Nairobi, Kenya, where MDPC built an amphitheater at a Presbyterian church camp. He sponsored several children in Guatemala through the organization Common Hope. He was a fellow with the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and a member of the American Petroleum Institute, Sigma Xi scientific research society, and the American Chemical Society. He is survived by a son, a daughter, a stepson, a stepdaughter, and two grandsons.

On the Hill, Mr. Suhling was a member of the Blackford Literary Society, “Whispers” board, and the “E” Club, as well as a schoolroom keeper and Senior Monitor. He played varsity football and was on the track team. He received the chemistry and mathematics prizes. After graduation, Mr. Suhling continued his education at Purdue University and was a member of Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. During World War II, Mr. Suhling served in the United States Marine Corps. After the war, he continued his education at the University of Virginia and Duke University. For many years, Mr. Suhling served as the president of his own company, Suh Distributing Co. He served as director of Central Fidelity Bank, president of the Lynchburg Kiwanis Club, a scoutmaster for a Boy Scout troop in Lynchburg, Va., and senior warden of St. John’s Church. Mr. Suhling raised and trained dogs, particularly Irish setters. He was very active in the Lynchburg community. He is survived by his wife, Margieanne; a sister; three daughters; one son; 10 grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. EHS relatives include his brother, William G. Suhling III ’39.

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LEWIS WARDLAW PARKER, JR. ’47

ALLAN ROBERTSON HANCKEL ’49

STEPHEN AUSTIN BRYAN ’51

of Richmond, Va., died Jan. 29, 2011.

of Norfolk, Va., died Sept. 27, 2010.

of Brenham, Texas, died March 18, 2008.

While at EHS, Mr. Parker was a Senior Monitor, head waiter, schoolroom keeper, treasurer of the Missionary Society, and a member of “E” Club. He was on the varsity football, winter track, and varsity track teams. Mr. Parker matriculated at the University of Virginia. He was president of Parker Oil Co., Inc., and helped develop this business into one of Virginia’s largest oil distribution companies. In 1973, he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates and served for two decades. He held numerous leadership positions, including president of the Virginia Petroleum Jobbers Association, director of the Bank of Virginia, counsel to the Union Oil Company of California, and chairman of the brand committee of the National Oil Jobbers Council. Mr. Parker was a member of the Masonic Lodge, the Lions Club, Virginia Oil Men’s Association, and the Woodfield Club. Mr. Parker is survived by his wife, Carol; four daughters; a stepson; a brother; 11 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

At EHS, Mr. Hanckel was a member of the choir and the varsity track team. He was a Monitor and a cheerleader. After graduation, Mr. Hanckel went on to the University of Virginia. For 32 years, he was the owner and president of Hanckel Smith Sales Company, Inc. He retired briefly in 1992, but soon began working for Hobbs and Associates, where he remained for 13 years. Mr. Hanckel was a master sergeant in the Virginia National Guard and a scoutmaster for a Boy Scout troop in Norfolk, Va. He was a member of the Norfolk City Planning Commission and was the commodore of the Norfolk Boat Club. He served on the board of the Mary Ludlow Home for Elderly Ladies. Mr. Hanckel was an avid tennis player, a charter member of the Downtown Racquet Club in Norfolk and ranked No. 2 in the state for men 60 years and older. He is survived by his wife, Jane, three sons, and four grandchildren.

At Episcopal, Mr. Bryan was a member of the Chronicle board, choir, and Glee Club. He was a Monitor and a cheerleader. After graduation, Mr. Bryan matriculated at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he earned a degree in mechanical engineering. At Georgia Tech he was a member of Chi Phi fraternity. During World War II, Mr. Bryan served three years in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a pilot. After the war, he began working as a consulting engineer. Mr. Bryan worked for Bovay Engineers, Inc., as a project engineer. He was a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Texas Society of Professional Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Houston Chamber of Commerce. He is survived by his wife, Sallie, and a daughter.

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memoriam

COURTL ANDT DIXON BARNES BRYAN ’52

JOSEPH LINWOOD ANTRIM III ’64

of Guilford, Conn., died Nov. 15, 2009.

of Richmond, Va., died June 3, 2010.

As a student, Mr. Bryan was a member of the Blackford Literary Society, the Chronicle and “Whispers” boards, choir, Glee Club, and press club. He was a cheerleader and a substitute waiter. After graduation, he attended Yale University, where he was chairman of The Yale Record. He joined the U.S. Army and served two years as a photo intelligence officer in Okinawa and Korea. He also served during the Berlin Crisis of 1961. Mr. Bryan was a freelance writer. His first published short story, “So Much Unfairness of Things,” appeared in The New Yorker and has been reprinted in two anthologies. His first novel, “P.S. Wilkinson,” was the winner of the 1965 Harper Prize Novel contest. He wrote other novels, including “The Great Dethriffe,” “Friendly Fire,” and “Beautiful Women; Ugly Scenes.” Mr. Bryan spoke at the Miller and Rhoads Book and Author Dinner in 1947, as did his father, Joseph Bryan III ’21, in previous years. In 1963, he provided the narrative for a widely distributed Swedish documentary, “The Face of War.” He also wrote coffee table books about the National Geographic Society and the National Air and Space Museum. He wrote for The New York Times magazine, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, Esquire, Saturday Review, The New Yorker, and other periodicals. He is survived by his wife, Mairi; a sister; a son; two daughters; a stepdaughter; a stepson; and four grandchildren.

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At Episcopal, Mr. Antrim was a member of the Fairfax Literary Society, Missionary Society, Chronicle and “Whispers” boards, and Daemon. He was a Monitor and varsity basketball manager. After graduation, Mr. Antrim matriculated at the University of Virginia and received his bachelor’s degree in English. At U.Va., he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. Mr. Antrim worked at Chemical Bank as a security analyst. After leaving Chemical Bank, he began a long and successful career with Davenport & Company, LLC. There, he was the executive vice president, director, member of the executive and investment policy committees, and head of asset management. Mr. Antrim held leadership positions at many institutions, including president of the Mary Morton Parsons Foundation; chairman of Planned Parenthood of Virginia; treasurer of the Community Foundation; and a member of Cabell Foundation, the Garth Newell Music Center, and Jefferson’s Poplar Forest. He is survived by his wife, Phoebe; a daughter; a son; a grandson; and two brothers, including Hugh T. Antrim ’67. EHS relatives include his father, Joseph L. Antrim, Jr. ’30; niece, Elizabeth Antrim Dansby ’99; and nephew, Hugh T. Antrim, Jr. ’02.


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Memorial and Honor Gifts

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any donors choose to make memorial gifts to Episcopal High School as a way to pay tribute to friends and loved ones. We are grateful to these donors who contributed to EHS from Nov. 16, 2010, to Feb. 10, 2011.

M E M O R I A L G I F TS

In Memory of Miss Caroline Elizabeth Anderson ’97 Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sanford Ainslie, Jr. ’56 Mr. Joshua Spencer Glazer ’95 Mr. Scott Crissman Harris ’97 Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Stewart Canfield Meyer ’38

In Memory of Mr. William Verner Daniel ’46 Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sanford Ainslie, Jr. ’56

In Memory of Mr. William Weems Gates ’93 Mr. Matthew Charles Chellgren ’92

In Memory of Mr. Robert A. Douglas Mrs. Robert A. Douglas

In Memory of Ms. Kristin Ashley Armistead ’00 Mr. Mark C. Prescott

In Memory of Dr. Edward Ryant Dyer, Jr. ’35 Mrs. Edward Ryant Dyer, Jr.

In Memory of Dr. Lauren Michelle Armistead ’97 Mr. Mark C. Prescott

In Memory of Mr. John Chauncey Everhart ’08 Ms. Katharine Shannon Brady ’08 Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Daniel Brady Ms. Ann Rehm Cowden ’07 Mr. Edward Spencer Graves III ’08 Mr. Evan Patrick King ’09 Mr. Kyle Foster Liddick ’08 Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Liddick Ms. Alexandra Goadby Mannix ’08 Ms. Marina Amanda Myers ’08 Ms. Tessa Jamison Waldrop ’08 Mr. Steven Webber and Mrs. Elizabeth Bles-Webber

In Memory of Mr. Lucien Minor Geer Mr. and Mrs. Fred Washington Bailey III ’86 Mr. and Mrs. John F. DePodesta Mr. and Mrs. Robert Whitehill Robinson ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Chacko Thomas ’76 Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coale Tylander

In Memory of Mr. David Jeter Blalock ’86 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Whitehill Robinson ’85 In Memory of Mr. Edward Trigg Brown ’36 Mrs. John Hill Cronly, Jr. Mr. William P. Moore, Jr. In Memory of Mr. George Patrick Brown ’80 Mr. and Mrs. Henry Andrew Brown III ’72 In Memory of Mr. Patrick Henry Callaway Mr. William Anderson Parker, Jr. ’45 In Memory of Dr. Robert Spann Cathcart III ’57 Mr. and Mrs. John Ballard Syer ’57 In Memory of Mr. George Carruthers Covington ’71 Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Downing Mears, Jr. ’71

In Memory of Mr. Robert Wiatt Farrar ’07 Mr. Lyle Hamilton Farrar ’04 Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Koonts Mr. Theodore Leon Peterson III ’07 In Memory of Mr. David Milton French ’32 Emerging Issues, FCIC Mr. George French and Mrs. Sarah Wright Mr. and Mrs. Alan P. Plante Mr. and Mrs. Madison J. Wright

In Memory of Mr. E. Howard Goodwin ’38 Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sanford Ainslie, Jr. ’56 Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Robinson Hoxton III ’62 Dr. and Mrs. W. T. Longstreth, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Toy Savage In Memory of Mr. Gary Lyn Hadwin, Jr. ’99 Mrs. Lindsay Whittle Comstock ’99 and Mr. Ethan G. Comstock In Memory of Mr. Ernest Helfenstein III ’50 Mr. and Mrs. J. E. G. Craig, Jr. In Memory of Mr. Archibald Robinson Hoxton, Jr. ’35 Mrs. Archibald R. Hoxton, Jr. In Memory of Mr. Gerald W. Kurek Mr. and Mrs. James Ross Kurek ’04

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In Memory of Mr. Collier Cobb Lilly ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sanford Ainslie, Jr. ’56 Mr. and Mrs. Scott Alexander Collie ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Whitehill Robinson ’85 In Memory of Mr. Peter Kingsley McKee ’52 Mr. and Mrs. John C. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Crimmins Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kingsley McKee, Jr. ’74 Mr. and Mrs. T. Braxton McKee ’77 In Memory of Mr. Archibald Erskine Nevitt ’43 Mrs. Archibald Erskine Nevitt ’43 In Memory of Mrs. Yvonne Tomanelli Pinckney Lt. Bryan St. George Pinckney ’98 In Memory of Mr. William Bee Ravenel III Mr. and Mrs. Robert Love Taylor, Jr. ’57

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In Memory of Mr. John Luther Walker ’54 Mrs. Jane W. Kerewich In Memory of Dr. Joseph Percivall Whittle ’38 Mrs. Lindsay Whittle Comstock ’99 and Mr. Ethan G. Comstock In Memory of Mr. Robert Llewellyn Whittle 1906 Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Cleveland ’52

H O N O R G I F TS In Honor of Ms. Elizabeth Alston Armfield ’05 Mr. and Mrs. William J. Armfield IV In Honor of The 2011 Senior Class Ms. Anna Dupree Belk ’07 In Honor of Mr. Thomas V. Berry, Jr. Ms. Virginia James Oates ’09

In Memory of Dr. Charles Henry Sackett ’42 Mrs. Charles H. Sackett

In Honor of Mrs. Lucy Whittle Goldstein ’97 and Mr. Jeremy Goldstein Mrs. Lindsay Whittle Comstock ’99 and Mr. Ethan G. Comstock In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Halm Mr. and Mrs. Andrew W. Nickle In Honor of Ms. Caroline Carter Hancock ’97 Mr. and Mrs. William J. Armfield IV In Honor of Mr. Robert Whittle Larkin ’05 Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Larkin, Jr. In Honor of Mr. Paul Barringer Light ’06 Mr. and Mrs. James Randolph Light, Jr. In Honor of Mr. Thomas Gray Light ’06 Mr. and Mrs. James Randolph Light, Jr. In Honor of Mr. Robert Elijah Mason IV ’77 Mr. Dickinson M. Lupo

In Honor of Mr. Clarence Fletcher Carter III ’54 Mr. and Mrs. William David Simpson Kuhne ’84

In Honor of Mr. Andrew Reid Nickle ’11 Mr. and Mrs. Andrew W. Nickle

In Memory of Mrs. Virginia N. Settle Dr. and Mrs. Peter Ives Warfield ’90

In Honor of Mr. Elwood Brogden Coley, Jr. ’73 Mr. and Mrs. David Wilkinson Carr, Jr. ’73 Mr. and Mrs. William Smith Peebles IV ’73

In Honor of Rev. Gideon L. K. Pollach Mr. George French and Mrs. Sarah Wright Mr. and Mrs. John M. Walker

In Memory of Mr. Marvin S. Singletary Mr. and Mrs. John H. McRae Mr. John-Ashton McRae ’03

In Honor of Mrs. Anita B. Doyle Ms. Cameron Wright Griffith Hawkins ’10 Dr. and Mrs. Richard W. Hawkins

In Honor of Mrs. Rebecca Pomeroy Shores ’02 Mrs. Lawrence G. Rawl

In Memory of Mr. William Elmore Spruill ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sanford Ainslie, Jr. ’56 Mr. and Mrs. Scott Alexander Collie ’85

In Honor of Mr. William Perry Epes III ’65 Mr. Jack Alexander Yeh ’99

In Honor of Mr. Abel Alexander Shuford II ’62 Mrs. Comer Shuford Wear ’95 and Mr. Ralph Wear

In Honor of Mr. Leavenworth M. Ferrell II Mr. David Frederick Upton Stover ’08

In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Crenshaw Watts III Mr. and Mrs. William Smith Peebles IV ’73

In Memory of Mr. Matthew Thompson Scott ’82 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Haines Marston ’82

In Memory of Mr. John Philip Strubing ’93 Mr. and Mrs. Alex B. Gates In Memory of Mrs. Mary E. Myers Stubbs Mr. Philippe McCook Dujardin ’09

In Honor of Ms. Annette Williamson Mrs. Lawrence G. Rawl

Class Notes Now Online! View the latest notes submitted by your classmates, and submit your news, on the EHS website. Just go to the homepage and click on “Alumni” and then “Class Notes.” For help with passwords or login, please contact the Alumni Office.

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The Roll Call Makes it Possible Each year, Episcopal alumni, parents, and friends give generously to the Roll Call, the School’s annual fund. Because of their support, students are able to enjoy the wide variety of opportunities offered at EHS, allowing them to live, learn, and grow in a place that is like no other. Gifts to the EHS Roll Call affect each student on a daily basis. Last year, the Roll Call helped purchase: • New books and online databases in the library • New roof and carpeting for Callaway Chapel • New digital cameras for student photographers • Uniforms, equipment, travel, and tournament fees for athletic teams • Dorm improvements, including new laundry systems, carpeting, and dorm snacks • Approximately 375,000 meals served in Laird Dining Hall

Your gift makes a difference. Support Episcopal by: • Sending a check • Donating online via Episcopal’s secure website: www.EHSRollCall.org • Calling toll-free at 877-EHS-1839

______________________________________ For more information about the Roll Call, please contact: Elizabeth Woodcock, Director of Annual Giving 1200 N. Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA 22302 Phone: 703-933-4148 E-mail: rollcall@episcopalhighschool.org www.episcopalhighschool.org

@

MS GRA PRO PHOTOGRAPHY

MUSICAL THEATER

Is Unlike A Day Anywhere Else...

SUMMER

A Day At Episcopal

MATH AND SCIENCE

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

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2011

LEADERSHIP LANGUAGE YOUNG Be a part of the Episcopal High School WRITERS experience this summer, as a day or overnight

EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL

student. These special summer programs offer students entering grades seven through nine the opportunity to enjoy days and nights on Episcopal’s campus, learning from exceptional teachers and alongside talented peers.

YOUNG WRITERS WORKSHOP June 26-30, 2011 BROADWAY BOUND MUSICAL THEATER CAMP June 26-30, 2011 FIELD EXPERIENCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE June 26 – July 1, 2011 EHS LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE July 10-14, 2011 For additional information, please contact: Damian Walsh Director of Summer Programs summer@episcopalhighschool.org Episcopal High School 1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302

FUN WITH MATH AND SCIENCE July 11-15, 2011 July 18-22, 2011 DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY: A CRASH COURSE IN PHOTOGRAPHIC PRACTICE July 17-24, 2011 THE LANGUAGE CAMPS AT EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL July 24-28, 2011

REGISTER ONLINE To register for the Episcopal High School 2011 Summer Programs, just visit

www.episcopalhighschool.org/ summerprograms


U.S. Postage PA I D

1200 North Quaker Lane Alexandria, VA 22302 703-933-3000 1-877-EHS-1839

Permit No. 105 Alexandria, VA

EHS • SPRING 2011

Non-Profit Organization

THE MAGAZINE OF EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL • Spring 2011

www.episcopalhighschool.org

Change Service Requested

REUNION

2011

JUNE 10 AND 11

Board Chairman John Townsend ’73 A Decade of Board Leadership

RETURN TO EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL Reunion 2011 will be held June 10 and 11 for the Classes of 1956, 1961, 1966, 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006.

Episcopal’s Chapel Talks CAM PAI G N U PDATE:

Inspire! A Celebration of Academics at EHS


Spring 2011 EHS: The Magazine of Episcopal High School