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I N T E R N A T I O N A L

16 Pages Number 229 10th year

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

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Thursday, November 8, 2018

Actor Michael Douglas gets star on Hollywood Walk of Fame LOS ANGELES - Oscar-winning actor Michael Douglas got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Tuesday in honor of his 50 years in show business. The megastar was joined at the ceremony by his 101-year-old father and Hollywood legend Kirk Douglas as well as Jane Fonda, who starred with him in the 1979 drama “The China Syndrome,” about an accident in a nuclear power plant. Also attending was Douglas’s wife, the actress Catherine ZetaJones, and other family members. “This is a great honor and I’m not getting any younger, I want to enjoy it with (my family),” the 74year-old actor said as the star was unveiled. Douglas got emotional and teary-eyed as he addressed his father, telling him that his presence at the event meant a lot. “I’ll say it simply and with all my heart, ‘I’m so proud to be your

son,’” he said, choking up. Speaking at the ceremony, Fonda wondered why it took so long for the younger Douglas to finally get his star. “Michael Douglas and I share something far more specific and unique than acting together,” she said. “We both come from families referred to by the press as Hollywood royalty. “Both of our fathers were movie legends, and thankfully, Kirk Douglas is still with us,” she added, referring to her late father Henry. “Stepping into a family business, any family business, is always challenging. Look at the Trumps or the Corleones.” The younger Douglas was just 29 when he earned his place among Hollywood’s elite as the producer behind “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” then the first movie in 40 years to sweep the “big five” Oscars for best picture, director, actor, actress and screenplay. (afp)

e-mail: info_ibp@balipost.co.id online: http://www.internationalbalipost.com. http://epaper.internationalbalipost.com.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Australian Hollywood star Rebel Wilson

IBP/net

Rebel Wilson ‘deeply sorry’ for plus-size rom-com claims

SYDNEY - Australian Hollywood star Rebel Wilson has apologised for claiming she is the first plus-sized woman to be a lead actress in a romantic comedy, saying her comments were “not only wrong but also incredibly hurtful”.

VALERIE MACON / AFP

Actor Kirk Douglas (R) attends a ceremony honoring his son actor Michael Douglas (2nd L) with a Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame, in Hollywood, California on November 6, 2018.

The “Pitch Perfect” star -- who made international headlines recently for her successful defamation case in Australia against several magazines -- said in an interview with Ellen DeGeneres that she was “proud to be the firstever plus-sized girl to be the star of a romantic comedy”. Wilson was promoting her upcoming role in the movie “Isn’t It Romantic”. There was a backlash on social media to her remarks, with users pointing out that other plus-sized actresses including Queen Latifah, Ricki Lake, and Mo’Nique had starred in such films. Wilson was also criticised for

blocking some Twitter users who complained. In a series of tweets on Monday, Wilson wrote that she was “deeply sorry”. “I neglected to show the proper respect to those who climbed this mountain before me,” she said. “With the help of some very compassionate and well-thought out responses from others on social media, I now realize what I said was not only wrong but also incredibly hurtful. “To be part of a problem I was hoping I was helping makes it that much more embarrassing & hard to acknowledge. I blocked people on Twitter because I was hurting from

the criticism, but those are the people I actually need to hear from more, not less.” Wilson was awarded Aus$4.5 million ($3.3 million) in damages against Bauer Media last year over articles claiming she lied about her age and background to further her career -- the largest defamation win in Australian legal history. But Bauer appealed, arguing the size of the settlement set a dangerous precedent and there were errors of law in the judgement. Wilson was earlier this year ordered to return most of the payout after it was slashed by a court. She has lodged an application to appeal the decision. (afp)

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IBP/afp

This handout photo taken on October 6, 2018 and released on November 5, 2018 by Inserm shows a general view of La Rinconada, the highest city of the world (5300m). A team of 14 French and Italian scientists will take part in a research at the end of January 2019 in La Rinconada, the highest city in the world nestled in Peru with nearly 50,000 inhabitants living at over 5000 m altitude to study the adaptations of the human organism to its environment and in particulary to hypoxia.

Superbugs to ‘kill millions’ by 2050 unless countries act

Millions of people in Europe, North America and Australia will die from superbug infections unless countries prioritise fighting the growing threat posed by bacteria immune to most known drugs, experts predicted Wednesday. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) warned of “disastrous consequences” for public healthcare and spending unless basic hospital hygiene is boosted and unnecessary antibiotic use slashed. Drug-resistant bacteria killed more than 33,000 people in Europe in 2015, according to new research published separately this week. In a landmark report, the OECD

said 2.4 million people could die from superbugs by 2050 and said the cost of treating such infections would balloon to an average of $3.5 billion (three billion euros) a year in each country included in its analysis. Michele Cecchini, lead on public health at the OECD, told AFP that countries were already spending an average of 10 percent of their healthcare budgets on treat-

ing antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bugs. “AMR costs more than the flu, more than HIV, more than tuberculosis. And it will cost even more if countries don’t put into place actions to tackle this problem,” he said. - ‘Enormous death toll’ As humans consume ever more antibiotics -- either through prescrip-

tions or agriculture and livestock products given medicines to stave off infection -- strains of bacteria are developing that resist the effects of drugs designed to kill them. In low and middle-income countries, resistance is already high: in Indonesia Brazil and Russia up to 60 percent of bacterial infections are already resistant to at least one antibiotic. And the growth of AMR infections is predicted to be between four and seven times faster by 2030 than currently. “Such high resistance rates in health care systems, which are

already weakened by constrained budgets, will create the conditions for an enormous death toll that will be mainly borne by new-borns, very young children and the elderly,” the report said.

Continued to page 6

News can also be heard in “Bali Image” at Global Radio FM 96.5 from 9.30 until 10.00 am. Listen to Global Radio FM at http:// globalfmbali.listen2myradio.com or live video streaming at http:// radioglobalfmbali.com and http:// ustream.tv/channel/global-fm-bali.


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Thursday, November 8, 2018

Bali News

International

To realize 20 million domestic tourists visits

Tourist attractions will meet travel agencies

DENPASAR - The Indonesia Recreation Park Business Association (PUTRI) will bring together tourist destinations / tourist attractions and recreational parks with travel agencies. This effort is meant to increase the number of foreign tourist visits to Indonesia, namely 20 million visits in 2019.

IBP/Wawan

The tourists visited Denpasar

Chairperson of PUTRI Bali, Trimafo Yudha, said the meeting between travel agencies and tourist attraction operators will be held in the form of a table top consisting of buyer-meet-buyer at Inna Kuta on November 8-9. The participating travel agencies consist of those belonging to the members of ASITA Bali. Travel agencies of Bali become the hub to sell tourist attraction outside Bali after exploring Bali. “We’d like to bring together the travel agencies in Bali becoming the hub of other regions since long time ago. Then, we also bring them together with the operators of tourist attraction becoming the participants,” she explained on Tuesday (Nov. 6) The sellers are operators of tourist attractions from outside Bali. “And then PUTRI will facilitate to mediate with the ASITA members and some players such as travel industry to meet,” she said. The meeting named as ITAF (Indonesia Tourist Attraction Forum) features the theme of Roadmap of Promotion and Sales of the Indonesian Tourism Industry to Reach a Visit of 20 Million Tourists in 2019. The meeting will also discuss about the potential and benefits of tourism synergy in the creative industry. It is meant to bring together the tourist attraction with travel agencies. “Indeed there are not many participants, but this is a good start where tourist attractions and recreation parks are the most determining in the world of tourism, having the most solid institutions and indeed better known to the public,” she explained. In Bali, there are approximately 30-50 travel agencies that will help introduce the tourist attractions outside Bali. Meanwhile, the PUTRI members in Bali have around 50 tourist attraction and recreational parks. With this meeting, the sellers consisting of tourist attraction from throughout Indonesia have the opportunity to introduce their property to prospective buyers. On that account, the tourist visit can be evenly distributed. “Through this event, they will be able to introduce their property in the hope they can make cooperation contracts, while the travel agencies using the services of tourist attraction know that there are tourist attractions like these. If there are requests from their clients they can recommend these destinations,” she added. (kmb42)

LBF 2018 features MSMEs to present culinary and non-culinary business MANGUPURA - Although the Legian area has been known for a long time, promotions related to tourism potential in Legian needs to be continued. This is meant to increase the number of tourist visits to the region. One of the promotional efforts is through the Legian Beach Festival (LBF) 2018.

As in previous years, the festival entering the eleventh year will continue to display various culinary and non-culinary endeavors. It is meant to elevate the potential of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) having continuously showed improvement in Bali. Committee Chairman of the

Legian Beach Festival (LBF) 2018, Nyoman Sarjana, stated on Tuesday (Nov. 6) that LBF 2018 will take place on November 8-12. Other than focusing on the MSMEs, special cultural arts will also be displayed namely Barong Sai and Cak LBF as well as economic and business activities. “So, we hope

this festival will be able to increase tourist visits, economic growth in the community as well as the preservation of the arts and culture,” he concluded. This year’s LBF said Sarjana will also be filled with Mass Yoga by involving around 2,000 participants. This Mass Yoga is also

supported by the Indian Embassy. He hoped the activity can achieve the MURI record. “In addition to Mass Yoga, visitors to LBF 2018 will also be presented with laughter yoga, Cak a cappella and various arts and cultural events that can support tourism activities,” he concluded. (kmb23)

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International

Activities

Thursday, November 8, 2018

15

PULLMAN BALI LEGIAN BEACH LAUNCHES “BATUAN SPIRIT” BY DEWA PUTU ARSANIA As part of Pullman brand’s global art initiative, Pullman Hotels & Resorts in Indonesia have been creating timeless experiences for guests by blending elements of local interest, intriguing culture and visual ingenuity, through the discovery of different art forms. On November 1st 2018, Pullman Bali Legian Beach launched its second Artist Playground exhibition of 2018, titled “Batuan Spirit” by Dewa Putu Arsania. The Batuan village gave its name to a style of painting which evolved in the 1930s. A group of local villagers, most notably Ida Bagus Made Togog and Ida Bagus Made Wija, began experimenting with ink-washed paintings on black backgrounds. This technique has since emerged into a major Balinese artistic style, now commonly known as Batuan painting. Dewa Putu Arsania is one Batuan artist who has so

far remained steadfast in maintaining this traditional painting style with the basic mediums of Chinese ink (Mangsi) and paper or canvas. His works describe the various themes of wayang puppet stories specific to the area of Bali. Until the mid-80s, Dewa Putu Arsania lived exclusively for his paintings and created very subtle and finely crafted works that also found their admirers at exhibitions in Japan and Europe. These works far exceeded the norm in their quality. Batuan Spirit is the theme chosen for this exhibition, to acquaint the world with the characteristics paintings of Batuan. The stories of Mahabharata, Ramayana, Tantri as well as the social and daily life of the Balinese are beautifully presented on canvas. These stories define the Balinese culture. The exhibition will be displayed until April 2, 2019.


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Health

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

The clocks ‘fell back.’ Here’s how to survive the darker days.

FOR the 100th year, we get to turn our clocks back an hour, alleviating the gloom of dark mornings but robbing us of daylit evenings. According to a recently added section of The Indoor Generation, a survey from YouGov and Velux, many of us feel less productive as the clocks roll back — 74 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity, and 34 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity significantly. Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Institute for Health in the Built Environment at the University of Oregon, says the human need for daylight is unconscious, but fundamental. “The rhythms of light and dark are a fundamental part of the ecological system that nearly every species on earth evolved within,” he says. “Should we really expect anything

but an erosion of productivity if this natural system is severely disrupted?” ohn Sharp, M.D., psychiatrist on faculty at Harvard Medical School and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and author of “The Emotional Calendar: Understanding Seasonal Influences and Milestones to Become Happier, More Fulfilled, and in Control of Your Life,” also says less light in your day can cause things to slow down. “The interesting thing is, without light, our sleep wake cycle would be much longer than it is now. But it’s the absence of light that sets us into our sleep-wake patterns,” says Sharp. “When that gets shifted, it really affects us and can cause people to be irritable, sleepy, and want to quit the day earlier. It’s easier just to shut

it all down at 5 p.m.” A few countries in the European Union have led a hearty discussion in hopes of abolishing daylight saving all together. Some Northernmost countries, where it can be either light or dark for days on end depending on the time of year, cited health issues caused by the phenomenon — such as an eight percent increase in the risk of stroke and 24 percent increased risk of heart attack the Monday following spring forward. The only good news about turning the clock backward is, according to that same study, that extra hour of sleep coincides with a reduced risk of heart attack the following Monday by 21 percent. So how can we better get ahead of the havoc daylight saving wreaks on our lives? Ease into the sleep shift

Sharp says dialing back your bedtime by 15 minute increments can help you ease the transition. “Think back to when you want to wake up and how much sleep you normally need, then gradually adjust your bedtime toward your sleep goal,” he says. Avoid alcohol and refined carbs and sugar before bed

IBP/net

According to survey, 74 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity, and 34 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity significantly.

At least 20 percent of American adults rely on alcohol to help them fall asleep says Dr. Sanam Hafeez, clinical psychologist and teaching faculty member at Columbia University Teacher’s College. Yet, she says imbibing the night before the clocks roll back is much more likely to hinder your sleep than help it. “Alcohol disrupts circadian func-

tioning, directly interfering with the ability of the master biological clock to synchronize itself,” she explains. “Because circadian rhythms have such a powerful, dominating influence over the way our bodies function, the disruptive effects of alcohol can be widespread, affecting sleep and other systems, including liver function,” she explains. Sharp says though booze and carb-rich meals and snacks might be comforting come shorter days, there’s a price to pay for overindulging — especially that night. “Even if it relaxes you, you won’t get the quality of sleep that makes you feel better during the day if you drink. And carbs sap energy because they metabolize into sugar and screw up your baseline metabolism and glucose production in a way that effects your energy and outlook,” he says. So you might be better off saving the booze and sweets for the ‘hygge’ or ‘còsagach’ inspired hibernation spells to come. Get out in the daylight

Hafeez says light suppresses the secretion of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin — and dark induces it. To better adjust to daylight saving time in fall, Hafeez advises exposing yourself to as much light as you can during the day. Even if it’s chilly, a long walk outside can elevate your serotonin levels (and your mood), give you a dose of vitamin D — even boost your immune system, as we’ve previously reported. Conversely, when night falls, Hafeez recommends avoiding bright light so you can fall asleep faster. “For example, if you

get up at night to go to the bathroom, don’t turn on the light,” she explains. To help recalibrate your circadian rhythms the Monday after the clocks roll back, Wymelenberg recommends, if at all possible, having your first morning meeting outside as a walkand-talk. If not, try to take your laptop to a spot in your building by a sunny window. Don’t sleep with your smartphone

Hafeez says your phone might mess with your sleep patterns more than you think — one study revealed that 68 percent of smartphone owners sleep either holding their smartphone, having it in bed with them, or on their nightstand. Says Hafeez: “So many people use their smartphones as their alarm clocks — it makes sense to want your phones within an arm’s reach. But the temptation to check social media sites, work email or news headlines is often too strong to resist. As a result, you might feel energized from interacting with others, or stressed out by something that you read when you should actually be relaxing, which partly explains why people who consume electronic media in bed are at higher risk for insomnia.” To quell the culprit, simply keep your phone in another room and set an old school alarm to wake up instead. All these easy little tweaks can add up to make a big difference in terms of how your body adjusts to turning the clocks back, says Sharp. And if you can’t make it to bed 15 minutes earlier, at least consider keeping your hands out of the cookie jar tonight. (IBP/net)

Spanking just makes kids worse, doctors say

PARENTS who hit their kids may believe that a swat “just gets their attention” or imposes oldfashioned discipline, but spanking in fact makes behavior worse than it was before and can cause long-term harm, pediatricians said Monday. The American Academy of Pediatrics strengthened its advice against corporal punishment in update guidelines, saying it makes kids more aggressive and raises the risk of mental health issues. “Experiencing corporal punishment makes it more, not less, likely that children will be defiant and aggressive in the future,” the group says in its new guidelines to pediatricians. “There’s no benefit to spanking,” said Dr. Robert Sege of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, who helped write the guidelines.

“We know that children grow and develop better with positive role modeling and by setting healthy limits. We can do better.” Verbal abuse and humiliation is also counterproductive, the pediatrics group said. “Parents, other caregivers, and adults interacting with children and adolescents should not use corporal punishment (including hitting and spanking), either in anger or as a punishment for or consequence of misbehavior, nor should they use any disciplinary strategy, including verbal abuse, that causes shame or humiliation,” the group says in the updated guidelines. “Within a few minutes, children are often back to their original behavior. It certainly doesn’t teach children self-regulation,” Sege told NBC News.

“Techniques such as time out and other effective forms of punishment, the goal is to teach the child to regulate herself, so that she will have the ability to control and manage her own behavior. And that’s what it really is all about.” Americans still strongly believe in beating, spanking or paddling children, both at home and in school. “According to a 2004 survey, approximately two-thirds of parents of young children reported using some sort of physical punishment,” the pediatrics group said. “These parents reported that by fifth grade, 80 percent of children had been physically punished, and 85 percent of teenagers reported exposure to physical punishment, with 51 percent having been hit with a belt or similar object.” And in 2013, a Harris Interactive

poll found that 70 percent of parents agreed with the statement that “good, hard spanking is sometimes necessary to discipline a child,” although that’s down from 84 percent of parents in 1986. But things are changing, Sege said. “If you limit your surveys to people who have a child aged 5 years and younger in their homes, who are a new generation of parents, most of them don’t like to spank their children and often don’t spank their children,” he said. “We think there’s a generational shift where today’s parents are much less likely to spank their children than their parents were.” One group studied parents in their home and found most parents did give kids a verbal warning before physically striking out. But they did not wait long. “Corporal punishment then occurred at a

mean of 30 seconds later, suggesting that parents may have been ‘responding either impulsively or emotionally rather than instrumentally and intentionally,’” the pediatrics group said. It did little good. “The effects of corporal punishment were transient: within 10 minutes, most children (73 percent) had resumed the same behavior for which they had been punished.” Not only does hitting kids do little good; it can worsen their longterm behavior. “Children who experience repeated use of corporal punishment tend to develop more aggressive behaviors, increased aggression in school, and an increased risk of mental health disorders and cognitive problems,” Sege said in a statement. (IBP/net)

Bali News

International

ASITA, HPI and Pawiba agree to improve and conduct joint monitoring

DENPASAR — Three tourism stakeholders in Bali, namely the Association of Indonesia Tours and Travel Agency (ASITA), Indonesia Tour Guides Association (HPI) and Bali Tourist Transport Association (Pawiba) signed a joint decree at the Bali Tourism Board Office on Tuesday (Nov. 6). The signing was also witnessed by the officials from the Bali Tourism Office. As the front guard, the three agreed to make improvement according to applicable regulations, mainly after unhealthy business practices in the Chinese market. “ASITA, Pawiba and HPI are in indeed the tourism sector, we are the spearhead. ASITA is bringing in tourists, HPI is accompanying them while they are going to the destination, and Pawiba is transporting while they are in Bali,” said Chairman of the ASITA Bali, Ketut Ardana. Therefore, continued Ardana, the three associations agreed to improve tourism conditions in Bali mainly after the Bali tourism is sold cheaply by unhealthy mafia business practices in the Chinese market. In particular, his organization invited the ASITA members to support this movement so that they do business in a healthy manner. “I am sure that Pawiba and HPI are also like that, so today we sign the agreement because we want to jointly do field monitoring. We agree to improve what we consider to be damaging the image of Bali tourism,” he explained. Chairman of the HPI Bali, I Nyoman Nuarta, said that Chinese market had recently been degraded due to the actions of several art shops (Chinese network stores—Ed). He appreciated the governor of Bali’s statement that will close legal and illegal Chinese network stores committing unhealthy business practices. But the facts in the field have not been directly proportional to the governor’s statement. Until Tuesday, some Chinese network stores were still open. They even applied a different scheme when delivering tourists. “What’s wrong? That is why the three of us will try to be the leading that are going to convey later to the

governor or deputy governor. Essentially, there are law enforcement issues that have not been effective,” he explained. According to Nuarta, there are four points in the agreement with the three tourism stakeholders. One of them is that each association will prepare five personnel to monitor in the field. If there is evidence related to legal matters, it will be submitted to the relevant authorities. “It is the substance becoming the root of problems here so that we will move together. Each association will also provide sanctions when its members violate the decisions we have agreed upon,” he explained. Chairman of the Bali Tourism Transport Association (Pawiba), Nyoman Sudiartha, said the three stakeholders agreed to keep tourism in Bali better and sustainable. In addition to carrying out monitoring and supervision together, each association has the right to propose to the government to revoke business licenses or profession permits for members remaining to commit violations even though they have been imposed with sanctions. If any parties found doing business without permission in the field monitoring, the evidence will be collected and reported to relevant parties so that it can be processed immediately by law. “We support the government’s recommendations to crack down on the Chinese market. We, from the Pawiba as one of the suppliers in the form of tourist transportation strongly support this agreement to improve the quality of Chinese tourism market,” he explained. When separately interviewed, Governor of Bali, Wayan Koster, said that gubernatorial instruction to close Chinese network shop are being discussed by the team. His team is still making data collection related to the permits and completeness. “In principle, all the legal and illegal businesses running unfair business practices must be closed, too. As soon as possible, it will be reviewed legally so that I will not be sued,” he said. (kmb32)

IBP/kmb32

The signing was also witnessed by the officials from the Bali Tourism Office.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

3

Dukuh Penaban Museum starts to draw visitors

AMLAPURA — Dukuh Penaban Palm-leaf Manuscript Museum (Dukuh Penaban Museum) located at Dukuh Bukit Penaban, Karangasem village, is a fairly a new museum having been operated since January 1, 2018. Nevertheless, the museum gradually draws the interest of visitors. This museum also supports the existence of the local tourism village. Chief of Penaban customary village, I Nengah Suarya, accompanied by his secretary, I Nengah Sudana Wiryawan, stated on Tuesday (Nov. 6) that Penaban Museum is established on land property of customary village across 1.5 hectares. He said the museum was designed by the famous architect I Ketut Artana from Arte Architect where this museum applies the concept of Nista Madya Utama. The museum is backed up by curators who are experts, researcher and humanists such as I Dewa Gde Catra, Sugi Lanus, Hedy Hinzler and Ketut Artana. Moreover, during the visit of the Director General of Culture of the RI, Hilman Farid, he was also willing to be a curator of the palmleaf manuscript (lontar) denoting the only one in the world made by customary villages. “Exploration of the values in the manuscript can be implemented in real practice. And this manuscript clinic can help all people having such document if they find any difficulty in caring for, reading and translating,” he said. Suarya added the difference between the Penaban Museum and other museums. The museums in general only showcase the collection of lontar manuscripts, just like a library. Meanwhile, the Penaban Museum other than storing lontar collection, also implements the contents to the customary community of Dukuh Penaban, such as through the making of herbal soap by fennel sourcing from healing manuscript and oblation from Empu Lutuk. Currently, it is being prepared to make coconut oil medicine. “If there are manuscripts belonging to residents but the owners cannot maintain and the manuscripts have been damaged, we will do the maintenance and preservation. In fact, this effort gets response from community beyond our expectations. Additionally, we get support and attention from various groups such as researchers, humanists, writers, craftsmen, campus at home and overseas and others. “Hopefully, in the future this museum will continue to advance and flourish,” he said. He said that since the operation of the Dukuh Penaban Museum on January 1, 2018, the number of visitors is quite crowded reaching thousands of people. They are domestic and foreign tourists as the museum

is indeed established to support the local tourism village. Currently, the museum remains in the process of integration with trekking path and sad ripu sacred bathing place. “Previously there were graduate students from the University of Melbourne that organized a workshop in this museum. Even today, on November 6, there are 30 students of Diploma 3 majoring in Library Studies at Faculty of Social and Political Sciences of Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, led by Tri Achmad. Their visit is a field trip. During the visit they are given a kind of public lecture about the process of making palm leaf paper until it is ready to be written by one of museum curators, Ide I Dewa Gde Catra. Furthermore, they are also given a way to treat and conserve palm-leaf manuscript and write down the names of participants with Balinese script,” he explained. He further added that every full moon in January, April and October, it performs a sacred dance namely the Yellow Butterfly and Canglongleng Dance. According to him, the Yellow Butterfly Dance tells the story about the king’s struggle when fighting to Lombok, while the Canglongleng Dance tells about the occurrence of plague claiming many fatalities at Dukuh Penaban. After the dance was performed, the plague finally ended. Meanwhile, the Baris Poleng Canglongleng in other region is better known as Baris Ketekok Jago. At Dukuh Penaban village, this baris dance tends to display individual expressions and character of the dancers, so the dance movement will be different or not uniform. He explained the history on the Baris Poleng Canglongleng was inspired by the disaster at Dukuh Penaban customary village around 1721 Caka or AD 1643. It is said that at that time an outbreak caused many people to die. After that, there was a revelation from the deities that he should be given chance to make a performance. When carrying a sedan chair, the residents said Ooh ... ihhh ….ohhh ... This procession then inspired local people to make the Baris Poleng Canglongleng Dance. After the dance was performed, the plague gradually disappeared. From that moment on, every ceremony held at Puseh Temple is always jazzed up with the performance and presented to deity of the local puseh temple.

On that account, other than serving as sacred dance, the Baris Poleng Canglongleng is also functioned as a deterrent to danger or epidemics. In the meantime, the Yellow Butterfly Dance comes with irregular movement as it highly depends on the mood expression or divine vibration of the dancer, like the original butterflies flying wherever they want to go with friends. This Yellow Butterfly Dance tells about the story of religious journey of a group of Yellow Butterflies while escorting the royal troops of Karangasem led by I Gusti Anglurah Ketut Karangasem that would attack the Selaparang kingdom in Lombok. On the day of Anggara Umanis Perangbakat in 1614 Caka or AD 1619, early the morning four sailing boats departed from Jasri Beach led by King Anglurah Ketut Karangasem with Arya Kertawaksa and accompanied by 40 invulnerable troops from the Seraya village. Originally, they sailed to cross the Lombok Strait. At that time, thousands of yellow butterflies were flying to also cross the Lombok Strait which is famous for its swift currents. The butterfly coming from the north-west followed the boat climbing the waves and flew up toward the sunlight looking like sparkling gold. Several groups overtook the boat as if they were guide showing off the direction to be followed. Some larger groups were behind the boat, sometimes going forward and backwards, as if they were royal stumps and flags. Everyone on the boat was surprised to see such thousands of yellow butterflies flying through the sky accompanying their journey. In fact, the thousands of yellow butterflies were bestowed by Ida Bhatara Alit Sakti (deity) at Bukit Temple following her uncle’s journey. Shortly after the departure of the boat carrying the Karangasem troops, the thick leaves of kepel or burahol tree at Bukit Temple fell down into yellow butterflies that flew in the sky following the journey of King Anglurah Ketut Karangasem to expand the territory to the Island of Lombok. It is said the kepel tree remains to firmly stand at the Bukit Temple. Local people believe in it as the stick of the mother Ida Bhatara Alit Sakti when walking from Amlaraja Palace to the east to reach a plateau which is then called Bukit Temple where the stick was finally plugged in. (kmb41)


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Bali News

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

Mangrove Park plan in Ngurah Rai Forest Park

KABUL - On a good day, it takes Mohammad less than three hours to drive from Ghazni to Kabul. But preparations for the hair-raising journey through Taliban-infested areas can take weeks.

DENPASAR - The nature tourism cultivation plan at the Ngurah Rai Grand Forest Park (Tahura) utilization block re-emerged lately. Moreover, the Bali provincial government is now planning the arrangement of the area spreading across 1,373.5 hectares holistically. The Ngurah Rai Forest Park will be used as a mangrove park. various parties so that the design of this park becomes good,” he explained. Koster added that central government including the president greatly supports the plan and indeed directs Bali government to carry out mangrove conservation. Moreover, the mangrove will be well cared for, and the Mangrove Study Center will also be built there. The Ngurah Rai Grand Forest Park area will be equipped with a jogging track so that people can take advantage of it for walking and breathing fresh air. “There is even a direction to plant mangroves beside the toll road piles, so they will look more beautiful. By that way, the piles will not be visible. It’s a good idea, I think it will become a good project,” he added. Meanwhile, Head of the Bali Forestry Agency, Luh Ayu Aryani, stated that Ngurah Rai Grand Forest Park will be arranged without changing its sustainability as a mangrove conservation area. At present, the management is indeed handled by Head of Technical Executive Unit (UPT) under coordination with the Head of the Bali Forestry Agency. However,

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The Bali provincial government is now planning the arrangement of the area spreading across 1,373.5 hectares holistically. in the next arrangement, administratively there are cooperation scheme and the permits are issued by central government considering the conservation areas belong to the authority of the Directorate General of Natural Resources Conservation, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. “Well... we will make cooperation with a third party because we serve as the operator that will make coordination. “Indeed the UPT is the operator based on a decree. However, in terms of funding and

other aspects are impossible to develop it conventionally,” she explained. Ayu added that conventional development requires coordination with officials and the surrounding community. Besides, it needs support and qualified facilitation so that the arrangement to make the Grand Forest Park more beautiful remains in principles of conservation and the ecosystem stays sustainable. At present, her agency is planning to manage the Grand Forest Park to be divided into utilization blocks, buf-

fer blocks, core blocks and special blocks. Utilization blocks are the areas that will be cooperated later while special blocks are generally intended for temple as Balinese local wisdom. “In 2019 we will design the site resumed with the management plan. It will be designed in such a way that we can truly sustain our mangrove forest and have an attraction for visitors. In accordance with the rules, the permanent facilities cannot be built there,” she said. (kmb32)

Municipal Police secure foreigner with depression in Kuta

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After being interrogated, the foreigner only coming with a passport wandered in Kuta.

MANGUPURA - Suspected of being depressed, an Australian tourist was secured by Kuta Municipal Police on Tuesday (Nov. 6). The foreigner was previously handed over by a hotel security because for several times he came to hotels, restaurants and public places like confused person. When asked for his confirmation, group head of the Kuta Municipal Police, Nengah Wika, said the foreigner had slept before the Segara Temple. In addition, the foreigner had time to walk into hotels and restaurants without any supplies, so they were expelled by local security guard. After being interrogated, the foreigner only coming with a passport wandered in Kuta. Moreover, he did not have a place to stay, got hungry and looked like a confused person. He brought an Australian

passport and a key along with the tag. Although he had been secured, he could suddenly flee. Responding to the increasing number of tourists suspected of experiencing depression that frequently make trouble in the Kuta subdistrict, it needs serious attention because they are considered very disturbing to the people around the Kuta sub-district. Moreover, within this month, the Kuta subdistrict has received 4 public reports related to trouble-making tourists. Acting subdistrict head of Kuta, Made Widiana, when met at his office on Tuesday (Nov. 5) hoped all relevant parties such as government, police authority, immigration office and village officials to join hands in handling this matter. In addition, as a follow up, this problem also needs to be commu-

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Highway to hell: Afghan travellers run gauntlet of Taliban violence

Governor: It’s entirely managed by government

“Well, the mangrove is already damaged. Many of them are bald and littered. So, it does not look neat. Besides, many people also encroach. On that account, there is an idea to manage the mangrove and made it into a mangrove park,” said the Governor of Bali, Wayan Koster, when confirmed after attending a Plenary Meeting at the Bali House of Representatives, on Tuesday (Nov. 6). According to Koster, this plan still has not been final but will be processed soon because it mainly keeps the mangroves sustainable, healthy and can be empowered. Dead or bare mangroves will be replanted, re-arranged and cleaned up from pollution and garbage. The encroachment of land as well as illegal buildings in the area will also be cracked down on. He affirmed there is no involvement of private sector in the management plan. “It’s fully handled by the government. There is no private business (but) will be managed by the provincial government technical unit. The stages will soon be realized as it needs to conceptualize the park. We’ll cooperate with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), the Ministry of Forestry and

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

nicated with consulate authority of the country concerned regarding the further handling whether they should be deported immediately or whatsoever. Therefore, he hoped there is also a handling in terms of immigration procedures. “We rely on the immigration authorities to handle this in accordance with the operating procedures available. If possible, this is also to be communicated with the consular office so as not to damage the tourism image,” he hoped. For this reason, his authority will discuss the problem in the coordination meeting held at the end of 2018. In the coordination meeting, it will be discussed the cases in Kuta as well as in South Kuta. “Later on, it becomes one of the agendas related to stressed, crazy and trouble-making tourists,” he said. (kmb23)

ZAKERIA HASHIMI / AFP

In this photo taken on October 29, 2018, Afghan local vehicles with passengers travel on the highway between Ghazni and Kabul. On a good day, it takes Mohammad less than three hours to drive from Ghazni to Kabul. But preparations for the hair-raising journey through Taliban-infested areas can take weeks. Road trips are a dangerous, and often deadly, activity in Afghanistan. Travellers run the gauntlet of Taliban checkpoints, fighting, robberies, kidnappings, and pressure-

plate bombs targeting government officials and security forces. The stretch of Highway 1 between the Afghan capital and the southeastern city of Ghazni -- which the Taliban stormed in

August and still threaten -- is one of the most treacherous. Spontaneous trips are out of the question, said Mohammad, who is in his 20s and a regular visitor to Kabul.

Mohammad, not his real name, asked AFP to use a pseudonym to avoid being identified by the Taliban. He begins preparing for the journey at least two weeks before his planned departure, starting with growing out his beard, which he normally keeps short, to create a scruffier appearance. He then starts working his contacts, calling trusted relatives and neighbours who ply the busy route for information about Taliban activity along the main artery connecting Kabul to the insurgent strongholds in the south. “You have to be careful who you call because you could be sold out to the Taliban” by someone working for the militant group, he told AFP.

- ‘Many reasons to worry’ On the day of his departure, Mohammad swaps his clean, wellironed clothes for a dirty pyjamalike shalwar kameez to make himself look more like a villager and clears the call history on his mobile in case a phone number raises suspicion. “You can’t just jump into a car and come (to Kabul), not if you want to be on the safe side,” he said. Mohammad’s most recent trip to Kabul was delayed for three days after he received warnings of Taliban disguised as Afghan soldiers manning checkpoints along the road. The first thing Taliban militants

check is a person’s tazkira, or national identification document. “If the tazkira is from Ghazni then you may be fine. If not, they might think that you are a member of the security forces from another province coming to Ghazni to fight,” Mohammad said. After registering to vote in the October 20 parliamentary election -- which the Taliban had vowed to attack and which was finally cancelled in Ghazni due to protests -- Mohammad carries a second tazkira that does not have a sticker identifying him as a voter. “There are many reasons to be worried and anxious,” Mohammad explained. “Even if they don’t kill you, they may keep you as a hostage and ask for a ransom. If they kept me for one night, my mother would not survive.” A one-way trip between Kabul and Ghazni costs Mohammad 250 afghanis (around $3) in a Toyota Corolla taxi, a ubiquitous model in Afghanistan that is often used as public transport. He tries to travel with drivers he knows. He avoids travelling on Mondays and Wednesdays. Those are the days the Afghan army delivers supplies to its troops in the provinces and attacks along the highway are more likely, Mohammad said. Thursday, the last day of the Afghan working week, is also a bad day to venture out of the city. Militants lie in wait for government employees as they leave Ghazni for the weekend. (afp)

Nancy Pelosi: Former US House speaker eyes gavel once more

WASHINGTON - With Democrats capturing control of the House of Representatives in Tuesday’s midterms, one lawmaker will reclaim the mantle of Washington’s most powerful woman -- and an opposition scourge for President Donald Trump. Democratic Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is expected to become speaker of the House, a position she held for four years from 2007, when she made history as the first woman ever to rise to that post. Should she take the gavel from outgoing Speaker Paul Ryan, the 78-year-old would become the nation’s third most senior official, after the president and vice president

-- and seal her reputation as one of the great survivors in American politics. In her first stint, Pelosi was a strong opposing force to Republican George W. Bush in the final two years of his presidency. Her role as a check on Trump would be similar. She and the Democratic leadership would have the power to block Republican legislation, hamstringing large parts of Trump’s agenda ranging from proposed new tax cuts to construction of a wall on the border with Mexico. And Pelosi could make life for Trump much harder if she launches impeachment proceedings. So far she has spoken out against

using such a powerful political cudgel against him, arguing that the explosive step would likely mobilize Republican voters eager to protect the president. In her reprised role, she will have to thread a political needle, standing up to Trump when needed but also showing that her party is capable of working with the president to get laws passed. “A Democratic Congress will work for solutions that bring us together, because we have all had enough of division,” Pelosi said in a speech after claiming her party’s control over the House. “The American people want peace. They want results.” (afp)

Zach Gibson/Getty Images/AFP

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), joined by House Democrats, delivers remarks during a DCCC election watch party at the Hyatt Regency on November 6, 2018 in Washington, DC.


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International

Thursday, November 8, 2018

BUSINESS US reassures Taiwan on security as China increases threats

TAIPEI - Any attempt to determine Taiwan’s future by “other than peaceful means” is a threat to regional security and a matter of “grave concern” to the United States, Washington’s de facto ambassador to Taipei said Wednesday, in a nod to Chinese military intimidation against the island.

Brent Christensen also said Washington would continue military sales to Taiwan while promoting its participation in the international community that Beijing increasingly seeks to restrict. China considers Taiwan its own territory to be absorbed using force if necessary. It has lately stepped up its threats in an attempt to undermine President Tsai Ing-wen, who has refused to bow to Beijing’s demand that she recognize Taiwan as a part of China. The U.S. cut formal ties with Taiwan in 1979 to recognize Beijing but the two maintain robust unofficial military and diplomatic ties. Those relations are underpinned by the Taiwan Relations Act, which requires the U.S. to ensure that Taiwan has the ability to defend itself and U.S. policy “has not changed” in the 40 years since its passage, Christensen said at a news conference. “Any effort to determine the future of Taiwan by other than peaceful means represents a threat to the peace and security of the Western Pacific area and is of grave concern to the United States,” said Christensen, who heads the American Institute in Taiwan,which functions as an embassy in all but name. “We are opposed to unilateral attempts to change the status quo.” Christensen pointed to a recent $330 million arms sale to Taiwan as evidence of Washington’s fulfilling its obligation to support Taiwan in “maintaining a sufficient self-defense capability against coercion.” “Promoting security cooperation and improving Taiwan’s self-defense capability go hand in hand,” he said. A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman on Wednesday reiterated Beijing’s strong opposition to arms sales and “any kind of official exchanges and military interactions between the U.S. and Taiwan.”

AP Photo

In this image made from video, American Institute in Taiwan director Brent Christensen gestures while speaking during a press conference in Taipei, Taiwan, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. Washington’s de facto ambassador to Taiwan reassured the self-governing island of American security backing against threats from China. Christensen said the U.S. considers any attempt to determine Taiwan’s future by “other than peaceful means” to be a matter of “grave concern.” China considers Taiwan its own territory to be absorbed using force if necessary. “We hope the U.S. will deal with Taiwanrelated issues with caution so as to avoid the impacts on China-U.S. relations and peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait,” Lu Kang said at a daily briefing. While the U.S. encourages dialogue between China and Taiwan, it will at the same time cooperate to promote shared democratic values and improve economic relations with the island, Christensen said. That includes ensuring Taiwan has a voice in international organizations from which Taiwan has been excluded. China has used its economic might and diplomatic clout to keep

Taiwan out of the United Nations, and has increased the pressure by blocking Taipei’s representatives from attending international meetings such as the World Health Assembly, while pressuring multinational companies ranging from fashion brands to airlines to describe Taiwan as part of China. Alarmed by the deteriorating situation, the U.S. in September recalled its envoys to the Dominican Republic, El Salvador and Panama after decisions by those nations to cut ties with Taiwan in favor of diplomatic relations with China. Taiwan now has just 17 diplomatic allies as China ratchets up pres-

sure on the island’s government to endorse its “One-China” principle. “The United States has long been a vocal supporter of Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organizations, and we continue our informal consultations and engagement to allow Taiwan to have a more substantive role in the international community,” Christensen said. Taiwan, a former Japanese colony, split from the mainland in 1949 after Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalists fled there following defeat by Mao Zedong’s Communist army. (ap)

Europe’s main stock markets rise at open

European stock markets rose around half-a-percent at the start of trading on Wednesday, with investors assessing US midterm election results that pointed to political gridlock across the Atlantic. London’s benchmark FTSE 100 index

climbed 0.6 percent to 7,079.76 points, compared with the close on Tuesday. In the eurozone, Frankfurt’s DAX 30 gained 0.5 percent to 11,542.09 points and the Paris CAC 40 won 0.5 percent to 5,100.08.

In the US, President Donald Trump’s Republican party maintained its control of the Senate but the Democrats regained power in the House of Representatives, in line with forecasts. While the vote saw Trump’s party lose

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overall power on Capitol Hill, analysts pointed out that the result is unlikely to lead to a reversal of the White House’s popular tax cuts and deregulation that have helped to lift US stock markets this year. (afp)

Thursday, November 8, 2018

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Museum Batuan exhibiting works by 70 artists with integrity

Museum Batuan was first established as a place to showcase the wealth of talent found amongst the unusually large number of painters working in this village, and houses a truly astounding collection of Modern Traditional Batuan Style Paintings and on October 29th the museum opened a exhibition of contemporary works entitled “Integrity”.

each of these paintings stands as a testament to the remarkable and enduring strength of the land and culture of Bali to invite us all to

The village of Batuan has an extremely long and rich history that includes an extraordinary visual and performing arts heritage. The village temple, which itself demonstrates the great skill of painters, sculptors, dancers and other artists, also houses a document that refers to an artists guild that already existed when the temple was established some 1000 years ago. Archeological evidence also shows that skilled artists were already working in Batuan long before that. For most of Batuan’s history, art was created in the religiocultural context as a communal act of devotion intimately tied a holistic way of life wherein all aspects of life understood as being part of a unified cosmo-vision. While these Balinese Hindu practices still ensure that arts continue to thrive here with exceptional power, painting in particular has been developing on its own uniquely fine-arts path, with traditional methods being expanded to include more contemporary themes and approaches. The newly opened exhibition is a tremendous show featuring a remarkable 70 artists from Batuan, Bali and indeed the world. While the artists of this exhibition work in a variety of styles, techniques and methods, they share a common source of inspiration: Bali -and more particularly the spiritual, philosophical or unseen forces that inspire them create. Keeping with the tradition of devotional works, each of the

Detail of painting by I Wayan Kaler currently on display at Museum Batuan

paintings speaks to the artist’s personal exploration of the unseen either within themselves or as it is expressed collectively and as such are direct references to the notion of ‘integrity’. As museum owner pak Dewa explained: “my father created this museum as part of his dream to celebrate the rich artistic heritage of Batuan and Bali. I am pleased to say that this exhibition indeed celebrates the wealth of talented artists working in Bali today and is in integrity with the vision of this museum”. Although the word integrity is often used to refer to being in alignment with one’s principles, integrity in fact has a wider meaning. Integrity is defined as ‘being part of the whole’ and in the context of this exhibition refers to the bringing together of different artists who share a common source of inspiration but it also refers to this source of inspiration and how it is expressed. Balinese culture is -broadly speaking, based on integrity both in terms of acknowledging all parts of life and also in terms of how this is expressed with art, religion, farming, economics, architecture, fashion, cosmology, education, social, political, personal, spiritual practices interweaving as individual threads that make up part of a larger whole. Each of these aspects of life is clearly tied to the others and this interrelatedness is explicitly acknowledged in the traditions of Bali in myriad ways. Painting is

no exception and although most painting on the island is no longer created in the same communal devotional context that it once was, this understanding of life remains an integral part of art practices on the island. So strong is this understanding, that even visitors to the island who may not fully grasp the astonishing degree to which these connections are honored here, certainly feel it. Maintaining an artistic practice requires a certain degree of integrity anywhere in the world as it comes with numerous challenges – the greatest of which is perhaps remembering that we are always part of the whole of life and persevering in trying to express this integrity in art works that necessarily fall short but always hold the potential of bringing us that much closer to expressing this integrity with all that is. From Balinese fold tales and shadow puppet stories that carry moral teachings, to scenes of everyday life in Bali represented as unified visions of life as one interrelated unfolding, to more conceptual expressions of particular struggles to maintain traditions, or personal experiences of interactions with the subtle forces that inform these traditions, to satirical representations of our changing times, to simple homages to the beauty and power of the land of Bali whether literal, symbolic, metaphoric, conceptual or poetic, whether abstracted, personal, imagined or remembered,

appreciate the beauty of life and our integral place in it. INTEGRITY will be on display at Batuan Museum, until 28th, 2018.

IBP/kmb

Tipat Santok Lalah Manis Have you ever tasted tipat santok? This traditional food is the most popular on the Bali Island. Balinese people of all walks of life really like this simple menu. Children, teenagers and old people never get bored with this food because it is easily obtained. Moreover, the flavor can be customized because the sauces can be increased or decreased as desired. Tipat santok is a breakfast menu which is very well known in Bali. Tipat santok with spicy sweet sauces are often becoming people’s choice. It is called so because it offers sweet and spicy flavor. Spicy here does not happen due to too much pepper but because of spicy

chili, while the sweet flavor is given by the brown sugar. In Java this food is commonly known as gado-gado. Tipat santok is very easy to find. It is cheap and served fresh because it is prepared after being ordered. Almost at every village street people can enjoy this food because many merchants of this food are open until late evening. They usually sell at village roadside, traditional markets and in the aisles. Basically the main ingredient is ketupat (rice bag) wrapped in young coconut leaf. However, in later development, people also use plastic or banana leaves as the wrapper. In the presentation, the

tipat santok is served with various vegetables such as water spinach, sprouts, and cucumber. Optionally it is accompanied with tofu or tempeh and fried red beans. In the meantime, the spice is made from fried peanut mixed with garlic, aromatic ginger, lime, palm sugar, fermented shrimp paste and fermented soy beans where all these herbs are then pulverized. After that, it is sprinkled with fried shallot. Now, it is ready to be served. One portion of tipat santok costs varies according to the venue and merchants. At villages, a portion is sold for IDR 4,000 – IDR 5,000 while in urban areas ranging from IDR 6,000 to IDR 10,000. (kmb)


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Thursday, November 8, 2018

W

RLD

‘For the dog, it’s a game’: sniffing out truffles in Italy

RODDI - “Go on Rocky, find it! Good boy!” The labrador wags his tail, happy to have found the hidden treasure as he graduates from Italy’s “truffle dog university”, doing his master proud. Giovanni Monchiero is the dean of the unusual academy in Roddi in northwestern Italy and, like his father, grandfather and greatgrandfather, transforms “normal” dogs into expert seekers of the lucrative fungus. “Teaching a dog to find truffles is very simple, you just need plenty of patience and to realise that for the dog, it’s a game,” said Monchiero, 55. “We start by getting the dog to play with the truffle. Personally, I use a fresh truffle, but if you don’t have one you can put some trufflescented oil on a tennis ball. You throw it, the dog has to retrieve it and you reward him with dog biscuits.” Then the master makes the game a little more complicated by throwing the truffle into long grass, where the dog can’t see it. “That’s when you start giving commands: go on, find it, you’ve found it, well done! You have to

always congratulate and reward,” Monchiero said. - ‘Gentle methods’ -

“Once the dog has learned the truffle aroma, the next step is to bury the truffle, not very deep at first.” Graduates then delight in unearthing the knobbly fungi lurking among the roots of oak, linden, willows or poplar trees -- with which they have a symbiotic relationship. Roddi is in the Alba region, famous for its white truffles, “distinguished by an intense perfume, evocative of the woods, of nature,” said Antonio Degiacomi, head of Italy’s National Centre for Truffle Studies. This year white truffles fetch 350 euros ($400) for 100 grammes (around three ounces), down from at least 600 euros last year, with an average truffle weighing 20 grammes. Going truffle hunting is a passion, said Monchiero, who heads

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out every morning and evening during the truffle season, which runs from September 21 to January 31. The university was founded by his great-grandfather in 1880 and Monchiero’s principle is that while not every dog can become a good truffle-hunter, all breeds have a chance. “Some dogs are predisposed to find truffles, others are not,” said Monchiero, who has even trained a small German Pinscher to sniff out the delicacy destined for the finest restaurants. He has trained dozens of dogs, usually one or two at a time. “Master Monchiero is the best in the whole Piedmont region. This is the third dog he has trained for me,” said Rocky’s master, Diego Guaraldo. “He doesn’t use cruel methods like depriving the dog of food, but gentler methods,” said Guaraldo, a 36-year-old lawyer, describing the university’s graduates as “real champions”. (afp)

MARCO BERTORELLO / AFP

Truffle hunter Giovanni Monchiero poses with a picture of his grandfather Giovanni Monchiero in Roddi. near Alba, northwestern Italy on October 24, 2018.

Superbugs...

From page 1

“Even small cuts in the kitchen, minor surgery or diseases like pneumonia could become life-threatening.” Perhaps more worrying is the prediction made by the OECD that resistance to so-called 2nd- and 3rd-line antibiotics -- break-glass-in-case-ofemergency infection treatments -- will balloon by 70 percent by 2030. “These are antibiotics that as far as possible we don’t want to use because we want these as back up,” Cecchini said. “Essentially, we are using more when we should use less and we are running out of our best options in case of emergency.” - How to avoid disaster -

The group, which advises the World Health Organization on public health initiatives, said the only way to avert disaster was to implement immediate, sectorwide changes in behaviour. The report called on healthcare professionals to ensure better universal hygiene stan-

Thursday, November 8, 2018

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dards in hospitals and clinics by insisting all staff wash their hands and conform to stricter safety regimes. It also suggested resistance could be fought with better and quicker testing to determine if an infection is viral -- meaning antibiotics are useless -- or bacterial. New swab tests can give a result in a matter of minutes, and Cecchini also put forward the idea of “delayed prescriptions” to dent antibiotic overuse by making patients wait three days before picking up their antibiotics -- roughly the time it takes for a viral infection to run its course. In trials of the technique, two thirds of patients given delayed prescriptions for antibiotics never collected their medicine. The OECD said such changes would cost as little as $2 (1.7 euros) per person per year and would save millions of lives and billions of dollars by mid-century. “They would decrease burden of AMR in these countries by 75 percent,” said Cecchini. “It would pay for itself in a few months and would produce substantial savings.” (afp)

Anger mounts after deadly Marseille building collapse MARSEILLE - French officials vowed to inspect all Marseille buildings “unsuitable” for habitation as anger rose over the collapse of two buildings in the Mediterranean city, where up to eight people are feared dead. A fifth body was recovered on Wednesday morning under rubble of the dilapidated buildings, which crumbled suddenly on Monday morning in Noailles, a workingclass district in the heart of the port city. The dead include two women and three men, prosecutor Xavier Tarabeux told AFP. According to authorities, a total of five to eight people could have died in the collapse. Interior Minister Christophe Castaner told lawmakers in Paris that he had ordered a building by building audit before an “ambitious programme for ensuring safe conditions” along with Marseille authorities. “Nearly 6,000 properties have been identified as at risk” in the city, he said, representing some 44,000 lodgings in lower-class neighbourhoods, calling the situation unacceptable. Rescuers have been delicately

International

searching what is left of the buildings. A third adjoining building partially collapsed on Monday night. Residents said Tuesday the structural risks of the buildings and others like them were widely known, but that city officials did little when alerted about them. “Everybody knew about the problems with the two collapsed buildings,” said Patrick Lacoste, a spokesman for a local housing action group. “People died for nothing, even though we knew.” “It’s hell here, they know that it’s crap and now people die for nothing,” said local resident Toufik Ben Rhouma. The disaster, he added, was “100 percent the fault of city hall”. “It’s been 10 years that I have been living here and I have never had anyone come and inspect my apartment,” said a woman who identified herself as Sophie. Her neighbour said she hadn’t seen any inspector in 27 years. On Tuesday afternoon, some residents returned to their homes in neighbouring buildings to pack up belongings in bags and suitcases, some leaving carrying televisions with them, an AFP reporter said. (afp)

WANG Zhao / AFP

A Boeing 777X model is displayed at the Airshow China 2018 in Zhuhai in southern China’s Guangdong province on November 7, 2018.

Boeing issues advice over sensors after Indonesia crash

Boeing issued a special bulletin Wednesday addressing a sensor problem flagged by Indonesian safety officials investigating the crash of a Lion Air 737 that killed 189 people last week. The planemaker said local aviation officials believed pilots may have been given wrong information by the plane’s automated systems before the fatal crash. “The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has indicated that Lion Air flight 610 experienced erroneous input from one of its AOA (Angle of Attack) sensors,” Boeing said. “Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB) directing operators to existing flight crew procedures to address circumstances where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor.” An AOA sensor provides data about the angle at which wind is passing over

the wings and tells pilots how much lift a plane is getting. The information can be critical in preventing the plane from stalling. Lion Air JT610 plunged into the Java Sea less than half an hour after taking off from Jakarta on a routine flight to Pangkal Pinang city. There were no survivors. The doomed jet was a Boeing 737Max 8, one of the world’s newest and most advanced commercial passenger planes, and there is still no answer as to what caused the crash. A preliminary report is expected at the end of the month. Search teams have filled some 186 body bags with remains found after the devastating crash, but only 44 victims have been identified so far. Indonesian officials said on Wednesday they would extend by three days the search for bodies.

Divers have recovered one of the two “black boxes” -- the flight data recorder -- but are still searching for the cockpit voice recorder, in the hope it will shed more light on the cause of the disaster. Indonesian investigators said this week the plane had an air-speed indicator problem on the doomed flight and on three previous journeys. The glitch had been repeatedly serviced and Lion Air’s technical team declared the plane to be airworthy. The new details -- gleaned from the flight data recorder -- came after the government said it was launching a “special audit” of Lion Air’s operations. The accident has resurrected concerns about Indonesia’s poor air safety record, which until recently saw its carriers facing years-long bans from entering European Union and US airspace. (afp)


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Destination

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

Carlsen to defend chess crown against great American hope

Museum Negeri Propinsi Bali Bali Provincial State Museum in Denpasar

DENPASAR - Museum Negeri Propinsi Bali, or the Bali Provincial Public State Museum, is the island’s main museum and a central landmark highlighted on city tours to the heart of the provincial capital, Denpasar. The island’s oldest and largest, the Bali museum houses over 10,000 exhibits in separate pavilions, all built in architectural styling that pays homage to Balinese heritage with stone carvings, bas reliefs and tropical gardens dominating its exteriors. Often referred

to simply as the ‘Bali Museum’, Museum Negeri Propinsi Bali flanks the Pura Jagatnatha Temple and the Puputan Badung square, which is a popular weekending destination for Denpasar locals. The museum is certainly the place to head to in Denpasar town where you can get insightful introductions to Balinese arts and history for an hour or two, then continue with a stroll to the square or a visit to the temple next door. The museum covers a total of

2,600sqm, divided into three sections, namely an outer courtyard, a ‘jaba tengah’ middle courtyard, and the ‘jeroan’ or main section where most of the pavilions are. The three pavilions are named Tabanan, Karangasem, and Buleleng, after Bali’s three largest regencies. Inside each pavilion are collections of traditional paintings, religious artefacts and agricultural tools that offer a lot for kids and adults to look at and talk about. Vast collections of ethnographic displays

range from classical Kamasanstyle paintings hailing from the Klungkung regency in east Bali to archaeological finds such as ancient statues and inscriptions. There are also weapons dating back to the Bronze Age in Bali, as well as pre-Hindu era ritual items and more contemporary items such as wayang kulit shadow puppets, theatrical masks, old textiles, costumes and musical instruments. The Benefits Of Visiting Bali

Place Your Add Here

It is for Job Vacancy, Property, Selling or Buying Please contact Gugiek : 08123840500

Provincial State Museum The next question, what is the benefit visiting Bali Provincial State Museum? Surely this will be a question for who has never visited this museum. Bali Provincial State Museum is an ethnography museum category. Therefore you must have an interest in history or like to see the typical Balinese architecture. However, if you don;t have an interest in Balinese antiquity, it will be difficult for you to feel the benefits of visiting the Museum. Bali Provincial State Museum is different from the existing museum in Ubud tourist attractions. In Bali Museum, you can see art collection with historical value from Balinese culture. Museum collections consist of ethnographic collections such as equipment used during prehistoric times, religious and customary ceremonial material, Balinese art and culture development, from time to time. By seeing the museum collection, you will be able to compare, the form of a Balinese civilization from a prehistoric era to modern times. (IBP/net)

Nick Kyrgios

IBP/net

‘Struggling’ Kyrgios seeing psychologists, working on mental health

SYDNEY - Temperamental Australian tennis star Nick Kyrgios says he is talking to psychologists and “trying to get on top” of his mental health after another roller-coaster season where he was criticised for his on-court antics. Kyrgios finished his season early in October after an elbow injury forced him out of the Kremlin Cup in Moscow. The fiery 23-year-old lost his status as Australian number one to 19-year-old Alex de Minaur in the same month. Returning home to prepare for next year, the world number 37 admitted he was working through mental health issues that had plagued him throughout the season. “I was obviously struggling with a couple of things on and off the court this year, so it hasn’t been easy,” he told hometown newspaper the Canberra Times. “But I’m starting to see some psychologists and trying to get on

top of my mental health. “I probably left it a little too long. But I’ve been doing that and I feel more open about talking about it, I don’t feel like I’ve got to hide that sort of stuff any more.” The supremely talented but combustible Kyrgios has become infamous for petulant behaviour, outbursts and meltdowns on court. At the US Open in August, an umpire gave the Australian a controversial pep talk during his second-round game for his perceived lack of effort. He exited the Shanghai Masters in the first round last month, where he was also criticised for his lacklustre performance.

Kyrgios said he was “very lucky” to have had an international tennis career and announced an overhaul of his playing schedule to try and avoid a repeat of his mental and physical burnout. “I’m going to work with my team to get the correct schedule, I don’t think I’ve got it right the last couple of years because I haven’t made it to the end of the year once,” he said. Kyrgios started the year well when he captured a fourth career title in Brisbane in January. But he then missed two months of the campaign, including the French Open, in the spring. A hip injury forced his early withdrawal from the ATP season last year. (afp)

LONDON - Norway’s Magnus Carlsen will seek to cement his reputation as history’s greatest chess player on Friday when he launches a defence of his crown against the first US title contender since Bobby Fischer in 1972. Both Carlsen -- a 27-year-old superstar at home who is also a parttime model -- and 26-year-old Fabiano Caruana are prodigies returning mass appeal to their highbrow game. The world title will go up for grabs in a former London school of art and design whose sweeping glass dome and imposing columns have featured in a recent series of fashion shows. It is a fitting venue for Carlsen. The champion since 2013 has also been one of the faces of a street-smart Dutch apparel brand since 2010. But the chess world is more enthralled with Carlsen’s intuition and prodigious memory than his rugged looks.\ “There is no doubt that Carlsen is one of the best chess players ever,” British Chess Magazine editor Milan Dinic told AFP.

- ‘Not nerdy looking’ The Norwegian won his third world title in a series of rapid play tiebreakers against Russia’s Sergey Karjakin in 2016 in New York. His first came when he toppled Viswanathan Anand on the former champion’s home turf in India. Carlsen defended his crown in a rematch played the subsequent year in Russia. But he really began making a name for himself when he managed to draw Garry Kasparov -- the Soviet and Russian legend whose record ranking Carlsen eventually broke -- at the tender age of 13. Carlsen actually beat Kasparov’s compatriot and nemesis Anatoly Karpov at the same event. He has spent a good part of his time since then making chess fun again. Carlsen took time off preparations for the London series to play an exhibition game against the Liverpool football team’s chess-loving rightback Trent Alexander-Arnold. The 20-year-old rising star lost, but can console himself with the knowledge that he held out against Carlsen

for nearly twice as many moves as Microsoft’s Bill Gates. Carlsen has succeeded in “removing the stigma associated with chess,” championship organiser Ilya Merenzon told AFP. “He’s not a nerdy looking male and he’s not just another Russian chess player,” said Merenzon. “Carlsen has galvanising mainstream interest in chess and (is) bringing new people to it.” - In Fischer’s shadow What Carlsen has done for the global game, Caruana is achieving in the United States. Americans have not had a chess hero since Fischer stunned Soviet champion Boris Spassky in an epic series in 1972 that epitomised the Cold War rivalry between the two superpowers. Now, US media is fascinated with the possibility of the chess title coming home nearly 50 years later. Caruana has the credentials to become another chess sensation in the 12-match series that plays out over the coming weeks in London. The Italian-American from Miami has played for both countries and became a grandmaster at 14. He earned his shot against Carlsen by winning this year’s Candidates Tournament in Berlin. And his climb up the FIDE chess federation’s rankings to the number two spot has taken him within just three points of Carlsen’s total of 2,835. “Caruana had an amazing 2018 which gives him a lot of vigour ahead of the match,” said British Chess Magazine’s Dinic. “Also, I think Caruana is psychologically stronger than Karjakin was in 2016, while Carlsen is a bit weaker on that front compared to two years ago.” Chess has its own unique scoring system that awards the winner of each game one point. A draw sees the contenders share half a point. The title goes to the first person to reach 6.5 points. A rapid series of tiebreakers are played in case the two are level on points after the first 12 games. (afp)

Magnus Carlsen

Eduardo Munoz Alvarez / AFP


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Thursday, November 8, 2018

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Barcelona through in Champions League as Liverpool suffer shock loss

Barcelona secured their place in the Champions League knockout stage on Tuesday with a 1-1 draw away to Inter Milan, as Harry Kane revived Tottenham Hotspur’s hopes but Liverpool slumped to a shock defeat. Last year’s runners-up were beaten by Red Star Belgrade, although the biggest losers on the night were Thierry Henry’s Monaco, who were eliminated following a resounding loss to Club Brugge. Lionel Messi was still missing for Barcelona at the San Siro, and it was substitute Malcom who came off the bench to give the Spanish champions a late lead.

But Inter hit back to earn a point thanks to Mauro Icardi’s 87thminute leveller, keeping the threetime former winners on course to join Barcelona in qualifying for the last 16 from Group B. Tottenham remain in the hunt, however, after Kane’s late brace secured a 2-1 win over PSV Eindhoven. The Dutch side had got off to a

superb start at Wembley, taking the lead when Luuk de Jong headed home in the second minute. Mauricio Pochettino’s team were starting to get desperate when skipper Kane equalised with 12 minutes left, and he headed home in the 89th minute with the help of two deflections as Spurs got their first win of the campaign. “We had to dig deep and find

another level when it mattered. The whole season we’ve been grinding out results here and there,” said Kane. Liverpool were strong favourites away to Red Star in Serbia, but Jurgen Klopp’s team were poor in a 2-0 defeat to the 1991 European Cup winners. Milan Pavkov scored twice in seven first-half minutes, heading in the opener and then beating Alisson with a powerful strike from range, to the delight of a huge home support. “The boys are very disappointed, I’m very disappointed and we have to do better,” said Klopp. The defeat exposes the Anfield club to the threat of an early elimination in Group C, with Napoli coming from behind to draw 1-1 at home to Paris Saint-Germain in the night’s other game. - Napoli hold PSG -

Andrej ISAKOVIC / AFP

Red Star Belgrade’s Serbian forward Milan Pavkov (C) shoots and scores his second goal during the UEFA Champions League Group C second-leg football match between Red Star Belgrade and Liverpool FC at the Rajko Mitic Stadium in Belgrade on November 6, 2018.

Kylian Mbappe set up Juan Bernat to put Paris ahead just before the break, but Lorenzo Insigne beat Gianluigi Buffon from the penalty spot in the second half as these sides played out a draw for the second time in a fortnight. “This is a difficult group but we saw with Liverpool losing that everything is possible,” said PSG’s Julian Draxler. “A draw in Naples is not bad and we still have our fate in our own hands.” Liverpool and Napoli are locked on six points from four games, with PSG one behind and Red Star another point adrift. Liverpool travel to the French capital in their next

game. Meanwhile, Atletico Madrid gained revenge for a 4-0 defeat away to Borussia Dortmund last month as Diego Simeone’s side defeated the Germans 2-0 in Spain, Saul Niguez and Antoine Griezmann scoring the goals. The two favourites in Group A are not guaranteed a path to the last 16 yet, however, after Club Brugge claimed a stunning 4-0 win at Monaco. The Belgians had not won a Champions League match since 2005, but they were 3-0 up midway through the first half at the Stade Louis II. Hans Vanaken scored twice, including a penalty, and the Brazilian Wesley belted in the third before Ruud Vormer sealed the win.

From World Cup to Suzuki Cup for globe-trotting Eriksson Sven-Goran Eriksson once pushed for World Cup glory with England but the much-travelled coach is now eyeing Southeast Asian silverware with his new team, the Philippines. The Philippines have never won the Suzuki Cup but the door could be open for the 70-year-old Swede after Thailand, the defending champions, were forced to field a weakened team. As the 10-team tournament kicks off this week, Thailand, the

Philippines and Vietnam also have one eye on the much bigger Asian Cup, which they will play in January after it expanded to 32 teams. Thailand have dominated Southeast Asia’s biennial tournament, winning the last two editions and a record five in total. But Eriksson, who took England to World Cup quarter-finals in 2002 and 2006, has targeted an improvement on the Azkals’ three semi-final appearances from 2010 to 2014. “The pressure is on the whole

team to try to do better in the Suzuki Cup than the Philippines has done before. That means at least reaching the final,” said Eriksson. As the Suzuki Cup isn’t part of FIFA’s official calendar, Thailand’s Japan-based stars Teerasil Dangda and Chanathip Songkrasin, the top-scorer and MVP respectively in 2016, are unable to make the trip. Captain Theerathon Bunmathan is also busy in Japan, while goalkeeper Kawin Thamsatchanan has not been released by his Belgian

Trent Sainsbury. “We were just on the attack all the time,” said Kane. “In the end we managed to take a couple but I think we deserved it. “We had to dig deep and find another level when it mattered. The whole season we’ve been grinding out results here and there. “Obviously we’d like to be higher up the table in the league and doing better in the Champions League, but we’re still fighting.” Spurs still face an uphill task to reach the knockout stage as they need to beat Inter Milan at home in their next Champions League clash

and most likely Barcelona away on December 11. “It’s another game we must win, we want to have the possibility to go to the next stage,” said Pochettino, who praised his players’ efforts after an arduous run of four games in eight days. “The team is growing up. In these four games, three victories, we lost to Man City and I think the draw was more the fair result. “Pleased of course, we’re always trying to improve, but with all the circumstances the team is fighting.” (afp)

Thailand coach Milovan Rajevac said he hoped his team would thrive in the pressure of missing their senior players. “We will play in the Suzuki Cup without the four but I have faith in other players. We are a team and everybody is equally important,” the Serb said. “Our aim is to retain the Suzuki Cup. We are under pressure but I will try to make my players turn pressure into motivation. We will do our best.”

- ‘Worrying’ for Henry -

Semi-finalists in 2017, Monaco are now eliminated. It was a dreadful display from a side who have not won in 15 games, including five matches under Henry. This result also came on the day the club’s Russian billionaire owner Dmitry Rybolovlev was arrested in a corruption investigation. “We started well, but once we fell behind we stopped playing and that’s a little bit worrying,” said Henry of his team’s performance. Porto are on the brink of qualification from Group D after a 4-1 win at home to Lokomotiv Moscow. They lead the section by two points from Schalke, who defeated Galatasaray 2-0 in Gelsenkirchen. (afp)

TED ALJIBE / AFP

Sven-Göran Eriksson, the Philippine’s new national football team coach, speaks during a press conference in Manila on November 5, 2018.

Ben STANSALL / AFP

Tottenham Hotspur’s English striker Harry Kane applauds the fans following the UEFA Champions League group B football match between Tottenham Hotspur and PSV Eindhoven at Wembley Stadium in London, on November 6, 2018. Tottenham won the match 2-1.

club OH Leuven. Football Association of Thailand president Somyot Poompanmuong suggested the Thais’ priority was the Asian Cup, where they haven’t reached the knockout stages since 1972. “The Asian Cup is very important for us,” he told AFP. “We want to get past the group stage, that is our target this time.” Somyot added: “The AFF Cup is also important for us. We don’t have some of our best players so that makes it more difficult but gives other players a chance.” - ‘Under pressure’ -

Spurs still alive in Champions League, insists Kane

Harry Kane believes Tottenham can still make the last 16 of the Champions League after coming to his side’s rescue once more in a late turnaround to beat PSV Eindhoven 2-1 on Tuesday. Mauricio Pochettino’s side were only 12 minutes away from being eliminated as they struggled to recover from Luuk de Jong’s opener for PSV after 61 seconds at Wembley. But England captain Kane came to the rescue with a predatory equaliser before heading the crucial last-gasp winner with the aid of a deflection off PSV’s

9

The Philippines will also be affected by the scheduling and will have to manage without goalkeeper Neil Etheridge, for the most part at least. The Cardiff City number one was named in the preliminary 29man squad and is expected to jet to Asia after Cardiff’s clash with Brighton and Hove Albion on Saturday. He should be ready to take on Singapore three days later and then East Timor, before returning to the English Premier League once the international break ends on November 20. But Etheridge will be available in January for the Asian Cup in the United Arab Emirates, when they face South Korea, China and Kyrgyzstan in Group C. The Philippines, under Eriksson, will be making their first appearance in the continental tournament. “I could easily say win it (but) I don’t know if it’s realistic to think that for the first time,” Eriksson said. “Let’s start with the Suzuki Cup, that’s first.” (afp)


8

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Barcelona through in Champions League as Liverpool suffer shock loss

Barcelona secured their place in the Champions League knockout stage on Tuesday with a 1-1 draw away to Inter Milan, as Harry Kane revived Tottenham Hotspur’s hopes but Liverpool slumped to a shock defeat. Last year’s runners-up were beaten by Red Star Belgrade, although the biggest losers on the night were Thierry Henry’s Monaco, who were eliminated following a resounding loss to Club Brugge. Lionel Messi was still missing for Barcelona at the San Siro, and it was substitute Malcom who came off the bench to give the Spanish champions a late lead.

But Inter hit back to earn a point thanks to Mauro Icardi’s 87thminute leveller, keeping the threetime former winners on course to join Barcelona in qualifying for the last 16 from Group B. Tottenham remain in the hunt, however, after Kane’s late brace secured a 2-1 win over PSV Eindhoven. The Dutch side had got off to a

superb start at Wembley, taking the lead when Luuk de Jong headed home in the second minute. Mauricio Pochettino’s team were starting to get desperate when skipper Kane equalised with 12 minutes left, and he headed home in the 89th minute with the help of two deflections as Spurs got their first win of the campaign. “We had to dig deep and find

another level when it mattered. The whole season we’ve been grinding out results here and there,” said Kane. Liverpool were strong favourites away to Red Star in Serbia, but Jurgen Klopp’s team were poor in a 2-0 defeat to the 1991 European Cup winners. Milan Pavkov scored twice in seven first-half minutes, heading in the opener and then beating Alisson with a powerful strike from range, to the delight of a huge home support. “The boys are very disappointed, I’m very disappointed and we have to do better,” said Klopp. The defeat exposes the Anfield club to the threat of an early elimination in Group C, with Napoli coming from behind to draw 1-1 at home to Paris Saint-Germain in the night’s other game. - Napoli hold PSG -

Andrej ISAKOVIC / AFP

Red Star Belgrade’s Serbian forward Milan Pavkov (C) shoots and scores his second goal during the UEFA Champions League Group C second-leg football match between Red Star Belgrade and Liverpool FC at the Rajko Mitic Stadium in Belgrade on November 6, 2018.

Kylian Mbappe set up Juan Bernat to put Paris ahead just before the break, but Lorenzo Insigne beat Gianluigi Buffon from the penalty spot in the second half as these sides played out a draw for the second time in a fortnight. “This is a difficult group but we saw with Liverpool losing that everything is possible,” said PSG’s Julian Draxler. “A draw in Naples is not bad and we still have our fate in our own hands.” Liverpool and Napoli are locked on six points from four games, with PSG one behind and Red Star another point adrift. Liverpool travel to the French capital in their next

game. Meanwhile, Atletico Madrid gained revenge for a 4-0 defeat away to Borussia Dortmund last month as Diego Simeone’s side defeated the Germans 2-0 in Spain, Saul Niguez and Antoine Griezmann scoring the goals. The two favourites in Group A are not guaranteed a path to the last 16 yet, however, after Club Brugge claimed a stunning 4-0 win at Monaco. The Belgians had not won a Champions League match since 2005, but they were 3-0 up midway through the first half at the Stade Louis II. Hans Vanaken scored twice, including a penalty, and the Brazilian Wesley belted in the third before Ruud Vormer sealed the win.

From World Cup to Suzuki Cup for globe-trotting Eriksson Sven-Goran Eriksson once pushed for World Cup glory with England but the much-travelled coach is now eyeing Southeast Asian silverware with his new team, the Philippines. The Philippines have never won the Suzuki Cup but the door could be open for the 70-year-old Swede after Thailand, the defending champions, were forced to field a weakened team. As the 10-team tournament kicks off this week, Thailand, the

Philippines and Vietnam also have one eye on the much bigger Asian Cup, which they will play in January after it expanded to 32 teams. Thailand have dominated Southeast Asia’s biennial tournament, winning the last two editions and a record five in total. But Eriksson, who took England to World Cup quarter-finals in 2002 and 2006, has targeted an improvement on the Azkals’ three semi-final appearances from 2010 to 2014. “The pressure is on the whole

team to try to do better in the Suzuki Cup than the Philippines has done before. That means at least reaching the final,” said Eriksson. As the Suzuki Cup isn’t part of FIFA’s official calendar, Thailand’s Japan-based stars Teerasil Dangda and Chanathip Songkrasin, the top-scorer and MVP respectively in 2016, are unable to make the trip. Captain Theerathon Bunmathan is also busy in Japan, while goalkeeper Kawin Thamsatchanan has not been released by his Belgian

Trent Sainsbury. “We were just on the attack all the time,” said Kane. “In the end we managed to take a couple but I think we deserved it. “We had to dig deep and find another level when it mattered. The whole season we’ve been grinding out results here and there. “Obviously we’d like to be higher up the table in the league and doing better in the Champions League, but we’re still fighting.” Spurs still face an uphill task to reach the knockout stage as they need to beat Inter Milan at home in their next Champions League clash

and most likely Barcelona away on December 11. “It’s another game we must win, we want to have the possibility to go to the next stage,” said Pochettino, who praised his players’ efforts after an arduous run of four games in eight days. “The team is growing up. In these four games, three victories, we lost to Man City and I think the draw was more the fair result. “Pleased of course, we’re always trying to improve, but with all the circumstances the team is fighting.” (afp)

Thailand coach Milovan Rajevac said he hoped his team would thrive in the pressure of missing their senior players. “We will play in the Suzuki Cup without the four but I have faith in other players. We are a team and everybody is equally important,” the Serb said. “Our aim is to retain the Suzuki Cup. We are under pressure but I will try to make my players turn pressure into motivation. We will do our best.”

- ‘Worrying’ for Henry -

Semi-finalists in 2017, Monaco are now eliminated. It was a dreadful display from a side who have not won in 15 games, including five matches under Henry. This result also came on the day the club’s Russian billionaire owner Dmitry Rybolovlev was arrested in a corruption investigation. “We started well, but once we fell behind we stopped playing and that’s a little bit worrying,” said Henry of his team’s performance. Porto are on the brink of qualification from Group D after a 4-1 win at home to Lokomotiv Moscow. They lead the section by two points from Schalke, who defeated Galatasaray 2-0 in Gelsenkirchen. (afp)

TED ALJIBE / AFP

Sven-Göran Eriksson, the Philippine’s new national football team coach, speaks during a press conference in Manila on November 5, 2018.

Ben STANSALL / AFP

Tottenham Hotspur’s English striker Harry Kane applauds the fans following the UEFA Champions League group B football match between Tottenham Hotspur and PSV Eindhoven at Wembley Stadium in London, on November 6, 2018. Tottenham won the match 2-1.

club OH Leuven. Football Association of Thailand president Somyot Poompanmuong suggested the Thais’ priority was the Asian Cup, where they haven’t reached the knockout stages since 1972. “The Asian Cup is very important for us,” he told AFP. “We want to get past the group stage, that is our target this time.” Somyot added: “The AFF Cup is also important for us. We don’t have some of our best players so that makes it more difficult but gives other players a chance.” - ‘Under pressure’ -

Spurs still alive in Champions League, insists Kane

Harry Kane believes Tottenham can still make the last 16 of the Champions League after coming to his side’s rescue once more in a late turnaround to beat PSV Eindhoven 2-1 on Tuesday. Mauricio Pochettino’s side were only 12 minutes away from being eliminated as they struggled to recover from Luuk de Jong’s opener for PSV after 61 seconds at Wembley. But England captain Kane came to the rescue with a predatory equaliser before heading the crucial last-gasp winner with the aid of a deflection off PSV’s

9

The Philippines will also be affected by the scheduling and will have to manage without goalkeeper Neil Etheridge, for the most part at least. The Cardiff City number one was named in the preliminary 29man squad and is expected to jet to Asia after Cardiff’s clash with Brighton and Hove Albion on Saturday. He should be ready to take on Singapore three days later and then East Timor, before returning to the English Premier League once the international break ends on November 20. But Etheridge will be available in January for the Asian Cup in the United Arab Emirates, when they face South Korea, China and Kyrgyzstan in Group C. The Philippines, under Eriksson, will be making their first appearance in the continental tournament. “I could easily say win it (but) I don’t know if it’s realistic to think that for the first time,” Eriksson said. “Let’s start with the Suzuki Cup, that’s first.” (afp)


10

Destination

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

Carlsen to defend chess crown against great American hope

Museum Negeri Propinsi Bali Bali Provincial State Museum in Denpasar

DENPASAR - Museum Negeri Propinsi Bali, or the Bali Provincial Public State Museum, is the island’s main museum and a central landmark highlighted on city tours to the heart of the provincial capital, Denpasar. The island’s oldest and largest, the Bali museum houses over 10,000 exhibits in separate pavilions, all built in architectural styling that pays homage to Balinese heritage with stone carvings, bas reliefs and tropical gardens dominating its exteriors. Often referred

to simply as the ‘Bali Museum’, Museum Negeri Propinsi Bali flanks the Pura Jagatnatha Temple and the Puputan Badung square, which is a popular weekending destination for Denpasar locals. The museum is certainly the place to head to in Denpasar town where you can get insightful introductions to Balinese arts and history for an hour or two, then continue with a stroll to the square or a visit to the temple next door. The museum covers a total of

2,600sqm, divided into three sections, namely an outer courtyard, a ‘jaba tengah’ middle courtyard, and the ‘jeroan’ or main section where most of the pavilions are. The three pavilions are named Tabanan, Karangasem, and Buleleng, after Bali’s three largest regencies. Inside each pavilion are collections of traditional paintings, religious artefacts and agricultural tools that offer a lot for kids and adults to look at and talk about. Vast collections of ethnographic displays

range from classical Kamasanstyle paintings hailing from the Klungkung regency in east Bali to archaeological finds such as ancient statues and inscriptions. There are also weapons dating back to the Bronze Age in Bali, as well as pre-Hindu era ritual items and more contemporary items such as wayang kulit shadow puppets, theatrical masks, old textiles, costumes and musical instruments. The Benefits Of Visiting Bali

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It is for Job Vacancy, Property, Selling or Buying Please contact Gugiek : 08123840500

Provincial State Museum The next question, what is the benefit visiting Bali Provincial State Museum? Surely this will be a question for who has never visited this museum. Bali Provincial State Museum is an ethnography museum category. Therefore you must have an interest in history or like to see the typical Balinese architecture. However, if you don;t have an interest in Balinese antiquity, it will be difficult for you to feel the benefits of visiting the Museum. Bali Provincial State Museum is different from the existing museum in Ubud tourist attractions. In Bali Museum, you can see art collection with historical value from Balinese culture. Museum collections consist of ethnographic collections such as equipment used during prehistoric times, religious and customary ceremonial material, Balinese art and culture development, from time to time. By seeing the museum collection, you will be able to compare, the form of a Balinese civilization from a prehistoric era to modern times. (IBP/net)

Nick Kyrgios

IBP/net

‘Struggling’ Kyrgios seeing psychologists, working on mental health

SYDNEY - Temperamental Australian tennis star Nick Kyrgios says he is talking to psychologists and “trying to get on top” of his mental health after another roller-coaster season where he was criticised for his on-court antics. Kyrgios finished his season early in October after an elbow injury forced him out of the Kremlin Cup in Moscow. The fiery 23-year-old lost his status as Australian number one to 19-year-old Alex de Minaur in the same month. Returning home to prepare for next year, the world number 37 admitted he was working through mental health issues that had plagued him throughout the season. “I was obviously struggling with a couple of things on and off the court this year, so it hasn’t been easy,” he told hometown newspaper the Canberra Times. “But I’m starting to see some psychologists and trying to get on

top of my mental health. “I probably left it a little too long. But I’ve been doing that and I feel more open about talking about it, I don’t feel like I’ve got to hide that sort of stuff any more.” The supremely talented but combustible Kyrgios has become infamous for petulant behaviour, outbursts and meltdowns on court. At the US Open in August, an umpire gave the Australian a controversial pep talk during his second-round game for his perceived lack of effort. He exited the Shanghai Masters in the first round last month, where he was also criticised for his lacklustre performance.

Kyrgios said he was “very lucky” to have had an international tennis career and announced an overhaul of his playing schedule to try and avoid a repeat of his mental and physical burnout. “I’m going to work with my team to get the correct schedule, I don’t think I’ve got it right the last couple of years because I haven’t made it to the end of the year once,” he said. Kyrgios started the year well when he captured a fourth career title in Brisbane in January. But he then missed two months of the campaign, including the French Open, in the spring. A hip injury forced his early withdrawal from the ATP season last year. (afp)

LONDON - Norway’s Magnus Carlsen will seek to cement his reputation as history’s greatest chess player on Friday when he launches a defence of his crown against the first US title contender since Bobby Fischer in 1972. Both Carlsen -- a 27-year-old superstar at home who is also a parttime model -- and 26-year-old Fabiano Caruana are prodigies returning mass appeal to their highbrow game. The world title will go up for grabs in a former London school of art and design whose sweeping glass dome and imposing columns have featured in a recent series of fashion shows. It is a fitting venue for Carlsen. The champion since 2013 has also been one of the faces of a street-smart Dutch apparel brand since 2010. But the chess world is more enthralled with Carlsen’s intuition and prodigious memory than his rugged looks.\ “There is no doubt that Carlsen is one of the best chess players ever,” British Chess Magazine editor Milan Dinic told AFP.

- ‘Not nerdy looking’ The Norwegian won his third world title in a series of rapid play tiebreakers against Russia’s Sergey Karjakin in 2016 in New York. His first came when he toppled Viswanathan Anand on the former champion’s home turf in India. Carlsen defended his crown in a rematch played the subsequent year in Russia. But he really began making a name for himself when he managed to draw Garry Kasparov -- the Soviet and Russian legend whose record ranking Carlsen eventually broke -- at the tender age of 13. Carlsen actually beat Kasparov’s compatriot and nemesis Anatoly Karpov at the same event. He has spent a good part of his time since then making chess fun again. Carlsen took time off preparations for the London series to play an exhibition game against the Liverpool football team’s chess-loving rightback Trent Alexander-Arnold. The 20-year-old rising star lost, but can console himself with the knowledge that he held out against Carlsen

for nearly twice as many moves as Microsoft’s Bill Gates. Carlsen has succeeded in “removing the stigma associated with chess,” championship organiser Ilya Merenzon told AFP. “He’s not a nerdy looking male and he’s not just another Russian chess player,” said Merenzon. “Carlsen has galvanising mainstream interest in chess and (is) bringing new people to it.” - In Fischer’s shadow What Carlsen has done for the global game, Caruana is achieving in the United States. Americans have not had a chess hero since Fischer stunned Soviet champion Boris Spassky in an epic series in 1972 that epitomised the Cold War rivalry between the two superpowers. Now, US media is fascinated with the possibility of the chess title coming home nearly 50 years later. Caruana has the credentials to become another chess sensation in the 12-match series that plays out over the coming weeks in London. The Italian-American from Miami has played for both countries and became a grandmaster at 14. He earned his shot against Carlsen by winning this year’s Candidates Tournament in Berlin. And his climb up the FIDE chess federation’s rankings to the number two spot has taken him within just three points of Carlsen’s total of 2,835. “Caruana had an amazing 2018 which gives him a lot of vigour ahead of the match,” said British Chess Magazine’s Dinic. “Also, I think Caruana is psychologically stronger than Karjakin was in 2016, while Carlsen is a bit weaker on that front compared to two years ago.” Chess has its own unique scoring system that awards the winner of each game one point. A draw sees the contenders share half a point. The title goes to the first person to reach 6.5 points. A rapid series of tiebreakers are played in case the two are level on points after the first 12 games. (afp)

Magnus Carlsen

Eduardo Munoz Alvarez / AFP


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RLD

‘For the dog, it’s a game’: sniffing out truffles in Italy

RODDI - “Go on Rocky, find it! Good boy!” The labrador wags his tail, happy to have found the hidden treasure as he graduates from Italy’s “truffle dog university”, doing his master proud. Giovanni Monchiero is the dean of the unusual academy in Roddi in northwestern Italy and, like his father, grandfather and greatgrandfather, transforms “normal” dogs into expert seekers of the lucrative fungus. “Teaching a dog to find truffles is very simple, you just need plenty of patience and to realise that for the dog, it’s a game,” said Monchiero, 55. “We start by getting the dog to play with the truffle. Personally, I use a fresh truffle, but if you don’t have one you can put some trufflescented oil on a tennis ball. You throw it, the dog has to retrieve it and you reward him with dog biscuits.” Then the master makes the game a little more complicated by throwing the truffle into long grass, where the dog can’t see it. “That’s when you start giving commands: go on, find it, you’ve found it, well done! You have to

always congratulate and reward,” Monchiero said. - ‘Gentle methods’ -

“Once the dog has learned the truffle aroma, the next step is to bury the truffle, not very deep at first.” Graduates then delight in unearthing the knobbly fungi lurking among the roots of oak, linden, willows or poplar trees -- with which they have a symbiotic relationship. Roddi is in the Alba region, famous for its white truffles, “distinguished by an intense perfume, evocative of the woods, of nature,” said Antonio Degiacomi, head of Italy’s National Centre for Truffle Studies. This year white truffles fetch 350 euros ($400) for 100 grammes (around three ounces), down from at least 600 euros last year, with an average truffle weighing 20 grammes. Going truffle hunting is a passion, said Monchiero, who heads

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out every morning and evening during the truffle season, which runs from September 21 to January 31. The university was founded by his great-grandfather in 1880 and Monchiero’s principle is that while not every dog can become a good truffle-hunter, all breeds have a chance. “Some dogs are predisposed to find truffles, others are not,” said Monchiero, who has even trained a small German Pinscher to sniff out the delicacy destined for the finest restaurants. He has trained dozens of dogs, usually one or two at a time. “Master Monchiero is the best in the whole Piedmont region. This is the third dog he has trained for me,” said Rocky’s master, Diego Guaraldo. “He doesn’t use cruel methods like depriving the dog of food, but gentler methods,” said Guaraldo, a 36-year-old lawyer, describing the university’s graduates as “real champions”. (afp)

MARCO BERTORELLO / AFP

Truffle hunter Giovanni Monchiero poses with a picture of his grandfather Giovanni Monchiero in Roddi. near Alba, northwestern Italy on October 24, 2018.

Superbugs...

From page 1

“Even small cuts in the kitchen, minor surgery or diseases like pneumonia could become life-threatening.” Perhaps more worrying is the prediction made by the OECD that resistance to so-called 2nd- and 3rd-line antibiotics -- break-glass-in-case-ofemergency infection treatments -- will balloon by 70 percent by 2030. “These are antibiotics that as far as possible we don’t want to use because we want these as back up,” Cecchini said. “Essentially, we are using more when we should use less and we are running out of our best options in case of emergency.” - How to avoid disaster -

The group, which advises the World Health Organization on public health initiatives, said the only way to avert disaster was to implement immediate, sectorwide changes in behaviour. The report called on healthcare professionals to ensure better universal hygiene stan-

Thursday, November 8, 2018

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dards in hospitals and clinics by insisting all staff wash their hands and conform to stricter safety regimes. It also suggested resistance could be fought with better and quicker testing to determine if an infection is viral -- meaning antibiotics are useless -- or bacterial. New swab tests can give a result in a matter of minutes, and Cecchini also put forward the idea of “delayed prescriptions” to dent antibiotic overuse by making patients wait three days before picking up their antibiotics -- roughly the time it takes for a viral infection to run its course. In trials of the technique, two thirds of patients given delayed prescriptions for antibiotics never collected their medicine. The OECD said such changes would cost as little as $2 (1.7 euros) per person per year and would save millions of lives and billions of dollars by mid-century. “They would decrease burden of AMR in these countries by 75 percent,” said Cecchini. “It would pay for itself in a few months and would produce substantial savings.” (afp)

Anger mounts after deadly Marseille building collapse MARSEILLE - French officials vowed to inspect all Marseille buildings “unsuitable” for habitation as anger rose over the collapse of two buildings in the Mediterranean city, where up to eight people are feared dead. A fifth body was recovered on Wednesday morning under rubble of the dilapidated buildings, which crumbled suddenly on Monday morning in Noailles, a workingclass district in the heart of the port city. The dead include two women and three men, prosecutor Xavier Tarabeux told AFP. According to authorities, a total of five to eight people could have died in the collapse. Interior Minister Christophe Castaner told lawmakers in Paris that he had ordered a building by building audit before an “ambitious programme for ensuring safe conditions” along with Marseille authorities. “Nearly 6,000 properties have been identified as at risk” in the city, he said, representing some 44,000 lodgings in lower-class neighbourhoods, calling the situation unacceptable. Rescuers have been delicately

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searching what is left of the buildings. A third adjoining building partially collapsed on Monday night. Residents said Tuesday the structural risks of the buildings and others like them were widely known, but that city officials did little when alerted about them. “Everybody knew about the problems with the two collapsed buildings,” said Patrick Lacoste, a spokesman for a local housing action group. “People died for nothing, even though we knew.” “It’s hell here, they know that it’s crap and now people die for nothing,” said local resident Toufik Ben Rhouma. The disaster, he added, was “100 percent the fault of city hall”. “It’s been 10 years that I have been living here and I have never had anyone come and inspect my apartment,” said a woman who identified herself as Sophie. Her neighbour said she hadn’t seen any inspector in 27 years. On Tuesday afternoon, some residents returned to their homes in neighbouring buildings to pack up belongings in bags and suitcases, some leaving carrying televisions with them, an AFP reporter said. (afp)

WANG Zhao / AFP

A Boeing 777X model is displayed at the Airshow China 2018 in Zhuhai in southern China’s Guangdong province on November 7, 2018.

Boeing issues advice over sensors after Indonesia crash

Boeing issued a special bulletin Wednesday addressing a sensor problem flagged by Indonesian safety officials investigating the crash of a Lion Air 737 that killed 189 people last week. The planemaker said local aviation officials believed pilots may have been given wrong information by the plane’s automated systems before the fatal crash. “The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has indicated that Lion Air flight 610 experienced erroneous input from one of its AOA (Angle of Attack) sensors,” Boeing said. “Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB) directing operators to existing flight crew procedures to address circumstances where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor.” An AOA sensor provides data about the angle at which wind is passing over

the wings and tells pilots how much lift a plane is getting. The information can be critical in preventing the plane from stalling. Lion Air JT610 plunged into the Java Sea less than half an hour after taking off from Jakarta on a routine flight to Pangkal Pinang city. There were no survivors. The doomed jet was a Boeing 737Max 8, one of the world’s newest and most advanced commercial passenger planes, and there is still no answer as to what caused the crash. A preliminary report is expected at the end of the month. Search teams have filled some 186 body bags with remains found after the devastating crash, but only 44 victims have been identified so far. Indonesian officials said on Wednesday they would extend by three days the search for bodies.

Divers have recovered one of the two “black boxes” -- the flight data recorder -- but are still searching for the cockpit voice recorder, in the hope it will shed more light on the cause of the disaster. Indonesian investigators said this week the plane had an air-speed indicator problem on the doomed flight and on three previous journeys. The glitch had been repeatedly serviced and Lion Air’s technical team declared the plane to be airworthy. The new details -- gleaned from the flight data recorder -- came after the government said it was launching a “special audit” of Lion Air’s operations. The accident has resurrected concerns about Indonesia’s poor air safety record, which until recently saw its carriers facing years-long bans from entering European Union and US airspace. (afp)


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International

Thursday, November 8, 2018

BUSINESS US reassures Taiwan on security as China increases threats

TAIPEI - Any attempt to determine Taiwan’s future by “other than peaceful means” is a threat to regional security and a matter of “grave concern” to the United States, Washington’s de facto ambassador to Taipei said Wednesday, in a nod to Chinese military intimidation against the island.

Brent Christensen also said Washington would continue military sales to Taiwan while promoting its participation in the international community that Beijing increasingly seeks to restrict. China considers Taiwan its own territory to be absorbed using force if necessary. It has lately stepped up its threats in an attempt to undermine President Tsai Ing-wen, who has refused to bow to Beijing’s demand that she recognize Taiwan as a part of China. The U.S. cut formal ties with Taiwan in 1979 to recognize Beijing but the two maintain robust unofficial military and diplomatic ties. Those relations are underpinned by the Taiwan Relations Act, which requires the U.S. to ensure that Taiwan has the ability to defend itself and U.S. policy “has not changed” in the 40 years since its passage, Christensen said at a news conference. “Any effort to determine the future of Taiwan by other than peaceful means represents a threat to the peace and security of the Western Pacific area and is of grave concern to the United States,” said Christensen, who heads the American Institute in Taiwan,which functions as an embassy in all but name. “We are opposed to unilateral attempts to change the status quo.” Christensen pointed to a recent $330 million arms sale to Taiwan as evidence of Washington’s fulfilling its obligation to support Taiwan in “maintaining a sufficient self-defense capability against coercion.” “Promoting security cooperation and improving Taiwan’s self-defense capability go hand in hand,” he said. A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman on Wednesday reiterated Beijing’s strong opposition to arms sales and “any kind of official exchanges and military interactions between the U.S. and Taiwan.”

AP Photo

In this image made from video, American Institute in Taiwan director Brent Christensen gestures while speaking during a press conference in Taipei, Taiwan, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. Washington’s de facto ambassador to Taiwan reassured the self-governing island of American security backing against threats from China. Christensen said the U.S. considers any attempt to determine Taiwan’s future by “other than peaceful means” to be a matter of “grave concern.” China considers Taiwan its own territory to be absorbed using force if necessary. “We hope the U.S. will deal with Taiwanrelated issues with caution so as to avoid the impacts on China-U.S. relations and peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait,” Lu Kang said at a daily briefing. While the U.S. encourages dialogue between China and Taiwan, it will at the same time cooperate to promote shared democratic values and improve economic relations with the island, Christensen said. That includes ensuring Taiwan has a voice in international organizations from which Taiwan has been excluded. China has used its economic might and diplomatic clout to keep

Taiwan out of the United Nations, and has increased the pressure by blocking Taipei’s representatives from attending international meetings such as the World Health Assembly, while pressuring multinational companies ranging from fashion brands to airlines to describe Taiwan as part of China. Alarmed by the deteriorating situation, the U.S. in September recalled its envoys to the Dominican Republic, El Salvador and Panama after decisions by those nations to cut ties with Taiwan in favor of diplomatic relations with China. Taiwan now has just 17 diplomatic allies as China ratchets up pres-

sure on the island’s government to endorse its “One-China” principle. “The United States has long been a vocal supporter of Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organizations, and we continue our informal consultations and engagement to allow Taiwan to have a more substantive role in the international community,” Christensen said. Taiwan, a former Japanese colony, split from the mainland in 1949 after Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalists fled there following defeat by Mao Zedong’s Communist army. (ap)

Europe’s main stock markets rise at open

European stock markets rose around half-a-percent at the start of trading on Wednesday, with investors assessing US midterm election results that pointed to political gridlock across the Atlantic. London’s benchmark FTSE 100 index

climbed 0.6 percent to 7,079.76 points, compared with the close on Tuesday. In the eurozone, Frankfurt’s DAX 30 gained 0.5 percent to 11,542.09 points and the Paris CAC 40 won 0.5 percent to 5,100.08.

In the US, President Donald Trump’s Republican party maintained its control of the Senate but the Democrats regained power in the House of Representatives, in line with forecasts. While the vote saw Trump’s party lose

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overall power on Capitol Hill, analysts pointed out that the result is unlikely to lead to a reversal of the White House’s popular tax cuts and deregulation that have helped to lift US stock markets this year. (afp)

Thursday, November 8, 2018

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Museum Batuan exhibiting works by 70 artists with integrity

Museum Batuan was first established as a place to showcase the wealth of talent found amongst the unusually large number of painters working in this village, and houses a truly astounding collection of Modern Traditional Batuan Style Paintings and on October 29th the museum opened a exhibition of contemporary works entitled “Integrity”.

each of these paintings stands as a testament to the remarkable and enduring strength of the land and culture of Bali to invite us all to

The village of Batuan has an extremely long and rich history that includes an extraordinary visual and performing arts heritage. The village temple, which itself demonstrates the great skill of painters, sculptors, dancers and other artists, also houses a document that refers to an artists guild that already existed when the temple was established some 1000 years ago. Archeological evidence also shows that skilled artists were already working in Batuan long before that. For most of Batuan’s history, art was created in the religiocultural context as a communal act of devotion intimately tied a holistic way of life wherein all aspects of life understood as being part of a unified cosmo-vision. While these Balinese Hindu practices still ensure that arts continue to thrive here with exceptional power, painting in particular has been developing on its own uniquely fine-arts path, with traditional methods being expanded to include more contemporary themes and approaches. The newly opened exhibition is a tremendous show featuring a remarkable 70 artists from Batuan, Bali and indeed the world. While the artists of this exhibition work in a variety of styles, techniques and methods, they share a common source of inspiration: Bali -and more particularly the spiritual, philosophical or unseen forces that inspire them create. Keeping with the tradition of devotional works, each of the

Detail of painting by I Wayan Kaler currently on display at Museum Batuan

paintings speaks to the artist’s personal exploration of the unseen either within themselves or as it is expressed collectively and as such are direct references to the notion of ‘integrity’. As museum owner pak Dewa explained: “my father created this museum as part of his dream to celebrate the rich artistic heritage of Batuan and Bali. I am pleased to say that this exhibition indeed celebrates the wealth of talented artists working in Bali today and is in integrity with the vision of this museum”. Although the word integrity is often used to refer to being in alignment with one’s principles, integrity in fact has a wider meaning. Integrity is defined as ‘being part of the whole’ and in the context of this exhibition refers to the bringing together of different artists who share a common source of inspiration but it also refers to this source of inspiration and how it is expressed. Balinese culture is -broadly speaking, based on integrity both in terms of acknowledging all parts of life and also in terms of how this is expressed with art, religion, farming, economics, architecture, fashion, cosmology, education, social, political, personal, spiritual practices interweaving as individual threads that make up part of a larger whole. Each of these aspects of life is clearly tied to the others and this interrelatedness is explicitly acknowledged in the traditions of Bali in myriad ways. Painting is

no exception and although most painting on the island is no longer created in the same communal devotional context that it once was, this understanding of life remains an integral part of art practices on the island. So strong is this understanding, that even visitors to the island who may not fully grasp the astonishing degree to which these connections are honored here, certainly feel it. Maintaining an artistic practice requires a certain degree of integrity anywhere in the world as it comes with numerous challenges – the greatest of which is perhaps remembering that we are always part of the whole of life and persevering in trying to express this integrity in art works that necessarily fall short but always hold the potential of bringing us that much closer to expressing this integrity with all that is. From Balinese fold tales and shadow puppet stories that carry moral teachings, to scenes of everyday life in Bali represented as unified visions of life as one interrelated unfolding, to more conceptual expressions of particular struggles to maintain traditions, or personal experiences of interactions with the subtle forces that inform these traditions, to satirical representations of our changing times, to simple homages to the beauty and power of the land of Bali whether literal, symbolic, metaphoric, conceptual or poetic, whether abstracted, personal, imagined or remembered,

appreciate the beauty of life and our integral place in it. INTEGRITY will be on display at Batuan Museum, until 28th, 2018.

IBP/kmb

Tipat Santok Lalah Manis Have you ever tasted tipat santok? This traditional food is the most popular on the Bali Island. Balinese people of all walks of life really like this simple menu. Children, teenagers and old people never get bored with this food because it is easily obtained. Moreover, the flavor can be customized because the sauces can be increased or decreased as desired. Tipat santok is a breakfast menu which is very well known in Bali. Tipat santok with spicy sweet sauces are often becoming people’s choice. It is called so because it offers sweet and spicy flavor. Spicy here does not happen due to too much pepper but because of spicy

chili, while the sweet flavor is given by the brown sugar. In Java this food is commonly known as gado-gado. Tipat santok is very easy to find. It is cheap and served fresh because it is prepared after being ordered. Almost at every village street people can enjoy this food because many merchants of this food are open until late evening. They usually sell at village roadside, traditional markets and in the aisles. Basically the main ingredient is ketupat (rice bag) wrapped in young coconut leaf. However, in later development, people also use plastic or banana leaves as the wrapper. In the presentation, the

tipat santok is served with various vegetables such as water spinach, sprouts, and cucumber. Optionally it is accompanied with tofu or tempeh and fried red beans. In the meantime, the spice is made from fried peanut mixed with garlic, aromatic ginger, lime, palm sugar, fermented shrimp paste and fermented soy beans where all these herbs are then pulverized. After that, it is sprinkled with fried shallot. Now, it is ready to be served. One portion of tipat santok costs varies according to the venue and merchants. At villages, a portion is sold for IDR 4,000 – IDR 5,000 while in urban areas ranging from IDR 6,000 to IDR 10,000. (kmb)


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Bali News

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

Mangrove Park plan in Ngurah Rai Forest Park

KABUL - On a good day, it takes Mohammad less than three hours to drive from Ghazni to Kabul. But preparations for the hair-raising journey through Taliban-infested areas can take weeks.

DENPASAR - The nature tourism cultivation plan at the Ngurah Rai Grand Forest Park (Tahura) utilization block re-emerged lately. Moreover, the Bali provincial government is now planning the arrangement of the area spreading across 1,373.5 hectares holistically. The Ngurah Rai Forest Park will be used as a mangrove park. various parties so that the design of this park becomes good,” he explained. Koster added that central government including the president greatly supports the plan and indeed directs Bali government to carry out mangrove conservation. Moreover, the mangrove will be well cared for, and the Mangrove Study Center will also be built there. The Ngurah Rai Grand Forest Park area will be equipped with a jogging track so that people can take advantage of it for walking and breathing fresh air. “There is even a direction to plant mangroves beside the toll road piles, so they will look more beautiful. By that way, the piles will not be visible. It’s a good idea, I think it will become a good project,” he added. Meanwhile, Head of the Bali Forestry Agency, Luh Ayu Aryani, stated that Ngurah Rai Grand Forest Park will be arranged without changing its sustainability as a mangrove conservation area. At present, the management is indeed handled by Head of Technical Executive Unit (UPT) under coordination with the Head of the Bali Forestry Agency. However,

IBP/kmb

The Bali provincial government is now planning the arrangement of the area spreading across 1,373.5 hectares holistically. in the next arrangement, administratively there are cooperation scheme and the permits are issued by central government considering the conservation areas belong to the authority of the Directorate General of Natural Resources Conservation, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. “Well... we will make cooperation with a third party because we serve as the operator that will make coordination. “Indeed the UPT is the operator based on a decree. However, in terms of funding and

other aspects are impossible to develop it conventionally,” she explained. Ayu added that conventional development requires coordination with officials and the surrounding community. Besides, it needs support and qualified facilitation so that the arrangement to make the Grand Forest Park more beautiful remains in principles of conservation and the ecosystem stays sustainable. At present, her agency is planning to manage the Grand Forest Park to be divided into utilization blocks, buf-

fer blocks, core blocks and special blocks. Utilization blocks are the areas that will be cooperated later while special blocks are generally intended for temple as Balinese local wisdom. “In 2019 we will design the site resumed with the management plan. It will be designed in such a way that we can truly sustain our mangrove forest and have an attraction for visitors. In accordance with the rules, the permanent facilities cannot be built there,” she said. (kmb32)

Municipal Police secure foreigner with depression in Kuta

IBP/kmb23

After being interrogated, the foreigner only coming with a passport wandered in Kuta.

MANGUPURA - Suspected of being depressed, an Australian tourist was secured by Kuta Municipal Police on Tuesday (Nov. 6). The foreigner was previously handed over by a hotel security because for several times he came to hotels, restaurants and public places like confused person. When asked for his confirmation, group head of the Kuta Municipal Police, Nengah Wika, said the foreigner had slept before the Segara Temple. In addition, the foreigner had time to walk into hotels and restaurants without any supplies, so they were expelled by local security guard. After being interrogated, the foreigner only coming with a passport wandered in Kuta. Moreover, he did not have a place to stay, got hungry and looked like a confused person. He brought an Australian

passport and a key along with the tag. Although he had been secured, he could suddenly flee. Responding to the increasing number of tourists suspected of experiencing depression that frequently make trouble in the Kuta subdistrict, it needs serious attention because they are considered very disturbing to the people around the Kuta sub-district. Moreover, within this month, the Kuta subdistrict has received 4 public reports related to trouble-making tourists. Acting subdistrict head of Kuta, Made Widiana, when met at his office on Tuesday (Nov. 5) hoped all relevant parties such as government, police authority, immigration office and village officials to join hands in handling this matter. In addition, as a follow up, this problem also needs to be commu-

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Highway to hell: Afghan travellers run gauntlet of Taliban violence

Governor: It’s entirely managed by government

“Well, the mangrove is already damaged. Many of them are bald and littered. So, it does not look neat. Besides, many people also encroach. On that account, there is an idea to manage the mangrove and made it into a mangrove park,” said the Governor of Bali, Wayan Koster, when confirmed after attending a Plenary Meeting at the Bali House of Representatives, on Tuesday (Nov. 6). According to Koster, this plan still has not been final but will be processed soon because it mainly keeps the mangroves sustainable, healthy and can be empowered. Dead or bare mangroves will be replanted, re-arranged and cleaned up from pollution and garbage. The encroachment of land as well as illegal buildings in the area will also be cracked down on. He affirmed there is no involvement of private sector in the management plan. “It’s fully handled by the government. There is no private business (but) will be managed by the provincial government technical unit. The stages will soon be realized as it needs to conceptualize the park. We’ll cooperate with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), the Ministry of Forestry and

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

nicated with consulate authority of the country concerned regarding the further handling whether they should be deported immediately or whatsoever. Therefore, he hoped there is also a handling in terms of immigration procedures. “We rely on the immigration authorities to handle this in accordance with the operating procedures available. If possible, this is also to be communicated with the consular office so as not to damage the tourism image,” he hoped. For this reason, his authority will discuss the problem in the coordination meeting held at the end of 2018. In the coordination meeting, it will be discussed the cases in Kuta as well as in South Kuta. “Later on, it becomes one of the agendas related to stressed, crazy and trouble-making tourists,” he said. (kmb23)

ZAKERIA HASHIMI / AFP

In this photo taken on October 29, 2018, Afghan local vehicles with passengers travel on the highway between Ghazni and Kabul. On a good day, it takes Mohammad less than three hours to drive from Ghazni to Kabul. But preparations for the hair-raising journey through Taliban-infested areas can take weeks. Road trips are a dangerous, and often deadly, activity in Afghanistan. Travellers run the gauntlet of Taliban checkpoints, fighting, robberies, kidnappings, and pressure-

plate bombs targeting government officials and security forces. The stretch of Highway 1 between the Afghan capital and the southeastern city of Ghazni -- which the Taliban stormed in

August and still threaten -- is one of the most treacherous. Spontaneous trips are out of the question, said Mohammad, who is in his 20s and a regular visitor to Kabul.

Mohammad, not his real name, asked AFP to use a pseudonym to avoid being identified by the Taliban. He begins preparing for the journey at least two weeks before his planned departure, starting with growing out his beard, which he normally keeps short, to create a scruffier appearance. He then starts working his contacts, calling trusted relatives and neighbours who ply the busy route for information about Taliban activity along the main artery connecting Kabul to the insurgent strongholds in the south. “You have to be careful who you call because you could be sold out to the Taliban” by someone working for the militant group, he told AFP.

- ‘Many reasons to worry’ On the day of his departure, Mohammad swaps his clean, wellironed clothes for a dirty pyjamalike shalwar kameez to make himself look more like a villager and clears the call history on his mobile in case a phone number raises suspicion. “You can’t just jump into a car and come (to Kabul), not if you want to be on the safe side,” he said. Mohammad’s most recent trip to Kabul was delayed for three days after he received warnings of Taliban disguised as Afghan soldiers manning checkpoints along the road. The first thing Taliban militants

check is a person’s tazkira, or national identification document. “If the tazkira is from Ghazni then you may be fine. If not, they might think that you are a member of the security forces from another province coming to Ghazni to fight,” Mohammad said. After registering to vote in the October 20 parliamentary election -- which the Taliban had vowed to attack and which was finally cancelled in Ghazni due to protests -- Mohammad carries a second tazkira that does not have a sticker identifying him as a voter. “There are many reasons to be worried and anxious,” Mohammad explained. “Even if they don’t kill you, they may keep you as a hostage and ask for a ransom. If they kept me for one night, my mother would not survive.” A one-way trip between Kabul and Ghazni costs Mohammad 250 afghanis (around $3) in a Toyota Corolla taxi, a ubiquitous model in Afghanistan that is often used as public transport. He tries to travel with drivers he knows. He avoids travelling on Mondays and Wednesdays. Those are the days the Afghan army delivers supplies to its troops in the provinces and attacks along the highway are more likely, Mohammad said. Thursday, the last day of the Afghan working week, is also a bad day to venture out of the city. Militants lie in wait for government employees as they leave Ghazni for the weekend. (afp)

Nancy Pelosi: Former US House speaker eyes gavel once more

WASHINGTON - With Democrats capturing control of the House of Representatives in Tuesday’s midterms, one lawmaker will reclaim the mantle of Washington’s most powerful woman -- and an opposition scourge for President Donald Trump. Democratic Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is expected to become speaker of the House, a position she held for four years from 2007, when she made history as the first woman ever to rise to that post. Should she take the gavel from outgoing Speaker Paul Ryan, the 78-year-old would become the nation’s third most senior official, after the president and vice president

-- and seal her reputation as one of the great survivors in American politics. In her first stint, Pelosi was a strong opposing force to Republican George W. Bush in the final two years of his presidency. Her role as a check on Trump would be similar. She and the Democratic leadership would have the power to block Republican legislation, hamstringing large parts of Trump’s agenda ranging from proposed new tax cuts to construction of a wall on the border with Mexico. And Pelosi could make life for Trump much harder if she launches impeachment proceedings. So far she has spoken out against

using such a powerful political cudgel against him, arguing that the explosive step would likely mobilize Republican voters eager to protect the president. In her reprised role, she will have to thread a political needle, standing up to Trump when needed but also showing that her party is capable of working with the president to get laws passed. “A Democratic Congress will work for solutions that bring us together, because we have all had enough of division,” Pelosi said in a speech after claiming her party’s control over the House. “The American people want peace. They want results.” (afp)

Zach Gibson/Getty Images/AFP

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), joined by House Democrats, delivers remarks during a DCCC election watch party at the Hyatt Regency on November 6, 2018 in Washington, DC.


14

Health

Thursday, November 8, 2018

International

The clocks ‘fell back.’ Here’s how to survive the darker days.

FOR the 100th year, we get to turn our clocks back an hour, alleviating the gloom of dark mornings but robbing us of daylit evenings. According to a recently added section of The Indoor Generation, a survey from YouGov and Velux, many of us feel less productive as the clocks roll back — 74 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity, and 34 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity significantly. Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, Ph.D., associate professor and director of the Institute for Health in the Built Environment at the University of Oregon, says the human need for daylight is unconscious, but fundamental. “The rhythms of light and dark are a fundamental part of the ecological system that nearly every species on earth evolved within,” he says. “Should we really expect anything

but an erosion of productivity if this natural system is severely disrupted?” ohn Sharp, M.D., psychiatrist on faculty at Harvard Medical School and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and author of “The Emotional Calendar: Understanding Seasonal Influences and Milestones to Become Happier, More Fulfilled, and in Control of Your Life,” also says less light in your day can cause things to slow down. “The interesting thing is, without light, our sleep wake cycle would be much longer than it is now. But it’s the absence of light that sets us into our sleep-wake patterns,” says Sharp. “When that gets shifted, it really affects us and can cause people to be irritable, sleepy, and want to quit the day earlier. It’s easier just to shut

it all down at 5 p.m.” A few countries in the European Union have led a hearty discussion in hopes of abolishing daylight saving all together. Some Northernmost countries, where it can be either light or dark for days on end depending on the time of year, cited health issues caused by the phenomenon — such as an eight percent increase in the risk of stroke and 24 percent increased risk of heart attack the Monday following spring forward. The only good news about turning the clock backward is, according to that same study, that extra hour of sleep coincides with a reduced risk of heart attack the following Monday by 21 percent. So how can we better get ahead of the havoc daylight saving wreaks on our lives? Ease into the sleep shift

Sharp says dialing back your bedtime by 15 minute increments can help you ease the transition. “Think back to when you want to wake up and how much sleep you normally need, then gradually adjust your bedtime toward your sleep goal,” he says. Avoid alcohol and refined carbs and sugar before bed

IBP/net

According to survey, 74 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity, and 34 percent of Americans say a lack of daylight affects their productivity significantly.

At least 20 percent of American adults rely on alcohol to help them fall asleep says Dr. Sanam Hafeez, clinical psychologist and teaching faculty member at Columbia University Teacher’s College. Yet, she says imbibing the night before the clocks roll back is much more likely to hinder your sleep than help it. “Alcohol disrupts circadian func-

tioning, directly interfering with the ability of the master biological clock to synchronize itself,” she explains. “Because circadian rhythms have such a powerful, dominating influence over the way our bodies function, the disruptive effects of alcohol can be widespread, affecting sleep and other systems, including liver function,” she explains. Sharp says though booze and carb-rich meals and snacks might be comforting come shorter days, there’s a price to pay for overindulging — especially that night. “Even if it relaxes you, you won’t get the quality of sleep that makes you feel better during the day if you drink. And carbs sap energy because they metabolize into sugar and screw up your baseline metabolism and glucose production in a way that effects your energy and outlook,” he says. So you might be better off saving the booze and sweets for the ‘hygge’ or ‘còsagach’ inspired hibernation spells to come. Get out in the daylight

Hafeez says light suppresses the secretion of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin — and dark induces it. To better adjust to daylight saving time in fall, Hafeez advises exposing yourself to as much light as you can during the day. Even if it’s chilly, a long walk outside can elevate your serotonin levels (and your mood), give you a dose of vitamin D — even boost your immune system, as we’ve previously reported. Conversely, when night falls, Hafeez recommends avoiding bright light so you can fall asleep faster. “For example, if you

get up at night to go to the bathroom, don’t turn on the light,” she explains. To help recalibrate your circadian rhythms the Monday after the clocks roll back, Wymelenberg recommends, if at all possible, having your first morning meeting outside as a walkand-talk. If not, try to take your laptop to a spot in your building by a sunny window. Don’t sleep with your smartphone

Hafeez says your phone might mess with your sleep patterns more than you think — one study revealed that 68 percent of smartphone owners sleep either holding their smartphone, having it in bed with them, or on their nightstand. Says Hafeez: “So many people use their smartphones as their alarm clocks — it makes sense to want your phones within an arm’s reach. But the temptation to check social media sites, work email or news headlines is often too strong to resist. As a result, you might feel energized from interacting with others, or stressed out by something that you read when you should actually be relaxing, which partly explains why people who consume electronic media in bed are at higher risk for insomnia.” To quell the culprit, simply keep your phone in another room and set an old school alarm to wake up instead. All these easy little tweaks can add up to make a big difference in terms of how your body adjusts to turning the clocks back, says Sharp. And if you can’t make it to bed 15 minutes earlier, at least consider keeping your hands out of the cookie jar tonight. (IBP/net)

Spanking just makes kids worse, doctors say

PARENTS who hit their kids may believe that a swat “just gets their attention” or imposes oldfashioned discipline, but spanking in fact makes behavior worse than it was before and can cause long-term harm, pediatricians said Monday. The American Academy of Pediatrics strengthened its advice against corporal punishment in update guidelines, saying it makes kids more aggressive and raises the risk of mental health issues. “Experiencing corporal punishment makes it more, not less, likely that children will be defiant and aggressive in the future,” the group says in its new guidelines to pediatricians. “There’s no benefit to spanking,” said Dr. Robert Sege of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, who helped write the guidelines.

“We know that children grow and develop better with positive role modeling and by setting healthy limits. We can do better.” Verbal abuse and humiliation is also counterproductive, the pediatrics group said. “Parents, other caregivers, and adults interacting with children and adolescents should not use corporal punishment (including hitting and spanking), either in anger or as a punishment for or consequence of misbehavior, nor should they use any disciplinary strategy, including verbal abuse, that causes shame or humiliation,” the group says in the updated guidelines. “Within a few minutes, children are often back to their original behavior. It certainly doesn’t teach children self-regulation,” Sege told NBC News.

“Techniques such as time out and other effective forms of punishment, the goal is to teach the child to regulate herself, so that she will have the ability to control and manage her own behavior. And that’s what it really is all about.” Americans still strongly believe in beating, spanking or paddling children, both at home and in school. “According to a 2004 survey, approximately two-thirds of parents of young children reported using some sort of physical punishment,” the pediatrics group said. “These parents reported that by fifth grade, 80 percent of children had been physically punished, and 85 percent of teenagers reported exposure to physical punishment, with 51 percent having been hit with a belt or similar object.” And in 2013, a Harris Interactive

poll found that 70 percent of parents agreed with the statement that “good, hard spanking is sometimes necessary to discipline a child,” although that’s down from 84 percent of parents in 1986. But things are changing, Sege said. “If you limit your surveys to people who have a child aged 5 years and younger in their homes, who are a new generation of parents, most of them don’t like to spank their children and often don’t spank their children,” he said. “We think there’s a generational shift where today’s parents are much less likely to spank their children than their parents were.” One group studied parents in their home and found most parents did give kids a verbal warning before physically striking out. But they did not wait long. “Corporal punishment then occurred at a

mean of 30 seconds later, suggesting that parents may have been ‘responding either impulsively or emotionally rather than instrumentally and intentionally,’” the pediatrics group said. It did little good. “The effects of corporal punishment were transient: within 10 minutes, most children (73 percent) had resumed the same behavior for which they had been punished.” Not only does hitting kids do little good; it can worsen their longterm behavior. “Children who experience repeated use of corporal punishment tend to develop more aggressive behaviors, increased aggression in school, and an increased risk of mental health disorders and cognitive problems,” Sege said in a statement. (IBP/net)

Bali News

International

ASITA, HPI and Pawiba agree to improve and conduct joint monitoring

DENPASAR — Three tourism stakeholders in Bali, namely the Association of Indonesia Tours and Travel Agency (ASITA), Indonesia Tour Guides Association (HPI) and Bali Tourist Transport Association (Pawiba) signed a joint decree at the Bali Tourism Board Office on Tuesday (Nov. 6). The signing was also witnessed by the officials from the Bali Tourism Office. As the front guard, the three agreed to make improvement according to applicable regulations, mainly after unhealthy business practices in the Chinese market. “ASITA, Pawiba and HPI are in indeed the tourism sector, we are the spearhead. ASITA is bringing in tourists, HPI is accompanying them while they are going to the destination, and Pawiba is transporting while they are in Bali,” said Chairman of the ASITA Bali, Ketut Ardana. Therefore, continued Ardana, the three associations agreed to improve tourism conditions in Bali mainly after the Bali tourism is sold cheaply by unhealthy mafia business practices in the Chinese market. In particular, his organization invited the ASITA members to support this movement so that they do business in a healthy manner. “I am sure that Pawiba and HPI are also like that, so today we sign the agreement because we want to jointly do field monitoring. We agree to improve what we consider to be damaging the image of Bali tourism,” he explained. Chairman of the HPI Bali, I Nyoman Nuarta, said that Chinese market had recently been degraded due to the actions of several art shops (Chinese network stores—Ed). He appreciated the governor of Bali’s statement that will close legal and illegal Chinese network stores committing unhealthy business practices. But the facts in the field have not been directly proportional to the governor’s statement. Until Tuesday, some Chinese network stores were still open. They even applied a different scheme when delivering tourists. “What’s wrong? That is why the three of us will try to be the leading that are going to convey later to the

governor or deputy governor. Essentially, there are law enforcement issues that have not been effective,” he explained. According to Nuarta, there are four points in the agreement with the three tourism stakeholders. One of them is that each association will prepare five personnel to monitor in the field. If there is evidence related to legal matters, it will be submitted to the relevant authorities. “It is the substance becoming the root of problems here so that we will move together. Each association will also provide sanctions when its members violate the decisions we have agreed upon,” he explained. Chairman of the Bali Tourism Transport Association (Pawiba), Nyoman Sudiartha, said the three stakeholders agreed to keep tourism in Bali better and sustainable. In addition to carrying out monitoring and supervision together, each association has the right to propose to the government to revoke business licenses or profession permits for members remaining to commit violations even though they have been imposed with sanctions. If any parties found doing business without permission in the field monitoring, the evidence will be collected and reported to relevant parties so that it can be processed immediately by law. “We support the government’s recommendations to crack down on the Chinese market. We, from the Pawiba as one of the suppliers in the form of tourist transportation strongly support this agreement to improve the quality of Chinese tourism market,” he explained. When separately interviewed, Governor of Bali, Wayan Koster, said that gubernatorial instruction to close Chinese network shop are being discussed by the team. His team is still making data collection related to the permits and completeness. “In principle, all the legal and illegal businesses running unfair business practices must be closed, too. As soon as possible, it will be reviewed legally so that I will not be sued,” he said. (kmb32)

IBP/kmb32

The signing was also witnessed by the officials from the Bali Tourism Office.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

3

Dukuh Penaban Museum starts to draw visitors

AMLAPURA — Dukuh Penaban Palm-leaf Manuscript Museum (Dukuh Penaban Museum) located at Dukuh Bukit Penaban, Karangasem village, is a fairly a new museum having been operated since January 1, 2018. Nevertheless, the museum gradually draws the interest of visitors. This museum also supports the existence of the local tourism village. Chief of Penaban customary village, I Nengah Suarya, accompanied by his secretary, I Nengah Sudana Wiryawan, stated on Tuesday (Nov. 6) that Penaban Museum is established on land property of customary village across 1.5 hectares. He said the museum was designed by the famous architect I Ketut Artana from Arte Architect where this museum applies the concept of Nista Madya Utama. The museum is backed up by curators who are experts, researcher and humanists such as I Dewa Gde Catra, Sugi Lanus, Hedy Hinzler and Ketut Artana. Moreover, during the visit of the Director General of Culture of the RI, Hilman Farid, he was also willing to be a curator of the palmleaf manuscript (lontar) denoting the only one in the world made by customary villages. “Exploration of the values in the manuscript can be implemented in real practice. And this manuscript clinic can help all people having such document if they find any difficulty in caring for, reading and translating,” he said. Suarya added the difference between the Penaban Museum and other museums. The museums in general only showcase the collection of lontar manuscripts, just like a library. Meanwhile, the Penaban Museum other than storing lontar collection, also implements the contents to the customary community of Dukuh Penaban, such as through the making of herbal soap by fennel sourcing from healing manuscript and oblation from Empu Lutuk. Currently, it is being prepared to make coconut oil medicine. “If there are manuscripts belonging to residents but the owners cannot maintain and the manuscripts have been damaged, we will do the maintenance and preservation. In fact, this effort gets response from community beyond our expectations. Additionally, we get support and attention from various groups such as researchers, humanists, writers, craftsmen, campus at home and overseas and others. “Hopefully, in the future this museum will continue to advance and flourish,” he said. He said that since the operation of the Dukuh Penaban Museum on January 1, 2018, the number of visitors is quite crowded reaching thousands of people. They are domestic and foreign tourists as the museum

is indeed established to support the local tourism village. Currently, the museum remains in the process of integration with trekking path and sad ripu sacred bathing place. “Previously there were graduate students from the University of Melbourne that organized a workshop in this museum. Even today, on November 6, there are 30 students of Diploma 3 majoring in Library Studies at Faculty of Social and Political Sciences of Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, led by Tri Achmad. Their visit is a field trip. During the visit they are given a kind of public lecture about the process of making palm leaf paper until it is ready to be written by one of museum curators, Ide I Dewa Gde Catra. Furthermore, they are also given a way to treat and conserve palm-leaf manuscript and write down the names of participants with Balinese script,” he explained. He further added that every full moon in January, April and October, it performs a sacred dance namely the Yellow Butterfly and Canglongleng Dance. According to him, the Yellow Butterfly Dance tells the story about the king’s struggle when fighting to Lombok, while the Canglongleng Dance tells about the occurrence of plague claiming many fatalities at Dukuh Penaban. After the dance was performed, the plague finally ended. Meanwhile, the Baris Poleng Canglongleng in other region is better known as Baris Ketekok Jago. At Dukuh Penaban village, this baris dance tends to display individual expressions and character of the dancers, so the dance movement will be different or not uniform. He explained the history on the Baris Poleng Canglongleng was inspired by the disaster at Dukuh Penaban customary village around 1721 Caka or AD 1643. It is said that at that time an outbreak caused many people to die. After that, there was a revelation from the deities that he should be given chance to make a performance. When carrying a sedan chair, the residents said Ooh ... ihhh ….ohhh ... This procession then inspired local people to make the Baris Poleng Canglongleng Dance. After the dance was performed, the plague gradually disappeared. From that moment on, every ceremony held at Puseh Temple is always jazzed up with the performance and presented to deity of the local puseh temple.

On that account, other than serving as sacred dance, the Baris Poleng Canglongleng is also functioned as a deterrent to danger or epidemics. In the meantime, the Yellow Butterfly Dance comes with irregular movement as it highly depends on the mood expression or divine vibration of the dancer, like the original butterflies flying wherever they want to go with friends. This Yellow Butterfly Dance tells about the story of religious journey of a group of Yellow Butterflies while escorting the royal troops of Karangasem led by I Gusti Anglurah Ketut Karangasem that would attack the Selaparang kingdom in Lombok. On the day of Anggara Umanis Perangbakat in 1614 Caka or AD 1619, early the morning four sailing boats departed from Jasri Beach led by King Anglurah Ketut Karangasem with Arya Kertawaksa and accompanied by 40 invulnerable troops from the Seraya village. Originally, they sailed to cross the Lombok Strait. At that time, thousands of yellow butterflies were flying to also cross the Lombok Strait which is famous for its swift currents. The butterfly coming from the north-west followed the boat climbing the waves and flew up toward the sunlight looking like sparkling gold. Several groups overtook the boat as if they were guide showing off the direction to be followed. Some larger groups were behind the boat, sometimes going forward and backwards, as if they were royal stumps and flags. Everyone on the boat was surprised to see such thousands of yellow butterflies flying through the sky accompanying their journey. In fact, the thousands of yellow butterflies were bestowed by Ida Bhatara Alit Sakti (deity) at Bukit Temple following her uncle’s journey. Shortly after the departure of the boat carrying the Karangasem troops, the thick leaves of kepel or burahol tree at Bukit Temple fell down into yellow butterflies that flew in the sky following the journey of King Anglurah Ketut Karangasem to expand the territory to the Island of Lombok. It is said the kepel tree remains to firmly stand at the Bukit Temple. Local people believe in it as the stick of the mother Ida Bhatara Alit Sakti when walking from Amlaraja Palace to the east to reach a plateau which is then called Bukit Temple where the stick was finally plugged in. (kmb41)


2

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Bali News

International

To realize 20 million domestic tourists visits

Tourist attractions will meet travel agencies

DENPASAR - The Indonesia Recreation Park Business Association (PUTRI) will bring together tourist destinations / tourist attractions and recreational parks with travel agencies. This effort is meant to increase the number of foreign tourist visits to Indonesia, namely 20 million visits in 2019.

IBP/Wawan

The tourists visited Denpasar

Chairperson of PUTRI Bali, Trimafo Yudha, said the meeting between travel agencies and tourist attraction operators will be held in the form of a table top consisting of buyer-meet-buyer at Inna Kuta on November 8-9. The participating travel agencies consist of those belonging to the members of ASITA Bali. Travel agencies of Bali become the hub to sell tourist attraction outside Bali after exploring Bali. “We’d like to bring together the travel agencies in Bali becoming the hub of other regions since long time ago. Then, we also bring them together with the operators of tourist attraction becoming the participants,” she explained on Tuesday (Nov. 6) The sellers are operators of tourist attractions from outside Bali. “And then PUTRI will facilitate to mediate with the ASITA members and some players such as travel industry to meet,” she said. The meeting named as ITAF (Indonesia Tourist Attraction Forum) features the theme of Roadmap of Promotion and Sales of the Indonesian Tourism Industry to Reach a Visit of 20 Million Tourists in 2019. The meeting will also discuss about the potential and benefits of tourism synergy in the creative industry. It is meant to bring together the tourist attraction with travel agencies. “Indeed there are not many participants, but this is a good start where tourist attractions and recreation parks are the most determining in the world of tourism, having the most solid institutions and indeed better known to the public,” she explained. In Bali, there are approximately 30-50 travel agencies that will help introduce the tourist attractions outside Bali. Meanwhile, the PUTRI members in Bali have around 50 tourist attraction and recreational parks. With this meeting, the sellers consisting of tourist attraction from throughout Indonesia have the opportunity to introduce their property to prospective buyers. On that account, the tourist visit can be evenly distributed. “Through this event, they will be able to introduce their property in the hope they can make cooperation contracts, while the travel agencies using the services of tourist attraction know that there are tourist attractions like these. If there are requests from their clients they can recommend these destinations,” she added. (kmb42)

LBF 2018 features MSMEs to present culinary and non-culinary business MANGUPURA - Although the Legian area has been known for a long time, promotions related to tourism potential in Legian needs to be continued. This is meant to increase the number of tourist visits to the region. One of the promotional efforts is through the Legian Beach Festival (LBF) 2018.

As in previous years, the festival entering the eleventh year will continue to display various culinary and non-culinary endeavors. It is meant to elevate the potential of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) having continuously showed improvement in Bali. Committee Chairman of the

Legian Beach Festival (LBF) 2018, Nyoman Sarjana, stated on Tuesday (Nov. 6) that LBF 2018 will take place on November 8-12. Other than focusing on the MSMEs, special cultural arts will also be displayed namely Barong Sai and Cak LBF as well as economic and business activities. “So, we hope

this festival will be able to increase tourist visits, economic growth in the community as well as the preservation of the arts and culture,” he concluded. This year’s LBF said Sarjana will also be filled with Mass Yoga by involving around 2,000 participants. This Mass Yoga is also

supported by the Indian Embassy. He hoped the activity can achieve the MURI record. “In addition to Mass Yoga, visitors to LBF 2018 will also be presented with laughter yoga, Cak a cappella and various arts and cultural events that can support tourism activities,” he concluded. (kmb23)

 Founder : K.Nadha,  General Manager :Palgunadi Chief Editor: Gugiek Savindra  Editors:Agus Toni, Daniel Fajry, Mawa, Sueca, Denpasar: Dira Arsana, Giriana Saputra, Subrata, Sumatika, Asmara Putra. Bangli: Suasrina, Buleleng: Mudiarta, Gianyar: Manik Astajaya, Karangasem: Bagiarta, Klungkung: Sosiawan. Jakarta: Nikson, Hardianto, Ade Irawan. NTB: Agus Talino, Izzul Khairi, Raka Akriyani. Surabaya: Bambang Wilianto.  Office: Jalan Kepundung 67 A Denpasar 80232. Telephone (0361)225764, Facsimile: 227418, P.O.Box: 3010 Denpasar 80001. Bali Post Jakarta, Advertizing: Jl.Palmerah Barat 21F. Telp 021-5357602, Facsimile: 021-5357605 Jakarta Pusat. NTB: Jalam Bangau No. 15 Cakranegara Telp. (0370) 639543, Facsimile: (0370) 628257. Publisher: PT Bali Post

International

Activities

Thursday, November 8, 2018

15

PULLMAN BALI LEGIAN BEACH LAUNCHES “BATUAN SPIRIT” BY DEWA PUTU ARSANIA As part of Pullman brand’s global art initiative, Pullman Hotels & Resorts in Indonesia have been creating timeless experiences for guests by blending elements of local interest, intriguing culture and visual ingenuity, through the discovery of different art forms. On November 1st 2018, Pullman Bali Legian Beach launched its second Artist Playground exhibition of 2018, titled “Batuan Spirit” by Dewa Putu Arsania. The Batuan village gave its name to a style of painting which evolved in the 1930s. A group of local villagers, most notably Ida Bagus Made Togog and Ida Bagus Made Wija, began experimenting with ink-washed paintings on black backgrounds. This technique has since emerged into a major Balinese artistic style, now commonly known as Batuan painting. Dewa Putu Arsania is one Batuan artist who has so

far remained steadfast in maintaining this traditional painting style with the basic mediums of Chinese ink (Mangsi) and paper or canvas. His works describe the various themes of wayang puppet stories specific to the area of Bali. Until the mid-80s, Dewa Putu Arsania lived exclusively for his paintings and created very subtle and finely crafted works that also found their admirers at exhibitions in Japan and Europe. These works far exceeded the norm in their quality. Batuan Spirit is the theme chosen for this exhibition, to acquaint the world with the characteristics paintings of Batuan. The stories of Mahabharata, Ramayana, Tantri as well as the social and daily life of the Balinese are beautifully presented on canvas. These stories define the Balinese culture. The exhibition will be displayed until April 2, 2019.


I N T E R N A T I O N A L

16 Pages Number 229 10th year

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Price: Rp 3.000,-

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Actor Michael Douglas gets star on Hollywood Walk of Fame LOS ANGELES - Oscar-winning actor Michael Douglas got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Tuesday in honor of his 50 years in show business. The megastar was joined at the ceremony by his 101-year-old father and Hollywood legend Kirk Douglas as well as Jane Fonda, who starred with him in the 1979 drama “The China Syndrome,” about an accident in a nuclear power plant. Also attending was Douglas’s wife, the actress Catherine ZetaJones, and other family members. “This is a great honor and I’m not getting any younger, I want to enjoy it with (my family),” the 74year-old actor said as the star was unveiled. Douglas got emotional and teary-eyed as he addressed his father, telling him that his presence at the event meant a lot. “I’ll say it simply and with all my heart, ‘I’m so proud to be your

son,’” he said, choking up. Speaking at the ceremony, Fonda wondered why it took so long for the younger Douglas to finally get his star. “Michael Douglas and I share something far more specific and unique than acting together,” she said. “We both come from families referred to by the press as Hollywood royalty. “Both of our fathers were movie legends, and thankfully, Kirk Douglas is still with us,” she added, referring to her late father Henry. “Stepping into a family business, any family business, is always challenging. Look at the Trumps or the Corleones.” The younger Douglas was just 29 when he earned his place among Hollywood’s elite as the producer behind “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” then the first movie in 40 years to sweep the “big five” Oscars for best picture, director, actor, actress and screenplay. (afp)

e-mail: info_ibp@balipost.co.id online: http://www.internationalbalipost.com. http://epaper.internationalbalipost.com.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Australian Hollywood star Rebel Wilson

IBP/net

Rebel Wilson ‘deeply sorry’ for plus-size rom-com claims

SYDNEY - Australian Hollywood star Rebel Wilson has apologised for claiming she is the first plus-sized woman to be a lead actress in a romantic comedy, saying her comments were “not only wrong but also incredibly hurtful”.

VALERIE MACON / AFP

Actor Kirk Douglas (R) attends a ceremony honoring his son actor Michael Douglas (2nd L) with a Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame, in Hollywood, California on November 6, 2018.

The “Pitch Perfect” star -- who made international headlines recently for her successful defamation case in Australia against several magazines -- said in an interview with Ellen DeGeneres that she was “proud to be the firstever plus-sized girl to be the star of a romantic comedy”. Wilson was promoting her upcoming role in the movie “Isn’t It Romantic”. There was a backlash on social media to her remarks, with users pointing out that other plus-sized actresses including Queen Latifah, Ricki Lake, and Mo’Nique had starred in such films. Wilson was also criticised for

blocking some Twitter users who complained. In a series of tweets on Monday, Wilson wrote that she was “deeply sorry”. “I neglected to show the proper respect to those who climbed this mountain before me,” she said. “With the help of some very compassionate and well-thought out responses from others on social media, I now realize what I said was not only wrong but also incredibly hurtful. “To be part of a problem I was hoping I was helping makes it that much more embarrassing & hard to acknowledge. I blocked people on Twitter because I was hurting from

the criticism, but those are the people I actually need to hear from more, not less.” Wilson was awarded Aus$4.5 million ($3.3 million) in damages against Bauer Media last year over articles claiming she lied about her age and background to further her career -- the largest defamation win in Australian legal history. But Bauer appealed, arguing the size of the settlement set a dangerous precedent and there were errors of law in the judgement. Wilson was earlier this year ordered to return most of the payout after it was slashed by a court. She has lodged an application to appeal the decision. (afp)

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This handout photo taken on October 6, 2018 and released on November 5, 2018 by Inserm shows a general view of La Rinconada, the highest city of the world (5300m). A team of 14 French and Italian scientists will take part in a research at the end of January 2019 in La Rinconada, the highest city in the world nestled in Peru with nearly 50,000 inhabitants living at over 5000 m altitude to study the adaptations of the human organism to its environment and in particulary to hypoxia.

Superbugs to ‘kill millions’ by 2050 unless countries act

Millions of people in Europe, North America and Australia will die from superbug infections unless countries prioritise fighting the growing threat posed by bacteria immune to most known drugs, experts predicted Wednesday. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) warned of “disastrous consequences” for public healthcare and spending unless basic hospital hygiene is boosted and unnecessary antibiotic use slashed. Drug-resistant bacteria killed more than 33,000 people in Europe in 2015, according to new research published separately this week. In a landmark report, the OECD

said 2.4 million people could die from superbugs by 2050 and said the cost of treating such infections would balloon to an average of $3.5 billion (three billion euros) a year in each country included in its analysis. Michele Cecchini, lead on public health at the OECD, told AFP that countries were already spending an average of 10 percent of their healthcare budgets on treat-

ing antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bugs. “AMR costs more than the flu, more than HIV, more than tuberculosis. And it will cost even more if countries don’t put into place actions to tackle this problem,” he said. - ‘Enormous death toll’ As humans consume ever more antibiotics -- either through prescrip-

tions or agriculture and livestock products given medicines to stave off infection -- strains of bacteria are developing that resist the effects of drugs designed to kill them. In low and middle-income countries, resistance is already high: in Indonesia Brazil and Russia up to 60 percent of bacterial infections are already resistant to at least one antibiotic. And the growth of AMR infections is predicted to be between four and seven times faster by 2030 than currently. “Such high resistance rates in health care systems, which are

already weakened by constrained budgets, will create the conditions for an enormous death toll that will be mainly borne by new-borns, very young children and the elderly,” the report said.

Continued to page 6

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Edition Thursday, November 8, 2018 | International Bali Post  

Headline : Superbugs to ‘kill millions’ by 2050 unless countries act

Edition Thursday, November 8, 2018 | International Bali Post  

Headline : Superbugs to ‘kill millions’ by 2050 unless countries act

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