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Empowering Global Citizens A World Course

TRAVEL PROGRAMS


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Background Envoys is dedicated to expanding the boundaries of possibility for global education. We collaborate with innovative schools to design, develop, and implement comprehensive programs, blending online courses with focused international travel. Upholding our mandate for the empowerment of communities abroad, we partner with carefully selected experts in our destination countries to create high-quality educational experiences. The rigorous and coherent curriculum laid out in Empowering Global Citizens: A World Course epitomizes both the rising standards for the development of global competency and the tremendous learning potential for globally- focused courses to reinvent the ways in which people learn. Extending upon this contribution to global education pedagogy, we have designed a series of travel programs that complement specific units of the World Course’s secondary school curriculum. The programs build upon the concepts taught during the classroom units, though alterations may be made in the scope, sequence, and focus to allow the travel to take place before, during, or after the classroom teaching period. These travel programs expand the opportunity set for learning, allowing students and teachers alike to create synergies between classroom activities and the larger world, thereby facilitating the development of student agency, empathy, and deep knowledge. We believe that the work that matters in the 21st century will be performed by teams that utilize diverse skill sets and technologies to collaborate across geographic, cultural, and temporal boundaries. The competencies developed through the World Course curriculum are critical in empowering students to be a part of these teams, and we believe that this model has the potential to create a new paradigm for global education, one that more effectively prepares students to take on the challenges of the future.


Program Table The travel programs listed below have been developed to complement specific units of the World Course’s secondary school curriculum. While the programs are designed to reify the concepts taught during these units, alterations may be made in the scope, sequence, and focus to allow the travel to take place before, during, or after the classroom teaching period.

Semester Course: The Environment World Course Unit(s)

Context(s)

Global Travel Program Theme

E.2 The World As It Could Be E.3 The World As It Should Be

Ecuador and the Tensions Between Conservation Galapagos and Development

E.1 The World As It Is E.2 The World As It Could Be E.3 The World As It Should Be

Hong Kong, Beijing, Seoul, Tokyo

Urban Asia: Models or Missteps for the World?

Semester Course: Society and Public Health World Course Unit(s)

Context(s)

Global Travel Program Theme

SPH.2 What’s Public about Public Health? SPH.3 Context Studies? SPH.4 The Health and Wealth of Nations

Peru

Un Techo Para Mi Pais: Transforming Lima’s Slums

SPH.2 What’s Public about Public Health? SPH.4 The Health and Wealth of Nations

Malawi

Challenges to Public Health in Low-Resource Contexts

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Semester Course: Global Conflicts and Resolutions World Course Unit(s)

Context(s)

Global Travel Program Theme

GCR.1 Anatomy of a Conflict GCR.2 Security Issues in Asia GCR.4 An Agenda for Peace GCR.5 Individuals, Civil Society, and Responses to Conflicts

South Korea

Divided Koreas: A Nation Seeking Itself

GCR.1 Anatomy of a Conflict GCR.4 An Agenda for Peace GCR.5 Individuals, Civil Society, and Responses to Conflicts

Colombia

Peace in Our Time: Rebuilding Social Contracts

GCR.1 Anatomy of a Conflict GCR.4 An Agenda for Peace GCR.5 Individuals, Civil Society, and Responses to Conflicts

Sri Lanka

Reconciliation through Social Action

Semester Course: Development Economics: Growth and Development in Latin America World Course Unit(s)

Context(s)

Global Travel Program Theme

DE.1: International Trade DE.2 Exchange Rates, FDI, and the Argentinian Crisis

Argentina/Chile

Development Pathways in Latin America

DE.1: International Trade DE.3 Going Beyond Economic Growth and the Role of Institutions in Growth

Colombia

Coffee, Pottery, and Mochillas: Tracing International Trade

Semester Course: Technology, Innovation, and Globalization World Course Unit(s)

Context(s)

Global Travel Program Theme

TIG.2 Technological Developments and Society TIG.4 The Acceleration of Technological Change and the Future

Japan

The Role of Technology in Postmodern Japan

TIG.3 Emerging Technologies and Globalization TIG.4 The Acceleration of Technological Change and the Future

Uruguay

Sustainability and Clean Energy Solutions

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G a l ap ag os Isl a nd s TENSIONS BETWEEN CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn how to use systems thinking and scenario planning to envision our environmental future • Learn to understand the complexity around environmental conservation • Evaluate specific environmental and economic challenges from the perspectives of community members, national government, and international organizations • Inspire individual awareness of the responsibilities created by the extant impacts of our actions on global systems • Inspire students to use critical reasoning skills to create the future that they want

OVE RV I E W The Galapagos Islands offer more than just an ecological adventure. They provide the perfect setting to help students make connections between abstract concepts of systems thinking and real issues confronting the world. Through a blend of focused instruction, interactive activities, and real-life adventures, students gain tangible, firsthand knowledge of the ways in which shifts in variables in Ecuador and the greater world have impacted the reality of the Islands, both for better and for worse. The program capstone enables students to demonstrate their grasp of the issues and ability to navigate complexities to reach viable solutions. 6


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S We spend a day at the Charles Darwin Research Center, where students learn about conservation efforts and spend time bonding with the magnificent tortoises.

PUERTO AYORA We explore the town of Puerto Ayora, meeting with local hotel owners, community leaders, and fishermen in order to learn how their lives are impacted by laws regarding conservation. We connect our modern-day observations to the islands’ unique “human history”.

ISABELA ISLAND Isabela is one of the youngest and largest islands, dominated by the dormant Sierra Negra Volcano. Our hike up to the top provides a tangible experience of the ‘wildness’ of the Galapagos.

IMPACTS OF VISITORS During our explorations of the islands, students learn about native, endemic, and invasive species of both fauna and flora. We visit a local organic farm and learn about efforts to introduce sustainable and non-invasive agriculture to the islands. Students also engage with local community members to learn about the benefits and costs of the regulations surrounding tourism on the Islands. TORTOISE CONSERVATION

CLOSING NEGOTIATIONS Drawing upon their experiences, interviews, and observations to define their views, students engage in a multi-party negotiation exercise that highlights the complex nature within the Galapagos Islands and the competing interests among the local and global stakeholders.

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Ur ban Asi a MODELS (OR MISSTEPS) FOR THE WORLD? GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn about threats to the natural and man-made world and how those threats might be minimized • Learn how to use systems thinking and scenario planning to see how population demographics are dictating the future of urban life • Inspire students to strive to understand threats to the natural environment and innovation methods to minimize those threats • Inspire students to use critical reasoning skills to create the future that they want

OVE RV I E W During the first decade of the 2000s, more than 200 million people moved from rural to urban areas of East Asia, one of the largest migrations in recorded human history. The continued rise of Asian ‘mega-cities” has created many challenges, and the negative possibilities of these dense urban areas provide one view of a dystopian future. However, a mixture of governmental and private actors in China, South Korea, and Japan are working to develop new models to tackle issues of public transportation, provision of services, air pollution, overcrowding, natural disaster response, and more. 8


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S HONG KONG The original ‘entrepot’, Hong Kong’s world-famous skyline provides the perfect entryway into learning about how architectural innovation has responded to the limits of geographic space. We trace the patterns of urbanization and development in Hong Kong, focusing on the massive changes to public housing from the 1950s to the current era as well as the re-purposing of administrative and police buildings from the British colonial eras.

SEOUL Receiving acclaim as “World Design Capital 2010”, Seoul’s metropolitan govenrment has taken several inititatives to improve the functioning and liveability of their city, including ‘greenspacing’ out several highways and moving governmental offices to a separate urban area. We review these changes firsthand, seeing the promises (and shortcomings) of Seoul’s architectural innovations. TOKYO The organization of Japanese society to prioritize eficiency has fostered incredible growth, giving rise to a highlydeveloped society that follows radically different patterns than in the West. We learn about the ways that the Japanese government and civil society prepares for (and responds to) natural disasters, then turn our attention to the remarkable public transportation system exemplified by the shinkansen bullet trains.

BEIJING We focus on air pollution in Beijing, meeting with representatives from the National Meterological offices as well as ordinary citizens to learn about how they alter their lifestyles according to the breathability of the surrounding environment.

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Pe ru UN TECHO PARA MI PAIS: TRANSFORMING LIMA’S SLUMS GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES OVE RV I E W Around the world, the prevalence • Build understanding of the inextricable links between poverty of substandard housing and lack of and ill health services creates dire consequences for public health, restricts inhabitant’s • Learn to understand public health potential for achievement, and violates issues in an in-depth way by human rights. The sense of urgency connecting classroom learning with that existed in these slums led to the real-life examples creation of TECHO, a youth led non- • Inspire in students compassion profit organization seeking to overcome for and a desire to promote public poverty through the joint work of families health issues and to work to and youth volunteers. We work directly diminish the impact of poverty on with the TECHO team in Peru, building health an understanding of their model • Evaluate public health and for development and experiencing housing policies within Peru and firsthand the power of mass mobilization. their impacts on the lives of many Explorations of the country outside of different people Lima and and site visits with additional organizations provides students with • Evaluate models from TECHO and other actors in alleviating housing the data necessary to create a nuanced and public health issues in Peru analysis of the TECHO organization. 10


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S DEMYSTIFYING LIFE IN SLUMS We travel into Lima’s slums and conduct surveys of locals, learning about their hopes and dreams and the obstacles presented by the lack of housing. We take intentional steps to defeat aspects of ‘voyeurism’, teaching students how to recognize humanity and uphold dignity of others.

GRASSROOTS BUSINESS FUND GBF invests in businesses in emerging markets to drive economic development and improve local standards of living. GBF projects in Peru range from artisanal crafts to innovative agriculture to sustainable forestry. We meet with GBF fund managers to learn about the process of screening, selecting, and supporting entrepreneurial businesses throughout Peru, then travel to visit selected organizations in person.

UN TECHO PARA MI PAIS With operations in 19 countries, TECHO has mobilized more than 500,000 volunteers, to construct houses for more than 86,000 families. We collaborate with TECHO’s staff in Lima, learning about their strategies to promote community development in slums, foster social awareness and action, and undertake ongoing political advocacy. Students join a ‘mass-build’ project, working hand-in-hand with community members to create viable housing alternatives.

THE INCA TRAIL We journey to the highlands surrounding Cusco, learning about life in rural areas. We analyze the costs and benefits of tourism as a method for economic development and improvements in public health. Students experience the magical beauty of a sunrise at Machu Picchu, deepening their appreciation for Peru’s natural beauty and fostering an understanding of the diverse sides of the country.

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Ma lawi CHALLENGES TO PUBLIC HEALTH IN LOW-RESOURCE CONTEXTS GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn to understand public health issues in an in-depth way by connecting classroom learning with real-life examples • Inspire in students a commitment to justice as it relates to public health and to work to diminish the impact of poverty on health • Evaluate public health constraints within Malawi, how they are related to poverty, and their impacts on the lives of many different people • Evaluate the viability of organizations that ‘fill-the-gap’ for missing public health institutions in Malawi

OVE RV I E W Known as “The Warm Heart of Africa”, Malawi is home to some 15 million people and a wide array of wildlife. This landlocked nation is among the poorest on the planet, lacking basic infrastructure, resources, and skilled populace. Focusing on health within the country, students actively learn from and with the local Malawian people, gaining a deeper respect for the reality of the challenges that they overcome on a daily basis. By working directly with on-the-ground ‘agents of change’ we promote transformational learning that sets students up to become successful and responsible citizens.

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PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S HEALTH CARE IN MALAWI We learn about the range of health challenges Malawians face on a daily basis. Students meet with a variety of organizations and individuals who have chosen to devote their lives to meeting these challenges.

ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES We move between Malawi’s first Fair Trade Tea Estate (trying out their selection of specialist teas!) and Malawi’s leading sugar producer, engaging in intensive talks and presentations on the sustainable practices and fair trade methods developed by these estates. Students engage in a series of chain activities to better understand the connections between the use of resources and public health issues.

HIV AND AIDS We learn about and visit local HIV clinics, seeing how medicine is best distributed and what actions are being taken to educate and avoid stigma of those living with HIV. Students engage in a ‘Narrative Four” exercise with community volunteers, gaining empathy into the reality of life at subsistence levels.

MOUNT MULANJE We visit the majestic Mulanje Mountain and engage in a challenging daylong hike to the plateau. Students learn about the significance of nature for Malawian culture, deepening their appreciation for the people and the lives that they lead.

NUTRITION We learn about the logistical planning and nutritional care it takes to feed 740,000 school children every day in Malawi, and see the demand for services at a local feeding center. SA MP LE I T I N E R A RY D AY S 1-3 ARR I VA L A N D B L A N T Y R E D AY S 4-6 MU LA NJ E D AY S 7-10 V I LLA G E V I S I T S ( T H Y O L O , N CHA LO , M A J E T E ) D AY S 11-1 2 C LO SI NG A N D D E P A R T U R E

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Sou t h Ko rea DIVIDED KOREAS: A NATION SEEKING ITSELF GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn the elements of conflict between the two Koreas • Learn how individuals and civil society have responded to the reality of a divided nation • Inspire students to understand that there are different ways to respond to conflicts, and build respect for the resiliency of nations and individuals • Evaluate the types of international conflict resolution methods that have been undertaken on the Korean peninsula • Inspire an appreciation for the emotional turmoil created by war

OVE RV I E W Far and away the per-capita leader in outbound international students, the site of the ‘Miracle on the Han’ has a wide network of academic, diplomatic and economic relationships. As changes in the global political economy continue to heighten the geographic significance of the Korean peninsula, the dense web of connections results in a true global ‘hotspot’. This program focuses on the impact of the DPRK/ROK split on the economies and the people from each respective nation. We learn about both the inherent sadness related to the division as well as the enduring hope for reconciliation. 14


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S DEMILITARIZED ZONE We journey to the infamous “DMZ” and Panmunjom village to gain a better perspective on how the perpetual threat of invasion from the North has influenced development in the South.

DIALOGUE WITH DPRK DEFECTORS We have the unique opportunity to interact with a group of North Korean defectors studying English in Seoul. Following a visit to the Demilitarized Zone, this person-to-person interaction allows for a deeper and more emotional understanding of the immense sadness surrounding the split of the Korean peninsula.

KOREAN DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE We visit KDI, an autonomous economic think tank providing research and analysis of economic policy decisions. KDI scholars provide a series of perspectives on the economic and social forces that led to the divergent paths for the two Koreas.

BUDDHIST TEMPLESTAY Designed to enhance the public’s understanding of Korean Buddhism, a typical temple stay program entails participation in ceremonial services and Zen meditation. Meals are taken in complete silence with no wasting of food. Students engage in an overnight stay at the temple at the close of our time in South Korea.

MYEONGDONG AND GANGNAM The lively Myeongdong and Gangnam areas provides the perfect environment to experience modern Korean fashion and youth culture, thereby developing a deeper understanding of the cultural shifts that have taken place since the Korean War. SA MP LE I T I N E R A RY D AY S 1-2 ARR I VA L D AY S 3-5 S EO UL EXP L O R A T I O N S D AY S 6-7 D MZ A ND D E F E C T O R S D AY S 8-9 T EMPLESTA Y D AY S 10-11 C LO SI NG A N D D E P A R T U R E 15

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Sr i L an ka RECONCILIATION THROUGH SOCIAL ACTION OVE RV I E W In 2009, mass military action by Sri Lanka’s armed forces brought an end to the long running and bloody war with the LTTE. The 26-year long conflict, which grew from ethnic tensions between the Buddhist Sinhalese majority and the Hindu Tamil minority, cost more than 100,000 lives and 200 billion USD, destroying lives throughout the nation. We learn about the history of the conflict, and then examine the process of reconciliation amidst the dire needs for economic development, working with local NGOs focused on empowering economically disadvantaged children and youth. These deep connections allow students to gain real insight into the process of sustainable development and reconciliation. 16

GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn the elements of conflict that have taken place in Sri Lanka, and gain an understanding of the true horrors of civil war • Learn how individuals and civil society have responded to the conflicts and reconciliation process in Sri Lanka • Inspire students to understand that there are different ways to respond to conflicts, and build respect for the resiliency of nations and individuals • Evaluate the potential for different models of social enterprises working to spur economic development and create peace in Sri Lanka • Evaluate the role and responsibility of international organizations in fostering peace within Sri Lanka


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S We meet with a variety of organizations, including World Vision, UNESCO, and the US Embassy, learning about how they approach development choices and aid in the post-conflict setting.

EDUCATE LANKA FOUNDATION ELF is a non-profit organization dedicated to empowering economically disadvantaged youth by enhancing their access to education, mentoring, and employment opportunities. ELF serves all communities, regardless of their ethnicity, caste, or religion. We meet with key ELF ground staff to learn about the process for coordination, selection, and scholarship distribution, and spend time interacting and traveling with Educate Lanka students and liaisons to better understand how education serves as an avenue to peace in Sri Lanka.

ANCIENT CITY OF SIGIRIYA The ruins of the capital built by the King Kassapa I (477–95) lie on the steep slopes and at the summit of a granite peak standing some 180 meter high and surrounded by jungle. Known as the ‘Lion’s Rock’, Sigiriya is considered to be the symbol of Sri Lanka. . TEA LEAF VISION Tea Leaf Vision is a non profit organization which serves young adults from remote villages. The organization works to develop professional, emotional and personal competencies to enhance opportunities for the future.

FOUNDATION OF GOODNESS NGO Taking a holistic approach to bridging the gap between the urban and rural sector in Sri Lanka, FoG empowers over 30,000 lives in 100+ villages annually. Students learn about large scale and multi-faceted efforts for development within the country. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS SA MP LE I T I N E R A RY

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Col o m bi a PEACE IN OUR TIME: REBUILDING SOCIAL CONTRACTS OVE RV I E W Colombia’s rapid return to stability provides an optimal context to explore the realities of conflict resolution, as systemic inequalities within the nation threaten to disturb the newfound peace. Students confront the history of conflicts within Colombia, and then learn how that history has shaped the lives of individuals around the country. We examine the potential for healing in Colombia, visiting social entrepreneurs working in different sectors around the country. We go ‘behind-the-scenes’ to learn and participate in their everyday operations, delving into the various public and private arenas by which people from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds are working together to build (and rebuild) their national identity 18 and social contract..

GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn the elements of conflict that have taken place in Colombia’s modern history, and gain an understanding of the complexity behind conflict resolution and peace education • Learn how individuals and civil society have responded to the ongoing conflicts in Colombia • Inspire students to understand that there are different ways to respond to conflicts, and build respect for the resiliency of nations and individuals • Evaluate the potential for different models of social enterprises working to create peace in Colombia


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S PERSPECTIVES ON PEACE We engage with local teachers and students to learn how the past history of violence has impacted families and individuals. Program participants learn to retell the stories that they have heard, building a deeper empathic connection.

PEACE EDUCATION We meet with the Ministry of Education to learn about how schools have responded to the mandated curriculum surrounding peace education. MENTORSHIP MODELS The business accelerator Endeavor works with Colombian entrepreneurs with potential to catalyze long-term economic growth in a wide range of industries, including manufacturing, advertising, and entertainment. We meet with Endeavor’s leaders to learn about how they select and mentor different entrepreneurs.

NON-PROFIT ACTORS Compartamos con Colombia is a nonfor-profit consultancy firm that advises, accompanies and gives support to allow early stage social entrepreneurs to reach self-sustainability. We partner with CCC to learn about the growth of social enterprises in the Colombian context.

POVERTY MAPPING IN CARTAGENA Considered by many as the most beautiful city of Colombia, Cartagena also contains the largest inequality of the region. Within the city limits lie areas of high touristic affluence, historical landmarks and beautiful landscapes along with vast neighborhoods that live under the extreme poverty line.

RURAL LIVELIHOODS Traveling around the Sabana provides a unique opportunity to understand the magic behind the traditions within the rural communities, as well as the lasting effects of war on these localities. SA MP LE I T I N E R A RY D AY 1 ARR I VA L D AY S 2-5 BOG O TA D AY S 6-7 T HE SA B A N A D AY S 8-10 C A R TA G EN A D AY 11 C LO SI NG A N D D E P A R T U R E 19

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Arg e n t i na DEVELOPMENT PATHWAYS IN LATIN AMERICA GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES OVE RV I E W With bountiful natural resources, a highly • Learn about the breakdown of trust in institutions caused by Argentina’s educated and diverse population, and debt crises an industrialized economy, Argentina can be considered a case study for • Inspire a connection to Argentina’s success. Moreover, as the birthplace of people, culture, and country that the tango, Che Guevara, and Jorge Luis goes beyond classroom learning Borges, Argentina’s cultural legacies • Evaluate the tangible and intangible have impacts that spread far beyond effects of the debt crises on its borders. However, Argentina is also Argentina, comparing urban and a case study in ‘should haves’. Since rural areas reaching a peak of the world’s seventh• Learn about the myriad pathways wealthiest nation in 1920, the twentieth towards economic, social, political, century has seen Argentina follow an environmental, and spiritual often-tortuous path of political turmoil development and economic crisis. Traveling through and experiencing this vital and vibrant • Act as knowledgeable and informed citizens who can provide fact-based nation provides the perfect context for arguments regarding international considering development models and trade, capital flows, and other the role of external forces in mitigating aspects of the global political (or exacerbating) crisis. 20 economy


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S DISCOVERING BUENOS AIRES We engage with one of the world’s greatest cities, moving at a relaxed pace through the Plaza de Mayo, Casa Rosada, the Colon Theatre, and other noteworthy areas. We close our day learning about the history and traditions of La Recoleta Cemetery. Students use their observations from the day to discuss the extent to which a country’s financial history can be evidenced (or masked) by its urban infrastructure and landmarks.

GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMY We visit the Museum of Foreign Debt where we will make connections with our earlier studies about the Argentine economic crisis. Afterwards, we participate in a role play debate where the local government, private sector actors, congressmen and international financial authorities discuss the responsibilities of the crisis, going all the way back in history to the first endeavor of independence in the early 1800’s. RURAL LIVELIHOODS We hold a workshop session on the best use of natural resources and interplay between political decisions and rural livelihoods. After a visit to the famed Museum Guachesco Ricardo Güiraldes, students have the opportunity to ‘get their hands dirty’ and learn the art of silver-smithing. This challenge of learning from a foreign native pushes student communicative development while also building confidence in their own ability to navigate the world.

PAMPA ARGENTINA We visit the grassland region surrounding the capital city, beginning with a visit to a typical farm, where we witness traditional ways of living from the land and interview rural farmworkers. During an eveningtime ‘Fiesta Gaucha’, we practice our tango skills, gaining a real connection to Argentinan culture.

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Col o m bi a COFFEE, POTTERY, AND MOCHILAS: TRACING INTERNATIONAL TRADE: GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn about approaches to growth and development and the role of Colombian (and international) politics in the deepening of inequality within the country • Learn about concepts of free trade and how real individuals in Colombia have been affected by changes in international trade regimes • Inspire students to further question and examine their own interpretations and understandings of growth within cultural contexts

OVE RV I E W With a fast growing, diverse economy and youthful demographics, Colombia was named by Economist Intelligence Unit as a member of the next generation of ‘tiger economies’. However, Colombia remains one of the most unequal countries in the world, with stark differences in opportunities and living conditions for different members of society. These systemic inequalities threaten to disturb the newfound peace, creating a heightened urgency within the nation. We delve into this issue by tracing selected products back through various processors and middlemen to their initial source, learning about the impact of trade policies on each stage of the value chain. 22


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S THE COFFEE REGION We visit a typical coffee farm (hacienda) and its processing plant to learn about the coffee production process and the impact on the surrounding community, guided by members of a local family. Students rotate through sections to learn about planting, collecting, and post-harvest processes.

SEWYAKA COMMUNITY We hike to the community of Sewyaka, a town where three different indigenous cultures meet. Students visit a local school to learn about the education system and better understand the differences in ways of life within Colombia. MOCHILA TRADITIONS We meet with weavers of mochilas, delicately crotched bags that exemplify the rich cultural heritage of the Arhuacos and Wayuu peoples. These bags made by hand through traditional techniques passed on from generation to generation, and taking over two months to complete.

CERAMICS AND TRADE A traditional pottery-making village, Raquira is considered to be the “Ceramics Capital of Colombia”.As globalization created a higher demand for “authentic” pottery, the artisan craft has transformed into an industrial occupation, altering the focus of the community. Students have the opportunity to go ‘hands-on’ with local artisans, learning how they turn raw materials into finished materials. We then follow the product chain from the creators through to the shops, learning how different lives are impacted by the development of these products.

TRADITIONS FROM THE LAND OF MAGICAL REALISM From near-ubiquitous cafes to the nightly salsa dances, Colombia holds a wealth of beautiful cultural traditions that both exemplify Latin America and stand alone. Students engage with the beauty of the country and the people, developing a deeper connection with the culture.

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Jap an THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN POSTMODERN JAPAN GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn how Japan has leveraged technological innovation within its own cultural patterns to accelerate its economic development • Learn how the exponential rate of technological development has impacted Japanese society • Evaluate the ways in which Japan is attempting to utilize technology to resolve different social issues • Inspire students to engage in thoughtful consideration of the ways in which they currently utilize technology

OVE RV I E W Adopt, adapt, adept. Throughout history, the Japanese have followed this three-step approach to localizing and improving foreign ideas to fit within their cultural milieu. This tradition of refinement has created a culture that is reflective of the world, yet uniquely Japanese. We explore the role of technological innovations in shaping (and being shaped by) Japanese culture, examining how combinations and clashes between tradition and modernity have repeated in Japan’s modern history.

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PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S SHINKANSEN TRANSPORTATION We explore Japan’s famous bullet trains, the most efficient mass transportation system in the world. The unique ‘shinkansen culture’ demonstrates both Japan’s technological prowess as well as the synergy created through mass adherence to behavioral rules. At the Maglev Exhibition Center, we watch the world’s fastest bullet train being tested, and learn about the superconductive linear mechanisms.

JAPANESE POP CULTURE Otaku culture—a fantastic virtual world of manga and anime crossing into the ‘real world’—has become an international phenomenon. We explore the streets, shops, arcades and performance spaces of Akihabara, learning about the modern “Cool Japan” era and considering how Otaku exemplifies both the positive and negative impacts of technology on society. SUMO TRAINING STABLE Professional sumo wrestlers live in communal “stables” where all aspects of their lives are dictated by tradition. The unique experience of visiting a stable requires students to adhere to strict rules of behavior, providing the perfect context for discussing how adherence to order and politeness are reflected within Japanese culture.

SOFTBANK ROBOTICS CENTER Japanese telecommunications giant SoftBank has designed Pepper, the world’s first ‘emotional humanoid robot. The inspiration for the movie “Frank and Me”, Pepper provides an illustration of one potential pathway for our future. TOYOTA MOTORS We tour the factory of the world’s largest car manufacturer, witnessing the impressive blend of technology and manpower in the production line and learning about the Kaizen philosophies.

ZEN RITUALS Led by a Japanese monk, students engage in Zen meditation sessions Afterwards, we visit the Fukagaw Fudodo temple, an active temple with daily fire rituals (Goma), demonstrating the contrasts between Japan’s traditiondriven past and technology-driven present.

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Ur u g u ay SUSTAINABILITY AND CLEAN ENERGY SOLUTIONS GOAL S AND OBJ ECT IVES • Learn how Uruguay has combined technological innovation with solid economic policymaking and international trade to transform its energy sector • Learn how the shift to sustainable energies has impacted Uruguay’s economy and society • Inspire students to engage in thoughtful consideration of how technology might be used to solve social problems

OVE RV I E W Uruguay’s stable democracy and wide range of social benefits have made the country considered by many to be an exemplar for the region. Peace, stability, lack of corruption, income equality, and freedom of press have created a context for continued innovation in the use of clean energy. Starting in 2005, Uruguay transformed its energy sector, creating a mixture of policies and investments focused on wind and hydropower. By 2015, nearly 95 percent of the country’s energy came from renewable sources, placing the Uruguay is at the forefront of a growing movement of countries, communities and individuals who are changing the way they generate and use energy. 26


PR O G RAM E L E M E N T S DISCOVERING MONTEVIDEO We explore the city, moving at a relaxed pace through the Plaza de la Independencia, Solis Theatre, the Palacio Salvo and other landmarks. The observations from the day lead to conversations around the tangible impacts stemming from energy policies.

WIND FARMS Uruguay’s development of wind energies is considered to be the most successful case of energy transformation in the world. The nation went from having virtually no wind generation in 2007 to the most wind per capita of any country in 2014. We visit a wind farm outside of Montevideo, viewing the massive turbines and learning about the mixture of engineering and investment necessary for its creation.

UNA ESCUELA SUSTENTABLE We visit the construction site of the first environmentally sustainable public school in Latin America. The school utilizes a blend of technologies for water harvesting, food production, waste treatment,solar and wind energy, and thermal/solar heating and cooking.

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM We explore the old quarter of Colonia del Sacramento, engaging with locals while learning about the past and present of this UNESCO World Heritage site. Students analyze the city through frameworks for sustainable tourism, considering how Uruguay’s advancements in energy are being translated to other economic sectors.

AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY We visit an agroindustrial processing plant running on biofuel and proceed to a traditional cattle farms, examining how the clean energy policies have impacted both large and small farmers.

SA MP LE I T I N E R A RY D AY S 1-5 ARR I VA L A N D M O N T E V I D E O D AY 6 JUA R EG UIB E R R Y D AY S 7-9 S A N J O SÉ/N U E V A H E L V E C IA D AY S 10-11 C O LO NI A D E L S A C R A M E N T O D AY 12 C LO SI NG A N D D E P A R T U R E

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Contact Information

1-800-515-6523 info@envoys.com One Broadway 14th Floor Cambridge MA, 02142

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