Page 1

DUBLIN: HOME-LESS OR HOMES FOR LESS? Winter Term 2017/2018 Research and Design Studio Documentation


CONTENTS Introduction

4-5

A brief backround on the irish housing crisis

6-7

Housing references

8-9

Solutions for Dublins housing crisis

11 - 47

Stoneybatter - self-effective Green Coreop Shared space - Artery Your stoney better - „You better do it yoursef“ Stoneybatter - „Up the Batter!“ Connecting neigbourhoods, neighbours and people

12 - 17 18 - 23 24 - 29 30 - 35 36 - 41 42 - 47

Further Projects

48 - 49

Participants, Acknowledgements, Sources Impressum

50 - 51 52


4


INTRODUCTION

DUBLIN: HOME-LESS OR HOMES FOR LESS?

An ad showing advisory services provided by the Tenancy Protection Service, Threshold, on behalf of the Dublin Local Authorities, supported by Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government and Department of Social Protection.

In the light of the Global Financial Crisis in 2008, Ireland’s national economy collapsed. After an unprecedented real estate boom, the bubble around the Irish housing market burst. Many working families found themselves incapable of paying off their mortgages and faced imminent homelessness. The number of homeless people in Ireland is on the rise ever since, especially in the city of Dublin.

ging from temporary emergency shelters to squats in abandoned buildings. Meanwhile, the underlying issue of affordable housing shortage remains pressing as the demand grows vis-Ă -vis Post-Brexit speculations. In this design studio, we will examine alternative housing models and develop strategybased sustainable urban design solutions for the homeless in a specific neighbourhood in Dublin.

As a response to the persistent basic need for shelter, ad hoc scenarios were developed, ran-

5


THE IRISH HOUSING CRISIS GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS IN EUROPE

The widespread financial crisis that the globalised economy went through in 2007 and 2008 has left palpable damage around Europe. The national economies of several EU countries known as PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain) have suffered particularly since. A leading driver to the substantial economic crash was the boom and bust of their real estate markets, which was catered for by easy access to cheap capital for banks and their subsequent loosened mortgage lending practices. Ireland is an exceptional case among the aforementioned economically distressed European countries. From the mid-1990s, Ireland went through an unprecedented rapid economic growth – also known as the Celtic Tiger - for more than a decade, transforming it from one of the poorest countries in Western Europe to one of the wealthiest. Some of the most prominent enablers of growth were the low corporate taxation policies (attracting firms such as Intel, Microsoft and Google) and the targeting at foreign direct investment. This together with expansive bank lending led to a long-term price increase of real estate and an inevitable property bubble in Ireland, fuelled by a large construction sector and a housing system built on home ownership.

6

THE IRISH HOUSING SYSTEM

The housing system in Ireland is largely based on laissez-faire liberalisation of the property market. Most housing programs and funds focussed on factory-workers and farmers in rural Ireland until urbanisation continued to attract more people and drive wealthy families away from the poverty and crowdedness of the city to the suburbs (Pedriac, 2011:33). A Housing Act in 1924 provided subsidies for new houses, which could be payed to both local authorities and private builders, while still restricting sale prices and rents of subsidised houses. This marked the beginning of the State’s encouragement of the private sector to provide housing (Pedriac, 2011:37). After WW II, there was little war damage compared to other European countries, which rendered large-scale governmental subsidies for social rented housing unnecessary (Pedriac, 2011:43). When workers started increasingly moving to big towns and cities in the 1970s, the inadequacies of the Irish housing and related social policies became evident. This was especially inflicted by the policy shift away from direct housing provision towards a housing market led by private developers (Pedriac, 2011:47). With less subsidies and secured social and rented housing, the demand for owner-occupation increased, leading to a direct rise in property price (ibid). From the mid 1970s and until today, the housing market in the Irish Republic remains the principal producer of homes in the absence of price-control by the State (Pedriac, 2011:51).


POST-CRASH

With the economic boom of the 1990s till mid-2000s, the real estate market expanded and purchase capacity of homes increased with loosened mortgage policies. However, as the national economy in Ireland underwent a drastic downturn from 2008 onwards, mortgages were foreclosed, forcing purchasers to pay their home-debts to the banks. Many working families found themselves incapable of paying off such large sums amidst the financial crash and were forced to seek alternative housing solutions. Meanwhile, many property owners took advantage of the crisis and offered housing for the highest bidder. With the lack of rent-control and tenure-security regulations, homelessness expanded drastically. According to the Dublin Region Homeless Executive, in August 2017, 1146 families with 2379 children were registered in homeless accommodation. This number, however, solely reflects those officially registered for emergency accommodation services provided by the State. Many other unregistered families stay with friends, families, hostels, B&Bs or end up sleeping rough. Homelessness has been spiralling since 2008. “There are queues of hundreds of homeless people to get food in nightly soup runs, queues trying to get private rental accommodation and queues of a different kind in higher income suburbs where families are ‘outbidding each other’ to buy homes. Six ‘trophy’ houses on one road in Dublin 4 were sold for between €3 and €4 million each in 2016,” (Sunday Times 2017).

Meanwhile about 13% of the total housing stock in Ireland remains empty (Sunday Times 2017). In Dublin City alone, 40 000 residential units have been identified as vacant in 2017 (Irish Examiner 2017). The city centre is underperforming in many areas as a result, while the waiting list for social housing keeps on growing. Many speculative houses were left unfinished and abandoned after the economic crash, forming a landscape of “ghost estates” or “new ruins”. In a country, where the housing system is based on valuing and encouraging home-ownership, people tend to purchase a home with mortgage between their 20s and 30s, so that when they retire in their 60s, they can survive rent-free especially with modest pensions like in Ireland. Today, with the purchase capacity dropping, home ownership has fallen with it to a 50-year low nationwide. In Dublin, an evident drop from 10% renters and 75% owner-occupiers in 2000 to 25% renters and 60% owner-occupiers in 2016 (Irish Times 2017). AUGU ST

DUBLIN REGION

2 017

FAMILIES WHO ARE HOMELESS August (week of 21st–27th) 2017

IN HOTELS H O T E L

1146

704 FAMILIES WITH

1418 DEPENDENTS

IN HOMELESS ACCOMMODATION

FAMILIES

422 FAMILIES

WITH

WITH

2379

DEPENDENTS

961 DEPENDENTS

Number of adults with dependents who are homeless in Dublin September 2016 – August 2017

Kenna Pedriac (2011) Housing Law, Rights and Policy. Chapter 2: Outline of the Development of the Irish Housing System. Clarus Press. Dublin.

2,423

2,129

2,110

2,110

2,096

1,357

1,376

1,368

1,382

1,353

Sept 16

Oct 16

Nov 16

Dec 16

Jan 17

2,065

2,214

2,262

2,266

2,270

2,379

2,046

http://www.homelessdublin.ie/homeless-families The Sunday Times (5/3/2017) The Sunday Times Irish Rich List – The Definitive Guide to Wealth in Ireland. The Irish Examiner (07/10/2017) 40,000 vacant residential units in Dublin City. The Irish Times (14/3/2017) Home ownership in Dublin falls to record low.

No. of individual adults with dependents

1,410

1,426

1,465

1,477

1,492

Feb 17

Mar 17

Apr 17

May 17

Jun 17

1,586

1,559

Jul 17

Aug 17

No. of dependents

The Dublin Region Homeless Executive is provided by Dublin City Council as the lead statutory local authority in the response to homelessness in Dublin and adopts a shared service approach across South Dublin County Council, Fingal County Council and Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council. For more information please see www.homelessdublin.ie

7


HOUSING REFERENCES

RESEARCH TASK AFFORDABLE / ALTERNATIVE HOUSING MODELS Participants were asked to work in groups of three. Each group was to analyse one affordable housing model, show how it has been applied based on a few built references worldwide and explore, whether similar housing forms are available in Ireland. The houisng model analysis was to be carried based on the following criteria: - The organisational model and legal status: association, cooperative, co- housing, ownership, shared ownership, rental - The conditions of membership - Duration of stay: long-term, temporary, conditional - Affordability / financial model - Involved stakeholders: who is the intended inhabitant; who/which ins titutions are involved in this housing model - Applicability: where is the model practiced? - Similar housing models in Ireland, especially Dublin

The housing models examined were: 01- Cooperative Housing 02- Building groups (Baugruppen) 03- Ausbauwohnen 04- Functional Conversion 05- Co-housing 06- Self-built & Open-source Houses 07- Micro Apartments or Compact Living 08- Mobile / Nomadic Housing 09- Squats 10- Antisquats / Antikraak (temporary rent on short-notice basis) 11- Public Social Housing 12- Homes for the Homeless

The results of the analysis were to be shown with graphical means, using diagrams and illustrations. The purpose of this exercise was to develop an overview of different housing models that can be applied in the next phase of this research and design project. Students were asked to prepare a short overview of their housing models already before traveling to Dublin, in order to pose questions regarding such housing models in the Irish context.

8

References for housing in Ireland: https://fitzsij.github.io/CohousingIRE/


DESIGN TASK A CONCEPT FOR SOCOAL/AFFORDABLE HOUSING After getting an overview on diverse alternative housing models, it is time to develop your own housing model for Dublin. 1- From city to quarter: The area you work on stretches between Stoneybatter (Manor Street) and Phoenix Park (Infirmary Road). Extract the factors you want to focus on in your concept, developing your vision for social/affordable living. 2- From quarter to sites: Your urban design concept encompasses both vacant sites: Infirmary Road and O‘Devaney Garden. You are dealing with housing on an urban scale, which is part of and linked to the surrounding urban fabric.

the wall. These structures should be integrated in your housing scheme. You are free to consider integrating other existing buildings in your design. 4- From housing to living: Propose a programme that is not limited to shelter. Who will be living in the houses you design? What are their spatial needs? What other functions would you integrate in your concept, for the housing model to be livable as an urban quarter? What spaces are shared and how are they managed? How does the housing extend to the open spaces in between?

Urban Design Strategy A Concept

5- Housing - but how? According to the policies of Zone 5 in Dub3- From vacant sites to derelict buildings: lin, you are allowed to build up to 8 floors forThe Social/Affordable Housing housing model you develop should take with a site coverage up to 90%. You are asked into conside- ration existing buildings. The to build a minimum of 50 dwellings per hospital and the ‚married quarters‘ are both hectare. Your housing scheme should address protected structures, as well as some parts of at least two different target groups.

OMA‘s analysis of Parc La Vilette through zoning and programmatic sections 1983

OMA‘s analysis of Parc La Vilette through zoning and programmatic sections 1983 source: https://scenariojournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/OMA_La-Vilette_section-plan_2.jpg source: https://scenariojournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/OMA_La-Vilette_section-plan_2.jpg

9

After getting an overview on diverse alternative housing models, it is time to develop your own housing model for

parts of the wall. These structures should be integrated in your housing scheme. You are free to consider integrating


10


SOLUTIONS FOR DUBLINS HOUSING CRISIS STONEYBATTER - SELF-EFFECTIVE Falk Benz, Ulrich Müller, Roger Winkler

GREEN COREOP

Jonas Löber, Jennifer Köck, Nils Wagner

SHARED SPACE - ARTERY Caner Sahin, Celina Schäfer, Fabio Vornhein

YOUR STONEY BETTER „YOU BETTER DO IT YOURSELF“ Lutz Bauer, Christian Brönner, Aki Käppler

STONEY BATTER.“UP THE BATTER!“ Christopher Gallinari, Simon Fiedler, Lukas Feile

CONNECTING NEIGHBOURHOODS, NEIGHBOURS AND PEOPLE Hwangsoo Jeon, Stephan Faulhaber, Natascha Bastos De Almeida

11


STONEYBATTER SELF-EFFECTIVE

Falk Benz, Ulrich Müller, Roger Winkler

While analysing and setting up our concept for ‘self-effec- tive Stoney Batter’ three main aspects came into our focus. Our first key goal is to create a community center for the currently separated Parts Arran Quay D and E within the area of the recently teared down ‘O‘Daveney Garden’. Since there is a big demand for affordable and social housing, we also developed a concept for participation of future inhabitants in the planning- and building process. Another important aspect of involving the inhabitants is to enable the people to identify and occupy the spaces they live in, even though the new appartments are not for sale on the speculative property market. This approach gives the government and the City Coucil of Dublin a better control on the leases in the area of Stoney Batter. To transfer this idea into a feasably concept we put our last main focus on clearifying the borders in which the participation as a bottom-up intervention and the urban planning as a top-down intervention can occur. The clear borders include the hierachy of the infrastructure to separate residential

12

from public spaces as well as making clear positions on the building volumes and orientation in the existing urban context of Stoney Batter. Furthermore we want to draw attention on the process of building and living in a home. Due to the life-cycle of building components and the tensants length of stay, we think that it is possible to make clear decisions on which parts of the buildings can be available for participation of the inhabitants. The sanitary element for example can be repetitive and prefabricated, so it shouldn‘t be self-build. But the non-supporting walls and ceiling could be self-build. To create a mixed-use area and to support the financial concept of our idea for affordable housing we integrated some commercial uses. A working yard is located at the Infirmary Road with several workshops for carpenters, artists, mechanics, etc. On the O‘Devaney Square we intend to set up a few commerical stores for local supplies.


13


SPATIAL CONCEPT

PARTICIPATION

ORGANISATION

14


Sportsfield

Open-Air Stage

Roadblocking

Dwelling Yard Bus stop

Roadblocking

II+

D III

IV

Dwelling Yard

TG IV III

Dwelling Yard O‘Devaney Square III

II+D

IV

Stoneybatter Community Center

Bus stop

V

IV TG

III

Dwelling Yard

II+D

Dwelling Yard IV III

II+D

Connection for pedestrian Bus stop

Childcare Center

Connection for pedestrian

Community hall I+D

II+D

Dwelling Yard III

III

Work- and Dwelling Yard

III

D

III+

III

Siteplan

Sections

Area

GSEducationalVersion

15


INFIRMARY ROAD

1st Floor

GSEducationalVersion

-----------------

WEDNESDAY

5pm Barbecue ---------------

FRIDAY

8pm Filmnight ---------------

SATURDAY SATURDAY

11am 11am Workshop Workshop -----------------

Visualisation of the work- and dwellingyard

1st Floor

GSEducationalVersion

Floorplan of the work- and dwellingyard, Infirmary Road

16


O‘DAVENEY GARDENS

1st Floor

GSEducationalVersion

--------------Opening Hours --------------Monday - Friday 7am to 8pm Saturday 8am to 8pm ---------------

Visualisation of the work- and dwellingyard

1st Floor

GSEducationalVersion

Floorplan of the work- and dwellingyard, Infirmary Road

Section

17 GSEducationalVersion


GREEN COREOP Jonas Löber, Jennifer Köck, Nils Wagner

The analysis of the neighborhood of Stoneybatter was focused on our perception. We decided to examine the aspects of borders, like fences or walls as well as housing typologies and public green areas. Firstly a large agglomeration of dead ends in combination with a high amount of walls and fences causes a feeling of separation and being unwelcome. Due to these aspects, the neighborhood of Stoneybatter is divided into various sub-districts without any connecting links. Furthermore, the analysis of public green spaces detects a lack of accessible public green spaces. Especially the Arbor Hill area is nearly completely covered by buildings or streets. There are nearly no public green spaces or private gardens. In the majority, dwellings are too small to offer living space for families. Our analysis concludes that there is a need for a higher permeability between those subdistricts. The aim of the design should be to reduce barriers by creating connections and meeting points. This leads to the idea of a green core on the site of O‘Devaneys Garden. On the one hand, this core creates a center for the citizens to meet and enjoy outdoor activities while on the other hand, it has a revitalizing effect for surrounding streets. The implemented structure allows creating a hybrid of permeability and privacy by the applied constellation of solitaire buildings. At the access to the park, there are public squares located, which offer commercial facilities. Furthermore, green pocket spaces link form surrounding streets into the park.

18

In comparison to O’Devaneys Garden, the In rmary Road is de ned by smaller structures in addition to the existing listed buildings. Due to the variety of arrangements, new squares are created to bring a unique character to the site. In its center, the building of the former In rmary will be used as a community center including a communal library, a store, and a café. In addition, a Kindergarten will be located on the site. The historical Marriage Quarter offers space for micro apartments. The inhabitants of the dwellings are divided by 30% regular buyers, 40% hire purchase and 30% applicants for social housing and are organized in a cooperative. This non-profit cooperation is initiated by governmental organizations to guaranty a reduced purchase of land and to enable fair rent conditions. The buildings are arranged in groups of two to eight buildings which form a community. Each community is located around a patio and has a community room which can be adapted by the interests of the community. The balconies oriented to the patio, offer a high level of community and also save a necessary level of privacy. The idea is to create space for families with many children same as singles in need. So there are micro-apartments, as well as cluster ats and standard ats from one to four bedrooms. Various playgrounds and different spaces for outdoor activities offer excellent conditions.


19


listed buildings, important connections, meeting points

use of buildings, green areas, transport infrastructure

Section West/East O´Devaneys Garden

20

green core, important connections, meeting points

streets and pedestrian pavements

streets and pedestrian pavements

building plots, building communities and solitary houses

building plots, building communities and terraced houses

building plots with houses and common open spaces

building plots with houses and common open spaces


Siteplan

Section South/Nord O´Devaneys Garden

21


Typologies of Use

Community indoor spaces

Types of housing

Community outdoor spaces

Section prototypical area O´Devameys Garden M 1:200

Section prototypical area O´Devameys Garden M 1:200

Elevation prototypical area O´Devameys Garden M 1:200

22


View of an inner block courtyard O´Devameys Garden

Ground floor plan prototypical area O´Devameys Garden

First floor plan prototypical area O´Devameys Garden

23


SHARED SPACE ARTERY

Caner Sahin, Celina Schäfer, Fabio Vonrhein

The Shared Space Artery connects the whole area. Most importantly it connects The four big urban spaces that reach from a more intimate and private outdoor space over an public commercial space up to an big public park in wich outdoor activitys as well as cultu- ral activities take place. This Park is the center of the upper area and the shared space ends there. It starts in the lower area and opens up with an urban space that combines communal outter space like workshops and ateliers with commercial and gastronomic use. The central goal is to break down the existing barriers and connect the existing area with the newly built. Furthermore the goal is to create an urban and high quality social housing area wich ends the stigma of rental housing in Ireland. The Housing Typology Concept is divided into three important categories. At first a diverse ground level provides a vital and urban atmosphere. Therefore Housing as well as communal and commercial use take place on

24

the ground oor. An open space that invites the people to meet and stay brings life to the center of the block. Also communal spaces can be easily integrated in the outer space. The communication between the houses takes place on the inner side of the block. Porches, balconys and teraces create meeting places and additional open area for the inhabitants. This Planning Area includes commercial, communal, housing and of ce areas. The center of this area is a big urban space that connects communal and public living. The shared space leads right through the area and brings an urban space into the housing area. The ground level is devided into commercial, office and cultural use. Workshops, an Event Place, Planting areas, gastronomy and commercial areas create an diverse ground level. The workshop is used to help the inhabitants create parts of the fassade, furniture and smaller buildings. The connection between inhabitants and external people connects the area with Dublin.


25


26


Siteplan

27


Ground Floor

Section A

28

First Floor


Ground Floor

First Floor

Section B

View

29


YOUR STONEY BETTER „YOU BETTER DO IT YOURSELF“ Lutz Bauer, Christian Brönner, Aki Käppeler

„Jonas and Lucy Lumberjack recently got married and are looking to move to Dub- lin, because Lucy is starting her new job as an art consultant. Jonas, a carpenters son is planning on doing some small builders jobs on the side but mainly stay at home to raise their son Max. Even though they were looking for quite some time, they couldn´t find a affordable apartment or house for their needs and ideas. They really wanted some green space for their child to grow up with some nature, Lucy wanted to be able to get into the city quickly with public transportation and also have a small room for hobby of stencil art. Jonas needs some outdoor space for his DIY

30

projects and wants to be close to a park to walk their dog. After some frustrating months of searching they read about the “Your Stoney Better” project in a newspaper article. It sparked their interest since it seemed to be a perfect match. They found a nice Level 2 apartment with 70 sqm to build their dream. With the money they saved on the cheaper apartment they plan to invest into a small exhibition of Lucys Art in one of the near by galleries. The Lumberjack family finished refurbishing their apartment after 5 months and a ready to move into their individually designed apartment for their own happily ever after...“


31


32


III

IV

II II

IV IV V IV

V

IV

III

V

III

V

II

IV

IV

III

III IV

IV III

III IV

IV IV III III

II I

III

III

IV

III

Site Plan

Concepts GSEducationalVersion

33 GSEducationalVersion


Site Plan GF

34


VISUALISATION MAKER SPACE SITE PLAN GF 1_200 SECTIONS 1_200

DUBLIN FAB-LAB

GSEducationalVersion

EXAMPLES WORKYARD AUSBAU

GSEducationalVersion

GSEducationalVersion

Visualisation Maker Space GSEducationalVersion

Sections

35


STONEYBATTER .`UP THE BATTER`!

Christopher Gallinari, Simpon Fiedler, Lukas Feile

How we can improve living in Stoneybatter

36


37


How can we improve urban quality by reducing sealing and traffic?

How we can redensify

GSEducationalVersion

GSEducationalVersion

Section

38


II

III II

III

IV III III III III

III

III III

II

III IV

IV III

III III

III III

III

III

III III

III III

III

III

IV

III III III

III III

IV

IV III

III IV IV

III

III

III III

IV

IV

III

IV

III IV III IV

III

IV

III

III

IV

III II

III

IV

III

III

III

IV

IV IV IV V

II

III IV

IV IV IV IV III

II

IV IV

IV IV

IV

IV

III

III

III III

III III III III

IV

III

IV

IV

IV IV III

III

III

III

IV

III

IV III

III III

IV III

IV

III

IV IV IV III

III

IV IV

III III III

IV

III III III III II III III IV III III

III III

III

IV

III III III

III

III

I

III

IV III

II III

III III

III III

III III

III

III III

III III II

Stoneybetter Site Plan

figure ground plan

housing

commercial use

public building

39

nalVersion

Arbeitsblatt 1 (6)


O´Devany´s Garden

GSEducationalVersion

Section O´Devany´s Garden

40


7 4

5 3

6

2 1

Focus area and housing typologies

Floorplan Building Type 1 : stacked housing

GSEducationalVersion

Building Type 2 : apartment housing

GSEducationalVersion

Section Infirmary Road

41


CONNECTING

NEIGHBOURHOODS, NEIGHBOURS, PEOPLE Hwangsoo Jeon, Stephan Faulhaber, Natascha Bastos De Almeida

The City of short distance Accessibility - Instead of equipping a few flats with a very high degree of accessibility, our goal is to build as many flats as possible without barriers. For this reason, we orientate ourselves on the ready approach with which it is possible to prepare many flats for elderlyfriendly living. All apartments are barrier-free accessible through the elevator and barrierfree according to LBo. Since it is not only the construction of barrier-free buildings that is important, but the very individual adaptation to the living situation, we support the living space adapting and include here the housing advice of the paritiitischer special service. The barrier-free, intergenerational outdoor facilities of the green Mutte create a meeting place for young and old. Variety in the quarter - The combination of privately financed and publicly subsidized apartments in all rental properties results in stable, socially mixed neighborhoods. Due to the use-neutral layout of the flats, residential offers are created that work for different generations and forms of life (eg for single parents). It automatically creates a wide variety of life forms in the quarter. Mixed-use development - Our residential project integrate multiple uses like workplaces, service facilities, cafes, little shops, and a foodmarket.

42

Flexibility - The idea ist to generate a housetype which is adaptated to the special needs and dreams of the inhabitants .It is a house typ which can be insert in the ,Block-randbebauung“ and in the existing house rows. By replacing some old and dilapidated townhouses with new ones it is possible to break up with the monotonous street picture. Multiple users - The city compromises a heterogeneous mixture of inhabitants, with increasing diverse lifestyles and family models that need to be accomodated in the residential project. Residential projects no longer tend to respond to a single standard program and user. The diversity present in society is also translated into the patial complexity of the project. Individualization - Despite repeated claims identifying multi-family residential complexes as uniform and impersonal, this individual units adapted on the different inhabitants can be seen as an experiment of housing. Density and Compactness - By knowing the rooms that the society need we are able to generate compact units. To make the ,Blockrand“ more dense it is possible to in fill the middlezone with more units.


43


Guiding thread

actual situation

new little shops with collective spaces in betwee

Atmospherical views

44

Revitalisation of the actual situation

the new quarter

new urban road netwok in cross direction through the quarter


Urban Design Concept

Row houses below the military hospital

Design of the space in front of the military hospital

Improvement of the actual situation in Stoneybatter

Site Plan

45


prototypical area : groundfloor M 1:200

living prototypical area : section A

46

shop / office / studio

small commercial

coffee shop

shop


prototypical area : Floor Plans

47


FURTHER PROJECTS NEW O´Devaney Gardens

NEW O´DEVANEY GARDEN Martin Koleda, Michael Befeld

NEW O´Devaney Gardens

25

its

un

88

its

180

its

un

s nit

un

u 86

al tot

380

its

un

its

un

e

88

bik

25

wa

THE SHARED SPACE ART_ERY

sh

THE SHARED SPACE ART_ERY ing

SITE PLAN 1:1000

CUT SECTION AA 1:500

s nit

s nit

u

A

THE SHARED SPACE ART_ERY 180

u 86

e

bik

ing

sh

wa

Fanny Lou Kunschert al tot

bik e ing

sh

wa

380 AXONOMETRIC DRAWINGS

FIGURE GROUND PLAN 1: 5000

STUDENT HOUSING

siteplan 1:500 GREENED ARCADES

GSPublisherVersion 0.0.100.81

BALCONY

e

bik

CONNECTING PATHS ing

sh

wa

ATELIER ROOMS

EVENT SPACE

e

bik

ing

sh

wa

ZONING CONCEPT

e

bik

DWELLING UNITS

sh

wa ing

COMMERCIAL SPACE, COFFEE SHOP

A

48

COMMUNAL SPACE, KITCHEN

COMMERCIAL SPACE, STORES

siteplan 1:500

GSPublisherVersion 0.0.100.81

PARKING

SHARED SPACE STREET MAP KEY

HOUSING TYPOLOGY


GSEducationalVersion

street

street

GSEducationalVersion

Example floor plan 1 : 200

ONE COMMUNITY GSEducationalVersion

GSEducationalVersion

around 20 families per floor

O’Devaney Gardens 1 : 500

around 5 singles per floor

Inhabitants

Cornelius Backenstrass, Jasmin Sorour, XhuljoSulaj

Dublin, Infirmary Road | HOMES SA CLOUCH and Art Sa Clouch

ACTION

GET TOGETHER

Svenja Lynn Schalm und Tabita Cargnel

Final presentation - 30.01.2018

Example floor plan 1 : 200

SAND

DRYWALL

SOCIAL

H

FITN PUB ESS PARK ING

CHILL

GRAVEL

CONNECT

SAND

SPORT

GSEducationalVersion

GSEducationalVersion

RELAX

PERCEIVE

barrier free access

PLAY

ARRIVE

street

barrier free access

WATER

street

barrier free access

barrier free access

GET TOGETHER

LAWN FOR READING

ASC

Example floor plan 1 : 200 H

Perspective of courtyard to the north Cornelius Backenstrass

Jasmin Sorour

barrier free access

Xhuljo Sulaj

LAWN FOR READING

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

GSEducationalVersion GSEducationalVersion

around 20 families per floor

O’Devaney Gardens 1 : 500

around 5 singles per floor

Inhabitants

Groundplan of one block 1:200

HOMES SA CLOUCH Render Garden inside block

Section through block 1:200

Svenja Lynn Schalm, Tabita Cargnel

Dublin, Infirmary Road | HOMES SA CLOUCH and Art Sa Clouch

ACTION

GET TOGETHER

Svenja Lynn Schalm und Tabita Cargnel

Final presentation - 30.01.2018

SAND

SPORT DRYWALL

FITN PUB ESS PARK ING

CHILL

GRAVEL

CONNECT

SOCIAL

H

barrier free access

barrier free access

RELAX

WATER

PERCEIVE

PLAY

ARRIVE

LAWN FOR READING

ASC H

Perspective of courtyard to the north Cornelius Backenstrass

Jasmin Sorour

Xhuljo Sulaj

Groundplan of one block 1:200

Render: Garden inside block

EUS

Thesis-Entwurf Dublin

Prof. Nina Gribat

Seite 4

Render Garden inside block

Section through block 1:200

CO‘ DEVANEY GARDENS Vanessa Sophie Jansen, Arne Udo Schneider, Johanna Maria Westermann II II

III

II II

III IV III

III

III

IV

III

IV II

III

IV

V IV III

III

V

II II II I III

IV

P III

P

IV V IV

III

IV

II III II III

III

III

Render: Garden inside block III

EUS

II

Thesis-Entwurf Dublin

Prof. Nina Gribat

Seite 4 II

I

II

II

III

III

GSEducationalVersion

49

PRIVATE

PUBLIC


COORDINATION Proffesor Dr. Nina Gribat

Researchers M.Sc. Iman Charara Dipl. Ing. Andreas Schmitt

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS XXX

50


BILDQUELLEN Umschlag – https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Amatrice. JPG/1200px-Amatrice.JPG; https://www.nextquotidiano.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/ amatrice-campanile-crollato.jpg S. 6 – http://www.customidea.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/poster-amatrice.jpg S. 10 – eigene Darstellung, Basis: Geodaten Region Latium S. 11 – https://siviaggia.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/amatrice-centro.jpg S. 12 – http://www.cittadellamatrice.it/it/articles/65/sagra-dell-amatriciana-2016-di-amatrice. html S. 14 – http://www.pongovernance1420.gov.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/ AreeInterne_2014-1-e1482397447803.png S. 15 – Leonie Plänkers; Luftbild: Google Maps S. 17 – Leonie Plänkers S. 18 – http://footage.framepool.com/shotimg/404181764-gibellina-nuova-stadtansichtstrasse-sonnenschein.jpg; Luftbild: Google Maps; https://paulvonplace.files.wordpress. com/2012/04/gib-vecchia1.jpg S. 19 – https://ingvterremoti.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/terremoto1976_dbmi11.jpg S. 20 – http://www.presidente.regione.fvg.it/contenuti/Fotografie/60127_terremotoGemona1976.jpg ; https://i.ytimg.com/vi/ex3qR0RtAk8/maxresdefault.jpg; https://archiwatch.files. wordpress.com/2013/11/venzone-1976-oggi_3.jpg S. 21 – Leonie Plänkers S. 26 – Nina Gribat, Leonie Plänkers S. 28-57 – Verfasser der Arbeiten

For internat use only

This booklet was created for the purpose of university teaching and private documentation. A commercial duplication is excluded.

51


Impressum

Technische Universität Darmstadt Fachbereich Architektur (FB 15) Faculty of Architecture Fachgebiet Entwerfen und Städtebau (FG EUS) Chair for Design and Urbanism Prof. Dr. Nina Gribat M.Sc. Iman Charara Dipl. Ing. Andreas Schmitt www.eus.architektur.tu-darmstadt.de info@eus.tu-darmstadt.de +49-6151-16 23403

Druck: Rechnerpool des Fachbereichs Architektur Februar 2018, Darmstadt

52

Profile for Entwerfen und Städtebau_TU Darmstadt

Dublin: Home-less or Homes for Less?  

This documentation presents a selection of the results of the design studio "Dublin: Home-less or Homes for Less?" by the Chair of Design an...

Dublin: Home-less or Homes for Less?  

This documentation presents a selection of the results of the design studio "Dublin: Home-less or Homes for Less?" by the Chair of Design an...

Advertisement