Canadian Grocer March 2022

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A fresh look at the Serving halal produce department shoppers

How to fire up summer sales MARCH/APRIL 2022

Rick Rabba

Jamie Nelson

Justin Schley

Dominic Arsenault

Brian Bradley

Unstoppable INDIES We catch up with five of Canada’s

best independent grocers to talk about the pressures, the wins and what’s next


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Contents Opinions 7 || Front Desk 20 || Food Bytes 22 || Eating in Canada 24 || Consumer Connection People 8 || The Buzz

Comings and goings, store openings, awards, events, etc.

10 || Giovanni Angelucci

The Queen Street Bakery founder is serving up better gluten-free options

March/April 2022 || Volume 136 - Number 2

Cover Story

UNSTOPPABLE INDIES

53 We talk to five of Canada’s best independent grocers about the pressures, the wins and what’s next Features

A GOOD PROGNOSIS FOR PRODUCE 41 Our Produce Ops Survey reveals the department is holding firm, despite challenges

Ideas 15 || Shelflation

Less-than-fresh food is costing Canadians big time

16 || Could Canadians get behind cell-based meat?

Lab-cultivated meat is on the way, but hurdles remain

17 || Who’s on top?

COVER PHOTOS FROM LEFT: TOBI ASMOUCHA, THE PATTISON GROUP, TANYA GOEHRING, CHANTALE LECOURS, AND LUCAS FINLAY THIS PAGE: BOTTOM, SHUTTERSTOCK/STEFAN MALLOCH. TOP, TOBI ASMOUCHA

New Deloitte report reveals the world’s biggest retailers

STATE OF THE INDEPENDENT NATION 48 CFIG’s Tom Shurrie and Vince’s Market’s Giancarlo Trimarchi, talk about the current indie landscape

Aisles 77 || Selling the season

Summer is coming! Here’s how to fire up sales

85 || Maple syrup: Four things to know

Learn why this Canadian staple is suddenly trendy

10

Express Lane 86 || Hungry for halal

Nourish Food Marketing’s Salima Jivraj on what halal shoppers really want

Follow us on     @CanadianGrocer

41

MEET THE CHAMPIONS 69 Introducing the 35 winners of the 2022 Product of the Year Canada awards

@CanadianGrocerMagazine     Canadian Grocer Magazine

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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Sales Support:

How to Educate Deli Staff History, flavour profiles and serving suggestions The pandemic has created a more competent and curious grocery customer. Spending so much time at home has heightened the knowledge of many homecooks, turning them into explorers, looking for more insight into the products they are adding to their weekly menus.

To help your deli team bolster their knowledge and insight into the premium products they sell, Icons of European Taste, offers the following talking points to answer customer questions about Prosciutto di San Daniele PDO, Grana Padano cheese PDO and Prosciutto di Parma PDO.

How do I know these products are authentic? Each of these foods carries the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) seal, the European Union’s guarantee of quality and authenticity, so you know they are from a specific geographical region in Italy and are created using traditional techniques that have set the standard of culinary excellence for generations. Additionally, each is also fire-branded with its own distinct icon.

What makes Prosciutto di San Daniele unique?

Why should I choose Grana Padano cheese?

What makes Prosciutto di Parma unique?

• Only the selected thighs from Italian pigs,

• Naturally lactose free, a mature Grana

• PDO ensures that the 400 days of curing

sea salt, and 13-months of dry curing in the microclimate (air) of San Daniele del Friuli are used in making this product.

Padano cheese develops richer aromas and flavours, and is great for a cheese plate. However, younger-aged Grana Padano has a mild, pleasing flavour and are typically grated or shaved.

for each Prosciutto di Parma leg is done according to traditional methods in the gently rolling countryside near Parma, Italy.

• Thinly sliced Prosciutto di San Daniele is delicious in a wide range of dishes such as antipasto platters, sandwiches, pizzas and salads and pairs perfectly with white wine, or lighter, fruitier red wines.

• Serving and storage: Prosciutto di San Daniele is always best enjoyed immediately after slicing, for pre-sliced trays: remove from fridge 5-10 minutes prior to consumption. It is best stored in a fridge kept at temperatures around 1-7 Celsius and NEVER slice prosciutto with the skin on.

• Grana Padano pairs perfectly with anything sweet, like honey, apple, pear or dried fruit and is ideal as part of a cheese board, working well with cured meats, olives and nuts.

• Care and storage: Keep refrigerated at 4 degrees Celsius (39F) away from other strong-flavoured cheeses and wrap in a moist cotton or hemp cloth to prevent the texture from drying out or, alternatively, use a good quality plastic freezer bag.

• It is 100% natural with no preservatives, additives, nitrites, nitrates.

• Its ancient curing process yields a distinct mild delicate taste and has a fragrant aroma naturally created from the dry air around the hills in the province of Parma.

• Serving suggestions: It is delicious on its own and pairs well with rustic bread, juicy melon and a variety of cheeses. Unless directly specified, it should be sliced paper thin – no more than 1/16th of an inch; ideally, it should be translucent when held up to light.

The content of this promotional campaign represents the views of the author only and is his/her sole responsibility. The European Commission and the European Research Executive Agency (REA) do not accept any responsibility for any use that may be made of the information it contains.

CAMPAIGN FINANCED WITH AID FROM THE EUROPEAN UNION.

THE EUROPEAN UNION SUPPORTS CAMPAIGNS THAT PROMOTE HIGH QUALITY AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS.


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SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CANADA

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BETTER DAYS AHEAD? While the pandemic isn’t yet behind us, positivity is in the air

VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS

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SENIOR DIRECTOR AUDIENCE STRATEGY

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SALES NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER

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ACCOUNT MANAGER

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Spring is the air and (depending on where you live in Canada) temperatures are rising and maybe spirits, too. COVID19 restrictions are being lifted, and in some parts of the country masks have been ditched, or will be soon. And while the virus is by no means finished with us (we have our eye on you Deltacron!) there’s a sense that we’ve turned a corner and are ready to set COVID-19 aside and return to some form of normal. Indeed, after two extraordinary years that upended our lives and businesses, optimism is afoot and that was evident in our conversations with the independent grocers featured in this month’s cover story, “Unstoppable Indies.” Yes, there have been (and still are) challenges aplenty, but as Dominic Arsenault, owner of IGA Coaticook in Quebec puts it: “The last two years will make us strong. We’ve developed reflexes and agility that will serve us well in the future.” What’s more, the indie grocers we spoke to all expressed excitement about the opportunities ahead, be it new stores, new partnerships, or the chance to deepen community connections and go all-in with local. As Quality Foods’ Justin Schley says: “It’s never been a better time to be an independent grocer.” (Read all of the interviews starting on page 53). There’s more optimism to be found in “A Good Prognosis for Produce.” In this feature, writer Rosalind Stefanac brings you the results of our third-­annual Produce

Operations Survey. Despite the headaches caused by supply chain issues, labour shortages, shrink and price increases, survey respondents are (mostly) positive when it comes to the outlook for this crucial department. Flip to page 41 to see what the survey reveals about the state of sales, department challenges and investment plans. Also in this issue we talk to Nourish Food Marketing’s Salima Jivraj to get her insight on how to better serve halal shoppers (page 86). We also take a look at the latest in cell-based meat (page 16)—it’s coming, but will consumers bite? Happy reading! CG

Shellee Fitzgerald Editor-in-Chief

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

Keep up to date on the latest news by signing up for our e-newsletter. It’s free and we’ll deliver it to your inbox four times a week. Visit canadiangrocer.com to subscribe March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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The Buzz

OPENINGS

A new METRO PLUS opened in Montreal’s Côte-desNeiges neighbourhood in late February. Metro invested more than $10 million to open Metro Plus Wilderton, which replaces a Metro supermarket that shuttered in 2019. At 40,000 sq. ft., the new store is about 50% larger than the former location and among its offerings are kosher and vegan sections; a fish smoker at the fish counter; and more than 100 ready-to-eat meals prepared on site by the store’s chefs. Also on offer are Middle Eastern specialties from its Adonis banner and baked goods from Metro’s Première Moisson. Metro told Canadian Grocer that of the 199 Metro supermarkets in Quebec, 120 are now under the larger-format Metro Plus banner.

Western Canada is getting two more T&T’s in 2022

T&T SUPERMARKET is expanding again. The Loblawowned Asian supermarket chain has announced plans to open two stores in Western Canada over the next year. T&T says it will open its second store in Coquitlam, B.C. in late 2022, as well as a new store in Calgary, its fourth location in that city, in December. “We are excited to bring this experience to the local community in Northwest Calgary, with our Sage Hill location, as well as the growing communities of Lougheed, Burquitlam, and the students of Simon Fraser University with our new Coquitlam location,” said Tina Lee, T&T CEO in a release. In recent months, T&T has announced new locations in Toronto at CF Fairview Mall as well as its first foray into the Quebec market with a new store opening in Montreal later this year. These announcements will bring T&T’s store count to 33 locations across the country.

Kelowna, B.C. is home to a new COSTCO. The nearly 170,000-sq.-ft. warehouse is 24% larger than the previous location, just two kilometres away. The new, expanded Costco features more parking, new products, a gas station and a self-checkout area. Guelph, Ont. got its first FARM BOY in early March. Located at 370 Stone Road West, the 25,276-sq.-ft. store is Farm Boy’s 43rd store in the province.

GET RECOGNIZED FOR MAKING A POSITIVE IMPACT!

News to share? Tell us about your openings, comings and goings, etc. by dropping a line to sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com 8 CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

Canadian Grocer’s Impact Awards are back! We want to shine a spotlight on initiatives introduced by retailers, suppliers and solution providers that are making a meaningful difference in four areas: sustainability; diversity, equity & inclusion; supporting employees; and community service/giving back. Please take a few minutes to tell us about the great work being done at your company. There is no fee to nominate and winners will be featured in our August issue. Visit cgimpactawards.ca before May 30, 2022 to nominate.

METRO, LOBLAW

Metro invested $10 million to open Metro Plus Wilderton in Montreal’s Côte-desNeiges neighbourhood

The latest news in the grocery biz


COMINGS AND GOINGS

Jeffrey Min

Joseph Kim

Monika Russell

Vincent Nadeau

THE GROCERY FOUNDATION

Stephen Reid

Sara Andreoli

After more than a dozen years at Loblaw, Uwe Stueckmann has announced his retirement. As Loblaw’s executive vice president, chief customer officer, Stueckmann played a key role in the growing the PC Optimum loyalty program as well as bringing to life several of Loblaw’s leading brands including President’s Choice, No Name and Life Brand. The retail veteran previously held roles at Lowe’s and at Shoppers Drug Mart prior to its 2013 acquisition by Loblaw. Jeffrey Min has stepped down as CEO of Galleria Supermarket—the Korean specialty grocery chain he founded in 2003—and its wholesale division Korea Food Trading. Joseph Kim, who joined the business in 2005, most recently serving as vice-president, has been named Min’s successor. At Freshlocal Solutions, Monika Russell has been appointed chief financial officer and corporate secretary. Russell will be responsible for the financial strategy of the company whose operations include the Blush Lane and Be Fresh stores as well as the SPUD.ca e-grocery platform. Russell replaces Adrienne Uy who is taking on the role of executive vice president of transformation at the Vancouver-based company. Kraft Heinz Canada has added to its leadership team. Vincent Nadeau has been named vicepresident, sales. Nadeau has racked up experience at Mondelez International, PepsiCo as well as marketing firm Guilbault & Associates. Stephen Reid has been named president of the Ontario Produce Marketing Association. Reid, who has previously held roles at the Ontario Medical Association and the Pharmacists’ Association of Newfoundland and Labrador, replaces Michelle Broom. Acosta Canada has promoted Sara Andreoli to the role of vice-president, business insights. Andreoli joined the company in 2018 and most recently served as director of business insights.

Night to Nurture Raises $1.9 million The grocery industry came together virtually in late January to help kids in need. The Grocery Foundation’s annual Night to Nurture Gala shifted to a virtual-only format again this year as a result of a surge in COVID cases, but that didn’t dampen the generosity of the industry. “We are excited to share that we raised $1.9 million for The Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone. We are extremely grateful for the grocery industry’s support in this our second year of having to pivot to a virtual format,” says Shaun McKenna, the Foundation’s executive director. “Their support means so much to Canadian children and youth in these times of increasing need. We are hopeful that we will be able to return to an in-person format next year.” The evening was described by organizers as an “entertainment spectacle” with a lineup of comedy, music and magic performances from Canadian talent that included illusionist Darcy Oake, comedian Gerry Dee as well as musicians Tim Hicks, Alan Doyle, Fefe Dobson, Tyler Shaw and Alan Frew. Night to Nurture raises crucial dollars to fund breakfast programs in Canadian schools as well as to support the work of Kids Help Phone.

Comedian Gerry Dee entertains

Shaun McKenna of The Grocery Foundation and Kathy Hay of Kids Help Phone

Night to Nurture performers rehearse for the final number, “Lean On Me” Alan Doyle performs with Tim Hicks and Band

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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People BREAKING BREAD WITH GIOVANNI ANGELUCCI Entre­preneur is on a mission to bring better gluten-free options to Canadians By Christine Hogg Photography by Tobi Asmoucha

Who you need to know


G

iovanni Angelucci is determined to make consumers fall in love with eating bread again. After studying business at Western University in Ontario, then building a career in his family’s B2B fuel company, Angelucci says his latest venture, gluten-free bread brand Queen Street Bakery, was partly realized by accident, but ultimately born out of necessity. “My mom and wife are both gluten intolerant, as were a few other people at our office, and nobody really liked the gluten-free options that were available,” Angelucci says. Growing up in an Italian household, he recounts the many occasions he watched his family bake bread from scratch. “I’ve never really seen sugar added to bread, yet if you pick up any bread off the shelves, a lot of them have sugar or some version of sugar in them,” he says. “Most gluten-free options currently available are made to satisfy the necessity of it, but not necessarily the healthy aspect of it. Most products are made with rice or corn, which nutritionally don’t have a whole lot of value.” While Angelucci himself is not gluten intolerant, the idea of creating a better gluten-free product piqued his interest. In 2018, he enlisted the help of a baker and started testing recipes with the goal of creating a gluten-free bread that was so good, those eating it wouldn’t be able to tell that it was gluten-free. “We brought in someone who had experience in this area and trusted him to help grow the business,” Angelucci says. “Unfortunately, that didn’t quite work out, and the business ran into some trouble, but we pushed through and landed some key accounts after that, which gave us the basis for growth.” Despite a bit of a rocky start, Angelucci and his team persevered. In 2019, Queen Street Bakery’s current president (and Angelucci’s long-time friend) Tony Ayala came on board, and business boomed. “We brought in UNFI Canada to get us distribution across the country, as well as a broker to help us get the meetings with some of the other big retailers,” Angelucci says. “By August 2019, we had brought on Sobeys and a few of the other larger, regional accounts.” Queen Street Bakery also recently attracted the attention of District Ventures Capital, led by Canadian investor and entrepreneur Arlene Dickinson, who appears as a judge on CBC’s Dragons’ Den.

“The team at DV [District Ventures Capital] picked up on us very early and believed in the product and the vision for the company. They invested in us when we were quite small—uncommon for institutional investors—and have helped give us credibility,” Angelucci explains. “Since then, we have expanded together and even added in a few other partners who share the same passion and vision for what this can be.” To date, Queen Street Bakery’s products can be found in more than 1,000 grocery stores across Canada, including the Northwest Territories, and in major retailers including Loblaw, Longo’s, Zehrs, Walmart and Sobeys. Last June, Queen Street Bakery launched in the United States, where its products can now be found in roughly 1,500 stores. “We’re just scratching the surface,” Angelucci says. “If things go according to plan, we should be above that $5 million mark sometime next year.” Compared to a typical loaf of sliced white bread, a Queen Street Bakery loaf packs 12 grams of fibre, zero grams of sugar and 120 calories per loaf. The average loaf of white bread typically has just one gram of fibre, three grams of added sugar and 150 calories per two slices. Drawing inspiration from the ingredients grown in his grandmother’s backyard, Angelucci developed a series of superfood breads made from raw, natural ingredients like chia seeds, white beans, grape skins and activated charcoal. The company currently makes four variations of bread—the Chia Loaf, White Bean & Millet Seed, White Bean & Grape Skin, and Cinnamon Raisin. All of the loaves are free of allergens, and none of the products contain nuts, gluten, wheat or added sugars. Alongside its loaves, Queen Street Bakery also sells gluten-free superfood bagels (available in Chia & Flax or Cinnamon Raisin) as well as artisanal buns, pizza dough, and baking flour made from millet and sorghum flour. “I think we are going to look back on carbs the way we look at fat now,” says Angelucci, adding that fat was once deemed unhealthy, until people realized that all fats are not created equally, and neither are carbs. “The average person is just looking for a good, all-around healthier product that they can eat every day. In 10 years, I think we’ll be treating carbs as a staple again, but in moderate amounts and from the best possible sources. We like to say that we give people the bread they want, made from ingredients the body needs.” CG

30 seconds with …

GIOVANNI ANGELUCCI What do you like best about your job?

I like seeing good business ideas happen. We get to make a living out of providing customers with a healthier bread that they actually feel happy when eating.

What inspires you/keeps you passionate about what you do?

Our product is really amazing. Every day, we get messages from people telling us how happy they are to finally find a good gluten-free bread, or how finding Queen Street Bakery (QSB) has changed their life.

If you weren’t in the food business, what would you be doing?

I like to see ideas come to fruition that help change things for the better, so something along those lines. With QSB we’re bringing people back to bread. There are opportunities everywhere.

What’s the best career advice you’ve ever received?

That those who believe they can, and those who believe they can’t, are both right. So do your research, study the feasibility, and then confidently execute.

What’s your favourite product from your lineup?

That’s like asking a parent who their favourite child is! The lineup is all fantastic for different reasons. But the burger buns and the bagels are all amazing.

Biggest misconception about gluten-free food?

That it’s healthy. Not all gluten-free [products] are created equally, much is empty calories or loaded with sugar. QSB changes all that by making the healthiest bread.

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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NEW *


pasta perfection CATEGORY CLOSE-UP

Comfort, convenience, and a simple way to indulge at home

A

plate of perfectly cooked pasta, whether it’s topped with a delicious medley of fresh ingredients or a simple sauce, always hits right. It’s no surprise then that pasta has been the go-to for Canadians, especially during these pandemic times. In fact, at the beginning of the pandemic, the pasta category saw a 16% increase in value nationally. Here’s a look at why this longstanding kitchen staple continues to excite grocery shoppers.

The ultimate comfort food During the pandemic, many more of us turned to home cooking, not only as an activity to do safely but also to feel a sense of security in uncertain times. There’s something undeniably comforting about recipes that have been passed on from generation to generation—and pasta fits the bill. Plus, it’s a “no-fuss” meal and there’s always comfort in that.

Product Spotlight The Italpasta Artisan line is inspired by an age-old Italian way of making high-quality pasta complemented with 100% Canadian wheat. The six, unique pasta cuts feature a texture that’s ideal for sauce to cling to.

Convenient and easy Pasta is accessible in all grocery stores and an economical way to create a satisfying meal for the whole family. “Pasta is the perfect food for at-home chefs, especially those with little-to-no experience in the kitchen,” says Italpasta’s Vice-President of Sales, Angelo Boras. “Not only is cooking pasta easy, using our Italpasta brand pasta makes it virtually foolproof because of the thick-wall of our pasta—it’s forgiving of being overcooked.”

Artisan pasta gaining momentum More and more home cooks are opting for artisan dried pasta because it’s just as easy to make as the regular kind but the flavour and consistency can be far superior. A recent survey conducted by Angus Reid, commissioned by Italpasta, found that 49% of Canadians would pay a little more for an artisan line of pasta. Upscaling an economical meal with an indulgent ingredient also makes it feel that much more special. “We saw that Canadians are willing to pay a little more for a highquality pasta and [they] want to make sure they are getting their money’s worth from the products they buy,” says Boras.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

The cellophane window traditionally on Italpasta boxes has been removed in the Artisan line to be fully recyclable. This is part of the Small Impact, Big Change program aimed at ensuring all Italpasta products transition to eco-friendly packaging by 2030.

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Muskoka Brewery crafts premium beverages as unique and refreshing as the region they’re from. With a wide selection of beer, spirits, and non-alcoholic drinks, there is a taste for everybody and every occasion.

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STO C K U P & SAVE


Ideas

RETAILERS || SUPPLIERS || SHOPPERS || INSIGHTS

FOOD WASTE

SHUTTERSTOCK/BADNEWS86DUPS

ENTER “SHELFLATION” Ongoing supply issues are leading to another mounting problem: food waste. And it’s costing Canadians big time. The Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University, in partnership with Angus Reid, recently conducted a study on “shelflation.” Coined by the lab’s senior director, Sylvain Charlebois, the term is defined as: “When supply chain issues lead to overripe or less fresh food products making their way onto store shelves.” In a survey of 1,500 Canadians, 63% said they had to throw away food prematurely at least once in the last six months. Category wise, the highest percentage was in produce (45%), followed by dairy (31%), bakery products (27%), and meat (17%). The price tag for all that trashed food? Anywhere between $305 million and $545 million, according to the researchers’ estimates. “The most obvious impact for consumers is they’re spending more on items they’re not able to use. And with food price inflation at 6.5%, it’s just not affordable for Canadians to be doing that now,” says Janet Music, research associate at the Agri-Food Analytics Lab. “The second consideration is the

environmental cost. While there is a human cost to food waste— meaning a lot of wasted effort, time and money—it’s not environmentally sound to be throwing away that amount of food.” The report notes that while deterioration of the quality and freshness of food products can happen at any time, the researchers suspect the pandemic and global supply chain challenges have made things worse in recent months. “When supply chains aren’t working optimally, the chain will rob consumers of some needed shelf life at home,” the report states. One of the things the report looked at was the frequency with which Canadians tossed out food in the last six months; it found: 11% of tossed out food once, 24% twice, 43% three or four times, and 22% tossed food out at least five times or more. While supply chain issues may be the culprit for less-than-fresh foods on shelves today, consumers can help prevent it all going to landfill. Music says there’s a need for more consumer education about produce, for example, how to get certain fruits to ripen or what to look for when they’re going bad. —Rebecca Harris

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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Ideas

Could Canadians get behind cell-based meat?

CANADIANS COULD soon be eating labgrown meat that tastes like conventional meat. Just don’t expect to see it on grocery shelves any time soon. Lab-grown meat along with other cellbased products are “the future of food,” according to Lejjy Gafour, president of Vancouver-based Cult Food Science, the first publicly traded company in North America to invest in cellular culture companies. “It isn’t that it’s just like meat. It literally is meat, down to the cellular level. Making that clear to consumers will be really important.” Gafour says the ability to create meat that does not require the slaughter of animals will mean that “people will embrace it for reasons that include sustainability and compassion.” He expects to see cellbased products available within the next five to seven years. Major meat and food processors are 16 CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

betting heavily on its prospects, says Simon Somogyi, director of the Longo’s Food Retail Laboratory and Arrell chair in the business of food at the University of Guelph. He notes “massive” investments of $4 billion in lab-grown meat have recently been made by companies like Maple Leaf Foods, Nestlé and JBS. Somogyi says the cost to produce a kilogram of lab-grown meat has dropped from more than $200,000 about 10 years ago to about $20 today. That’s still higher than conventional animal protein but, at the current rate of investment and with declining production costs, labgrown meat will soon cost the same as conventional meat. “It’s a two-to-threeyear proposition. It’s going to be a reality sooner than later.” Making lab-grown meat involves taking stem cells from an animal, which are then grown in fermentation vessels,

not dissimilar to the giant tanks seen in breweries. Combined with nutrients like amino acids and carbohydrates and a growth factor, the cells ferment and multiply to create meat. In 2020, Singapore became the first country to grant regulatory approval to lab-grown meat. Chicken nuggets from Good Meat, a division of San Francisco-­ based Eat Just, are now available in Singapore but have yet to make it to grocery store shelves. Receiving regulatory approval in Canada and achieving commercial viability will be big stumbling blocks, says Dana McCauley, chief experience officer at the Canadian Food Innovation Network (CFIN) in Guelph, Ont. “There’s really not a lot of scalabilities in the many projects that are out there,” she says. “Right now, it’s just a lot of people doing a lot of disconnected activity.”

SHUTTERSTOCK/NEW AFRICA

Lab-cultivated meat is on the way, but there are still some hurdles to overcome By Danny Kucharsky


SHUTTERSTOCK/SCOTT CORNELL

Ideas Lab-grown meat has potential but it’s not yet ready for prime time, says Jo-Ann McArthur, president of Nourish Food Marketing in Toronto. “It’s going to be quite niche for a while because it doesn’t really have any proven commercial viability.” In Canada, it will likely show up first in fine dining restaurants to build cachet and interest early adopters and influencers. She adds consumers will have to be convinced the process makes meat in a more beneficial way than traditionally raised beef, for instance. It may be easier for consumers to support sustainably raised, certified humane or grass-fed beef. On the other hand, “consumers have been very accepting of vertical farming,” which McArthur describes as more of a tech play than a traditional farming play. As well, younger generations tend to be open to the marriage of science and food. “They understand that science is probably going to be a big part of feeding the world,” in the future, McArthur says. Getting the name right will be another critical step, she says. Terms like “labg rown” o r “c e l l u l ar m e a t” a re n o t consumer-­­­friendly, while “cultivated” or “clean meat” are. Advocates of the technology should also learn from the poorly handled launch of GMOs, says CFIN’s McCauley. Communication and education will be key in avoiding consumer confusion. Somogyi notes that research suggests cultivated meat produces about onethird of the carbon-dioxide of beef production. In addition, “the speed at which the energy efficiency of cultivated meat is becoming more efficient is far greater than the efforts at making conventional meat more efficient.” He forecasts that by 2030, conventional meat production could lose 20% of its market share to cultured meat and plant-based meat replacements. The first lab-grown meats will be in the form of chicken nuggets or hamburgers that will be sold in the frozen section of grocery stores. Once the technology can mimic steak and other meats, “I would suspect it is likely to be sold next to conventional meat,” says Somogyi. McCauley says it could take 50 years before lab-grown meat results in a major shift in agriculture. “I don’t think it’s the end of farming or the end of going to a steakhouse. That behaviour is ingrained culturally in Canada.”

WHO’S ON TOP? New Deloitte report reveals the world’s biggest retailers IT’S BEEN QUITE a year (or two), but despite ongoing disruption, global retail remains resilient. The total retail revenue of the top 250 retailers around the world grew by 5.2% to US$5.1 trillion in fiscal 2020 (July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021), according to Deloitte’s new Global Powers of Retailing 2022 report. That’s up from 4.4% growth in the previous period. However, 69 companies reported declining sales, 14 more than in the previous year. “Despite a year of economic fits and starts, retail appears to be on an upward trajectory, with innovation in digital and sustainability as exciting bright spots in the face of the disruption and uncertainty,” said Evan Sheehan, Deloitte’s global retail, wholesale and distribution leader, in the report. “Unfortunately, churn is likely to stick with us for a while, so anticipating customer needs has never been more critical. The retailers that can get consumers what they want, where they want it, and when they want it will be the ones that continue to win—no matter where they operate.” The top three global retailers all held on to their spots: Walmart is No. 1, with US$559.15 billion in retail revenue, followed by Amazon (US$213.57 billion), and Costco (US$166.76 billion). Other grocery, pharmacy and mass merchandise retailers in the top 10 are Kroger at No. 6 (US$131.62 billion), Walgreens Boots Alliance at No. 7 (US$117.7 billion), Aldi in the eighth spot (US$117.04 billion), and Target at No. 10 (US$92.4 billion). What makes the top three tops? Walmart’s 6.7% revenue growth was fuelled by growth in comparable store sales, along with a rapid rise in e-commerce sales. The report notes that U.S. e-comm sales grew by

79%, as Walmart made significant investments in this space. At No. 2, Amazon achieved the highest retail revenue growth among the top 10. Retail revenue (first-party retail sales only) soared by 34.8% as consumers did more online shopping during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the report notes that higher demand was partially offset by fulfillment network capacity and supply chain constraints. In third place, Costco’s retail revenue was up by 9.2%, driven by an 8% increase in comparable sales, along with new warehouse openings, including nine in the United States and one in Canada. How did Canada’s “big three” grocers fare? Loblaw ranked 25th on the top 250 list, with US$38.66 billion in retail revenue, up six spots from the previous fiscal year. Empire landed at No. 50 with US$21.58 billion in retail revenue, up five spots from the previous period. Metro is No. 79, with US$13.37 billion in retail revenue, up five spots from the previous period. Also are on list: Alimentation Couche-Tard, which landed at No. 88 with US$12.11 billion in retail revenue; and Save-On-Foods, which holds the 201st spot with US$5.48 billion in retail revenue. CG —Rebecca Harris

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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mutti.ca


CATEGORY CLOSE-UP

canned

tomatoes

Great taste plus love of Italian cuisine elevates premium tomato products

W

ith home-cooking increasing exponentially in the last few years, consumers are looking for ways to elevate their standard fare with great-tasting ingredients. Premium canned tomatoes offer an easy way to improve flavour in everything from stews and sauces to pizza—and they’re available year-round. Here’s why consumers are looking to premium tastes for their canned tomatoes.

to treat themselves. “Consumers have been missing that restaurant experience being limited to take-out during the pandemic, so they want to replicate that special meal,” says Laura Dal Bo, Director, Marketing, Communications & Import Brands at Italpasta Ltd., the exclusive importer of Mutti tomato products. “They’re looking to make economical meals feel more special with the addition of indulgent ingredients.”

Authentic Italian gaining favour

Fresh-tasting tomatoes year-round

Not only is Italian-inspired cooking on the rise, the preference for authentic Italian products, rather than just Italian-sounding ones, keeps increasing as consumer opt for healthy foods. Canned tomatoes are no exception. The research shows that consumers perceive made-in-Italy products with better quality and craftmanship, and are willing to pay a premium for it.

Consumers are discovering that a good, canned tomato can be used in a variety of ways and is often more flavourful than fresh in winter months. With good manufacturing practices, tomatoes are very well preserved by canning as their colour and overall quality remains intact. Given that grocery shoppers like to be inspired with meal ideas, grocers are encouraged to pair canned tomatoes with other meal prep ingredients such as meats, pastas and dairy.

Pizza sauce on the rise Pizza is one of those Italian-inspired foods that Canadians have gravitated towards throughout the pandemic. According to market research from NielsenIQ, more than three-quarters of Canadian households bought some sort of do-it-yourself pizza last year, and the pizza sauce category enjoyed tremendous growth in 2021.

Indulging at home It’s been a long pandemic and shoppers are ready

Beyond Italian fair, canned tomatoes can fit into a wide range of other world cuisines, too. “Putting pairings together on display saves time for the consumer and increases basket size,” says Dal Bo. “We’re seeing a lot of experimentation through different flavours and that’s one of the key reasons that Mutti launched its new Pizza Classica—to give consumers the option to get creative with their spices, yet still enjoy an authentic Italian pizza at home.”

Product Spotlight Mutti Organic Range, made from 100% Italian tomatoes, has a bright red colour and intense flavour. Like all Mutti products, tomatoes are processed at peak ripeness and packed within 24 hours of being picked to ensure a fresh taste. Great pizza combines fresh ingredients, a great dough and an excellent sauce. As a base for homemade pizza, Mutti Pizza Classica gives consumers that authentic Italian pizzeria taste to enjoy from the comfort of their home.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022


FOOD BYTES || Joel Gregoire

Helping shoppers save

As food prices climb, grocers that help shoppers stretch budgets will be particularly relevant this year At the start of the pandemic, worries that the global economy was heading into a depression were pervasive. Fast-forward two years and this is no longer what’s on people’s minds. While the pandemic continues, many economies, including Canada’s, are running hot. At the start of 2022, Canada’s Consumer Price Index reached its highest level in three decades. Earlier in 2021, the dominant narrative was that the inflation we were experiencing was transitory, but in 2022 that view has changed with inflation proving to be stubbornly persistent. The Bank of Canada has signalled that it intends to respond aggressively with rate hikes to cool this inflationary trend. With Canadian households among the most indebted in the world, and with the cost of living already very high, this will no doubt have ramifications across industries, including grocery.

MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS WHEN GROCERY SHOPPING Which of the following are most important to you when shopping for foods and drinks at grocery stores? (top 3)

52% 46% 35% 33% 20 CANADIAN GROCER

Lowest price Health considerations

Canadians were already value-conscious grocery shoppers. In consumer surveys when we’ve asked what matters most when shopping for food, price tops the list. Though not surprising, this underscores how the importance of price and value will increase as rates rise and many Canadians pay more for the debt they’ve accrued. In this environment, how can grocers respond and convey value to shoppers? Mintel’s research substantiates what is already abundantly clear: promotional activity resonates. More than two-thirds of Canadian shoppers say they look for sale items ahead of non-sale items either all or most of the time according to Mintel’s The Budget Shopper report, published in 2021. As grocers vie for traffic, offering compelling promotions will prove even more important with half of shoppers also indicating they will shop at different stores to get the lowest prices on the items they want. Savings can also come with other benefits. Canadians show deep concern over food waste and its impact on the environment. For grocers and food and drink manufacturers, helping Canadians save can align with environmental and ethically-minded initiatives that are good for both the planet and for wallets. One example is leveraging apps that help shoppers get the most out of their purchases with creative tips for using up (rather than tossing) their leftover food. And food rescue apps, such as Flashfood, are also gaining traction. These apps alert consumers to foods that are nearing their expiry date and can be bought at a discount at (partnering) grocery stores rather than ending up as trash. It’s better to save and eat the food than discard it—grocers can capitalize on this. Even as Canadians are likely to tighten their budgets, given current economic conditions, the reality is the vast majority are not spending too much time counting their pennies. Half of Canadians say they “watch their finances but don’t follow a budget” and fewer than one-in-five say they “follow a strict budget” (51% versus 16%, respectively). What this means is Canadians are busy and don’t have time to itemize the cost-benefit of every expenditure. As Canadians look to make tradeoffs, grocers can get creative with suggested meal solutions using different items on promotion that come in on, or below, budget such as dinners under five dollars per head. It all comes down to making saving easy for shoppers and doing some of the work for them. The pandemic has brought many surprises with high inflation being one of them. As expenses rise, grocers that can provide shoppers with easy and creative solutions that help them save will be particularly relevant in 2022. CG

Where produced Preferred brand KANTAR PROFILES/MINTEL, NOVEMBER 2021 | BASE: 2,000 INTERNET USERS AGED 18+

|| March/April 2022

Joel Gregoire is associate director, Food & Drink at Mintel, the world’s leading market intelligence agency. Based in Toronto, Joel researches and writes reports on Canada’s food and drink industry. @JoelDGregoire



EATING IN CANADA || Kathy Perrotta sourcing, freshness and pureness. And according to the report, the fastest-rising food labels of importance reveal that consumers are prioritizing organic, protein and local sourcing.

Shifting priorities

Three big insights on how Canadians are approaching healthy eating CANADIANS’ FOCUS on healthy eating has been a top priority for years and consumers have capitalize on the wealth of available health information. Today, consumers often view their health choices as an extension of their values and beliefs. But how do consumers define what is healthy to eat or drink? The answer to this question has evolved over the years from individuals solely focused on specific nutrients for nourishment to re-evaluating and elevating their understanding of mind and body benefits—for example, energy, mind or sleep. In addition, the pandemic has brought to the forefront lifestyle concerns and work-life balance demands, with big issues such as environmental safety, polarizing political views and climate change seeming inescapable at times. And according to Ipsos’ latest Canada CHATS 2022 Trends Report, one-in-five food and beverage choices made by consumers is motivated by the need for something healthy and nutritious. In fact, demand for healthy options is up more than seven percentage points, when compared to the pre-pandemic 2019 period. To better understand consumers’ approaches to healthy eating, here are three big health insights from this year’s Trends Report:

Fastest Rising Food Labels of Importance* 2022 % Change versus 2019 High Fibre Organic No GMOs Good Source of Protein Locally Sourced/Grown Farmed Responsibly

5 5 13 14 19 12

*NOTE ITEMS ARE RANKED BY SIZE; R12ME DEC’21 - % OCCURRENCES

22 CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

1. The broader shift toward holistic health doesn’t negate the importance of nutrient density With almost two-thirds of adults (64%) reporting to always or regularly consult on-package product information, the evaluation of quantities of specific nutrients (good and bad) continues to be table stakes for brands that wish to position themselves as relevant to consumers and their health aspirations. Top food labels such as Made in Canada, Best Before (date), All Natural, No Artificial Additives or Ingredients and Low Sugar, reflect consumers’ demand for details related to product

2. Quest for benefits Focusing on benefits that aid current well-being, future condition management, and prevention is a tremendous opportunity for innovation. More than a third of consumers (36%) report to have a dietary restriction or sensitivity that impacts their food and drink choices. Further, a rising share of food and beverage items (+10% versus 2019) are selected because they provide a specific mind-body benefit; this is led by weight control, digestive health, immunity support and augmenting mental focus and concentration demands. Opportunities abound for companies that possess the knowledge and nimbleness to communicate ingredient health benefits and help consumers be at their best. 3. Re-prioritizing customized eating regimes As consumers embrace information and the technologies that help them set and track personal goals, there will continue to be more adherence to specialized diets and personalized eating regimes. In fact, close to one-in-three adults (30%) report to follow diets—such as vegetarian, flexitarian, vegan, pescatarian and reduced-calorie regimes—that support lifestyle needs, goals and beliefs. And rising demand for plant-based protein options are strongly developed among both females and younger cohorts between the ages of 18 to 34 years old. Whether consumers’ focus is on replacing or reducing their intake of meat products, rising interest in plant-based products will undoubtedly play a large role in the future of protein consumption. Other shifting habits are being fuelled by “eating clean” demands. These include more cooking at home and keeping well-stocked pantries. These behaviours provide consumers with a degree of control and on-hand choice to thwart impulsive decisions. In fact, beyond the cost savings, more than half of meal preparers (52%) report that they cook at home because it is healthier. Consumers’ interest and involvement in their daily food choices presents a unique opportunity for retailers, manufacturers and foodservice operators to communicate nutrition benefits, curate specific dietary options and delight consumers with fresh, authentic and less processed product offerings that meet both Canadians’ cultural need for foods that can be discovered and shared, as well as fit into the holistic health framework. CG

Kathy Perrotta is a VP of Marketing with Ipsos Canada and leads the FIVE ser­vice, a daily diary tracking of what individuals ate and drank yesterday across all categ­ories/brands, occasions and venues. Kathy.perrotta@ipsos.com



CONSUMER CONNECTION || Ransom Hawley

More Canadian shoppers turn to Amazon for savings Amid rising inflation, more consumers are finding the retail giant offers a lot of value

The [Subscribe and Save] service lets members schedule regular deliveries of frequent purchases while earning savings of up to 20%. Those savings will be critical in the next 12 to 24 months as inflation continues to rise

24 CANADIAN GROCER

The pandemic accelerated e-commerce two years ago and there’s no sign of it slowing down. With 81% of Canadians reporting to be Amazon customers, it’s clear retailers will have a tough time keeping up with the marketplace giant. According to Caddle’s latest report, the quarterly insights tracker on Amazon Prime, data shows membership rates are not only holding, but subscriber retention is getting even stickier in the pandemic era. Overall, more than half of Canadians use the retail membership service and enjoy its perks. After a slight dip in numbers over the summer, Prime membership bounced back to more than 40% in the fourth quarter. The biggest barrier to membership remains price, but Amazon could overcome this by continuing to add value with growing video and audio streaming catalogues and faster delivery. Canadians want to spend less. In fact, research shows price is the No. 1 deciding factor for which online retailer they’ll use. From coast to coast, our surveys have found shoppers will change retailers if more savings are on the table, and we know that 52.8% plan to use coupons to temper rising costs. Amazon’s Subscribe and Save program remains a popular way of doing just that. The service lets members schedule regular deliveries of frequent purchases while earning savings of up to 20%. Those savings will be critical in the next 12 to 24 months as inflation continues to rise. One-third of Prime members say they use Subscribe and Save, and most intend to keep putting their shopping on autopilot post-pandemic. While the program’s convenience drove traction during the pandemic, it’s the savings that will spark a new wave of subscribers and retain existing members

|| March/April 2022

as Canadians try to balance their budgets. Entry to the subscription service was spurred largely by household stand-bys. Health and wellness products like vitamins and supplements have been in higher demand in recent years thanks to COVID-19. Though still strong, sales have slowed as immune health became less of a priority with a widespread vaccine rollout. Pet care continues to lead the subscription categories, representing 42% of transactions through the automatic service. While restocking household essentials like diapers and pet care are a gateway, we’ve seen purchases soon flow to other must-haves like household cleaners, beauty products and laundry supplies. But Amazon’s gains are a test for other retailers. While one-third of the service’s users spend $50 or less per month on subscription purchases, that number is expected to rise as consumers shift more products to arrive on a schedule. First-mover advantage is crucial for brands, because once a customer is subscribed, their loyalty is much harder to break. Walmart’s sales are being hit the hardest, but the e-tailer is also funnelling shoppers away from traditional grocery stores and is having an impact on drugstores. Now, more than ever, Canadians can shop a wider variety of goods without leaving their homes, but the subscription model takes convenience one step further. At this point, the biggest barrier to joining is a lack of knowledge about the program and how it works. Millennials have been the quickest to adopt the service, but its exceptional net promoter score (NPS) suggests further growth could rival even the gold standard of membership retention as word spreads. Costco still maintains a higher NPS, but its membership is perceived by many consumers as too exclusive and expensive. In fact, a staggering 57% of Canadian shoppers surveyed said they’d choose their Amazon Prime membership over their Costco card, a sentiment that’s growing. As inflation continues to outpace national income growth, shoppers will be increasingly motivated to reduce their monthly costs. As players like Instacart expand in the market with local delivery options, it remains to be seen if an Amazon Prime subscription will be considered a luxury Canadians can afford to cut. But with some of the most competitive prices in the market, and benefits like multimedia streaming, overnight delivery, and the Subscribe and Save model, Amazon is trying to position itself as a bargain. Indeed, Prime will likely only get better. As more value is layered in and services improve, the e-commerce giant will likely retain existing members and attract new ones, as more financially-savvy Canadians see that added value as a tiebreaker—which is worrying news for other retailers. CG

Ransom Hawley, former packaged goods leader, is founder and CEO at Caddle Inc., the largest mobile-first insights platform that rewards Canadians for sharing data and engaging with brands.


Learn how to navigate the knowledge era with keynote speaker

Dr. Nick Bontis • Reconnect with industry friends • Meet with key leaders • Expand your business network

Register now! #CPMA2022 convention.cpma.ca


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convention.cpma.ca

welcome The Canadian Produce Marketing Association (CPMA) is excited to host its 2022 Annual Convention and Trade Show live at the Palais des congrès, in Montreal, Quebec. CPMA’s Convention and Trade Show is Canada’s largest fresh produce event offering industry members the perfect opportunity to showcase their brands, connect with prospective clients, and discover the latest developments within the fresh fruits and vegetable sector.

Ron Lemaire, President Canadian Produce Marketing Association

This year’s program is designed to reunite the industry and provide countless networking and business development opportunities.

The 2022 edition, Industry Reunited, will be Canada’s first inperson produce show since the pandemic forced worldwide shutdowns. This year’s program is designed to reunite the industry and provide countless networking and business development opportunities. In addition, the educational sessions will dive deep into some of the pivotal points that have reshaped the landscape of our industry these past two years, including innovation, sustainability, supply chain disruptions, and more. In this issue of the Canadian Grocer, we introduce new products that will be part of our Trade Show’s New Product Showcase feature. I invite everyone to take this opportunity to discover what is coming next on the produce shelves in the following section. I would like to thank Canadian Grocer for, once again, being the official sponsor of the New Product Showcase. Each year, Canadian Grocer demonstrates its support for innovation in the produce industry by giving our members a platform to launch their new products to the market. I am looking forward to seeing you all in Montreal!

Ron Lemaire President, CPMA

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022


TEAM UP with

California Prunes Canadian athletes on the world stage have teamed up with California Prunes to share the health and nutrition benefits of prunes, motivating consumers to flock to stores to purchase them as a snack on the go, an addition to their favourite meals, or as a sugar substitute in baked goods

Marion Thénault Freestyle Aerial Skiier

California Prunes can help contribute to…

Strong Bones

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Immunity

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Heart Health

Sign up for our newsletter for market updates and industry news that may be relevant for your business. If you are interested in purchasing California Prunes visit CaliforniaPrunes.ca/trade for a list of California Prune handlers. CaliforniaPrunes.ca | @CAprunesCAN

Marion Thénault photo couresy of Freestyle Canada.


convention.cpma.ca

program at a glance Monday, April 4, 2022

Location

12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Registration Area Open

Tuesday, April 5, 2022

Room Palais des congrès

Location

Room

7:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Registration Area Open

Palais des congrès

8:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Chair’s Welcome Reception

St James Theatre

Wednesday, April 6, 2022 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Location Registration Area Open

Viger Hall

Viger Hall

Room Palais des congrès

Viger Hall

8:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Delegate and Companion Breakfast

Palais des congrès

517 C/D

10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Business Sessions

Palais des congrès

518 A/B/C

10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Companion Program

Off-site locations

11:30 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

Delegate Lunch

Palais des congrès

517 C/D

1:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Trade Show

Palais des congrès

Hall 220

2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Learning Lounge Sessions

Palais des congrès

Trade Show Floor

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Fresh Drinks for Young Professionals

Palais des congrès

519 A

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Women in Produce Reception

Palais des congrès

519 B

9:30 p.m. – 1:00 a.m.

After Party

Westin Hotel

Montreal

Thursday, April 7, 2022

Location

Room

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Registration Area Open

Palais des congrès

Viger Hall

9:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Awards Brunch

Palais des congrès

517 C/D

8:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Dietitians’ Session

Palais des congrès

518 A/B

11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Trade Show

Palais des congrès

Hall 220

12:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Learning Lounge Sessions

Palais des congrès

Trade Show Floor

6:30 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.

CPMA Annual Banquet Reception

Palais des congrès

517 B

7:30 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

CPMA Annual Banquet and Entertainment

Palais des congrès

517 C/D

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022


EXPERIENCE THE FLAVOR

divineflavor.com BETTER FOOD FOR A BETTER WORLD.


convention.cpma.ca

Del Fresco Produce Ltd. ALLWays Local Produce powered by CubicFarms

ALLWays Local Produce grown using Crop Motion Technology™ in a CubicFarm System provides plants with the perfect day, everyday, sustainably. Crop Motion Technology™ moves hundreds of plants through indoor growing modules using 52X less land, 95% less water, 80% less waste, with 45% more nutrients.

Canadawide - Frescadel

The sunshine brand has been given a makeover and is shining brighter than ever. With its vibrant colours and captivating pattern, the Frescadel family offers you an explosion of colour to brighten your day and wake up your taste buds!

Our Ombra brown tomato is delicious and unique! With its ability to change from one striking color to the next, this tomato perfectly blends in with every occasion with every shade! delfrescopure.com/ombra Booth 2315

EarthFresh

cubicfarms.com Booth 1821

“The new tray forming machine for top seal punnets.” This versatile double head machine, is capable of forming and erecting 2 tray sizes at the same time, in corrugated and solid board with 4 ledges folded and glued. boix.com Booth 2123

DelFresco Produce Ltd.

Cascades

With our 100% recycled cardboard trays, we provide a perfectly suited solution for growers, packers and retailers that maximizes the protection of harvests throughout the distribution journey up to the consumers’ kitchen while contributing to environmental efforts.

cascades.com/en/productsservices/packaging/food-packaging Booth 815

Canadawide

Canadawide proudly offers a Fairtrade banana program exclusively from Coliman. Being located in Mexico, we receive them in only 7 days. Coliman is ranked first in Europe for its Fairtrade organic bananas.

EarthFresh organic product lineup includes organic red, russet and golden potatoes in 100% compostable paper bags. Compostable packaging requires less carbon to produce and return nutrients back to the Earth. earthfreshfoods.com Booth 907

frescadel.com Booth 1601

Boix Machinery USA, LLC

EarthFresh

DelFrescoPure® Heirloom Tomatoes redefine variety. The “collector’s edition” of the tomato family stays true to its name. Add a little classical taste to your everyday recipes with DelFrescoPure® Heirloom Tomatoes. delfrescopure.com/heirloomtomatoes Booth 2315

Dole Food Company

3 New Chopped Kits! Healthy has never tasted so good. Healthy ingredients, flavors and textures deliver Dole’s signature Craveable Crunch in every bite! DOLE® Double Dill, DOLE® Maple Pecan and DOLE® Tropical Thai. dole.com Booth 709

These highquality potatoes are normally wasted because they don’t fit regular size standards. Help us rescue these delicious spuds! Packaging educates consumers on food insecurity while providing a way to help by purchasing potatoes that would have otherwise been wasted. earthfreshfoods.com Booth 907

EarthFresh

Organic Sweet potatoes are root vegetables with earthy undertones and a wealth of nutrients, including beta carotene, a powerful antioxidant. Organic baby sweet potatoes are fast cooking and packed in 1lb, 3lb and biobased packaging. earthfreshfoods.com Booth 907

canadawidefruits.com Booth 1601

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022



convention.cpma.ca

First Genesis Inc./ Sunflower Emerson Canada

Oversight Services puts cold chain data to work with analytics from inbound loads and across your fleet to provide facility, supplier and carrier scorecards, diagnostics, and optimization tools. We help reduce time, costs and energy consumption while improving product quality.

Meet our new sustainable packaging line with our HiCR2 Produce Pouch and Sustainable Produce Containers (SPC). The HiCR2 pouches are the highest clarity HDPE film and are recyclable. Our SPC are cardboard clamshells that are an alternative to plastic clamshells. sunflowerpkg.com Booth 1322

Fresh Direct Produce

Enjoy the flavor rush of highquality citrus and the benefits of pure organic nutrition. Check out Fresh Direct’s new line of Organic Citrus items, featuring conveniently resealable and 100% recyclable bags. Please visit booth #915 for more details. freshdirectproduce.com Booth 915

climate.emerson.com/en-us/ products/controls-monitoringsystems/cargo-tracking-monitoring/ software-products Booth 1223

Groupe Savoura/Savoura Group

The new packaging, entirely made in Quebec, consists almost entirely of compostable cardboard and a plastic film as a window, thus allowing consumers to see the product in the box and preserve the humidity of the fruits during their transport. savoura.com Booth 323

Gwillimdale Farms Fresh Del Monte Produce (Canada), Inc.

When you pick a Del Monte FairTrade Banana you are helping farmers earn a fair wage and joining forces with a company who is a true believer in ethical fruit sourcing. Become part of Del Monte’s “bananafactor” community! ®

Equifruit, Inc.

When you pick an Equifruit banana, you are supporting the OG #bananabadass brand. 100% Fairtrade-certified since day 1. Now available in conventional Fairtrade. equifruit.com Booth 215

Erablière Louis Vallières

Our delicious 100% pure maple products in an easy to carry format! Our box contains 12 individual portions of maple syrup or maple butter: the perfect size to bring in your lunchbox, sport activities or on your camping trips.

domainedugrandreed.com Booth 1502

delmontefresh.com Booth 407

Great Lakes Greenhouses Inc.

We are excited to launch our new ORGANIC packs to support any program. TOV (4-pack & bag), Bell Peppers (2pk/3pk/tray & flow-wrap) and organic minieggplant (2pk/tray/bag) are all grown, harvested and packed in-house ensuring exceptional quality and flavor profiles. greatlakesg.com Booth 2207

Fresh Del Monte Produce (Canada), Inc.

Pinkglow® is the first and only pink pineapple on the market. These exclusive pineapples have a delicious and unique taste, with notes of candy pineapple aromatics and are juicier and sweeter than a traditional pineapple. pinkglowpineapple.com Booth 407

Grimmway Farms

Leave the guilt behind with rainbow carrot chips! A nutritious alternative to salty snacks and sweets, their ridged edges and flexible, flat surface are the perfect match for your favorite dip and they’re naturally lowcalorie and fat-free. calorganicfarms.com Booth 1318

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

An age-old problem, misunderstood potatoes ending up unused. They are JUST, delicious white potatoes as nature intended. Grade 2 potatoes are a conscious option and rescue edible food waste. Available in 5 lb. compostable bags. Packaging for a greener future. gwillimdalefarms.com Booth 1301

Highline Mushrooms

Highline’s new Simple Sides come with delicious fresh ingredients sauce to bring out the savoury flavour of mushrooms. Our sauté kits currently come in two flavours, and make the perfect addition to any meal. highlinemushrooms.com Booth 2415


California Raisins – A Gift of Nature Naturally sun dried, with no added sugar or juice, California raisins are one of the most sustainable foods, trusted by retailers and consumers across Canada. This naturally sweet superfruit is synonymous with healthy eating and snacking.

59%

OF CANADIANS KNOW CALIFORNIA RAISINS ARE THE BEST QUALITY IN THE WORLD.1

Tip: Raisins are a delicious salad topper. Consider placing this affordable, nutritious dried fruit in the produce aisle to capture shoppers’ attention.

A SUSTAINABLE CHOICE In the San Joaquin Valley, both the sun and the heated soil work together like a natural oven to transform grapes into California raisins. Growers also use drip irrigation to make their water use as efficient as possible. 2 Consumers can feel good about choosing California raisins and including them as a healthy addition to meals and snacks.

49%

OF CONSUMERS NOW CONSIDER SUSTAINABILITY WHEN PURCHASING FOOD AND BEVERAGE PRODUCTS. 3

97%

OF CANADIANS RECOGNIZE THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF RAISINS.4

For more reasons to love California Raisins, visit: CaliforniaRaisins.ca @raisins.ca 1 Raisin Administrative Committee – Canada Evaluation, Rose Research LLC (Based on a subset of respondents that are aware of CA/USA raisin production and have bought raisins recently) 2 Raisin Industry, Raisin Administrative Committee 3 2022 food and beverage trends, Canadian Grocer 4 Raisin Administrative Committee – Canada Evaluation, Rose Research LLC (Based on a subset of respondents that have bought raisins recently)


convention.cpma.ca

La Presserie

La Presserie, a new Canadian company, has launched a delicious and innovative line of raw unpasteurized plant-based cold pressed salad dressings, which include clean-label fruit and vegetable-based varieties that make salads more nutritious, as well as completely dairy-free and egg-free creamy classics with fresh herbs. lapresserie.com Booth 1803

Martin’s Family Fruit Farm Ltd

The Apple Jacket™ is an innovation from Martin’s in sustainable apple packaging. A 100% post-consumer recycled cardboard sleeve gently encases premium apples. This offers a plastic-free option for packaged apples that greatly reduces bruising. Available in 2pk and 6pk formats.

Mastronardi Produce Ltd./ SUNSET

Mucci Farms

sunsetgrown.com Booth 1315

muccifarms.com Booth 1615

Mastronardi Produce Ltd.

Mastronardi Produce Ltd./ SUNSET

Designed with mother nature in mind, our new 100% paperboard packaging is fully recyclable and features high-impact graphics, making them an earth-friendly option that shines on shelf.

Mucci Farms Hot Shots are Flavour on Fire! Our mix of hot peppers will help you turn up the heat with some of the world’s hottest varieties! Great for sauces, salsa, or even as a snack…if you dare!

martinsapples.com Booth 705

Litehouse Inc.

Delicious Dips that drive demand! Check out the NEW Litehouse Dips! Litehouse is excited about a NEW Greek Yogurt Dressing, Purely Balanced and only 45 calories per serving!

litehousefoods.ca Booth 520

Untouched. Untreated. Unprecedented. We’re here to revolutionize how greens are grown. That’s why our premium crafted blends are greenhouse grown and washed and ready to eat, making them a safe, healthy and convenient choice. trustthequeen.com Booth 1315

At SUNSET, we’re always growing for the future. Our Organic Grape Tomatoes are now offered in a convenient topseal package with a recyclable base that significantly reduces plastic.

Mucci Farms

How do you showcase the freshest, most flavorful produce and amplify Greenhouse grown? With a fresh new look for a full lineup of flavorful products! muccifarms.com Booth 1615

sunsetgrown.com Booth 1315

Longvine Growing Co

Snacking tomatoes and Snacking cucumber meet for the perfect environmentally and lunch box friendly to go pack. longvine.com Booth 109

Maglio Companies

Peeled, deseeded, and individuallywrapped mango halves with an extended shelf life of 30 days at production! maglioproduce.com Booth 1919

Mother Raw Mastronardi Produce Ltd./ SUNSET

Perfect for little hands, our Qukes™ & Dip and Angel® Sweet & Dip packs will delight snackers of all ages. Whether you dunk’em or dip’em, they’re the perfect lunchbox treat! sunsetgrown.com Booth 1315

Mother Raw introduces our latest Plant-Based Dips & Quesos. Consciously crafted with only the purest and best ingredients from Mother Earth, our dips and queso’s are made with mouth-watering combinations of olive oil, apple cider vinegar, veggies, and spices. motherraw.ca Booth 417

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

Mucci Farms

Certified Organic by Pro-Cert, our Natural Organics grape tomatoes are high in flavour and featured in a 2lb sustainable cardboard fiber tray that’s 100% recyclable and glue free! muccifarms.com Booth 1615


convention.cpma.ca

Ocean Mist Farms Mucci Farms

Snack Sweet & Smart – Indulgent and nutritious sweet treats, Naturipe Snacks™ Bliss Bentos are big on flavor to satisfy your shopper’s sweet tooth! Combining fresh fruit with other specialty ingredients in three flavor assortments, offering up to 21 days shelf-life. muccifarms.com Booth 1615

Naturipe Farms

Snack Sweet & Smart – Indulgent and nutritious sweet treats, Naturipe Snacks™ Bliss Bentos are big on flavor to satisfy your shopper’s sweet tooth! Combining fresh fruit with other specialty ingredients in three flavor assortments, offering up to 21 days shelf-life. naturipesnacks.com Booth 1815

naturSource Inc.

Nature Fresh Farms

How do you showcase the freshest, most flavorful produce and amplify Greenhouse grown? With a fresh new look for a full lineup of flavorful products! naturefresh.ca Booth 315

This chocolate and cinnamon infused mix with salted pretzels, praline almonds, creamy cashews, and dark chocolate chunks is made in a peanut free facility. This product comes in a 500g package and is a source of plant based protein.

Ocean Mist Farms’ ValueAdded product line is a variety of retail-ready packs offering nutritious shelf-ready options that are microwaveable and convenient. Bilingual packaging available. All product is grown and processed in-house, guaranteeing our Gold Standard Quality! contactus@oceanmist. com for more information. oceanmist.com Booth 1018

Océan Vert

The MIDI Spring Mix is a ready to eat mix of greens grown in a vertical farm without any pesticide. Of high quality, our lettuces have an exceptional shelf life that leaves no one indifferent. midi.ca Booth 1115

natursource.com Booth 825

Oppy

Nature Fresh Farms

Picked at their freshest peak for their fragrance and flavor, Nature Fresh Farms Greenhouse grown Strawberries are incredibly sweet and noticeably juicy. We combine technology and a hands-on approach to sustainably grow the highest quality berries. naturefresh.ca Booth 315

NNZ Inc.

Vertical form fill and seal, stand up pouch, quad seal or horizontal seals paper packages are available. 100% Recyclable, 100% Compostable, Paperlock™ heat sealing technology. Mesh made from 100% natural plant fibres. Can be adapted to existing automated packaging lines. nnz.ca Booth 2228

We’re upping the ante in packaged salads with our soilfree, fully-automated high density vertical farm. Our proprietary touchless technology, humidity, temperature, water, light and nutrient-controlled environment not only produces greens that are safer and more sustainable—they taste infinitely better too. upverticalfarms.com Booth 1209, 1309

Oppy

Amuse your shelves with the latest innovation in the powerful berry category—Happy Berry™ hydroponic strawberries.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

Produced under hoops in California our sustainablygrown tabletop berries boast less water use, ease of picking, no ground fumigation, yearround availability, and more! promo.oppy.com/osphappyberry Booth 1209, 1309

P.L. Light Systems

The TriPlane sets a new standard for LED horticultural lighting as a true 1-for-1 replacement of the 1000W HID luminaire. The LED modules can be adjusted independently in precise increments—allowing for highly customized light distribution, in any CEA application. pllight.com Booth 2613

Pure Flavor

Enjoy the natural sweetness of Organic Luna Sweet Cocktail Tomatoes that are prized by chefs and home cooks alike for their juiciness and meaty texture. Their versatility makes them ideal for baking, stuffing, and slicing in elegant appetizers and hors d’oeuvres. pure-flavor.com Booth 2115

Red Sun Farms

Red Sun Farms is excited to showcase new and sustainable packaging innovations for compostable wrap, recyclable topseal, and bags! Sustainability is the root of everything we do at Red Sun Farms. Stop by booth #515 to learn more! redsunfarms.com Booth 515


convention.cpma.ca

Taylor Farms

Sollum Technologies Safe Food Corporation

Let our single-serve packs of succulent dried fruits steer you toward an ideal lifestyle! From breakfast to on-the-go snacking, our portion packs are for anytime and anyone. Vegan, organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, sulphite-free, and nut-free. For more snacks, visit sunnyfruit.com. sunnyfruit.com Booth 225

Saladexpress Inc.

Latest additions to Florette’s salad kit combinations of deli salads and crispy lettuce, the Tex-Mex corn fiesta, the Quinoa and caramelized onions and the Tuscan-style Pasta flavours deliver a delightful taste experience through crafted sous-vide toppings in their own dressing. florette.ca/en/salad-kits-inclamshells Booth 1101

Sambrailo

Our ReadyCycle® closed pint basket is one of our newest offerings in our sustainable packaging line. 100% recyclable, home compostable, and custom print and designs available. An ideal alternative to single use plastic clamshells. readycyclepackaging.com Booth 2321

Designed and manufactured in Canada, the state-of-the-art smart LED grow light solution redefines the horticultural lighting industry. It can recreate any spectra of the Sun's natural light and its cycles from anywhere in the world.

Packed with bold flavors, this salad has delicious smoky bacon and crunchy golden honey almonds with a sweet maple bourbon vinaigrette with crisp romaine lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, green onion, and carrots. taylorfarms.com Booth 1809

sollumtechnologies.com Booth 220

Sunkist Growers, Inc.

Sunkist® California Mandarins have snack time, solved. This new kid-friendly packaging, loved by millennial moms, features a mandarin character and lollipop logo. With 25% of consumers increasing on-the-go snacking, matching merchandising can help drive your Peel Good Citrus™ sales!

Taylor Farms

Our Earthbound Farm Organic Broccoli Slaw, Cauliflower Florets, Green Beans, Vegetable Medley, and Broccoli Florets are ready to be added as a side or a main dish for any meal- all organic, simple and delicious. earthboundfarm.com Booth 1809

Taylor Farms

taylorfarms.com Booth 1809

Taylor Farms

We have the most EXTRA snack tray for you- filled with crunchy carrots, juicy tomatoes, savory flax seed corn chips and chunky guacamole! Perfect for a day on the go or a filling snack at the office.

Remember strawberries from Grandma’s garden? The Star Group’s “Juliets” aim to be the best berry you’ve tasted since then. Grown in state-of-the-art greenhouses in Delta, BC, Juliets are optimized for flavour, rather than transportability. Launching spring, 2022. thestargroup.ca Booth 607

peelgoodcitrus.com Booth 1711

Savor the flavors of summer all yearroasted almonds paired with roasted watermelon seeds and feta cheese over romaine sprinkled with a hint of radicchio. Toss with one-of-a kind (kind of sweet kind a tart) watermelon lime vinaigrette.

The Star Group

The Little Potato Company

The Little Potato Company takes the guess work out of mealtime by offering busy families exciting, easy, and delicious products that come together in minutes. Our three new products include two Microwave Ready flavours of Smoked Salt and Roasted Garlic, Rosemary, & Thyme, and our new purple potatoes, Purely Purple in a 1.5 lb bag. littlepotatoes.com Booth 601

Just add eggs! The Star Group’s breakfast kits make for easy omelettes, any time of day. Unique, patented packaging allows dairy, meat and fresh value-added produce items to travel together, providing an (almost) all-in-one meal solution. thestargroup.ca Booth 607

The Star Group

Reducing single-use plastics is of critical importance to all of us as global citizens. By supporting the research of Queens University’s Open Plastic initiative, The Star Group is helping leading scientists transform plastic waste into high-value, reusable materials. thestargroup.ca Booth 607

taylorfarms.com Booth 1809

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER

The Star Group

|| March/April 2022


convention.cpma.ca

UNITEC Canada Fruit and Vegetables Technology, Inc.

Troppy Foods Ltd

Troppy Foods Ltd. is a company that specializes in Jackfruit Products. We use Vacuum Frying Technology which is lower pressure and temperature rather than atmospheric deepfat frying to improve the quality attributes of food products. troppyfoods.com Booth 2307

Intelligent robotic technology able to place apples inside trays so that stems are oriented in the same direction. Together with UNITEC vision system Apples Sort3, 100% made in UNITEC, it can orient apples’ stems with the part with more color. en.unitec-group.com Booth 1917

Windset Farms

Windset Farms

Windset Farms® is excited to be adding Paper Punnets and Paper Lidding to our produce packaging! Using more widely recyclable paper to package our produce is just another way we are offering more sustainable options for our customers! greenhousegrown.com Booth 507

Windset Farms® brings together your all-time favourites; Concerto® Grape Tomatoes, Dolce® Sweet Mini Peppers, and Fresco® Baby Cucumbers in this easy and convenient Greenhouse Party Tray! Perfect for any get-together or at home snacking, rinse and enjoy! greenhousegrown.com Booth 507


Call for nominations! Save-On-Foods We know Canada’s grocery Rehan's Your Independent Grocer industry is filled with examples of companies making a positive impact whether it is improving the planet, supporting employees or helping local communities. The second annual Canadian Grocer Impact Awards is now open for nominations to recognize initiatives Unilever Canada introduced by retailers, suppliers and Here are just some of our 2021 solution providers that are making winners. To see all the winners a meaningful difference in four visit: cgimpactawards.ca categories: Sobeys Sustainability (food waste, ethical sourcing, energy efficiency initiatives etc.) McCormick Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Supporting Employees Community Service/Local Impact/Giving Back Tell us about the amazing work being done at your company! Winners will Rabba Fine Foods be featured in the August issue of Mother Parkers Canadian Grocer.

• • • •

Submit your nominations at cgimpactawards.ca DEADLINE TO ENTER: MAY 30, 2022 Have questions? Please contact Shellee Fitzgerald, editor-in-chief, Canadian Grocer at sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com


It’s time to learn and celebrate in person again BE PART OF THESE TWO MUST-ATTEND EVENTS THIS SPRING.

Presented by

May 31 & June 1, 2022, Toronto Congress Centre RCC STORE brings Canada’s most influential retail leaders, world-renowned visionaries, and passionate entrepreneurs together to discuss critical topics affecting retail. F E A T U R I N G

ROCKY OZAKI,

KATE ANCKETILL,

Founder & CEO, The NoW of Work Inc.

Founder & CEO, GDR Creative Intelligence

PACO UNDERHILL, Author, How We Eat: The Brave New World of Food and Drink

STAY TUNED FOR THE FULL AGENDA.

Presented by

June 1, 2022, Toronto Congress Centre Join us in celebrating the people behind Canada’s best new products in food, non-food and private-label categories.

LEARN. RECONNECT. CELEBRATE. Visit STOREConference.ca and RCCGrandPrix.ca for more information and tickets


Produce operations survey

a

good prognosis for produce

Survey shows produce is holding firm despite ongoing pandemic challenges By Rosalind Stefanac AS WE REFLECT on another year of pandemic living, several positive trends in produce reveal the future may be shining a little brighter for grocers, even in these still challenging times. In our third annual Canadian Grocer Produce Operations Survey, retailers across the country weighed in on the repercussions of a global pandemic on their produce departments, as well as the opportunities for growth expected ahead.

GETTY IMAGES/SMITHCJB

Produce sales stay steady

Fewer survey respondents (47%) noted that their total produce sales had gone up in the last six months, compared to the year prior (75%), but another 35% said sales had stayed the same. The vast majority (86%) were also optimistic that same-store produce sales will increase or stay the same for the remainder of 2022, with fresh vegetables and locally-sourced produce being the key drivers. “I see the biggest thing that’s happening right now is everybody wants leafy greens, and we’re selling more spinach and romaine than ever,” says Ryan Dennis, owner of Larry’s Market, a full-service grocery store specializing in organic produce with two locations in North

Vancouver. “We’re seeing a real focus on healthy eating with people really trying to make sure that they’re putting the right [foods] into their bodies.” But it’s not just leafy greens gaining consumer attention in the produce section. The Power of Produce 2022, a new report from the Food Industry Association (FMI) in the United States, shows that six-in-10 shoppers purchase fruits and vegetables to deliver on specific health benefits, specifically apples, bananas, berries, oranges, broccoli and spinach. They also want more information about health and nutrition benefits, recommended daily intake and portion sizes, which presents an opportunity for produce departments. These shoppers also come from higher-income households and take more grocery trips in a typical week—and spend more than average on a per capital basis. Ron Lemaire, president of the Canadian Produce Marketing Association (CPMA), says there is no doubt the pandemic has had an impact on consumers wanting to eat healthier and looking to incorporate more fruits and vegetables into their diets as result. With more people now accustomed to cooking at home using

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

41


Produce operations survey fresh produce, he expects this trend to continue even as restrictions lift and foodservice options expand. “Local produce has really surged throughout the pandemic… with the growth and strength of our domestic market, and we’re hopeful that we will continue to see the entire fruit and vegetable category grow,” he says. That’s not to say this past year hasn’t had its challenges for produce departments across the country. According to our survey respondents, supply chain issues, labour shortages, shrink and subsequent price increases were all significant hurdles.

The strain of supply chain issues + rising prices

Among the key challenges affecting produce departments in 2021, supply chain issues were among the very worst, says Mimmo Franzone, senior director, produce, floral and senior merchandising services at Longo’s in Ontario. On top of port delays and an overall increase in freight rates, if products were made or packaged in close quarters, changes had to be made to create safer working environments, which also contributed to delays in arrivals. “It was tough to try and educate our guests about the cost of logistics and the impact it had on retailers,” he says. For grocers in Western Canada, pandemic-induced supply chain challenges—coupled with severe flooding

and other erratic weather conditions in 2021—put produce departments “through the ringer,” says Daniel Pazder, director of produce at Freson Bros. in Edmonton. But with Alberta getting better at hydroponics (a production method where plants are grown in a nutrient solution instead of soil) and in working with local producers, he says more produce items (for instance, lettuce and tomatoes) have become more accessible closer to home. Some grocers like Fresh City Farms in Toronto are even operating their own farms to develop a more sustainable approach to fresh produce production longterm. The grocer recently secured a 20-year lease to an 11-acre plot of land in the city, of which 1.5 acres will be used to grow produce for its customers. With transportation costs going up, escalating prices in produce have been unavoidable—and are expected to continue. From a consumer perspective, the FMI report shows price is now on par with ripeness and appearance when it comes to produce purchasing decisions. With fresh produce prices somewhat or much higher in the fourth quarter of last year, the majority of consumers (92%) say they’ve made changes by focusing on promotion and shelf-life to waste less at home. Rick Stein, vice-president of fresh foods for FMI, says although produce didn’t experience the kind of inflation hikes seen in other areas like meat, it may be “more in

Produce department challenges

“On a scale of ‘not serious at all’ to ‘extremely serious,’ how would you rate the seriousness of the issues facing your produce department?” not serious at all

Quality of product

10

34

Consistent supply

10

24

Shrink/spoilage

12

How to increase consumption of produce

15

Outbreaks/recalls

34

Traceability (point of origin)

39

Price perception of fresh produce

12

Competition from other supermarkets

7

Competition from online retailers

29

* Competition from other channels

27

Not enough staff

12

Employee training

7

somewhat serious

very serious

extremely serious

32

24

27

39

39

29

44

20 29

12

36

15 29

22

15

37

46

15 17

29 32

37

15 22

46 24 20

20 27

7

37

51

22

Erratic weather

12

41

32

Wholesale prices

12

42

34

** Produce department overhead

14

37

12

37

15 12 12

* (Farmers markets, natural food stores, etc.) ** (incl. energy costs, equipment) 42 CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022


Produce operations survey the spotlight” going forward as prices in other departments level out. Still, he says customers will appreciate those grocers who are finding solutions and stay committed to keeping prices as low as possible. “You might have come in for romaine but end up buying Boston lettuce,” he says. “Our members are really focused on [finding] solutions so that may mean substitutions.” The fact shoppers will likely increase their grocery visits as COVID-19 restrictions lift, should also help to balance out the impact of inflation. CPMA’s Lemaire notes that consumers now have an increased “produce IQ,” brought about by the rise in home cooking during the pandemic, which will enable them to make those produce substitution choices more effectively. But it also comes back to how well grocers merchandise and sell at the retail level, he adds. “If we’re able to maintain that diverse product offering in the produce department and merchandise in the right way, it enables the public to make those choices when walking through the produce department—and in an ideal world doing it at least two times a week,” he says.

Dealing with shrink

Shrinkage continues to be a problem experienced by most Canadian grocers. Our survey shows more than half (55%) report dealing with the same shrinkage issues as the year prior, while 25% still say they have even more. The majority of retailers surveyed are finding ways to reduce food waste in their produce departments by using ingredients for prepared foods in-store or fresh-cut programs, and by donating to food banks. At all of Freson Bros.’ 16 stores in Alberta, produce is being successfully repurposed for use in the delis and restaurants in the stores, or otherwise diverted out of landfills. “We’ve got some stores that are very rural so we have farmers who will come by and pick up the trim, and in our metro areas we’ve partnered with a compost outfit that comes several times per week,” explains

Pazder. “Because we’re cooking food in-store and not bringing in frozen products, we’re able to really work with our produce departments to reduce waste.” Longo’s Franzone says it’s about being proactive instead of reactive, which starts with sourcing. “Our goal is to always source the freshest produce available and ensuring we source from the most current growing regions,” he says. “After that, if any shrink or sub-par quality product shows up on the retail floor…our foodservice teams work closely with our produce teams to use this produce first when cooking fresh hot meals for our kitchen offerings.” The retailer has also partnered with Loop Mission, a circular economy project, to recover sub-par produce for use in smoothies and cold-pressed juices. Others like Larry’s Market are working with food rescue companies like Too Good to Go, which offer a free mobile app that connects consumers to unsold food surplus at reduced prices from grocery stores, bakeries and restaurants. Sustainable packaging is also top of mind for grocers when it comes to produce, especially in lieu of impending regulations banning plastics. Freson Bros., for example, is currently experimenting with alternative packaging such as compostable grape bags and strawberries in cardboard clam shells rather than plastic.

Staffing still a challenge

Not surprising, survey respondents noted labour shortages have been a key problem in the produce department in year two of the pandemic, just as they have been across the entire grocery store. Almost two-thirds of respondents (67%) said “not enough staff” was a very to extremely serious issue for them in the past year. Digs Dorfman, founder and president of the Sweet Potato grocery store in Toronto, says recruiting and frequent staff turnover has been a problem during the pandemic, a result of fears around working in a public-­ facing capacity, increased demand and government

The situation with shrink

Compared to last year, is shrink...?    more this year    less this year    about the same as last year

25%

What efforts are you making to reduce shrink/ food waste in the produce department?

Use for ingredients in prepared foods

55%

20%

Use for fresh-cut program Donation to food banks Use technology to better forecast and reduce any surplus

23%

“Ugly” produce sales Nothing - not currently making any effort to reduce shrink/food waste in produce department Other

2%

34%

48%

66% 64%

11% March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

43


Produce operations survey Pandemic impact

What changes have you made in your produce department as a result of COVID-19? Added more packaged produce Added more space between displays to allow for social distancing Expanded network of suppliers Added extra staff None of the above

7%

Other benefits enabling people to stay home from work. “This trend has largely gone away at this point, but 2021 was the most difficult year to hire staff that we’ve ever been through,” says Dorfman. CPMA’s Lemaire says lack of access to labour is a particular challenge for produce managers because it may mean there is no one rotating product fast enough to ensure the freshest, best-looking produce is in front of the consumer. “If you’re going to do anything, make sure you’re not short-changing the produce department because it’s your first point of entry in most stores and that first influence on sale,” he says.

Produce investments for the future

When it comes to immediate investments for their produce departments, our survey respondents are putting a high priority on sustainability factors, such as implementing energy-efficient lighting and chill cases, as well as adding more staff and renovating their produce departments. Investing in marketing with new signage and mobile merchandisers are also on the list within the next two years. Analysts say retailers should also keep online shopping on the radar in terms of potential growth for the sector. “Produce is now becoming almost a staple for the

17%

54% 44% 39% 32%

online shopper,” says FMI’s Stein, noting this shopper is often affluent and spends more on every grocery trip compared to the traditional shopper. “That produce is making it into e-commerce more than we ever thought it would is interesting.” (According to the FMI report, 79% of online fresh produce shoppers pay attention to online specials and 75% look for seasonal or new items.) Along with the lure of convenience online shopping provides, Stein says shoppers will be looking to convenient options for produce in-store, too, whether that means fresh-cut fruits and vegetables or ready-to-go bagged salads. “As our retailers think about how they go to market, they need to provide even greater variety and opportunities for convenience,” says Stein. Having experienced the challenges of supply chain issues first-hand, Longo’s Franzone says these past few pandemic years have also highlighted the importance of developing relationships in produce across the board. “I believe the greatest investment you can make is building sustainable relationships with your partners,” he says, noting that this requires making time to understand their business needs and using their strengths to build on your strategic plans. “These strong partnerships allow you to innovate and push boundaries and to take our industry to another level.” CG

Investing in the produce department

Tell us about your investment plans for your produce department recently invested

Energy-efficient lighting

55

Energy-efficient chill cases

37

Signage

24

Mobile merchandisers

16

Portable bins

18

Total department renovation

24

More produce department staff

26

Expanding floor space of produce department

11

44 CANADIAN GROCER

|| March/April 2022

within the next 1-2 years

future investment

5 13 11

24

32 21 18

18 18 11

13 21

11 10

16 10 18

45 17

18

19 15

8

no interest

18 16

10

wish list

29 22 21 42

18 21


SUPPORTING &

A Special Thanks To Our 2022 Sponsors The Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone would like to thank the following sponsors for their ongoing support of the Night to Nurture Gala: PLATINUM SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

FRESHOUSE FOODS

PRESENTING SPONSORS

CORPORATE SPONSORS

Special thanks to

for their support as a Media Sponsor


WESTERN CANADA’S LEADING INDUSTRY EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE #GSFShow22

April 25-26, 2022 Vancouver Convention Centre East Building

Grocery & Specialty Food West is back bigger and better than ever! Western Canada’s premier grocery event takes place over two days in the Vancouver Convention Centre East Building.

GROW Your Business The preeminent B2B grocery event will see you meeting with decision makers and discussing ways to enhance and grow baskets. From grabbing breakfast in morning conferences to connecting during cocktail hour, there opportunities are endless for attendees.

CONNECT & Network There are plenty of ways to have face-to-face connections at GSF 2022. With the new show app, you can make dedicated one-to-one Retailer Connect meetings, and there are several networking receptions to meet old and new colleagues. Sunday, April 24th kicks off with the opening reception, followed by the Monday Mix and Mingle Reception and the Awards Dinner.

DISCOVER Innovations Looking for the latest trends and products hitting grocery shelves? Check out the New Product Showcase displays that pave the way to the entrance of the trade show. Next stop by the hundreds of companies from across Canada and the world all under one roof! New pavilions not to miss include Canada Connect, First Timers, Quebec and Ontario. There’s lots of samples to discover and enjoy!

LEARN from Experts

Over two days, hear from key thought leaders on topics and issues affecting the grocery sector. Hear first hand about the Grocery Code of Conduct, as well as what long-term effects the pandemic will have on the way we shop, eat and relate to grocery.

CELEBRATE Grocery GSF 2022 will officially kick off the 60th anniversary of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers. Hear about where we are going and where the heart of innovation beats stronger than ever. The country’s best independent grocers will be celebrated at the Monday gala dinner – which grocers will take home gold? Join all of grocery in the festivities on Monday, April 25 with host Tony Chapman.

To exhibit contact Rolster Taylor: Rtaylor@cfig.ca Retailers get your FREE Trade Show Ticket: www.gsfshow.com

Download the GSF SHOW APP


Congratulations Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers on your 60th anniversary !

TRUSTED BRANDS for your Family

For over 100 years, P&G Canada has been providing trusted brands of superior quality and value that improve the lives of Canadians. Our mission is to be a force for growth and a force for good for our community and the world in which we live.


The independents

State of the independent nation

cfig’s Tom Shurrie and Vince’s Market’s Giancarlo Trimarchi,

on the current indie landscape

“When we’ve had blockades or natural disasters like in B.C. [the devasting wildfires and floods of 2021]; for example, we worked with the Canadian Produce Marketing Association and others to solve some of those issues as rapidly as we could” —Tom Shurrie

48 CANADIAN GROCER

ALTHOUGH SOME would say the grocery business has always been tough, these past few years seem especially fraught. From natural disasters and blockades to wave after wave of COVID-19 disruptions and the soaring costs of doing business, grocers have had a lot with which to contend. We recently spoke to Tom Shurrie, president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) and Giancarlo Trimarchi, partner at Vince’s Market and current chair of CFIG, about the current state of the industry. Here’s what they had to say about how independent grocers are holding up and the organization’s priorities in the coming months.

Meeting the challenges

“Independents are well known for being nimble and being able to react quickly to changes as they come,” says Trimarchi, when asked how independent grocers have been responding to recent business challenges. “I think we’ve just had to dig deep on those entrepreneurial skills that a lot of us have.” At the end of the day, he adds, “independents need to make sure we understand what our businesses need to do to stay relevant and competitive.” Although he admits, this is easier said than done. At a time rife with disruption and higher costs, Trimarchi, a second-generation grocer with five stores north of Toronto, says independents are at a disadvantage because of their size, relative to their larger chain competitors. “You really have to evaluate who you are as an independent grocer—where you fit in, who you serve, and then make sure that’s where you’re putting all of your energy.” Shurrie points to partnerships as an effective tool to tackle challenges. In the past year CFIG has been able to alleviate some supply chain pressures by working “hand-in-hand’ with other industry associations as well as government. “When we’ve had blockades or natural disasters like in B.C. [the devasting wildfires and floods of 2021] for example, we worked with the Canadian Produce Marketing Association and others to solve some

|| March/April 2022

By Shellee Fitzgerald

of those issues as rapidly as we could,” he says. Trimarchi also credits the group’s strong Associate Member Council (AMC) for helping navigate supply chain issues. Comprised of manufacturers, he says the AMC provides a “doorway into the world of supply chains that otherwise we wouldn’t have as independent grocers.”

Cracking the code For years there have been calls

to introduce a code of conduct for the Canadian grocery industry, similar to the codes that have been adopted in the United Kingdom and Australia. Such a code—which would establish rules around how food suppliers and retailers do business with each other—is, perhaps, closer to becoming a reality than ever before. “The great thing that’s happened now is that the industry has come together at the table,” explains Shurrie, noting that representatives from 10 industry associations (the Food Industry Code of Practice Design Team) have been working on a proposed code since last summer. “The talks are going very well… people are trying to find common ground for how a grocery code can proceed.” And how might a code of conduct make life better for independents? Trimarchi says he’s waiting to see the actual content of the draft code, but “ultimately, it’s all about creating a transparent and fair playing field.” He’s careful to draw a distinction between a “level” and “fair” playing field. “Levelling it or making it equal is something that I don’t think is a realistic goal, just because of the scale and size of our industry,” he explains. “But what I hope for is that it provides the rules of engagement so that we have transparent, fair dealings with our suppliers and vice versa. That can only lead to better, stronger relationships that will help grow our mutual businesses.” No surprise then, that when asked what key issues CFIG would be focusing on in the months ahead, the code will be a big one. “We were one of the original groups pushing for a code, so that is the No. 1 issue this year that we are heavily invested in,” says Trimarchi.


Curbing credit card fees The code is not the only

issue CFIG has its eyes on. The battle to lower credit card interchange, or processing, fees, continues. In 2020, the federal government brought some relief when it worked with credit card companies to reduce the interchange fee on each transaction from 1.5% to 1.4%. The pandemic, however, has pretty much erased any gains that were achieved. “The pandemic has showed us that the movement to cashless [transactions] has accelerated tremendously,” says Trimarchi. Because of consumers paying more with plastic, retailers are getting hit with more fees. It’s a problem that he says is disproportionately affecting independent grocers as the interchange fees are higher for smaller businesses—the big guys can use their clout to negotiate lower fees. “So not only are they doing more business, but they’re paying less, percentage-wise, on those transactions,” he says. “We think there’s an opportunity to really push right now and get some further reductions.”

CFIG’s president & CEO Tom Shurrie

Looking ahead While the past few years have pre-

FROM TOP: CFIG, MIKE FORD

sented plenty of obstacles for independent grocers, there have been positive outcomes, too, such as the goodwill they’ve built up with customers in the communities they do business. “Coming out of what was an extremely challenging two years with COVID-19, has provided the opportunity for independents to ingrain themselves in their communities and really bring value,” says Trimarchi. The opportunity now is for independent grocers to continue to serve their communities, he says. They can do this by staying relevant and continuing to evolve. “Really being connected to their business is the biggest opportunity that they have … to be hyperaware of what their customers are looking for and be nimble and deliver on that value proposition. A huge opportunity is to maintain that trust and market share that we have been able to grow in the last couple of years,” he says. Trimarchi also notes that technology is making it easier for independent retailers and suppliers to do business, opening up another opportunity. For many years, it was scale and volume determining the ability of suppliers and independents to do business together. “As the chains got bigger and bigger and the independents kind of grew at their rates, a lot of times we were cut out of the mix, because it was just costly to do business with us directly,” he says. “But a lot of this technology has reduced a ton of those layers of cost to the point where I think there’s a tremendous opportunity in re-establishing those one-to-one relationships with manufacturers.”

Staying relevant CFIG is turning 60 this year,

which begs the question: how does a six-decadesold organization maintain its relevance to indie grocers today? Trimarchi points to CFIG’s mandate to ensure it’s delivering value to its members. “It’s all

Giancarlo Trimarchi, partner at Vince’s Market and CFIG chair

about continuing to provide value and opportunities for members that they otherwise wouldn’t be able to get” on their own, he says. That means helping members to make connections in the industry and helping them to improve their businesses. Shurrie, meanwhile, says staying relevant is achieved by what he calls a “feedback loop.” Constant input from CFIG’s members on what’s happening on the ground in their communities as well as from its volunteer AMC, “Helps us stay very relevant to the issues. And if we continue to keep that sustainable feedback loop happening…I think the next 60 years look pretty strong for CFIG.” Trimarchi’s outlook is also positive. “We’re in a great industry,” he says, adding that “the more we’re connected to one another and engaged in our industry and learning and trying to get better, trying new things and being adaptable, the better it will be for us and the stronger we can grow as independents.” CG

“You really have to evaluate who you are as an independent grocer—where you fit in, who you serve and then, make sure that’s where you’re putting all of your energy” —Giancarlo Trimarchi

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

49


Congratulations CFIG and Thank You! Thank you for allowing Howell Data Systems to serve your members for 30 years of your 60 year history.

Customer Self-Scan Kiosks

Handheld Store Management Apps

Smartphone Client Loyalty Apps

Point-Of-Sale Solutions

Custom E-Commerce Site

Congratulations on 60 years of being a strong and united voice for over 6900 independent grocery retailers, across Canada. The programs you provide continue to assist with operational excellence and foster solid relationships among retailers and suppliers. Howell Data Systems is honoured to be a member of a collaborative community that equips and enables independent, franchised and specialty grocers for sustainable success.


Retail Innovation –

Driven by Grocers In 1948 a distraught grocery store manager had a revolutionary idea for retail technology. He pleaded with the Drexel Institute of Technology to come up with a way to move shoppers through his store more quickly. Delays and regular manual stocktaking were costing him a fortune. The inspiration for what later became the bar code came to Joe Woodward while sitting on Miami Beach. Per the Grocer’s request, he wanted to create a code that could be printed on groceries and recorded automatically to speed up supermarket checkout and simplify stocktaking.

In 1966 the Kroger Grocery Company wished publicly: “Just dreaming a little . . . could an optical scanner read the price of an item and total the sale?. . . . Faster and more productive service is needed desperately. We solicit your help.” Kroger then looked for a technology partner with the necessary expertise.

As he pondered the checkout dilemma, an idea came to him. He poked four fingers into the sand, pulled his hand toward him, and had four lines. He thought “Golly! Now I have four lines and they could be wide lines and narrow lines, instead of dots and dashes.”

RCA commissioned several companies for the technical development leading to the first real-life Bar Code test at the Kroger Kenwood Plaza store in Cincinnati in 1972. Engineers realized that bar codes would have to be universal if the laser and bar code were to revolutionize the checkout counter. On June 26, 1974, an item marked with a Universal Product Code (UPC) was scanned at the checkout of Marsh Supermarket, in Troy Ohio.

Woodward’s brilliantly simple epiphany was a Bar Code based on Morse Code. It has had a far-reaching impact on modern existence. In 1960, the Hughes Aircraft Company announced sensationally that their scientist, Theodore Maiman, had developed an “atomic radio light brighter than the center of the sun.” It was a “LASER”, an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Maiman imagined the laser would have many applications in science, communications, industry, and medicine. But he did not foresee the supermarket check-out scanner or the printer.

In 1996, I was awestruck by “The Road Ahead” by Bill Gates. He foresaw the world profoundly changed by a global information superhighway. Mr. Gates stated, “Corporations will redesign their nervous systems to rely on the networks that reach every member of the organization and beyond into the world of suppliers, consultants and customers.” He described smartphones with built-in cameras, on-board music, email, and internet browsing

Credit to Smithsonian Magazine The History of the Bar Code, Gavin Weightman, Sept 2015

capability. He envisioned a world in which market information will be plentiful and transaction costs low. “It will be a shopper’s heaven”. It all seemed incredible to me. Yet today Howell Data Systems’ grocery POS solutions communicate real-time to clients’ smartphones. Customers can self-scan items, view promotions and digital gift card balances, shop online, receive instant shopping privileges, rewards, and emailed receipts! ...and it all started with a forward-thinking grocery store manager in the 1940’s.

For thirty years Grocers have driven Howell Data Systems’ technology and growth with your advice and your innovative ideas. We could never thank you enough. Paul Howell, Founder and CEO Howell Data Systems Inc.

special promotional feature in CanaDIan GROCER - march/april 2022



The independents

Rick Rabba

Jamie Nelson

Justin Schley

Dominic Arsenault

Brian Bradley

FROM LEFT: TOBI ASMOUCHA, THE PATTISON GROUP, TANYA GOEHRING, CHANTALE LECOURS, AND LUCAS FINLAY

By Rebecca Harris, Danny Kucharsky and Shellee Fitzgerald

Unstoppable indies

Canada is home to some of the best independent grocers in the world. These operators, found in every community across the nation, are known for their creativity, resilience and ability to quickly react to the changing needs of their business. Canadian Grocer recently caught up with five impressive indie grocers: Jamie Nelson of Save-On-Foods/Pattison Food Group, Dominic Arsenault of IGA Coaticook, Justin Schley of Quality Foods, Brian Bradley of Stong’s Market, and Rick Rabba of Rabba Fine Foods. We talked to these grocers about how they’re tackling the pressures facing the business, the wins and what’s next. Read on to see what they had to say. (The following interviews have been edited for length and clarity) March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

53


Congratulations

Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers on celebrating

60 Years!

IMPERIAL DISTRIBUTORS CANADA INC

PattisonFoodGroup.com


The independents

Jamie Nelson

COO, PATTISON FOOD GROUP EVP, SAVE-ON-FOODS JAMIE NELSON’S first brush with grocery was packing groceries at a Mission B.C., Overwaitea Foods (now Save-On-Foods) while in high school back in 1979. In the ensuing years, Nelson has ascended to the executive ranks of the company, serving as both the executive vice-president of Save-OnFoods as well as chief operating officer of The Pattison Food Group (PFG)—formed last year to unite Jim Pattison Group’s grocery businesses, which include SaveOn-Foods, Buy-Low Foods and Quality Foods, among others. Canadian Grocer recently caught up with Nelson to talk about the challenges and opportunties of operating a grocery business today.

What are the biggest pressures facing the business today and how are you tackling them?

PATTISON FOOD GROUP

All businesses, big and small, are facing similar challenges in the marketplace when it comes to recruitment and retention and we are experiencing those same challenges. We’re always recruiting for the best talent to keep our pipeline of future leaders full and offer several benefits, competitive salaries, continuing education and more— these programs and benefits are key to retaining and developing our top talent. Another pressure we’re facing is significant supply chain shortages and interruptions. Again, this isn’t unique to our company or even our industry; just look at your local car dealership or furniture store and you’ll see the effects of supply chain issues caused by inclement weather events, COVID19, and countless other factors that influence the global supply chain.

How do you keep up with changing customer needs?

Innovation is a key part of our culture and we have a strong focus on staying

current with the ever-changing trends to ensure we have the products our customers are looking for. We are also proud to offer our customers the convenient option of online pickup and delivery. In short, we ask our customers what they want and we listen.

Why do you think the Save-On-Foods brand resonates so well with customers?

Our people are our most valuable asset and we are very proud to have more than 23,000 of the world’s best grocers on our team. As grocers, we have faced many challenges in the past two years that have given our team members the opportunity to go above and beyond to serve their communities. It’s because of our people that we are proud to be [recognized as] one of B.C.’s Top Employers for 2022, B.C.’s Most Loved Brand and a certified Great Place to Work.

Can you tell us about an initiative introduced in the business that you’re most proud of?

At the onset of the pandemic, we recognized that there was a significant need for our e-commerce offering. More than ever, our customers were counting on us to supply the food and medicine they needed as quarantine and stayat-home orders took effect. While our brick-and-mortar stores remained open to customers with enhanced safety precautions, we also worked to ensure online shopping was expanded to all communities that we serve across Western Canada and the Yukon. We’re proud that our online shipping service is ours from beginning to end—it’s really our team members who walk the aisles and pick our customers’ groceries and it’s our team members who deliver orders to our customers’ houses and vehicles. This is a big differentiator and ensures our

customers get the same great level of service they’re used to getting in store.

What are the big opportunities for independent grocers right now?

We see supporting local as one of the biggest opportunities. At Save-On-Foods we carry more than 2,500 locally-made products from more than 2,000 local growers and producers. The quality of locally grown food is second to none. You’re supporting locals when you buy Western Canadian products at Save-OnFoods and we couldn’t be more proud! Strengthening those local relationships means we’re reinforcing local economies and that is critical to all of our success.

What’s next for Save-On-Foods/ Pattison Food Group?

These are definitely exciting times as we continue to grow and evolve as the Pattison Food Group. There is plenty of uncertainty in the world today, but we can only control what we can control and that is running great stores, giving great customer service and looking after our people. We have plans to grow all of the banners within the group and we are very excited about our venture into the United States with the purchase of Roth’s Fresh Market [an Oregonbased grocer with nine stores that PFG acquired last fall]. —Shellee Fitzgerald

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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60 YEARS OF PARTNERSHIP

Happy Anniversary to CFIG and its members



Behind every legendary product is a legendary relationship. Congratulations to CFIG on 60 years of supporting the Canadian grocery industry! We look forward to many more years of successful partnership. From your many friends and proud partners at Kraft Heinz Canada.


The independents

Dominic Arsenault OWNER, IGA COATICOOK DOMINIC ARSENAULT started working at IGA Coaticook in 1992, six years after his father bought the store in the Quebec Eastern Townships town. When his father retired in 2002, it was Arsenault’s turn to buy the store. Over the years, the store has expanded from 12,000 square feet to the 36,000 square feet it occupies today. Last year, Arsenault was named Personality of the Year by local newspaper Le Progrès de Coaticook, for his local involvement and for keeping the community supplied with food during COVID-19. Arsenault recently spoke to Canadian Grocer.

The last few years have been challenging. How do you maintain staff morale? It’s important to be with them on the floor. Communication, encouragement and recognition of the efforts they’ve made and will make are also important. People sincerely feel that we’re with them and that they play an important role for our clients, the community and the people they live with. The work we do is important.

CHANTALE LECOURS

What would you say are the biggest pressures facing your business and how are you tackling them?

For the last two years, my team and I, like all food merchants, have been faced with several challenges. We’ll have them still in the years to come, I’d say; COVID19 hasn’t finished giving us headaches. There are supply chain challenges on a daily basis. Inflation is another major challenge; when there’s a surge in inflation, customers rush to discount stores and big box stores. Staffing is another issue, [but] the situation is currently under control. Being present with our employees and close to them helps with retention. When I compare ourselves with other retailers, we’re doing well. I’m going to have another

competitor within a year—a Super C (Metro) is coming, so that’ll be a challenge. E-commerce had a major boom during the pandemic. During its height, it represented 6% of sales. Now we’re around 3%, which isn’t negligible.

What are you doing about inflation?

We’re focusing a lot on store brands, which is where we have the greatest short-term advantage. Using local suppliers also helps a lot because there are fewer rate shocks with local suppliers than with those abroad.

During these unusual times, what has surprised you about consumer behaviour? People are cooking a lot, which is a good thing, because when you want to save money on groceries during a period of high inflation, it’s the best way to do so. Cooking at home is also the best way to eat healthy.

Tell us an initiative you’ve introduced at your store that you’re most proud of.

Our ability to deliver online orders at a never-before-seen level, within six hours. Not many banners are able to have online orders delivered the same day. I’m particularly proud of what our team was able to do. In January, after the holidays, there were a lot of COVID-19 cases here. People weren’t super sick, but they had to isolate at home. They realized the importance of having a store that’s able to deliver a service that other banners can’t. People thanked us many times.

Were there many COVID-19 cases among your employees?

We had two major waves. We had 30 employees in isolation for two weeks. Maintaining operations was a big challenge. Since the start of the pandemic, between one-third to half of my employees [were off with] COVID. We

didn’t have workplace outbreaks. It was mainly people living under the same roof with people who had COVID-19.

What do you see as the biggest opportunity ahead for independent grocers like yourself?

Continuing to put the emphasis on local products. During the pandemic people realized the importance of buying products that are from close to home and available when they need them.

Would you say it’s a good time to be an independent grocer?

The last two years have been very, very challenging. Everything we planned went out the window. I think we’ll have supply headaches for another year. But the last two years will make us strong. We’ve developed reflexes and agility that will serve us well in the future.

What’s new at IGA Coaticook?

I just signed a collective agreement with my employees in January. I think it’s a big accomplishment during a pandemic and period of high inflation. It was enormous for me. The work climate in Quebec has become more one of collaboration than of confrontation. The mentality has changed in the last 20 years. —Danny Kucharsky

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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The independents

Justin Schley EVP & CFO, QUALITY FOODS QUALITY FOODS traces its roots back to 1982, when twentysomethings Ken Schley, John Briuolo and Noel Hayward opened Qualicum Foods on Vancouver Island. Four years later, the first Quality Foods opened in Parksville. Today, Quality Foods, which was acquired by Jim Pattison Group in 2017, operates 12 stores across Vancouver Island and one in Powell River, B.C. We spoke to Justin Schley, the company’s executive vice president and chief financial officer, about the business of selling groceries.

Why did you follow in your father’s foot­ steps and get into the grocery business?

Grocery is in my family DNA … I grew up in the stores and always had odd jobs after school. I used to collect buggies and work in different departments as a kid in Qualicum Beach. After university, I moved to Alberta and worked in the oil and gas sector. I came back to the company in 2012 after getting my CPA. I was missing home a bit, but also missing the industry. I was drawn back to the business and the people—it’s just a great place to be.

TANYA GOEHRING

What are some new highlights for Quality Foods?

We just broke ground on a new location opening in Royal Bay Victoria next year—our third location in Victoria. Royal Bay is an up-and-coming community and we get to be the centrepoint of it all, which is exciting. It will have the same look and feel of a traditional Quality Foods and will feature our lounge concept called Upstairs, which will be great for the area. In addition, we continue to leverage our strength in technology. We were the first grocer to have a [loyalty] app and now our app has fully personalized offers as well as ‘my daily special’ where a customer can scan an

item with their phone in the aisle and get a price just for them.

What is Quality Foods known for?

We’re definitely known for our community involvement. We live in these communities, the company has grown along with them, and we’re well connected to what’s going on in each of them. Our stores play a pivotal role in these towns, just like a church or community centre would. They’re community hubs. In a lot of our stores we design meeting rooms and event spaces where people can use them for free. We’ve always tried to create gathering places where you can shop, but also meet and socialize.

warehouse on the island where we selfdistribute to our own stores.

It has been a challenging few years for the grocery sector. How do you maintain morale with your staff?

What do you see as the biggest opportunity ahead for independent grocers like yourselves?

Our team members are most important to us. Without them, we wouldn’t have a company. We are very proud to have one of the best compensation packages in the industry, which includes full 100% employer paid benefits as well as a fully funded RRSP program. In addition, we were one of the first grocers to implement the $2 wage premium in Canada during COVID-19 and we were one of the only companies that made it permanent. Certainly, all the publicly traded grocery companies have shareholders and dividends they have to pay, so “hero pay” is going to be one of the first things they get rid of. But we wanted to keep people happy.

What is the biggest pressure facing your business and how are you tackling it?

Currently, the biggest challenges are supply chain issues and inflation in the industry. We are constantly looking at sourcing other local products to keep the shelves full. We are lucky to have a

As an independent grocer, it’s all about community and being local. Now that we are rounding the corner with COVID19, we can get back to fully involving ourselves in community events and local sports events.

Would you say it’s a good time to be an independent grocer?

It’s never been a better time to be an independent grocer. As the big guys consolidate, they lose touch with their roots and what it means to truly be local. During the pandemic, people were shopping more locally and I think they better understood their direct impact, realizing: ‘wherever I shop, I’m creating a job; I’m supporting that person and my money stays in the community.’ It just became more real. More than ever, I think independents have the key advantage because they speak local from their heart. It’s not just a marketing campaign like the big guys do. It’s real. —Rebecca Harris

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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The independents

Brian Bradley PRESIDENT, STONG’S MARKET STONG’S MARKET first swung its doors open for business in Vancouver back in 1931. More than 90 years later, the grocer is still going strong with two locations (Dunbar and North Vancouver) that are fixtures in their communities. When Cori Bonina, the founder’s granddaughter, stepped down as CEO of Stong’s in 2019, Brian Bradley, a grocery industry veteran, stepped up, assuming the role of president. Canadian Grocer spoke with Bradley about operating an indie grocery business today.

fortunate from an in-stock position and that has separated us from the crowd.

What are the biggest pressures facing your business right now?

There are a couple of things. First, the partnerships we’ve formed with local organizations—we really like to show our community support at the grassroots level. Another one is the local restaurants we partnered with and were able to help when they were either closed or had limited capacity. By selling their products in our stores we not only helped them out, but we drove some significant sales [for ourselves], too. And then we did something really cool at Christmas—we remain closed on Christmas and Boxing Day so we set up a “help yourself” display outside of the store filled with 20 of the most commonly forgotten items for Christmas dinner (gravy mixes, stuffing, pineapple etc.) with a sign that said, “Hey, make a donation to the food bank and help yourself.”

Rising costs. That would be for the cost of goods, supplies, services. And employee costs are going up with the mandatory paid sick days, new payroll taxes in B.C., rising wages—every cost of doing business continues to go up.

How are you tacking that?

It really causes you to be diligent and, as I say, ‘manage the pennies and the dollars take care of themselves.’ You’ve really do have to manage every expense line and scrutinize every expense so you don’t have to pass everything on to your customers. But, unfortunately, at the end of the day, some of it does get passed along.

LUCAS FINLAY

With so much competition, how do make sure your stores stand out?

We’re known for variety, selection and supporting local—that’s really how we stand out from the crowd. And as we’ve seen transportation and supply interruptions over the last several months, we’re fortunate that we deal with so many different vendors, that we’ve never really been out of stock. There might be a certain brand we don’t have, but we always have an alternative for our customers. So we’ve been

How do you keep up with customers’ changing needs?

As a smaller independent we have an advantage because we can listen and react to our customers quickly. I always say “feedback is a gift’ and we want to make sure we take that customer feedback and respond to it.

Tell us about an initiative launched at Stong’s that you’re proud of?

What was the response?

Our customers were just so impressed. We saved Christmas for them! And the feedback from the food bank that got the donation was very positive as well. The amazing part was that no one cleaned out [the display]; there was still product there when we returned!

In your career you’ve worked at a big chain (Safeway) for many years and now

at an independent. What do you like about the indie side of the business?

Oh boy, I could go on for hours. It’s really the ability to pivot quickly and react to customer concerns. You can impact the business quickly with the decisions you make and changes you make. In a larger corporate structure it takes a little more time to make those changes.

What’s next for Stong’s?

Ideally we’d like to find additional sites in the greater Vancouver area, to expand our store count and our business. We’ve got a really loyal customer base and we hear from customers all the time, ‘When are you going to open a Stong’s in my neighbourhood?’ But finding real estate for a full-size grocery store is a huge challenge right now. We’re even [considering] a non-conventional store with a focus on fresh and convenience in a smaller-store format, rather than a traditional full grocery store. Maybe it’s a small produce store with an aisle of grocery—something a quarter or less than half the size of a normal grocery store where we can cater to a certain neighbourhood. We’re looking at opportunities like that, but we certainly want to grow and add to our store count. —Shellee Fitzgerald

March/April 2022 || CANADIAN GROCER

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The independents

Rick Rabba

PRESIDENT, RABBA FINE FOODS

RABBA FINE FOODS is a family-run operation that began as a single store in downtown Toronto. Jack Rabba, an immigrant from the Middle East, purchased the store in 1967, not long after arriving in Canada. Today, Rabba has a network of 35 locations across the Greater Toronto Area with plans to expand. Canadian Grocer caught up with Rick Rabba, the company’s president (and son of Jack), about keeping staff engaged, standing out from the crowd and the opportunities ahead.

What is the biggest pressure on your business right now and how are you managing it?

Supply chain pressures are probably the most prevalent issue right now, but we have been able to mitigate these challenges because of our significant investment in our distribution and logistics network—it provides a backbone that allows us to be nimble in the face of uncertainty. Of course, we would not be able to meet these challenges if we did not have the significant support of our suppliers and we are proud of the strength of those relationships.

How do you keep staff engaged and maintain morale?

Our business is family owned and operated so we work closely with our people on a daily basis. I think the closeness and accessibility between 66 CANADIAN GROCER

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You operate in a very competitive market; how do you stand out?

What we’ve been doing since the beginning is to have a fresh offering, complete with HMR, bakery and produce, but in an urban format and available 24/7. Our customers appreciate being able to fill their fridge at competitive prices in one quick stop that works around their schedules. Another difference maker is our strategic alignment with branded partners [Paramount Fine Foods, Tim Hortons]. Adding quick-service restaurants has been well-liked by our customers and has elevated the overall in-store experience.

In these unusual times, what is something that has surprised you?

I am always amazed at the level of resiliency and commitment shown by our people. Regardless of the challenges we’ve faced in the last two years, they have continued to persevere with unwavering spirit and enthusiasm. Another thing that has really made an impression is the importance of our relationships with groups like Distribution Canada and the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers. Independent grocers are such an important part of the Canadian business landscape and there have been many times in the last couple of years that I have turned to these groups for insight, resources and information.

Tell us about an initiative introduced at your stores that you’re most proud of?

We are very proud of our Rabba Kitchen program. We’ve recently taken steps to improve the overall experience and modernize our menus. Over the course of the pandemic, we’ve responded to our customers’ needs for an excellent in-home dining experience and we’ve seen great gains in this area. We have also responded to an increase in desire for healthier options that still retain a homemade profile. We believe customer demand for high-quality take-home meals will only increase over time and it’s something we look forward to continuing to develop.

What’s the biggest opportunity ahead for independent grocers?

The biggest opportunity is to look at the ways they can involve themselves in their community. This can be done by supporting meaningful events and organizations and by supporting local businesses. As a Toronto-area retailer, we work closely with phenomenal Toronto brands like Tonica Kombucha, Pizza Libretto and others to promote and support local manufacturing.

What’s next for Rabba?

We will continue to expand our store network and renovate existing stores to add more in-home dining options. Our newest location [opening soon] in Toronto’s financial core will cater to a young and vibrant urban consumer. Significant reinvestment in our distribution and logistics network, including environmentally sustainable initiatives, is also a key focus of management. We’ve learned from the last two years that building trust and reliability in your supply chain is more valuable now than it’s ever been. —Shellee Fitzgerald

TOBI ASMOUCHA

management and staff really helps to resolve a lot of the issues. There are no ivory towers here! My father spends every Saturday and Sunday in the stores visiting with our people; whether having a coffee with them or discussing in-store challenges, they know their voices are being heard. We are also very fortunate to have many people who have been with us for decades and for whom we have the greatest respect.


SUPPORTING ONTARIO’S INDEPENDENT GROCERS SINCE 1993 Supply Chain Solutions Grocery / Dairy Food Service Industrial

905-361-1081 cjrwholesale.com

905-671-8100 dairycentral.ca


DISCOVER NEW FLAVOURS DREAMT UP & CHOSEN BY CANADIANS. Product of the Year – Sauces*

*survey of 4,000 people by Kantar

Now available all year-round


2022 Product of the Year

Electric Toothbrush

MEET THE CHAMPIONS Bread & Bagel

DEMPSTER’S SIGNATURE BAGELS Bimbo Canada Baked fresh daily with quality ingredients, Dempster’s premium bagels are crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside. Available in Four Cheese, Parmesan Garlic & Herb, and Brioche flavours.

What new products have the right stuff? Four thousand Canadian consumers have voted to determine the 35 winners of the 2022 Product of the Year Canada awards. The program, which operates in more than 40 countries, recognizes “outstanding” innovation. “One of the great strengths of Product of the Year is that we champion manufacturers for putting forward products that reflect the latest trends and offer consumers the solutions they’re looking for,” says Mike Nolan, Global CEO of Product of the Year Management. From personal care and household essentials to the latest food and beverage options and beyond, without further ado, here are the 2022 winners:

PHILIPS ONE BY SONICARE Philips Canada The Philips One by Sonicare is a gentle electric toothbrush that features microvibrations and tapered bristles on the head. A built-in, two-minute timer ensures a thorough brushing, and the sleek portable case (available in four colours) offers consumer convenience.

Beauty

L’ORÉAL PARIS VOLUMINOUS NOIR BALM MASCARA L’Oréal Paris

Dairy-Free Cheese

BOURSIN DAIRY FREE Fromageries Bel

This hypoallergenic mascara is formulated with 99% per cent natural origin ingredients and delivers bold clean volume, length, and definition, creating up to 7x fuller lashes for all-day wear.

A blend of fresh garlic, fragrant parsley and chives, with a dairyfree base of organic coconut oil.

Face Serum

NEUTROGENA HYDRO BOOST HYALURONIC ACID SERUM Johnson & Johnson Suitable for all skin types, this hypoallergenic, fragrance-free face serum is formulated with a mix of micro and macro hyaluronic acid, glycerin and vitamin B5 to provide 24-hour hydration for healthier looking, supple skin.

Cheese

BOURSIN MINIS GARLIC & FINE HERBS Fromageries Bel A smaller, bite-sized version of Boursin’s creamy, spreadable cheese. These Minis can be served as appetizers, or used to enhance the flavour and texture of a dish. Available in two flavours: Garlic & Herbs and Shallot & Chives.

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2022 Product of the Year Healthy Snacks

Grocery Delivery Service

ANGIE’S BOOMCHICKAPOP SALTED MAPLE FLAVOURED KETTLE CORN Conagra

VOILÀ BY SOBEYS Sobeys Touted as the “future of online grocery delivery,” Voilà by Sobeys offers a freshness guarantee, no hidden fees and groceries delivered straight to customers’ doors.

This certified gluten-free, wholegrain popcorn with a bold maple flavour has just 70 calories per cup, is made from non-GMO ingredients and is free from artificial colours, flavours and preservatives.

Functional Beverage

OASIS HEALTH BREAK WITH COLLAGEN A. Lassonde Oasis Health Break with Collagen is a functional juice that contains two grams of collagen and is free from added sugar, artificial sweeteners, preservatives and allergens.

Gluten Free

SOL CUISINE CAULIFLOWER BURGER Sol Cuisine Sol Cuisine’s cauliflower burger is made from real ingredients like cauliflower, sweet potato and chickpeas, making it a suitable option for gluten-free and plantbased consumers.

Household Cleaning Product

SUNLIGHT RINSE AID Henkel

Hair Care

DOVE HAIR THERAPY BREAKAGE REMEDY RANGE Unilever Canada The Dove Breakage Remedy range includes a strengthening shampoo, conditioner and leave-on treatment. The collection penetrates deep into the hair cortex to boost hair strength from root to tip, resulting in thicker looking, strong hair.

Sunlight Rinse Aid for dishwashers removes stubborn water spots and residue, and features a pourable nozzle to prevent mess and waste.

Frozen Food

COMPLIMENTS SMOKED GOUDA CHEESE BEEF BURGERS STUFFED Sobeys These 6-oz. beef burgers are stuffed with real smoked Gouda cheese, resulting in a bite that’s both smoky and savoury.

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2022 Product of the Year Plant-Based Foods

DEMPSTER’S CHICKPEA TORTILLAS Bimbo Canada

Ready-to-Eat

VECTOR MAPLE CRUNCH CEREAL Kellogg Canada

These 10-inch tortillas are baked with chickpea flour, onion and garlic. With a mild flavour and containing no artificial colours or flavours, these vegan tortillas are also versatile (they can be wrapped, rolled and baked).

Whether for snacking or as a traditional bowl, this ready-to-eat, high-protein cereal is comprised of 11 essential nutrients with crunchy, maple flavoured pieces. Plant-Based Chicken

SOL CUISINE HOT N’ SPICY CHIK’N WINGS Sol Cuisine

Organic Beverage

BLENDER BITES ONE STEP ORGANIC SMOOTHIE PUCKS Blender Bites Ltd.

Coated in a crispy breading and delivering a spicy twist, these plant-based chicken wings are 100% vegan, kosher and non-GMO verified.

Available in three flavours made from fruits, vegetables and plantbased vitamins and minerals, these frozen pre-portioned organic smoothie pucks are certified organic, plant-based, soy-free and have no added sugar.

Household Product

SPONGETOWELS ULTRAPRO PAPER TOWEL Kruger Products L.P. These premium paper towels, which use less fibre and are softer and more absorbent, can be used for a variety of household functions.

MORE PRODUCT OF THE YEAR WINNERS…

Sauces

HEINZ CROWDSAUCED The Kraft Heinz Company Heinz Crowdsauced—Tarchup (tartar sauce and ketchup), Hanch (hot sauce and ranch), and Wasabioli (wasabi and garlic aioli)—are three niche sauces that are distinctly Canadian and based on consumer data and insights.

Bed Frame • PODIUM GOODMORNING.COM, Goodmorning.com Coffee Maker • HAMILTON BEACH FLEXBREW TRIO COFFEE MAKER, Hamilton Beach Cookware • T-FAL PLATINUM HARD ANODIZED COOKWARE, Groupe SEB Canada Mattress • CASPER WAVE HYBRID SNOW, Casper Mattress-in-a-Box • COCOON by Sealy Classic Mattress, Sealy Canada ltd. Small Appliances • T-FAL EASY FRY GRILL & STEAM XXL AIR FRYER, Group SEB Sofa-in-a-Box • THE ENDY SOFA, Endy Vision Care • HOYA MIYOSMART LENS, Hoya Vision Care Canada

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2022 Product of the Year

Skin Care

NEUTROGENA BRIGHT BOOST OVERNIGHT RECOVERY GEL CREAM Johnson & Johnson

Sustainable Product

ZIPLOC RECYCLABLE PAPER BAGS SC Johnson

Nourishing and brightening, the gel cream is formulated with neoglucosamine (an amino sugar), vitamin C and hyaluronic acid, which helps to exfoliate and even out skin tone.

Ziploc’s new recyclable paper bags (sold in packs of 50) are food safe and resealable, and their non-wax formula makes them recyclable, too. Snacks: Cheese and Cheese-Flavoured

COMPLIMENTS MAPLE & AGED WHITE CHEDDAR POPCORN MIX Sobeys

Soups & Dressings

CAMPBELL’S CONCENTRATED BROTH Campbell Company of Canada

Crunchy popcorn kernels are coated with real Canadian Grade A maple syrup and mixed with savoury and sharp, aged white cheddar.

Four times more concentrated than Campbell’s Ready to Use Broths. Prepared in Canada, each carton prepares four cups of broth and is free from artificial colours and flavours.

Snacks

TAKIS DRAGON SWEET CHILI Bimbo Canada

Spreads

THE LAUGHING COW MIX CHICKPEA WITH HERBS Bel Canada Group

Limited edition rolled tortilla chips with an intense sweet and spicy hot flavour combination. These chips are available in two different size options: a 280-gram family pack bag and a 90-gram individual bag.

The first product to mix real cheese and real legumes on the Canadian market. Delivers a unique snack experience. Sweet Snacks

SARA LEE LITTLE BITES PARTY CAKE MINI MUFFINS Bimbo Canada Bite-sized, peanut-free, golden muffins packed with rainbow sprinkles. Each box contains five pouches of four muffins each for convenient snacking and a source of energy on the go. 74 CANADIAN GROCER

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Snack Bars

LIVE RIGHT CRAN-CHERRY CASHEW DARK CHOCOLATE FRUIT & NUT BAR Live Right Snacks Salty and sweet, this snack bar is plant-based, gluten-free, and made using 70% organic ingredients. CG


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Roasted Garlic & Asiago

Red Wine Pepper Coated

PERFECT FOR ENTERTAINING.

Our charcuterie salamis come in three delicious new avours, are conveniently pre-sliced, and perfectly snackable. They’re made for summer patio gatherings or picnics in the park. Get inspired at pillers.com.


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SUMMER ENTERTAINING

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SELLING THE SEASON Summer, and the promise of outdoor entertaining, is just around the corner. Here’s how to fire up sales during this key period By Michele Sponagle

After a tough slog of a year, COVID-19 restrictions are being lifted and with them, hopefully, Canadians’ spirits and their desire to entertain friends and family this summer. “Without going as far as to declare summer 2022 as the ‘best summer ever,’ I think that this summer will be a significantly stronger period than we’ve seen over the past few years,” says Jeff Doucette, general manager of marketing agency Field Agent Canada. “More gatherings will be likely and [they’ll] be larger, if restrictions remain lifted.” But, like ants at a picnic, inflation will be the unwelcome guest this summer. It will affect categories like meat, Doucette says. “Retailers may want to consider picking a star protein and developing a ‘won’t be beat’ stance,” he advises. “Become the destination for chicken, pork or ground beef and make a price impression that can be the centre of summer campaigns.”

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THRILL OF THE GRILL Despite the impact of inflation on meat prices, Rod Koning, executive director, domestic channel marketing, Canada Beef, is also confident about the season ahead. “The last two summers we’ve seen strong demand with consumers coming out of restrictions and mandates,” he says. “We expect that to continue in 2022.” He points out that value-cut offerings from the hip and shoulder cuts, thin cuts, and medallions—pre-marinated or cross-merchandised with marinade solutions—can help stretch food dollars. And to help consumers be more confident in their cooking, the recently launched The Canadian Beef Information Gateway provides grilling recipes, accompanied with instructional cooking videos, nutritional information and more. A food prep trend expected to continue to be popular this summer is smoking. “Backyard smokers with indirect heat, using smoker boxes containing wood chips, provide a great flavour base to favourite beef cuts,” adds Koning. Popular items will include Korean-style thin cut short ribs, bone-in rib steak (French cut-style) and skewers. Brisket and top sirloin cap steaks remain in high demand. Hanging tender and skirt steaks are gaining popularity at specialty butchers and provide bold beef flavours and they’re ideal for creating “dine-out dishes” at home, such as shawarma and fajitas. MORE THAN MEAT While we’re still figuring out how COVID-19 has changed society, it’s clear that Canadians’ eating habits have shifted. A recent Deloitte Canada survey, for instance, found nearly two-thirds of consumers said they’re more interested in how their diets affect overall health and immunity. It has created a sweet spot for retailers and suppliers. Ryan Dennis, owner of Larry’s Market in Vancouver, says he’ll be focusing on providing kits for customers to help them do vegetarian barbecues right. “I think vegan protein shreds with a pulledpork type consistency will do well,” he says. “It’s not just about burgers this year, so we’re creating easy options to take the work out of summer entertaining.” As Canadians embrace non-meat selections, B.C.based The Very Good Butchers has added more soy and gluten-free options to its lineup—spicy Italian Mmm Meatballs, ground Butcher’s Select options like A Cut Above Beef and A Cut Above Pork are made with simple ingredients such as split peas, navy beans, and pea protein. Lauren Watkins, president, Puravida Foods, also expects to see momentum build for quick, healthy foods: “We believe that summer grilling season is the perfect time to keep this trend moving forward. There’s something so satisfying about grilling vegetables or meats that allow their natural flavours and textures to be highlighted by the subtle smokiness of a grill.” She predicts grilled fruits and vegetables will

be the star of the 2022 grilling season as people seek ways to increase their vegetable intake. Consumers will want to maximize their time outdoors, so items offering convenience will be appealing. Puravida Foods’ line of pre-prepped, fire roasted vegetables offer a heat-and-serve option. They work as a side dish, or can be incorporated into other dishes such as a salad. Puravida Foods will work with grocers to bring awareness of the value pre-prepped, ready-to-use products bring to consumers. “Educating grocers on available products trickles down to the consumers because the choices grocers make directly impact what’s available in the market,” says Watkins. The company will also collaborate on sampling events. Watkins is bullish on summer sales. “I think they will soar to new levels since people are looking to restore a sense of normalcy while also taking advantage of loosened restrictions and great weather.” NAVIGATING NEW PRODUCTS During the pandemic, Canadians sought excitement by shaking up their old habits and this included trying new foods. “We believe people will start grilling different things,” says Teresa Spinelli, president, Italian Centre Shop, a grocery retailer with locations in Edmonton and Calgary. “They will try other exciting fish, more stuffed meats, like kabobs. Spices will be big this year—from Mediterranean to South American.” Grilling cheeses, like halloumi, are trending, wrapped with prosciutto or eggplant, grilled peaches and portobello mushrooms. The trick with new products is getting consumers to try and to understand them. This summer may mark the return of demos and sampling. “We’re hoping to have demos and a barbecue at all our stores, promoting not only our house products, like Massimo’s Italian sausage and Piedmontese beef, but having those items alongside complementary items,” says Spinelli. She’d like to have supplier support for those demos. “We know that is difficult to do, but

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even information from the vendors really helps our retail team make that product shine.” FLAVOUR BOOST Just in time for summer entertaining come new spins on classics. French’s, a century-old brand, for instance, has debuted new creamy versions of its classic mustard. “These thick and spreadable options are changing the condiments game,” says Deborah Sharpe, group marketing director, McCormick Canada. French’s is now offered in three creamy spreads—Yellow Mustard, Sweet Applewood and Honey Chipotle. They’re ideal to serve with barbecue fare and cold cuts, to whisk into dressings or marinades, add to devilled eggs, or stir into salads. “Big, bold flavours will continue to be popular across the country no matter what category is being purchased,” explains Sharpe. The new Club House La Grille All Purpose Grilling Blends are a great way to add them to anything on grill. “They enhance, but don’t compete, with the flavour of the grill.” Garlic & Crushed Herbs, Smoked Paprika & Onion, and Cracked Pepper & Garlic, are seasonings that are easy to use for grillers looking to maximize flavour. From April to August, McCormick brands— French’s, Frank’s, Club House La Grille and Stubb’s— will be featured on in-store displays and have a presence in promotions and flyers. Consumers can get classic Canadian recipes by scanning a QR code to access the Explore Grilling Flavours landing page. “We work in partnership with customers to bring these campaigns to life throughout the consumer journey, bringing together all the products needed for grilling in one convenient destination in-store,” says Sharpe. “Sixty-six per cent of consumers say they’d buy more grilling condiments or seasonings, if displayed in one place. It’s a win-win for retailers and our brands alike.” At Neal Brothers Foods, chief snacking/sipping officer Peter Neal says flavour inspiration is coming from far-flung locales. “We continue to see an exploration of new exciting flavours from all corners of the world,” he says. “For snacks and hot sauces, we are seeing more spicy renditions of traditional flavours such as ketchup or dill pickle. They often represent the essence of a food experience from a popular vacation locale.” The influence is seen in many of the Toronto company’s new products, like its popular smoky, spicy, citrus Mexican Street Corn Chips. Launching in May are two grilling sauces (Crank Coffee BBQ and Sweet Heat Habanero), plant-based offerings, including salad dressings—white balsamic raspberry, Caesar, ranch and mango poppy seed as well as a queso. To help boost sales, Neal Brothers will offer combinations and collaborations with snacking and beverage deals, as well as displays. “Summer sales depend on good weather,” adds Neal. “The better it is, the more social gatherings and entertaining there will

be. Overall, we’re hoping for a bump with more people feeling more comfortable gathering and enjoying good times together.” At Summer Fresh, new hummus and creamy dip offerings take their flavour inspiration from potato chips. Last year, shoppers couldn’t get enough of its dill pickle hummus, according to Susan Niczowski, the food company’s president and founder. Shoppers seeking healthier nibbles will be dunking into its new chip-inspired dips—barbecue, spicy Buffalo and spicy dill pickle. WHAT’S BREWING IN BEER? Looking ahead, Jessica Embro, grocery and The Beer Store key account manager at Sleeman Breweries, is seeing innovation with flavour extensions in the premium light beer segment as well as growth in the non-alcohol category, with potential increased shelf space dedicated to the latter. “Lime is a top-selling beer flavour and, based on consumer research, continues to be in demand,” she says. The company will launch Sleeman Clear 2.0 Lime with 90 calories and 3 grams of carbs per 355-mL serving this spring. Citrus fruits are commonly used to add flavour and liveliness to grilled vegetables or dips like guacamole, making Clear 2.0 Lime a perfect pairing. The summer may hold challenges. “We are going up against inflated volumes over the last couple of years due to pandemic buying behaviours and, therefore, expect beer sales, specifically at grocery, to continue to level out in 2022,” notes Embro. “The on-premise channel will likely regain some momentum and we may see some strength in the value beer segment, due to the heavy inflation we’re experiencing.” To assist retailers, Sleeman is planning on value-­ add programs where customers will be able to sample Sleeman Clear 2.0 Lime post-grocery shop. Also watch for a Sapporo national, enter-to-win promotion with a personalized trip to Japan.

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1 BEYOND THE CEREAL AISLE

Shelley Balanko, senior vice-president of The Hartman Group, says maple syrup and maple sugar have gained traction as an alternative to more processed sweeteners as it’s natural and rich in nutrients. Given this trend and that maple syrup “is a premium product,” Balanko suggests grocers experiment with placing it on aisle perimeters where “shoppers look to find premium, healthy and culinary-forward items.” Also consider merchandising it in a way that speaks to different usage occasions, like to sweeten a pasta sauce, she says. Loblaw banners display bottled maple syrup outside the breakfast aisle, depending on seasonality, and “occasions through­ out the year,” says Kathlyne Ross, vice-president, pro­­d­uct development, innovation and sustainability at Loblaw.

Maple Syrup Four things to know By Chris Daniels

2 GLOBAL FLOW The harvest of Canadian maple syrup—from the sap extracted from sugar and red maple trees—is in global demand. In fact, Canada produces a whopping 79% of the world’s maple syrup, with most of the production (73%) taking place in Quebec, where the production is regulated by the Quebec Maple Syrup Producers. To be classified as maple syrup in Canada, the product has to be made exclusively from maple sap (not mapleflavoured sugar) and boiled down to a minimum of 66% sugar.

4 SWEETEST THING

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Infusing a food or beverage with an additional flavour is nothing new but recently the practice has expanded into categories in a big way—now it’s maple syrup’s turn. Infusions allow the “liquid gold” to maintain its classification, while differentiating the taste profile. Loblaw, for instance, introduced PC Black Label Bourbon Barrel-Aged Maple Syrup. “We found a spot in Maple syrup and that could age related products (maple Vermont the syrup in bourbon butter, sugar) topped barrels,” explains Ross. $558.5 million in 2020, “We were inspired by bartenders across the up 7.9% versus the country who were using year prior, according to syrups infused with Statistics Canada vanilla, caramel, spice and smoke flavours in cocktails.” Family-owned Glengarry Maple in North Lancaster, Ont., has launched specialty maple syrups such as the Smoked Scotch Bonnet Infused, Chipotle Infused, and Cherry Tart. “You can add more margin and make more money with specialized products because you’re not competing with everyone else,” says Phillip Zoeller, a partner in the business with his father, Bill. Glengarry also has more specialty maple syrups in the works. “We’re looking to push the boundary with our flavoured or infused options, and inspire people’s minds about what they can do with maple syrup beyond the pancake,” says Zoeller. Today, its enhanced maple syrup products account for about 40% of sales—slightly more than for its pure maple syrup. Glengarry’s “Farmers Market Series,” featuring a maple salad dressing, maple barbeque sauce and maple rub, makes up about 20%.

It’s the exclusive maple syrup supplier for Giant Tiger, but Martinette Gourmet Maple in Coaticook, Que., has found its sweetest success with treats. Think maple popcorn and hard candy. The margins are better, and they’re inexpensive to make, as only a bit of maple syrup (which is expensive) is needed, says Lisa Nadeau, president of Martinette. “We’re now working on spicy maple roasted almonds,” she says.

Loblaw has integrated maple syrup into its President’s Choice products as well, introducing “a new twist on a traditional favourite.” That includes maple marshmallows, maple balsamic vinaigrette and PC Waffle Cone Chicken with Spicy Maple Syrup Boneless Chicken Breast Fillets. “There’s nothing we aren’t willing to explore with this iconic Canadian flavour,” says Ross. CG

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Express Lane

HUNGRY FOR HALAL

Nourish Food Marketing’s Salima Jivraj on what halal shoppers really want By Chris Powell THE DEMAND for Canadian halal food is on the rise. To get a better handle on halal shoppers’ behaviours and attitudes, Toronto-based Nourish Food Marketing conducts an annual survey of more than 1,000 principal grocery shoppers. Salima Jivraj, account director and multicultural lead with Nourish—and a halal food expert who founded both the website Halal Foodie and the Halal Food Festival—leads The Nourish Halal Shopper Study. Jivraj recently spoke to Canadian Grocer about the study, halal shoppers and the market in Canada; halal “is not just for Ramadan and Eid,” she says. The following has been edited for length and clarity.

Can you provide a snapshot of the Canadian halal market and its shoppers? The halal market is currently valued at more than $1 billion and is growing by between 10% and 15% year. The typical growth for established grocery categories is around 2% a year, meaning that halal is very much in a growth phase. Halal shoppers also tend to over-index in their use of online services such as delivery and click-and-collect. In 2021, 53% of [general] shoppers used online services. When we asked the same question for the halal market, 72% said they shopped online. Halal shoppers are traditionally larger families in need of more food and need to shop more often; because they couldn’t get out as much during the pandemic, online shopping served as a real solution.

How do halal shoppers regard current halal options? One of our [survey] questions was ‘How would you rate the major food chains when it comes to meeting 86 CANADIAN GROCER

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your needs for halal food products?’ In the past, it’s always been fair or neutral, but this is the first year they’ve actually been satisfied—with 51% of survey respondents rating them as good or very good. That’s a large increase from 36% in 2019. Over the past three years, [the major chains] have put more emphasis on this shopper.

Are there any retailers leading the way? Walmart has done a great job. They have a pretty good-sized halal offering, and during big events like Ramadan and Eid they’ll call it out on the website, and [the section] is easy to navigate and find what you need. There are also more manufacturers, and I think [retailers] are doing a good job of listing them in addition to the typical ones that have been around for 15 to 20 years. They still have those guys, but I think they’re more open to bringing in new players.

Who are the market leaders among the brands? Mina, which is owned by Maple Leaf Foods, is really strong; as is Zabiha, which is owned by Maple Lodge Farms; and Sufra, which is owned by Loblaw Companies Ltd. They are still big players, but they dropped in share with aided awareness [in this year’s study]. They offer things like hot dogs and chicken nuggets, but they’re a little bit on the stereotypical side; if it’s chicken, it [tends to be] tandoori chicken or Middle Eastern shawarma. When we asked respondents what advice they had for brands and grocers, they said ‘Don’t assume we’re all South Asian. And even if we are, don’t assume that’s [the only food] we like.’

What about emerging players? [A company] that has really stepped up in terms of meeting the evolving needs of halal shoppers is The Meathead Store. They provide online shopping and have a retail space, plus a wide range of organic products—which was also a big gap [in the halal market]. They’re opening up a whole new door to Canadian Muslims who were born here or have lived here a long time. I think they’ve provided a good solution for the younger generation that has outgrown their parents’ community store and the impersonal big box stores. It’s one to watch.

Where are consumers buying halal products? The big ones [in Ontario] are Costco, Walmart and Iqbal Halal Foods—they account for more than 30% [of the market]. Iqbal is really interesting because it only has three locations. They’re one of the pioneers in halal foods. Costco wasn’t in the top three in the 2019 study—it was probably number four of five—but what came out in our focus groups is that because people were going out less for groceries, they would stock-up on meats. The Costco Business Centre has a big wholesale meat counter for halal, so [shoppers] would go there and stock up for like a month or two. CG

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LIVE & IN PERSON

2022 OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE

TRADE SHOW + CONFERENCE April 25 & 26, 2022 Vancouver Convention Centre, East Building DATE

CONFERENCE HOURS

TRADE SHOW HOURS

Monday, April 25 Tuesday, April 26

7:00am – 11:00am 7:00am – 11:00am

11:00am – 4:30pm 11:00am – 4:00pm

GSFSHOW.COM

#GSFShow22

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:


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Meghan Larson

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meghan.larson@fcc.ca 236-380-2080

amandeep.malik@fcc.ca 604-379-8385

alex.lau@fcc.ca 604-217-2254

matthew.vandijk@fcc.ca 250-859-2699

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fcc.ca


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

WELCOME FROM THE CHAIR OF GSF WEST WELCOME TO THE 33 EDITION OF GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST! RD

We’re back live and in person! The theme for Grocery & Specialty Food West is Grocery Redefined, reflecting the altering landscape of the business; from technology to product assortment, the grocery industry is constantly changing and adapting to consumers’ needs. The GSF West show is where grocery gathers annually to grow and redefine the business. This year’s workshops and morning conference sessions will provide you with data and insights into how to drive the industry forward post-pandemic. Morning conference sessions are geared to give attendees an overview of the retail store and consumer trends. Workshops and experts will give you a look at where we’ve been, and where we are heading after the disruption faced over two years, providing information on emerging technologies, consumer insights, business solutions and more. In the afternoon, see you on the trade show floor to network, collaborate and discover products and solutions to meet your changing business needs. GSF West is the only grocery retailing event where you’ll find all your business needs—to get your product on and off the shelf and into baskets. Regional pavilions include those from Ontario and Quebec, and one focusing on SMEs: Canada Connect. Take advantage of all the free networking opportunities, kicking off with the Sunday opening reception, followed by the Mix and Mingle networking reception Monday afternoon, by the trade show stage. Conclude the day with dinner and entertainment in the evening mingling with key business partners, while taking in the breathtaking mountain views in the Summit Room at the Vancouver Convention Centre West Building. Grocery & Specialty Food West is the West’s only one-stop grocery exhibition – from front end to back end. Visit the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers’ booth in the entrance to the trade show and find out how the association can assist your business goals. Be sure to download the comprehensive new and improved GSF Show App! It will allow you to schedule business meetings and network while providing a comprehensive schedule at your fingertips! We look forward to seeing you at the show! Sincerely,

GIANCARLO TRIMARCHI, PRESIDENT

CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION 3.........WELCOME MESSAGE 5.........GENERAL INFORMATION & CFIG STAFF

6.........2022 CFIG BOARD OF DIRECTORS

7.........CFIG ASSOCIATE MEMBERS’ COUNCIL

17.......SPONSORS ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW 9.........PROGRAM: KEYNOTES, WORKSHOPS AND EVENTS

16......SPEAKERS’ SPOTLIGHT

EXHIBITOR LISTINGS 14.......TRADE SHOW FLOOR PLAN 15.......EXHIBITORS BY BOOTH NUMBER 18......EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME 23...... EXHIBITORS BY PRODUCT CATEGORY

GSF ANNUAL CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW PRESENTED BY:

THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT GROCERS / FÉDÉRATION CANADIENNE DES ÉPICIERS INDÉPENDANTS 105 - 401 GORDON BAKER ROAD NORTH YORK, ON M2H 3P8 TEL: 1-800-661-2344 | FAX: 416-492-2347 EMAIL: INFO@CFIG.CA | WWW.CFIG.CA

CHAIR, CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT GROCERS FÉDÉRATION CANADIENNE DES EPICIERS INDÉPENDANTS WWW.CFIG.CA

#GSFSHOW22

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

3


Welcome Back!

Stop by and say hi! | Booth 715


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

GENERAL INFORMATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW ATTIRE

SAVE THE DATE

BUSINESS CASUAL

BADGE COLOURS RED..............................RETAILERS/WHOLESALERS GREEN........................MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS RESTAURANT/FOODSERVICE

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2022 Tuesday, October 25 & Wednesday, October 26, 2022 Toronto Congress Centre North Building WWW.GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

YELLOW.........................DISTRIBUTOR/IMPORTER/EXPORTER BLUE............................EXHIBITORS GREY...........................MEDIA B:11"

T:10.75"

EXHIBITOR & ATTENDEE REGISTRATION

REGISTRATION DESK AND SELF CHECK-IN KIOSK VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE, EAST BUILDING, 999 CANADA PL, VANCOUVER BC

SATURDAY, APRIL 23................................ 8:00AM – 5:00PM MONDAY, APRIL 25.................................. 6:30AM – 6:30PM

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST 2023 Monday, April 23 & Tuesday, April 24, 2023 Vancouver Convention Centre East

TUESDAY, APRIL 26 .................................. 6:30AM – 3:30PM

WWW.GSFSHOW.COM

SUNDAY, APRIL 24.................................... 8:00AM – 4:00PM

CFIG STAFF THOMAS SHURRIE President & CEO ANDREA ALMARZA Executive Assistant to the President & CEO and to the VP of Finance and Administration GARY SANDS Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Advocacy FRAN NIELSEN Vice President, Finance & Administration

#GSFSHOW22

NANCY KWON Vice President, Marketing & Communications

NOAH ROSE Member Services, Sales & Marketing Representative

NICOLE FANG Multimedia Designer

JOE SAWAGED Director, Member Services & Industry Relations

JESSICA HERDSMAN Registration, Events and Operations Manager IRMELI KOSKINEN Coordinator, Member Services

DIANA STEVENSON Director, Conference & Events ROLSTER TAYLOR Director, Sales

SUZANNE REGIMBAL Member Services, Account Manager

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

5


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

2022 CFIG BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) is governed by a Board of Directors elected from the membership and reflecting a regional distribution. A national office consisting of the President and staff implement the federation’s operations in a manner consistent with the policies established by the Board. The Board and the President also receive ongoing input from advisory committees consisting of members established across Canada.

THOMAS SHURRIE

*President & CEO, CFIG, Toronto, ON

BILL COLEMAN

Coleman Group of Companies, Corner Brook, NL

MIKE LONGO

*Secretary, Longo Bros. Fruit Markets, Vaughan, ON

GIANCARLO TRIMARCHI

*Chair, Vince’s Market, Newmarket, ON

DOMINIC ARSENAULT

IGA Coaticook, Coaticook, QC

ANTHONY GRECO

Concord Food Centre & Oak Ridges Food Markets Thornhill, ON

EMMY MIN

KFT/Galleria Supermarket, Vaughan, ON

BRIAN BRADLEY

Stong’s Markets, Vancouver, BC

ERIN HIGDON

*Member at Large, Powell’s Supermarket Ltd., Bay Roberts, NL

JAMIE NELSON

*Treasurer, Save-On-Foods, Langley, BC

DAN BREGG

*Vice Chair, Buy-Low Foods, Surrey, BC

BROOKE KYNOCH

Safety Mart Foods, Chase, BC

RICK RABBA

The J. Rabba Company Ltd., Mississauga, ON

PIERO CARBONE

Garden Foods Bolton Ltd., Bolton, ON

CHRISTOPHER LEE

Southside Market AG Foods, Revelstoke, BC

JUSTIN SCHLEY

Quality Foods, Errington, BC

RON WELKE

*Honorary Past Chair, Federated Co-operatives Ltd., Saskatoon, SK

*EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 6

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

#GSFSHOW22


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS’ COUNCIL Co-operation and communication between supplier and retailer have become increasingly important in grocery retail. CFIG’s Associate Members’ Council (AMC) has in turn become more integral to the direction of the federation as a whole. The Associate Members’ Council is a group of senior executives representing a variety of Canadian grocery product companies. The AMC meets quarterly, and provides professional guidance to the Board of Directors on industry news and trends.

DAVID BLACKMORE

VP, Sales, Procter & Gamble Inc.

JOHN KOTSOPOULOS

VP, Sales & Trade Marketing, Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

TIM MCNERNEY

Sr. VP, National Sales & Consumer Marketing Coca-Cola Refreshments

GREG COLES

Chief Customer Officer, Nestlé Canada Inc.

SCOTT LORIMER

Sr. VP Retail Sales, Maple Leaf Foods Inc.

VINCE MENDES DE FRANCA

President, General Mills Canada

NANISS GADEL-RAB

*Co-Vice Chair VP, Customer Development Unilever Canada

MIKE LUST

*Chair,VP Customer Development, PepsiCo Foods Canada

CHRIS POWELL

Past Chair, Sr. VP, Business Development, Tree of Life Canada

TODD JOHNSTON

VP Sales, Lactails Canada

SAM MAGNACCA

VP, GM, Acosta Canada

KEVIN RIESCHI

Director, Client Solutions and Partnerships, Interac Corp.

VINCENT NADEAU

VP, Sales, Kraft Heinz Company

MICHEL MANSEAU

Sr. VP & GM Consumer Business, Kruger Products LP

ERIN ROONEY

VP of Sales and Marketing, McCormick

PETER BOWMAN

Sr. VP, Retail & Food Service Sales, Saputo Dairy Products Canada

#GSFSHOW22

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

7


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APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

2022 GSF AGENDA

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING & WEST BUILDING

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE EXHIBIT HALL A & BALLROOM C

SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2022

WORKSHOP ❶ 9:00AM – 9:30AM | MEMBER UPDATE

5:30PM – 7:00PM | OPENING RECEPTION *ALL WELCOME

Critical policy and program updates for indepedents pertinent for their business. Presented by Gary Sands, Tom Shurrie, CFIG

CHOOSE ONE WORKSHOP VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING

EAST MEETING ROOMS 1 – 3 (PARKVIEW TERRACE) SPONSORED BY:

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

WORKSHOP ➋ 9:00AM – 9:30AM | STORE OF THE FUTURE 2030 EAST BUILDING | BALLROOM C

MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2022

VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING

CONFERENCE HOURS: 7:00AM – 11:00AM TRADE SHOW HOURS: 11:00AM – 4:30PM

MORNING CONFERENCE & WORKSHOP SESSIONS*

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBITION HALL A | BALLROOM C *PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

7:00AM – 7:30AM | BREAKFAST EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A SPONSORED BY:

A look at why grocery retailers need to be more radical than ever before, and how most of the ideas to help this transformation are already here. Presented by Stewart Samuel, IGD WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY:

CHOOSE ONE WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP ❶ 9:40AM – 10:10AM | LEVEL UP LOCAL EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

Hear from Heather Thomson, Alberta School of Business - School of Retailing, to level up your local business strategies. Her advice? Don’t do things differently, do different things.

WORKSHOP ➋ 9:40AM – 10:10AM | THE FUTURE OF RETAIL IS ‘PHYGITAL’ EAST BUILDING | BALLROOM C

7:30AM | WELCOME & REMARKS- TOM SHURRIE EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

7:45AM – 8:15AM | FUTURE OF MOBILITY EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

An inside view on what it might mean for industries from automotive to retail and everything in between. Ted Graham, Head of Open Innovation at General Motors & author of The Uber of Everything, will help audiences understand mobility: it impacts people, culture, industries and the workforce.

Is your store ready for the electronic shelf label revolution? Discover the new trends, tools and opportunities grocers can have beyond price automation with ESLs to help them fulfill their operational strategies. Presented by Diego Mazzone, JRTech Solutions WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY:

CHOOSE ONE WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP ❶ 10:20AM – 10:50AM | THE GREAT RESIGNATION EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

Eric Termuende takes us on a journey filled with out-of-the-box

SPONSORED BY:

8:15AM – 8:45AM | EMERGING FROM COVID EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

ideas that are budget-free and actionable as we work to thrive through 'The Great Resignation.'

A focus on the six sticky retail trends that are here to stay. Presented by Stewart Samuel, IGD

WORKSHOP ➋ 10:20AM – 10:50AM | THE DIGITAL CONSUMER

8:45AM – 9:00AM | COFFEE BREAK

A look at changes in consumer shopping expectations and the key customer experience components people expect when shopping online. Presented by Vincent van der Heijden, Instacart

SPONSORED BY:

EAST BUILDING | BALLROOM C

WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY:

#GSFSHOW22

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

9


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION

EAST BUILDING | HALLS A, B & C

TRADE SHOW HOURS: 11:00AM – 4:30PM 12:00PM – 1:00PM | TOP 10 IN GROCERY CONTEST EAST BUILDING | HALLS A, B & C - DISPLAYS

1:00PM – 1:30PM |

EDUCATION SESSION

EAST BUILDING | INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS TRADE FLOOR STAGE

Growing your Social ROI in Grocery! Social media is a powerful (and not to mention FREE) tool that can be used to promote to, engage with, and learn about your customers. Social media enthusiast Darian Kovacs explains how to find the right combination of platforms, tools, content, and creativity that will provide maximum ROI to grow your sales and customers. SPONSORED BY:

2:00PM – 2:30PM |

EDUCATION SESSION

EAST BUILDING | INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS TRADE FLOOR STAGE

Mike Lust, PepsiCo Foods, shares the latest category insights and

trends to grow your business.

✈ ATTENTION: FULL DELEGATE RETAILERS

A TRIP TO GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2022 IN TORONTO WILL BE DRAWN! Includes: return airfare for one, accommodations during the show and a chance to win the Grand Prize at the event! SPONSORED BY::

TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2022

VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING

CONFERENCE HOURS: 7:00AM – 11:00AM TRADE SHOW HOURS: 11:00AM – 4:00PM

MORNING CONFERENCE & WORKSHOP SESSIONS*

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBITION HALL A | BALLROOM C *PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

7:00AM – 7:30AM | BREAKFAST MAIN STAGE | EXHIBIT HALL A

SPONSORED BY:

SPONSORED BY:

4:15PM – 5:00PM | MIX AND MINGLE *ALL WELCOME EAST BUILDING | INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS TRADE FLOOR STAGE

MC

7:30AM | WELCOME & REMARKS: TOM SHURRIE MAIN STAGE | EXHIBIT HALL A

SPONSORED BY:

7:45AM – 8:15AM | CODE PANEL DISCUSSION

EVENING EVENT

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

WEST BUILDING | 1055 CANADA PLACE | THE SUMMIT ROOM – 3RD FLOOR

EVENING EVENT: 6:00 – 9:30PM

Retailer Fireside Chat with Giancarlo Trimarchi, Vince’s; Erin Higdon, AGD; Dan Bregg, Buy-Low Foods; Ron Welke, FCL.

*PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

SPONSORED BY:

6:00PM – 6:30PM | RECEPTION

8:15AM – 8:45AM | KEYNOTE: TONY CHAPMAN

WEST BUILDING | THE SUMMIT ROOM – 3RD FLOOR

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

WEST BUILDING | THE SUMMIT ROOM – 3RD FLOOR

Marketing Hall of Legend and Canadian Advertising Hall of Fame Inductee Tony Chapman will take you behind the scenes of Chatter that Matters, his radio show and podcast, to share some lessons he has learned chatting to people who make things happen, despite often challenging circumstances.

Magician Bill Cook with hosts Tom Shurrie, Tony Chapman

SPONSORED BY:

6:30PM – 9:00PM INDEPENDENT GROCER OF THE YEAR AWARDS GALA & ENTERTAINMENT

DINNER SPONSORS:

8:45AM – 9:00AM | COFFEE BREAK EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A SPONSORED BY:

ENTERTAINMENT SPONSOR:

10

WINE & BEER SPONSOR:

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

#GSFSHOW22


Revive your Bulk Aisle with DIGI Canada DIGI’S SM6000 Self Service Scale with e.Sense and Bring Your Own Container- Redefines the new normal for self-service, offering a modern-day approach that brings speed, convenience and adaptability for a hassle-free customer experience.

How it Works 3 easy steps 1

BENEFITS Accurate PLU call up Reduced shrinkage and preserved margins 15” Capacitive touch display

Minimized abandonment during purchase

OPEN CONTAINER/ PULL DISPENSER TO TRIGGER e.Sense SENSOR

2 PLACE ITEM ONTO SCALE PLATTER (1) SELECT CORRECT PLU (2)

Reduced training costs Intuitive user interface Easy integration

3 SELECT PRINT LABEL (1) AND PASTE ONTO THE TRAY OR ITEM (2)

DIGI Canada, Quality Food Service Equipment

HIGH-SPEED WEIGH-PRICE LABELLER

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COUNTER SCALE

BANDING MACHINE

ELECTRONIC SHELF LABELS

PRODUCE WRAPPERLABELLER

Measurement Canada

sales@ca.digi-group.com

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APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBITION HALL A | BALLROOM C

CHOOSE ONE WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP ❶ 9:00AM – 9:30AM | STORE MANAGERS' BEST PRACTICES EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

IGYA Juror Al Hollman shares the best practices amongst grocers in Canada.

WORKSHOP ➋ | MATTER MOST TO THE

PEOPLE WHO MATTER MOST TO YOU

EAST BUILDING | BALLROOM C

In this age of noise, with too many and too much chasing a finite amount of time, most brands and ideas are starving for attention. There is very little differentiation. Presented by Tony Chapman, Podcaster, Chatter that Matters

CHOOSE ONE WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP ❶ 10:20AM – 10:50AM | THE PERFECT STORE AND VR EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

Join Jeremy Attridge (Kraft Heinz) and Adrienne Cardy (Explorer Research) to learn how they’ve partnered to use virtual reality to validate the ‘Perfect Store’, build category learnings, and improve the shopping experience.

WORKSHOP ➋ 10:20AM – 10:50AM | GROCERY IQ 2022 EAST BUILDING | BALLROOM C

Driving forces behind grocery shopper attitudes and behaviours post pandemic. EnsembleIQ shares exclusive results from a comprehensive study of Canadian shoppers conducted in late 2021. Presented by Beth Brickel, EnsembleIQ WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY:

WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY:

TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION

EAST BUILDING | HALLS A, B & C

CHOOSE ONE WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP ❶ 9:40AM – 10:10AM | CREATING THE FUTURE

CUSTOMER GROCERY EXPERIENCE

TRADE SHOW HOURS: 11:00AM – 4:00PM 1:00PM – 1:30PM |

 EDUCATION SESSION

EAST BUILDING | MAIN STAGE–EXHIBIT HALL A

EAST BUILDING | INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS TRADE FLOOR STAGE

Accelerated by the pandemic, digital transformation has forced the supermarket industry to rethink business models and customer experiences. Jean-Pierre Lacroix, SLD, will help answer the future “Physi-digital” customer experience.

Grocery Gets Electric! Listen to Himanshu Sudan of eCamion for an innovative market solution for a fast-charging electric vehicle charging stations ideal for retail settings. And learn how to monetize them by putting energy back into the grid.

WORKSHOP ➋ 9:40AM – 10:10AM | AI TO HELP MEET THE

CHANGING LANDSCAPE

SPONSORED BY:

2:00PM – 2:30PM |

 EDUCATION SESSION

EAST BUILDING | INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS TRADE FLOOR STAGE

EAST BUILDING | BALLROOM C

How artificial intelligence can help retailers gain access to similar metrics that online retailers enjoy. Presented by Tamey McIntosh, Warsame Ahmed, Braiyt AI

Food Safety: A Profit Centre. Flipping food safety on its head to create profit centres from what are commonly considered sources of debt or operational costs. Presented by Sean Pindar, FoodByte SPONSORED BY:

WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY:

SEE YOU IN TORONTO AT GIC 2022! GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2022: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 & WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2022 GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST 2023: MONDAY, APRIL 23 & TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2023

12

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

#GSFSHOW22


There is only one #1 publication in grocery 2020’s Gen Next winners The lure of seafood DECEMBER 2020 • JANUARY 2021

Empire Co.’s

Michael MEDLINE talks Voilà, private label

and leading and learning during covid-19

#1 Reach 219,254** total readers #1 Frequency 8 issues/year • 4 e-newsletters/week #1 Website 214,333* page views/mo. • 123,659* uniques/mo. #1 E-Newsletter 14,937* opt-in subscribers To subscribe visit: canadiangrocer.com To advertise contact: Vanessa Peters, vpeters@ensembleiq.com Visit us at booth # 7 *aam, Alliance for Audited Media June 2020 || **aam, Alliance for Audited Media June 2021


14

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

LEVY SERVICE DESK

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CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT GROCERS · FÉDÉRATION CANADIENNE DES ÉPICIERS INDÉPENDANTS 105 GORDON BAKER ROAD, SUITE 401, TORONTO, ON M2H 3P8

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VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE - EAST HALLS A, B & C VANCOUVER, BC

APRIL 25 - 26, 2022

*As of March 14, 2022

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST FLOOR PLAN

APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

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APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

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EXHIBITORS BY BOOTH *As of March 14, 2022

4.................. Baicorp Financial Inc. 6.................. Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) 7.................. Canadian Grocer 300............. Sunshine Pickles 307............. Beyond Meal Inc. 308............. Trio Bakery 311............... Ginger Goat 312.............. Zast Foods Corporation 315.............. Jakeman’s Maple Products 317.............. Fraktals Chocolate 400............. Grainworks, Inc. 408............. Artisan West Marketing Ltd. 409............. PepsiCo Canada 414.............. LPB Distribution 415.............. In-Store Water Systems Inc. 418.............. Bizerba 421.............. Danone Canada 507............. Fromagerie Bergeron 509............. Galerie au Chocolat 511............... Lulubelle & Co 514-515...... ACOSTA 600............. Moneris 601............. Hussmann Canada Inc. 601............. Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. 601............. Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd. 602............. Amerlux 604............. Bank of Montreal 605............. Burnbrae Farms Ltd. 606............. Federated Insurance Company of Canada 608............. Bimbo Canada/Canada Bread 609............. Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP 614.............. Caledon Farms 615.............. Nestle Canada Inc. 618.............. Ethical Bean 619.............. Western Grocer Magazine 620............. PIM Brand Canada– Welch’s Fruit Snacks 621+722.... Raimac Food Store Equipment 701.............. A Lassonde Inc. 704............. Hobart Canada 706............. BoxMaster 707............. Boosh Food 711............... The Grocery People (TGP) 715.............. Kraft Heinz Canada 718.............. Rossdown Farms & Natural Foods 723............. Cavendish Farms 800............. Procter & Gamble 801............. Tree of Life Canada 804............. Nuvo Retail Group 805............. Ishida Canada

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805............. Proluxe Canada 808............. Inform Brokerage 809............. Sobeys Wholesale 815.............. Kruger Products L.P. 819.............. Motorola Value Added Distributor 821.............. Troppy Foods Ltd. 823............. OK Frozen Dough 901............. The Coca Cola Company 904............. FMS Solutions 905............. Unilever Canada 906............. Unitex Sales Ltd. 908............. Lactalis Canada 909............. GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. 914.............. Howell Data Systems 915.............. Advantage Solutions 916.............. MIWE Canada Inc. 922............. Fun Tyme Foods 923............. Frylow Canada 1001........... RATIONAL 1004........... Conglom 1005........... Old Dutch Foods Ltd 1009........... Bosa Foods 1015............ Kev’s Juice 1020........... Ponderosa Mushrooms & Specialty Foods 1021........... Kostklip 1100............ Arneg Canada 1101............ Loblaw Companies Limited 1104............ The Aggressive Good 1107............ DIGI Canada Inc. 1109............ Associated Grocers 1115............. Maple Leaf Foods 1119............. Country Golden Yolks 1120............ Dart Canada Inc. 1121............. Pan X Corp 1201............ Relationshop 1205........... Novolex 1209........... Trumps Food Interests Ltd.– Wholesale Bakery 1211............. Bob Bakery World Ltd 1218............ Grocery Business Media Inc. 1219............ Rill Foods- Soup & More 1221............ Oregon Fruit Products 1300........... JRTech Solutions 1308........... ADN Refrigeration & Kysor Warren 1314............ Primo Animal Health 1315A......... Bubuwares 1316............ Premium Growers LLC 1318............ Harvey’s Butter Rum Batter, LLC 1319............ Canadian Wise Foods Inc. 1320........... Secret Aardvark 1321A......... Sutra Sauces

1321B.......... K & M Farms 1323........... ColdChase 1401........... Salt Spring Coffee 1403........... The Ice Cream Depot 1410............ KB Honey Family 1411............ WorkSafeBC 1415............ Care Bakery 1417............ Vanillablossom Flavors Inc. 1418A......... Nature’s Choice Foods 1418B.......... 63 Acres Premium BC Beef 1422........... Tea Sparrow 1423........... PMF Brands 1501........... Refresh Packaging Compostable Creations 1502........... Rivercity Innovations Ltd 1504........... Organika Health Products Inc. 1505........... Quinn’s Bakeshop & Baxter’s Bakery 1508........... Rubicon Food Products 1509........... BR[AI]YT 1510............ Taco Revolution 1511............. A&A Greenilla Food Ltd. 1514............ Dr. Bee 1515............ Udutu Online Learning Solutions 1516............ Kula Foods Inc. 1517............ Bullocks Bistro Sauces & Dressings 1519............ ECOCERT Canada 1521............ Inmar Intelligence 1522........... Baking Barn 1523........... FoodByte 1525........... Hungry Hunter Raw 1700........... Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs 1712............ Weber Marking Systems Canada 1718............ Dyna-Pro Environmental 1724........... eCAMION Inc. 1726........... Peak Performance Products Inc. 1736........... FCC 1752............ Star Wholesale Ltd 1760........... Portland Pet Food Company 1762........... Vana Life Foods LP 1764........... Cardamom Hills Trading Co. 1766........... Amboseli Foods 1768........... JT’s Original Louisiana Bar-B-Que Sauce 1770........... Pure Wild Oregon 1774............ Fume-eh Gourmet Foods

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

15


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

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SPEAKERS AT GSF 2022 WARSAME AHMED, BR[AI]YT As CEO of BR[AI]YT, Warsame Ahmed helps bring AI automation to physical retailers.

AL HOLLMAN, IGYA JUROR Al Hollman spent his entire career in the food business, retiring in February 2015 from Federated Co-operatives Limited.

STEWART SAMUEL, IGD Stewart Samuel is Program Director at IGD Canada. He is an expert on food retailer strategies and trends.

JEREMY ATTRIDGE, KRAFT HEINZ Director of Category Management Jeremy Attridge leads strategic engagement with retail customers through best-in-class shopper insights and category management initiatives.

DARIAN KOVACS, DIGITAL MARKETING SPECIALIST Darian Kovacs is the Indigenous founder of Jelly Digital Marketing, and PR and digital marketing course Jelly Academy. He is also the host of Amazon Prime’s Marketing News Canada.

HIMANSHU SUDAN, ECAMION Himanshu Sudan is a Director of eCAMION, a technology provider for flexible battery storage, electric vehicle charging, and energy management solutions. He is also a Chartered Professional Accountant.

BETH BRICKEL, ENSEMBLEIQ Beth Brickel is a Senior Research Director in the Insights & Innovation team at EnsembleIQ. She has more than 20 years of market and customer research experience. ADRIENNE CARDY, EXPLORER RESEARCH Executive Vice President Adrienne Cardy is a shopper insights expert helping clients develop effective retail strategies grounded in shopper behaviour. TONY CHAPMAN, CHATTER THAT MATTERS Tony Chapman is the creator and host of Chatter that Matters, a media platform that includes two national radio shows, podcast and a blog. BILL COOK, MAGICIAN Bill Cook is a three-time award winner at the prestigious World Magic Seminar in Las Vegas.

TED GRAHAM, GENERAL MOTORS As the Head of Open Innovation at GM, Ted Graham tackles important issues pertaining to the future of transportation. He is also the author of The Uber of Everything.

16

JEAN-PIERRE LACROIX, SLD Jean-Pierre Lacroix is president of strategic design agency SLD, and is known as a visionary design thinker, strategist, author, and speaker. MIKE LUST, PEPSICO FOODS CANADA Known for building strong customer relationships, Mike Lust, Vice President Customer Development at PepsiCo Foods Canada, has been with PepsiCo for 26 years. DIEGO MAZZONE, JRTECH SOLUTIONS As President and CEO of JRTech Solutions, Diego Mazzone runs the leading electronic shelf label (ESL) supply and integration company in North America. TAMEY MCINTOSH, BR[AI]YT Co-founder and COO of BR[AI]YT, Tamey McIntosh is passionate about technology and how it can help solve realworld problems.

HEATHER THOMSON, CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR EXPERT Heather Thomson is the Executive Director of the University of Alberta’s School of Retailing and has more than a decade of leadership experience in various retail settings. ERIC TERMUENDE, FUTURE OF WORK EXPERT NoW Innovations co-founder Eric Termuende advises organizations on futureproofing their teams, talent management, and rehumanizing the workplace. VINCENT VAN DER HEIJDEN, INSTACART A member of the Instacart Business Development team, Vincent van der Heijden develops partnerships with retailers looking to amplify their same-day grocery offering.

SEAN PINDAR, FOODBYTE A converted trained chef and serial entrepreneur with 15+ years in leadership and innovation.

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

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17


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

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EXHIBITOR LISTINGS 63 ACRES PREMIUM BC BEEF 8966 Nowell St. Chilliwack, BC V2P 4W8 (604) 792-4204 info@63acresbeef.com www.63acresbeef.com We started 63 Acres to create a local brand of premium beef naturally raised without any added hormones or steroids. BOOTH #1418B

A LASSONDE INC. 170, 5e Ave. Rougemont, QC J0L 1M0 (888) 477-6663 info.sales@lassonde.com www.lassonde.com Lassonde is the North American leader in the development, manufacture and sale of fruit and vegetable juices, beverages and snacks. BOOTH #701

✪ A&A GREENILLA FOOD LTD.

463 Hunters Green NW Edmonton, AB T6R 3C3 (780) 439-0870 info@aagreenillafood.com www.aagreenillafood.com We are the only Myanmar food manufacturer in North America. We provide scalable, retail-ready, shelf-stable, high-quality, authentic Myanmar foods. BOOTH #1511

✪ ACOSTA

2700 Matheson Blvd. E., East Tower, Ste. 101 Mississauga, ON L4W 4V9 (905) 238-8058 BRafuse@acosta.com www.acosta.ca We are the sales and marketing powerhouse behind the most recognized brands and a proven resource for top retailer. BOOTH #514-515

ADN REFRIGERATION & KYSOR WARREN #3113-1225 Kingsway Ave. Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 1S2 (604) 945-0788 cathy.n@adnrefrigeration.com www.adnrefrigeration.com Complete refrigeration solution for supermarket refrigerated merchandisers, refrigerated systems, installation, service and maintenance. BOOTH #1308 ADVANTAGE SOLUTIONS PO Box 241 Stn Main Keswick, ON L4P 3E2 (800) 268-3425 jennifer.hutchinson@asmnet.com www.asmnet.com Advantage Solutions provides HQ sales services, analytics, insights, retail services, business process outsourcing & in-store media for CPG brands & retailers across all trade channels. BOOTH #915 AMBOSELI FOODS 320 W 1550 N Layton, UT USA 84041 (801) 455-1868 sylvia@amboselifoods.com www.usimplyseason.com Amboseli Foods is a specialty food seasoning manufacturer that provides premium private labeling services and markets under the USimplySeason brand. BOOTH #1766

18

CFIG MEMBER

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

✪ SHOW SPECIAL

AMERLUX 178 Bauer Dr. Oakland, NJ USA 7436 (973) 882-5010 dknickerbocker@amerlux.com www.amerlux.com Manufacturer of innovative lighting solutions that captivates, inspires, and commands attention. Enhancing retail, commercial, hospitality and supermarket environments while focusing on quality and service excellence. BOOTH #602

✪ BEYOND MEAL INC.

7491 Pacific Cir. Mississauga, ON L5T 2A4 (416) 874-1700 sales@beyondmealinc.com www.sanotti.ca Sanotti offers a variety of sesame-based and plant-based chocolate spreads. All of our products are proudly developed, manufactured, and packaged in Ontario, Canada! BOOTH #307

✪ BR[AI]YT 1339 Wellington St. W. Ottawa, ON K1Y 3B8 (613) 722-0001 contact@braiyt.com www.braiytvu.com BraiytVu - Changing the way retailers think about retail analytics. Using AI to analyze footfall traffic, wait times, and more to help make informed decisions. BOOTH #1509

BIMBO CANADA/CANADA BREAD 2 International Boulevard, Ste. 100 Etobicoke, ON M9W 1A2 (800) 465-5515 BC.ConsumerEngagement@grupobimbo.com www.bimbocanada.com Bimbo Canada/Canada Bread is the leading producer and distributor of packaged fresh bread, bakery products, snacks and sweet goods. BOOTH #608

✪ BUBUWARES

✪ BIZERBA 4110 - 853 Seaborne Ave. Port Coquitlam, BC V3B 0N9 (604) 353-0789 ca.info@bizerba.com www.bizerba.ca Bizerba is a market leader in retail weighing, labelling, and food processing. Come check out our latest innovations, including the Bizerba Dragon Rapid Cook Oven!

✪ BULLOCKS BISTRO

BOB BAKERY WORLD LTD. #210 20285 Stewart Cres. Maple Ridge, BC V2X 8G1 (604) 380-4080 bob.bobbakeryworld@gmail.com www.bobbakeryworld.com We are a wholesale supplier to the bakery industry and will be bringing many products to showcase including the Photocake printing system. BOOTH #1211

BURNBRAE FARMS LTD. 3356 County Rd. 27 Lyn, ON K0E 1M0 (800) 666-5979 general@burnbraefarms.com www.burnbraefarms.com Burnbrae Farms eggs and egg products can be found in your local grocery store, restaurants, food-service operations and homes across Canada. BOOTH #605

BOOTH #1109

✪ BOOSH FOOD

✪ CALEDON FARMS

BAICORP FINANCIAL INC. 1290 Cornwall Road Oakville, ON L6J 7W5 (905) 844-8820 info@baicorp.ca www.baicorp.ca Helping Independent Food Retailers get the most out of their Employee Benefits and Total Rewards

BOOTH #707

BOOTH #614

ARNEG CANADA 18, Rue Richelieu Lacolle, QC J0J 1J0 (450) 246-3837 hfriedmann@arnegdml.com www.arneg.ca Arneg Canada manufactures and supplies coolers and freezers for use in retail food and beverage stores. We also supply parts. BOOTH #1100

ARTISAN WEST MARKETING LTD. 1361- 25th St. West Vancouver, BC V7V 4J4 (778) 251-3651 saasha.stanley@artisanwest.com www.artisanwest.com A brand management firm representing specialty foods across Canada, highlighting domestic and imported cheeses, organic flatbreads, hand-crafted preserves, and bean to bar chocolate. BOOTH #408

ASSOCIATED GROCERS 7100 44th St. SE Calgary, AB T2C 2V7 (587) 229-3872 info@associatedgrocers.ca www.associatedgrocers.ca Associated Grocers is a full-service grocery wholesaler catering to the best independent grocers in Western Canada.

BOOTH #4

✪ BAKING BARN

745 15 St. N Lethbridge, AB T1H 2Y2 (403) 894-2787 bakingbarnyql@gmail.com www.bakingbarn.ca We offer handcrafted vanilla products including vanilla extract, sugars, white hot chocolate, & salt!! It takes 1 full year for the perfect blend is achieved! BOOTH #1522 BANK OF MONTREAL 595 Burrard St. Vancouver, BC V7X 1L7 (778) 879-6784 tasaday.pollesel@bmo.com www.bmo.com Top-tier financial institution that provides expert advice and custom tailored solutions. BMO is the preferred bank of choice for independent grocers. BOOTH #604

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

BOOTH #418

103-6554 176 St. Surrey, BC V3S 4G5 (604) 900-3386 hello@booshfood.com www.booshfood.com Boosh Food is a plant-based, Non-GMO and gluten-free Canadian company. We use all natural ingredients to make delicious and convenient Heat & Eat meals. BOSA FOODS 1465 Kootenay St. Vancouver, BC V5K 4Y3 (604) 253-5578 matthew.dale@bosafoods.com www.bosafoods.com Discover the finest products found in the Mediterranean diet and Italian culture right here. BOOTH #1009 BOXMASTER 100-880 Belgrave Way Delta, BC V3M 5Y8 (604) 521-4715 aparsons@boxmaster.com www.boxmaster.com BoxMaster produces custom corrugate packaging and products for customers across Canada. BOOTH #706

128 - 21300 Gordon Way Richmond, BC V6W 1M2 (778) 386-9699 info@bubuwares.com www.bubuwares.com Sustainable natural bamboo straws and cutlery. 100% Plastic-Free, 100% Biodegradable. BOOTH #1315A SAUCES & DRESSINGS 245 Utsingi Dr. Yellowknife, NT X1A 0E7 (867) 669-9763 info@bullocksbistro.ca www.bullocksbistro.ca Bullocks Bistro Salad Dressing and Cooking Sauce, bringing a unique and unforgettable taste of Northern Canada to the world. BOOTH #1517

29 Melanie Dr. Brampton, ON L6T 4K8 (905) 584-6781 sales@crumps.ca www.caledonfarms.ca Caledon Farms has built their reputation throughout the pet marketplace as manufacturing treats that are high quality, and have single or limited ingredients. CANADIAN GROCER 20 Eglinton Ave. West, Ste. 1800 Toronto, ON M4R 1K8 (877) 687-7321 vpeters@ensembleiq.com www.canadiangrocer.com Canadian Grocer is the #1 magazine, website and e-newsletter for the Canadian grocery industry, with an audience of 219,000 retailers and decision makers. BOOTH #7

CANADIAN WISE FOODS INC. 14-12484 82 Ave. Surrey, BC V3W 3E9 (604) 593-5160 info@canadianwisefoods.com www.canadianwisefoods.com Canadian Wise Foods is a B.C. company specializing in meat marinades, ethnic sauce and spice mixes for retail, private label, and food service. BOOTH #1319

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CARDAMOM HILLS TRADING CO. 4356 NE Flanders St. Portland, OR USA 97213 (503) 806-3416 sophie@masalanw.com www.cardamomhillstc.com Cardamom Hills’ handcrafted chutneys are made using Pacific Northwest sourced ingredients paired with Indian spices to offer unique flavor combinations. BOOTH #1764

CARE BAKERY 3823 29 St. NE Calgary, AB T1Y 6B5 (403) 724-1920 info@carebakery.com www.carebakery.com Gluten-free products with ingredients you can pronounce. Chef Made, Chef Endorsed. BOOTH #1415

CAVENDISH FARMS 100 Midland Dr. Dieppe, NB E1A 6X4 (506) 852-0793 wells.stephanie@cavendishfarms.com www.cavendishfarms.com At Cavendish Farms, we’re a family food company. We pride ourselves on high-quality products, exceeding our customer’s needs, and strong relationships with growers. BOOTH #723

✪ COLDCHASE

3623 44 Avenue E., #101 Edmonton International Airport Edmonton, AB T9E 0V4 (780) 909-5664 ramlani@coldchase.com www.coldchase.ca Environmental global tracking system using reusable sensors for cold chain verification for warehouse and transport of perishable goods. BOOTH #1323 CONGLOM 2600 Marie-Curie Ave. Saint-Laurent, QC H4S 2C3 (514) 333-6666 ksande@conglom.com www.conglom.com We are a manufacturer and distributor of a wide variety of consumer and industrial products. BOOTH #1004 COUNTRY GOLDEN YOLKS 8950 Ford Rd. Rosedale, BC V0X 1X2 (604) 819-8938 jeff@countrygoldenyolks.com www.countrygoldenyolks.com Country Golden Yolks: Free range and Organic Eggs. “Eggs The Way Nature Intended.” BOOTH #1119 DANONE CANADA 100 Rue de Lauzon Boucherville, QC J4B 1E6 (450) 655-7331 serviceclientele-canada@danone.com www.danone.ca Danone Canada is the leading producer of top essential dairy, plant-based, creamer, and beverage brands like Activia, Oikos, Silk, So Delicious, Evian, and International Delight. BOOTH #421 DART CANADA INC. 2121 Markham Rd. Toronto, ON M1B 2W3 (416) 293-2877 hector.hofilena@dartcanada.ca www.solocup.ca Dart Canada is the leading supplier of single-

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use plates, bowls, cups and cutlery under the well-known Solo and Dart brands. BOOTH #1120

DIGI CANADA INC. 87 Moyal Ct. Concord, ON L4K 4R8 (416) 648-2243 cara.tulloch@ca.digi-group.com www.digisystem.com/ca/en/ Digi Canada Inc.offers a complete line of food equipment for over 25 years. We offer across-the-store solutions for quality weighwrap-labelling equipment, POS systems, ESL and consumables. BOOTH #1107

✪ DISTRIBUTION CANADA INC. (DCI) 3425 Harvester Rd. Ste. 102c Burlington, ON L7N 3N1 (905) 681-3933 admin@distributioncanada.ca www.distributioncanada.ca DCI is a national organization of retailers and wholesalers that fosters collaborative selling relationships between its members, manufacturers, and key stakeholders. BOOTH #6

DR. BEE 17617 Ford Detour Rd. Pitt Meadows, BC V3Y 0A7 (604) 460-8889 sales@drbee.ca www.drbee.ca What started as a small, local honey farm has grown over 25 years to become an industry-leading operation offering innovative and all-natural honey bee products. BOOTH #1514

✪ DYNA-PRO ENVIRONMENTAL

575 Roseberry St. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0T3 (800) 284-6315 larryj@dyna-pro.com www.dyna-pro.com Dyna-Pro Environmental has provided Ultra-Pure’s reverse osmosis water dispensing machines, water treatment systems, and customized solutions to water problems across Canada for over 30 years. BOOTH #1718

ECAMION INC. 450 Midwest Rd. Scarborough, ON M1P 3A4 (416) 755-6460 info@ecamion.com www.ecamion.com eCAMION Inc. designs, engineers and manufactures Electric Vehicle Ultra Fast Charging based on energy storage. This solution is ideal for retail settings. BOOTH #1724

ECOCERT CANADA #6-616 10th St. E. Saskatoon, SK S7H 0G9 (306) 665-9072 office.westcanada@ecocert.com www.ecocert.com/en-CA/home Ecocert provides you with suitable solutions to promote good environmental and societal practices, across all sectors, all over the world. BOOTH #1519

✪ ETHICAL BEAN 1315 Kootenay St. Vancouver, BC V5K 4Y3 (604) 363-2637 orders@ethicalbean.com www.EthicalBean.com Vancouver’s Premium Fairtrade Organic Coffee. Just better. BOOTH #618

FCC 310-5460 152nd St. Surrey, BC V3S 5J9 (604) 379-8385 amandeep.malik@fcc.ca www.fcc-fac.ca/en/financing/food.html A Canadian federal Crown corporation, FCC lends money and provides other services to food and beverage processors, equipment manufacturers, logistic providers and other businesses. BOOTH #1736

✪ FUME-EH GOURMET FOODS

FEDERATED INSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA 108-4595 Canada Way Burnaby, BC V5G 1J9 (604) 294-2337 mauro.ditullio@federated.ca www.federated.ca Federated Insurance offers customized insurance solutions designed for the grocery store industry, featuring industry-leading coverage such as product recall, transit, computerized equipment and infestation.

FUN TYME FOODS 102-455 De Baets Winnipeg, MB R2J 4M3 (204) 953-1444 info@funtymefoods.com www.funtymefoods.com Displaying Cookie Pop and Candy Pop Popcorn. A sweet snack with chocolate and cookie/candy icing. BOOTH #922

BOOTH #606

FMS SOLUTIONS 5511 Tomken Rd. Ste. 204 Mississauga, ON L4W 4B8 (877) 435-9400 Gary.Bickmore@fmssolutions.com www.fmssolutions.com Since 1974, FMS’ mission has been to help retailers succeed by providing operators with the financial information and support they need to run their business. BOOTH #904

✪ FOODBYTE

1505 Barrington St., Ste. 100 Bedford, NS B3J 3K5 (902) 488-5030 sales@joinfoodbyte.com www.joinfoodbyte.com Food safety automation software for food processors that simplifies the day-to-day management of food safety programs and traceability. BOOTH #1523

✪ FRAKTALS CHOCOLATE

145 Industrial Parkway S., Unit 1 Aurora, ON L4G 3V5 (905) 727-7279 info@fraktals.com www.fraktals.com Producer of small-batch, handmade artisanal treats since 2005. Known for our signature product, Belgium Chocolate Cashew Buttercrunch. We make astonishingly good chocolate confectionery! BOOTH #317

✪ FROMAGERIE BERGERON

3837, route Marie-Victorin Saint-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC G0S 2C0 (418) 886-2234 marketing@fromagesbergeron.com www.fromagesbergeron.com Fromagerie Bergeron produces 15 ripened, lactose-free cheeses, available as wheels, slices and tips. Selection of fresh cheeses. More than 30 years of expertise. BOOTH #507 FRYLOW CANADA 2289 Deerbrush Cres. North Saanich, BC V8L 0C5 (250) 589-8338 chris@frylow.com www.frylow.com Frylow is an oil-extending device for use in all deep fryers. Frylow will improve the quality of food in addition to savings on oil costs. BOOTH #923

2001 Gable Dr. Coquitlam, BC V3E 1Z8 (604) 908-9263 info@fume-eh.com www.fumeeh.com Locally produced, natural wood-smoked olives and smoked olive tapenade. The perfect gift, and delicious snack. Charcuterie, wine pairing, unique gourmet foods. BOOTH #1774

✪ GALERIE AU CHOCOLAT

6665 Chemin de la Côte-de-Liesse Montreal, QC H4T 1Z5 (514) 331-8460 salesteam@gmvchoc.com www.galerieauchocolat.ca The BEST tasting ‘Better for You’ chocolate items in the market - crafted in Canada! A chocolate experience not to be missed. BOOTH #509

GBS FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT INC. 2871 Brighton Rd. Oakville, ON L6H 6C9 (905) 829-5534 pdouglas@gbscooks.com www.gbscooks.com A coast-to-coast distributer of equipment specific to the retail/grocery trade. Sales, service and support across the board, 24/7. BOOTH #909

✪ GINGER GOAT

Kitchener, ON (519) 904-4628 hay@gingergoat.ca www.gingergoat.ca Ginger Goat is a creator of heat, flavour and fun...for your mouth! All-natural Canadian made hot sauces that have been featured on Hot Ones. BOOTH #311 GRAINWORKS, INC. Box 30 Vulcan, AB T0L 2B0 (800) 563-3751 sales@grainworks.com www.grainworks.com Grainworks, Inc. provides certified organic grains, beans, flours, flakes and mixes in shelf -ready and bulk packages. BOOTH #400

GROCERY BUSINESS MEDIA INC. PO Box 23103 Longworth PO Bowmanville, ON L1C 0H0 (905) 697-0467 admin@grocerybusiness.ca www.grocerybusiness.ca Grocery Business Magazine is Canada’s leading grocery publication and eNews provider, serving independent retailers with trending information they can use to increase profit. BOOTH #1218

✪ HARVEY’S BUTTER RUM BATTER, LLC 912 S. National Ave. Bremerton, WA USA 98312 (360) 373-6460 orders@harveysbrb.com www.harveysbrb.com

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

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Harvey’s hot buttered rum beverage mix is in major grocery stores in the Northwest during Q4. Our specialty popcorn is smallbatch made using natural ingredients. BOOTH #1318

HOBART CANADA 105 Gordon Baker Rd. Toronto, ON M2H 3P8 (866) 334-2371 marketing@hobart.ca www.hobart.ca Hobart Canada provides a full line of equipment for the foodservice and retail industries including baking, weighing & wrapping, food machines, warewashers, refrigeration and cooking. BOOTH #704 HOWELL DATA SYSTEMS 103 - 3011 Underhill Ave. Burnaby, BC V5A 3C2 (800) 410-6871 sales@howelldatasystems.com www.howelldatasystems.com Point-of-sale solutions with integrated e-commerce, mobile loyalty app, customer self-scan terminals, chain management solutions, DVR solutions & more. BOOTH #914 HUNGRY HUNTER RAW 6195 Springcreek Rd. Smithville, ON L0R 2A0 (289) 723-2266 sarah@bigcountryraw.ca www.hungryhunter.ca Raw pet food made easy! Perfectly balanced, highly digestible raw meals for dogs and cats. BOOTH #1525 HUSSMANN CANADA INC. 5 Cherry Blossom Rd. Cambridge, ON N3H 4R7 (519) 653-9980 rob.arabski@hussmann.com www.hussmann.com Hussmann enables excellence in food retailing with merchandising and food display equipment, refrigeration systems, service, maintenance, energy solutions, food quality expertise and store planning. BOOTH #601

INFORM BROKERAGE 2286 Holdom Ave. Burnaby, BC V5B 4Y5 (604) 324-0565 mwatson@informbrokerage.com www.informbrokerage.com At Inform, we know food: prepare, present, market, sell. Whether food service, retail, or c-store, Inform is your informed source. BOOTH #808

✪ INMAR INTELLIGENCE

50 Dynamic Dr., Unit #2 Toronto, ON M1V 2W2 (416) 298-1234 solutions@inmar.com www.inmar.com Inmar applies data science and technology to create valuable insights that make it easier to understand, predict and meet the personalized needs of today’s shoppers. BOOTH #1521

IN-STORE WATER SYSTEMS INC. 112 Oakdale Rd. Toronto, ON M3N 1V9 (416) 616-1184 www.nimbuswatersystems.com Full service water treatment company. Best range of equipment and options for both vended and store use water. Purchase, leasing, rental and revenue share available. BOOTH #415

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ISHIDA CANADA 2076 192 St., Unit 101 Surrey, BC V3Z 0N2 (778) 578-2928 info@ishidacanada.ca www.ishidacanada.ca Ishida Canada is a world leader in the design, manufacturing and installation of multi-head weighing machines and complete weighing and packaging line solutions. BOOTH #805

JAKEMAN’S MAPLE PRODUCTS 454414 Trillium Line, RR1 Beachville, ON N0J 1A0 (519) 539-1366 chad@themaplestore.com www.jakemansmaplesyrup.com The Jakeman Family has been producing our award-winning blend of 100% pure Maple Syrup since 1876. BOOTH #315 JONES FOOD STORE EQUIPMENT LTD. 2896 Norland Ave. Burnaby, BC V5B 3A7 (604) 294-6321 info@jonesfood.com www.jonesfood.com Jones Food Store Equipment provides equipment, refrigeration system designs, installation, service and energy solutions for small to large footprint supermarkets, warehouses, liquor stores and more.

✪ KEV’S JUICE

104 338 W. 8th Ave. Vancouver, BC V5Y 3X2 (604) 999-5713 kevin@kevsjuice.com www.kevsjuice.com Kev’s Juice is a locally made cold pressed juice co. We offer a variety of organic cold pressed juices, health shots and oat milks. BOOTH #1015

✪ KOSTKLIP 119-1611 Broadway St. Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 2M7 (604) 468-1117 sales@kostklip.com www.kostklip.com Our merchandising solutions include data label strips, printed plastic ShelfTalkers, sign holders, shelf management product organizers and fixture mounts for electronic shelf labels. BOOTH #1021 KRAFT HEINZ CANADA 95 Moatfield Dr. Toronto, ON M3B 3L6 (416) 441-5000 info@kraftheinz.com www.kraftheinzcompany.com Kraft Heinz Canada provides quality, taste and nutrition for all eating occasions. Kraft Heinz’s iconic brands include Kraft Peanut Butter, Heinz Ketchup, KD and Nabob.

BOOTH #601

BOOTH #715

JRTECH SOLUTIONS 2365 Rue Guenette Montreal, QC H4R 2E9 (514) 889-7114 info@jrtechsolutions.com www.jrtechsolutions.com With Pricer’s electronic shelf labels (ESL), JRTech helps retailers fulfill their operational strategies. Beyond price automation, discover our unique ESL features (Click-and-Collect, Put-to-light, Geolocation, ShelfVision). BOOTH #1300

KRUGER PRODUCTS L.P. 2 Prologis Blvd., Ste. 500 Mississauga, ON L5W 0G8 (905) 812-6900 Steve.Turner@krugerproducts.ca www.krugerproducts.ca Kruger Products is Canada’s leading manufacturer of quality tissue products. We are proud to offer a portfolio of Canada’s favourite tissue brands for every room!

✪ JT’S ORIGINAL LOUISIANA

1370 E Georgia St. Vancouver, BC V5L 2A8 (604) 655-5044 info@kulakitchen.ca www.kulakitchen.ca Meaning “eat” in Swahili, Kula offers plant-based prepared foods including stews, sauces and protein that can be found in local retail shops and restaurants.

BAR-B-QUE SAUCE 6563 McDonald Ave. #119 Ste. E Gig Harbor, WA USA 98335 (253) 606-2635 bbqsaucebyjt@gmail.com www.bbqsaucebyjt.com JT’s premium Bar B Que Sauces are gluten free, and do not contain high-fructose corn syrup or added preservatives. Original, Chipotle and Bourbon are available. BOOTH #1768

K & M FARMS 28494 Maclure Rd. Abbotsford, BC V4X 1L4 (604) 854-4830 kmfarms@shaw.ca www.kmfarms.ca K & M Farms grows, packages and sells free-range chicken. Our signature product is our heavy roaster (5 to 6 lbs). BOOTH #1321B

✪ KB HONEY FAMILY

#15 - 5684 Landmark Way Surrey, BC V3S 7H1 (604) 532-9757 kiddbros@telus.net www.kbhoneyfamily.com We are home to Canada’s oldest honey brands! Still family owned and operated since 1884 with a wide variety of fun and healthy flavour options. BOOTH #1410

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BOOTH #815

✪ KULA FOODS INC.

LPB DISTRIBUTION 1580 Rue Chabanel O Montreal, QC H4N 1H4 (514) 588-8888 info@lpbdistribution.com www.lpbdistribution.com Importer of French and Western European products: Confectionery, chocolates, fine food grocery, natural organic products, jams, chips, etc. Canadian manufacturer of fine chocolates and pralines. BOOTH #414

✪ LULUBELLE & CO

#1108-5530 Rue Saint-Patrick Montreal, QC H4E 1A8 (514) 501-9318 marie@lulubelleandco.com www.lulubelleandco.com Delicious plant based gluten-free baking mixes, palm-oil free sprinkles, food colouring, instant yeast, alum-free baking powder and xanthan gum. BOOTH #511 MAPLE LEAF FOODS 6897 Financial Dr. Mississauga, ON L5N 0A8 (905) 285-5000 daisy.samaniego@mapleleaf.com www.mapleleaffoods.com As we pursue our vision to become the most sustainable protein company on earth, we work to reconnect families with the goodness of food. BOOTH #1115

✪ MIWE CANADA INC.

10-3055 Lenworth Dr. Mississauga, ON L4X 2G3 (190) 561-4050 b.garisto@miwe.com www.miwe.com Expertise in baking processes, high competent consulting and first class service, MIWE has been a leader in the world of baking for over 100 years. BOOTH #916

MONERIS 3300 Bloor St. W. Toronto, ON M8X 2X2 (844) 824-1704 Isabel.Mifsud@moneris.com www.moneris.com Moneris is Canada’s largest provider of innovative solutions for mobile, online and in-store payments, processing more than one in three transactions. BOOTH #600

LACTALIS CANADA 405 The West Mall, 10th Floor Toronto, ON M9C 5J1 (416) 626-1973 angela.cove@ca.lactalis.com www.lactalis.ca Lactalis Canada is a leading producer of dairy products. Our brands include Lactantia, Astro, Olympic, IOGO, Black Diamond, Cracker Barrel, and Balderson.

MOTOROLA VALUE ADDED DISTRIBUTOR 633 Granite Court Pickering, ON L1W 3K1 (647) 883-8377 jsimmonds@lenbrook.com www.lenbrookcanadasolutions.com Lenbrook is the Canadian Value Added Distributor for Motorola Two-Way Radios and Body-Worn Cameras. Visit us to learn about the Curve Wi-Fi enhanced business radio! BOOTH #819

LOBLAW COMPANIES LTD. 1 PC Circle Brampton, ON L6Y 5S5 (514) 210-3404 hugo.turenne@loblaw.ca www.freshmart.ca The Affiliated Independent Team at Loblaw takes great pride in serving independent grocery retailers across the country.

NATURE’S CHOICE FOODS PO Box 93 Stn Del Ctr. Maple Ridge, BC V2X 7E9 (604) 465-2100 info@natureschoice.ca www.natureschoice.ca Nature’s Choice specializes in importing and wholesaling premium spices, herbs & blends. In addition, we mix our own blends and custom blends for customers.

BOOTH #1516

BOOTH #908

BOOTH #1101

BOOTH #1418A

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NESTLE CANADA INC. 25 Sheppard Ave. W. North York, ON M2N 6S8 (416) 512-9000 consumer.care@ca.nestle.com www.madewithnestle.ca Nestle Canada has a wide variety of food, beverage, and nutrition products to help you and your family live happier and healthier lives. BOOTH #615 NORTHWEST REFRIGERATION & AIR CONDITIONING LTD. 363 Kaska Rd. Sherwood Park, AB TA8 4E9 (877) 464-0313 office@northwest-refrig.com www.northwest-refrig.com Northwest Refrigeration provides refrigeration equipment, store design, engineering, installations, renovations and quality refrigeration service. BOOTH #601 NOVOLEX 101 East Carolina Ave. Hartsville, SC USA 29550 (800) 845-6051 novolexmarketing@novolex.com www.novolex.com Novolex develops and manufactures diverse packaging products for foodservice, delivery and carryout, food processor and industrial markets that touch nearly every aspect of daily life. BOOTH #1205

NUVO RETAIL GROUP 101 10th St. NW Calgary, AB T2V 1V4 (403) 473-3911 brad.hunt@nuvorg.com www.nuvorg.com We SELL our clients’ products at store level, whether that is POG compliance or selling displays, we will increase your presence in store! BOOTH #804

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OREGON FRUIT PRODUCTS 3180 22nd St. SE Salem, OR USA 97302 (800) 547-9153 info@oregonfruit.com www.oregonfruit.com Oregon Fruit Products offers canned specialty premium fruit. We never add anything artificial, trusting the pure goodness of natural fruit to inspire. Non-GMO Project Verified. BOOTH #1221

✪ PONDEROSA MUSHROOMS

✪ ORGANIKA HEALTH PRODUCTS INC.

✪ PORTLAND PET FOOD COMPANY

Richmond, BC V6V 1V2 (604) 340-2259 krista.cline@organika.com www.organika.com Natural health products: collagen powder line – Canada’s #1 selling collagen powder brand, better-for-you keto friendly cookies, baby & kids supplements. BOOTH #1504

✪ PAN X CORP

18 Samuel Cres. Georgetown, ON L7G 5J2 (416) 829-7102 daniel@panax-cbd.com www.dansfarmaroot.com We are a Canadian Ginseng Farm that produces world-class Ginseng Nutraceuticals. BOOTH #1121

✪ PEAK PERFORMANCE

PRODUCTS INC. 6135 Danville Rd. Mississauga, ON L5T 2H7 (877) 833-7325 info@pppinc.ca www.pppinc.ca Peak is a leading Canadian distributor of Grocery, Natural Health and Sports Nutrition products with a growing portfolio of innovative, healthier alternatives for every lifestyle. BOOTH #1726

OK FROZEN DOUGH 4145 Spallumcheen Pl. Armstrong, BC V0E 1B6 (250) 546-0311 info@okfrozendough.com www.okfrozendough.com OK Frozen Dough has been supplying consistent, quality frozen bread and bun dough to Western Canadian in-store and independent bakeries for over 27 years.

PEPSICO CANADA 2095 Matheson Blvd. E. Mississauga, ON L4W 0G2 (289) 374-5000 info@pepsico.com www.pepsico.ca Pepsi Beverages, Quaker and Frito-Lay will be present to share what’s new and exciting across their Beverage, Snack Foods and Nourishing Food categories.

BOOTH #823

BOOTH #409

✪ OLD DUTCH FOODS LTD. 7800 Fraser Park Dr. Burnaby, BC V5J 5L8 (604) 430-9955 consumercare@olddutchfoods.com www.olddutchfoods.com Old Dutch Foods Ltd is a trusted leader in the Canadian snack industry. Come see us, learn about our products and share our Taste for Life. BOOTH #1005

PIM BRAND CANADA – WELCH’S FRUIT SNACKS 1595 Sixteenth Ave. Richmond Hill, ON L4B 3N9 (647) 278-8747 ltomilin@pimbrands.com www.pimbrands.com North America’s leading makers of popular Welch’s Fruit Snacks and one of the 50 largest global candy companies.

ONTARIO MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS 1 Stone Rd. W. Guelph, ON N1E 0C7 (226) 218-0704 Mark.jonker@ontario.ca www.ontario.ca/omafra Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs supports Ontario’s food processing industry. Contact us for more information on sourcing foods and beverages from Ontario. BOOTH #1700

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BOOTH #620

✪ PMF BRANDS

6308 146th St. Surrey, BC V3S 3A4 (604) 594-9190 manan@nanakfoods.com www.nanakfoods.com PMF Brands will showcase two of its prominent brands: Nanak, an ethnic brand, and Emerge, a plant-based category brand. BOOTH #1423

& SPECIALTY FOODS 22100 136 Ave. Maple Ridge, BC V4R 2P7 (604) 945-9700 info@ponderosa-mushrooms.com www.ponderosa-mushrooms.com Growers, packers and distributors of a full line of Specialty Mushrooms, Wild Mushrooms, Truffle Products, Seasonal Greens and Others. BOOTH #1020

120 NW 9th Portland, OR USA 97209 (503) 449-1960 kmccarron@portlandpetfoodcompany.com www.portlandpetfooddcompany.com Portland Pet Food Company manufactures all human-grade dog meals and treats that are sourced and made in the USA. BOOTH #1760 PREMIUM GROWERS LLC 8633 Wabash Dr. NE Salem, OR USA 97305 (503) 592-7176 bob@premiumgrowers.com www.premiumgrowers.com Snack foods and candy, roasted nuts, Oregon hazelnuts, nut butters & confections, almonds, cashews and more. BOOTH #1316

PRIMO ANIMAL HEALTH 4425 E Agave Rd., Ste. 106 Phoenix, AZ USA 85044 (855) 957-7466 sales@primopup.com www.primoanimalhealth.com Healthcare products for dogs and cats. Branded, private label, and custom formulation. Supplements, topicals, dental care and more. BOOTH #1314 PROCTER & GAMBLE 4711 Yonge St. Toronto, ON M2N 6K8 (416) 730-4711 nazarec.tl@pg.com www.PG.ca For over 100 years, P&G Canada has been providing trusted brands of superior quality and value that improve the lives of Canadians. BOOTH #800 PROLUXE CANADA 2076 192nd St., Unit 101 Surrey, BC V3Z 0N2 (888) 517-1556 sales@proluxe.com www.proluxe.com Proxluxe Canada powers kitchens to produce consistent quality food, faster. World leaders in dough presses and panini grills. BOOTH #805

✪ PURE WILD OREGON

Family owned and operated, our success is driven by made-from-scratch baked goods including Swiss Rolls, Butter Tarts, Loaves, Cakes and Cookies! BOOTH #1505

✪ RAIMAC FOOD STORE EQUIPMENT #9744 - 197B St. Langley, BC V1M 3G3 (604) 619-2793 davem@raimac.com www.raimac.com Raimac’s motto is “everything for the food store except the food!” New equipment, refurbished equipment and store fixtures. Parts and Service and equipment. BOOTH #621 & 722

✪ RATIONAL

107-2410 Meadow Pine Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5N 6S2 (905) 567-5777 info@rational-online.ca www.rational-online.com/en_ca/ home/index.php Stop by our booth to see the newest members of the RATIONAL family: the iCombi Pro and iVario Pro. BOOTH #1001

RED PLATE FOODS 1968 NW Jack Lake Ct. Bend, OR USA 97703 (541) 550-7676 hello@redplatefoods.com www.redplatefoods.com Baked goods made in a dedicated facility certified free from top allergens, gluten free, kosher and vegan. Products include granola, cookies and muffins. BOOTH #1215

✪ REFRESH PACKAGING

COMPOSTABLE CREATIONS 201, 203 58 Ave. SW Calgary, AB T2H 0A5 (877) 434-2384 info@refreshpackaging.ca www.RefreshPackaging.ca We manufacture 100% Certified Compostable product to replace plastic. We specialize in custom bag products of all styles from grocery checkout to ziptop food-storage bags. BOOTH #1501 RELATIONSHOP 33130 Magnolia Circle, Ste. B Magnolia, TX USA 77354 (214) 226-5829 haydee@relationshop.com www.relationshop.com We are a leading provider of customer engagement solutions. We are passionate about helping grocers build customer loyalty, drive incremental sales, and improve the digital customer experience through relevancy, personalization, and engagement. BOOTH #1201

8269 SW Wilsonville Rd. Ste. A Wilsonville, OR USA 97070 (541) 662-1478 nfaubel@purewildoregon.com www.purewildoregon.com Salt Free Spices—Taco, Rice, 2 Minute Salsa, Rib Rubs, Salt Free Rice Mixes, Gluten Free Frozen Cookies & Brownies.

✪ RILL FOODS- SOUP & MORE

QUINN’S BAKESHOP & BAXTER’S BAKERY 426 Nugget Ave. Toronto, ON M1S 4A4 (416) 609-2200 fpatel@baxtersbakery.ca www.baxtersbakery.ca

BOOTH #1219

BOOTH #1770

PO Box 102 Thorp, WA USA 98946 (509) 964-2520 rills@fairpoint.net www.rillfoods.com Rill Foods produces soup mixes. Sourcing legumes, potatoes, barley & onion from Pacific Northwest. GMO & sugar-free, no MSG, artificial colors, or flavors.

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

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RIVERCITY INNOVATIONS LTD. 201-116 Research Dr. Saskatoon, SK S7N 3R3 (306) 986-8888 support@rivercityinnovations.ca www.rivercityinnovations.ca Specializing in cold chain temperature monitoring for groceries. Our wireless solution prevents product loss, saves labour costs and automates reporting. Check Less - Do More. BOOTH #1502 ROSSDOWN FARMS & NATURAL FOODS 2325 Bradner Rd. Abbotsford, BC V4X 1E2 (604) 856-6698 sales@rossdown.com www.Rossdown.com Rossdown offers an array of high-quality chicken and turkey products, including organic, animal welfare certified, RWA, halal and further prepared items. BOOTH #718

✪ RUBICON FOOD PRODUCTS

180 Brodie Dr., Unit 1 Richmond Hill, ON L4B 3K8 (403) 607-5810 rosario@rubiconexotic.ca www.rubiconexotic.ca With a 40-year heritage, Rubicon sources only the finest exotic fruits to create bestin-class exotic juices and beverages. BOOTH #1508

✪ SALT SPRING COFFEE

105-3551 Viking Way Richmond, BC V6V 1W1 (778) 986-8922 brian@saltspringcoffee.com www.saltspringcoffee.com Salt Spring Coffee is a family-owned company offering organic, fair trade coffee since 1996. Available formats include whole bean, ground and compostable coffee pods. BOOTH #1401

✪ SAPUTO DAIRY

PRODUCTS CANADA GP 1889 Kingsway Ave. Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 1T1 (604) 420-6611 salescanada@saputo.com www.saputo.ca Manufacturer & distributor of a vast range of dairy brands such as as Dairyland, Milk2Go, Armstrong, Joyya, AlexisdePortneuf, and our new plantbased Vitalite! BOOTH #609 SECRET AARDVARK 15377 S Maplelane Rd. Oregon City, OR USA 97045 (503) 890-9284 stacy@secretaardvark.com www.secretaardvark.com Hot Sauces and Marinades. We put a little something extra in everything we do. Come be unexpectedly inspired by us! BOOTH #1320

SOBEYS WHOLESALE 1020 64 Avenue NE Calgary, AB T2E 7V8 (403) 730-3500 Melissa.Lee@sobeys.com www.sobeyswholesale.com Sobeys Wholesale is a progressive Canadian food distribution group committed to offering our customers quality products and services in a mutually beneficial partnership. BOOTH #809

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✪ STAR WHOLESALE LTD.

1430-246 Stewart Green S.W. Calgary, AB T3H 3C8 (403) 312-4969 bmarlow@starwholesaledsd.ca www.starwholesaledsd.ca Full Line DSD Food Distributor. National coverage. Grocery, Pharmacy, Mass and C-store. Exclusive brands with exceptional service. BOOTH #1752 SUNSHINE PICKLES 30043 Jane Rd. Thamesville, ON N0P 2K0 (519) 692-4416 info@picklesplease.ca www.picklesplease.ca Conventional and certified organic pickled products. All grown and processed in Canada. We don’t use chemical additives or preservatives. BOOTH #300

SUTRA SAUCES #6 -1338 Stellys X Rd. Brentwood Bay, BC V8M OB6 (250) 813-1011 sutrawholesale@gmail.com www.sutrasauces.com We are white-label experts. We can create custom packaging and recipes for internationally inspired fresh frozen sauces. GFSI certified, family owned and operated. BOOTH #1321A

TACO REVOLUTION 6 - 3012 Boys Rd. Duncan, BC V9L 6W4 (250) 244-6492 uprise@tacorevolution.ca www.tacorevolution.ca Our line of take-home Mexican food products allows you to have an authentic taco truck experience in the comfort of your own kitchen. BOOTH #1510

✪ TEA SPARROW

2455 192nd St. Surrey, BC V3Z 3X1 (604) 779-5940 Ariella@teasparrow.com www.teasparrow.com We are North America’s first tea company to use solely eco-friendly packaging, giving us the lowest footprint in the industry. Plus, our teas are awesome (just saying). BOOTH #1422

✪ THE AGGRESSIVE GOOD

30 McArthur Ave. Ottawa, ON K1L 6R2 (613) 552-0027 info@tagpods.com www.aggressivegood.com TAGpod Solutions consist of easy to integrate modules that make zero-waste shopping and distribution easy, with the focus of being green and clean. BOOTH #1104 THE COCA COLA COMPANY 335 King St E. Toronto ON M5A 1L1 (647) 256-7200 consumer.relations@coca-cola.com www.coca-cola.ca Together with our bottling partner, Coca-Cola Canada Bottling, we offer more than 250 drinks across 38 brands in Canada. BOOTH #901 THE GROCERY PEOPLE (TGP) 14505 Yellowhead Trail Edmonton, AB T5L 3C4 (780) 447-5700 TGPinfo@fcl.crs www.tgp.crs

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

The Grocery People (TGP) is a unit of Federated Co-operatives Limited (FCL) that delivers groceries and creates programs for independent retail stores across Western Canada. BOOTH #711 THE ICE CREAM DEPOT 400, 3615 11 St. Nisku, AB T9E 1C6 (780) 690-1464 mmaier@theicecreamdepot.ca www.theicecreamdepot.ca The Ice Cream Depot is a Master Distributor of Chapman’s Ice Cream for Alberta. We also carry Blue Bunny and many other unique brands. BOOTH #1403 TREE OF LIFE CANADA 6185 McLaughlin Rd. Mississauga, ON L5R 3W7 (905) 507-6161 canada.sales@treeoflife.com www.treeoflife.ca Tree of Life, growing brands in Canada for over 70 years. With unparalleled category expertise in our industry, serving brand partners, customers and consumers. BOOTH #801

TRIO BAKERY 3750A Laird Rd. #2-5 Mississauga, ON L5L 0A2 (647) 224-4227 mdkesler@triobakery.ca www.borekpie.com Manufacturer of savory and sweet borek pies. We combine great quality of local produce, old world recipe and fully automated production for a delicious taste. BOOTH #308

✪ TROPPY FOODS LTD.

5455 120th St. Delta, BC V4E 2A1 (778) 889-4750 info@greatfoods.ca www.greatfoods.ca Troppy Foods Ltd. is a company that specializes in Jackfruit Products, Vacuum Frying Technology, and making healthy snacks everyone would enjoy! BOOTH #821

✪ TRUMPS FOOD INTERESTS LTD. -

WHOLESALE BAKERY 646 Powell St. Vancouver, BC V6A 1H4 (604) 732-8473 susan@trumpsfood.com www.trumpsfood.com Trumps Bakery offers innovative desserts: dessert loaves, cookies, bars and squares, buffet cakes and cheesecakes, individuals, gluten free, vegan and regular desserts. BOOTH #1209

✪ UDUTU ONLINE

LEARNING SOLUTIONS PO Box 48149 Victoria, BC V8Z 7H5 (778) 533-8355 richardm@udutu.com www.grocerylms.com Grocery training made easy! Perfect for the challenging grocery industry. Streamlined onboarding, consistent training, improved compliance, and reduced costs. BOOTH #1515 UNILEVER CANADA 160 Bloor St. E., Unit 1400 Toronto, ON M4W 3R2 (416) 415-3000 unilevercanadamedia@edelman.com www.unilever.ca

Displaying innovation items from condiments, ice cream, dry soups, and vitamins/ supplements categories. BOOTH #905

✪ UNITEX SALES LTD.

102 - 30720 Simpson Rd. Abbotsford, BC V2T 6C7 (604) 855-1850 info@unitexsales.com www.unitex.ca Amplify your brand with professionally branded corporate apparel, uniforms and promotional products. We will match your goals with excellent solutions. BOOTH #906

✪ VANA LIFE FOODS LP

113 Cherry St. Seattle WA 98104 (347) 446-6504 vrinda@vanalifefoods.com www.vanalifefoods.com Our ready-to-eat bowls are made using green chickpeas in 4 flavors. Our meals are gluten-free, non-GMO, vegan, plantbased. BOOTH #1762

✪ VANILLABLOSSOM FLAVORS INC.

#21 6809 Kirkpatrick Cres. Saanichton, BC V8M 1Z8 (250) 893-9962 dave.best@vanillablossom.com www.vanillablossom.com Special discount show deals. Wholesale & Retail, Vanilla Beans, Vanilla Extract, Vanilla Paste,Coffee Extract, Coffee Paste, Spices, Herbs & Seasonings. BOOTH #1417

WEBER MARKING SYSTEMS CANADA 6180 Danville Rd. Mississauga, ON L5T 2H7 (905) 564-6881 Fax: (905) 564-6886 info@webermarking.ca www.webermarking.ca Weber Marking Systems Canada is a leading manufacturer and supplier of high-quality labels, innovative labeling systems, and reliable coding products to the Canadian marketplace. BOOTH #1712 WESTERN GROCER MAGAZINE 1313 Border St., Unit 16 Winnipeg, MB R3H 0X4 (204) 954-2085 rbradley@mercurypublications.ca www.westerngrocer.com Western Grocer Magazine has served as a voice for the Western Canadian grocery industry since 1916. We would love to learn more about your business. BOOTH #619

WORKSAFEBC PO Box 5350 Stn Terminal Richmond, BC V6B 5L5 (604) 231-8480 Retail@worksafebc.com www.WorkSafeBC.com We help to reduce risk and keep workplaces healthy and safe through education and consultation. BOOTH #1411

✪ ZAST FOODS CORPORATION

222 Islington Ave. Ste. 6C Toronto, ON M8V 3W7 (416) 539-9278 info@zastfoods.com www.zast-foods.com Featuring Nudefruit; Cookin’ Greens; Cineplex Mexican Snax and Popcorn; Nourishtea Organic Loose leaf Teas. BOOTH #312

#GSFSHOW22


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

EXHIBITORS BY CATEGORY ADVERTISING/MEDIA/ MARKETING PROGRAMS

63 Acres Premium BC Beef Associated Grocers Bob Bakery World Ltd. Canadian Grocer Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) eCAMION Inc. Grocery Business Media Inc. Inmar Intelligence JRTech Solutions Relationshop The Aggressive Good The Grocery People (TGP) The Ice Cream Depot Western Grocer Magazine

AUTOMATION SYSTEMS

BR[AI]YT ColdChase FoodByte Rivercity Innovations Ltd. Weber Marking Systems Canada

BAGS

Novolex Refresh Packaging Compostable Creations Unitex Sales Ltd.

BAR CODING EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS

Weber Marking Systems Canada

BAKED GOODS: FRESH/ FROZEN/REFRIGERATED

Bimbo Canada/Canada Bread Care Bakery Inform Brokerage MIWE Canada Inc. OK Frozen Dough Pure Wild Oregon Quinn’s Bakeshop & Baxter’s Bakery Red Plate Foods Sutra Sauces Trio Bakery Trumps Food Interests Ltd. Wholesale Bakery

BEAUTY & PERSONAL CARE

Organika Health Products Inc. Procter & Gamble

BEVERAGES

A Lassonde Inc. Danone Canada Dyna-Pro Environmental Inform Brokerage In-Store Water Systems Inc. Kev’s Juice Nestle Canada Inc. PepsiCo Canada Rubicon Food Products Tea Sparrow The Coca Cola Company

#GSFSHOW22

CARDS

eCAMION Inc.

CHECKOUT EQUIPMENT

Bizerba

CLEANERS & SUPPLIES

Dart Canada Inc. Kruger Products L.P. Procter & Gamble Refresh Packaging Compostable Creations

COFFEE & TEA

Advantage Solutions Ethical Bean Kraft Heinz Canada Salt Spring Coffee Tea Sparrow

CONDIMENTS

Bullocks Bistro Sauces & Dressings Cardamom Hills Trading Co. FUME-eh Gourmet Foods Fun Tyme Foods Ginger Goat JT’s Original Louisiana Bar-B-Que Sauce Secret Aardvark Sunshine Pickles Unilever Canada

CONFECTIONERY

Advantage Solutions Fraktals Chocolate Galerie au Chocolat LPB Distribution Nestle Canada Inc. PIM Brand Canada – Welch’s Fruit Snacks Premium Growers LLC

CONSULTING SERVICES Baicorp Financial Inc.

FCC Nuvo Retail Group Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Relationshop Udutu Online Learning Solutions

COUPON REDEMPTION SERVICES

Inmar Intelligence

DAIRY & EGGS

Artisan West Marketing Ltd. Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Country Golden Yolks Danone Canada Fromagerie Bergeron Lactalis Canada PMF Brands Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP

DISPLAY CASES

ADN Refrigeration & Kysor Warren Arneg Canad BoxMaster Hussmann Canada Inc. Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd.

DISTRIBUTOR WHOLESALE

Bob Bakery World Ltd. Conglom Dyna-Pro Environmental Loblaw Companies Limited LPB Distribution Motorola Value Added Distributor Peak Performance Products Inc. Ponderosa Mushrooms & Specialty Foods Proluxe Canada Sobeys Wholesale Star Wholesale Ltd. The Coca Cola Company The Grocery People (TGP) Tree of Life Canada Vanillablossom Flavors Inc.

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

ColdChase Ecocert Canada Frylow Canada

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Bank of Montreal FCC Federated Insurance Company of Canada FMS Solutions

FIXTURES: STORE

Kostklip

FOODS: BABY

Nestle Canada Inc.

FOODS: CANNED

Oregon Fruit Products

FOODS: DELI

Artisan West Marketing Ltd. Bosa Foods Burnbrae Farms Ltd. FUME-eh Gourmet Foods Maple Leaf Foods Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP

FOODS: DRY

A&A Greenilla Food Ltd. Acosta Advantage Solutions Canadian Wise Foods Inc. Dr. Bee Grainworks, Inc. Jakeman’s Maple Products

Lulubelle & Co Red Plate Foods Rill Foods- Soup & More Troppy Foods Ltd.

FOODS: ETHNIC

Amboseli Foods Canadian Wise Foods Inc. Cardamom Hills Trading Co. Kula Foods Inc. PMF Brands Rubicon Food Products Taco Revolution

FOODS: FROZEN

A&A Greenilla Food Ltd. Acosta Boosh Food Cavendish Farms K & M Farms Kula Foods Inc. PMF Brands Sutra Sauces The Ice Cream Depot Tree of Life Canada Trio Bakery Unilever Canada Zast Foods Corporation

FOODS: HEALTH

Boosh Food Care Bakery Danone Canada Pan X Corp

FOODS: KOSHER

KB Honey Family Ponderosa Mushrooms & Specialty Foods Trumps Food Interests Ltd. Wholesale Bakery

FOODS: NATURAL/ ORGANIC

Baking Barn Beyond Meal Inc. Galerie au Chocolat Grainworks, Inc. Harvey’s Butter Rum Batter, LLC KB Honey Family Kula Foods Inc. Lulubelle & Co Peak Performance Products Inc. Red Plate Foods Rill Foods- Soup & More Secret Aardvark Sunshine Pickles Vana Life Foods LP Zast Foods Corporation

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022 | GSFSHOW.COM

23


APRIL 25 & 26, 2022 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE | EAST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2022 | PASSWORD: GSFSHOW2022

DOWNLOAD SHOW APP:

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

FOODS: PREPARED

JT’s Original Louisiana Bar-B-Que Sauce Maple Leaf Foods Ponderosa Mushrooms & Specialty Foods Proluxe Canada Taco Revolution Vana Life Foods LP

FOODS: SNACK

A Lassonde Inc. Bimbo Canada/Canada Bread Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Fun Tyme Foods Galerie au Chocolat Harvey’s Butter Rum Batter, LLC Jakeman’s Maple Products Maple Leaf Foods Old Dutch Foods Ltd. PepsiCo Canada PIM Brand Canada – Welch’s Fruit Snacks Premium Growers LLC Star Wholesale Ltd. The Ice Cream Depot Troppy Foods Ltd. Zast Foods Corporation

FOODS: SPECIALTY

A&A Greenilla Food Ltd. Acosta Artisan West Marketing Ltd. Baking Barn Bosa Foods Cardamom Hills Trading Co. Care Bakery Country Golden Yolks Dr. Bee FUME-eh Gourmet Foods Inform Brokerage JT’s Original Louisiana Bar-B-Que Sauce LPB Distribution Oregon Fruit Products Rill Foods- Soup & More Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP Taco Revolution Tree of Life Canada Trio Bakery

FOODS: SPREADS

Beyond Meal Inc. Jakeman’s Maple Products KB Honey Family Kraft Heinz Canada

FOOD PREPARATION EQUIPMENT

Bob Bakery World Ltd. Frylow Canada GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Hobart Canada Hussmann Canada Inc. Ishida Canada Proluxe Canada Rational

MOBILE APP SPONSORED BY:

FOOD SAFETY & SANITATION

ColdChase FoodByte

FOODSERVICE

Beyond Meal Inc. Bosa Foods Cavendish Farms Conglom Pure Wild Oregon Sutra Sauces Trumps Food Interests Ltd. Wholesale Bakery Vana Life Foods LP

FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT

ADN Refrigeration & Kysor Warren Bizerba GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Raimac Food Store Equipment

FRUITS

Oregon Fruit Products Troppy Foods Ltd.

HOUSEWARES

Bubuwares

HVAC & FREEZERS

ADN Refrigeration & Kysor Warren Arneg Canada Hobart Canada Hussmann Canada Inc. Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. MIWE Canada Inc. Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd. Raimac Food Store Equipment Rivercity Innovations Ltd

JUICES

Rubicon Food Products The Coca Cola Company

LABELLING & PRICING EQUIPMENT

Bizerba DIGI Canada Inc. Hobart Canada Ishida Canada JRTech Solutions Kostklip Weber Marking Systems Canada

LIGHTING

Amerlux

MATERIAL HANDING & BACKROOM EQUIPMENT

DIGI Canada Inc. Raimac Food Store Equipment

MEAL SOLUTIONS

GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Kraft Heinz Canada Sutra Sauces

MEAT: BEEF

63 Acres Premium BC Beef

24

GSFSHOW.COM | GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2022

MEAT: POULTRY

Canadian Wise Foods Inc K & M Farms Rossdown Farms & Natural Foods

NATURAL PRODUCTS

Boosh Food Caledon Farms Dr. Bee Ginger Goat Lulubelle & Co Organika Health Products Inc. Premium Growers LLC Secret Aardvark Star Wholesale Ltd.

NUTRITIONAL AIDS

Pan X Corp Primo Animal Health

OTHER

BR[AI]YT Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) Federated Insurance Company of Canada Frylow Canada Harvey’s Butter Rum Batter, LLC Inmar Intelligence Motorola Value Added Distributor Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Vanillablossom Flavors Inc. WorkSafeBC

PACKAGING

BoxMaster Conglom Dart Canada Inc. Ishida Canada Novolex Refresh Packaging Compostable Creations The Aggressive Good

PAPER PRODUCTS

BoxMaster Dart Canada Inc. Kruger Products L.P. Novolex Procter & Gamble

PET FOOD & SUPPLIES

Caledon Farms Hungry Hunter Raw Portland Pet Food Company Primo Animal Health

PHARMACEUTICALS: OTC

Primo Animal Health

POINT-OF-SALE SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT DIGI Canada Inc. Howell Data Systems Moneris

PRIVATE LABEL

Amboseli Foods Baking Barn Caledon Farms Fraktals Chocolate Sunshine Pickles The Grocery People (TGP)

SIGNAGE & GRAPHICS

63 Acres Premium BC Beef Kostklip

SPICES & FLAVOURINGS

Amboseli Foods Ginger Goat Nature’s Choice Foods Pure Wild Oregon

STATIONARY SUPPLIES

Vanillablossom Flavors Inc.

STORE FURNISHINGS & DESIGN

Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd.

TECH/IT Baicorp Financial Inc.

BR[AI]YT FoodByte JRTech Solutions Relationshop Rivercity Innovations Ltd. The Aggressive Good Udutu Online Learning Solutions

TRADE ASSOCIATION

Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI)

TRADE PUBLICATIONS

Canadian Grocer Grocery Business Media Inc. Western Grocer Magazine

TRAINING

Udutu Online Learning Solutions

TRANSPORTATION

Associated Grocers

UNIFORMS

Unitex Sales Ltd.

VITAMINS & SUPPLEMENTS

Organika Health Products Inc. Pan X Corp Peak Performance Products Inc. Unilever Canada

WAREHOUSING

Associated Grocers

WATER

A Lassonde Inc. Dyna-Pro Environmental In-Store Water Systems Inc.

#GSFSHOW22


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