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Eastern New Mexico University is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status in its programs, activities or employment.

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ENMU-Ruidoso 709 Mechem Drive · Ruidoso, NM 88345 (575) 257-2120 · (575) 257-9404 fax www.ruidoso.enmu.edu e·f

Board of Regents Mr. Terry Othick, President Ms. Susan Tatum, Vice President Ms. Veronica Ayala, Secretary Dr. Dan Patterson, Member Ms. Jane Christensen, Member e·f

Community College Board Mr. Brad Treptow, Chair Mr. James Paxton, Secretary Dr. Michael Budd, Member Dr, F. Lynn Willard, Member Ms. Gina Klinekole, Member e·f

ENMU-Ruidoso Administration Dr. Clayton Alred, President Mr. Pierre Laroche, Vice President of Student Learning Ms. Sheila Farquer, Business Affairs Director Ms. Coda Omness, Communications/Student Relations Director Mr. John Hemphill, Workforce Development and ABE Director

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The overarching mission of ENMU-Ruidoso is to enhance the lives of our students and the communities we serve, now and into the future. Eastern New Mexico University-Ruidoso Branch Community College combines a traditional learning environment with twentyfirst century instructional technology to provide an enhanced educational experience. ENMU-Ruidoso emphasizes liberal learning, freedom of inquiry, cultural diversity and whole student life. Scholarship, cultural enrichment, excellent teaching and enriched learning define the college community’s relationship and contributions.

• Teaching and learning is central to everything we do • Personalized attention and customer service define how we work • Responsiveness to students and our community is core to our success

ENMU-Ruidoso’s seven purposes

ENMU-Ruidoso’s focus

• To offer general academic studies for students wishing to transfer to a University

• Prepare students for meaningful careers and advanced study

• To offer career and technical education programs leading to gainful employment for students in their chosen field • To offer a dual credit enrollment Early College Program for qualified high school students • To offer workforce education and training services and provide institutional leadership in the economic development of the region • To offer programs of instruction leading to Associate degrees and Certificates of Completion • To offer lifelong learning opportunities for all citizens through continuing education and community service programs • To offer adult basic education for those wishing to achieve literacy skills, completion of a high school equivalency diploma and English proficiency

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ENMU-Ruidoso’s values

• Impart citizenship and leadership for the betterment of the community • Support and expand the role of higher education and excellent teaching • Empower citizens to respond to a rapidly changing world • Contribute to the economic viability and well-being of our community


September 2016 Dear ENMU-Ruidoso community: It is with a sense of pride and appreciation that I present this five-year strategic plan for Eastern New Mexico University-Ruidoso Branch Community College. I am proud of the collaborative effort that started with groups of community members assembling to compile their observations of the campus. Multiple participants including faculty and staff along with College Board members added their opinions of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats facing the institution. Throughout the process, community members clearly expressed their support for and their dedication to their local community college. Faculty and staff contributed their time and considerable talents toward making this document a template to not just to provide services to area residents but to enrich the lives of the students and communities we serve. As the youngest higher education institution in the state, we find ourselves facing numerous challenges in an environment of rapidly changing technology, evolving student demographics, and dwindling financial resources. With this plan we meet those challenges head-on. The heart of the plan lies in the five strategic goals that redefine the methods we employ to serve our students, maintain high-quality programs, serve our communities, maintain effective and efficient operations, and develop facilities for the future. We direct our energy and our talents to these five goals that will carry us forward while valuing our efforts to maintain an environment of continuous improvement. In closing, I want to thank all of the participants who generously contributed their time, energy, and wisdom to this process. That involvement has resulted in a document that will provide a lasting contribution to this evolving institution. I now ask all of our constituents to join me on the path charted by this plan. Sincerely,

Clayton Alred, Ph.D. President

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Serve student needs

A. Expand recruiting efforts and staff involvement in them B. Strengthen outreach to new student markets C. Expand public events to attract students and their families D. Enhance retention efforts E. Facilitate workforce and economic development opportunities through technical/business training F.

Engage student more fully to improve their chances of success

2016-2020 Performance Indicator Summary INDICATOR

1-A-1

Number of contacts with county high school students including: general population, dual credit, and early college

1-A-2

Number of faculty/staff involved with recruiting activities

1-A-3

Percent of in-district students enrolled

1-B-1

Number of contacts with under-employed workers

1-B-2

Number of contacts with students returning from other universities

1-C

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PERFORMANCE MEASURE

Number of campus and community events focused on recruiting

1-D-1

Number of tutoring visits

1-D-2

Number of classes supported by iBest activities (Integrated Basic Education Training)

1-E

Number of non-credit, workforce classes offered

1-F

Number of academic interventions

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020


Maintain high quality programs to satisfy the needs of our students

A. Align all general education offerings with New Mexico standards B. Maintain learning outcomes for all coursework C. Support innovative technologies by training all faculty on Quality Matters processes D. Support innovative technologies by certifying all online offerings with Quality Matters certification E. Establish external linkages with business and industry when appropriate F.

Expand external experiences for students (competitions using gaming simulations, internships, shadowing/ volunteering, “ride-alongs,” etc.)

G. Fully implement “intrusive advising” and degree audit program H. Develop procedures to secure data from NMSU and UNM on transfers I.

Implement periodic program assessments to evaluate faculty credentials, enrollment, completers, licensure pass rates and any external recognition of all programs

2016-2020 Performance Indicator Summary INDICATOR

PERFORMANCE MEASURE

2-A

Percent of general education courses aligned

2-B

Number of courses with revised learning outcomes

2-C-1

Number/percent of full-time faculty QM trained

2-C-2

Number/percent of part-time faculty QM trained

2-D

Number of QM certified courses per year

2-E

Number of associations established per year

2-F

Number of external experience per year

2-G

Number of degree plans filed

2-H

Number of student with transfer data

2-I-1

Number of programs reviewed per year

2-I-2

Licensure pass rates

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

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Make ENMU-Ruidoso an integral part of Lincoln County and the Mescalero Apache Reservation

A. Establish lines of communication with community groups B.

Create community/organizational partnerships with the campus

C. Continue highly visible service projects that show ENMU-Ruidoso’s support of the community D. Strengthen relationship with Mescalero Apache Tribe, recognizing their unique standing in the community and region E. Make ENMU-Ruidoso the first choice among higher education institutions for district residents F.

Support legislation to establish statutes to allow school districts to join college district

G. Pursue approval from residents of other Lincoln County school districts to join college district

2016-2020 Performance Indicator Summary INDICATOR

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PERFORMANCE MEASURE

3-A

Number of community/advisory meetings with public

3-B

Number of partnerships created per year

3-C

Number of service events per year

3-D-1

Number of initiatives with tribe per year

3-D-2

Percent of Native American students enrolled

3-E-1

Percent in-district students enrolled

3-E-2

Percent Hispanic students enrolled

3-F

Passage of district expansion bill

3-G

Number of successful elections

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020


Maintaining effective and efficient campus operations

A. Develop an allocation report designed to track allocations of major categories of institutional expense B. Conduct annual review of allocations with campus stakeholders C. Continue faculty/staff forums with committee progress reports D. Establish a protocol for committees to regularly share information E. Address staffing challenges (slow hires, attracting people to Ruidoso, salary, etc.) F.

Provide cross-training for related units; support the “one-person deep” offices

2016-2020 Performance Indicator Summary INDICATOR

PERFORMANCE MEASURE

4-A

Preparation dates of allocation reports

4-B

Dates of allocation reviews

4-C

Number of forums held to present committee work

4-D

Number of sets of committee minutes distributed

4-E-1

Avg. number of days from “resignation” to “first day”

4-E-2

Percent or dollar increases per year

4-F

Number of employees cross-trained

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

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Develop facility and technology plans to anticipate future needs

A. Initiate study to determine best uses of available space to guide future renovations B. Investigate financing options for renovations and identify course of action C. Acquire funding for renovation of additional space D. Complete planned renovations E. Incorporate “green� building design and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) construction standards in all future projects F.

Design and implement campus security measures for all campus facilities

G. Establish faculty-driven technology initiatives

2016-2020 Performance Indicator Summary INDICATOR

5-A

Completion date of study

5-B

Identification of financing options

5-C

Date funds acquired

5-D

Completion of projects/phases

5-E

Number of green projects per year

5-F-1

Number of security measures implemented

5-F-2

Employment date of security officer

5-G

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PERFORMANCE MEASURE

Completion of technology plan

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020


ENMU-Ruidoso Campus History ENMU-Ruidoso was established as an off-campus instructional center of ENMU in 1991. In 1994, the College moved to its current campus—a gift from local businessman Dale Walthal. In 2005, ENMU-Ruidoso was legislatively approved as a Branch Campus of ENMU-Portales; at that time, academic development and oversight, faculty hiring, and related academic procedures previously approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs at ENMU shifted to the provost of ENMU-Ruidoso. For several years enrollments climbed, but ENMU-Ruidoso enrollments have dipped in recent years. Lincoln County’s population has also dropped in recent years, suggesting that the College is experiencing a larger socio-economic trend in post-recession, rural New Mexico. Since its inception, ENMU-Ruidoso has aggressively provided post-secondary preparation and credit and life-long learning opportunities for the community it serves. It continues to partner with employers, area high school districts, state and federal workforce development departments in order to support meaningful employment, educational quality and access, citizenship and economic development.

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ENMU-Ruidoso Strategic Plan 2016-20  

ENMU-Ruidoso Strategic Plan includes 5 specific goals and the strategies that will be put in place to reach these goals.

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