The First 70 Years - A History of the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering

Page 1


The University of Oklahoma

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING The First 70 Years

Tom J. Love George Lynn Cross Professor Emeritus



CONTENTS

Acknowledgements .......................................................................................... v Forword ............................................................................................................ vii Chapter 1 - The Beginning 1892-1908 ............................................................ 1 Chapter 2 - The New College 1909-1920 ........................................................ 28 Chapter 3 - The College Matures 1920-1930 ................................................... 60 Chapter 4 - The Depression Years 1930-1940 ................................................. 87 Chapter 5 - World War II and Post War Recovery 1940-1950 ........................ 111 Chapter 6 - The Age of Computers Begins 1950-1960 ................................... 142 Chapter 7 - A Changing College in a Changing World 1960-1970 ................. 170 Appendix A - Curricula Appendix B - Faculty Changes Appendix C - Alumni Communication



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writing of this history has required assistance from a number of sources. First, Dean Billy Crynes recognized the desirability of having the story of the College of Engineering preserved in a book that would be available for those interested. Primarily this would include former students, faculty, and their families. I accepted his invitation to take on the task of writing such a history. I must apologize to him, and all who contributed material for the delay in completing this work. Secondly, Dean Tom Landers is responsible for having me resurrect the incomplete manuscript and encourage the completion of the history up to the 1970 school year. Dean Landers also was very helpful in his review of the manuscript and his suggestions for modifying the format in order to make the book more readable. He has also provided the resources for the printing of the book. Dean Landers assigned Karen Kelly, External Relations Coordinator for the College of Engineering, and Megan Denney, Communications Coordinator of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, to assist in preparing the final draft and help with the arrangement of publication. Both have been extremely valuable in this endeavor. Megan prepared the final formatting of the manuscript and was very helpful in selecting and placing the illustration in the text. A major source of information for the work was obtained from The Western History Collections of The University Libraries. Professor John R. Lovett, Director of Special Collections and Curator of Western History Collections, was very helpful in making the related holdings available. These included microfilms of The Oklahoma Daily and its predecessor, The University Catalogs, Engineering College Bulletins, and The University Commencement Bulletins. He also retrieved many photographs from the archives that were related to the College of Engineering for our selection to be included in the book. He was always patient and his staff always helpful over the 20 years that it has taken to complete this first part of the College history. In addition, Professor David Levy, an outstanding teacher, historian, and author, made a special contribution in sharing a letter he had found in President David Ross Boyd’s files regarding some early political maneuvering to block the University of Oklahoma from offering a program of study in engineering. Professor Levy also found a copy of Dean Felgar’s initial acceptance of a faculty position at the v


University. I sincerely appreciate his encouragement and highly recommend Professor Levy’s book, The University of Oklahoma, A History Volume I, for those who wish to have a better insight into the history of the University. A special thanks goes to Professor Barton Turkington for his collection of the Sooner Shamrock magazines published by the students of the College of Engineering from 1941 until 1970. This collection forms an important record of engineering student life and demonstrates a forward-looking view of the students as they wrote about both the activities of the College, as well as some of the latest advances of engineering throughout the nation. It is my hope that this collection will be preserved in the University Archives. Former Associate Dean Terri Reed Rhoads, Susan Calonkey, Assistant to the Associate Dean, Sue Mobley, Student Leadership & Services Coordinator, helped with the computer archiving of the manuscript. In the initial activities of writing this history, the following faculty and emeritus faculty formed an advisory committee and were very helpful in forming the early chapters. They were Harold K. Bone, Laverne A. Comp, and D. Barton Turkington from Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; F. Mark Townsend, Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, and Raymond D. Daniels, from Chemical Engineering and Material Science; Joakim G. Laguros, Brandon H. Griffith, Jimmy F. Harp, from Civil Engineering and Sanitary Science; Gerald Tuma, Gene Walker, and Ansel Challenner from Electrical Engineering; Bobbie Foote, and William L. Cory from Industrial Engineering; Donald E. Menzie, Tom Morton, and former Professor John Campbell from Petroleum and Geological Engineering.

vi


FOREWORD In 1988, Dean Billy Crynes recognized that there was little information available with regard to the history of the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering. He asked if I would undertake the task of writing such a history. I was honored to be asked, and was pleased to have an opportunity to continue to be involved with the school. I had retired from the faculty at the first of the year and had a long relationship with the college. I must admit that the task was much larger than I realized at the time. My admiration and respect for professional historians has since increased many fold. My association with the University of Oklahoma began in January 1946 when, as a recently married veteran, I enrolled in the College of Engineering. Since I had several semesters of work before entering service, I was able to complete my degree by the end of August l947. During my time as a student, I supplemented our income by teaching ground school at night to students who were taking pilot lessons under the GI Bill at various flying schools in the City. This experience led me to have an interest in teaching. As my course of study came to an end, I met with Professor Dawson, Chairman of the School of Mechanical Engineering, about graduate school, expressing my interest in a teaching career. He advised me to go into industry first, since he felt that the experience would be a valuable asset in teaching. After graduation, I spent nine years working in industry as a project engineer and senior research engineer in Kansas City. During this time, I earned a Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering at The University of Kansas by attending an evening graduate program. I was appointed as an Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering at OU in the fall of 1956. The history of the College of Engineering is very much the story of the creative, hard working students who have passed through the trials of the course of study in engineering. A major problem for any historian is the limit to the amount of information that you can include, as well as the possibility of overlooking important facts. I have tried to give a cross section of activities of the students, as well as the overall changes in the structure of the College. The letters solicited from alumni are of particular interest in giving an insight into student life. It is my wish that I could have included the story of each student that studied engineering at OU. I have vii


personally known many outstanding individuals who were in my classes, and have been fortunate to keep in touch with a number of them. I was tempted to write their stories into the book, but this is a story of the entire college and it would not be fair to overemphasize Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. The course of study in engineering is demanding, requiring the development of the ability to examine complex problems and to create solutions to those problems. It involves the development of mathematical skills and a working knowledge of physics and chemistry. The ability to visualize and to be creative is important. It also involves working with others in team efforts to produce useful results. I have emphasized student activities in the Engineers’ Club, LKOT, and the technical societies as recorded in the student newspaper and the engineering student magazine. These activities aid in the development of social skills and leadership qualities and are important to successful careers. Most graduates of the College of Engineering go on to careers in engineering, including engineering management. Some have been successful in founding their own companies. A significant number have become officers in major corporations. In particular, OU engineering graduates have occupied the office of president of major oil companies at various times. A fraction of our graduates have gone on to graduate schools and have careers in research and teaching. And some engineering graduates go on into such careers as medicine, law, dentistry, as well as business. It should also be noted that engineers are important to our national defense, and many of our graduates have had successful careers in the military. A number of these achieved the rank of general officer. The exploration of space also includes astronauts, who have engineering degrees from our college. This history does not attempt to adequately treat the growth of research programs. That is, the development of the graduate research programs. In chapter 7, the rapid development of these activities is outlined in noting the addition of faculty with doctoral degrees, and the corresponding increase in the award of graduate degrees. The details of the research journal articles and technical publications that accompanied this development are not included. The funding sources for this work were for the most part federal agencies. During this period, the University of Oklahoma Research Institute served as an administrative office for much of this work, it was dissolved in 1973. In 1986 President Emeritus George Cross published a book, The University of Oklahoma Research Institute, 1941-1973, which reviewed the history of that organization.

viii


It is my hope that readers will find the story of the College interesting and that older graduates will enjoy nostalgia as they review some of the happenings during their stay at the University. More recent graduates perhaps will gain a perspective of their own stay at OU. On a sad note, magnified by the fact that I did not finish this manuscript in a timely fashion, many of those who wrote letters, in response to a request sent out to the alumni asking for input, have since died. Their letters give an insight into the caliber of students and the difficulties they faced. The letters also give a perspective of the environment in which they worked to obtain their degree. Many of the emeritus faculty, who formed an initial advisory committee for this history, also died in the intervening time. We live most of our life without much awareness of how quickly our life, and that of our associates, is passing. As faculty, we are always aware of the changing student body, and while the faculty is also changing, the cycle has a longer wavelength, and we tend to think that the present is reality and fail to take note of passing time. However, we are all part of a continuous living institution and history is just a dim reflection gathered from records of the lives of the people who compose that institution. This history presents a partial overview that is a reminder of the living organization of which we have been a part. As the University of Oklahoma Chant reminds us, “LIVE ON UNIVERSITY!�

Tom J. Love, Jr George Lynn Cross Professor Emeritus Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

ix



HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 1 The Beginning 1892-1908 Even as settlers raced into the newly opened unassigned lands, the railroad and the telegraph stretched out across Indian Territory like thin ribbons forecasting the technology boom that the next century would hold. On May 2, 1890, the Territory of Oklahoma was formed and on December 19, 1890 the Territorial Legislature passed the bill establishing three territorial schools including the University at Norman. Not surprisingly, the act specifically provided for mechanics, engineering, mining, and metallurgy to be taught at the University, although it would be almost 20 years before the College of Engineering would be established. However, the need for engineers was apparent as electricity and steam power, along with internal combustion engines, were changing the face of the world. The need for highways, water systems, sanitation facilities, and railroads were all developments that demanded engineering education. On November 16, 1907, President Theodore Roosevelt issued the proclamation admitting Oklahoma as a state. Arthur Grant Evans was appointed as the University’s second president as a result of the political turmoil following statehood and the election of the first governor. During his first year in office, 1908-1909, he reorganized the university creating the College of Engineering. In addition to Engineering, the catalog published in the spring of 1909 listed the Graduate School, the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Fine Arts and the School of Pharmacy. The sixteen years of "prenatal" development that led to the birth of the College of Engineering is an interesting story of the struggle to build a university that would grow to serve the state, nation and, indeed, the world. The College of Engineering had its beginning in the territorial days of the University, and those early years are important to our history. The first classes of The University of Oklahoma were convened in September 1892 as a phenomenal century of progress was drawing to a close. The utilization of steam power had come of age. Steam powered ships across oceans, trains of cars loaded with people and goods across land, and machinery for agricultural and industrial production. The nation had grown to stretch from coast to coast, and in Oklahoma Territory, the white settlers were crowding into the land that had been given as a refuge for the Native American peoples. Only 10 years earlier, the Pearl Street Power Station in New York City brought electric lighting to the United States. Earlier in the century the telegraph reached across the ocean and the telephone had been 1


The Beginning 1892-1908

2

invented only 16 years before the first classes convened at the University. As the century came to a close, the steam turbine, the internal combustion engine, and the radio were among the technological developments that foretold the explosion of progress to be experienced in the twentieth century. The automobile was a machine that excited the imagination, but was thought to be of little practical value. Balloon flight had spurred the desire for heavier than air flight, and a few daring men flew in gliders as they raced to develop powered flight. Civil engineers designed the bridges and railways, the canals and tall structures. Mechanical engineers designed and developed steam engines and the machinery they powered. Electrical engineers were busy with the expanding telegraph and electrical power generation and distribution. Indeed, engineers were providing the leadership for an expanding new world that would leave behind the condition in which humans had lived for centuries; struggling to survive by the strength of their own backs or of the labors of those they enslaved. Shortly after the establishment of the University, the City of Norman voted for incorporation on May 12, 1891. The census of that date showed that Norman had 1,218 inhabitants. There were two banks, four hotels, five restaurants, five hardware stores, one furniture store, two ice-cream parlors, three millinery stores and 12 grocery stores. Norman was a frontier town built along the Santa Fe Railroad. Main Street was a 150 foot-wide red dirt road bordered by wide wooden sidewalks. There were no sewers, running water or electric lights. The alleys behind the buildings reeked of sewage and garbage that was infested with rats. Weeds grew in profusion and seemed to threaten to choke the town. An area in the vicinity of what is now Boyd and Pickard was designated as the city dump. The town leaders campaigned for people to cut the weeds on their property and struggled to clean up the town. The people of Norman and Cleveland County were required to donate 40 acres for the University along with $10,000 to be for use of the Board of Regents in constructing a building. It had been quite a political battle to have the University placed in Norman. Still, the money was raised and the land obtained just under the deadline given in the act. In addition to the 40 acres, a strip of land that connected the property to Main Street was donated. This became University Avenue. On March 19, 1892, the Regents let the contract for the construction of the first university building. On July 6, 1892, David Ross Boyd, superintendent of the Arkansas City, Kansas,


The Beginning 1892-1908

3

schools was appointed the first president of the University of Oklahoma. His salary was $2,400 per year. Class work was scheduled to begin September 15, 1892. President Boyd worked hard to assemble a faculty and a student body in time for that starting date. He hired three faculty members to help teach the fall semester. Considering that there was no telephone and mail had to travel on the train, it is somewhat amazing that he was able to put a faculty together in such a short time. William N. Rice from Southwest Kansas College was recruited as professor of ancient languages and literature, Edwin C. DeBarr for the sciences and French, and David Ross Boyd S.E. Amos as instructor in English, history photo from the 1909 Mistletoe and civics. During August 1892, President Boyd worked to attract as many students as possible. He visited nearby towns and mailed a four page brochure that he had prepared to all he thought might be interested. The newly settled state had few high schools, and most of the potential students had been part of families who had spent the previous few years seeking land and working to carve out farms and businesses from the land they settled. There had been little time to go to school and few if any schools to attend. For the first decade, the primary student body attended the preparatory classes. When classes began on September 15, there were 57 students enrolled. That number rose to 83 by the end of the first semester, and the total enrollment for the first year was given as 119. The building under construction on the future campus was not completed until August 1893 and temporary classrooms were set up in a rock building on the southwest corner of Main and Santa Fe in Norman. Edwin C. DeBarr, one of the original four faculty members, provided a leadership role in the development of the engineering curriculum. DeBarr was a graduate of the Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilanti, of the Michigan Agricultural College and of the University of Michigan. He had taught in the public schools of Michigan and was at a professor of chemistry and biology at Albion College. He had special training for teaching chemistry, physics and biology, and was appointed Professor of Chemistry and Physics. To meet the demands of the


The Beginning 1892-1908

4

Territory, a program of study in pharmacy was instituted with DeBarr taking the lead in setting up and teaching the course of study. With all of this he earned his PhD at the University of Michigan in 1899. DeBarr was later to become the first Vice President of the University, and in 1916 he was listed as Head of Chemistry when the chemistry building, that was later named for him, was built. He apparently was popular with students and was called “Daddy DeBarr” during his later years on the faculty DeBarr was a very religious man who led the singing of the hymns in the opening of the chapel services held at ten o’clock each week day. Unfortunately, he was apparently a high ranking official of the Ku Klux Klan. In 1988 the Regents of the University removed his name from the building that is now simply known as the Chemistry Building. In the summer of 1893 as the young University readied to move into the new building, the first annual University Catalog was published for the 1892-1893 school years. The listing of courses was quite ambitious considering there were only four faculty members and probably not more than one or two students ready for college work. The courses listed below are those that would be directly related to engineering. Bear in mind that Professor DeBarr was the only faculty member in these areas, and he must have carried a heavy load in the preparatory courses in math, physics and chemistry. Math 1 Math 2 Math 3 Math 4 Math 5

Solid and Spherical Geometry College Algebra Plane and Spherical Trigonometry Plane Analysis Differential Calculus

Math 6 Integral Calculus Math 7 Theory of Equations Math 8 Plane Surveying Math 9 Determinants Math 10 Solid Analytics

Chem 1 Chem 2 Chem 3 Chem 4

General Chemistry Analytical Chemistry Analytical Chemistry Quantitative Analysis

Chem 5 Chem 6 Chem 7 Chem 8

Physics 1 Mechanics Sound and Light Physics 2 Electricity Magnetism Heat Physics 3 Batteries

Quantitative Analysis Organic Chemistry Organic Analysis Organic Synthesis

Physics 4 Laboratory Physics 5 Laboratory - Electricity Physics 6 Laboratory - Sound and Light

The reader will note a few courses that look out of place, but the faculty must be credited for vision and a great deal of optimism. These courses were viewed as the basis for the technological explosion that they must have sensed to be on the horizon.


The Beginning 1892-1908

As shown by the second catalog, in the school year 1893-1894, there were 142 enrolled in the University including one freshman; the rest were in preparatory classes except for seven in pharmacy. The total expenditures for the second year of the University were $7,741.60.

5

The new building, which was ready for the 1893 fall semester, must have looked like a palace to many who had come from surrounding homesteads. It had three stories and a basement. Broad winding stairs with banisters of elegant designs connected the floors. The floors themselves were three inch thick heart of pine flooring and the doors and doorways were described as simply trophies of the cabinet maker’s art. It cost $32,000. The 22 rooms were well lighted and well ventilated. (However, this does not imply electric lights.) A heating and ventilating system was installed at a total additional cost of $5,500. Two wells furnished a good supply of water.

By 1894-95, the enrollment had risen to 186 including nine college freshmen and seven firstyear Pharmacy students. The offerings listed in chemistry, physics, and mathematics were more modest. There were four courses each in chemistry and math, but none in physics.

The first structure on The University of Oklahoma campus, circa 1900 photo from the 1911 Sooner Yearbook


The Beginning 1892-1908

6

In September 1895, Frederick Stanton Elder (AB Princeton) came to the University from Parsons College as instructor of mathematics. He later was promoted to Professor of Mathematics and he remained until 1905. Mr. Elder really taught the first engineering courses at OU. The announcements for 1895-96 indicated the following courses would be offered: First semester

Physics 1

Mechanics, sound, light

Second semester Physics 2

Electrical units and measurements

First semester

Math 1 Math 3 Math 5 Math 7

Higher Algebra Analytical Geometry Advanced Calculus Analytics of 3 dimensions and surfaces

Second semester

Math 2 Math 4 Math 6 Math 8

Trigonometry and surveying Differential and integral calculus Continuation of Math 5 Higher plane curves

In both the 1897-98 and the 1898-99 catalogs, the following descriptions of a physics laboratory are given: A large convenient well lighted laboratory has been fitted in the basement with many modern conveniences. Apparatus for the study of mechanics, pneumatics, light heat, and electricity sufficient to illustrate these topics. Tables and cases are so arranged as to give ample room for each student to perform individual experimental work. Apparatus and supplies for the study of general chemistry and pharmacy are now in place and ready for use. A full set of apparatus will be in place for the coming year for use in the laboratory study of elementary physics.

Perhaps this announcement was premature since it was not repeated in the 18991900 catalog. Dr. DeBarr was listed as Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy and Mr. Elder was listed as Professor of Mathematics. Neither physics, nor the physics laboratory, were mentioned in this or the 1900-01 catalog. In the meanwhile, the City of Norman prepared to enter the twentieth century. In 1894, a city water system with a well, a steam-driven pump and a standpipe


The Beginning 1892-1908 7

served to provide running water into the newly laid water pipes around town. In 1895, the city council took over a small private telephone company and set up a switchboard in a building at the water plant. The switchboard indicated that the University number was one and the residence of President Boyd as number four. On September 7, 1898, long distance service to Oklahoma City was installed. Prior to this, the Santa Fe telegraph was the connection to the rest of the world. There was still no electric power provided, but on January 16, 1897, Montgomery Ward demonstrated the first horseless carriage in town. It was an electric battery powered vehicle. Most observers reckoned that it was a wonder, but doubted that it would ever be practical enough to replace the horse. In 1897-98, there were enrolled two seniors, two juniors, two sophomores, and 20 freshmen. There were also nine special students. The enrollment in the preparatory school was 309. Two B.A. degrees were awarded in 1898, the first for the young university. In 1900, Carleton Ross Hume, one of those receiving a B.A. in 1898, was awarded the first M.A. As the new century dawned, changes in the University began to accelerate just as technology was rapidly expanding the world in which people lived. In the catalog for 1899-1900, only DeBarr, Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy, and Elder, Professor of Mathematics, were listed in the sciences out of a total faculty of six. The chemical and pharmaceutical laboratories were the only laboratories mentioned. These were in four rooms in the west end of the building. The high schools in the state were still just developing; therefore the university remained responsible for teaching the high school curriculum. In the 1899-1900 catalog, four towns had high schools with two years of accredited work. They were El Reno, Guthrie, Oklahoma City and Pauls Valley. Newkirk and Shawnee were listed for one year accreditation, and 22 towns, including Norman, were listed as having partial accreditation. The 1900-1901 catalog still made no reference to courses or laboratories in physics. However, Charles Newton Gould, A.M. (Nebraska), was listed as Instructor in Geology. Perhaps it was because Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College announced a program in engineering the previous year or there may have been requests from students, but, engineering was mentioned for the first time in the 19011902 catalog. At least there was recognition of a demand for engineering courses.


The Beginning 1892-1908 8

Under a heading of ENGINEERING COURSES, the following paragraph appeared: Full courses are not as yet offered nor degrees granted along the lines of civil, mechanical, mining, or sanitary engineering. Nevertheless by a proper choice of courses already scheduled here in the subjects of mathematics, surveying, graphics, chemistry, geology, mineralogy, German and French, students may find full equivalents for courses as provided in the first two years at the best scientific and technical schools of the east.

Under the listings in Mathematics, Professor Elder listed the following for the first time: Math 7 and 8, Mechanics of Engineering. Text: Church’s “Mechanics of Engineering.” There was a footnote to the effect that 7 and 8 will be given in 1903-1904.

The catalog of 1902-1903 was the most optimistic and enthusiastic publication yet. The legislature had provided that the following buildings be built: University Hall A heating and lighting plant (estimated cost to be $15,000) Gymnasium Music rooms

Floor plans of the original building now called Science Hall and the new University Hall were published in the catalog. The first floor of the Science Hall would house Chemistry, Pharmacy and Biology. Geology, the chapel, and museum would be located on the second floor. Medicine would occupy the entire third floor. For the first time in several years, the Physics laboratory was again described: $600 worth of good apparatus for demonstrations in mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. During the coming year there will be added sufficient equipment for courses in physical measurements and special courses in each of the great departments of physics.

The catalog stated that Math VII and VIII, Mechanics of Engineering, would be offered both semesters at 8:00 a.m. Courses of introductory work in civil engineering and mining engineering were announced. The curriculum for civil engineering


The Beginning 1892-1908 9

was listed as follows: Math I, IIa and b, III, IV Graphics I, II Chemistry I, II German I, II, III French I, II Geology III, IV

The following note was also listed. “Courses in physics will also be provided this year from which electives may be chosen. They are not outlined here, as the instructor in physics has not been chosen.” Mining engineering received a little more attention, undoubtedly due to Mr. Gould’s influence. The following description was given: Object: The object of the work in Mining Engineering is to qualify students for future work in prospecting, mining, quarrying, and assaying, with particular reference to those products that are found in Oklahoma and adjacent states. To this end especial attention will be paid to such non-metallic products as gypsum, salt, coal, asphalt, oil, gas and building stone. At the same time ordinary metallic products will not be neglected. The course of study in mining engineering was listed as follows: English German History Mathematics Chemistry Geology Graphics Physics Thesis elective

3 hrs 16 hrs 4 hrs 26 hrs 25 hrs 17 hrs 8 hrs 8 hrs 4 hrs 13 hrs

The 1903-1904 Catalog announced that on January 6, 1903, fire destroyed University’s original building. The hall was being renovated in accordance with the plans listed in the previous year’s catalog. The 1905 Mistletoe (the first University year book) has under the heading of literary contributions an eye witness account of the tragedy. The fire started late in the afternoon in the basement and burned most of the night. Students and faculty joined in trying to save what could be saved.


The Beginning 1892-1908 10

The University records were successfully removed from the burning building along with some valuable chemical balances. Flames towered upward into the night as the fire raced through the well oiled pine floors, and explosions were heard as the chemicals in the chemistry laboratory ignited. The library of almost 12,000 books and pamphlets was lost along with valuable physical and chemical apparatus. The catalog states; “Very few students gave up their work, though scientific work was considerably embarrassed for a time by lack of apparatus and specimens.� The citizens of Norman were prompt in tendering temporary class and chapel room. The new University Hall The University’s second administration building, was under construction on University Hall the present site of Evans photo courtesey of the Western History Collection Hall and the new building was occupied on March 16, 1903. Provisional plans were announced to utilize the $35,000 insurance money for a science hall. A grant of $30,000 from the Carnegie Foundation for a new library was announced with the statement that plans have not been made but completion is expected within one year. These two buildings were completed and are still standing, one on each side of the oval just north of Evans Hall. Three temporary wooden buildings were southwest of the site for the new science hall to be used as laboratories until the new building could be finished. In the summer of 1903, the wooden walk down University Boulevard was replaced with a concrete walk, and with the rows of trees planted earlier, the approach to the campus became more attractive. The University did not have dormitories, and students who did not already live in Norman lived in boarding houses that Norman residents developed as a business. The cost for room and board was estimated to be from $3 to $5 per week in the 1903 catalog. The principal modes of transportation for the students were walking and bicycles. Sports teams, glee clubs, literary clubs, and other organizations typical to college life were organized. There were tugs of war, boxing matches, and other competitions between the college students and the preps. When the classes


The Beginning 1892-1908 11

were large enough, these contests extended between under class and upper class students. Faculty entertainment included lectures, attending student concerts, drama productions and the faculty socials. Roy Gittinger provided a description of the faculty picnics in his History of The University of Oklahoma 1892-1942: In some ways the university faculty of forty years ago was like a large family. All members from the President to the head janitor, met socially on terms of equality. For more than ten years the outstanding social event was the faculty picnic, which all attended, accompanied by their families. Professor Van Vleet was the most active in organizing and carrying out these picnics, which were usually held along the bank or on the sands of the Canadian River, or in Grotts Grove, northeast of Norman, a short distance east of Grotts schoolhouse. Each family brought its share of home-cooked food, except for the coffee, which was made on the spot. The [sic] climatic year of this early period was 1904-05 when two picnics were held, one in October 1904, and one in April 1905.

The enrollment in the University as of May 15, 1904 listed 128 students in Arts and Sciences (two graduate students, 10 seniors, 14 juniors, 25 sophomores, 41 freshmen and 36 special students). The School of Mines listed four students. There were 218 preparatory students. So it was 12 years since the first classes had been held, and the University of Oklahoma was still primarily a prep school. There had been an effort from the beginning to offer courses in physics, which seemed to appear and then disappear from the catalog. It hardly seems possible, with the small college student body, that there were still plans for a degree program in engineering. It is interesting to note that competition between the A&M College in Stillwater and the University started early in territorial days. The following letter from the David Ross Boyd papers in the University Archives illustrates some of the political pressures that President Boyd faced in his efforts to offer engineering at the University (special thanks to Professor David Levy, who provided a copy of the following letter, which he found in his research for his book The University of Oklahoma, A History, Volume I). The letter is written to Mr. Henry Asp of Guthrie. Mr. Asp served on the Territorial Board of Regents of the University from 1898 to 1902, and president of the Board in 1901. According to Gittinger, in his History of The University of Oklahoma 1892-1942, Henry Asp “was one of the leading figures of the Oklahoma Territory. Later he was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. Regent Asp was eager at all times to use his influence for the struggling university. Asp Avenue, one of the approaches to the campus, was named in his honor and in


The Beginning 1892-1908 12

recognition of his service.�

Norman, Okla., July 18, 1904

My Dear Mr. Asp: I am enclosing a clipping from the first column of the first page of The Oklahoma Farmer. It is written, I think, by Mr. Thoburn, the Secretary of the Territorial Board of Agriculture. I am writing you because you appreciate the conditions and are on the ground. I know that you are busy, but if you could find time to intimate to Mr. Thoburn that there are great many people of the belief that the Secretary of the Territorial Board of Agriculture is an unnecessary position and that the functions claimed to be discharged by that office could better be done by an officer or member of the faculty of the A&M College where the data and books and other accumulations of information agricultural could be available for the student body, - you would, I think be doing the Territory a service, the University a service, and possibly Mr. Thornburn himself, a service. It is an excellent thing for some men in positions which they think are very responsible, to be able to perceive clearly the limitations that surround their own positions; and then to have such a sense of propriety to tend to their own business, that they would always be within these limitations. Mr. Thornburn and his friends were very persistent in urging their interests before two or three legislatures before this office was established; they will again be appearing before the legislature seeking to extend and deepen the hold that this office will have upon the Territorial government. I think you could have it intimated to him that it will not help his purpose for him to be assaulting the University. Moreover, the force of the experience and precedent Universities of Michigan, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Colorado, and Texas, ought to be worth something as compared with his views as to what duplicating the work of the A&M College may be. I feel that his starting a campaign that includes having farmers write letters to the Governor against the University is unwarranted and indicates a vicious animus. He is also sending clippings to other papers, as note the letter to Mr. Galobie enclosed. I assume you know that some of the best engineering schools of this country are in the universities of the states named above. Of course, I believe that you would feel that you could speak and act more intelligently if you could find out the work in engineering as proposed in the University and the “Mechanical Department� in the A&M College. It would be impractical for me to attempt to do this


The Beginning 1892-1908 13

in this letter, and it would be difficult to do besides. Suffice it to say, however, that this work covers the Hydraulic, Sanitary, Electrical, Mechanical, Civil, Mining, and numerous other departments of engineering. All these courses with us would cover, including the preparatory work, six or seven years; the A&M, preparatory and all, does not cover more than four or five years and is called only a “Mechanics Department.” Moreover, the matter of pointing out that the University should not get out of the range of its business, it could be appropriately pointed out of the output of the A&M College does not in a general way, produce educated farmers. I have noticed that the A&M College, for a number of years back, has called attention, with a great deal of apparent pride, to what its graduates are doing along lines for which it was never intended, the A&M College should prepare them. I do not know that many of them have returned to the farm and have distinguished themselves as modern, educated farmers. I trust, Mr. Asp, that you will not feel that this is an intrusion. This letter accomplishes two purposes: first it gives me an opportunity to let off steam to a confidential friend who will sympathize with me in my emotions as well as in my ideas. But, second, especially to have you know the situation that you may be able to do whatever comes your way to promote the general welfare. I might say that the Governor has heartily approved our plans in regard to this work on several occasions.

Cordially your friend,

David Ross Boyd

In the 1903-1904 catalog, courses in graphics were listed under Professor Elder’s direction: “For students who are proposing to devote themselves to work in civil, mechanical, electrical, or mining engineering.” Graphics I 4 hrs Fundamentals 1st Semester Graphics II 4 hrs Descriptive Geometry 2nd Semester

The new Science Hall was occupied in September 1904, and the Carnegie Library in January 1905. In the summer of 1904, Charles Curtis Major (M.E. Cornell) was appointed Professor of Physics and Electricity and Head of the School of Applied


The Beginning 1892-1908 14

Science. The new school included civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. The School of Mines with Professor Gould as Head, remained separate. The temporary wooden buildings were designated to house the engineering shops. These wooden buildings were west of Science Hall, later called Park Row, and were in use for fifty years. Curricula in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering were outlined. Under mathematics, Professor Elder offered surveying. The following courses were described: Math VI Strength of Materials. Text: Merriman’s Strength of Materials. Brick, stone, timber, cast iron, wrought iron, steel. Math VII and VIII Mechanics of Engineering. Statics, dynamics of rigid bodies, work, energy, power, friction, strength of materials, stresses and strains in beams, columns, shafts, and framed structures, elasticity, theory of flexure, safe loadings, earth pressure on retaining walls, theory and construction of dams, the flow and pressure of liquids.

Major resigned in the summer of 1905 after staying only one year, and Cyril Methodius Jansky was appointed as Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering and Head of The School of Applied Science as Major’s replacement. Jansky had an A.B. from Valparaiso College in 1891 and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan in 1904. He had spent a year as a research assistant at the National Bureau of Standards prior to coming to Oklahoma. He was a member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE). In addition, Henry Hume McPherson was appointed Instructor of Mechanical Engineering. He had an M.E. degree from Cornell University in 1903 and had spent two years as an Instructor in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin in 1903-1905. In the 1906-07 catalog, the list of physical facilities included the following: “Heating Plant, all buildings are heated by steam and are completely wired and supplied with electric lights.” At last the electric age had come to the University. Under laboratories: the chemistry and pharmacy laboratories, the biological laboratories and the geological laboratories were included. In addition, the physics lab was described as follows: Physical laboratory situated in the basement of University Hall and is being equipped with standard instruments and apparatus for experiments and research work in mechanical measurements, heat, sound, light, and, magnetism and electricity. The apparatus is of the best American and German make. The laboratory work required in


The Beginning 1892-1908 15 connection with several of the electrical engineering courses will be given in the physics laboratory.

Engineering shops were listed as occupying the two frame buildings and were described in the following fashion: Machine shop, foundry, forge, pattern and wood shops, drill press, milling machine, planer, shaper, engine lathe, tool grinder, bench vises, small tools. All machines are new. Mechanical testing laboratory, 100,000 lb. Riehle (ordered), transverse test machine, extensometers, 1000 lb. cement machine moulds, sieves, and other accessories for concrete testing.

The faculty of the new School of Applied Science was listed as President Boyd, Jansky, DeBarr, Gould, Reaves, Woodruff, McPherson, ___________ Assistant in Civil Engineering, ____________ Assistant in Physics, _________ Assistant in Drawing. Samuel Watson Reaves was the new Professor of Mathematics replacing Professor Elder who had resigned. Reaves had a B.S. from the University of North Carolina and a B.A. from Cornell and had been teaching at Clemson. He later received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. From 1923 until 1940, he would be Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Woodruff was an Instructor in Mineralogy. The blanks were shown to indicate that there were plans to employ faculty in those positions. The course listings for this year in areas related to engineering are shown below. The courses in mathematics that were, in fact, engineering courses were: Math IIb Math XVII Math VII Math VIII

Surveying Descriptive Geometry Theoretical Mechanics Strength of Materials

While only Jansky was listed as Professor of Physics, the complete listings of physics courses are as follows: Physics I General Physics Physics II General Physics Physics Ia Laboratory Mechanics, Measurements, Density, Elastic Constants, Lenses, Thermometers, Specific heat Physics IIa Electrical Measurements, Resistance, EMF, Capacity, Induction Physics III Electrical and Magnetic Measurements Physics IV Electrical and Magnetic Measurements


The Beginning 1892-1908 16 Physics V Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism Physics VI Theory of Light Physics VII Theory of Heat

Electrical Engineering courses were listed under the School of Applied Science under Professor Jansky’s name. EE I EE II EE IIa EE III EE IV EE V EE VI EE VIa EE VII EE VIII EE IX

Primary and Storage Batteries Direct Current Machinery Laboratory AC Currents and Machinery AC Current Electric Railways Electric Transmission of Energy Electrical Engineering Laboratory Design of Electrical Machinery Telephone and Telegraph Electro-Chemistry

Under Civil Engineering, the name of the professor in charge was listed as a blank, but a full listing of courses was presented. CE I CE II CE III CE IV CE V CE VI CE VII CE VIII CE IX CE X CE XI CE XII CE XIII CE XIV

Surveying Surveying Surveying Surveying Structural Mechanics Roads and Pavement Theory of Structures Water Supply Engineering Water Supply Engineering (cont of VIII) Hydraulics Hydraulic Engineering Masonry Construction Cement and Concrete Sanitary Engineering

Under Mechanical Engineering, Instructor McPherson was listed in charge and the courses were as follows: ME I ME Ia ME II ME III ME IIa

Valve Gears, Motions of Steam Engines Laboratory Steam Machinery Steam Engines and Boilers Laboratory (materials)


The Beginning 1892-1908 17 ME IIIa ME IV ME V ME VI ME VII ME VIII ME IX

Laboratory Steam Engineering (Prime Movers, Air Compressors, Refrigeration) Heat Engines, Thermodynamics Graphical Statics of Mechanisms, Friction, Strains, Stresses Thermodynamics Power Plants Heating and Ventilating

Under separate listings, were three courses in Shop and three courses in Drawing. As we look back on this list of courses, it must be realized that these were plans, primarily of Professor Jansky, for the development of an engineering degree program. They were not unique; engineering was a well established course of study by 1870 in many eastern schools. However, it is worth a pause to study the relationships and importance of these courses to the rapidly developing technology in society. The previous 25 years had seen the rapid development in electric power. Direct current had applications in railways, street cars and horseless carriages. The invention of the transformer in 1885 made long distance transmission more efficient and the development of the incandescent light provided people the opportunity for longer days of enjoyment. The telegraph, telephone, and now the beginnings of radio provided instant communication over long distances. In Civil Engineering, the importance of surveying in the layout of railroads, streets as well as property lines is immediately obvious. The design of buildings and bridges gave emphasis to the need of mechanics, materials, and structures. New water supplies and sewer systems were needed for the rapidly growing towns and cities throughout the nation. In Mechanical Engineering, steam had been established as the primary power system for commerce. Steam powered the trains and ships that provided transportation for people and commerce, factories that manufactured goods, refrigeration, and electrical generation. It still was in use for pumping water for municipal and industrial uses. The internal combustion engine development in the later part of the 19th century had not yet gained widespread use; however, the theory must have been taught in the courses on heat engines and thermodynamics. The shop courses, also under the supervision of mechanical engineering, provided practical knowledge for manufacturing and design. During the year 1906-1907, the School of Applied Science had an enrollment of 37 students including four third year, 12 second year and 15 first year students. The School of Mines had only six students enrolled. The total University enrollment was 641 but still included 229 preparatory students. There must have been a feeling that the University of Oklahoma was finally becoming a University.


The Beginning 1892-1908 18

Vernon L. Parrington, Professor of English and coach of the football team, wrote his impressions of the University in the 1905 Mistletoe. As I walk up the boulevard today I can see the real growth that has been made. Science Hall with its laboratories is really a science hall; the Carnegie Library has over six thousand volumes, which in another twelve months or so will become ten thousand; workshops begin to look like real shops; the trees are growing; the Athletic Association is gathering a big debt; and the football team has almost defeated Texas. These things have come about within my recollection. The changes of the near future hardly fall within this sketch, but I will add to this at any rate. The coming year will see several new men added to the faculty - an instructor in French and Spanish, another in economics, a third in physics and perhaps others. We are coming in bravely and although we may not be a university yet, we are making solid progress to that end. Perhaps in another eight years - But who knows what will take place in that time?

Indeed, Parrington, a very popular teacher, (who was later to win a Pulitzer Prize) was to fall victim to the political storm that tore up the University with the coming of statehood, only three years later. His essay must have graphically expressed the feelings of those pioneering faculty who were struggling to found the University that we have today. The new School of Applied Science had difficulty retaining faculty members. Major had resigned after one year, and in the spring of 1906 McPherson resigned after only one year. A young instructor of mechanical engineering from the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College was hired as his replacement, Mr. James Houston Felgar. Felgar had received his A.B. degree from the University of Kansas in 1901 and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago in 1905. He had served at Stillwater only six months before joining the faculty at the University. James Houston Felgar

In the catalog published in March 1907, the requirements for admission to the School of Applied Science were listed as follows:


The Beginning 1892-1908 19 English Foreign Language History Math 12,13,14 Physics Electives

3 units 2 units 1 unit 3 units 1 unit 5 units for a total of 15 units of high school credit

Letter of acceptance from James Houston Felgar, July 11, 1906 Credit to David Levy, David Ross Boyd Professor Emeritus, who found this letter in the University archives while conducting research for his book The University of Oklahoma: A History


The Beginning 1892-1908 20

Under the heading of “Engineering Shops� the names of Mr. Felgar, Mr. Flood and Mr.____________ were listed. (Mr. Flood was the University carpenter.) The shop courses were listed as follows: Shop I Shop II Shop III Shop IV

Woodworking (including pattern making), Mr. Flood Forge work (forging, welding, tempering, foundry), Mr. Flood Machine Shop (lathe, drill press, shaper, planer, grinder, milling machine), Mr. Felgar Machine Shop continued, Mr. Felgar

Courses in drawing with the instructors responsible were also listed in this catalog. Drawing I Drawing II Drawing III Drawing IV Drawing V Drawing VI Drawing VII Drawing VIII Drawing IX Drawing X Drawing XI Drawing XII

Perspective, shades and shadows Mechanical drawing Descriptive geometry Machine design Kinematic drawing Kinematic drawing Steam engine design Power plant design Map drawing Structural drawing Structural designing Electrical machine design

Jansky Storm Reaves Jansky Felgar Felgar Felgar Felgar ______ ______ ______ Jansky

Clarence Storm was listed as a chemistry major in the 1905 Mistletoe. Felgar noted that Clarence Storm was an assistant in drawing during the 1906-1907 school year. The 1909 Mistletoe, under alumnae news, shows Clarence Storm as a civil engineer in Seattle, Washington. While his degree was not officially engineering, he was perhaps the first engineer to graduate from the University of Oklahoma. It was during this time that Oklahoma became the 46th state admitted to the Union, and Charles N. Haskell was elected the first Governor of the new state. On December 20, 1907, just as the Christmas vacation was beginning, the new University Hall was struck by fire. This was barely short of four years from the date when the first administration building had burned. A new coat of tar was being applied to the roof. A coal oil stove had been brought into the tower to heat the tar. While one man worked on the roof, another heated more tar over the stove. The bucket boiled over and the fire began to spread. In the Sooner Story 1890-1980, Professor Lewis Salter describes the tragedy:


The Beginning 1892-1908 21 I remember students waiting for the Santa Fe: the north bound train was in town, and most of the students who were going home looked out, saw the smoke and hurried off in the direction of the campus. Under the dome on each floor was an open space. The fire dropped through the opening from floor to floor. Students and townspeople had time to enter the burning building and carry out books and loose materials from the classrooms and the physics laboratory. Many things that were thrown out of the second story windows were completely destroyed when they hit the ground, so nothing of great consequence was saved, except for records. Those were moments of excitement, so a lot of foolish things were done. The fire department could do little to save the building. Many of the school's books and records were destroyed again.

The classes and administrative functions from University Hall had to be crammed into the Science Hall, Carnegie Library and the temporary wooden buildings on campus. The rock building downtown which had served the University for the first year and again when the first building burned, was again pressed into use. There is no part of a state university that is not affected when political conflicts invade the campus and the victorious party slashes the "evil" core of the institution, and then parades the reformed body so that the public may see the good that they have done. Dr. George L. Cross, in his book Professors, Presidents and Politicians, retraces the events leading to the reorganization of the University in 1908 as recorded by Dr. Gittinger. In this case it was both political and religious pressures that influenced the events. During territorial days, the governor had been appointed by a Republican administration. In Norman, a rather strong group of Southern Methodists on the east side of Norman had opposed and been very critical of President Boyd in spite of his many efforts to make peace with the group. Governor Haskell won as a Democrat with the strong support of this very same Southern Methodist Church. Dr. Cross, in his writings, related the following incident which directly influenced the School of Applied Science. During the school year an event occurred that had a definite bearing on the effort to oust Boyd. Lyman Abbott, who had succeeded Henry Ward Beecher as pastor of the Plymouth Congregational Church in Brooklyn, New York, and who in 1908 was editor of the Outlook, a national family magazine, for some reason became available for a series of lectures at the University of Oklahoma from March 4 to 10, 1908. It is not clear how a man of Abbott’s stature could have been attracted to the little prairie institution at Norman; perhaps he


The Beginning 1892-1908 22 had through former contacts, developed a friendship with President Boyd. Whatever the factors involved in his appearance, Abbott gave his lectures for the most part without incident. One question following a lecture, however, led to disastrous results: What did Abbott think about the virgin birth? Abbott replied that, while the virgin birth was a part of orthodox Christianity, belief in it was not of supreme importance; many good and worthy Christians doubted it. Abbot's comment had an overwhelming impact on the Southern Methodists in his audience that afternoon. After the lecture was over, Mr. and Mrs. John Hardie, Professor and Mrs. Cyril Methodius Jansky and Professor and Mrs. Roy Gittinger walked part of the way home together. Mrs. Hardie was much upset, even distraught, about what she referred to as ’Abbott’s terrible statement.’ In an effort to soothe her, Jansky mentioned that some very good men had not accepted the story of the virgin birth - Ralph Waldo Emerson, for example. The remark caused Mrs. Hardie to become hysterical. According to Gittinger, she said that Abbott was an infidel, that Jansky must be an infidel to defend Abbott, and in fact, the University must be a nest of infidels, or it would not have brought an infidel to the campus to lecture on religion. The Hardies were prominent members of the Southern Methodist Church. On May 21, 1908, the Norman Transcript published a letter that had been written to Mr. Linebaugh, a Southern Methodist Minister, who had been appointed to the University Regents by Governor Haskell, from Pastor R.E.Morgan of the Southern Methodist Church in Norman. The letter (which was republished in the Outlook) made the following statement. The following are names of University Professors who dance, play cards and are immoral in their lives. J. F. Paxton, V.L. Parrington, L.W. Cole, H.D. Guelich, W.P. Humphreys, E.M. Williams, G.A. Hool, Miss Berenice Rice, and Miss Ruby Givens. C.M. Jansky is an infidel, so I hear.

George Albert Hool had been added to the faculty in 1907 to head up the program in Civil Engineering. He had a S.B. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology awarded in 1905. Hool was apparently not fired, as was Jansky, in the reorganization. He did, however, resign in 1909 shortly after the reorganization was finalized. On June 23, 1908, the Regents, apparently acting under the direction of Governor Haskell, appointed Arthur Grant Evans as President of the University. President


The Beginning 1892-1908 23

Boyd was dismissed along with eight of the total of 28 members of the University faculty. The catalog published in June 1908 was apparently ready for publication before President Boyd was dismissed. Under the faculty listings, both Boyd and Evans were listed as follows:

Arthur Grant Evans Photo courtesey of the Western History Collection

David Ross Boyd, President, AB 1878, MA 1881, PhD 1898 Dr. Arthur Grant Evans, President Borough Road College, London 1878 Principal Public Schools, Earls Barton, England 1878-1883 Cherokee Male Seminary, Tahlequah, 1884-1885 Principal, Salida Academy, Colorado 1892-1896 President, Henry Kendal College, Muskogee 1898-1908 President of the University, 1908-

Those faculty members directly involved with engineering were listed as follows. **Cyril Methodius Jansky AB 1891, BS 1904 Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Head of the School of Applied Science. (The ** referred to a footnote at the bottom of the page. **C. M. Jansky, Associate Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering.) *George Albert Hool, Instructor in Civil Engineering, SB MIT 1905 (The * again referred to a footnote * Professor of CE elect.)

J. H. Felgar was listed as Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Frank Flood was listed as the University carpenter and instructor in shop. Among the new members of the faculty as of June 23, 1908, the following appointment directly affected engineering: George Childs Jones, Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering AB Southwestern University 1876, MA Vanderbilt University 1879 Grad student Physics & Electrical Engineering, University of Chicago LL.D. Royal University of Berlin 1900 Southwest Baptist University, Prof of Physics and Mathematics, 1879-1890


The Beginning 1892-1908 24 President, Arkadelphia Methodist College, 1894-1904 Prof. Physics, Epworth University, 1904-1906 President, Oklahoma College for Young Ladies, 1906-1908 (Jones was an appointee of the new administration)

According to Dr. Gittinger as quoted in Dr. Cross’ book, “Jones’ training had not prepared him to teach courses in Physics and Electrical Engineering. Realizing that he was not qualified, he tried to retain Jansky as an associate to handle the engineering courses, but Jansky soon left for a position at the University of Wisconsin. Jones was asked to resign in 1909.” In this same catalog, the first formal curricula for Electrical, Civil, and Mechanical Engineering were published. Persons outside the field of engineering may puzzle over the detailed structure of engineering curricula. Faculty members in engineering have always devoted a great deal of time and debate on the detailed makeup of the engineering course of study. The structure is necessary because of the way the content of each course depends on the skills and knowledge gained in preceding courses. The foundations are in the basic sciences and mathematics. The engineer in any field must learn to creatively design solutions to real problems by the application of the basic laws of science and making quantitative tests of the solutions through mathematical models. The curricula presented in the June 1908 catalog was similar to those that would follow in the next decade or so. Under the section devoted to the School of Applied Science, the following faculty were listed: Boyd, President Jansky, Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Head of School of Applied Science DeBarr, Professor of Chemistry Gould, Professor of Geology Reaves, Professor of Mathematics Hool, Instructor in Civil Engineering Felgar, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Guy Y. Williams, Instructor in Chemistry Flood, Assistant in Shop __________, Instructor in Drawing

Guy Y. Williams graduated in 1906 from the University with a degree in chemistry. He started working as an undergraduate lab assistant, and became a very colorful as well as popular teacher. Small, but very athletic, he was noted for doing onehand stands in class and occasionally entered the classroom through the transom


The Beginning 1892-1908 25

over the door. He was to later become Director of Chemical Engineering and Chairman of Chemistry in 1923. The first two years of the Electrical Engineering and the Mechanical Engineering curricula were the same with specialization coming in the last two years. Civil Engineering specialization started in the freshman year. The following detailed degree plans were listed for the first time in the catalog published in June 1908. Dean Felgar, in his history of the college written in 1940 for the Sooner Magazine, credits Professor Jansky for the development of these curricula. It is almost certain that the degree plans were modeled from the prevailing courses of study in other schools that had been offering engineering for some 40 to 50 years. The enrollment in 1908 showed a total of 790 students in the University with 53 enrolled in the School of Applied Science. The College of Arts and Sciences had 194 students while Fine Arts had 203, Pharmacy had 51, Medicine had 15, there were two students in the School of Mines and 251 students were enrolled in the preparatory school. The enrollment included 36 out-of-state students with nine from Missouri, seven from Texas and four from Kansas. Thus, as the University moved from being a territorial school to the new status as a state university, engineering had a start. The curriculum was in place: there were shops and laboratories, and a small group of students classified as engineering majors. It might be a stretch to say that a faculty was in place. Major and Macpherson had each stayed only one year. Jansky, who had done a good job of getting engineering started, was one of the victims of the political purge that took away the president and almost half of the faculty. Only Felgar, who had joined the faculty two years before, and Hool, who had come as an instructor in Civil Engineering the previous summer remained. Jones, a political appointee to replace Jansky and not qualified to teach engineering, completed the roster of faculty. Jones was asked to resign at the end of the year and Hool, who was apparently not happy with the situation, also left at the end of the year. Perhaps the publication of the letter, which included him as one of those faculty members who were labeled immoral, influenced his decision to leave. There were two new faculty recruited in September 1908. With Jansky’s departure, Felgar, who had been placed in charge of the School of Applied Science, recommended Harold Veach Bozell as an instructor of Electrical Engineering and Herbert Bancroft Dwight as an instructor of Drawing. These were approved by the new Board of Regents. President Boyd must have felt a mixture of pride, sorrow and frustration as he looked back down University Boulevard when he departed the University that summer


The Beginning 1892-1908 26

of 1908. The young elm trees that lined the street and beautified the campus were growing and looking healthy. He had personally planted, watered and nurtured those trees, just as he had nurtured the students and faculty. And just as the trees had taken root, in spite of scoffers who said they would never grow on the prairie, the University had taken root. At the end of the street lay the ruins of the fire ravished University Hall. It must have seemed symbolic, for just as the fire in December had destroyed the core of the campus, so the political fire that swept in with statehood seemed to have destroyed the core of the University. However, on either side of the ruins were the Carnegie Library and Science Hall, reminders that President Boyd was leaving a foundation. He must have wondered about the future and whether the University would survive and grow in spite of the political storms that seemed to sweep across the prairie with each change of administration, just as the strong north wind would bring the freezing chill with the passing of each weather front. It is doubtful that his emotions would let him visualize the University of today with the top teachers on the campus honoring him with their titles of David Ross Boyd Professor. In the The Sooner Story - Ninety Years at The University of Oklahoma - 1890-1980 by Long and Hart, Deak Parker, a prominent early graduate and campus leader as a student, had this to say about President Boyd. In a very peculiar sense, David Ross Boyd had made the University. It would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that he made it with his bare hands. As he changed the landscape, so did Dr. Boyd dominate the building of the University in all its branches. From the beginning, he was the controlling force in its creation. Every faculty member, every student, every custom, every stick and stone on the campus, was there because of him. Such driving energy, such abundant vitality, such singleness of purpose, and such executive genius, are rare on this planet. Dr. Boyd was the University, and the University was Dr. Boyd. It always will be. [...] As long as an elm stands, as long as there is one stone on top of another, in these buildings, Dr. Boyd is here. He will never be forgotten nor his work undone.

James Houston Felgar, as other faculty who were re-hired by the new administration, must have wondered about the future. In the brief history which he wrote for the Sooner Magazine in 1940 shortly after his retirement, he describes the changes in a very matter-of-fact manner. The years that had elapsed and the success of the College perhaps had modified the feelings that must have surged through the faculty during that summer of 1908. The factual account which he gives of


The Beginning 1892-1908 27

the history of the College seems to reveal the steady “business-like” manner with which he obviously approached the task of regrouping and leading the efforts of building a College of Engineering. Thus, engineering as a course of study at the young university struggled into existence. References 1. Womack, John, Norman, An Early History 1820-1900, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1976.

2. Gittinger, Roy, The University of Oklahoma 1892-1942, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1942. 3. Cross, George L., Professors, Presidents, and Politicians, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1981. 4. Long, Charles F. and Hart, Carolyn G., The Sooner Story - Ninety Years at The University of Oklahoma - 1890-1980, The University of Oklahoma Foundation, 1980. 5. Felgar, J. H., “A History of the College of Engineering,” Sooner Magazine, August 1940. 6. The Mistletoe 1905, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 7. The Mistletoe 1909, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 8. The University of Oklahoma Catalogs, 1892-1906, The University of Oklahoma Archives. 9. The University of Oklahoma Catalogs, 1907-1911, The University of Oklahoma Archives. 10. David Ross Boyd Papers, Box 1, Folder 16, The University of Oklahoma Archives.


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 2 The New College 1909-1920 On April 2 and 3, 1909, The Regents of the University of Oklahoma approved the recommendations of President Arthur Grant Evans for the reorganization of the University. Thus the College of Engineering came into being with James Houston Felgar as Dean of the College. The University Catalog published in June 1909 listed the following faculty in Engineering: James Houston Felgar, AB Kansas, BS Armour, Professor of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Dean of the College George Albert Hool, SB M.I.T., Professor of Civil Engineering, Director of the School of Civil Engineering Daniel Webster Ohern, PhD Johns Hopkins, Professor of Mineralology, Director of the School of Mines Harold Veach Bozell, BS Kansas, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of Electrical Engineering Herbert Bancroft Dwight, BS Colorado, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Other faculty members from Arts and Sciences were listed as engineering faculty. These included those from the various departments that taught math, physics, chemistry, English and other subjects to the engineering students. The enrollment in the College consisted of three seniors, three juniors, eight sophomores, fourteen freshmen and six special students for a total of 51 students. The total University enrollment was 696, including 214 preparatory students. While, at first thought, five faculty members for a college might seem small, the facultystudent ratio of 1 to 10 would be considered very good compared to subsequent norms. The facilities of the College were the same as those listed in chapter one. These consisted of the three wooden buildings west of Science Hall housing offices, class rooms and laboratories. In June 1909, Charles Lewis Kaupke received his BSCE as the first graduate in Engineering from the University and the newly formed College. There was no summer school in the summer of 1909 because of the lack of funds. With Hool’s resignation, Frank William Chappell, BS Vanderbilt was appointed 28


The New College 1909-1920 29

Additionlly William Aitkenhead, BS Purdue, was appointed as instructor in shop. (He was awarded an MA degree at OU in 1913 and was promoted to Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering.) President Evans provided money from the University budget for the construction of a permanent engineering building, which was a real boost to the new College. The University Catalog published in March 1911 describes the new building as follows: During the year 1909-1910, a very substantial building was erected for the College of Engineering. While the ultimate design for this building is that it should be used for the shops, it is so constructed that it will make ample provision for the entire work of the college. The building is a handsome brick and stone structure two stories high, 160 1/2 feet x 38 feet with a one story wing for the foundry 38’ 10” x 30’ 2”. The whole is fire proof. This building gives to the College of Engineering first class facilities for work. It is so arranged that it has its own heating plant with a boiler which supplies sufficient steam for the independent operation of all machinery in the college. The rooms of the second story give ample accommodations for the Engineering Library, for recitations, and all work in drafting. The entire west end of the first floor is used for shop work.

This original engineering building is still in use on the south east corner of Asp and Felgar Street as the Engineering Laboratory Building. It houses laboratories and faculty offices. The young Felgar, only 30-years-old at the time of his appointment, proved to be an effective leader for the new college. He was married, but the couple had no children, and both he and Mrs. Felgar became immersed in University life. The 1909 yearbook shows Mrs. Felgar as the “Class Mother.” In 1910, Dean Felgar organized the Engineers’ Club. It included both students and faculty and held meetings once a month at which specially prepared papers on engineering subjects were read and discussed. It also served as a soNow Professor Felgar has been for years cial club for engineering students The Dean of our engineers which has continued as a focus He is loyal, modest, firm and true of students in the college into He gives his life for Okla. U. present times. A ditty describing Dean Felgar appeared in the


The New College 1909-1920 30

1911 Sooner Yearbook along with student poems about other faculty over the campus. This perhaps gives the best perspective on the personality and Next let’s give three ringing cheers character of the Dean. to the great professors of engineers Bozell, Chappell and Bert Dwight, too It should be noted that he had only Without these men, what would we do? been dean two years and a faculty member for five years when this was written. But, from a student’s perspective, that is a long time. An additional ditty tells of the other faculty members in the college. Years later in The Sooner Story, F.G. Tappan (a long-time Director of Electrical Engineering) described Dean Felgar as follows: His greatest personal assets making for success in engineering education and as dean have been his absolute fairness in adjusting controversies, his ability to appreciate both sides in an argument and his motto that ‘youth must be served’... must be led and encouraged in education and never forced or driven into a position.

Dean Felgar’s philosophy of education was also quoted in The Sooner Story as follows: Every college curriculum should contain subjects which will help the student to take his position among men...subjects to develop his personality...a background of literature, social and philosophical subjects which will help the engineer to take his place on equal terms in competition with other intellects...training which will help him to cooperate with his fellow men rather than differentiate himself from them...material which will help a man talk something besides ‘shop’ with people he meets outside of business and professional relations.

Dean Felgar also participated in other activities of campus life. He is shown as one of the faculty members in the first fraternity on campus, Beta Theta Pi, and served as a member of the University Athletic Council for many years as well as many other campus committees. The 1910 graduation list shows the second graduating class from engineering: Lloyd Burgess Curtis BSEE Harry Garfield Powell BSCE


The New College 1909-1920 31

Curtis, who had earned a BA in Spanish in 1908, was shown in the 1915 Sooner Yearbook as Assistant Professor of Spanish and also pictured with the University Band as the band instructor. Minutes of early College of Engineering faculty meetings have been preserved in their original hand-written form in a large ledger book. The first minutes recorded are actually out of place and are located on page 12 of the ledger among the minutes for 1911-1912. For readers who have served as faculty members, these minutes show much similarity to faculty meetings in more recent years. Former students might be somewhat disappointed at the routine nature of what went on behind those closed doors. Much of the business of the meetings was associated with student petitions. It will also be noted that faculty members from Arts and Science who taught math and other subjects to engineering students participated in the meetings. The minutes of that first faculty meeting are presented in their entirety below: REGULAR MEETING Oct. 11, 1910 Meeting was called to order with Dean Felgar in the chair. Nominations for secretary were called for. Prof. Bozell was nominated. Moved, seconded and carried that nominations be closed and Prof. Bozell be declared elected. Petition from Geo. G. Shallenberger was presented reading: `Prof. Felgar: I wish to be permanently enrolled in the State University of Oklahoma.’ (signed) Geo. G. Shallenberger. `Petition approved’ (signed) J.H. Felgar. Moved by Prof. Reaves, seconded by Prof. Turley, that Mr. Shallenberger’s petition be granted and that he be reinstated. Carried. Moved by Prof. Dwight, seconded by Prof. Turley, that those who were required to take Chem II and not Chem III on account of change of course may be permitted to substitute Chem III for Chem II., Carried. Discussion followed about advisability of suggesting change of time between classes, but no action. Moved by Prof. Reaves, seconded by Prof. Ohern that the chairman be delegated to see the President about a solution of the difficulties with the present time clock and system. Carried. Meeting adjourned.


The New College 1909-1920 32

Reaves, as noted earlier, was Professor of Mathematics, and, interestingly, Turley was Professor of Pathology in the School of Medicine. Bozell served as secretary for the College of Engineering faculty for the remainder of his stay on the faculty, and signed the minutes of later faculty meetings. The next regular faculty meeting was held December 13, 1910, with Dean Felgar in the chair at 4:40 p.m. Dean Felgar reported on the problem with the clocks stating that the bells rang with the clocks but the clock was not to be depended on. No steps were taken toward seeing about another clock. After approving a couple of petitions, the faculty discussed allowing credit to Arts and Sciences students in some engineering courses and changing the Christmas holiday period. None of the details of the discussions were given nor was any resolution made in either case. Prof. DeBarr announced plans to present at the next or a following meeting for the adoption of a course in Chemical Engineering and Sanitary Engineering. The meeting was adjourned at 5:40 p.m. and signed by H.V. Bozell (secy). The Chemical Engineering curriculum was not mentioned in the minutes of the next meeting held February 14, 1911, but at the next meeting, March 14, 1911, with Prof. Bozell in the chair, curricula were presented for Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. A common first year was provided for all majors. These were essentially the same as were listed in Chapter One with minor changes. The Chemical Engineering curriculum was of course new. It should be noted that there were no courses in Chemical Engineering as such; instead Chemistry courses, along with a group of courses selected from other fields of engineering and other supporting courses in Arts and Sciences compared the plan of study. At the meeting of March 21, 1911, Professor DeBarr presented a modified version of this curriculum which was adopted by the faculty. The revised curriculum was not shown in the minutes. A complete listing of the curricula as published in the September 1913 catalog will be presented later in this chapter. Although the School of Chemical Engineering was listed as a part of the College of Engineering, it was actually administered from the Department of Chemistry. In a similar fashion, the School of Mining Geology was under the Directorship of a member of the Geology faculty. Neither of these schools listed faculty. Additionally, the School of Chemical Engineering had no separately listed courses. In 1911, Professor Ohern resigned and Professor Charles Henry Taylor of the Geology faculty became Director of the School of Mining Geology. The 1911 graduating class consisted of three students in engineering, increasing by one over the 1910 class. These are listed as follows:


The New College 1909-1920 33 Verne E. Alden, BSEE Earl Briggs Johnson, BSEE (his career was as an engineer with OG&E) Clarence William McFerron, BSCE (later earned a professional degree of CE in 1918)

Alden

Johnson

McFerron

Dr. Gittinger, in his History of the University of Oklahoma, tells of Governor Cruce's reorganization of the Regents. Although Cruce had been president of the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents during the term of Governor Haskell, Cruce abolished the Board. As a result, all state institutions that were not under the State Board of Agriculture were placed under the State Board of Education with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction as chairman of a board of six appointive members. The board was appointed on April 8, 1911 and on May 25, 1911, President Evans was dismissed and Julien Charles Monnet, Dean of the School of Law, was appointed Acting President of the University. President Evans did not have the opportunity to occupy the new University Hall although he was responsible for the selection of the architectural style of the building. The building that bears his name has become the model for the campus architectural style. A comparison with the photographs of the two earlier University Halls (seen in chapter one) and the new building causes one to realize The University’s third administration building, Evan’s Hall that out of those disasters photo from the 1916 Sooner Yearbook came a more beautiful


The New College 1909-1920 34

campus. In the spring of 1911, the legislature appropriated the money for a law building. President Evans had opposed this appropriation, a fact which is said to have added to the movement to remove him from office. This building was completed in 1913 and named Monnet Hall in honor of Dean Monnet. In not too many years, the engineering students found that the owls which decorated the north and south ends of that building were much more attractive painted a bright green color. They remain green to this day. The minutes of the next faculty meeting following were not dated. Acting President Monnet chaired the meeting and Professor Dwight was named secretary pro tem. The business consisted of two student petitions. The final action is quoted as follows. “Acting President Monnet announced decision that hereafter the Faculty of the College of Engineering would hold special meetings only...These to be called when matters needing faculty attention should arise. Meeting adjourned. (signed) H. B. Dwight Secy. pro tem.” The next meeting was dated April 3, 1912 and chaired by Dean Felgar. The University had no dormitories and the students lived in boarding houses. In the catalog published March 1911, prospective students were told that board and room should run from $4 to $6 per week. The catalog noted that “There is work to do in the University and in town by which students may support themselves wholly or in part while attending school. The University does not promise employment to anyone.” In a similar note the catalog made it clear that a degree did not guarantee a job with the following notice: “No institution can guarantee a position to everyone it graduates. The giving of employment is totally beyond control of such an institution. The University authorities will use their best efforts to aid worthy graduates in securing suitable positions.” Later it will be noted that the engineering dean’s office took an early lead in assisting graduates with placement, setting the stage for the present University Career Services. Student life was changing. The rivalry between the college level students and the preparatory students gave way to clashes between freshmen and upperclassmen. As a sophomore Verne Alden, BSEE 1911, had his head shaved by a marauding band of freshman in 1908. Although hazing of freshmen continued until the veterans returned from World War II, the class competitions became organized in the form of intramural sports. Notations in the yearbook each year indicated that many of the engineering students participated in these intramural sports. Since fraternities had been established and much of the social life of the campus centered in these organizations, many of the engineers became active in fraternities.


The New College 1909-1920 35

Much of the engineering students’ social life centered around the Engineers’ Club. The first officers of the club are pictured in the 1911 Sooner Yearbook: S. H. Griffin, Pres., BSCE 1912

C. W. McFerron, Treas., BSCE 1911

David Renshaw, Vice Pres., BSEE 1914

V. E. Alden, Secretary, BSEE 1911

1911 Engineers’ Club photo from the 1911 Sooner Yearbook

Professor Chappell in Civil Engineering resigned at the end of the 1910-1911 school year. In the fall of 1911, he was replaced by James I. Tucker who was named Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Director of the School of Civil Engineering. Tucker held a BS degree from Tufts 1901 and had earned an LLB from the Boston Evening Law School in 1909. In addition to courses in Civil Engineering, Professor Tucker taught the course in contracts taken by all engineering students. It must have been interesting to have a lawyer on the engineering faculty. The 1912 Sooner Yearbook shows pictures of the officers of the Engineers’ Club or Engineers’ Society as entitled in the yearbook: David Renshaw, President, BSEE 1914 Joseph Cowan Gordon, Secy.-Treas., BSME 1915 Leo H. Gorton, Vice President, BSEE 1913

1912 Engineers’ Club photo from the 1912 Sooner Yearbook

Renshaw, who had been vice president the year before was the third baseman for the Sooner baseball team and Captain of the 1912 and 1913 teams. The note under his picture in the yearbook stated “Good student and justly popular.”


The New College 1909-1920 36

1912 Pick and Hammer Club photo from the 1912 Sooner Yearbook

That year the yearbook also showed a picture of the Pick and Hammer Club. The membership in this organizations appeared to be from across campus and not restricted to engineering majors. In April 1912, the Regents announced that Stratton Duluth Brooks was appointed president as of May 1. He had earned an AB from Michigan in 1896 and an AM from Harvard in 1904 and was awarded an Honorary LLD by Colby College in 1912. He was superintendent of the public schools in Boston at the time of his acceptance of the OU presidency. Dr. Brooks proved to be a good choice and served as an able leader of the University until 1923 when he accepted the position of president of the University of Missouri. In 1912, the graduating class decreased in size to only two students. These are listed as follows: Schenk Henry Griffin, BSCE Harrison Worth Nighswonger, BSCE

Stratton Duluth Brooks


The New College 1909-1920 37

Automobiles had begun to appear in Norman, but were few in number. In 1913, Henry Ford introduced the assembly line and cars soon became more available. It would be after World War I, however, before they became plentiful. Even then the reliability left much to be desired, being susceptible to corrosion and part failure by fatigue. Still it was the development of the automobile that added importance to the development of the Glenpool oil field in 1905 and the larger Cushing field in 1915. In 1903, the Wrights had flown the first airplane. By 1913, planes were flying for an hour and covering distances of 100 miles or more; and in 1913 Igor Sikorsky built and flew the first multi-engine plane. That same year marked the introduction of vacuum tube triodes as repeaters in telephone lines, the cascadetuning radio receiver. There would be no commercial radio station in Oklahoma for another 10 years. In 1913, the first home refrigerator went on sale in Chicago and Irving Langmuir developed the inert gas filled tungsten filament lamp, which markedly improved the life of light bulbs. And in 1913, the Interurban Line was noted in the Catalog as providing hourly service between Norman, Oklahoma City, Moore, Britton, El Reno, and Yukon. The Interurban was an electric street car system operated until after World War II. The faculty of the College of Engineering listed in the Catalog dated September 1913 included many faculty members from Arts and Sciences. Those who were directly involved with the College of Engineering are listed below: James Houston Felgar, Dean of the College of Engineering Edwin DeBarr, Director of Chemical Engineering James Irwin Tucker, Prof. CE and Director of the School of Civil Engineering Harold Veach Bozell, Prof. EE and Director School of Electrical Engineering Charles Henry Taylor, Prof. Geology and Director of the School of Mining Geology Herbert Bancroft Dwight, Prof. Mechanics William Aitkenhead, Assistant Prof. ME Lester William Wallace Morrow, Assistant Prof. EE Frank Lloyd Weaver, Instructor CE

Dr. DeBarr was listed on leave. Prof. Morrow had a Master of Engineering degree from Cornell and Weaver had a BCE from Michigan. These two were new faculty members added in the summer of 1913. This faculty administered curricula which were listed as “Outline of Work of Several Schools� in the Sept. 1913 Catalog. The minutes of the faculty of the College of Engineering show that the numbering system was changed to a system that no longer included Roman numerals. In addition, the March 11, 1913 minutes show


The New College 1909-1920 38

the following motion passing: “Freshman Conference: one hour a month, consisting of talks by the Directors of the different Schools of the College of Engineering, or others designated by them and the Dean, and assigned readings with one written exercise for each school, required of all freshman.� Furthermore, the catalog called for each student to complete a thesis in order to receive a degree in engineering stating: Each candidate for a degree in engineering will be required to prepare a thesis on some special engineering subject. The thesis is selected at the beginning of the senior year and thesis submitted for approval not later than the first Monday in May before graduation. Original typewritten copy and drawings, which shall become property of the University, must be presented.

A review of the curricula listed in the appendix will show that a great difference existed in the credit allowed for the required thesis among the schools. It is interesting to note that these curricula were very similar to the curricula that existed in the College 30 years later. However, content of the courses changed substantially as technology advanced. The thesis requirement became difficult to administer as class sizes became larger and was eventually dropped. Some of the advanced courses offered by the College in 1913-1914 are shown in the following list. Courses numbered 200 and above were graduate level while those numbered 100 and above were senior-graduate level. CE 200, 201 CE 202 CE 203 CE 204, 205 CE 206, 207 CE 208 EE 201 EE 202 EE 204, 205 EE 206 EE 207 ME 163 ME 164 ME 165 ME 201 ME 202

Advanced Structural Design Reinforced Concrete Advanced Rail Road Engineering Water Purification and Sewage Disposal Water Power and Irrigation Highway Engineering Advanced AC Analysis Transient Analysis Advanced Electric Railway Engineering Advanced Steam Power Hydroelectric Power Generation Refrigeration Heating and Ventilation Gas Engines (Internal Combustion Engines) Advanced Heating and Ventilation Advanced Refrigeration


The New College 1909-1920 39

By 1916-1917, Electrical Engineering had added EE 210 Advanced Radio Telegraphy and Telephony and EE 211 Engineering Mathematics. This included Heavyside Operators, Harmonic Analysis, Cable and Telegraph Currents, Pole Shoe Wave Forms, Flux of Heat in Armature Conductors, and Oil Cooled Transformers. Mechanical Engineering had added ME 167 Mathematical Theory of Thermodynamics. Geology added Geol 110 Petroleum and Gas Geology, while Mechanics added Mech 156 Machine Design. In the 1918-1919 Catalog a program in Petroleum Technology was initiated in Chemistry with Associate Professor Padgett in charge. The added courses are listed as follows: Chem 132 Chem 137 Chem 142 Chem 143 Chem 145 Chem 134

Petroleum Technology Analysis of Petroleum and its Products Gas Analysis Petroleum Technology Lab Field Work Petroleum Research

In 1919-1920, the Chemical Engineering curriculum was split into three options: Metallurgical Chemistry, Petroleum Technology, and Sanitary Chemistry. In 19121913 College enrollment consisted of six seniors, seven juniors, five sophomores, 10 freshmen and 35 unclassified students for a total of 63. The total enrollment for the University was 866. The minutes of the regular Engineering faculty meeting held November 12, 1912 show that President Brooks presided. At this meeting, Dean Felgar made a motion that a special committee be appointed to consider entrance requirements and propose changes. Professor Dwight was named chairman with Professor Haseman of Physics and Dean Felgar as members. At the regular meeting of December 10, 1912, with Vice President DeBarr as chair of the meeting, the committee report was adopted as follows: Your committee is unanimously agreed that it is to the best interests of the College of Engineering to have as nearly as it can the same required units for entrance as the other colleges of the University. Your committee therefore recommends that 1/2 unit of Freehand Drawing be not a required subject, that one unit of Physics be changed to one unit of Science as a required subject and that Geometry and Algebra - the other units under consideration - remain as required subjects.


The New College 1909-1920 40

It seems obvious that the College was under pressure to conform to the less demanding requirements of the era in Arts and Sciences. Curriculum compromises have always evoked an emotional response in Engineering Faculty meetings. The Catalog of 1913 - 1914 gave the following admission requirements for the College of Engineering: English 3 units Algebra 1 ½ units Geometry 1 ½ units History 1 unit + Foreign Language 2 units * Physics 1 unit Electives 5 units + For Chemical Engineering must be German * Chem 1 unit, Botany 1 unit, Zoology 1 unit may be substituted

The war in Europe was sending waves of apprehension and patriotism throughout the United States. The 1913-1914 Catalog made note of the preparations that were starting at the University and in the State. The following announcement was included in the Catalog: Engineering Corps. Co. A Oklahoma National Guard was established May 1913. Officers are from the Faculty of Schools of Civil and Mechanical Engineering. Signal Corps. Field Co. A Oklahoma National Guard was Established June 1913, Officers are from the Faculty of the School of Electrical Engineering. The organizations are well supplied with suits, arms, field equipment, signal equipment, and other materials which are regularly furnished by the U.S. Government.

In 1913, there were five graduates from engineering. Four received BSEE degrees and Albert Edward Gartside received the first BSChE degree. The enrollment in the College increased to 91 students distributed as follows: seven seniors, seven juniors, 11 sophomores, 35 freshmen, and 31 unclassified students. The University enrollment had risen to a total of 1,377. In 1914 there were six degrees awarded in Engineering and in 1915, there were eight degrees awarded. Among these was Joseph Cowan Gordon, the first to earn a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Gordon wrote a letter in 1970 in response to an inquiry from the school.


The New College 1909-1920 41

Portions were published in The Vector, a newsletter of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Gordon had a successful career as a Petroleum Engineer and was living in Dallas when he wrote the letter that is included in appendix of this book. During the 1913-1914 year, the University power plant was moved to a new addition on the East side of the Engineering Building. The large concrete stack was erected, and tunnels were constructed to the other buildings on campus. These included University Hall (later renamed Evans Hall), Science Hall, Carnegie Library, and Monnet Hall. The graduate program in engineering had its beginning in the regular meeting of the Faculty of the College of Engineering on November 11, 1913, when the following action was taken. The meeting was chaired by Dean Felgar and Professor Bozell served as Secretary. Report of the Committee on Advanced Degrees was heard which was as follows: Committee recommends that the College of Engineering come under the requirements now necessary to offer the master’s degree, this degree to be the Master of Science, qualified by the School in which the work is done. This Committee recommends the following: That graduates of this institution holding the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering, or the Master of Science in Engineering, may be granted the professional degree of Engineer qualified by the school in which the undergraduate work is done, upon the following conditions: The candidate must present evidence of at least three years of practice in his profession, at least one of which must have been in a position of responsibility. He shall present a satisfactory thesis upon some engineering subject. This thesis shall cover investigation carried on personally by the applicant for the degree. The thesis must be presented in its final form to the Dean of the College of Engineering not later than May 1, of the year in which the degree is to be granted. The candidate shall provide two type written bound copies of the thesis and duplicate sets of all drawings, plans, specifications and other material applying to the thesis, to the University for its permanent possession. On motion this report was adopted and ordered sent to the proper authorities.

Similarities will be noted between the requirements and the experience requirements for professional registration and for full membership in many professional societies.


The New College 1909-1920 42

Most of the discussion in these early faculty meetings was spent on student petitions. Those readers who have served on faculties will appreciate action taken in the meeting of October 12, 1915, with President Brooks in the Chair. “On motion Dean was authorized to appoint a permanent committee to consider all petitions and report at each regular meeting.” Another interesting piece of business was the following: “The Dean was authorized to appoint a committee to consider means of publicity of the College of Engineering.” Incidentally, the petition committee idea apparently did not work for long. Within a year, petitions were again being presented for approval. Another issue which still periodically comes before the faculty was being debated at the meeting of March 9, 1915. "On motion the following regulation was adopted: No withdrawal may be obtained by any student not making a passing grade in the subject from which the withdrawal is requested." The last minutes in the record book were for the proceedings of November 14, 1916. Minutes from subsequent faculty meetings have been lost for years 19171927. Bound volumes of typewritten minutes appeared beginning October 1928. In the 1918-19 Catalog, the role of the faculty in working with students was published as follows: Faculty advisers assigned to each student. The relation of the adviser to the student is, as far as possible, that of a friendly counselor, ready at all times to assist by encouragement, advice or warning to the end that the student may be directed along lines of high ideals in scholarship and right living. The advisor receives monthly reports from each student’s instructors and in case these reports show diminishing quality of work or excessive absences, the advisor summons the student for consultation.

In February 1914, Mr. Alex W. McCoy arrived from the University of Missouri as an instructor in Geology. Although he served only one year as a faculty member, he brought to the University the The headline read, “Sons of Old great tradition of Saint Patrick. The Erin Honor Patron Saint.” Engineers’ Club elected Jim Bennett (BSCE 1915), the first of a long line of St. Pats. Jim was president of the club and led in the organization of the first Engineers’ St. Pat’s celebrations. On Tuesday, March 10, 1914, the OU student newspaper, The University Oklahoman, carried a front page notice, “Engineers Plan to Celebrate March 17, May Paint the Campus Green. A meeting


The New College 1909-1920 43

of all engineers is called for tomorrow.” On Friday the newspaper announced, “Erin Go Braugh” says all engineers. Engineers will hold open house Tuesday. A banquet will celebrate the knighthood of the seniors. Listed were Jim Bennett, Charles Carey, Joe Gordon, Sabert Hott and David Logan. On Tuesday, March 17, 1914 the newspaper was printed in green ink. There were 800 visitors reported to have attended the open house where they observed exhibits including a model of a modern manufacturing plant, an oscillograph, a flashing sign of the letters OU in electric lights, a calculating machine, a blue print machine, a miniature telephone system, a calorimeter and a testing machine. The following year, the celebration was to be even greater than in 1914. In the February 19, 1915, edition of The University Oklahoman, the announcement was made that the engineers were arranging for St. Pat. On Friday March 5, it was noted that 90 members of the Engineering College have paid $1 each for a record celebration and that 25 prominent engineers from over the state have been invited. On March 17, 1915, the student newspaper again was printed in green. The paper described the 1914 celebration as well as describing the parade from the Engineering Hall to the Assembly Hall. The open house was described along with the announcement that President Brooks will serve as toastmaster for the banquet. Later, it was announced that 1,100 had visited the openhouse. In the 1915 year book, the following material was the topic of a single page: Saint Patrick Booster The one thing more than any other that has placed the College of Engineering where it now is has been the enthusiastic interest the students have taken in the annual celebration, which is held in honor of their patron saint. The need of something of this kind was felt by the students who first enrolled in the Engineering Department. The Saint Patrick’s Day plan that has been and is adopted by nearly all the larger engineering schools was the plan that they chose to inspire interest and stimulate loyalty to the College. The plan has been, as elsewhere, a tremendous success each year. This year the engineering students put out a special edition of the University Oklahoman to advertise the event. The Engineering Building, all the followers of Erin and all engineeringdom were on dress parade. Saint Patrick’s Day has come to be one of the big days at the


The New College 1909-1920 44 University and THE BIG DAY for all engineers.

In 1915, an event occurred that started a unique tradition at the University. Some of the engineering students borrowed a Civil War cannon from Edwards Park in downtown Norman. It was displayed at the openhouse. In January 1916, the Electrical Engineering seniors took field trips to Wellington, KS and Chicago to see industrial installations. This would become an annual affair. In March, the student paper reported that Western Electric had donated a demonstration telephone exchange to the engineering students. This included two operator boards and two exchanges. The March 10, 1916 edition of The University Oklahoman announced, “Felgar’s Students Plan Celebration. Randall Clark, President of St. Pat’s Board tells of plans for the openhouse, banquet, and dance.” The Green Edition of the paper was printed on March 17, 1916 with banner headlines, “Engineers Hold Open House.” There were two articles of special interest. The first relates that on Wednesday night there had been a midnight attack on “Old Trusty.” The cannon had been standing in the oval since last year. Tuesday night, the engineering students, apparently hearing of the possibility of foul play, had moved the cannon to the Engineering Annex and chained it to an iron column. The Laws crawled through a window and were filing the chain. The guard notified his captain and the invading army was routed to the tune of a .38 automatic. The other story reported that the people of Norman were awakened at midnight by “Old Trusty” and the sound of steam whistles. Thus started the tradition of the firing of Old Trusty on Saint Patrick’s Day. The following description is taken from the 1916 Sooner Yearbook giving the background of the celebration and the story of its growth during the first three years: ERIN GO BRAGH Saint Patrick Was An Engineer In 1903, a few Irish engineers at the University of Missouri discovered that St. Patrick was an engineer, thus linking the best profession with the most popular saint. The exact process of deductive reasoning that was followed in order to arrive at this momentous discovery is unknown, but let that be as it was. The same discoverers first honored St. Patrick with public demonstration by parading around the quadrangle. Martyrdom was the fate of these patriots, for the faculty failed to see the connection between St. Patrick, engineering and a parade. True to the laws of society, these


The New College 1909-1920 45 faithful were expelled, just because they started something new. The following year, all the loyal engineers took a cut. In 1906, a field party of engineers found a stone of mysterious aspect and covered with undecipherable hieroglyphics. A member of the party with a slight knowledge of archeology immediately recognized the value of the stone and took it back to the University with him. The archeology professors deciphered the inscription after many months of labor and found that it read: Saint Patrick Was An Engineer The significance of this statement was realized and they proceeded that year to let the world know that St. Patrick was an engineer and they could prove it. Their enthusiasm expended itself in a real celebration consisting of a parade, an openhouse, and an engineers’ ball. Each year the celebration has assumed greater importance and proportions until today it is the biggest event in the school year of the Tigers. The engineering students at the University of Oklahoma became members of St. Patrick’s Clan in 1914 through the efforts of A. W. McCoy who brought with him from Missouri a piece of the sacred Blarney Stone. The first celebration was conducted as an openhouse in the afternoon and a banquet and knighting ceremony that night. The celebration was pronounced a remarkable success considering the time spent in preparation and was repeated in 1915 on a larger scale. At the openhouse in the afternoon, the Engineering Building, its contents, and inmates were on display and the visitors were conducted through a route taking in the entire engineering building and the power plant. In the evening, a banquet was served in the gymnasium. Visiting engineers from all parts of the state responded to a toast by the toastmaster, President Stratton D. Brooks. The seniors and certain faculty members were knighted and presented with green diplomas. This year the event assumed greater proportions than ever before. Special exhibits were prepared and preparations made to handle a large crowd. ’Old Trusty,’ the cannon that guards the campus, was secured and placed under guard until the 17th. Following time honored traditions, the lawyers attempted to ship the cannon to Oklahoma City,


The New College 1909-1920 46 but they were surprised at their task and the engineers will never forget how the lawyers went through the hedge, also they will never forget how the glass tinkled down out of the windows when the salute was fired at dawn on March 17. After a morning spent in final preparation, the doors were thrown open to the visitors at 1:30 p.m. In the shops, a display of woodwork, patterns, etc. were shown. All the machines were in operation in the shop, and in the forge room, the embryo blacksmiths hammered on the iron. The surveying instruments of the Civil Engineering Department were displayed along the south side of the building. In the annex were the Mining Geology exhibits and the big Riehle testing machine and cement testing apparatus. The Mining Geology exhibit contained a miniature oil derrick with all the drilling apparatus. The boiler and `Gus’ came under observation in the power house together with the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The Electrical Department had some unbelievable things that can be performed by electricity, together with all the useful appliances. The Western Electric Telephone Board was a very interesting exhibit as it showed in detail how modern telephony is affected. The best exhibit was the spinning ball: Nonmagnetic, a piece of meteor keeps spinning all day with frequent reversals, perpetual motion, and the most wonderful discovery.’ All this it was and more, according to Clarence Karcher, who suited his talk to his audience. The swimming kewpie and the light that burned when floating on boiling water, together with the tin can motor completed the trick exhibits of this department. Upstairs the exhibits of the drafting department, the Civil Engineering Department and the Chemistry Department all came in for their share of attention along with the blue print machine, the 5000 volt resonator and the wireless. After viewing all the exhibits and having every detail explained to them by the guide, the visitors were conducted out the main entrance, there receiving a time card, originally punched at the entrance and showing the time spent in the building. The day’s celebration was closed by a banquet in the gymnasium, when all seniors and two members of the faculty were honored with the degree of Knight of St. Patrick. The following night at the St. Patrick’s wake, many engineers proved that they were as proficient in the Terpsichorean Art as they were in their respective professions.


The New College 1909-1920 47

At that time, there were several students on a combined program to receive their BA in four years and the BS in the fifth year. Logan did not stay for his BSEE degree. In 1920, Tom Sorey, BA Oklahoma (1920), was appointed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Drawing and was placed in charge of The ditty under David Logan’s photograph in Drawing. Sorey’s family had the yearbook read “Does St. Patrick love the moved to Oklahoma City in engineer? LO! Here is a son who should to 1908 and he graduated from him be dear.” Oklahoma City High School in 1914 and enrolled in Mechanical Engineering at OU. In 1917, Professor Whittemore asked Sorey to join him in Washington at the Bureau of Standards. In 1919, he returned to Oklahoma City and worked as an architectural draftsman for an architectural firm in Oklahoma City. Dean Felgar called him and asked him to come back to OU to take charge of Engineering Drawing. Sorey was allowed to enroll in two courses which permitted him to complete a BA degree. He had originally planned to get his BSME in the fifth year. Sorey was a member of Sigma Tau, St. Pat’s Board, and Sigma Chi social fraternity. During his tenure he spent one summer at MIT taking architectural courses, another summer at the Chicago Art Institute, and a summer at a large architectural firm in Chicago. He initiated new courses in architectural perspective and architectural design which were the forerunner of the School of Architecture. He resigned in 1923 to enter private practice. Later his firm of Sorey, Hill, and Sorey designed the Oklahoma Memorial Union, several dormitories at OU, the BotanyMicrobiology building and several fraternity and sorority houses at the University. Everett Stirling Davis served as shop instructor from 1914 until 1921. As indicated earlier, the Engineers’ Club was organized in 1910 as a club for all engineering majors. The Pick and Hammer Club for students interested in Geology had been organized in 1906 and the Chemistry Club in 1908. In 1912, Professor Bozell organized the first student chapter of a national professional society at the University - the AIEE (forerunner of the IEEE). In 1912, the Architectural Club was founded for the purpose of learning the beauty of architecture around the world. This was open to students across the campus. In 1914, the Mechanical Engineering Society was organized and in 1917 this organization became a student chapter of ASME as the second national professional society to have a chapter on campus. The Civil Engineering Society was organized in 1916 and the Chemical Engineering Society was established in 1920.


The New College 1909-1920 48

In 1914, the Edison Club was established as the first Honorary Engineering Society on Campus. Charles Carey, EE; Sabert Hott, CE; and Ray Flood, CE, were the officers. In 1915, the name was changed to the Newton Club. In 1916, the Mu Chapter of Sigma Tau was established at OU replacing the Newton Club. Sigma Tau, a national honorary engineering fraternity, had been started in 1906 at the University of Nebraska. The concrete pyramid at the west entrance to Felgar Hall was built to honor this fraternity. Saint Pat’s Board was established in 1915. This group of student leaders was elected from the various programs in engineering to lead the student activities and to plan the Saint Patrick celebration each year. It was an honor to serve on this board. There were many other clubs and fraternities across campus in which engineering students participated. Fraternities had been established early and many engineering students belonged to these as well as clubs for debate, music, languages and literature. One of the unique organizations was the Tobasco Club whose members were the best ballroom dancers from each fraternity. The Enchiladas was the corresponding women’s dance group. The two clubs met weekly in a downtown dance hall. On April 7, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany, joining the Allies in defense of Europe and the world. The University responded in an all-out effort in response to the war. By fall 1917, the male students were organized into six companies. R. V. James, BSCE (1918) and long-time faculty member was pictured as Captain of Company E. The students wore military uniforms but drilled with wooden guns, since rifles were in demand by the regular military. By February 1918, military drill was compulsory for all male students. A note in the 1918 Sooner Yearbook stated the following: Engineering students who are drafted into service, may be transferred to the enlisted reserve for the time necessary for the completion of their engineering course. Unless an extreme emergency occurs, these men will not be required to enter active service but one month each summer, until they have completed their technical training.

Unfortunately for some, this policy did not always function as intended. Frank Keller, BSChE 1920, wrote that he enrolled at OU in 1915 and in 1917, he enlisted in The Engineers’ Enlisted Reserve, but the draft board drafted him. He was assigned to the 109th Engineers, 34th Division. He said that there was an order to send him to OU, but the order was not obeyed, as he was sent to France and


The New College 1909-1920 49

returned after the war to complete his requirements for a degree in Chemical Engineering. He later had a career with the National Bureau of Standards in Denver. However a number of students were able to obtain deferments and went into service upon completion of their degree. The 1918 Sooner Yearbook was “Dedicated to our fellow students who answered the call of their country.” The University also geared up for its role in training for the war effort. In that same issue, the following description is given of some of those courses: 13 courses in seven different departments are being offered at the University of Oklahoma for the direct purpose of training soldiers, training men who expect to become soldiers, training people who take the place of soldiers in civil life or training ‘The folks at home’ on their duties in helping to win the war. Wireless telegraphy for men of draft age is offered by the College of Engineering. Wireless telegraphy for men or women who wish to take the place of railroad and commercial telegraphers who enter the military service is offered by the School of Electrical Engineering. Military field engineering for men of draft age is offered by Civil Engineering. Gas engine work for men of draft age is offered by Mechanical Engineering. Oxy-acetylene welding is offered for men of draft age by Mechanical Engineering.

A total of 460 men were trained as wireless operators, automobile mechanics, or general mechanics in the vocational training school of the University. In October 1918, the Student Army Training Corps was established at OU. During the war, 1,300 students were inducted and served as enlisted soldiers. Buildings were converted into barracks and active duty Army officers were assigned in charge of the program. The students had drill and military exercises as well as attending classes in subjects related to military requirements. For his contribution to the war effort, President Brooks served as Oklahoma Food Administrator from July 1917 until April 1918 in addition to his responsibilities at the University. In all, 30 faculty members, 400 alumni, and 1,875 students served in the military, according to the 1919 Sooner Yearbook. In February 1919, an Army ROTC unit was established at OU consisting of a Field Artillery unit and an Infantry unit. Two years of military training was made mandatory for all male students, a requirement that lasted until the 1960s. Such training benefitted the country significantly when World War II started.


The New College 1909-1920 50

The University Oklahoman became The Oklahoma Daily at the start of the 19161917 school year. The headline on the March 17, 1917 issue was, “Race War Precipitated by Theft of St. Pat Cannon.” The article goes on to state that the war was precipitated Friday night between the St. Pats and the lawyers. The lawyers discovered the cannon at the home of Elvis Whitwell, an engineer, just north of town. On the first trip, the owls made away with the carriage of the gun. The engineers captured several suspects taking them three or four miles northeast and commenced an interrogation. In the meantime, five engineers, guarding the remainder of the cannon, were confronted by a large band of lawyers, who then made away with the rest of the gun. As a result there were a number of black eyes and several were seen packing six shooters. A box outlined in heavy black lines appeared in the paper deploring the fact that students were toting guns and threaten expulsion for any student found with a gun. The Saint Patrick celebration was held in spite of the missing “Old Trusty.” The open house, banquet, and dance apparently went off without further problems. The edition of Tuesday, March 20, 1917, stated that Old Trusty appeared at 2 p.m. Sunday afternoon with a “thunderous bark and the lawyers yell.”

The original “Old Trusty” on the North Oval, circa 1918 photo courtesey of the Western History Collection


The New College 1909-1920 51

The March 17, 1917 edition of The Oklahoma Daily was again printed on green paper and was full of articles about engineering. Some of the summer jobs of engineering upperclassmen were listed. Roy H. Balyeat, who was a four-year Navy veteran, had charge of the wireless test on the USS Nevada; Clyde Whitwell was employed by Pioneer Telephone in Norman; Clifton Mackey, Elvin D. Freeman, Albert M. Pigg, Hazlitt B. Caldwell, and Steedman spent the summer installing the wiring in DeBarr Hall; Loyal Holland worked for Chandler Electric; Paul Koester, for the Prairie Pipeline; and B. Paul Stockwell for the Zahn Oil Co. in Marietta. There was also a list of former graduates and the jobs that they currently held. Lloyd Curtis, Westinghouse in Wilkinsburg, PA.; Harry Powell, Canadian County Engineer; Verne Alden, Westinghouse, Swissdale, PA.; Earl Johnson, draftsman, OKC; Clarence McFerron, Concrete Oil Storage, Tulsa; Schenk Griffin, Southern Railway in Virginia; Harrison Nighswonger, Benham Engineering, Blackwell; Tom Ashbury, Oklahoma Electric Co., OKC; Weaver Holland, Westinghouse, Dallas; and Albert Gartside, Mine LaMotte Co. in Missouri. There was also an article in the March 17, 1917 edition of The Oklahoma Daily telling of the wireless plant in the south end of the Electrical Engineering Laboratory. Under the leadership of Roy H. Balyeat, one of the most powerful radio stations in the southwest had been constructed. It had a sending range of over 700 miles and messages were received from Arlington, Virginia, Mexico, Honolulu, and Berlin. It should be noted that all messages were in Morse Code as the radio did not have the capability for voice communication at this time. The war had its effect on the Saint Patrick celebration in the College of Engineering as well. The officers of the 1918 St. Pat’s Board were R. V. James, Pres.; Clyde Whitwell, Treas.; with George Dolph and Loyal Holland in charge of publications. The 1918 yearbook gives the following description below the pictures of St. Pat’s Board: Sure and just because the engineers decreed no open house this year didn’t mean that they’d pass up their sacred saint; so Saint Patrick was duly honored. First indications of a celebration were the green tags labeled ‘St. Pats.’ 1918, seen on the coat lapels of numerous engineers. Festivities began with a big bang the night of March fifteenth and when we all woke up in the morning even The Oklahoma Daily had turned to an emerald hue. But the banquet! Why ‘tis said it was enough to make the lawyers turn green with envy. And what more could engineers want?


The New College 1909-1920 52

1918 St. Pat’s Board photo from the 1918 Sooner Yearbook

In the 1919 Yearbook, under the Saint Pat’s Board was the following explanation: Because the engineers declared no open house again this year was no sign that due honor and respect to their patron saint was neglected. The day was ushered in by the barking of ‘Old Trustee’ which reminded even the stupid lawyers that the ‘Engineer’s Day’ had come and that the engineers as usual were on the job. The green edition of The Oklahoma Daily and their usual banquet followed by their annual dance, made the celebration complete.

A letter written by Clyde H. Whitwell, in response to mailings requesting information in preparation for writing this history, gives a good description of Norman, the campus and student life in engineering. It is included in its entirety, with only minor editing, in the appendix of this book. Whitwell included a picture of the class on 1918 which is on the following page. Whitwell was a member of the Newton Honorary Society and a charter member of the Mu chapter of Sigma Tau. He was also a member of AIEE, the Engineers’ Club, and St. Pat’s Board. The Oklahoma Daily, dated Monday, March 17, 1919, featured the following headlines: “Engineer Coffee Spiked by Laws,” the accompanying story read: Feminine law student is believed to have stirred a chemical mixture into Saint Patrick’s favorite drink. The coffee served to the young


The New College 1909-1920 53 sons of Erin and their invited out of town guests, as well as of the entire University was spiked. The program was interrupted from time to time on account of the various diners, who had partaken, being forced to go outside on account of the nausea. The banquet was held in the “Y” Hut at 6:30 Saturday evening with 150 members of engineering plus a dozen or more guests. President Stratton D. Brooks, acting as toastmaster for the evening, conducted the affair with his usual flow of merriment and spontaneity, helping to relieve the unpleasantness which tended to mar the occasion. Eleven seniors and four new faculty members kissed the Blarney Stone and were dubbed Knights of St. Pat.

The College of Engineering class of 1918

The same issue of the paper listed 36 engineering graduates who were in the armed forces. Nearly all were commissioned officers. Many engineering students have always been active not only in the various organizations in engineering, but have participated in activities across campus. Space prohibits listing all of those deserving to be listed. However, the history would be incomplete without giving some recognition to the students and their achievements. The 1914 Sooner Yearbook showed the following student activities: Charles Edward Carey, Norman, Varsity Basketball, President Edison Club, AIEE, Engineers’ Club, Electrician in charge of Law Building and Power Plant Robert D. Evans, OKC, Chair AIEE, Edison Club, Secy. Engrs. Club


The New College 1909-1920 54 David Ellery Renshaw, Henessey, 2 yr. Captain Varsity Baseball, President Engrs. Club., AIEE

The University football team showed three brothers who were members. Sabert Hott, BSCE 1914, right tackle; Oliver Hott, BSME 1916, right tackle; Willis Hott, BSME 1916, right guard. Sabert was an officer of the Edison Club, the first engineering honor society. “Them Hotts” were stars of the team. The 1916 Sooner Yearbook listed the following among the engineering seniors: W. E. Byrne, BSCE, Lawton, Engr. Club, CE Club, Newton Club, St. Pats. Board Murel Edward Carpenter, BSCE, Collinsville, Sigma Chi, Tabasco, Engrs. Club, CE Club Wright L. Felt, BSEE, Hamilton, Texas, Kappa Sigma, President, Engrs. Club, AIEE, Newton Club, St. Pats Bd., Varsity Baseball Clarence J. Karcher, BSEE, Hennessey, PE-ET, Physics Club, Pres. Engrs Club, Pres. AIEE, Newton Club, Class football. (Karcher actually received a BS in Physics and not engineering. He is credited with the invention of reflection seismology in petroleum exploration. The Karcher endowment for Distinguished Lectures in Physics, Chemistry, and math were later given in Karcher’s honor.) Harry Oderman, BSME, OKC, Sigma Chi, Interfraternity Council, Tabasco Board, ME Club, St. Pats Bd, Phi Mu Alpha, Newton Club, Senate, Teutonia

From the 1917 Sooner Yearbook, the following are a few of the Engineers that were pictured: Clifton M. Mackey, Durant, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Tau, AIEE, Checkmate, Engrs. Club, Physics Club, Tobasco Ray H. Balyeat, Norman, Engrs. Club, AIEE Hazlitt B. Caldwell, Shawnee, Delta Theta, Sigma Tau, PE-ET, Engrs. Club, Student Council E. D. Freeman, Chandler, Masonic Club, AIEE, V.P. Engrs. Club, Sooner Staff, Varsity Track, Class Football Dudley Jones, Shawnee, CE Club, Pres. Engrs. Club


The New College 1909-1920 55 E. W. Pembleton, Sigma Tau, Treas St. Pats.’16, Pres. St. Pats. ‘17, Treas. ME Club ‘15, Pres. ME Club ‘17

The 1918 yearbook, in addition to listing Clyde Whitwell, lists those mentioned in his letter as well as others. R. V. James, already mentioned as a long-time faculty member, was a leader in the class. Bennie Shultz, who spent his career as Supervisor of the University Power Plant, was also a member of the Class of 1918. There is an endowed scholarship in Mechanical Engineering, given by Mr. Shultz and his wife Audrey. A sampling of other seniors are given as follows: Leo Humphreys, Tulsa, Sigma Chi, ASME, Engrs. Club, Glee Club, Class football, President of Senior Class John Erter, Tulsa, Phi Mu Alpha, Band, Orchestra, Engrs. Club Loyal B. Holland, Chandler, Engrs. Club, AIEE, Ruf Nex, St. Pats. Board Benjamin Paul Stockwell, OKC, ASME, Engrs. Club, Class football, St. Pats. Board Calvin Hughes, Lone Wolf, Sigma Tau, AIEE, Sooner Staff, St. Pats. Board

There had been 14 engineering graduates in the class of 1917, 15 in 1918 and only 11 in 1919 as a result of the war. The 1919 Sooner Yearbook included the following graduates: Paul O. Koester, Sigma Tau, Phi Delta Chi, ASME, Engrs. Club, Basketball Roy Edward Heffner, Clinton, AIEE, Engrs. Club, Math Club, YMCA John B. Donaldson, Sigma Tau, Alphi Chi Sigma, Chem. Club, Chairman, St. Pats. Board

In 1920, Theresa Reinhardt became the first woman graduate of the College of Engineering. She earned her BSCE in that year. Undoubtedly she was the co-ed that Clyde Whitwell recounted the joke about in his letter. In the 1920 Sooner Yearbook, she stands on the front row of the Knights of Saint Patrick picture as they stand in their overcoats before the Engineering Building. In the directory of


The New College 1909-1920 56

engineering graduates appearing in the 1940 Sooner Magazine, she is listed as living in Oklahoma City and having the title of Construction Engineer with the firm of Reinhardt and Donovan Co. Her married name was listed as Dolan.

Theresa Reinhardt, the first woman to graduate from the College of Engineering, stands with the Knights of St. Pat Photo courtesey of the Western History Collection

The graduation list increased to 21 that year and in addition to Miss Reinhardt, included Frank Keller and Ronald F. Danner from Thomas. He was a member of Sigma Tau, AIEE, Engineers Club, and a member of St. Pat’s Board. Mr. Danner spent his career with OG&E, serving a number of years as Vice President for Engineering. In February and March 1920, The Oklahoma Daily told of the election of the St. Pat’s Queen. Ninety percent of the College voted for one of the three candidates who were listed as Virginia Hancock, Jessie Kellog, and Fern Rundle. Virginia Hancock, a student from Muskogee, won. At the banquet held at the TeePee house at 8 pm on March 17, R. V. James dubbed the Queen and presented her with a St. Pat’s pin. She then had the privilege of knighting the seniors. The papers recount that an electric sign with $125 worth of light bulbs was erected over the engineering building, not to be confused with the sign later erected in 1930 over Felgar Hall. The sign flashed “Erin go Braugh” (Ireland Forever).


The New College 1909-1920 57

The March 16, 1920, issue of The Oklahoma Daily announced that 250 plates were reserved for the banquet. President Brooks was scheduled to be Toastmaster and Dean J. H. Felgar was to speak on problems of the modern engineer. The sixth annual open house and parade were to be held in celebration of engineering. The green sheets of March 17, 1920, carried the surprising headline, “Prexy Settles Old Trusty.” The story continued as follows: Last night, President Brooks, with his customary acumen, personally discovered the hiding place of “Old Trusty.” Under his supervision, the old cannon was unearthed from beneath the floor directly under the desk of Bennie Shultz in the electrical shop. Tom B. Ferguson and force loaded the cannon into the Prexy’s own car before the eyes of several hundred engineers. At 11 p.m., the car departed for parts unknown. President Brooks was driving. The Prexy had spent the entire afternoon and evening around the engineering building before he had accomplished his purpose. The cannon was buried two feet below the floor and its hiding place had been a profound secret for three weeks.

President Brooks must have felt that he had put an end to the custom of firing the cannon. It is assumed that he served as toastmaster at the banquet as he had been scheduled. He must have been met with less than the usual enthusiasm. The 1920 Sooner Yearbook, for the first time, displayed a picture of the Engineers Queen. This is apparently the first time that a Queen had been elected and started a tradition which continues as a highlight of the Engineers’ Week celebration.

Virginia Hancock, the first Engineers’ Queen photo from the 1920 Sooner Yearbook

The campus had changed over the period from 1909 until 1920. The University Hall had been rebuilt (and still stands as Evans Hall).


The New College 1909-1920 58

The Engineering Building, built in 1910, had been enlarged and the University Heating and Power Plant had been added to it. In 1917, a one story addition was made to the Engineering Building 37 feet by 183 feet for a wood shop, electric, hydraulics and materials laboratory. Monnet Hall (the Law Building) had been constructed as had the Chemistry Building (at that time named DeBarr Hall), and Holmberg Hall was also completed. The Geology Building (now Carpenter Hall) was built in 1919 and the “new library� (now Jacobson Hall) was constructed in 1920. The campus had taken on the appearance of a true university. The University and the College of Engineering were growing. As early as the 1917 Yearbook, Dean Felgar makes the following pitch for a new building: The College of Engineering in the University has, since its establishment, had a remarkable growth. The work done in the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma has always been considered equal to any in the south and west. This is borne out by the fact that many of the largest manufacturing and other concerns requiring engineering skills send requests to the engineering faculty of young men to take charge of special lines of work in their establishments, nearly every week of the college year. With an appropriation for a new engineering building, which is badly needed, the College of Engineering of the University of Oklahoma would become the leading College of Engineering in the west.

The world war had passed and the faculty and student body had stabilized. There were still a few veterans finishing their degrees. However, without the G.I. Bill that followed later wars, the numbers were not great. The University still had no dormitories. Each time an effort had been made, the boarding house owners in Norman had enough political power to stop any appropriation. Board and room was listed as from $8 to $10 per week in the 1919-1920 Catalog. It noted that the YMCA and the YWCA would help students find a place to stay. The fraternity and sorority houses provided for some students. King Hall for women sponsored by the Episcopal Church was operating. The catalog noted that the Knights of Columbus was building a dormitory for Catholic men, to be completed in 1920. The Masons were building a dormitory to house 135 men which they hoped to complete in the 1920-21 school year. This building still stands as Whitehand Hall on the northwest corner of University Blvd. and Boyd Street, and is now owned by the University. And so the college had matured. The traditions of Saint Patrick were established and students of the college had a spirit and an enthusiasm for their profession. Dean Felgar had done a good job of guiding the college from its shaky


The New College 1909-1920 59

beginning through the war to end wars and the future looked good for both the University of the College of Engineering.

References 1. Gittinger, Roy, The University of Oklahoma, 1892-1942, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1942. 2. Cross, George L., Professors, Presidents and Politicians, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1981. 3. Long, Charles F. and Hart, Carolyn G., The Sooner Story - Ninety Years at The University of Oklahoma - 1890-1980, The University of Oklahoma Foundation, 1980. 4. Hellemans A. and B. Bunch, Simon and Shuster, Time Table of Science, 1988. 5. Felgar, J. H., “A History of the College of Engineering,� Sooner Magazine, August 1940. 6. Engineer Alumni Directory, Sooner Magazine, August 1940. 7. The University of Oklahoma Catalogs, 1909-1920, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 8. Sooner Yearbooks, 1909-1920, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 9. The University of Oklahoma Student Newspaper, 1914-1920, University Archives, Microfilm Files. 10. Minutes of the College of Engineering Faculty Meetings, 1910-1916, College of Engineering Files. 11. The AME Vector, Vol. IV, No. 4, May 1970, The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Oklahoma.


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 3 The College Matures 1920-1930 The decade of the 1920s was the decade in which perhaps greater changes occurred for the average family in the United States than ever before or since. The inventions and technological developments of the previous 30 years were put to practical use. The automobile replaced the horse. By the end of the decade, there was a telephone and a radio in most residences, and most urban homes also had electric lighting. Highways connected cities and airlines were in an early stage of formation. Railroads were still the primary method of long distance travel, but Pullman sleepers and elegant dining cars made travel a pleasure. However, the decade began with a recession and ended with the Great Depression. In between, there was great industrial growth in the East and the oil boom in Oklahoma. All of this had a marked effect on the University and the College of Engineering. In 1922, John C. Walton was elected governor with the support of those who were disgruntled about the economic conditions in the state. He believed that President Brooks, along with the faculty and alumni of the University, had not supported him. When the Board of Regents would not fire Brooks, he set out to replace the Board. The May 1, 1923 issue of The Oklahoma Daily ran a story with the headline: “Regents Are Ousted by Governor - Rumor of Brooks Discharge Unverified.” The article quoted Governor Walton, “As I have previously stated, the educational system, as far as possible should be removed from political maneuvering. But as long as it stands today, maneuvering against me and largely Yankee Republican, I think it ought to be in the hands of the Democratic Governor.” There was an outcry in support of Brooks. The May 2, 1923 issue of The Oklahoma Daily carried a story that alumni had sent a recommendation to the Governor that Brooks be retained and the May 4 issue stated that business men were behind Brooks. The headline in the May 8 issue was, “Dr. Brooks to be Missouri Prexy.”

James S. Buchanan photo from the 1924 Sooner Yearbook

The May 11, 1923 issue of The Oklahoma Daily stated that Dean Buchanan had been chosen to be the temporary President. The 60


The College Matures 1920-1930

Regents made several well published offers to noted educators over the next two years. Dr. Buchanan, who had been the Dean of Arts and Sciences, was a popular President for his two-year term. However, in July 1925, William Bennett Bizzell became President. He had been President of Texas A & M College since 1914 and came with strong academic credentials. He proved to be an outstanding president and would continue as President of the University of Oklahoma until 1941. He had received his BS, PhD, and LLD from Baylor University, the LLM from the Illinois College of Law, an MA from the University of Chicago, and PhD from Columbia University. He was a Fellow in several learned societies and had written several books and published many scholarly articles.

61

William Bennett Bizzell photo from the 1926 Sooner Yearbook

In his inaugural address, delivered on February 5, 1926, President Bizzell set forth goals for the University. The entire address seems as appropriate for today as it was almost 80 years ago. A few selective quotes are given below: ...Every University worthy of the name attempts to accomplish its objectives by instruction and research. [...] There is no business today that is independent of science. There is no industry that is not imperiled or advanced by scientific discovery. The chemists, the physicist, and the biologist are daily extending the boundaries of knowledge to new limits; and the engineer and scientific technologist are applying this knowledge in a thousand ways to industrial and commercial enterprises. [...] It is my earnest desire to see the research and instructional program of the University adapted to the actual and potential needs of the state. [...] We must never forget that the essential justification for education at the public expense in a democracy is training for good citizenship. [...] The time has come when the University should extend its facilities and provide graduate students with adequate research opportunities leading to the doctor’s degree. [...] It is my sincere desire that the University shall be worthy of the confidence and the goodwill of our entire citizenship. I solemnly pledge my best efforts to so direct the policies of the University as to merit the moral and financial support of all those who believe in the cause of education...


The College Matures 1920-1930

62

President Bizzell would continue as President of the University of Oklahoma through the rest of the 1920s and 1930s. During his presidency, the University grew in both size and quality, while riding the waves of economic and political storms that battered the state. The 1920s was a period of stable growth for the College of Engineering. James Huston Felgar continued as an effective dean throughout the period, with a steady Drawing of the new Engineering Building hand guiding the expansion and growth. The Saturday, March 19, 1921 edition of The Oklahoma Daily reported: “Bill for Engineering Building Killed in Committee.” The paper also noted that the faculty of the College of Engineering left for the capitol early Friday in hopes of obtaining an override of the committee action. Not until 1923 did the legislature appropriate funding for a new engineering building. On January 2, 1925, The Oklahoma Daily reported the new building for the engineers. Classrooms to be used for classes were listed as 208, 209, 211, 302, 305, and 307. This building consisted of what is now the west wing of Felgar Hall. The dean’s offices were in rooms 201 and 202, while room 216 served as the Engineering Library. The stacks were in the north quarter of the room, while the remaining space was arranged with tables for student use. Room 300 was arranged as an auditorium with a stage, fixed seating with fold down desk arms, and a projection booth. Dean Felgar’s strengths were in the human side of engineering as opposed to the technical side. He took a deep and lasting interest in his students and knew them all by name. Throughout his tenure as dean, he advised every freshman engineering student. His teaching was concerned primarily with courses in freshman orientation, contracts, management, and ethics. Dean Felgar was awarded an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree by his alma mater, The Armour Institute in 1929. The following comments were taken from an article in the November 1946 issue of the Sooner Shamrock written by Professor Tappan as a eulogy for Dean Felgar. ...He took a keen interest in all of the engineering students and knew


The College Matures 1920-1930

63

nearly all of them by name. He kept up with the location of his engineering graduates and often visited them in their homes or businesses when he would be in the locality. The many hundreds of students who took his courses in Engineering Contracts or Business Organizations and Management, often thought he preached too much about ethics, clean living, and proper mental and physical attitudes toward life,...but years later, they say that they remember and appreciate these moral counsels more than any other of their courses. He was very much disturbed by the rivalry between the engineers and the lawyers during the engineering open house activities. And, after each celebration was over, he would say, ‘Thank God that is over and no serious incidents have occurred.’

Dean Felgar had the respect of the students and faculty alike. He was always neatly dressed and presented a good image of the office he held. When students became too noisy in the hall outside of his office, he would step out of his office door and silently look over the crowd and a hush would immediately fall over the group. He had the reputation of being fair in his dealings with the departments, faculty, and students. He was always interested and participated in the Engineers’ Club and other student society events. A very strong supporter of the engineering registration laws, he was one of the first Registered Professional Engineers in the state of Oklahoma. The March 17, 1922 edition of The Oklahoma Daily gives the following glimpse of Dean Felgar: The fact that Dean Felgar sometimes sneaks down to the boiler room for a smoke, let’s say with some of the seniors, adds to his popularity. A Dean without a front office that can be reached by the greenest freshman is something that engineers are proud of.

The Faculty of the College exhibited stability and growth during the 1920s. New programs in Architectural Engineering, Petroleum Engineering, Engineering Physics, and Aeronautical Engineering were initiated. The faculty changes in each school are reviewed in the appendix. The campus building program was active in the decade of the 1920s. The Women’s Building (no longer standing) was completed in 1921. The Engineering Building


64 The College Matures 1920-1930

An aerial photo of campus in 1927

Photo courtesey of the Western History Collection


The College Matures 1920-1930

65

(Felgar Hall) was completed in January 1925, along with the Pharmacy Building (Sutton Hall). The first unit of Memorial Stadium, seating 16,000, was completed in the same year. The first university dormitories, Hester Hall and Robertson Hall, were constructed in 1925 and 1926 for women students. The Liberal Arts Building (Buchanan Hall) was completed in 1926. The Field House was constructed in 1926 and 1927. The Hygeia Building (Ellison Hall) was built in 1927 and 1928. The Oklahoma Memorial Union, along with the stadium, was financed with private funds from a drive that started during President Buchanan’s brief tenure, and was completed in 1928. The University Library (first unit of the Bizzell Memorial Library) was constructed in 1929, along with the University Press Building (later to be the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory) and the Petroleum Engineering and Refinery Building (now used as a storage facility for the OU Physical Plant). The curricula of the various programs remained relatively stable during the decade. They are listed in the appendix as they appeared in the 1928-1929 Catalog published in April 1929. The first year remained common for all programs. It is appropriate, however, to review the developments of the various programs, noting some of the major developments and activities in each of the Schools. Courses were offered throughout the period under the listing of Engineering. The list of faculty was always headed by Professor Felgar followed by the most junior faculty in each department. The latter taught the freshman engineering problems course under Dean Felgar’s direction. Other courses included Contracts, Public Utility Control, Engineering Evaluation of Public Utilities, and two courses in Engineering Management. In 1924-25, the Civil Engineering curriculum included seven courses in surveying, two courses in water supply and sewerage, one course in economics, two courses in masonry, foundations and reinforced concrete, a seminar, an inspection trip, and a course in design. Highway Engineering was listed as a separate group of courses taught by Civil Engineering faculty, including Highways, Roads and Pavement, Advanced Highways, Structural Engineering, and Structural Design. In the 192526 Catalog, these courses were no longer listed separately and were included with the Civil Engineering offerings. In 1929, the Civil Engineering students were still required to take 14 semester hours of surveying. In 1924-25, course listings for the School of Electrical Engineering included the following: five courses in DC machinery and laboratories; nine courses in AC circuits, machinery, and laboratories; two courses in radio, and single courses


The College Matures 1920-1930

66

each in batteries, power plants, hydro-electric plants, railway engineering, electrical transmission, transient phenomena, engineering mathematics, problems, inspection, special lectures, seminar, and design. The most significant development in electrical engineering came by way of what might be called extracurricular activities. This was the development of a radio station. The first licensed regular radio broadcast was started in the United States in 1920. In 1921, a freshman electrical engineering student, Maurice Prescott, along with Otto Walter, a recent graduate and newly appointed assistant professor, installed a 30 watt broadcasting station, with the licensed call letters 5XW, in the Prescott home basement. Across the nation, radio was becoming the newest “rage” in entertainment. The March 14, 1922 issue of The Oklahoma Daily carried the following story: RADIO CONCERT IS A SUCCESS. One of the best radio musical programs that has been heard in Norman was given Saturday night at the home of Mrs. B.H. Rackley, 526 Miller, by Maurice Prescott, Ted Hodges, and Doane Tolleson, sophomore engineers. The students tuned in music from stations in Roswell, New Mexico, Detroit News, University of Wisconsin, Westinghouse Station in Chicago, Reynolds Radio Co., Denver, and Oklahoma City.

The Oklahoma Daily ran the following story on March 17, 1922: “DANCE MUSIC BY WIRELESS. Dinty Moore will have a chance to rest at the Engineers’ Dance while the radio cuts in on the Deep River Orchestra of Dallas. Dancing by wireless telephone will soon be the latest and engineers are the pacesetters.” In 1923, the station was moved into the Electrical Engineering Laboratories and assigned the call sign, WNAD. The April 21, 1923 issue of The Oklahoma Daily carried a story stating that OU had one of the strongest stations in the Missouri Valley. The story further stated that an aerial had been installed from the smoke stack to the roof of the Engineering Building. O. W. Walter, Asstistant Professor of Electrical Engineering supervised and Maurice Prescott was the only licensed operator. Eugene Bathe, B. F. Thompson, and Francis Floyd were listed as assistants. Eugene Bathe, BSEE 1925 and Ansell Challenner, BSEE 1925, told the story in 1989, that Old Trusty was used to shoot a rope up inside the smoke stack in order to hoist the antenna in place. Bathe remained as a graduate assistant for several years with WNAD. He retired as Superintendent of Transmission and Distribution at OG&E. Challenner went with General Electric after graduation, returned as a faculty member in 1937, and retired as Professor of Electrical Engineering in 1968. In those early years of WNAD, Bathe and Challenner recounted that the engineers were in charge and programming was sometimes difficult to develop.


The College Matures 1920-1930

67

Microphones were scarce and WNAD was fortunate to have two. One of the favorite programs broadcast were concerts from Holmberg Hall. A line would be strung from the engineering building over to Holmberg and the students would run back and forth between the transmitter in the Engineering Building and the concert. Bathe recalls broadcasting organ concerts from the Sooner Theater after the movie ended. After the concert he would send a personal message to his parents who were listening in Bartlesville. On January 2, 1925 The Daily Oklahoman reported that WNAD would be getting new equipment and moving into new quarters on the second floor of the Engineering Laboratory Building. This same issue carried the story of the move of the College into the new building. From humble beginnings in the College of The station would be operated Engineering, WNAD became one of the top radio by Eugene Bathe, LeRoy Mofstations in the region fett, and G. L. Wheeler, under the supervision of O. W. Walter. The power would be boosted to 500 Watts with a new flat top inverted antenna. Weather reports were to be given at 9:30 each night. Fine Arts programs were broadcasted from 8:30 to 9:30 on Wednesdays, and eventually basketball games and the news were broadcasted. On Thursday, March 17, 1927, The Oklahoma Daily announced that the transmitting power of WNAD had been boosted to 3600 Watts, making it the most powerful school radio station in the United States. The School of Electrical Engineering continued to operate the station, although, programming was directed by Ted Beaird and a committee set up under the University Extension Division. The 1927 Sooner Yearbook had a brief review of WNAD indicating the station was operated by Eugene Bathe and directed by Ted Beaird. Broadcasts were reportedly received in every state in the Union and in Canada, Alaska, the Panama Canal, Cuba, and Mexico. Throughout the period, the Electrical Engineering seniors took an annual inspection trip. Bathe and Challenner recalled the cost was $150 and they traveled to Chicago, Milwaukee, and Keokuk, Illinois. Power plants, manufacturing facilities, and telephone exchanges were the objects of these field trips, giving the students a glimpse of the “real world.� Early in the decade the Mechanical Engineering curriculum centered on steam power, with eight courses, including laboratories, devoted to steam power and


The College Matures 1920-1930

68

steam turbines. Other sequences included two courses in thermodynamics, two courses in gas (internal combustion) engines, two courses in heating and ventilating, and single courses in air and gas compression and measurement, fuels and lubrication, refrigeration, and research. Shortly after Carson became Director, the two course sequence, ME 170 and ME 171 (Mechanical Engineering Conference) was added. Mechanical Engineering students of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s will remember these courses, which Carson taught in the Engineering Auditorium until his retirement. ME 171 involved the senior students making presentations which summarized articles from The Mechanical Engineering Magazine. In ME 170, the junior students would provide discussion of the reports given by the seniors. The research efforts of the school in this time period centered on problems in natural gas measurement and transmission. The Oklahoma Daily reported in the March 4, 1922 issue that The Pittsburgh Gas Meter Co. had given two gas meters to Mechanical Engineering to be used in the gas measurement course taken by all engineers. The April 15, 1925 issue of The Oklahoma Daily indicated that more than 100 men from Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas and Kansas were in attendance at the three-day Gas Meter Course taught by Associate Professor G. B. Helmrich. In recounting

The Gas Meter Course was a popular part of the College of Engineering for many years


The College Matures 1920-1930 69

the beginnings of the annual course, Dean Carson in 1946 credited John Baxter with organizing the first meeting in 1924. The primary emphasis of the original meeting was on repair of the tin case meters. Everyone was requested to wear overalls and to actually work at repairing meters. In 1925, the course included wet gas and proportional meters. It was called The Oklahoma Gas Measurement Short Course. The name of the course was changed to the Southwestern Gas Meter Short Course in 1926. Professor Helmrich, Director of the School of Mechanical Engineering, served on the committee. As a result of the many requests for copies of lectures given in 1925, it was decided to publish proceedings of the conference in 1926. Subsequently, proceedings were to be published every two years. Manufacturers were invited to display equipment related to gas metering, and the tradeshow became an important part of the conference from that time forward. After Professor Helmrich resigned from the faculty, Carson took charge of the short course. This continued to be one of Dean Carson’s chief interests for the rest of his life. The meeting continued to be a popular event for the gas metering and processing industry. Professor Lichty had a deep interest in aviation gas engines and had earlier obtained a Liberty aircraft engine for use in the Mechanical Engineering laboratory. This interest in aviation continued in Mechanical Engineering after he left the University. In 1929, an Aeronautical option was included in Mechanical Engineering.

Aeronautical Engineering grew in popularity at the University in the late 1920s with the formation of Tau Omega, the aeronautical engineering honor society at the University. One of this society’s projects was the construction of the glider seen above.


The College Matures 1920-1930

70

The courses for the option were shared by the Department of Mechanics. Courses in Mechanical Engineering included: Elements of Aeronautical Engineering, Aeronautical Motors, and Theory of Propellers. The sequence in Mechanics included two courses in aerodynamics and one course in “aero plane� design. The February 16, 1928 edition of The Oklahoma Daily reported the formation of the aeronautical engineering honor society, Tau Omega. This became the first honor society for aeronautical engineering in the country as chapters were soon established at a number of Midwestern schools. Tau Omega later merged with another aeronautical honor society, Gamma Alpha Rho, which had been founded in the East. The present society is named Sigma Gamma Tau. The February 21, 1930 edition of The Oklahoma Daily reported that 15 students were majoring in the Aeronautical Engineering option in Mechanical Engineering. Carl Ritter, the first student in the Aeronautical option in Mechanical Engineering was reported as working for NACA (predecessor to NASA) in Langley, Virginia. Assistant Professor C. D. Case supervised the student members of Tau Omega in building a glider. The glider is reported to have cost $100 and to have weighed 100 pounds. It had a 34-foot wing span and the length of the fuselage was 22 feet. On Sunday, March 16, 1930, Professor Case piloted the glider on seven successful flights. The curriculum in Chemical Engineering remained under the control of the Chemistry Department throughout the period. There were no courses listed as Chemical Engineering during the first half of the decade. The three options originally established continued until 1925. These options were Metallurgical Chemistry, Petroleum Technology, and Sanitary Chemistry. In the 1925-1926 Catalog, the following courses were listed in Chemical Engineering: ChE 7 ChE 105 ChE 107 ChE 115

Processes and Manufacturing Methods Industrial Processes Theory of Industrial Operations Plant Design

3hrs 2hrs 3hrs 2hrs

The curriculum for Chemical Engineering was reduced to a single unified list of courses for the first time. The listing for the year 1929, located in the appendix, was the adopted curriculum. In 1924, the School of Engineering Physics was established with Dr. Homer Dodge, Professor of Physics as Director. The curriculum, published in the 1923-1924 Catalog, was essentially the same as that listed for 1929 shown in the appendix. There were no separate courses designated as Engineering Physics and no separate faculty listed. The program of study contained the basic core courses in engineering with


The College Matures 1920-1930

71

a selection of Physics courses forming a major. The degree in Engineering Physics continues essentially in this form to this day. As mentioned, the 1923-1924 Catalog announced that Architectural Engineering was equipped to give work of the first two years. It was planned to give work for the third and fourth years. In the 1926-1927 University Catalog, it was noted that the first three years of Architectural Engineering were being offered. These included seven courses in Architectural and Mechanical Drawing, three courses in Architectural design, a course in structures, and a course in heating and ventilating. With the appointment of Harold Gimeno in 1927, the full curriculum was offered as listed in the 1929 curriculum in the appendix. With the appointment of Joe Smay as Director of the School of Architectural Engineering in 1929, the school also began to offer a degree in Architecture in 1930. The curriculum for the first two years of the Architecture Degree was the same as that for Architectural Engineering. The School of Petroleum Engineering was established in 1924 with curricula in Production Engineering, Refinery Engineering, and Oil Field Management. The latter course lacked the mathematical requirements of the engineering degrees and included more courses in business. The first courses in Petroleum Engineering were listed as follows: PE 101 PE 102 PE 103 PE 105

Drilling and Development Production Equipment and Methods Natural Gas, Casing Head Gasoline, Elements of Refining Oil Field Management

The programs in Petroleum Engineering proved to be very popular and received much industrial support. By 1929, a separate building, known as the Petroleum Engineering Laboratory and Refinery was completed. The School developed an active research program and the 1928-1929 Catalog listed the following Industrial Fellows in Petroleum Engineering: W. Grant Annable, B.Com, McGill 1924, Industrial Fellow Wilbur Frank Cloud, BA, Okla., 1925, MA, 1926, American Petroleum Institute Research Fellow William Patrick Gage, BSCE, Okla., 1928, Industrial Fellow William Schriever, AB, Morningside, 1916, MS, Iowa, 1917, PhD, 1921, American Petroleum Institute Research Fellow. (Shriever was appointed Professor of Physics in 1927) Wilhelm Levi Steiner, AB, Phillips, 1925, Industrial Fellow


The College Matures 1920-1930

72

In the 1920-1921 Catalog, the School of Engineering Geology was listed in the College of Engineering under the supervision of the Department of Geology. Geology also offered a curriculum in Mining Geology. There were no courses offered in Engineering Geology as such. The 1924-1925 Catalog lists the following courses in Mining Geology: Economic Geology, Mine Timbering, Mine Management, Valuation of Mineral Deposits, Advanced Studies of Ore Deposits. The 1926-1927 Catalog lists the curricula as Geological Engineering and Mining Engineering, still with no separate faculty. The catalog issued April 1930 lists the School of Geological Engineering with V. E. Monnett as Director and the School of Mining Engineering with H. C. George “in charge.” The graduate degrees during the decade consisted primarily of professional degrees in the various areas. In 1923, Earl Bartholomew was awarded the MSME. Frank Martin received the MSEE in 1924. Joseph Alexander Diffendaffer was awarded the M Engr in Engineering Physics in 1927. Two master’s degrees were awarded in 1930, Herbert Peters, MSPE, and Merl D. Creech, MS Engr. (Mechanics). Creech was to join the Mechanics faculty a decade later. The production of degrees during the decade is presented in the chart on the following page. Student organizations during the period included the Engineers’ Club, St. Pat’s Council, consisting of a representative elected from each degree program, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, and Sigma Tau, national honor society. In 1924, a new honor society was organized under the name of Tau Pi for the purposes of petitioning for a chapter of Tau Beta Pi, a national honor society formed at Lehigh University in 1878 and predominately at Eastern universities. In 1926, the Oklahoma Alpha Chapter of Tau Beta Pi was founded. Ray Matlock and Frank Morris (later to become long-time and much respected faculty members in the College of Engineering) were charter members. The following year’s election included L. A. Comp and Bill Cory, who were also later to serve as faculty members, in addition to serving on the editorial committee for this history. Tau Omega, aeronautical engineering honor society, was established in 1928. The foregoing paragraphs provide the academic record of the faculty and curricula in the 1920s, but the real history of the College is in the stories of the students, their struggles and victories through work, studies, and joys on an education that would launch their careers.


5

7

3

4

1

0

0

0

0

Ch E

CE

EE

ME

EG

PE

Oil Field Mgt.

Engr. Phys.

Mining Engr.

0

0

0

0

6

4

9

6

4

0

‘21

0

0

0

0

5

6

13

6

1

0

‘22

0

0

0

0

3

5

11

12

3

2

‘23

0

0

0

0

5

2

7

9

3

0

‘24

0

0

0

0

3

4

12

12

2

0

‘25

0

0

0

0

1

7

9

15

2

1

‘26

1

0

0

3

4

5

8

12

1

0

‘27

0

1

0

8

8

6

18

7

2

3

‘28

Data tabulated from University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, University Archives

0

Arch E

‘20

Bachelor of Science degrees granted 1920-1930

0

0

0

11

9

8

12

3

3

0

‘29

0

0

6

23

8

9

25

13

2

2

‘30

The College Matures 1920-1930 73


The College Matures 1920-1930

74

In spite of the fact that President Brooks had commandeered Old Trusty and supposedly buried it in a watery grave in the South Canadian River, the festivities for Saint Patrick’s Day were in high gear in 1921. On Friday, March 11, 1921, The Oklahoma Daily announced that Iris Leadman, Arts and Sciences sophomore from Heavener and a member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority had been elected as the Engineers’ Queen. On March 17, The Oklahoma Daily was printed in green and carried the headlines, “3 Cheers, 3 Beers, OU Engineers.” The Toastmaster for the Engineers’ Banquet was Jack Owens, VP and General Manager of Oklahoma Gas and Electric. The State Senators who were sponsoring a bill for a new engineering building were invited to be guests at the banquet. According to custom, 25 seniors were knighted by Queen Leadman. There was apparently no St. Pat elected in 1921. The paper reported that for the first time in several years, there were no hostilities from the lawyers and almost every lawyer went through the open house. Engineering Physics provided an X-ray for each visitor that volunteered. The EEs flashed an electric sign and demonstrated high tension electricity. The MEs ran the Liberty aero plane engine, while the CEs had constructed a miniature city and highway. The Engineering Geology demonstration was a miniature oil well. In January 1922, Sibyl Tinklepaugh was selected from a field of six candidates to be the Engineers’ Queen. Sibyl was a junior in Arts and Sciences from El Reno. She was a member of the Alpha Phi sorority with a high academic ranking. She was a member of the Y. W. Ducks Club, the Women’s Riding Class, Tennis Club, and the YWCA Cabinet. In 1926, she would be listed as a graduate assistant in Physics. Frank Martin, BSEE 1923, MSEE 1924, was elected to be St Pat. He later would have a career with Western Electric. The Engineering banquet was held at President Brooks must have been the First Baptist Church and the dance surprised by the roar of a cannon that was held at the Women’s Building. The shattered the silence of the campus at Friday, March 17, 1922 edition of The midnight on Wednesday and again at Oklahoma Daily displayed a picture 5 a.m. on Thursday, as the paper reof the new Knights of St. Pat wearported that “Old Trusty,” or a substiing cowboy hats. The same issue of tute, had been fired. the paper announced that, “Old Trusty, the Civil War cannon, which occupied center stage in the traditional battles between the engineers and the lawyers for a number of years is gone. But, despite its demise, the St. Pats found artillery with which to fire a lusty salute to the Irish Engineers’ when dawn broke this morning.”


The College Matures 1920-1930

75

On the next morning, Saturday March 18, 1922, the headlines and the lead story in The Oklahoma Daily were as follows: PREXY BANS ST PAT’S OPEN HOUSE IN ULTIMATUM AGAINST CANNONADES St. Pat’s Day celebration by the College of Engineering has been suspended for all time to come is the decision reached by University Authorities. The decision is the finale of President Stratton D. Brook’s unsuccessful efforts of several years to stop the engineers from shooting guns and other explosives in the night. Some 10 or 12 engineers rode about town in a truck owned by the McIntyre Jitney Company, driven by George McKinney, Chief of the Norman Fire Force. The explosives, as far as could be ascertained were lead pipes filled with high power explosive powder. The engineers in the truck were all masked. President Brooks tried to find out the names of those implicated from McKinney, but the Chief refused the information. President Brooks issued the ultimatum that no open house would be permitted unless the names of the violators were secured by 1 o’clock. These efforts were also fruitless, therefore the open house was called off and the doors of the Engineering Building were locked.

This was apparently the unofficial start of the Loyal Knights of Old Trusty, although

Loyal Knights of Old Trusty (LKOT)


The College Matures 1920-1930

76

the group would still be known as the Cannon Club for a few more years. Chief McKinney had gotten to know some of the engineering students through the volunteer fire force which he directed. He provided a room for a group of engineering students to sleep and they in turn served as ready volunteer fire fighters. A cartoon in The Oklahoma Daily in March 1923 showed a flat bed truck careening down the street with a car in hot pursuit. On the bed of the truck were figures dressed much like the modern day members of LKOT, firing a cannon from the back of the truck. Leaning out of the car window is the figure of President Brooks shaking his fist and yelling at the engineers. The LKOT tradition identifies Chief McKinney among its initial members. LKOT has continued throughout the years as a secret organization composed of student leaders in the College who are selected based on their tireless service in anonymity. Each spring, the graduating seniors in the organization remove their hoods to reveal their identity at the “fire out” during Engineers’ Week.


The College Matures 1920-1930

77

In 1923, President Brooks either forgot about the ultimatum to end the celebration of Engineers’ Week for all times, or he was so involved with problems with the new Governor that he chose not to continue the ban. In fact, President Brooks presided at the Engineering Banquet, held at the First Baptist Church. Margaret McKinney, a senior in Arts and Sciences reigned as Queen, and Knighted 35 seniors. She was escorted by Harold L. Patterson, BSCE 1923. Governor J. C. Walton had been invited to the banquet, according to The Oklahoma Daily, but apparently failed to attend. The Association of Collegiate Engineers, which had been formed the previous year as an organization to promote engineering education by engineering colleges in the Midwest, met at OU in conjunction with the annual engineering celebration. There were 20 delegates in attendance at the open house and banquet. On February 13, 1923, The Oklahoma Daily reported plans for the meeting and announced that at 9 p.m. Friday, a fireworks display will be given on Brooks Field north of the Engineering Building, the present location of Felgar Hall. The announcement stated that a cannon will be fired during the celebration and that green fusees will light up a shamrock, and green flares will burn during the display. The Electrical Engineers constructed a three foot sign on the water tower which read as follows: OU Engineers ‘23 Open House Erin Go Braugh

A specially constructed drum controlled the lights allowing only one line to burn at a time and automatically flashing the lines in sequence. The February 16, 1923 issue of The Oklahoma Daily reported that at 12 midnight, the cannon roared and continued to fire throughout the night, pausing just long enough to allow the barrel to cool. A picture of the “New Trusty” appeared on page four of the paper. The appearances were much the same as the cannon that is used today and much smaller than the original Old Trusty. This new design permitted the gun to be much more mobile and thus easily hidden. A special edition of The Oklahoma Daily was issued on Sunday, March 16, 1924. The paper announced that St. Pat’s Ball was held Friday night at Teepee Hall. The banquet would be Monday night at the First Baptist Church. At the stroke of midnight, Old Trusty would start a barrage of fire that would expend $100 worth of powder. There would also be $50 worth of fireworks at the same celebration. Miss Eleanor Kincaid, from Henrietta, and a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta


The College Matures 1920-1930

78

sorority, was elected the Engineering Queen. There was no mention of any election of a St. Pat. A picture of seventeen members of the “Cannon Club,” dressed in black hoods and sporting numbers from 1 to 44, appeared in the paper. The new “Old Trusty” stood in front of the group. The March 21, 1925 edition of The Oklahoma Daily was the special Engineering issue. The Engineering students hosted the student body with an open house in the new Engineering Building. A new era was launched and the paper announced that fireworks make history as the lawyers and engineers form a truce. It was reported that the lawyers and the Cannon Club got oiled together, went down to the College Shop and made speeches. A law student was even given the privilege of firing the cannon. Maude Gardner, a Fine Arts sophomore from Oklahoma City, was elected as Queen. Again, there was apparently no election for St. Pat. The March 17, 1926 St. Pat’s edition of The Oklahoma Daily announced that the old time feud is forgotten and that the bitter feelings between the engineers and the lawyers no longer existed. Marion Ollinger, a freshman from Oklahoma City, was elected Queen. Marion was the secretary of the freshman class, and a pledge to Kappa Alpha Theta. St. Pat had been elected; however, his identity was to be held as a secret until the banquet. The announcement that the feud was over was celebrated with a coat of green paint over the owls that adorned the north and south ends of the Monnett Hall. The lawyers retaliated by kidnapping Queen Marion and John Coffman, who had been elected St. Pat and whose identity was supposedly a secret. The Queen and St. Pat were taken to Chickasha and held overnight. They were returned late Wednesday, March 17 and were crowned on the steps of the Engineering Building at 10 o’clock on Thursday morning. That Friday in The Oklahoma Daily, Herbert Oakes, President of the Engineers’ Club, stated “...we are willing to come to reasonable peace terms.” The engineers appointed guards for each phase of the celebration and the chemical engineers were appointed to test the food at the banquet. The lawyers stated that they were willing to abandon the feud, but it was reported that “free lance” lawyers attempted to interrupt the dance. The paint on the owls caused Physical Plant employees great problems. At first they tried to remove the paint and failed. Finally, a coat of white paint and a coat of grey paint matching the color of the limestone were painted over the green owls. The thirteenth annual banquet was held Saturday, March 20, 1926. President Bizzell presided and speakers included Dean Walker of the University of Kansas, J.T. Owen, President, OG&E, John Shartel, President, Oklahoma Railway, and Dean Felgar. On Thursday, March 17, 1927, at 12:01 a.m., Old Trusty thundered its salute to


The College Matures 1920-1930

79

the day of the engineer. At 10:00 a.m., an airplane circled overhead and landed on the polo field of the University of Oklahoma. George Wills, BSCE 1927, dressed in a costume of green, stepped out of the plane to be greeted by the waiting crowd. Queen Patricia McMurray, an Arts and Sciences major from McAlester, with her royal court and guards, joined the parade to the front steps of the Administration Building where the crowning ceremony was held. There was no trouble from the lawyers as had been the case the previous year, but precautions had been taken all the same. Bud Harder, President of the Engineers’ Club had overseen the election and the arrangements. That afternoon, 2,500 visited the annual open house. At the banquet, 58 seniors were dubbed as Knights of St. Pat. Engineers’ Week started on Monday, March 12, 1928 with 17 coeds entered in the style show. The celebration extended into the night. The Tuesday edition of The Oklahoma Daily carried a picture of the 1928 Engineers’ Queen, Louise Hutchens, a Fine Arts Junior from Tishomingo, and a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. The same edition of the paper carried the front page story that seven engineering students had been arrested celebrating with a bottle of gin on the banks of the South Canadian River. The paper reported that suspension was expected. Lloyd Gray, BSME 1928, BSPE 1928, had the honor to be St. Pat. The annual open house was held from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 17, with an estimated 3,000 in attendance. In March 1929, Chester Burns, President of the Engineers’ Club announced that Marian Harrison, an Education junior from Tulsa had been elected Queen. She was a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. The lawyer-engineer feud had been too quiet the preceding two years, and the engineers were perhaps too relaxed. The headline in the morning edition of the Friday, March 15, 1929 Oklahoma Daily read, “ENGINEER QUEEN KIDNAPPED.” The engineering students, embarrassed by the act, tried to stop the publication of the paper. That same morning, a long distance telephone call revealed that Queen Marian had been taken to Enid to the home of Dorothy Champlin, a sorority sister. Two cars, filled with engineering students, sped to Enid to rescue the Queen. She was crowned in a ceremony on the steps of the Engineering Building as soon as the group arrived back in Norman. Paul Turnbull, BSPE 1929, was honored as St. Pat. As the ceremony ended, word quickly spread that the lawyers were removing the engineering flag that was flying from the flag pole in the North Oval. The crowd ran to the oval to see a figure climbing the pole and about to reach the flag. The engineers grabbed the pole and started to sway the pole so that it waved back and forth and threatened to fling the hapless law student to his death. The student


The College Matures 1920-1930

80

managed to free the flag and threw it to a group of fellow law students who were trying to save their colleague and fighting with the engineers. A law student grabbed the flag and ran into Monnet Hall, while an estimated 1,000 engineers abandoned the flag pole and ran to inThe Engineers’ flag over the North Oval vade the Law Barn. Presiphoto courtsey of the Western History Collection dent Bizzell learned of the situation and ran from the Administration Building into the crowd to single-handedly quell the riot. The dance that night in the new Student Union ballroom and the banquet held at McFarlin Methodist Church on Saturday night were reported to have been peaceful events. The Sunday, March 17 edition of The Oklahoma Daily reported that a number of the larger newspapers in the state carried exaggerated accounts of the queen’s abduction and the battles between the lawyers and the engineers.

Engineering student storm the “Law Barn” to retrieve the Engineers’ flag photo courtsey of the Western History Collection

Preparation for the 1930 Engineers’ Week started early. The big feature was to be a large “travelling” sign to be erected over the northwest corner of the Engineering Building. Clarence Anthony, BSEE 1930, and later a Vice President of OG&E, is reported to be one of the main figures in the design of the sign. L.A. Comp, BSCE 1927, and an Instructor in Mechanics (later a distinguished David Ross Boyd Professor of Aerospace Engineering), designed the structural.


The College Matures 1920-1930

81

support for the sign. The Physical Plant supervisor, Walter Kraft, blocked attachment of a sign to the crown of the roof for fear of damage. The sign consisted of a very large bank of light bulbs, individually wired to a control in the attic of the building. The control consisted of a trough of mercury through which a paper tape was threaded. The terminal ends of the wires connecting the lamps in the sign were pressed against the tape by springs. The tape would be perforated with the message to be displayed and as the tape was pulled through the trough, the perforations would allow the current to be conducted to the corresponding lamp. The message thus printed on the tape would be transferred to the lights and the message would move across the sign. The sign was lit for the first time for open house in the spring of 1930. In 1947, the sign was removed in conjunction with the building of the new addition to Felgar Hall.

Felgar Hall as it appeared in 1930

The February 16, 1930 edition of The Oklahoma Daily, announced that Sally Collier had been elected as Engineering Queen. Sally was the first Engineering Queen to be an Engineering student. The paper described Sally as a “petite brunette from St. Louis, Oklahoma.� It reported that she donned a pair of stripped overalls and climbed out on the scaffold for the electric sign on top of the Engineering Building to help put bulbs into the sockets for the sign. She was a Civil Engineering major, and had spent two years as an Architecture student at the University of Texas before transferring to OU. The paper went on to say that she played the piccolo,


The College Matures 1920-1930

82

flute and piano. Gertrude S. (Sally) Collier was only the second woman to graduate from OU with a degree in engineering, receiving her BSCE in 1931 (a letter from Sally is included in appendix C). The same edition of the paper reported that the lawyers and engineers would have a smoker Monday night with Dean Felgar and Dean Monnett. The purpose of the get together was to work out a truce and avoid the problems of past years during the engineering week celebration. Nevertheless, the engineers took no chances. On February 12, the paper announced that the engineers would have the next-in-line crowned if the lawyers kidnapped Sally. On Saturday, March 15, the paper reported that the engineering students, fearing the lawyers, took Miss Collier from her sorority house at 10:30 p.m. to a home in the southwest part of town. At 6 o’clock in the morning, they took her back to the sorority house and guarded her all day. The ceremonies went off without a hitch on Friday the 14th with the parade around campus beginning at 10:10 a.m. and the coronation at 10:30. James Herbert Pernell, BSEE 1930, was presented as St. Pat. The open house started at 1:00 p.m. and the Dance in the Union Ballroom from 8:00 p.m. until 11:40 p.m. The fireworks and Old Trusty continued into the night. It is unfortunate that there is not room to tell the stories of all of the graduates from the College of Engineering, and even if room was available, we do not have records of many who have had very successful careers. It is important, however, to include remarks from former students who answered our request as well as a mention of some of the students whose achievements are known. In 1922, Benjamin Henry Perkinson graduated with a BSME. He had a successful career in the oil industry. Upon his death, his family established an endowment to provide the Perkinson Chair in Mechanical Engineering. Also, graduating in that same year was Carl Reistle, Jr., BSChE, who became Chairman of the Board of Humble Oil and Refining Company and Chief Executive Officer of the Exxon Company after Humble changed to the new name. One alumnus that responded to the letter asking for input into the history was Harry F. Childers, BSME 1923. Harry graduated from Ponca City High School in 1915. Childers had studied voice since he was in the third grade and was an outstanding tenor. One of his friends, who had been a member of their male quartet in high school, had gone to Central State in Edmond and convinced him to transfer to the teachers college in order to sing in their quartet. After checking with the President of the school, he determined that the credits would apply to an


The College Matures 1920-1930

83

engineering degree at OU and transferred at the end of the first semester. In 1917, he entered the Army and spent four and a half months in France. After getting out of the Army, he worked for about a year saving $150 and went back to school at OU. Childers had a full career in plant engineering, first in the petroleum industry, then in the process industry, aircraft industry, and finally back in the process industry where he engineered many creative changes in production processes1. Retiring in his mid seventies, he continued to run his own farm in northwest Arkansas until his death. The 1925 graduating class included Charles Eugene Bathe, BSEE, who had a successful career with OG&E after his work getting WNAD started. Ansell Challenner, also BSEE 1925, worked 12 years with General Electric before joining the faculty in 1937. Bathe and Challenner roomed in the same rooming house just north of the campus (Challenner served on the editorial committee for this book). The two told of their experiences in the early days of WNAD and of the annual field trip the senior EEs took in 1925. The two used to double date and Challenner introduced Bathe to his wife-to-be. Also graduating in 1925 was J. Ray Matlock, long time faculty member in Civil Engineering. Matlock also served for many years as Chairman of the Oklahoma State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers. William R. Wolfe, BSEE 1926, played football for four years, lettering in 1924 and 1925. He belonged to the Sigma Nu fraternity and was active in the AIEE and the Engineers’ Club. He was LKOT member number 70. His engineering career was spent with OG&E where he rose to the position of vice president and manager of the western division. The 1927 class included Laverne A. Comp, BSCE. Comp’s father was a physician in Manitou, Oklahoma. This earned him the nickname “Doc” by which he was affectionately known. The yearbook listed his activities as Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Tau, ASCE, YMCA, and the Engineers’ Club. Glynne Casteel, BSME 1927, spent his career as an engineer in the generation department of OG&E. Two of his sons later received engineering degrees from OU. William L. Cory, BSME, 1928 was a member of Tau Beta Pi, ASME and the Engineers’ Club. He became a faculty member in the Mechanics Department in 1954. He also served on the editorial committee for this history. 1 As Plant Engineer for the Colgate-Palmolive-Peet plant in Kansas City, Childers interviewed the author in Dean Carson’s office in 1947. He was the author’s supervisor on his first engineering job after graduation.


The College Matures 1920-1930

84

Paul R. Turnbull, BSPE 1929, played varsity football and also had time to be a leader in student activities, as demonstrated by his election as St. Pat in 1929. Paul’s career with Humble Oil and Refining Company was interrupted by World War II. He served with the Army Air Corps in the European Theater, rising to the rank of Major. In 1949 he became manager of the drilling and production departments of La Gloria Corporation of Corpus Christi. Merl D. Creech, BSME 1929 and MS Mechanics, 1930. He would later serve on the faculty. The class of 1930 included two graduates who were to be long time and much beloved faculty members. Joe W. Keeley and Vester E. Willoughby both graduated in Civil Engineering. Willoughby taught one year and entered industry for six years before returning to the faculty in the Mechanics Department in 1937. Keeley joined the Oklahoma Highway Department where he worked until joining the Civil Engineering faculty in January 1941. Keeley was an active student leader, serving as president of Sigma Tau and held memberships in Tau Beta Pi, Checkmates, St. Pat’s Board, and ASCE. The class of 1930 also included Clarence W. Anthony, BSEE, one of the leaders in the design of the traveling sign, and who later became Vice President of OG&E. Gertrude Sally Collier West, BSCE 1931, retired to Edmond, and is the grandmother of ten. When asked for her input into the history as the second woman to graduate from the College of Engineering, she modestly avoided telling of her election as Engineering Queen in 1930 (that information was obtained from the Sooner Yearbook and the files of The Oklahoma Daily). She very graciously wrote of her memories of the College and provides an insight into the atmosphere of campus life for the engineering student, including playing the pioneering role as a female engineering student. She mentions the fact that there were other women in the College of Engineering at the time that she was a student, but for whatever reason, it would be 1936 before other women graduated from the College as two women graduated with engineering degrees that year. In 2009, over 20 percent of the engineerphoto from the 1931 Sooner Yearbook ing students are women. It is gratifying to look back and see that in the late 1920s and early 1930s, the experiences of Sally Collier were not too far different Gertrude Sally Collier West


The College Matures 1920-1930

85

from the experiences of women students today. Hopefully, women of today find much more opportunity to move up the professional ladder than was possible in Sally’s time frame. As the first engineering student to be elected Queen, it must have been pleasing for Sally Collier to learn that now only engineering students are eligible to be candidates, and often, a woman has been elected to be St. Pat. The University and the College had grown and matured during the 1920s. Graduates were taking their places and providing leadership not only for the growing industry and state agencies in Oklahoma, but also in major industrial firms and government agencies throughout the nation. Not only were OU Engineering graduates providing the technical leadership for the rapid expansion of the petroleum industry, they were playing major roles in the development of utilities, highways, construction, and manufacturing. The College of Engineering awarded 21 degrees in 1920, ten years later in 1930, the number awarded was 88. There had been 15 members of the Engineering faculty in 1920; in 1930, the number had increased to 28. It is obvious that the teaching load had increased, and some research had been undertaken, yet the faculty still seemed to take time for a personal caring relationship with the engineering students. The decade ended with the crash of the stock market. The shock waves were quick to arrive in Oklahoma as the major Eastern corporations, such as General Electric and Westinghouse, reacted by not recruiting engineering graduates. Soon to follow were those organizations in Oklahoma that had been looking to hire new engineers from OU.

References 1. Gittinger, Roy, The University of Oklahoma - 1892-1942, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1942. 2. Cross, George L., Professors, Presidents, and Politicians, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1981. 3. Bizzell, William Bennett, The Relations of Learning, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1934. 4. Sooner Yearbooks, 1920-1930, The University of Oklahoma Archives. 5. The University of Oklahoma Catalog, 1920-1930, The University of Oklahoma Archives.


The College Matures 1920-1930

86

6. The Oklahoma Daily, 1920-1930, Microfilm Files, The University of Oklahoma Archives. 7. The University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, 1920-1930, The University of Oklahoma Archives. 8. Sooner Shamrock, Vol. 7, No. 2, November, 1946. 9. Sooner Shamrock, Vol. 13, No. 1, October 1952. 10. Sooner Shamrock, Vol. 13, No. 2, December 1952. 11. OKCHE, Historical Issue, Summer 1977, The School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science. 12. The University of Oklahoma Fact Book, Institutional Research and Reporting, February 2009.


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 4 The Depression Years 1930-1940 The Stock Market crash of 1929 signaled the start of the Great Depression. By 1930, the wave of plant closings, bankruptcies and bank failures swept across the nation. In Oklahoma, the price of oil dropped to a few cents per barrel and through the decade the economic plight was worsened by a severe drought. There was no deposit insurance to protect those whose savings were in the banks, no crop insurance for the farmers and no unemployment compensation for the workers when jobs vanished. Frank Buttram, a leading figure in the oil industry and Chairman of the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents was the leading candidate for the office of Governor in the 1930 election. However, William H. “Alfalfa Bill” Murray, who had chaired the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention in the territorial days, entered the race as the populist candidate and won the election. During the campaign, The Oklahoma Daily (Oct. 30, 1930) quoted Murray in a speech delivered at Muskogee as opposing new buildings for OU and for tightening admission requirements. Fortunately, for the University the state constitution was amended at the same election to provide that the regents of the University could be removed only for cause by an impeachment process similar to that of elected officials. Not only was Murray not a very strong supporter of higher William H. “Alfalfa Bill” Murray education, but apparently because of ButPhoto courtesey of the Western History Collection tram’s relationship with OU, he was particularly critical of the University. The January 14, 1931 issue of The Oklahoma Daily devoted the front page to Governor Murray’s reforms. He proposed to limit the enrollment at the University to 2,500 students (there were 5,940 students on the Norman campus at the time), and eliminate 30 percent of the faculty. Faculty members would be expected to be in the class room eight hours per day. He would eliminate physical education 87


The Depression Years 1930-1940 88

and military training. He also asked that President Bizzell’s salary be reduced from $12,000 to $9,000. A few weeks later he initiated action to abolish the Geological Survey. In March 1931, Governor Murray demanded that the University budget be slashed by 30 percent. It was actually only reduced by 10 percent. In October, the Governor requested that the faculty and staff at OU contribute $2 to $10 each for a total of $1,000 to support his initiative legislation which included an income tax, unemployment relief, free textbooks for public schools, amendments to the tax laws and a restriction on wheat and cotton acreage. In 1932, the faculty was asked to contribute to Murray’s presidential campaign. At the Democratic Convention, he carried Oklahoma and North Dakota. However, Franklin Delano Roosevelt won on the second ballot. Murray continued to call for cuts in the University budget. Faculty salaries had been reduced by 30 percent. On March 13, 1933 he issued his executive order transferring all engineering from OU to Oklahoma A&M College. The student newspaper ran a headline that “Dean Felgar and Faculty to be dismissed July 1.” The engineering students were preparing for the annual open house when the news broke. Bessie Kniseley, an engineering student who had just been elected Queen gave a prophetic quote to the paper, “I won’t be the last queen. It is just newspaper talk. Without the engineers, there’d be no university.” As a result of the order and subsequent efforts to coordinate this and other programs affected, the legislature passed an act creating a coordinating board. In December 1933, the chairman of that board announced that plans for the removal of the Engineering College had been dropped. With the election of President Roosevelt in 1932, the nation began to develop programs to overcome the devastation of the depression. The National Recovery Act (NRA) provided for voluntary wage and price regulation. The Oklahoma Daily sported the “Blue Eagle” signifying compliance with the price controls, and announced that the Student Union and other businesses in Norman would also comply. The Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) provided jobs for some 200 needy students. This was later replaced by the National Youth Administration (NYA). These programs provided that a student could earn up to $20 per month. The number of working students rose to approximately 1,000 out of a student body of 6,000. In addition, the Public Works Administration (PWA) and the Works Progress Administration (WPA) provided federal funds for the completion of the Student Union, the construction of a building for


The Depression Years 1930-1940

89

the College of Business (now Adams Hall), a biological sciences building (now Richards Hall), the first air conditioning unit (a project for a laboratory unit under Professor E.F. Dawson, which incidentally air conditioned Dean Felgar’s office, Professor Carson’s office, and one class room), and the construction of the wind tunnel building (now known as the L. A. Comp wind tunnel). In addition, the WPA constructed campus streets and side walks. The 1934 election of Ernest W. Marland, a Ponca City oilman, as Governor of Oklahoma, provided a little better relationship between the University and the state executive branch. The economy gradually improved under the massive federal relief programs. However, Oklahoma accumulated some $20,000,000 of debt while strugging with the economic problems. In 1936, Governor Marland proposed restoration of the faculty salaries lost through the more than 30 percent cuts. President Bizzell called for a boost in faculty levels back to the 1929 level. In 1938, Leon C. Phillips was elected governor, the first to have graduated from the University of Oklahoma. A staunch conservative, he worked hard to reduce the state deficit and led the constitutional amendment that requires a balanced budget for the state. He reduced the appropriations for higher education, criticized President Bizzell, and falsely accused the University of teaching communism. When bills to permit bond issues for the construction of dormitories at the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma A&M were before him, he approved the bill for A&M, and vetoed the bill for the University (he did perhaps have some input from boarding house operators in Norman, who feared that dormitories would hurt their business). Drought, however, continued to plague the state, particularly in the west. The April 11, 1935 edition of The Oklahoma Daily carried the following story: Swirling Dust Moves Farmers Out Oklahomans in central and east get a pungent taste of the dust that for months has ravaged the western parts of the state. The sun appeared a pale electric blue, almost green. The sky grew murky as the sun was hidden behind a yellow pall. In late afternoon, visibility in Oklahoma City was reduced to two blocks. Twilight came early and by late afternoon it was dark more than an hour before the usual time. In Guymon and Buffalo, windows were broken as the swirling winds blew gravel against the buildings. Their crops blasted by swirling choking dust storms that have swept


The Depression Years 1930-1940 90 the panhandle for weeks, land was evacuated that produced thousands of bushels of wheat in better days. 36 truck loads of furniture were counted moving east from Guymon to Boise City.

Intense dust storms or “black blizzards” as they became known were reported again in 1936-38, with dust drifting into central Oklahoma. The funding of the University did not improve appreciatively through the course of the 1930s. Governor Phillips slashed the University budget, and in October 1939 the faculty took another 10 percent cut in salaries. The student enrollment had continued to grow, while the University budget decreased over the decade. Governor Phillips also vetoed a bill to construct the already designed $450,000 Petroleum Engineering building approximately four times the size of Felgar Hall. William Bennett Bizzell remained as University President throughout decade. He worked to get jobs and help for students, including trips he made to Washington, D.C. in attempts to obtain federal funds for student aid. He managed to obtain WPA funds for campus construction and NYA funds for student financial assistance. He started a drive for private endowments to aid the University and created the University of Oklahoma Foundation. He pointed out the loss of faculty to institutions in other states because of low salaries. and continued to push for improved faculty salaries, while his own salary was reduced almost half. In May 1940, President Bizzell announced his plans to retire in July of 1941 at the age of 65. In spite of the depression, the decade proved to be one of steady improvement in engineering achievement and technology. Highways across the nation were paved. On December 2, 1930 there was a celebration for the completion of paving Highway 77 from Kansas to Texas. Automobiles continued steady improvement with new models each year, as V8 engines and better suspensions, radios, and heaters were developed. Automobiles became streamlined for both looks and airflow as speeds increased on the new paved highways. Similarly, aircraft improved and airlines were established, with regular service across the nation. In 1935 Pan American Airways inaugurated regular airmail flights from California to Manilla on the “China Clipper.” Radios became and integral part of life, providing news, weather, and family entertainment. Dams were built and power plants grew larger. Electricity was distributed to rural as well as urban homes with the establishment of the Rural Electrification Agency (REA). Advances in refrigeration technology assured that frozen foods became widely distributed, and buildings began to be air conditioned. Other


The Depression Years 1930-1940 91

inventions of the period such as Nylon, television, jet engines, liquid rocket engines and computers would have their impact several decades later. In June 1935, Dean Felgar was given a leave of absence for health reasons. Frank Girard Tappan, Director of Electrical Engineering since 1919, was made Acting Dean for the 1935-1936 school year. Dean Felgar again served during the 19361937 school year, but then retired after serving 27 years as Dean. He had been a good leader in the development of a strong undergraduate college. Dean Felgar recognized the need for professional associations early in the life of the college through founding the Engineers’ Club and encouraging the tradition of St. Pat. He was a student-oriented dean, and during most of his career he advised every freshman in the college, making a point to get to know each student. At the state level he was instrumental, along with Professor J. F. Brookes, in the enactment of Oklahoma registration laws for Professional Engineers. Professor Brookes’ registration number was three and Dean Felgar’s number was seven.

William Henry Carson

In July 1937, William H. Carson was named the College’s second dean. Carson had been Director of the School of Mechanical Engineering since 1927 and was appointed Acting Director of the School of Petroleum Engineering in 1933. He was also the Director of the newly formed School of Natural Gas Engineering. For the first few years as Dean, he retained all three of these directorships including dropping the “Acting” from his title in Petroleum Engineering. Dean Carson had been very active with industry sponsored research in the area of metering of petroleum products. This work had its origins in the very popular Gas Measurements Short Course, which he took over from Professor Helmrich in 1926.

In 1930, the following curricula were offered by the College of Engineering: Architecture Architectural Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering

Electrical Engineering Engineering Physics Geological Engineering Mechanical Engineering

Aeronautical Engineering Mining Engineering Petroleum Engineering General Engineering


The Depression Years 1930-1940 92

In addition to the degree granting schools, there were the departments of Mechanics, Engineering Drawing, and Shop within the College of Engineering. By 1937, the curricula that were offered are listed as follows (see degree data on the following page). Architecture Architectural Engineering Landscape Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Municipal Engineering

Structural Engineering Transportation Engineering Electrical Engineering Engineering Physics General Engineering Geological Engineering

Mechanical Engineering Aeronautical Engineering Mining Engineering Natual Gas Engineering Petroleum Engineering Refining Engineering

It should be noted that Petroleum Engineering was the largest program in the later part of the decade. In 1936, the Engineer’s Council for Professional Development (forerunner of ABET, Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology) inspected and accredited the degrees in Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. There seemed to be little notice of this on campus at the time, and there was no indication in the College bulletins that these degrees had been accredited. Engineering Physics was administered by the Physics Department with Dr. Homer Levi Dodge listed as the Director. The program in Geological Engineering was administered by the Department of Geology with Dr. Victor E. Monnett listed as the Director. Mining Engineering, however, was administered in the College of Engineering with Professor H. C. George listed as “in charge.” There was apparently some competition for students between the two programs. The enrollment in the University and in the College of Engineering remained strong during this extraordinary period of economic depression. Student spirit in the College was high and the rivalry between the engineers and the lawyers continued to peak in intensity each spring. In the fall of 1930, aviation interests were heightened on campus when Professor Liston, a Naval Reserve aviator, flew the Tau Omega glider. There were 200 spectators to watch as an automobile pulled the glider into the air. On the first attempt, the tow rope broke. After a new rope was installed, the glider rose to a height of 20 feet and was released. Liston turned for the landing when a gust of wind caused the glider to swerve and crash into the ground with a force which ejected him from


5

0

4

14

17

12

15

20

6

0

0

0

0

Arch E

Landspace Arch.

Ch E

CE

EE

Geol. Engr.

ME

PE

Oil Field Mgt.

Mining Engr.

Engr. Physics

General Engr.

Natural Gas Engr.

0

0

2

2

4

23

22

10

21

12

5

0

2

0

‘32

0

1

2

2

0

32

27

6

14

13

3

0

4

0

‘33

2

1

1

0

0

44

22

3

13

16

6

0

5

1

‘34

5

2

0

0

0

30

31

3

30

20

15

0

3

2

‘35

6

2

2

0

0

24

28

2

16

7

15

0

4

2

‘36

1

4

4

0

0

40

19

10

15

10

16

0

0

0

‘37

0

3

5

0

0

40

16

7

20

9

24

1

8

3

‘38

4

4

5

0

0

60

22

19

20

8

22

0

4

3

‘39

Data tabulated from University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, University Archives

0

Architecture

‘31

Bachelor of Science degrees granted 1931-1940

2

4

3

0

0

84

24

19

29

12

43

0

2

1

‘40

The Depression Years 1930-1940 93


The Depression Years 1930-1940 94

the craft. Fortunately he was unhurt and the glider suffered only minor damage. That same week, J. T. Hawn, a senior engineering student rented a plane and buzzed the stadium during the OU-Kansas football game at an estimated 100 feet above the crowd. He was arrested and fined by the city and his pilot’s license was sent to the inspector for the U.S. Department of Commerce for further penalties. In February 1931, Antionette Halko, a Fine Arts junior and a member of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority from Tulsa was elected to be Queen. The schedule of events published in the March 11, 1931, Daily included the benefit show that night featuring a John Wayne movie. At 7:30 Thursday a meeting was held for all engineering students in the Engineering Auditorium. Friday morning featured the parade and coronation with the open house planned for that afternoon. The dance would be Friday night in the Union Ballroom. President Bizzell and E.K. Ramsey, a consulting engineer from Oklahoma City, were to be speakers at the banquet Saturday night at the First Christian Church, with J.F. Owens, VP and General Manager of OG&E as the toastmaster At 9:00 a.m. Thursday, Queen Antionette was kidnapped and taken to Oklahoma City. Fortunately, she was returned before midnight. Friday morning, a parade led by the 100 piece University Band, proceeded as scheduled. Paul Thurber, St. Pat for 1931 and Queen Antionette led the procession to the steps of the Engineering Building (Felgar Hall) for the coronation. President Bizzell chose not to punish the law students for the kidnapping and was quoted as saying, “The engineers painted the law barn and the lawyers abducted the queen. It looks to me like that evens the score.” In January 1932, President Bizzell campaigned to find part-time jobs for needy students, while the Lew Wentz Board made $1,277 in loans to students. At that point in time loans totaling $20,467 had been made to needy students. President Bizzell urged the unemployed to attend school. The average cost of board and room was reported as $25 per month, while the cost of living in a fraternity or sorority house was reportedly $40 to $50 per month. Tau Omega, the honor society for Aeronautical Engineering, founded at OU a few years earlier, began to reach out to other schools. In February 1932, Roy Hunt, owner of the Norman airport, provided a six seat Travel Air for students and faculty to fly to Wichita, Kansas to install a chapter of Tau Omega at what is now Wichita State University. Marian Mills, a member of Delta Gamma sorority from Norman, was elected as Engineers’ Queen for 1932. On Saturday, March 12, the student newspaper reported the engineers to say, “If the lawyers kidnap the queen, they can keep her


The Depression Years 1930-1940 95

until prosperity gets around the corner. Guards will protect her, but if she is kidnapped, there will be no search parties.” Ray Lynch of Oklahoma City was elected St. Pat and apparently the coronation and celebration proceeded without incident. The highlight of the week was having as the banquet speaker Dr. A.H. Compton, physicist from the University of Chicago and Nobel Prize winner. President Bizzell and Dean Felgar were also at the banquet; and Frank Ittner, President of the Engineers’ Club presided. Saturday night the dance was held in the Union ballroom as usual and the firing of Old Trusty occurred after the dance. In March 1933, with the depression growing worse, Governor Murray closed all banks in an attempt to avoid massive failures. In the legislature, a bill was introduced to shut down the University for two years. The bill fortunately failed but the bank closings meant that even students with financial resources were without money. The University Regents took special action to help students who needed food during the bank moratorium. Fortunately by March 12, 1933, the banks in Norman reopened and the crisis was eased. The faculty in the meanwhile had received a 20 percent cut in salary and January pay was not distributed until mid February. Instead of checks, the faculty received warrants. The banks in Norman were willing to buy the warrants since there was a small interest to be paid by the state, and the faculty managed to make ends meet. Bessie Kniseley, an Architectural Engineering student from Norman, was elected as Engineers’ Queen for 1933. It was this year that Governor Murray, on March 14, published his executive order closing the College of Engineering. The Oklahoma Daily reported that the engineers “maintained a stiff upper lip and prepared for open house.” Lee Minter of Oklahoma City was elected St. Pat and the festivities began at 9:40 a.m. on Friday March 17. The Daily headlines stated, “It may be the finale, but engineers still have full bag of tricks.” One of the interesting displays was the 16 foot by 6 foot wind tunnel built by Tau Omega under the direction of

Bessie Kniseley, Engineers’ Queen, 1933 photo courtesey of the Western History Collection


The Depression Years 1930-1940 96

Professor Liston in the basement of Felgar Hall. The coronation ceremonies were broadcast in a special two-hour program by WNAD, as Queen Bessie kissed the Blarney Stone on the steps of the Engineering Building. The open house was followed by the dance that night in the Union, and Old Trusty fired the customary salute at midnight. The banquet was held Saturday night in the Union Ballroom.

Lee Minter, St. Pat, 1933 photo courtesey of the Western History Collection

In the special edition of the Daily telling of the festivities, there were feature write-ups telling of jobs that engineering students had as well as recounting the successful careers of many who had graduated. The article reported that C. T. Holmes of Henryetta and Harrel (Eddie) Chiles (PE 34) of Itasca, Texas were doing the cleaning and pressing for several houses. Chiles later became the President, Chairman of the Board and CEO of the Western Company and attracted national attention with his campaign against wasteful government spending. John Houchin (PE 34) was listed as managing the Logan apartments for preceding four years. Houchin later became Chairman and CEO of Phillips Petroleum and served a seven year term on the Board of Regents of the University. Frank Ittner, President of the Engineers’ Club operated the candy machines in the fraternity houses. Richard Sneed and Glenn Voegelein were employed at Central State Hospital. Peter Tauson, who later did his master’s thesis on the design of the wind tunnel, worked as a fireman in Oklahoma City. Ralph and Bill Bollinger worked as salesmen of men’s wear. Jack Abernathy (PE 33) later became Chairman of the Board of Big Chief Drilling Company and remained an active supporter of the University over the years. He was elected to the first class of the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society in 1990.

In October 1933, Bessie Kniseley became the first woman elected to St. Pat’s Council. She remained an active student leader in the College until her graduation in 1936 with a BS in Architectural Engineering


The Depression Years 1930-1940 97

She married William M. Marriott, BSCE 1935. She earned a master’s degree in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley and taught there for a time. Another Architectural Engineering student, Sue Aycock, won a run-off election with Onlee West, to become the Engineers’ Queen for 1934. Sue worked 18 hours a week in the Registrar’s Office while carrying 12 hours of Architectural Engineering course work. As a sophomore, she had the highest grade point average of all woman in her class. She was a member of Mortar Board and received a gold ring from Tau Beta Pi (Tau Beta Pi did not admit women until 1965). She later graduated with the second highest grade point average in her engineering class. The lawyers were determined to kidnap Queen Sue, which led to an interesting account in The Oklahoma Daily on March 14. While a group of lawyers watched the engineering building, Bessie Kniseley put on Sue’s gray coat and left the building guarded by the Queen’s guard, the lawyers chased and stopped the car, but then realized that they had been duped. Later, they went to Aycock’s home and abducted Sue’s younger sister, who finally convinced them that she was not the Queen. Meanwhile, Sue left the building with one guard and had a leisurely lunch. That night, she was taken to Oklahoma City for safe keeping. Susan Aycock Turnbull has been a faithful supporter of the College of Engineering over the years. Her annual contributions to the Engineering Library significantly enhanced to the quality of the library and collection. Lewis McBride, BSME 1934, was elected St. Pat. All University classes were dismissed at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, March 16 for the parade and coronation. Open house entertained 600 visitors that afternoon and the annual dance was held in the Union Ballroom with the end of the dance punctuated by LKOT firing of Old Trusty and producing a fireworks display. The banquet followed on Saturday night with A.G. Davies, VP of OG&E presiding. The speaker was Mr. Paul Walker, Chairman of the State Corporation Commission. Thirteen were knighted at the Banquet. In January 1935, The Oklahoma Daily reported that St. Pat’s Council considered barring women students enrolled in the College of Engineering from the Queen’s race. The article noted that three of the previous four Queens had been engineering students. The article noted that it is believed that there would be candidates from Engineering this year. There seems to be no record as to whether the resolution passed. However, a number of years were to elapse before another student from engineering would be elected Queen (eventually it became required that the Queen be an engineering student.)


The Depression Years 1930-1940 98

Verna Holcomb, a home economics major from Fort Worth, Texas was elected Queen for 1935, and S. T. Husky was elected Captain of the Guard. The March 14, 1935 student paper announced Queen Verna Holcomb missing. This time the lawyers were frustrated because they had not kidnapped her. The next day, the paper carried an interview with the Queen by a reporter who had been blindfolded and taken to a farm house outside of Norman where the Queen was safely hidden from possible abduction. In the interview, “the engineers laughed with smug complacency and declared that leaving the Queen in the country for safe keeping is much simpler than guarding her in Norman. We’ve nothing to worry about.” Miss Holcomb stated that, “It’s been a lovely rest. I had dark circles under my eyes when I came out here, but it will be fun to re-appear for the show and the activities Friday.” At 8:30 Thursday night the engineers staged an elaborate show as a fund raiser as had been done for the previous 12 years. On Friday morning tall bespectacled Bruce Wiley, a senior Electrical Engineering student from Norman was revealed to be St. Pat. Bruce was later to serve on the EE faculty. At 9:50 a.m. the traditional parade wound from the Administration Building to Felgar Hall where St. Pat dressed in the traditional formal green tails and top hat crowned Queen Verna. The ceremony was broadcast over WNAD and loud speakers carried the messages from Dean Felgar, St. Pat and the Queen to the large crowd that had assembled. The Oklahoma Daily carried an architectural drawing of a proposed expansion of the Engineering Building. At that time the Engineering Building consisted of what is now the west An achitectural drawing of what many hoped the wing of Felgar Hall. Engineering Building (Felgar Hall) would become The expanded building would have a plan shaped in an E, with the center wing coinciding with the east wing of the present Felgar Hall. A four cornered Gothic tower with three arched doorways, located where the north east entrance is presently located, would serve as the main entrance. Dean Felgar and a committee of faculty had been lobbying the State Legislature for this expansion. Sue Aycock (Turnbull), Arch. E.36, Queen ‘34, wrote an article describing the proposed expansion in the paper expressing the need and hope of seeing the finished building within a few years.


The Depression Years 1930-1940 99

The celebration included the usual open house, dance and banquet. As always, the end of the dance and the knighting of the Knights were saluted by Old Trusty and LKOT. In the spring and fall of 1935, the Public Works Administration of the “New Deal” authorized funding support for construction of the Business Administration Building, the tower on the Student Union, a Biological Sciences building, an air conditioning laboratory, and the large 250 mph wind tunnel facility for Engineering. Peter Tauson (BSME 34, MS 36), a Russian emigrant, who had come to Oklahoma via a stint in the Army band at Fort Sill, designed the wind tunnel under the supervision of Professor Liston. The L. A. Comp Wind Tunnel in named in honor of Professor Comp, an outstanding and much loved teacher and one of the original faculty members in the Aeronautical Engineering program. In February 1936, St. Pat’s Council passed a rule that if the number one Queen candidate is kidnapped, the number two candidate will be automatically crowned. In some past instances there were suspicions that the candidate may have cooperated with the lawyers, so the rule was to hold regardless of the circumstances of the abduction. On March 5, 1936, Patience Sewell, a Pi Beta Phi sorority member and Arts and Science student from Oklahoma City was elected Queen. (Miss Sewell later became the first woman mayor of Oklahoma City, Patience Latting.) On Wednesday night, before the festivities were to begin with the Engineer’s Show, Miss Sewell was kidnapped by a band of law students at 10:20 p.m. from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Hanning, 741 S. Flood. The window of the cab was smashed in the brawl when she was taken. About 150 engineers were sent on an all night search throughout Norman and Oklahoma City. An anonymous call to the Pi Beta Phi house revealed that the hiding place was the home of M. M. Churchwell, the Principal of Norman High School. At 6:50 Thursday morning, the house was surrounded by engineers who eventually forced their way into the house and rescued the Queen returning her to the sorority house. Patience in an interview with The Oklahoma Daily said, “Being kidnapped is no fun...I got scratched and bruised in the fight, but not as much as some of the lawyers. Ten lawyers were just too much for three engineers.” The owl on the law building sported a new coat of green paint the next day. Tom Wood, one of the law students in the kidnapping was recognized by the engineers and was so frightened of the consequences that he asked for police protection and was placed in jail over night. The rule passed earlier in the semester about giving the crown to the second choice in case of kidnapping now


The Depression Years 1930-1940 100

posed a problem. A petition was circulated to overturn the rule, which the St. Pat’s council did without much urging. The Engineers’ Show was held Thursday night with a professional dance troupe from Oklahoma City as the featured act. On Friday, the traditional parade with Louin Roberts, Senior CE student from Blair, Oklahoma as St. Pat for 1936 at the head, formed in front of the Fine Arts Building and made its way around the oval to the Engineering building. Miss Sewell kissed the Blarney stone and was crowned Queen Patience. KOMA was the lead station in a broadcast of the ceremony which was aired over nine stations state wide. Dean Felgar, who was on leave of absence in California, missed the ceremonies for the first time. Tappan, who served as acting dean, presided and delivered the address. The depression was still in full swing and it is significant that the annual engineering edition of The Oklahoma Daily reported that all of the PE graduates and 30 of 31 ME graduates of 1935 were now employed in engineering jobs. The open house held Friday afternoon following the parade and coronation was reported to be the “trickiest yet” with a long list of demonstrations revealed in the paper. The dance in the Union Ballroom with the day climaxed by $400 worth of fireworks and the traditional firing of Old Trusty by LKOT. The blowing of the date whistle by the power plant was delayed until one o’clock. At the banquet on Saturday night the principal speaker was M. J. Stooker, Oklahoma City General Manager of Southwestern Bell with George A. Davis, Vice President of OG&E, serving as toastmaster. In February 1937, 934 students at OU held jobs through the NYA (National Youth Administration), a “New Deal” federal project providing help for needy students. This was out of an enrollment of about 6,000 students and indicated that the depression was not over. Vester E. Willoughby, BSCE 1930, joined the faculty of the Mechanics Department. This was occasioned by the death of Professor J. C. Davis, Chairman of the Department, who was replaced by Professor R. V. James. Willoughby became a very active faculty sponsor for the Engineers’ Club and LKOT, and has been memorialized by naming of the student lounge in his honor. The noted Physicist Niels Bohr, one of the fathers of atomic theory, was a guest speaker on campus during the month. The end of the month was punctuated by a “black blizzard”of blowing dust that hit Guymon bringing auto and bus traffic to a halt as people donned dust masks to ride out the storm. Jo Wade Thorton was elected Engineers’ Queen for 1937. She was an Arts and


The Depression Years 1930-1940 101

Sciences major from Oklahoma City and a member of Delta Gamma sorority. Floyd Hildebrand, an Electrical Engineering senior form Anadarko, was elected St. Pat. Great care was taken to prevent the kidnapping of the Queen. Seventy-five green shirted guards surrounded the Delta Gamma sorority house Thursday night to protect the Queen. The Oklahoma Daily carried a story by a student reporter who came to the house with one of the house boys hoping to get a story of the potential kidnapping. Instead, he and the house boy were captured and held captive all night in the kitchen. On Saturday morning, March 13, 1937, 2,000 students had gathered to watch the parade. There were 13 gaily colored floats, the University Band, and the Queen’s guard. The latter consisted of engineering student members of the ROTC mounted on Army horses as well as dismounted green shirted members who marched beside the Queen. There was tension in the air as the parade started. The owls had been painted green by some unknown Irish trolls and the law students had poured yellow paint over the Sigma Tau pyramid. As the parade passed the Law Building, there was a shower of eggs, bags of water and jeers from the building. Suddenly fire spread across the street sending flames 20 to 25 feet in the air with a cloud of dense black smoke. Harold Bone (BSME 38) was riding one of the horses. He stated that fortunately the horses were well trained by the Army or they might have run wild among the gathered crowd. In the confusion, Kenneth Schwoerke, a freshman law student climbed the flag pole and tore down the Engineering flag throwing it to other law students who ran into the Law Building and barricaded the doors. Schwoerke, barely escaped being seriously injured, as his clothing was torn off by the irate engineering students. As was the tradition, St. Pat had left the parade in search of the Blarney Stone, which he would take to the Engineering Building for the Coronation which would follow the parade. St. Pat was attacked by a band of lawyers. His green top hat, tie and collar were torn from him and later exhibited in a law class. President Bizzell, hurried to the scene of the riot as he had done during a similar fight some ten years earlier. Order was restored and the coronation proceeded as 50 or more students nursed the bruises of the day’s battle. The open house proceeded as planned with the dance that night followed by the fireworks and the traditional salute from Old Trusty. On Sunday night, the banquet was held at the Student Union with T. M. Beaird, alumni secretary, serving as toastmaster. There were talks by President Bizzell, Dean Felgar, and Mr. Orville Mosier, Vice President of Braniff Air Lines, an orignial Oklahoma company that started OKC-Tulsa service in 1928. In April 1937, the attendance at the annual Gas Measurements Short Course


The Depression Years 1930-1940 102

As black smoke filled the air at the 1937 Engineering Parade those on horseback feared the horses would become startled and cause additional complications


The Depression Years 1930-1940 103

The smoke cleared and the parade continued. Eventually the coronation was held on the steps of the Engineering Building.


The Depression Years 1930-1940 104

numbered 500. The course had been held annually since its beginning and the attendance held up very well throughout the depression. Professors Liston and Comp took six Mechanical Engineering students on a tour of the aircraft plants in Tulsa and Wichita, Kansas. In May, the State House of Representatives passed a bill for a new Petroleum Engineering Building; however, the bill was later killed. Governor Marland called for a 20 percent cut in University appropriations, and the University was still struggling to maintain its quality with the continued funding problems of the state. It was also this month that former Norman fire chief George P. L. McKinney died from a heart attack at the age of 65. He was the driver of the truck the night that the hooded figures fired the cannon around the city and eluded President Brooks, who had disposed of the first Old Trusty just one year prior. On Saturday, June 12, 1937, The Daily Oklahoman announced the retirement of Dean Felgar. Poor health was given as the reason for his decision to give up the reigns to the College which he had led since it was established in 1909. He was given the title of Dean Emeritus by the Regents and planned to continue teaching duties in the School of Mechanical Engineering. Professor William H. Carson was named as the second Dean of the College of Engineering. Dean Carson was an aggressive and hard working young man who, in 12 years, had risen from his initial position as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering to Professor and then to Director of the School in just three more years. He had later added the Directorship of Petroleum Engineering and the Directorship of the School of Natural Gas Engineering. He had managed the successful Gas Measurements Short Course and had continued to develop industry support for the Petroleum Engineering refinery and associated activities. As Dean he continued to teach the two courses required of all Mechanical Engineering students called Mechanical Engineering Conference. In this course students were assigned articles to read from the ASME Mechanical Engineering magazine. Each student would make an oral presentation to the class on the subject followed by a discussion. The course served a dual purpose of improving the public speaking abilities of the students as well as giving them an awareness of the current advances in mechanical engineering. In the late winter and early spring of 1938, the dust storms continued to periodically sweep in from the north. In February 1938, the Engineers’ Club voted to move the parade and the Engineering open house from Engineers’ week activities to the month of April in order to coincide with the statewide high school meet. The election of the Queen and St. Pat along with the coronation, dance and banquet would remain as Engineer’s week celebration.


The Depression Years 1930-1940 105

On Friday, February 11, 1938, The Oklahoma Daily announced that Demetrice Thorton from Hollis was elected Queen. At the same time, it was announced that the engineering students and the law students would have a “bury the hatchet” breakfast on Sunday morning. The purpose of the meeting would be to avoid the kind of conflicts that seemed to be getting out of hand each year during Engineers’ Week. At 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 16, junior Law student Kenneth Schwoerke (the very same student that as a freshman had climbed the flag pole to steal the engineering flag) along with several others came to Miss Thorton’s house at 722 Chautauqua. The guards, Tom Morton (BSPE 40) and Bob Crane, called for reinforcements. The engineers soon outnumbered the law students and the lawyers left empty handed. About 50 engineers guarded Demetrice as she worked at the library that night and three cars of engineers escorted her to a secret destination after work. Tom Morton returned to campus after a successful career in industry and taught Petroleum Engineering for several years before retiring a second time. He served on the advisory committee for this history. Ed Schlaffke (BSPE 38) was elected St. Pat and the coronation and dance went without further incident. The speaker for the banquet on Saturday night was W. M. Fleetwood, Attorney for Barnsdal Oil Company. Appropriately, his topic was on the relationship of lawyers and engineers in industry. As determined earlier in the year, open house was not held until April 29, 1938. It began with a parade led by the University Band. There were 14 decorated floats, several oil well supply trucks, and 20 horses with riders in the parade.

The wind tunnel laboratory has remained an important component of the College of Engineering

Many of the stories in The Oklahoma Daily on the day of the open house were devoted to the College of Engineering. One story about the wind tunnel indicated that while the building was completed, there was still needed work and expenditures to make the tunnel fully operational. The original drive shaft from


The Depression Years 1930-1940 106

the driving engine to the propeller which circulated that air in the tunnel had failed early in the operation of the tunnel. Professors Charles Paxton, Lawrence Cherry and L. A. Comp had designed a shaft to correct the problem. Because they could not find a shop in Oklahoma capable of building the shaft, the three worked overtime in the Engineering Shops and turned out a shaft that worked very well. Wind speeds of 300 miles per hour were attained in the tunnel. However, the tunnel was still of limited use because the initial funds did not provide for a balance that is necessary to the measurements of lift, drag, pitch, roll, and yaw. Professor Comp would later design and build the balance, which is still in use. In the fall of 1938, the University enrollment reached 6,557. A note appeared in the student newspaper telling women students, “If you want a husband, better enroll in Engineering.” The article noted that there were nine women and 1,562 men students enrolled in Engineering. In February 1939, it was announced that three students from the School of Architecture had been among the 17 winners selected from over 550 entrants in the competition for the Paris Prize for Architecture. Vestor E. Willoughby, Instructor in Mechanics, was named faculty adviser to the St. Pat’s Council. The University had continued to lobby the legislature for money to construct a new building for Petroleum Engineering at an estimated cost of $450,000. On March 3, Governor Leon Phillips made an unannounced visit to the campus to see for himself if there was a need for the building. The state continued to have fiscal problems and Governor Phillips, who was the first governor to have graduated from OU met the problems head-on. He was quoted as saying, “I didn’t make the state deficit, but I’m a coward if I don’t do something about it.” The University did not escape from his budget cuts. In addition to recommending a 20 percent cut in the University budget, he vetoed the Petroleum Engineering Building and the appropriation for dormitories. He also recommended that the freshman year be taught at Central State College. He was critical of President Bizzell and said that “He is capable of better work.” Nevertheless, Governor Phillips was invited to be the speaker at the Engineers’ Banquet Saturday night March 18, 1939. Maxine Moore, a Fine Arts junior from Sapulpa and member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority was elected Queen on Thursday March 9, 1939, with Old Trusty booming a salute to the new Queen. The Engineers’ Stage Show was held the following Thursday. That morning, the lawyers failed in their attempt to


The Depression Years 1930-1940 107

kidnap the Queen, but succeeded in causing some disruption of the Stage Show when they threw a stink bomb into the Sooner Theater. Police officers guarded both the Engineering Building and the Law Building throughout the night. Dwight C. Cain, a Chemical Engineering senior from Oklahoma City, was named St. Pat. The coronation and dance was held Friday night in the field house. WKY, KOMA, KTOK and nine other stations broadcast the ceremonies. The speaker, Governor Phillips, told of his student days and talked about the original Old Trusty. He praised the engineers but criticized “alumnitus� (apparently, the pressure that alumni brought on behalf of the University). He was made an Honorary Knight and fired Old Trusty after the banquet. The 26th annual Engineering open house was held April 28, 1939 in conjunction with the high school meet on campus. The parade started at the corner of Main Street and Highway 77 (Classen Blvd.) at 9:45 a.m. It proceeded down Main to University Blvd. and then south to the campus. Queen Maxine Moore cut the ribbon to open the doors for the 12,000 visitors. Cutting the ribbon opened an electrical circuit which activated a series of demonstrations, including raising the Engineering and the Gov. Leon C. Phillips fired Old Trusty LKOT flags over the enafter being an honorary knight trance to the building. A significant number of international students had been attracted to the University of Oklahoma by the reputation of the School of Petroleum Engineering and the Department of Geology. The student paper reported that the College of Engineering had graduates working in every country in South America as well as in Persia, New Zealand, Canada, and the East Indies. In an article on Dean Carson, the student newspaper reported that the Dean spent much of his time placing students in industry. He had made a recent trip to South America for the purpose of looking at the opportunities for engineering graduates.


The Depression Years 1930-1940 108

The Engineering edition of the student paper, April 28, 1939, described the parade and open house, and announced the acquisition by the School of Electrical Engineering of a television demonstration set which demonstrated all of the principles of modern television. The set included a phasmajector (a miniature television broadcasting station). This device generated what is technically called a video signal transmitted over wires to a large cathode ray oscillograph. This oscillograph translated the video signal back into a picture in much the same manner as a television receiver. Charles N. Paxton, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, had attempted for several years to get a flying club started at the University. Finally on September 15, 1939, Dean W. H. Carson announced that the University of Oklahoma would receive a Civilian Pilot Training unit sponsored by the Civil Aviation Authority. Professor Paxton, himself a Naval Reserve aviator, would be in charge of the program. Within a week, 25 students had paid a $40 fee to enroll in the program. There was still the problem that there was no suitable air field available in the Norman area. An earlier airport had been hit by a tornado and the land had been devoted to other use. By late October, a field had been located one-and-a-half miles west of Norman. With the financial help of the Norman Chamber of Commerce, a hanger capable of housing five airplanes was moved from Oklahoma City to the field. Burke’s Flying Service of Oklahoma City was awarded the contract to furnish five Piper Cubs and to provide the flight instruction for the program. The ground school would be furnished by the University. Professor Paxton along with L. A. Comp, Assistant Professor of Mechanics, and Laurence Cherry, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering were to be the faculty for the ground school. By March 1940, 25 of the 50 students in the program had soloed. The program was not limited to engineering students, although they made up the majority of the enrollment. This fact was criticized by some on campus, claiming favoritism; which was vigorously denied by the admissions committee including faculty from all segments of the University. At first it was reported that women would not be allowed in the program, a rule that was later changed to permit 10 percent female students. However, by the spring of 1940, there had still been no female applicants. The total flight instruction supplied by the course was 35 hours, which would provide the successful student with a private pilot’s license. The state financial conditions had not improved, even though the national economy was climbing out of the depression. The faculty of the University were required to take a 10 percent pay cut in the fall of 1939, but, the state could not meet the January payroll in 1940 and the faculty did not receive their checks until February 8. It is no wonder that the University had difficulty attracting and keeping qualified


The Depression Years 1930-1940 109

faculty. More surprisingly many good faculty members stayed over the years. On February 23, 1940, Tom Morton, PE senior, and President of the Engineers’ Club announced the five candidates for Engineers’ Queen. Buena Husky of Sand Springs was chosen from the group to be the Queen for 1940. Nicholas Tinker, a PE senior from Pawhuska, was elected St. Pat. While there were threats of kidnapping by the lawyers, the green guards were apparently effective and the festivities moved ahead as planned. The annual Engineers’ Show was held Thursday night March 14, with the dance held in the field house on Friday night. At 11:10 p.m., Queen Buena was crowned and the crowd moved outside to watch the fireworks over the reflecting pool between the field house and the stadium. Old Trusty fired the traditional salute to the Queen. At the banquet held Saturday night in the Union Ballroom, Dean Carson served as toastmaster. E.W. Smartt, Chairman of the State Board of Affairs was the speaker. On April 12, 1940, the Sigma chapter of Pi Tau Sigma, national honor society for mechanical engineering, was installed at the University of Oklahoma. On Friday, April 26, the annual Engineering open house began with a green shirt parade. The open house which lasted until 10:00 p.m. was held in conjunction with the annual high school meet at the University. That year’s open house drew some 15,000 to see the exhibits. In May of 1940, President Bizzell announced his plans for retirement effective July 1941 at the age of 65. President Bizzell was a nationally recognized scholar and academic leader. He had led the University through both good and bad times, and managed to build the physical facilities in spite of the severe financial constraints. He also led the development of quality graduate programs and awarded the first Doctoral degrees, although it would be a number of years before doctoral studies would be offered in engineering. However, at this time the master’s degree was considered the terminal degree for engineering throughout the nation. The President was under political pressure from Governor Phillips, and in spite of all his efforts, the funding for the University was less than adequate; he must have been frustrated and weary of fighting the battle. War clouds had gathered over both Europe and Asia throughout the decade. Since military science was required for all male students during their first two years, many engineering students chose to take advanced ROTC during their junior and senior years; earning a small amount of pay and ultimately receiving a commission in the reserves. These men were to be leaders in the U.S. armed forces in the approaching war. Some would die, and many would return to lead


The Depression Years 1930-1940 110

our country to recovery after the conflict.

REFERENCES 1. Gipson, A. M., Oklahoma, A History of Five Centuries, Harlow Publishing Company, Norman, Oklahoma 1965. 2. Cross, George L., Professors, Presidents, and Politicians, The University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 1981. 3. Sooner Yearbooks, 1930-1940, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 4. The Oklahoma Daily, 1930-1940, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 5. The University of Oklahoma Catalogs, 1930-1940, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, University of Oklahoma Libraries. 6. The University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, 1931-1940, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 7. The University of Oklahoma, College of Engineering Bulletins, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 8. Minutes of College of Engineering Faculty Meetings, The University of Oklahoma, College of Engineering Files.


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 5 World War II and Post War Recovery 1940-1950 The decade of the 1940s was a time of dramatic change for the University of Oklahoma. It started with sounds of war from Europe and Asia, and while the United States struggled to remain neutral, the inevitable entry into the world conflict was realized with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. As the war started, enrollments in the University dropped to one-third the pre-war level; then as the war ended, enrollments swelled over a period of twelve months to one-and-a-half times the pre-war numbers. The war brought many changes as the nation mobilized. The Office of Price Administration controlled consumer prices to prevent inflation; including the rationing of food as well as gasoline, tires, and other commodities. The automobile assembly lines were converted to manufacture military vehicles. Aircraft development and production accelerated. Advances were made in electronics with improved radios and the development of radar. The engineering profession was vital to the nation’s war effort. As the war ended, the nation’s factories were again converted to civilian needs. Engineers continued to be in great demand to repair and renovate factories which had operated throughout the war with minimum maintenance. Air travel boomed with new airliners designed and manufactured with the knowledge and technology developed in the war effort. Jet engines were produced for the new military fleet, although it would be in the next decade before jets became the standard for civilian airlines. Television, which had been developed in the 1930s, was commercialized and available in most urban areas by 1950. The fall of 1940 was a period of uncertainty for the university community. President Bizzell, who had led the University through the boom of the 1920s and the depression of the 1930s, had announced his plans to retire. The University Regents were seeking a new president. The National Guard had been mobilized and in September 1940, the Congress enacted the military draft. Students were torn by feelings of patriotism and worries of not finishing their education. Most engineering students were involved with ROTC and many upperclassmen were looking forward to being commissioned as officers. Even in those cases the decision to look for a job after graduation was tempered by the probable call to active duty. The Civilian Pilot Training Program, which was under the direction of the College of Engineering, received a boost when the Regents formally accepted a gift 111


World War II and Post War Recovery 112

of land from the Max Westheimer Estate for a new airfield. Mr. Westheimer had been a successful oil man in Ardmore and the gift to the University was arranged by Mr. Walter Neustadt, his son-in-law (the Neustadt family has generously supported the University over the years. Mr. Alan Neustadt is a member of the College of Engineering’s Distinguished Graduates Society and served on the College’s Board of Visitors). Professor Joe Smay, Director of the School of Architecture drew up plans for a hangar and terminal building, which was presented to the legislature in a request for funding. The legislature refused to support the project, but in the fall of 1941, the WPA started a $200,000 project to improve the field, funded by a federal grant and support from the University and the City of Norman. Dr. Cross in his book, The University of Oklahoma and World War II, recounts the chance encounter by Savoie Lottinville, the Director of the University Press, which led to the Navy establishing a primary flying school on the field during the war. The Navy greatly expanded the field, paving the runways and apron, and building hangars and buildings that are still in use by the University years later. President Bizzell, even though his retirement had been announced, continued to plead with the legislature for more funds for the University, including the needs of the College of Engineering. Dean Carson pleaded for additional space and faculty for the College. However, Governor Philips and the legislature responded by cutting funds for new construction and reduced the University’s salary budget by $200,000 for the next biennial appropriation. On November 16, 1940, the University of Oklahoma Regents named Joseph Brandt as President of the University effective August 1, 1941, following President Bizzell’s retirement. Brandt, a 1921 graduate of the University and a Rhodes Scholar, had studied for three years at Oxford. He earned both a BA and a MA in literature at Oxford, before returning to Oklahoma to work for the Ponca City News and the Tulsa Tribune. In 1928, he came to the University of Oklahoma as Director of the newly organized University of Oklahoma Press. He also served as editor

Joseph A. Brandt


World War II and Post War Recovery 113

of the Sooner Magazine. In 1938, became Director of the Princeton University Press, where he continued until he assumed the Presidency of the University of Oklahoma (he was the first alumnus of the University of Oklahoma to serve as President). Even before his arrival on campus, Brandt began to assume his leadership role. In January 1941, the Regents approved plans for The University of Oklahoma Research Institute. Dr. Cross, in The University of Oklahoma Research Institute 1941-1973, credits the idea of the institute to Brandt before he left for Princeton. The concept, however, was developed by Dr. Homer Dodge, Dean of the Graduate School and a group of faculty including Dr. George Cross, then Head of the Botany Department. Brandt was present at the Regents’ meeting for the approval. The Research Institute would play an important role in the development of research and graduate study in the College of Engineering in the following two decades. Upon his arrival on campus, President Brandt began to make a number of immediate changes. In September 1941, all new students in the University participated in a Matriculation Ceremony which was very similar to the more familiar commencement ceremony. This was complete with academic costumes for the students and faculty, a processional, and formal orations exhorting the students to take their education seriously. He also proposed other ideas, undoubtedly gathered from his days at Oxford and Princeton, including calling for all students to live on campus and to follow a dress code, which featured blazers for the male students. At the September 1941 Regents meeting, President Brandt proposed limiting the tenure of all deans, with the present deans’ term ending in one year, and following appointments be made for five years. All department heads and directors would be relieved of their positions at the end of the current school year with the replacement positions to be called Chairmen limited to three year appointments. These directives created considerable distress among the deans, who had enjoyed rather powerful positions under previous administrations. The department heads were likewise unhappy with the President’s proposal. Brandt also abolished the Academic Council, which was composed primarily of deans and had served as an advisory body to previous presidents. He replaced this with the newly organized University Senate (later named the Faculty Senate), composed of faculty members elected by their colleagues in proportion to college faculty headcount. Dean Homer Dodge and several leading faculty, including George Cross and Cortez Ewing, had worked to organize the Senate. In November 1941, construction began on the University’ first men’s dormitory


World War II and Post War Recovery 114

Under the sponsorship of the National Youth Administration, the dorm was to be built primarily by students working their way through school under NYA funding. However, with the impending war, the NYA funds were phased out and state funds were required to complete the building. The dormitory and adjacent dining hall were named Jefferson House at President Brandt’s suggestion. The buildings later became part of the complex used to house student athletes. Upon completion in 1942 the facility housed 88 men. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Sunday, December 7, 1941, had a profound effect on higher education. With a student body at the ideal military age, University enrollments had already been falling. President Brandt canceled 11 a.m. classes that Monday and met with the students urging them to stay in school and keep calm. He asked the students to curtail their social programs, stating that money spent on elaborate social functions would do far more good invested in defense bonds. As the spring semester approached male students were withdrawing in record numbers to volunteer for the military. President Brandt scheduled meetings with the male students to discuss different forms of military service as the campus role in the nation’s war effort began to take shape. By February 1942, the campus enrollment, which had approached 10,000 students in 1941, had dropped to fewer than 5,000. University and city leaders began to seek national defense work for students and those in the community. Various possibilities of obtaining Army Air Corps training programs failed because of the lack of University housing for men. In March 1942, the Navy announced plans to build a flight school at Max Westheimer field. In May, the Navy announced plans for the Aviation Technical Training School just south of the University. This would later be called the South Base. This basing benefitted the city, but offered little help to the University. In May 1942, the Navy set up the V-1 and the V-7 programs for college students. Some students joined the Army Reserve, while many others opted for the Navy programs. In general, those who chose the Navy fared better. Most of those in the Army were called out of school and placed in combat as enlisted men, while the majority of those in the Navy were able to complete more course work and to earn commissions before going to sea. In January 1942, the Regents established the University College upon the recommendation of President Brandt. The purpose of the college was to give all students a common liberal arts program for the first two years in the University before permitting them to declare a major. This caused a rather large problem for engineering students faced with the necessity of four years of highly structured course work. The professional school faculty were very much opposed to the concept but were given little say in the matter. Fortunately, the special training programs required


World War II and Post War Recovery 115

for the Navy and Army did not fit into this scheme and the actual implementation of the required two years of study was postponed and later modified to accommodate the professional curricula. In the fall of 1942, enrollments had dropped to 4,235 and the University made plans to change from a semester plan to a trimester plan in order to better fit the demands of the special service related programs and for those students who were being called into the armed forces. By the spring of 1943, enrollment had dropped to 3,238 including engineering enrollment of 641. In April 1943, students who had volunteered for the Army Enlisted Reserve Corps, with the promise that they could probably stay in school to finish their degree, were called to active duty and sent to various units around the country. With the decrease in enrollment, the need was critical for student housing to accommodate members of the various Armed Services programs, becoming even more urgent when the Navy placed the V-1, V-7 (combined into the V-12) and NROTC on active duty with full pay, uniforms and subsistence. Contracts were made with the now almost empty fraternity houses for residency of students in the Army and Navy programs. In February, the Army announced that 1,500 Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) students would attend the University. In September 1943, The Oklahoma Daily reported that 182 members of the ASTP were residing in the Field House. President Brandt appealed to the National Housing Authority for funds to build a group of men’s dormitories. These were completed in early 1944 and later named Woodrow Wilson Center. In January 1944, The Oklahoma Daily reported that some of the V-12 students had moved into the “Cleveland war dorm,” the first unit to be completed. When Robert Kerr was elected Governor and took office in January 1943, President Brandt had hoped that the funding for the University might improve. However, the state budget remained very tight, and Governor Kerr, noting the decrease in enrollment recommended that funding for higher education be decreased. Discouraged by the lack of support for the University and by the resistance of the faculty, led by the deans and department heads, President Brandt accepted the position as Head of the Press at the University of Chicago. He announced his resignation on Saturday, October 2, 1943, to be effective December 31, 1943. Although Brandt was president of the University for a very short time, his tenure made a definite impact on the character of the institution. He had become known for his autocratic decisions, but he left the University with a tradition of democratic participation by the faculty. While dean’s appointments are indefinite, department chairs and directors face a review each four years. The faculty of each department elect a committee of faculty (called “Committee A”) to advise the chairman on matters of budget and faculty evaluation. The Faculty Senate has continued to have an important role in


World War II and Post War Recovery 116

advising the President on policies regarding academic matters. The University College remains an active college, although not in the form which Brandt envisioned. President Brandt also inaugurated the title of “Research Professor” (later named the George Lynn Cross Research Professor) to reward those faculty members whose research accomplishments brought national acclaim to the University. It is always interesting to note the media reaction to the shocking news that the president of the University has resigned. On October 7, 1943, The Oklahoma Daily ran the banner headline, “Ewing May Be President.” This referred to Professor Cortez Ewing a popular and very distinguished professor of Political Science. The Regents quickly denied the rumor, and the paper printed a retraction of the story defensively noting that it had received the rumor from an unnamed, but reliable, source. On December 11, 1943, the Regents established a new process by naming a faculty committee, elected by the Faculty Senate, to advise the Regents in the selection of a new president. The committee was chaired by Dr. George Cross, at that time Acting Dean of the Graduate College, and Acting Director of the Research Institute. Initially the Regents named a member of its own group to serve as an Acting President after President Brandt’s departure. However, Regent McBride, who was appointed, decided that it would be better to have someone from the campus who could devote full time to the complex job of directing the University. Meanwhile, the committee presented the Regents with a list of candidates. On December 28, 1943, the Regents met to name an acting president. In somewhat of a surprise to many on campus, Dr. George Lynn Cross was named to serve until a permanent president could be named. Dr. Cross found himself to be concurrently the Acting Dean of the Graduate College, Acting Director of the Research Institute, and Acting President of the University. Additionally, the staffing in the President’s office was minimal. Nevertheless, he handled the problems of the University with an extraordinary skill and in September 1944, the Regents appointed him President of the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Cross, who remains the only University of Oklahoma faculty member ever appointed to the office, proved to be a truly exceptional choice. In his 25 years as President, he guided the University through many extremely difficult situations. The fairness and wisdom that he exhibited in his leadership earned the respect and admiration of the staff, students, faculty, and all those who knew of his work at the University. Under his leadership, the democratic process of faculty involvement in the governance of the academic program grew and the faculty took pride in the institution. Many of the outstanding faculty that could have taken positions at other institutions chose to stay at the University of Oklahoma because of this sense of participation.


World War II and Post War Recovery 117

Dr. Cross, a native of South Dakota, had earned his PhD in Botany at the University of Chicago and returned to the University of South Dakota in 1930 to head the Botany department there. In 1934, he joined the faculty of the University of Oklahoma in the Botany department, and eventually became head of the department. After his retirement from the Presidency, he continued to work at the University and his various writings are a valuable resource for any one interested in the history of the University. The writer of this history has relied heavily on his work. During 1944, the Army began to close down the ASTP unit. Many of the students were taken from school, given a quick infantry basic training and shipped to combat in Europe with minimal preparation. The University General Catalog for 19431944 listed a Norman campus enrollment of 3,081 plus 1,027 Navy and 1,315 ASTP. The College of Engineering enrollment George Lynn Cross was listed as 500 plus 818 Navy personnel. (It should be noted that many of those in ASTP did take engineering courses.) The 1944-1945 Catalog listed a University enrollment of 2,906 plus 768 Navy, while the engineering numbers were 341 (including 28 women) plus 704 Navy. The ASTP number was down to 286. President Roosevelt died on Friday, April 13, 1945. That very same day, tornadoes ripped across Oklahoma, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds of others. On May 3, the fall of Berlin and Hitler’s suicide were reported, and the German surrender quickly followed on May 7 with Victory in Europe (VE) Day celebrated May 8. In August, the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki forced Japan to surrender. With the rather abrupt end of the war, the demobilization of servicemen and women proceeded rapidly. The G. I. Bill provided for the returning veterans who would attend college to receive tuition, books, and a monthly subsistence. President Cross realized the impact that this sudden rush of students would have on the University. He recognized that many of the veterans would be married and some would have children which would compound the housing problem. The author was one of the married veterans coming back to school in January


World War II and Post War Recovery 118

1946. In the fall of 1945, while stationed in Oklahoma City, I checked with the University of Oklahoma about married student accommodations. The University gave me a sketch of the proposed Nieman apartments to show their plans for family friendly housing. When I checked with the University of Arkansas, where I attended before entering service, I found that they had, at that time, apparently given little, if any, consideration to the impending housing problem. Dr. Guy Y. Williams was appointed liaison officer for veterans. He had been an early student and faculty member in chemistry and headed the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering for many years. He made an impression on me as he carefully went over my transcript with a critical eye. I was relieved when he looked up and complimented me on my record and welcomed me to the University of Oklahoma. In January 1946, the paper reported the spring semester enrollment to be 5,400 including 2,400 veterans, 40 percent of whom were married. The Nieman apartments were not ready in the spring of 1946, but fortunately the Navy closed the two bases and the University converted barracks on the North Base, now the North Campus to married student apartments. In July 1946, the last of the active duty NROTC received commissions and the Navy programs were phased out. In June 1946, The Oklahoma Daily announced that the University was planning for 10,000 students in the fall semester. Housing for married veterans continued to be a problem. The building of “Sooner City” at the south end of the campus served to ease the problem. Dr. Cross, in his book, The University of Oklahoma and World War II, recounts how he gambled by ordering the pre-fabs from a helpful alumnus before he had financing and Regents approval. As it turned out, the pre-fabs paid for themselves several times over. The author and his wife moved into one of the 16’x16’ plywood bungalows in January 1947. We soon covered the 2”x2” studs with paste board to provide an insulating air space between the interior and the quarter inch plywood wall. This reduced the problem of sweating and mold that formed from the open gas stove that heated the room. A few curtains made from flour sacks that our parents had given us and an oven that fit over the gas hot plate that, was furnished, made a cozy home. On January 30, 1947, The Oklahoma Daily reported that “Sooner City” was suffering in a dust storm. “Sooner City” was the name given the pre-fab development and the land had been scraped bare by bull dozers in preparation for their construction. The Oklahoma winds would whip the fine dust from the bare ground, and it would whistle through the ill fitting windows and doors depositing sand dunes


World War II and Post War Recovery 119

at strategic locations throughout the house. By February 1947, the University enrollment was reported to be 10,009 students, of whom 7,439 were men, 2,570 were women, and 6,230 were veterans. According to the University General Catalog for 1946-1947, the University enrollment was 11,200. The engineering enrollment was given as 4,043 men and 34 women. This record enrollment for the College of Engineering was crowded into what is now the west wing of Felgar Hall, the Engineering Laboratory Building, and the small building east of the wind tunnel which was occupied by Petroleum and Chemical Engineering. In March 1947, construction bids were solicited for the addition to Felgar Hall. Work on the new addition was completed in the summer of 1948, providing considerable relief from the overcrowded conditions in the college. Elsewhere on campus, the University of Oklahoma Research Institute Building and a music practice addition to Holmberg Hall were constructed at the same time. The Physics Department, which had occupied space in Evans Hall, moved into the OURI Building and today occupies the entirity (known today as Nielsen Hall). Late in 1948, expansions of the Oklahoma Memorial Union and the football stadium were approved. The latter provided for enclosing the north end of the field, lowering the field and adding seats below the existing stands. A three-story press box was also added over the west stands. In the fall of 1947, the announcement came that the Interurban Railway would be closed. This electric street car system had served Norman and the University for some 34 years, bringing commuters from Oklahoma City and surroundings to campus and serving as a way that students could escape to the city for Saturday night fun. The terminal in downtown Norman was eventually converted into the Interurban restaurant (now Benvenuti’s Ristorante). Aeronautical Engineering laboratories were located in the north hanger of Westheimer Field after the Navy turned the field back over to the University. On Saturday, April 30, 1949, a tornado ripped through the North Campus. The hanger occupied by Aeronautical Engineering was totally demolished. A hand drill with a piece of wood driven into the metal housing was reclaimed and saved as a trophy of the force of the wind. The storm also destroyed 26 airplanes and other buildings. There were several deaths occurring during the decade that should be noted with special historical interest for the college. In May 1944, William Bennett Bizzell, the fourth president of the University, died of a heart attack. He was 68 years old and had been teaching since his retirement from the presidency. On July 9, 1946, Dean Emeritus James Houston Felgar died, he had been in


World War II and Post War Recovery 120

poor health for several years. Virtuallly his entire professional career had been spent at the University and as the first dean of the College of Engineering; he had served in that position for approximately 26 years. In 1947, at the age of 88, Dr. DeBarr, the original faculty member and first Director of the School of Chemical Engineering, died at his home. He had retired in 1923. He was a 33rd degree Mason, an Odd Fellow, Past Potentate of the India Temple in Oklahoma The hand drill that was recovered from the City, a Charter member of the destruction caused by the April 1949 tornado Elks and a Rotarian. Unfortunately for his memory, he has also been credited with being a member of the Ku Klux Klan. A particularly sad note for those of us who knew Professor Willoughby was his untimely death in September 1949. Vester E. Willoughby was an Associate Professor of Mechanics and had just been named Chairman of the Department. He was extremely active in his work as faculty advisor of student organizations, including Engineers’ Club, LKOT, The Oklahoma Society of Women Engineers, and Sooner Shamrock. The Oklahoma Daily, Tuesday, September 20, 1949, carried the story.

Vester E. Willoughby photo from the 1947 Sooner Yearbook

Professor Vester E. Willoughby, Associate Professor of Mechanics received third degree burns from his waist to his head as he lighted a gas fired water heater in the basement of his southwest Norman home. His son, 14 year old Jimmy Willoughby, jumped out of an upstairs window to the porch roof and to the ground rushing to turn off the gas. He then flooded the basement with water from the cistern. Willoughby was rushed to the Norman hospital.


World War II and Post War Recovery 121

William H. Carson served as Dean of the College of Engineering throughout the 1940s. While there were special courses offered and schedules varied through the time period, the basic curriculum remained fairly constant. Following is the list of the schools and curricula listed in the 1939-40 General Catalog of the University. School of Architecture Curriculum in Architecture Curriculum in Architectural Engineering Curriculum in Landscape Architecture School of Chemical Engineering School of Civil Engineering Curriculum in Civil Engineering Curriculum in Municipal Engineering Curriculum in Structural Engineering Curriculum in Transportation Engineering School of Electrical Engineering School of Engineering Physics School of General Engineering School of Geological Engineering School of Mechanical Engineering Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering Curriculum in Aeronautical Engineering School of Mining Engineering School of Natural Gas Engineering School of Petroleum Engineering

By the end of the decade, there were only minor changes noted in the above list. Landscape Architecture was dropped, and Municipal Engineering was renamed to Sanitary and Municipal Engineering. The School of Mining Engineering was dropped in 1949. The Department of Industrial Education listed a curriculum in Industrial Education and also a curriculum in Industrial Management Engineering. This latter program was the forerunner of Industrial Engineering, although at this time, the program consisted of some of the basic engineering courses with additional courses in shop and a group of courses taken in Business Administration. There were numerous faculty changes as many faculty members were reserve officers and called to active duty. There were also faculty that left to serve in the defense industry. Some of these returned after the war, while others did not. The faculty changes for the decade can be found in the appendix. According to the minutes of the Engineering faculty meeting on December 9, 1947, the faculty approved a curriculum in Industrial Management Engineering to be


World War II and Post War Recovery 122

offered by the Department of Industrial Education. The curriculum consisted of a group of basic engineering courses selected from offerings in Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering along with courses in shop and 38 semester hours of courses taken in Business Management. The finalized approved curriculum appeared in the 1949 College of Engineering Bulletin. This was the start of Industrial Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. The production of engineering degrees in the decade as recorded in commencement programs is illustrated in the table on the following page. On Friday, October 8, 1940, Engineering classes were dismissed at 10:30 a.m. so that students could plan a new journal. James Stockman, a senior in PE and a transfer student from Kansas State, had been editor of the engineering magazine at Kansas State the preceding year. Plans were made to begin the publication in 1941. Initial plans, approved by the students, called for a $1 fee each semester which would include dues to the Engineers’ Club and provide four issues each semester. The Regents turned down the requested fee; however, the first issue of the Sooner Shamrock, Vol.1 No.1, was published in March 1941. Claude Gordon was the editor; Sam Holland, faculty adviser; and Harper Thomas (later a faculty member in ME) was the personnel manager. R. T. Foor (later heading his own consulting engineering firm) was features editor. Don Malvern was digest editor (retired as a Senior Vice President of McDonnell Douglas Aircraft and served on the College of Engineering Advisory Board). An interesting article in the first issue was entitled, “Conquering the Atom.” The article predicted that atomic power would be used to power warships across the oceans. The article went on to state, “If such vast amounts of energy could be released and harnessed The Sooner Shamrock would be the for practical purposes, we would never magazine of the College of Engineering for again have to worry over the depletion almost three decades of coal and oil.”


6

34

13

6

24

3

27

0

48

95

2

10

Arch E

Ch E

CE

Engr. Physics

EE

General Engr.

Geol. Engr.

Ind. Mgt. Engr.

ME

PE

Nat. Gas. Engr.

Masters

5

2

77

38

0

22

2

18

7

15

22

2

1

‘42

1

0

57

35

0

7

9

26

3

12

31

5

2

‘43

2

0

27

30

0

3

3

8

2

8

30

2

2

‘44

0

0

24

46

0

6

6

33

0

26

23

4

0

‘45

1

0

16

23

0

4

5

24

1

16

10

4

2

‘46

7

0

71

88

0

19

9

29

7

22

37

1

2

‘47

21

2

114

139

0

33

19

52

11

48

45

2

10

‘48

28

1

104

79

1

37

21

36

7

41

41

13

6

‘49

Data tabulated from University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, University Archives

5

Architecture

‘41

Bachelor of Science degrees granted 1941-1950

40

2

193

154

6

74

13

91

27

59

54

15

14

‘50

World War II and Post War Recovery 123


World War II and Post War Recovery 124

A feature recognizing student leaders was initiated with the first issue. The title of the feature was “Men of Might.” The first two to be recognized were Wray Dudley (Natural Gas Engineering major from Pittsburgh, Pa, who was president of the Engineers’ Club) and Sam Blackwell (ME from Larned, Kan., President of Sigma Tau and Pi Tau Sigma. He also was a varsity baseball player). The Friday, February 7, 1941, The Oklahoma Daily related the latest incident in the ongoing drama of the Engineers-Lawyers feud. Two rival groups of engineering students had set out to paint the Law Barn on Wednesday. The first group had painted Engineer in large green letters when they were scared off. The second group appeared on the scene, armed with brushes and buckets just in time to be caught. They had the job of cleaning the paint left by the first group from the steps of the building. Both Dean Carson and Dean Hervey made statements denouncing the vandalism. In March 1941, Helen Roemer from Enid was elected from a list of five candidates to be Engineers’ Queen. John Lesch from Apache, Oklahoma was elected Captain of the Guard. Queen Helen, a resident of Robertson Hall, was housed with Mrs. George Garns, at 764 DeBarr, for security purposes. The paper reported that there were several attempts by the lawyers to kidnap the Queen, but the alert guards foiled each attempt. The Engineers’ Week celebrations included the traditional two performances of the variety show at the Sooner Theater on Thursday night, and the semi-formal dance held at the Field House on Friday night. At the dance, John “Dink” Taylor, from Blair, was revealed as the St. Pat for 1941. The fireworks display was performed at the mirror pool across the street from the Field House. At the banquet on Saturday night, Mr. E.L. DeGolyer5, a noted Petroleum Geologist and OU alumnus, was the speaker. The second issue of the Sooner Shamrock was published in April. The Men of Might for April were Stratton Cralle6, an Engineering Physics major from Springfield, Missouri and Norman Clark, a PE major from Brownsville, Texas. Jim Lesch7 was listed as Chairman of the student section of ASME. DeGolyer later donated his very valuable collection of historical works of science to the University forming the framework for the outstanding History of Science Library at the University.

5

6

Cralle was the grandson of Stratton Brooks, former president of the University.

Jim later retired as Chairman of the Board and CEO of Hughes Tool. He was an Energy Center founder, served as a member of the College Board of Visitors, and a member of the first class elected to the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society in 1990. The Lesch Centennial Professorship in ME was given in his honor.

7


World War II and Post War Recovery 125

On Saturday, May 3, 1941, the annual open house was held. The event was opened by a parade starting downtown, complete with band, mounted guards, and floats. At the Engineering building, guests were greeted by a mechanical robot in the form of Donald Duck. The paper reported that, “Gadgets and whirligigs run the gamut from mechanical marvels that will feed gold fish to remote control contraptions for testing a woman’s passion rating.” The open house ended at 10 p.m. with the traditional blast from Old Trusty. The May 1941 issue of the Shamrock featured Bob Eckart, Geological Engineering from Dallas, and Frank Binckley, Architecture from Racine Missouri, as the Men of Might. International students from around the world have had an important part in the history of the College of Engineering. Three outstanding international students were honored in this issue of the magazine. They were Abdurraham Durukal from Ankara, Turkey; Harry Fick, from Simcoe, Ontario, Canada; and Humberto Ochoa from Tampico, Mexico. Later, in March 1942, the Daily Oklahoman noted that students from eight countries were represented in the College of Engineering. The countries listed were Venezuela, Turkey, China, Columbia, Trinidad, Canada, Mexico, and Austria. By September 1941, enrollment was already falling as a result of the increased defense efforts. The National Youth Administration, which had supplied jobs to many needy engineering students during the depression years, was cut by 30 percent as the phase-down began. The first issue of Sooner Shamrock volume 2 of the was published in November 1941. Professor V. E. Willoughby replaced Professor Holland as the faculty adviser. The December issue of the Sooner Shamrock reflected the shock that war had come. The front cover displayed the headline, “America at War.” The lead editorial stressed the role that engineers have in the war effort. The need for engineers in national defense and in strategic oil production was great. The Men of Might for December 1941 were James Will (CE from Oklahoma City Central) and Bob Robinson (Geol. E. and graduate student in PE from Miami, Oklahoma). In the January 1942 issue, the Men of Might were Eldon Davenport, PE, (already employed by Shell Oil) and Jack Elkins (ME from Chickasha). The enrollment of women students increased in the 1940s. The Oklahoma Society of Women Engineers was founded in the fall of 1941. The January 1942, issue of the Shamrock saluted this newly formed group. Vivian Mills was the first president; she was the daughter of Professor Mills in Civil Engineering. Membership included Freda Meyers (VP), Loleta Neher (Secy-Treas.), Frances Witten, Dottie


World War II and Post War Recovery 126

Flick, Genevia West, Alemedia Rinsland, Elizabeth Cook, and Nancy Kendall. Mrs. Alfreda Chapman, Dean Carson’s Secretary, was the Sponsor. John Lesch, President of the Engineers’ Club was listed as an honorary member. Betty Jo Kerr, a student leader, who was active with the group a few years later, wrote that the National Society of Women Engineers, in researching the history of their organization, discovered that the University of Oklahoma Society of Women Engineers was the first organization of women engineers in the nation. Betty Jo served on the College of Engineering Board of Visitors and was elected to the 1991 Class of the Distinguished Graduates Society. The March 1942 edition listed the Men of Might as George McDermitt, an EE senior who had served four years in the Marines, and Jim Richardson, PE, from Oklahoma City. Jim had received his ROTC commission and was elected St. Pat for 1942. The April issue featured Alfredo Gamez (Geological Engineering from Caracas, Venzuela) and Richard Dulaney, who was an Engineering Physics major. Dulaney had spent a tour prospecting for oil with Standard Oil of California in Saudi Arabia and had written an article of his experiences in the January 1942 issue. In the May issue, Claude Gordon, EE from Okmulgee and editor of the Sooner Shamrock was named in the Men of Might along with Bill Klein, PE, George McDannon, PE, and “Tee” Johnson, Aero. All were in ROTC units. The feud with the lawyers took a different turn when four engineering students were arrested for throwing a rock through a glass window in the Law Barn. The four were commuters from Oklahoma City. Their punishment was suspension from classes and banning from campus until after Engineers’ week. Mary Lee Winters, from Oklahoma City, was elected queen and Bob Hines was elected Captain of the Guard. Queen Mary Lee was heavily guarded through the week and no kidnapping attempts were reported. The traditional show was held Thursday night at the Sooner Theater. At the coronation dance held on Friday, Jim Richardson was named St. Pat. There were no fireworks that year because of the war, but Professor Gerald Tuma did repair the electric sign over the Engineering Building. However, Professor Tuma reported that due to a shortage of mercury the sign would be shut down after the celebration until after the war. At the banquet on Saturday night, the speaker was Mr. Reford Bond, Chairman of the Corporation Commission. Bond had been chairman of the coordinating board in 1933 that recommended that the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma not be closed down. On May 2, 1942, the annual open house was held without the traditional parade.


World War II and Post War Recovery 127

The mechanical Donald Duck of the previous year greeted the visitors and the featured exhibit was one that was brought down from Will Rogers Air Base showing models of military aircraft and guns. There was a model of Hoover Dam built by the CEs, a model of a geyser by the Geological Engineers, a tesla coil demonstration by the EEs, and a miniature oil field by the PEs. The Oklahoma Daily reported on May 5, 1942, that two Naval Reserve programs had been set up. The V-1 program was for juniors and seniors in Engineering, Business, Physics, and Meteorology. The V-7 program was already underway. In addition, the NROTC program was being expanded. In September 1942, the student paper announced that there would only be one semester left for those students who had enlisted in the Army Reserve. On October 8, 1942, the paper announced the names of eight undergraduates that had been sworn into the Navy V-1 and V-7 programs. Alex Massad, a PE major was one of those listed. Alex would later retire as Executive Vice President of Mobil Oil. He served an active leadership role on the College Board of Visitors and was elected to the first class of the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society. The Men of Might in November 1942, were John Lesch, ME from Apache and Charles Mebb, EE from Hugo. Those listed in the December issue were Robert Hines, PE (later St. Pat) and Carl Zimmerman, EE. In December 1942, the Navy V-1, V-7, and NROTC students were placed on active duty with full pay, subsistence, and uniforms. Engineering students would be allowed up to eight semesters to complete their degrees. This changed the look of the campus, particularly engineering classes where most of the Navy students were studying. Housing these Navy students was a problem; since the University had such limited dormitory space (Jefferson House for 88 men had just been completed in September). Contracts to house the Navy students were made with the fraternity houses, which were suffering from the lack of enrollment. Each house was assigned a senior NROTC cadet as a commander to supervise the residents. In January 1943, there was an ongoing conflict between the Petroleum Engineers and the Oklahoma Daily staff. The shortage of sugar during the war had its effect in the shortage of Coca Colas. The Daily staff was located in what was then the University Press Building (now the Nuclear Engineering Building). In the building was a cooler that dispensed Cokes, which the students working on the newspaper considered to be their personal property. The Petroleum Engineers were located in the building east of the wind tunnel, which is now a storage building for the Physical Plant. The Petroleum Engineers proceeded to take advantage of the nearby


World War II and Post War Recovery 128

Coke machine under the assumption that the machine was public property, much to the chagrin of the Daily staff who complained bitterly in their newspaper about the PEs stealing their Cokes. After several editorials and news items, the controversy was resolved and the two student groups shared the machine. The January 1943 issue of the Shamrock had an interesting article on alternate fuels for automobiles, a subject that continues to be of interest. It described the use of methane, butane and propane in spark ignition engines and went into some detail of systems in use in Europe using wood and charcoal combustors to generate carbon monoxide which was then used to power conventional spark ignition engines. The Men of Might in this issue were Warren Crisjohn, PE, and Jack Glamann, PE. In March 1943, the Men of Might were Bill Hill, CE and Frank Folger, PE. In February 1943, the University announced that an Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) would be located at OU. This would be the Army equivalent to the Navy V-1 program. The ASTP would be housed in fraternity houses, although in September 1943, there were 183 housed in the Field House. Most of the ASTP students would be taking engineering subjects. In March, the Navy combined the V-1 and V-7 into the V-12 program. On March 12, 1943, the Daily announced that Doris Gene Kramer, a sophomore in Arts and Sciences from Oklahoma City, was elected Engineers’ Queen. She was elected from a field of four candidates. The law students, however, kidnapped all four of the candidates on Thursday, creating a crisis for the engineers. The Daily pictured Bob Nesbit, a law student having his head shaved and a shamrock painted on his scalp by a group of irate engineers. The engineers then proceeded in a group to the Law Building to engage in conversation with Dean Hervey of the Law school. Dean Hervey moved out on the steps to talk to the group of students. He spied the reporters and photographers that had gathered to report the story to the public. Dean Hervey yelled, “Send that photographer away. There will be no stories or pictures of this meeting.” The Dean urged the engineering students to just keep calm. “I’ll try to get them back tonight.” he said. The engineers shouted back, “Tonight, we want them back now!” John Lesch and Herb Keener, engineering student leaders agreed that publicity would not be good. The Queen candidates, who had been kidnapped around noon and taken to Oklahoma City, were returned about 6 p.m. the same day. The traditional celebration was held the following Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The Engineers’ Show, the Engineers’ Club annual fund raiser, was held on Thursday night at the Sooner Theater. On Friday night Bob Hines was revealed


World War II and Post War Recovery 129

to be the St. Pat for 1943. He supervised the coronation of Queen Doris Gene Kramer at the dance in the Field House. Following the coronation, St. Pat and the Queen fired salutes with Old Trusty. On Saturday night, Dean John G. Hervey, of the Law School was the speaker at the banquet. His talk was in the patriotic theme, “Faith of Our Fathers,” in keeping with the war atmosphere. Dean Carson was absent from the banquet this year, since he was attending a meeting of the Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education in Washington, D.C. In April 1943, the students who had joined the Army Enlisted Reserve Corps were called into active duty. The Engineering College was saddened to learn this same month of the death of one of its outstanding graduates. Lt. Tom Boyd, BSME, Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, and Pe-et, was killed in a training accident in Texas. The Shamrock reported that three new chapters of Tau Omega, the national honor society for Aeronautical Engineering, which had been founded at OU, had been established at Pittsburgh University, Illinois Institute of Technology, and the University of Minnesota. Professor L. A. Comp was the national president of the society. The officers of OSWE were Frances Witten (President), Carolyn McArthur (Secretary), and Betty Barefoot (Publicity Chairman). The Men of Might were Aton Torre, Brooklyn, NY, EE and Tom Higgins, AeroE, from Oklahoma City. The May 1943 issue of the Sooner Shamrock, showed Fred Bird as the editor, and Alex Massad as the business manager. There was an interesting article on RADAR - The Secret Word. Interestingly, radar was still a classified subject by the military at that time. The Men of Might in May were Hulusi Berelegen, Geol. E. from Ankara, Turkey, and George Russel, PE from McAlester. In the July 1943 issue, there was a list of 220 engineering alumni serving in the armed services. It was stated that this list was not complete. The Tau Beta Pi initiates included Howard C. Kauffman, who would later serve as President of Exxon. The two Men of Might were Joe Powell, AeroE from Missouri, and Herb Keener, PE from Rio de Janerio, a former Sooner Shamrock editor. The Men of Might in the Shamrock for September 1943 were Oma Gilbreth, PE from Borger, Texas, and Fulton Fears, CE from Lindsay. The November Men of Might were David Stark, ChE, from Calagary, Canada, and Wallace Ikard, EE from Cement. The Engineers’ open house was held on Friday, October 13, 1943. Again, Donald Duck welcomed the visitors to the event which featured coffee made from saw dust, water running from a suspended faucet, model of Boulder Dam, educated balls,


World War II and Post War Recovery 130

voice transmitted by a light beam, television demonstration, the wind tunnel, and an aircraft engine. At 9:30 p.m. after the open house, Queen Doris Gene Kramer dubbed the Knights of St. Pat. Alex Massad, President of the Engineers’ Club, accompanied the Queen, since St. Pat Bob Hines had already been called to active duty with the armed services. There were 25 knighted, including Alex Massad and Fulton Fears, who would later serve as a member of the CE faculty. In January 1944, the Men of Might were George Block, ME from Tulsa, Kenneth Doughty, AeroE from Martha, and Alex Massad, PE from Oklahoma City. In March, Frances Witten, an AeroE senior, was named editor of the Sooner Shamrock. There were four named Men of Might, Eddie Nakayama, ME, Earl Patterson, ChE, Jerry Johnson, CE, all from Oklahoma City, and Carl Hultin CE from Watawan, NJ. The last three were all in the Navy V-12. In the spring of 1944, some of the V-12 were moved into the new Cleveland dormitory from the fraternity houses. In March, orders came for 458 of the ASTP cadets to leave to train with the troops. These students were rushed through infantry basic and sent to the front in Europe in record time. Elizabeth Cook, an engineering senior from Topeka, Kansas, was elected Queen. She was affectionately known as “Cookie” by her engineering classmates. Carl Hultin was elected Captain of the Guard and the LKOT fired a salute to Cookie on the lawn of the Delta Delta Delta house in her honor. The Wednesday before the Friday coronation, 15 Navy men and one lawyer attempted to kidnap Queen Elizabeth on her way home guarded by three engineers. She managed to bolt into the Alpha Chi house, where the doors were quickly locked. Reinforcements for the engineering guards were quickly summoned and the engineers turned out in force hunting for the would-be abductors. The Gamma Phis and the Thetas won the Coed Capers at the Engineers’ Show on Thursday at the Sooner Theater. On Friday night, Queen Elizabeth was crowned and Earl Patterson was named St. Pat. Earl was a ChE in the V-12 program, and President of the Senior Class, as well as President of Tau Beta Pi. The Elizabeth Cook, festivities were marred when Jean Wheeler and 1944 Engineers’ Queen Beth Feagles, both runners-up, were kidnapped by a group of Naval premed students.


World War II and Post War Recovery 131

In the May 1944 issue of the Sooner Shamrock, Frances Witten, an AeroE from Pauls Valley and editor of the Sooner Shamrock was one of the Men of Might. Frances was not only an outstanding student leader, but she had a number of hours as an airplane pilot. Other Men of Might included George Ikard, PE from Cyril, Bob Matthern, CE, from East Field, New Jersey, and Manford Wirges, ChE, from El Reno. Wirges succeeded Witten as editor of the Shamrock. The July issue of the Shamrock had a feature article on Joe Keeley and V. E. Willoughby. Both had been good friends and active student leaders during their undergraduate days in CE in the late 1920s. Both had worked in Civil Engineering jobs for a number of years before returning to the faculty, and both were very popular teachers who spent much time working with the student organizations. It is interesting to note that through a typographical error, the picture of Keeley was captioned Willoughby and the photograph of Willoughby was captioned with Keeley’s name. The September 1944, Men of Might were C. M. Roscoe, CE, and Guy Keith, CE, both from California, and Don Bolton, ChE, from Seminole. All three were Navy V-12 students. By the November issue, George Grogran and Joe Mehan were coeditors of the magazine. Curt Guernsey, a Navy V-12 student, was the staff photographer. Curt later headed a successful consulting engineering business in Oklahoma City, and served as a member of the Visiting Committee for the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. He supplied a number of the pictures for this period in our history. The Oklahoma Society of Women Engineers officers were listed as Nancy Barberii, (President), Marion Crowley (VP), Helen Rooks (Secretary), Betty Jackson (Treasurer), and Smokey Cole (Publicity). Betty Jackson later had a very successful career as an Architectural Engineer, and retired as a Vice President of HTB, Inc. of Oklahoma City. Betty served on the College of Engineering Board of Visitors. The Men of Might were Ed “Oz” Bergholt, CE, Merritt A. Neal, CE, both from California, Gene Saver, CE from Phoenix, Ariz. and Morris Childs, ME, from Oklahoma. All were members of the V-12 program. Morris Childs later earned a PhD and served as head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. The Engineering open house was originally scheduled for October in 1944; however, it was postponed until December 15. That year, 2,000 programs containing eight pages were printed up for the occasion, which included demonstrations of a Selsyn servo motor and a microwave heating device. Six thousand persons visited the open house, which ended at 9:30 p.m. with the firing of Old Trusty. The electric sign over the Engineering Building was working for the open house. The Men of Might for January 1945, were Jack Coe, CE, San Francisco;


World War II and Post War Recovery 132

Bill Kerth, ME, Sacramento (both were in the V-12 program); and Chester Gates, AeroE, NROTC cadet from Seminole. Arahmae Sullivan, a junior in Fine Arts, was elected Engineers’ Queen in March. As was traditional, Old Trusty signaled her victory by firing a salute on the lawn of her sorority, Chi Omega. Lester Roberts, PE, from Watonga and a V-12 student was named as St. Pat for 1945. At the banquet Saturday night, the Speaker was Oklahoma Governor Robert Kerr. Governor Kerr was made an Honorary Knight of St. Pat, and 33 seniors were dubbed as knights. The Men of Might for March 1945 were George Grogan, AeroE, from OKC, an NROTC cadet, Elmer Klein, ChE, Ardmore, and Joe Mehan, AeroE, Chicago. Mehan was only 17 years old and was the outstanding junior engineer. He was LKOT #271, a member of Pe-et, Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, Institute of Aerospace Sciences, Engineers’ Club, and Editor of the Sooner Shamrock. In May 1945, the Men of Might were all in the Navy V-12 program. They were Lester Roberts, PE, Watonga; Frank Meek, GenE, Tulsa; Wally Johnson, CE, Bridgeville, CA; Bob Clark, EE, Boulder City, Nevada; and Jim Williams, ME, Visalia, CA. In the July issue, the list was Wilbur Kolar, ChE, OKC, and a cadet in NROTC; Bill Sylvester, PE, San Antonio, TX; Don Engle, AeroE, Okmulgee: Bob Hawkins, ME, Fort Smith, AR; and Claude Howard, AeroE, Paden, OK. The last four were all in the Navy V-12 program. Dick Askew became the business manager for the Sooner Shamrock with this issue and continued in that job until he graduated in 1947. In 1948 he earned his MS ChE. Askew was to later retire as Senior Vice President of Phillips Petroleum and served on the College of Engineering Board of Advisers. He was elected to the Distinguished Graduates Society in 1991. John Sherman Strance was the editor of the July 1945 Sooner Shamrock. In August 1945, the war in the Pacific came to an abrupt end with the nuclear bombings of Japan. The atom bomb had been a closely guarded secret and the surprise end of the war was welcomed with a great joy and sense of relief by the Allies. The G.I. Bill had been enacted which provided for tuition, books, and a living allowance for veterans of the war. In anticipation of the massive demobilization and its effect on the nature of the University, President Cross began to rapidly plan for the changes. In September, the Daily Oklahoman carried the announcement that the NROTC and V-12 programs would be reduced. In October, the paper carried the announcement that the V-12 program would end in July 1946. With the closing of the Naval Air Station, the paper announced on September 1945, that the University would get first pick of the property. This soon became known as the


World War II and Post War Recovery 133

North Campus and Max Westheimer Airport. The Men of Might listed in the September 1945 issue of the Sooner Shamrock were again all V-12 students. They were Bobby Gene Thacker, ME, OKC; John Sherman Strance, ME, OKC; and Jack Leroy Gross, ChE, Moore. Dean Morgensen was editor of the November issue of the Sooner Shamrock with Dick Askew continuing as business manager, while also serving as President of the Engineers’ Club. The November 1945 Men of Might were Howard Hoops, ChE, OKC; Howard Irby, CE, Wilson; and Patrick Murphy, CE, Stillwater. Both Irby and Murphy were in the V-12 program. In January 1946, the first wave of returning veterans entered the University. The Oklahoma Daily reported the total enrollment of the University to be 5,400. Of this number, 2,400 were veterans of the armed services, 40 percent of whom were married. The return of the veterans changed many of the traditional rules at the University. One of these was the no car rule. In February 1946, the student paper announced that students would be permitted to have cars, but not on campus. It was required that students with cars have liability insurance, pay a $1 fee, and have a car safety inspection. Students under 21 had to have their parents’ permission. In the January 1946 issue of the Sooner Shamrock, the Men of Might were listed as Bob Kincheloe, EE, OKC; and Betty Jo Kerr, CE, Norman. Known fondly as “Joker” by her fellow students, Berry Jo had a distinguished career as a Civil Engineer, retiring in 1990 as Director of Streets for the City of New Orleans. She has been an active member of the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science Visiting Council and the College of Engineering Board of Visitors. In March 1946, Betty Jo was a candidate for Engineers’ Queen. Other candidates included Bobby Henry, a sophomore in ME from Bartlesville (she had been named the Outstanding Freshman Woman in the University in the fall); Sally Lou Mitchell, Arts junior; Freda Croom, Business senior; and Pat Payte, sophomore in Sociology. Pat worked as a secretary in the Engineering Drawing office where she greeted a large number of the engineering students, and won the election. During the coronation rehearsal in the Field House, Pat was slightly bruised as she escaped capture by a band of Law students, who did manage to steal the crown and disrupt the rehearsal. At the coronation dance on Friday night, Tom McIntire was revealed as St. Pat and Queen Pat was crowned with a quickly made replacement crown. Among those Knighted at the banquet Saturday night in the Union Ballroom were Betty Jo Kerr, James Lesch, and Betty Jackson. Bob Harris, a PE senior, member of Tau Beta Pi, and a voice student, was the featured soloist for the Engineers’ Show, dance and banquet. Bob later sang professionally on national TV as a member of


World War II and Post War Recovery 134

Pat Payte and Tom McIntire (it is unknown if this picture contains the real or replacement crown)

the cast of the Fred Waring Show, for a number of years. As a result, he never practiced engineering, although he had an outstanding record as a student. The Men of Might in the March 1946 Sooner Shamrock were all members of V-12. Dean Morgensen, ArchE, Memphis, TX; Tom Polk, GeolE, Memphis, TN; and Bill Grieves, ChE, Tulsa. Dick Askew wrote an article entitled “Good Bye to the Navy,” celebrating the end of the V-12 program. He pointed out that since July 1943, 23 civilians and 305 Navy had graduated from the College of Engineering.

The May issue of the Sooner Shamrock listed the Men of Might as Walter Hart, PE, Alberta, Canada; and Dick Askew, ChE, Enid. The June picnic for the Engineers’ Club featured a search for the original Old Trusty. Late in 1945, a group of students interviewed the aging Tom Ferguson. He was the Physical Plant Supervisor, who had accompanied President Brooks, that night in 1920, when the President drove his Cadillac into the night with Old Trusty. According to Ferguson, the cannon had been dumped over a culvert into a brook, about a mile West and aquarter of a mile South of downtown Norman (the spot this most nearly describes is the current bridge on West 24th Street crossing Normandy Creek). In March 1946, a group of students probed the creek bottom with steel rods. However, the day was cold and the culvert had crumbled so that the probing was frustrated by submerged chunks of concrete. A picnic was planned for June. In the warmth of the sun and armed with a war surplus mine detector, surely the glory of the original Old Trusty would be restored and it could be enshrined at the entrance to the new engineering building that was being planned. Unfortunately, the quest was not successful. Presumably, Old Trusty remains sunken in the sands of the creek beneath a now paved creek bottom and the bridge of a four-lane busy street. photo courtesey of the Western History Collection

On June 22, 1946, the NROTC reverted to peacetime status and the V-12 program was terminated. There had been 495 NROTC students commissioned and 136 V-12 students had received commissions in the wartime programs.


World War II and Post War Recovery 135

Betty Jo Kerr was the editor of the Sooner Shamrock in July 1946, with Dick Askew remaining as the very able business manager. The Men of Might in that issue were Tom Kirkwood, EE, Kansas City, MO and a V-12 student; Bob Concanower, PE, Wichita Falls, TX, a returning veteran; and Tom McIntyre, PE, Cresent Heights, Canada. On July 19, 1946, Dean Felgar died. He had served as the first Dean of the College of Engineering from 1909 until 1937, and had been respected and much admired by all, especially, those who studied and taught under his direction. In September, the Sooner Shamrock had an article featuring the new Engineering Building that was being planned. A picture of Dean Carson discussing the plans with Betty Jo Kerr and Dick Askew illustrated student involvement in the plans. The plan was to add to the then present building two more wings connected along the north side by a building of equal height. The planform would be a large E shape with the main entrance at the center of the north side. At the entrance area, the building would extend to a fourth floor. As it turned out, there were only enough funds to complete a U shaped building, the present Felgar Hall. The Men of Might for September included James R. Lesch, ME, Apache. Jim, who had been an outstanding student and student leader before the war, had been called to active duty in the Army and served under General Patton in the armed forces in Europe. Others included were Ted King, GeolE, Fairview; and Kendal Garms, ME Loyal, OK, and a returning veteran. The November 1946, issue of the Sooner Shamrock was dedicated to Dean Felgar, with articles by Professor Tappan and Dean Carson describing his dedication and devotion to engineering students as he guided the development of the College. The Men of Might for November included Ray Loper, PE, Cleveland, OK; Bob Heaney, PE Memphis, TN; and R. O. Jackson, ME, Lexington, who spent his career as an engineer for OG&E.


World War II and Post War Recovery 136

In March 1947, Bobby Jean Craig, a Fine Arts sophomore from Frederick won the Engineering Queen’s race over Thelma Rose Wibker, an Engineering junior from Shreveport, La., and three other candidates. Old Trusty was fired on the lawn of the Chi Omega house to salute the Queen. On Wednesday, before the Friday coronation, Bobby Jean was kidnapped from her psychology class at noon. The lawyers overpowered the four bodyguards and whisked her away in a 1942 Oldsmobile. The lawyers apparently took her to Shawnee, but returned her late in the evening, unharmed and wearing an orchid. The rest of the St. Pat’s celebration proceeded without notable incident. The variety show was presented on Thursday with the coronation at the dance Friday night. Gordon Dempsey, ChE senior and returning veteran was named St. Pat at the ball. On the 21st, the Daily Oklahoman announced that construction bids were received for the addition to the Engineering Building, along with bids for the Research Institute Building and the music practice building on the East side of Holmberg Hall. Also that month, the Men of Might were all veterans: Ed Ham, AeroE, Guthrie; Carl Thain, AeroE, Waukomis; and John Kinnaird, CE, Randlett. In April 1947, the Men of Might were Walter Cralle, ME, Springfield, MO and a veteran; Rod McDaniel, PE, Calgary, Canada; and Robert Barbero, GenE, Pittsburg, KS. In May, the list was Robert Hamilton, ME, OKC; Otto Doner, Jr., ME, Sasakwa; and James Stark, PE, Calgary, Canada. In May, the Engineering open house was held for the first time since 1944. The Civil Engineering exhibit won the competition. In the fall of 1947, the enrollment on the Norman campus reached 12,000 with engineering enrollment at 1,898, which excluded the freshmen. The addition to the Engineering Building was under construction. Green shirts, which had been abandoned during the war years, were again adopted as the apparel of choice on the days of Engineers’ Club meeting and throughout Engineers’ Week. Jim Heid was the editor of the Shamrock and the Men of Might for October were Clarence Gates, EE, Tulsa; and two NROTC returnees from active duty: C.A. Vicklund, CE, Iron Mountain, MI; and Frank Chuck, ME, Brighton, IA. Frank spent most of his career in Venzuela with Creole Petroleum, retiring as Chief Engineer of Exxon Production Research. He was an active member of the Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Advisory Committee for a number of years. In November 1947, the Men of Might were all veterans of the war. They were George Binkley, ME, OKC, who spent his career with OG&E; Joe Enos, PE, and Tom Porter, CE, both from Lawton. The December Men of Might, again veterans, were Harry Hill, ME, Chickasha, who was later to serve a number of years as


World War II and Post War Recovery 137

a faculty member in Mechanics; George Eaton, Jr., PE, Stamps, AR; and Wayne Swearingen, PE, Perry. On January 7, 1948, Pi Epsilon Tau, honorary fraternity for Petroleum Engineers was installed at the University of Oklahoma. The Men of Might listed in the March 1948 issue of the Sooner Shamrock were Bill Forney, ME, Tulsa; Joe Morris, PE, Eldorado, Kansas; and Dave Rodgers, ChE, Hugo. All three were returning veterans. The 1948 campaign for Engineering Queen was intensly competitive according to the reports in The Oklahoma Daily. The campus was deluged with campaign materials. Pretty girls in green shirts and short shorts passed through engineering classes, passing out handbills. Block long parades with convertibles filled with girls carrying placards drove through Norman with horns honking. Dorthy Duffy, a Fine Arts sophomore and a Kappa Alpha Theta from Ponca City was elected from the field of four candidates. The Daily Oklahoman published a statement by John Gough, Captain of the Guards that 15 good men were watching over the Queen every second. This was in response to a published report that the lawyers planned to kidnap her. But at 3 a.m. Wednesday morning of Engineering Week, 30 lawyers entered the Phi Kappa Psi housemother’s apartment where Dorothy was hidden and whisked her out of bed. The engineering students chased and hunted for the kidnappers for five hours before the Queen was returned to campus. A record snow storm snarled traffic that day; however, it did not dampen the Engineering Week activities. The paper reported that the Engineers’ Variety Show was the best ever staged. There was some concern expressed that the jokes, songs and dances were a little too risqué. An elaborate stage setting, including a large cardboard castle was prepared in Building 92 of the south campus where the coronation ball was to be held. In the afternoon before the dance, the lawyers broke into the building and painted Monnett in huge red letters in red paint across the castle and splashed red paint over the entire set. The engineers worked feverishly to repair the damage in time for the evening coronation. Oklahoma City radio station KOMA broadcast the crowning of Queen Dorothy and St. Pat was revealed to be Harold Stanley, PE junior from Smackover, Ark. As a follow-up to these events a week later, Bill “Beep” Jennings, the law student, who had been an instigator in the Queen kidnapping, was whisked from his bed in the Sigma Chi house and taken to a field west of Norman at 3:45 a.m. His hair was clipped and he was left standing in the cold spring morning air, barefooted in his night clothes. In the April 1948 issue of the Sooner Shamrock the Men of Might were Stan Koutz, AeroE, Ponca City; Bobby Henry, an outstanding woman ME student from


World War II and Post War Recovery 138

Bartlesville; and Charles Mauck, ME, Birmingham, AL. In May, those selected for this honor were Bob Caswell, ME, Clinton; Homer Weeks, ME, Rogers, AR; and Jim Heid, PE, El Paso, TX. The new Engineering Building addition was occupied in the fall of 1948, easing the overcrowding that had been so acute since the return of the veterans. Unfortunately, the funds were depleted before the new library rooms could be completed. In October 1948, Harold Stanley, who had been elected St. Pat in the spring, took over as editor of the Sooner Shamrock. The Men of Might for October were Don Hott, ChE veteran from Medford, (possibly the son of either Sabert Hott, BSCE 1914, or Oliver Hott, BSME 1917, who both lived in Medford); and Rex Everett, PE, Ponca City (Rex married Betty Jo Kerr, who after graduation, remained as an engineer for the physical plant, while he finished his degree). In November, the Men of Might were Mike Rummell, PE, Lancaster, OH; Harold Miller, CE, Fox; and Warren Morris, GeolE, Eldorado, KS. All three were returning veterans. The December 1948 Men of Might were Guy Steele, GeolE, Okmulgee; Harold Stanley, PE, Smackover, AR; and Bill Matetich, GenE, a veteran from Ellwood City, PA. The 1949 Queen’s election and Engineering week celebration went without incident. Irene Bond, a junior majoring in interior decoration and member of Kappa Kappa Gamma was elected from a field of five contenders. The traditional Engineers’ Show was held Thursday night, March 17, 1949, at the Sooner Theater. Preston Rennie, a PE senior, was elected St. Pat and revealed at the coronation ball held at Building 92 on the south campus Friday night. The banquet was held Saturday night in the Union Ballroom. A feature article in the Thursday, March 17, 1949 Oklahoma Daily, noted the relatively large number of international students that had populated the College of Engineering, virtually since its founding in 1909. In the spring of 1949, the numbers of international students in the various programs were as follows: PE 38; ME 8; ChE 6; GenE 2; and CE 1. On Friday, April 29, the Engineering open house was held from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. and again on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. That afternoon the tornado destroyed the large hangar at Westheimer that was used by Aeronautical Engineering as a laboratory. Jim Cobb was the editor for the March issue of the Sooner Shamrock and the Men of Might honored in that issue were Mike Fiorillo, AeroE, New York City; Barney


World War II and Post War Recovery 139

Hendricks, CE. Aurora, IL; and Leonard Simmering. All were veterans. The April 1949 issue of the Sooner Shamrock honored as Men of Might Joe Wilson, ME, OKC; Jimmie Nelson, ChE, OKC, and Betty Jackson, ArchE, Norman. In May, the Men of Might included Jesse Fears, ChE, Shidler; Elizabeth Cole, EE, Missouri; and Preston Rennie, PE, Graham, TX. The October 1949 issue of the Sooner Shamrock was dedicated to the memory of Professor Vester E. Willoughby. Willoughby, who had just been appointed Chairman of the Department of Mechanics and Engineering Metallurgy, had been killed in the natural gas explosion in his home the month before, as described earlier in this chapter. Willoughby, in addition to being a good teacher, was the most active faculty member in supporting student activities. He had also served as the faculty advisor to the Sooner Shamrock since the first year of its publication. He had been the faculty adviser to the Engineers’ Club, the LKOT, and the Oklahoma Society of Women Engineers. The tower room over the northeast corner of Felgar Hall was later made into the Willoughby Lounge as a fitting memorial of his dedication to engineering students. Harry Hill, then a recent ME graduate and an Instructor in Mechanics, took over as faculty adviser of the Sooner Shamrock, having served on the staff of the publication as a student. In the October issue, George McKown, PE, OKC; Don Harder, EE, OKC; and Jim Harmon, GeolE, Heavener were the Men of Might. Jim Cobb continued as the editor through the November 1949 issue of the Sooner Shamrock. In that issue, the Men of Might were John Westervelt, PE, OKC; George Copland, ME, Norman; and Jim Ballard, PE, Sulphur. Beginning with the March 1950 issue, R. P. Egermeier was the editor. There were no Men of Might selected for that issue. In March 1950, Norma Tate, a sophomore speech major from Seminole and a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority, was elected Queen from a field of three candidates. On the Wednesday night before the Engineering Show on Thursday, two men claiming to represent Life Magazine approached her at the house. The men were actually a Law freshman, Jack Noles and William Badger, an Arts and Sciences junior. They convinced Miss Tate to accompany them to Oklahoma City where they planned to have a photographer take pictures for a story that they were writing about campus pageants in the US. Soon after they were in Oklahoma City, Miss Tate became suspicious and demanded to be taken back to campus. The kidnappers became nervous about taking her back and claimed that their car had broken down, so they put her on a bus to Norman and disappeared. The whole incident was a great embarrassment to the Queen. On Thursday, March 16, 1950 the traditional show was held at the Sooner Theater at 7:00 and 8:30 p.m.,


World War II and Post War Recovery 140

and the admission was 50 cents. Louie Miller was the emcee of the show, which featured the Varsity Club Orchestra, Charlie Beal singing Old Man River, The Tri Delt Tea for Two Skit and 16 other “big� acts. Ted McCourry, a CE senior was revealed as St. Pat for 1950. The only other notable incident occurred when the lawyers stole the large plaque with the names of all LKOT alumni from the hall of the Engineering Building. The Men of Might in the April 1950 Shamrock were Harper Smith, GenE, Hummelstown, PA; and Ernest Dickinson, PE, Quannah, TX. In May, the list was Carl Haskett, Engineering Physics, Norman; Jack Hitt, GeolE, Altus; and Irving Hill, PE, East Lansing, MI. That year, 2,700 high school students went through the Engineering open house held on Friday and Saturday May 5 and 6. The 1940s were a turbulent and changing time for the University and particularly the College of Engineering. Although the curriculum stayed relatively stable, enrollments fluctuated dramatically due to the war and there was much turnover in the faculty ranks. It was an important period for graduate programs as the number of master degrees was on the increase, and Chemical Engineering was approved to offer the PhD. This perhaps foretold the trend for the decades ahead. References 1. Cross, George L., The University of Oklahoma and World War II, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1980. 2. Cross, George L., The University of Oklahoma Research Institute, 1941-1973, The University of Oklahoma Press, 1986. 3. The Oklahoma Daily, 1940-1950, from microfilm, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 4. Sooner Yearbooks, 1940-1950, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 5. Sooner Shamrock, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1941-Vol. 10, No. 6, 1950.


World War II and Post War Recovery 141

6. Minutes, College of Engineering Faculty Meetings, June 1940-June 1952. 7. The University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, 1940-1950, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries.


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 6 The Age of Computers Begins 1950-1960 World War II was over, but the tensions between communism and democracy grew to new levels. On June 25, 1950, North Korea invaded South Korea and the United States rushed to defend democracy, landing troops in South Korea on July 1, 1950. The Selective Service and draft were reactivated and selected reserve units were mobilized later in the month. Enrollments in the College of Engineering dropped from a post WW II record of over 4,000 students in 1946-47 school year to approximately 1,800 in 1951-52 and 1952-53. Increasing back to over 3,000 in 1956-57 and 1957-58 as the Korean War ended and the veterans of that war returned to campus. Not surprisingly, these large swings in enrollment caused major administrative problems in the staffing and funding of the College. By the end of the ten year period, the United States was again involved in war, caused by communist aggressions, this time in Vietnam. The 1950s were a time of great increases in the standard of living for the American people. Building on engineering developments of the 1930s and 1940s, the engineers of the 1950s led the industrial developments which provided many improvements in the comforts and conveniences of life. In the home, there was wide-spread utilization of automatic washing machines and dryers, automatic dishwashing machines, black and white televisions, freezers and refrigerators as frozen foods also became available. Transcontinental TV transmission was inaugurated in 1951. Color TV was also introduced, although it would be the next decade before use became widespread. Semiconductors made possible miniature hearing aids and pocket transister radios during the 1950s. Window air conditioners appeared in the older homes and in faculty offices on the campus, while in newer homes, central heating and air conditioning became popular. On campus, a chilled water system was installed in the physical plant to supply central air conditioning for campus buildings. Automobile manufacturers provided options of power steering, automatic transmissions, and air conditioning in automobiles with ever more powerful high-compression engines demanding heavily leaded fuels. President Eisenhower created the interstate highway system, and the Turner Turnpike, Oklahoma’s first highway built to interstate standards, was completed by the middle of the decade. Airline travel boomed, replacing the train as the primary means of long distance public transportation. During the last half of the decade the Lockheed Constellations and the Douglas DC 6 were replaced by the Boeing 707 as jet engines proved more reliable and economical as a means of aircraft propulsion. 142


The Age of Computers Begins 143

In 1954, the United States commissioned the first nuclear powered submarine, and in 1958, the Shippingport reactor was activated. In October 1958, The As had been predicted in the first isUniversity announced that a training sue of the Sooner Shamrock in 1940, nuclear reactor along with a reactor atomic power was used to propel simulator would be purchased and warships across the ocean. installed in the old journalism building. Dr. Robert Howard, Professor of Physics was in charge of the project. The reactor was purchased from Aerojet General Nucleonics for a price of $96,950. It was a swimming pool type reactor with the fuel rods and moderator control rods immersed in an open top tank of water five feet by three feet wide and eight feet deep. The power was licensed at 15 watts. The installation was completed in February 1959. The 1950s were notable for the advent of the space race. On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite. A few weeks later the Soviets again scored a victory by sending a satellite into orbit with a dog on board to test for hazards to life that might exist in outer space. The United States had also been working to boost a satellite into orbit and in the following year, the Vanguard satellite was boosted into orbit. By the end of 1960, the United States had orbited 44 payloads while the Soviets had successfully launched nine. It would be in early 1961 before Yuri Gagarin would be the first human to successfully orbit the earth. On the social front, the 1950s represent a significant step forward in assuring equal rights for minorities in this country. Although the first African-American had been admitted to law school at the University of Oklahoma in the previous decade, undergraduates and the public schools across the state remained mainly segregated. Supreme Court decisions as a result of litigation by courageous civil rights advocates assured that the University would move toward integration. Unfortunately, it would take several years and much work in order to attract minorities into engineering fields. In medicine, the use of antibiotics became widespread during the 1950s and for the first time, many of the deadly infections that threatened human health were treatable. However, a virus, which was not treatable with antibiotics, swept the country. Poliomyelitis spread in epidemic fashion across the nation. The Oklahoma Daily had a headline article in July 1953, telling of scheduled talks on polio and expressing hope for control. Dr. Jonas Salk had developed a vaccine in the previous year and it was planned that mass inoculations would be available by 1954. The Oklahoma Daily reported in April 1955, that the national immunization effort was


The Age of Computers Begins 144

faltering since eight children were reported to have contracted polio as a result of the vaccinations. In October 1956, it was announced that the Salk vaccine was available to all students on campus. The development that would have its greatest impact on engineering and engineering education, however, was the advent of commercially available digital computers. In 1951, Remington Rand, announced the first computer for sale to the public, the Univac I. IBM began to market the IBM 650, followed by the IBM 704. It was not until 1956 that IBM announced the availability of the Fortran compiler, which greatly assisted in the adaptation of engineering computations to the computer. In April 1956, The Oklahoma Daily carried an article headlined, “OU May Get Electronic Brain.� Dr. S. N. Alexander, BSEE 1931, Chief of Data Processing for the National Bureau of Standards came to Oklahoma City to confer with a committee of faculty and a group from Frontiers of Science (a committee of industrial leaders in Oklahoma who were promoting the development of science in education within the state). The discussions addressed how the University might obtain an IBM 650 or IBM 704. In October, the University ordered an IBM 650 with a delivery time of six to nine months. The cost of air conditioning for the machine was $15,000 and it was to be installed in the South wing of the old Journalism building. The computer was installed in the fall of 1957. The memory unit of the machine was a large segmented magnetic drum. Binary numbers were stored on the drum in 2,000 addressable locations. When the machine was first used on campus, the programming involved placing numbers into the central processing unit register, then adding or subtracting in the addition register and transferring the numbers to addresses on the drum. These numbers and instructions were fed into the computer with punched cards. An improvement came with the use of the symbolic optimized algorithm program (SOAP), permitting the use of alphabetic names for variables and the program stored these variables in drum locations which were optimized for the sequence of use. The Fortran programming language finally became available for use in 1959. It was obvious that engineering research would demand a larger and higher speed computer than the commercially available units at the time. In October 1958, plans for a fund drive were announced for a new high-speed computer to be built under the direction of Professor Gerald Tuma of the School of Electrical Engineering. It was to be built from the design of a computer under development at the University of Chicago, and the Atomic Energy Commission Laboratories at Brookhaven and Los Alamos. Rice University was also building a similar machine and would cooperate with the University of Oklahoma. The OSAGE Computer, as it was named,


The Age of Computers Begins 145

was originally planned to be available by 1960. The Merrick Foundation was a major contributor and the building to house the new computer was located in the new research park on North Campus. Unfortunately, the machine was built before widespread availability of semiconductors and the large banks of vacuum tubes proved to be unreliable. The computer was in use for a short time in the 1960s, but was soon replaced by a commercial IBM machine with solid state technology. During the entire decade of the 1950s, Dr. Cross served as president of the University and Dr. Carson served as Dean of the College of Engineering. The University faced some difficult times in the beginning of the decade. With the outbreak of the Korean War and the reactivation of Selective Service, enrollments dropped, particularly in engineering. In January 1951, the University faced a one million dollar cut in the budget for the second straight year. The University passed regulations requiring students to live in University housing. The Norman householders whose boarding houses had served students for 50 years filed lawsuits to prevent the University from building more housing. There was uncertainty over the Navy’s intentions to reactivate the two Naval bases in Norman, causing great concern to the University because both facilities were being utilized. Finally in 1952, the South base was reactivated which brought 7,000 Naval personnel. As the Korean War ended, the returning veterans accounted for swelling enrollments and the budget of the University again improved. A faculty pay raise increased the average annual salary from $4,000 to $4,400. Dr. Cross had a philosophy of academic administration that encouraged faculty to do their best work in both teaching and research. The institution was perceived by the faculty to be democratic and many stayed at the University because of that perception, even though higher salaries had been offered by other institutions. His thoughts on university administration are recounted in his delightful book, Letters to Bill. In 1953, he selected Dr. Pete Kyle McCarter, from the University of Mississippi to serve as Academic Vice President. At about the same time Dr. Horace Brown was made Dean of the College of Business and Vice President for Finance. These two vice presidents served as chairmen of two faculty councils that had great influence in the operation of the academic side of the university, these councils were the Budget Council and the Council on Instruction. Members of these councils were nominated by the Faculty Senate and appointed by the President. During this period, the deans of the colleges were placed in a position of having virtually no direct budgetary authority. The departments made up the budget along with an evaluation of the faculty performance in teaching, research and service. The committee A and department chairman would rate the faculty and recommend the salary increases. The college dean, the graduate dean, and the dean of the


The Age of Computers Begins 146

University College would each make recommendations. The Budget Council would then make its recommendation on a line by line basis for the faculty of the entire Norman Campus. The Council on Instruction approved each course change after the departmental initiation and approval of the appropriate college, including the Graduate College and the University College. The Council watched for duplication of courses, appropriate instruction level, and adequacy of the faculty and other resources of the department requesting the course change. Dean Carson continued to serve throughout the decade. He was active in his associations with the petroleum industry and travel to South America and the Middle East during this time. He served as chairman of the engineering committee of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission. In 1954, the Central University of Venezuela awarded him an Honorary Doctor En Ingeneria degree. He continued to chair the Gas Measurements Short Course, which had met on campus since its founding in 1924, and continued to grow under his leadership. Dean Carson continued to teach the “Mechanical Engineering Conference� course which he had established early in his career. These two one-hour-courses were essentially public speaking courses with the students making oral presentations of the technical articles appearing in the ASME Mechanical Engineering magazine. He also continued to devote much of his time to the engineering placement activities, promoting industrial visits to campus and arranging for students to interview the companies when they arrived on campus. President Cross was very much concerned with the development of research and graduate study throughout the University. This was a development that was required for the University of Oklahoma to become a true university and to serve the State of Oklahoma in its industrial growth. Nationwide, engineering had been mainly an undergraduate professional program throughout the 1930s, and the master’s degree was generally considered as the terminal degree. Only in Chemical Engineering, with close ties to chemistry, had the doctoral program been initiated. Dean Carson and many of the faculty of the college believed that the college should concentrate on undergraduate teaching and were not really interested in research and graduate study. In 1955, Dr. Cross recruited Dr. Cedomir Sliepcevich, a dynamic young professor at the University of Michigan, to come to Oklahoma as the new Chairman of the School of Chemical Engineering. Sliepcevich had been a good friend of Dr. Carl Riggs, who was a fellow graduate student at Michigan. A Professor of Zoology and later Graduate Dean at the University, Professor Riggs suggested Dr. Sliepcevich to the Dean of the Graduate College, Dr. Glenn Snider, who relayed the


The Age of Computers Begins 147

suggestion to Dr. Cross. Dr. Cross was somewhat concerned about the reception that Sliepcevich might receive from the College of Engineering, but Dr. Huntington and other faculty in the School of Chemical Engineering, welcomed him to the campus. The following year Dr. Sliepcevich was made Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and given the charge to develop the graduate and research programs. Dr. Sliepcevich was indeed a good selection and his leadership marked the start of a new era in the College of Engineering. He immediately started to attract highly qualified new faculty to the University. Dr. Cross, in his writing The University of Oklahoma Research Institute, 1941-1973, points out how Dr. Sliepcevich utilized the Research Institute in helping to attract these new faculty even with the low salaries available at OU. The OURI (University of Oklahoma Research Institute) was a non-profit corporation initiated a decade earlier that administered all the sponsored research for the University. Under the guidelines set up by the University and OURI, a faculty member could earn 25 percent extra salary during the academic year, paid by the sponsored research grant. In addition, a full-time appointment during the summer months provided an additional three months of salary. In addition to attracting new faculty, Dr. Sliepcevich played key roles in the acquisition of the IBM computer and the nuclear reactor. With the several new faculty who held doctoral degrees, and with the cooperation of the departments of Math, Physics, and Chemistry who were staffed by faculty having doctoral degrees, Dr. Sliepcevich designed a new program leading to the PhD in Engineering Sciences. This was in additional to the PhD in Chemical Engineering that had been established a decade earlier. The Oklahoma Daily announced that the program had been approved on November 21, 1957. A brief description of the program appeared in the 1958 College of Engineering Bulletin. In the 1959 Bulletin, more details were included. The program was under the direction of the Graduate Standards Committee of the College of Engineering and the Dean of the Graduate College. Reading proficiency was required in two languages with at least one of those being Russian or German. A minimum of twenty graduate credits Cedomir Sliepcevich


The Age of Computers Begins 148

were required from the pure sciences with a minimum of nine hours of mathematics beyond calculus. A number of graduate students took advantage of this program, including three assistant professors who were given special permission by the Graduate College. Thomas Henry Puckett, an Instructor in EE was the first to be awarded the degree in 1960. Other noteable individuals in the program were James Palmer, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; Frank Cole, Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering; and Tom J. Love, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Palmer was awarded his degree in 1963 and Love took advantage of an NSF Science Faculty Fellowship to completed his degree at Purdue University the same year. Cole left the University for industry without completing his degree. Ed Blick, a graduate student in Aeronautical Engineering participated in the program, also receiving his degree in 1963, and continued on the faculty until his retirement. In addition to the initiation of the doctoral program, Dr. Sliepcevich also led the faculty in a move to upgrade the quality of undergraduate education. After a long and sometimes bitter battle, the faculty adopted the core curriculum in the spring of 1960. The concept of the core represented the courses which the faculty considered basic to any engineering degree. In addition, the core replaced “service courses� which departments taught for students in other engineering curricula than their own discipline. These core courses, taken by all engineering students, were designated as Engineering courses (rather than ME, EE, CE, etc.). Each course was administered by a committee selected from each school. This committee determined the course content, selected the book, and negotiated with the school chairmen to obtain the best possible teacher for the course. The August 1960 bulletin listed the undergraduate engineering curricula that is included on the following page. In April 1959, Oklahomans went to the polls and voted to legalize liquor sales. Alcoholic bottled beverages were to be sold in closely regulated stores. The sales of alcoholic cocktails and mixed drinks were still forbidden; however private clubs were permitted if the members supplied their own bottles. Oklahoma was one of the last states to repeal prohibition. In July 1959, the South Naval Base closed, permanently and the land was divided between the city of Norman and the University.


The Age of Computers Begins 149

August 1960 bulletin summary of engineering curricula Group A Courses

Credit Hours

Military Science or equivalent (a University requirement)

4-8

Math 21, 22, 103, 104; or 22, 103, 104

13-18

Chemistry 1, 2, 203; or 3, 203

8-11

English 21, 22

6

Speech 21 Engineering Drawing

2 2

Physics 51, 52

10

Engineering Core Courses Introduction to Engineering

2

Thermodynamics

4

Structure and Property of Materials

3

Electrical Circuits and Machinery

3

Engineering Laboratory I

1

Instrumentation and Analogs

2

Engineering Laboratory II

1

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

4

Statics

2

Strength of Materials

3

Dynamics

3

Advanced Engineering Laboratory

n/a

Group B Courses

Credit Hours

US Government US History Humanistic-Social Studies Chemistry or Physics Math (above Math 104)

3 3 9 3 6

Group C Courses

Credit Hours

Professional Electives

26-39

The total curriculum ranged from 126 to 152 hours.


The Age of Computers Begins 150

In January 1960, ROTC was dropped as a requirement for male students at the University of Oklahoma. The College of Engineering, with problems of a curriculum already overflowing, also dropped the requirement, easing somewhat the number of hours required for the bachelor’s degree. Accordingly, students wishing to take ROTC were required to take extra work to obtain their commission. The faculty changes during the decade of the 1950s are listed by department in the appendix. The production of degrees in the College is illustrated by the table on the following page. These numbers were taken from the Commencement Bulletin and include summer graduations. In the fall of 1950, the activation of the draft and the partial call up of reserves for the Korean War created an air of uncertainty for many students. The University was faced with the uncertainty of possibly losing facilities on the two Naval bases inherited from World War II, and faced a one million dollar drop in the budget for the second straight year as 1950 ended. The November issue of the Sooner Shamrock honored the Men of Might including two veteran pilots from World War II Charles Caudill, ME, Wichita Falls, TX; Jim Shults, CE, Gaston, TX; and Ted McCourry, CE, OKC, and a member of the NROTC. In the tradition of the times, the engineering students took an active part in the homecoming parade. The theme of the parade in 1950 was musical in nature. The EEs won first place with a float portraying “The Old Mill Stream.” Water was pumped over a water wheel. Fortunately, it was after the float had gone past the judging stand when and electrical problem caused a wire to burn out and the pump stopped. The ME float was a paper mache head which blew large soap bubbles for the song, “I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles.” A student had to ride inside the float and switch wires back and forth to make it operate. The PE float entitled “That Old Black Magic” rode on a 65 foot low boy, and the Geological Engineers, had a team of mules pulling a wagon for the song “Mule Train.” The Men of Might honored in the March 1951 issue of the Shamrock were Howard Perdue, PE, AR; Richard Denner, CE, Enid; and L. F. Meador, CE, Blue Eye, MO. Perdue, an Air Force veteran, was elected St. Pat later in the month.


22 0

15

36

5 4

54 1

62 2

19

11 3 0

BS AeroE MS AeroE

BS Arch MS Arch

BS ArchE

BS ChE

MS ChE PhD ChE

BS CE ME CE

BS EE MS EE

BS Engr. Phys

BS GenE MS GenE PhD Engr

continued on following page

‘51 0 3

3 2 0

16

33 1

39 4

2 1

23

14

37 0

‘52 8 1

2 3 0

9

28 1

22 1

0 0

17

9

28 1

‘53 6 1

7 0 0

16

22 1

18 4

3 1

21

3

13 1

‘54 9 0

3 2 0

6

22 0

16 7

5 0

21

6

24 2

‘55 9 0

6 1 0

12

34 1

20 5

6 0

20

5

22 1

‘56 14 2

5 0 0

17

64 2

27 5

4 0

29

9

32 0

‘57 25 0

1 4 0

20

71 2

17 3

13 1

36

19

18 0

‘58 44 10

Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees granted 1951-1960

5 3 0

21

73 5

32 6

5 0

27

21

32 0

‘59 25 5

2 4 1

27

59 1

27 5

7 1

35

13

21 0

‘60 44 3

The Age of Computers Begins 151


The Age of Computers Begins 152

BS MetE MS MetE

BS PE MS PE

BS NatGasE

BS ME MS ME

BS IndMgtE

BS GeoE MS GeoE

0

0 0

166 6

4

80 3

4

‘51 65 3

0

0 0

100 9

0

37 1

7

‘52 35 3

0

0 0

86 9

4

32 1

6

‘53 28 2

0

0 0

71 7

0

37 2

21

‘54 31 0

0

0 0

87 13

1

24 2

13

‘55 26 2

0

0 0

105 6

7

27 2

9

‘56 36 1

0

0 0

112 10

6

50 0

11

‘57 40 0

0

0 0

105 12

4

70 3

16

‘58 43 3

0

0 0

108 7

1

51 2

14

‘59 50 2

4

5 1

74 9

0

78 3

17

‘60 37 3

Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees granted 1951-1960

MS NucE


The Age of Computers Begins 153

Five beautiful women campaigned for the title of Engineers’ Queen, with Raynelle (Sandie) Sanderlin, elected Queen for 1951. Queen Sandie was an Alpha Phi majoring in Spanish from Shreveport, LA. The Engineers’ Show featured a number of acts from across campus and was ably led by Master of Ceremonies, Doug Cummings. The 1951 Engineering open house was held April 27 and 28, 1951, with Petroleum Engineering winning first prize by displaying a scale model of an oil field, complete with operating pumps pumping oil. Geological Engineering won second with Industrial Management Engineering winning third. The Men of Might selected in the May 1951 issue of the Sooner Shamrock were: Eddie Good, PE, San Antonio, TX; Joe Burke, ChE, Upper Darby, PA; and Doug Cummings, GeoE, Crescent. (Cummings had a very successful career in the oil and gas industry proved generous in his support of the College of Engineering and the University.) In September 1951, the addition to the Oklahoma Memorial Union building was completed, and in October, the Aeronautical Engineering Laboratory building was completed on the North Campus. This building was to replace the Hanger that had been destroyed by tornado in 1949. The structure, built for $105,000, housed a machine shop, a power plants lab, a structural test lab, a classroom and an office. The slide rule, which had been the chief computing tool for the engineering student, continued as the main symbol of engineering. All engineering students took required drawing courses and the drawing set was also a part of the engineer’s distinctive property. In October 1951, an ad for the Varsity Book Shop listed the following prices. Frederick Post Drawing Set Deitzgen Reliance Drawing Set K&E Mercury Drawing Set Slide Rules from $2.50 to $27.50 Keuffel and Esser Picket & Eckel Log-Log Duplex Decitrig

$21.75 $21.75 $23.00


The Age of Computers Begins 154

The Keuffel and Esser Log-Log Duplex rule, which had been the main choice in the 1940s, was constructed from a dense wood with plastic laminated faces. The term “Duplex” referred to the construction of the rule which consisted of two “fixed” scales supported by metal brackets at either end with a sliding scale working between the two Engineering students were outside pieces. The basic principle of the rule identified by the twelve-inch was that of adding logarithms in order to multirule, which hung from the ply. The “C” and “D” scales were used together belt in leather cases, always for most multiplication and division. The Logat the ready. Log scales were logarithms of logarithms and were used to raise numbers to fractional powers. Trigonometric functions were also available on the rules, with some rules including hyperbolic functions. The Pickett and Eckel rule was a post World War II product made of aluminum. Frederick Post also produced a slide rule, called the Post Versalog, with wood and plastic construction that became very popular with students in the 1950s. The scales on most of the slide rules were ten inches in length and provided an accuracy of three significant figures, which was satisfactory for most rough design work where the uncertainties of material properties were usually only known to one or at the most two significant figures. Most students who took courses from Professor Dawson in Mechanical Engineering, however, remember his twenty inch slide rule on which he would compute to four or five significant figures. Dawson, who was a very good and popular teacher, liked to pull out the rule and frighten new students with the thought that they would need to compute with the same precision as he. In addition to the slide rule, engineers utilized tables of logarithms for computations which required more than the three significant figures accuracy obtainable with the slide rule. In surveying classes, the book of tables for the logarithms of the trigonometric functions was an absolute necessity. Also available were a couple of mechanical calculators in each department. These calculators cost over $1,000 each and were noisy and slow, particularly when dividing. Few, if any, realized that within two decades the slide rules, the logarithm tables, calculators, and indeed, the drawing sets would become historical oddities. There was an article in the December 1951 Sooner Shamrock that told of digital computers and forecast, “These automatic computers will not only be used to solve complex and time consuming problems, but they will also be used in the automatic control of factories.” However, engineers of the time could scarcely dream of the day within a few decades when hand-held computers would provide computational power far beyond the capabilities of the large and seemingly sophisticated computers of the 1950s,


The Age of Computers Begins 155

automating not only factories, but automobiles and almost every machine in use. The Men of Might in the October 1951 Sooner Shamrock were as follows: Sam Wilson, ChE, Norman; Bill Farris, GeoE, Comanche; John Rowland, PE, Roswell, NM; and Bill Schofield, ME, Lake Charles, LA. Sam Wilson, who had been elected the outstanding Junior Engineer, the year before, was business manager for the Sooner Shamrock, President of the Engineers’ Club, and served in many other leadership positions. He later earned his MBA at Harvard and founded a successful industrial gasses supply business in Austin,TX. He served on the College of Engineering Board of Visitors and was an avid supporter of both the College and the University. In December, the list of recognized students included the following: R. C. Doremus, ME, Pompton Lakes, NJ; William H. Moody, ChE, Galena, KS; Carl Weatherford, PE, Stroud; and Jack Wilson, Monticello, MS. All were veterans of military service. In January 1952, the Navy reactivated the South Base and 7,000 men were moved into the base. This caused some problems for the University; but fortunately, the North Base was not repossessed by the Navy and the decreased enrollments with the new dormitories, eased the housing problems. In March 1952, the five Queen candidates wooed the engineering vote with booths constructed on the lawn in front of the Engineering Building. There was free coffee, cigarettes, cookies, conversion tables, book matches, cokes, and reportedly a few kisses given away campaigning votes. In a close vote, Ernestine “Ernie” Smith was elected Queen. She was an education major and a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority from Guthrie. Sam Wilson, President of the Engineers’ Club, announced that a pact had been signed with the lawyers that there would be no funny business and that the Queen would be left unguarded. K. Gene Mitchell, ChE senior from Seminole, was elected St. Pat for 1952.

Sam Wilson

On Thursday afternoon, before the annual dance, Queen Ernie received a call at her sorority house that John Vanderpool, her campaign manager was on his way to see her and that she was to wait in a downstairs room. About 3:30 p.m., she was seated in an anteroom when suddenly a hood was


The Age of Computers Begins 156

placed over her head and she was taken to Oklahoma City, where some woman stood guard over her. There was much concern about the abduction, but plans were readied to proceed with the dance, which was held Friday night in the Union Ballroom for $1.50 per couple. At about 9:43 p.m. engineering student Mairl McFall was checking the kitchen which adjoins the ballroom when he spied five figures in green robes and hoods with the Queen. The group made a dash for the elevator. McFall called for help from some engineers who were down stairs waiting for the elevator. When the door opened, Sam Wilson, grabbed one of the hooded figures, but the other four got away leaving the Queen behind. The one who was caught was taken away and questioned. He was reported to be an engineering student. There was nothing else reported in The Oklahoma Daily, but the May 1952 Sooner Shamrock reported that, “The whole kidnapping affair was later discovered to be a publicity gag by a group of engineering students who thought that they would see if they could stir up a little interest.” On Saturday, March 22, 1952, Queen Ernie Smith knighted 20 Knights, dubbing them with a twenty-inch slide rule. Dr. Morris Wardell, David Ross Boyd Professor of History was the speaker at the banquet. Dr. Lyle Albright, Assistant Professor of ChE, who had earned his way through college as a Magician, entertained the guests with magic tricks. The highlight of the banquet, however, was the announcement that the Engineering Building would be named Felgar Hall in honor of Dean Felgar, who had served as the first Dean of the College. In the March 1952 Sooner Shamrock, the following were honored as Men of Might: Gilbert Shaw, CE, OKC; Bill Price, PE, Norman; Owen Garriott, EE, Enid; and Gene Mitchell, ChE, Seminole and St. Pat for 1952. Owen Garriott later earned his PhD from Stanford and served on the faculty there before being selected to be an astronaut in 1965. His first space flight was in 1973 and lasted sixty days; his second flight was in 1983. He has been elected to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, is a member of the College of Engineering Board of Visitors and was elected to the College of Engineering Distinguished Graduates Society. The Engineering open house was held on Friday and Saturday, April 25 and 26, with the fund raising Engineers’ Show held in the Union auditorium on Friday night. The Petroleum Engineers won the open house for the fourth straight year with a model of off-shore operation. The ChEs won second with a processing plant layout and the CEs were third with a model landscape that included a dam, highways, and a bridge. IME had a sporting goods plant layout and the EEs had a


The Age of Computers Begins 157

display of photoelectric cells controlling water fountains, signs and radio programs, while the MEs had their traditional Rube Goldberg machine. According to The Oklahoma Daily, the Engineers’ Show “rolled ‘em in the aisles.” Don Strausbaugh was Master of Ceremonies for the fourteen acts which included performers from Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Delta Pi, Theta Xi, Delta Delta Delta, Gamma Phi Beta, and the residence halls. The Men of Might in the May 1952 issue of the Sooner Shamrock included Ralph Martin, ChE, Quantico, VA; Bill Harris, ChE, Marietta, OK; Bill McGee, IME, OKC; and Bill Hise, PE, Abilene, TX. Ralph Martin, who was editor of the Sooner Shamrock, later returned to the University and had a career with the University of Oklahoma Research Institute as a technical writer and administrator. On July 8, 1952, The Oklahoma Daily announced that Architecture had received a five-year accreditation and that the School had moved into the north wing of the Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, where offices, classrooms, and studios would be located on the second and third floor. The remodeling of the Engineering Auditorium, room 300 in Felgar Hall, was completed in the summer of 1952. The work included air conditioning the room, with the windows closed off by interior curve acoustical panels. The stage was remodeled, and a projection booth was built over the entrance to the room. The old cast iron and wooden seats were replaced with cushioned theater seats. In addition, an elevator was installed providing access to all floors including Willoughby Lounge on the fourth floor. The elevator was operated by a hydraulic lift, with the main

Among many updates that occured to Felgar Hall in 1952, an elevator was added which provided access to all four floors of the building


The Age of Computers Begins 158

piston retracting into a deep pit drilled in the ground below the first floor. Private funds for the elevator were provided by a fundraising drive led by Morris Spencer, BSME 1930, and Susan Aycock Turnbull, BS Arch 1936. On October 1, 2, and 3, 1952, the College of Engineering hosted the National Convention of Tau Beta Pi, the premier honor society for engineering comparable to Phi Beta Kappa for Arts and Sciences students. There were 150 delegates in attendance from 90 chapters across the nation. Robert H. Nagle, the National Secretary-Treasurer for many years, was in attendance. The Men of Might honored in the October issue of the Sooner Shamrock were Clint Atkins PE, Fort Stockton, TX; Bill Cagle, EE, Hollis; Ron Withers, GeoE, OKC; and Robert Laidlaw, PE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. In the December issue, those listed were, Gene Bane, CE, Knoxville, IA; Dick Alden, ME, Bartlesville; Anne Warren, PE, Shreveport, LA; and Alec Thompson, PE, OKC. On February 3, 1953, 2,000 people witnessed the dedication of the new Aeronautical Engineering Building on the North Campus. The building had actually been open for classes in the fall. There were 18 B-25 bombers from Vance Air Force Base that flew in formation over the ceremonies. The lights of the campus were changed to green for Engineers’ Week, which proceeded with little controversy. Neva Rae Chestnut, an Arts and Sciences sophomore from Oklahoma City and a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority, was elected to be the Engineers’ Queen from a group of five candidates. Tom McCasland, PE, was her campaign manager. McCasland, from Duncan, was to become a highly successful leader in the oil and gas industry and has been a long-time supporter of the University and the College. He has served on the College of Engineering Board of Visitors and the Board of Trustees of the University of Oklahoma Foundation. The McCasland Foundation has also been a major benefactor of the University, including the endowment of the McCasland Chair in Petroleum Engineering. Robert Laidlaw, PE, Calgary, Ontario, Canada, was elected St. Pat for 1953-54. The Oklahoma Daily, March 19, 1953, noted that there were only seven women students in Engineering. Majoring in EE were Jane Varga and Mary Nell Applegate of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Anne Warren was listed as the only PE major. Architecture Engineering majors were Violeta Eidelman, Barbara Jean Bauer, JoAnn Hickman, and Marjorie Mabrey. The Men of Might in the March 1953 issue of the Sooner Shamrock were Paul Moore, EE, Perry; Ralph Russell, PE, Houston, TX;


The Age of Computers Begins 159

Roy Stark, Architect from Appleton, WI; and Bob Jones, PE from Windyville, MO. In the spring of 1953, a new national honor society for Aeronautical Engineering was formed by merging Tau Omega, a national organization that had been founded at the University of Oklahoma in 1928, and Gamma Alpha Rho, which had been founded at Rennselaer Polytech in 1946. The historic meeting forming the new Sigma Gamma Tau was held at Purdue University. Professor L.A. Comp of OU was elected as the first president of the new society. Professor Comp recounted that the new Greek letters were chosen after much debate to represent the sum (Sigma) of Gamma (Alpha Ro) and Tau (Omega). The annual open house was held on Friday and Saturday April 24 and 25. The EEs and PEs tied for first place with the Industrial Management Engineers winning third. The Engineers’ Show was held in Meacham Auditorium on Saturday night with the acts drawn from campus organizations. On Thursday, April 30, 1953, The Oklahoma Daily ran a story of the returning prisoners form the Korean and Red Chinese prison camps. There were horror stories of the treatment of captured U.S. servicemen. Included, was the story of a death march in which 800 prisoners had been executed. Later in the decade, Wallace L. Brown, a Captain in the USAF became a student in Mechanical Engineering at OU under the auspices of the USAF Institute of Technology, Civilian Institutes Division. As a Lieutenant, on his first mission in a B-29, he had been shot down and was held prisoner of the Chinese for two-and-a-half years. He told of his ordeal in a moving book relating the details of the inhumane treatment that he and the others in the crew suffered at the hands of the Red Chinese. In the May 1953 issue of the Sooner Shamrock, the Men of Might were Sherm Creson, EE, Seminole; Bill Casteel, ChE, OKC; Dave Kindig, EE, Bartlesville; and Norman Rudi, Architecture, Glidden, TX. On Tuesday, May 3, 1953, The Oklahoma Daily, reported that the Student Senate had considered a proposition that the veil of secrecy be lifted from LKOT. The engineering students argued successfully that the membership of LKOT was on file in the Engineering Dean’s office, and that no rules were being broken. It was pointed out that the organization was not malicious, and that it was under University control despite the fact that the membership was secret to the public. Tragedy struck the University on Friday, July 17, 1953, when a C-117 carrying a


The Age of Computers Begins 160

group of NROTC students crashed on take off from Whiting Field. Of the 22 students who died, 12 were majoring in Engineering. The names of those who died were: James C. Stafford, Jr., EPhys Soph.; David R. Smith, EPhys Sr.; Lee Wayne Smith, EE Soph.; Lloyd Mosley Smith, EPhys Soph.; Edmund Fahrenkamp, ChE Soph.; Eldred Donor Bates, Engr. Soph.; John Paul Hughes, GeolE Soph.; Roy Verl Ludlow, EE Jr.; Robert E. Rhyne, Engr. Soph.; James Paul Raibourn, EE Soph.; George H. Prentis, IME Soph.; and Billy Everett Mills, EE Soph. The Sooner Shamrock listed Charles Bare, PE, Chickasha and John Borden, ME, OKC as the Men of Might in October 1953. The December issue named Richard Elms, EE, Erick; Jerry Glahn, ChE; Art O’Toole, PE, Bethlehem, PA; and Dillard Hammett, CE, OKC. The campaigns to elect the Engineers’ Queen were waged with the usual enthusiasm. According to The Oklahoma Daily, booths were erected in front of Felgar Hall with the contestants and their supporters passing out cigarettes, cokes, green cookies shaped like shamrocks, tea, book marks, and conversion tables. A six man jazz combo blasted out songs of “If you know Susie like I know Susie” and “Sweet Sue,” in support of candidate Susie Reily, who was elected to be the Queen for 1954. Queen Susie was a junior in education from OKC and a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority. Later in the spring she was elected Miss OU for 1954. The several years of quiet between the engineering students and the law students was broken when on Monday, March 15, 1954, the law students were greeted by three green shamrocks painted on either side of the entrance to the law barn (Monnett Hall), and the shields over the door were also painted green. The Daily Oklahoman ran a picture of the physical plant crew sand blasting the painted emblems. College of Law Dean Earl Sneed was quoted as saying, “We are tired of having our building painted up, but we will not seek retribution.” The St. Pat’s Council and Engineers’ Club sent letters of apologies to the College of Law for the paint. The year 1954, marked an innovation for the annual Engineering celebration. The first annual beard contest was held. Ken Hanes won the overall competition, but Bob Laidlaw was the most photogenic having trimmed the shape of a shamrock on his chin. In preparation for the annual dance, the engineering students committed an unfortunate design error on the elaborate decorations for the dance. When they tried to get them into the Union Building, they were 1/2 inch too large. The decorations were disassembled, transported on into the ballroom, and assembled on site. At the


The Age of Computers Begins 161

dance, Otis Gallas, PE, Kermit, TX was revealed as the new St. Pat for 1954. He assisted Queen Susie in the knighting of 25 new Knights of St. Pat. at the banquet, which followed on Saturday night, with approximately 50 in attendance. At each place there was a bag of favors, sent by various companies, who had responded to a letter written by Dorothy Clay, Dean Carson’s Assistant. In the March 1954 issue of the Sooner Shamrock, Jim Curran, EE, Shawnee; Jim Loomer, ChE, and Jon Withrow, PE were listed as the Men of Might. Those listed in the May issue were, Mary Nell Applegate, EE, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Bill Kennedy, ME, Norman, and Jack Harmon, PE, Bradford, PA. The annual open house and Engineers’ Show were held April 23 and 24, 1954. The Petroleum Engineers won first place with 24 exhibits showing the four phases of “Oil from Exploration to the Gas Station.” Chemical Engineering won second with their model refinery, atomic power plant, and model railroad. The EEs won third with a robot seeking light, an electronic puppy obeying spoken commands, and other exhibits. On Saturday, a special ceremony was held and Dorothy Clay was made honorary Engineers’ Queen, and given one of the green shirts, which had become emblematic of the Engineering College. Dorothy was always helpful. As custodian of student records for the College, she provided graduation checks for the students and much more by helping with advice on job interviews, judging beard contests, and in being and all-round friend of the students. The Show on Saturday night featured 16 acts, including can-can dancers and a magician. Two performances were required to meet the demand for tickets. In September 1954, four blasts from “Old Trusty” announced the first Engineers’ Club meeting of the year. The College of Engineering enrollment was given as 2,252 including only 13 women. The Men of Might in the October issue of the Sooner Shamrock were Bill Guffy, PE; Larry Swanson, IME; Ed Ligon, IME; and Hoyle Lockett, CE. The Engineering week celebration for 1955 began February 15 with the start of the second annual beard contest. Prizes were provided by 12 Norman businesses. In March, Jenny Lou Grimmett was chosen from a field of four contestants as the Queen. She was an education major from Houston, TX and a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority. Keith Farris, a PE senior from Lethbridge, Canada, was elected as St. Pat. The Engineers’ dance was held in the Union Ballroom on Friday night, March 18, 1955, followed by the banquet on Saturday night. Professor Joe Keeley was the master of ceremonies and the principal speaker was Mr. E.H. (Eddie) Chiles, President of the Western Company. A BSPE


The Age of Computers Begins 162

1934, Chiles was elected into the Distinguished Graduates Society in 1992. Professor Lyle Albright entertained the guests with magic tricks. Knighthood was bestowed by the Queen upon 24 seniors. Open house and the annual Engineers’ Show were held the following week. The show featured 16 acts and received good reviews in The Oklahoma Daily. Civil Engineering won first place in the open house with a model canal from Oklahoma City to the Kiamichi River and a history of bridge construction. Geological Engineering featured the hunt for uranium while the PEs drilled a 2,000 feet deep model oil well. On February 14, 1956, clean shaven contestants registered for the third annual beards contest to compete for $200 in prizes. On March 9, 1956, Paula Davenport, an education sophomore from Duncan, was chosen as Engineers’ Queen. Jack Keeley, CE from Norman, and son of Professor Joe Keeley, was revealed as St. Pat at the Engineers’ Dance held in the Union Ballroom on Friday March 16, 1956. Dean Carson served as Master of Ceremonies at the banquet held Saturday night. The annual Engineers’ Show fund raiser was held Friday, April 20, 1956, in Holmberg Hall with curtain time at 8:30 p.m. The show was made up as usual of acts from the sororities, fraternities, organized houses and individuals. On the same day, the annual open house was held in the afternoon and all day Saturday. The Architects built an arch over the reflecting pool made from 9,247 pieces. There were 1,927 pieces of 3/8 x 1 3/8 lath, 2,026 screws, 4,880 washers, 414 Bolts, and 414 3/4 Novaply triangular joint connectors. The PEs exhibit of models rigs and pumping units around the world, tied with the MEs Pi Tau Sigma Rube Golberg machine that printed law degrees on pink toilet paper. The CEs won third place with a model of a multi-purpose reservoir. The October 26, 1956 issue of the Daily Oklahoman reported the results of a student election for the top ten teachers on the OU campus. Professor J. F. Brookes of Civil Engineering and Professor Gerald Tuma of Electrical Engineering were the faculty members from Engineering that were included in the top ten. The Engineering students, after much discussion concerning the amount of activities crammed into Engineers’ week, decided to hold the annual variety show in the fall in order to alleviate the problems in the spring. The show was held on Friday November 16, 1956. Dean Augman, a law student, was the emcee for the 15 acts that performed in Holmberg Hall.


The Age of Computers Begins 163

The Men of Might page in the Sooner Shamrock, which had been omitted from the 1955-56 issues, reappeared in 1956-57. In October 1956, those honored were Dan McNatt, CE, OKC; Bob Kirby, PE, Ridgeway, IL; and Dick Day, ME, OKC. Day spent his career with OG&E and served as Vice President of Sales for that company. In December 1956, all three of the Men of Might were Mechanical Engineering majors: Ed Casteel, John Wallis, and John Holtzclaw. In March 1957, those listed were Gene Hegi, EE, Vilonia, AR; Jack Keeley, Norman; and Jim Williams, PE, Lloydminister, Alberta, Canada. The Men of Might in the May issue were Dwight Smith, AeroE, OKC; Ryan Adams, PE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; and Bat Shunatona, PE and GeolE, Wewoka. Married students had made up a significant fraction of the engineering student body since the veterans of WW II and Korea had returned to campus. On October 18, 1956, an organization of engineering student wives was formed. The Daily Oklahoman on March 12, 1957 announced, “Slide Rule Wives Organize.” Mrs. Don Menzie and Mrs. John Campbell were the faculty wives that served as the initial sponsors. Officers elected were, Mrs. Myrna Albright (President), Mrs. JoAnn Cate (VP), Mrs. Ann Jeffries (VP), Mrs. Carolyn Stewart (Recording Secretary), Mrs. Carol Southard (Corresponding Secretary), Mrs. Jean King (Treasurer), and Mrs. Marianelle Martin (Historian). The third annual beards contest began in February and culminated at the banquet during Engineers’ week. The 1957 Queen’s contest was again a week of politicking by the candidates and their sponsors. Cecille HoovenRoberts was chosen from a field of five beautiful hopefuls. She was a junior from Norman, and a member of Dorothy Clay, Assistant to the Dean and Senator Chi Omega sorority. Bat Josh Lee were made honorary knights in 1957 Shunatona, a senior in PE and GeolE from Wewoka, was elected St. Pat. He was also a veteran of the Korean War. Former Senator and OU Speech Professor Josh Lee was the speaker at the banquet on Saturday evening March 16, 1957. Honorary Knighthood was bestowed upon Senator Lee, Dorothy Clay, Assistant to the Dean, and Professor J.F. Brookes.


The Age of Computers Begins 164

The annual Engineering open house was held Friday and Saturday, March 5 and 6, 1957. The Mechanical Engineering exhibit featured a seven-foot spur gear, a Rube Goldberg machine that was a 15-stage baby spanker, a home made ram jet, and a torsion bar suspension, along with steam engines and internal combustion engines. Electrical Engineering took second place with a display of Hi-Fi sets and models of electrical fields. Petroleum Engineering placed third with a display of subsurface oil recovery operations. Aeronautical Engineering had a full-scale helicopter and a cut away of a two-stage rocket. The annual Engineers’ variety show was held Friday, November 22, 1957 at 8:00 p.m. in Holmberg Hall. It consisted of 15 acts by various campus organizations and individuals. The hit of the show was a marionette act created by Jim Gamble. An Aeronautical Engineering transfer from North Texas State, Gamble had achieved a professional level of production with marionettes which he had designed, fabricated, and manipulated. They were Fifi, a stripper; Sam Peabody, a drunk; Algernon; a trapeze artist; and Mr. Bones, a skeleton. Gamble entered active duty with the Air Force after graduation, and flew in the Berlin Air Lift. After separation from the Air Force, he flew as a captain for a major airline. He continued his hobby of puppeteering through this time and, after early retirement from the airline, developed his puppet studio into a very successful international business. The second year officers for the Engineers’ Wives Club were Mrs. Robert E. Schooler (President), Mrs. Robert G. Daniel (St. Pat Rep.), Mrs. Rex E. Ponsor (1st VP), Mrs. Donald F. Roush (2nd VP), and Mrs. Bill R. Glass (Secretary). Wives of the graduating seniors were awarded PhT degrees (Putting Hubby Through).

The Engineers’ Wives Club served as a social outlet for the wives of Engineering majors


The Age of Computers Begins 165

In March 1958, Deanna Erwin, a sophomore from Henryetta and a member of the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority was elected Queen from a group of six candidates. Maurice Box, ChE senior from Tahlequah, was elected St. Pat. The dance was held in the Union Cafeteria on Friday night, and the banquet was held in the Union Ballroom on Saturday night March 15. Governor Raymond Gary spoke and was made an Honorary Knight along with the 14 students who were dubbed Knights of St. Pat. The Men of Might named in the Sooner Shamrock for the 1957-58 school year are listed as follows. For October 1957, they were James E. Bradley, AeroE, OKC; Patrick Hosford, PE, Norman; and Clifford Dougherty, ChE, OKC. In December 1957, those honored were, Donald Goodman, PE, Blackwell; Gaines Godfrey, GeoE, Fort Worth, TX; and Maurice Box, ChE, Tahlequah. The March 1958, issue featured Jack Lawrence, GeoE, Pawnee; Jerry Fronterhouse, PE; and Bob Schwartz, ChE, Blue Island, IL. Fronterhouse, later became president of a large bank in Texas and served on the College Board of Visitors. The May 1958 magazine named Ed Parry, AeroE, Ardmore; Art Littleford, EE, Adair; and Al Buckingham, AeroE. Both Parry and Buckingham were Air Force veterans from the Korean War. Al Buckingham

Al Buckingham was a very talented cartoonist and his contributions to the Sooner Shamrock were always among the highlights of the magazine. His cartoons were somewhat prophetic and very comical. In the October 1958 issue he pictured the typical engineering student in 1980, which is included on the following page. On Friday, April 18, 1958, the annual open house began at 2:00 p.m. and lasted through Saturday. Architecture had another outdoors display composed of 9.7 miles of white cord, a 40-foot radio tower and quonset hut ribs. To construct the exhibit, took 20 students 60 hours each. IME built a model layout of an assembly line; AeroE displayed a water rocket, a pulse jet, a smoke tunnel, and a model ejection seat. EE had thirteen displays including police radar, an electric organ, a computer, and light beam transmission. The ChE exhibit featured sea water purification and a fluid flow visualization. Engineering Phyics built a robot, and MetE had a display


The Age of Computers Begins 166

One of Al Buckinham’s many cartoons that were featured in the Sooner Shamrock


The Age of Computers Begins 167

of crystal growth. ME had eleven exhibits including steam turbine, heat pump, power brakes, and fluid flow demonstrations. The CEs built a concrete hyperbolic parabloid building on the lawn for their exhibit. During the 1950s, the students on campus voted for their favorite summer session professor. Professor Fred Mouck, of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and always a student favorite, was runner up for five years. Finally, in the summer of 1958, he was elected as the favorite summer professor in a campuswide vote. In the fall of 1958, the north wing of the Bizzell Memorial Library was completed and the new library opened with much needed space for the growing University. In November 1958, the University closed Brooks Street where it crossed the campus and made an attractive pedestrian mall. Many of the town people, as well as students and faculty objected to the closing as being inconvenient; however, it did reduce the noise on campus and improved the safety and convenience for students crossing the campus between classes. The annual Engineers’ Show was held on Saturday, November 8, 1958 in Holmberg Hall with 12 acts from campus organizations competing for awards. The Men of Might for the fall issues if the Sooner Shamrock are given as follows. In the October 1958 issue, Fred Kelly, PE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Bill A. Glass, PE, Okmulgee; and Ralph Jackson PE, Maysville were listed. The December 1958 issue listed Jerry Miles, PE; Ted James, ME; and L. C. Smith, ME. Listed in the March 1959 issue were Riley Needham, PE; Luis Carrizales, ME, Caracas, Venzuela; and Steve Wixson, EE. The Men of Might in the May 1959 issue were Ves Neville, EE; Jerry Duncan, PE; and Jerry Moffett, ChE. In the spring of 1959, there were six women enrolled in Engineering out a total enrollment of 2,227. They were Ann Booth, PE; Sharon Butler, ArchE; Mildred Kane, ArchE; Ann Baldwin, Aero E; Anita Ruth Fisher, ChE; and Florence Risner, ME. The Engineering Student Wives organization boasted a membership of over 100 women and awarded PhT degrees to the wives of graduating seniors. Five sophomores campaigned to be crowned Engineers’ Queen for 1959, and Eva Brasel, a Pi Beta Phi member from Tulsa was elected. Ves Neville was chosen as St. Pat. The banquet was held Friday night March 13, 1959 in the Ballroom of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. The banquet speaker was Lt. Governor George Nigh. Special guests included Dean and Mrs. Carson, President and Mrs. Cross, and Professor and Mrs. Keeley. There were no major clashes with the lawyers this year.


The Age of Computers Begins 168

One note of interest appeared in The Oklahoma Daily concerning Ed Wong, ME, from Alberta, Canada. A very good student, was a self-taught tailor who made all of his own clothing including suits, shirts, slacks, jackets, and top coats. He also earned extra money as a player on the Oklahoma City Warriors, a semi-pro hockey team. The annual Engineers’ Show was held in Holmberg Hall at 8:00 p.m. on November 21, 1959; admission was $2. There were 12 acts featured and the marionette act by James Gamble, then a senior in Aeronautical and Space Engineering, was the hit of the show. On Friday, March 4, 1960, The Oklahoma Daily announced that Judy Black, a sophomore from Oklahoma City and a member of the Delta Gamma sorority, had been elected Engineering Queen from a field of five campus beauties. For Engineers’ week, the Sigma Tau initiates replaced all of the campus lights with green bulbs, which gave the University a green glow for the week. At the dance on Friday night March 18, 1960, Roy Adams was revealed as the new St. Pat. Roy was an Engineering Physics senior from Wewoka with a 3.95 grade point average. His campuswide honors included membership in Pe-et, Omicron Delta Kappa, Big Man on Campus, and he was selected as the top student senator. Mr. Donald S. Kennedy, President of OG&E was the speaker at the Saturday night banquet winding up Engineers’ week. Engineering open house was held on Friday and Saturday, April 15 and 16, 1960. The first place award went to the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering. Petroleum won second with Electrical Engineering placing third. The curriculum was changing to better prepare graduates for the “space age” and computers. There were also changes taking place in student life, that starting with the returning veterans of WWII and Korea. Expectations for faculty research were continuing to increase. As the spring semester of the 1959-60 school year came to a close, the College of Engineering was in a state of change. Plans for a new building were in the preliminary stages. The faculty was somewhat divided between the younger faculty led by Professor Sliepcevich, and the older more conservative faculty. Excerpts from letters written in 1989, in response to a general mailing, are included in the appendix of this book. These letters serve to provide some insights to the student life during this time. Nationally, there was a move spurred by the space race, to develop a curriculum based on a more advanced knowledge of mathematics, physics, and chemistry.


The Age of Computers Begins 169

The need for strong graduate programs and research initiatives were also being felt by the engineering colleges across the country. No longer was the professional master’s degree to be the “terminal degree” for engineering faculty. The computer was fast becoming an important tool. Clearly computers would permit engineering analysis based on advanced mathematics to become an everyday economical tool for the design of complicated systems, though few could foresee the availability and central role that computers would have in the future. The changes would be more visible in the decade to come.

REFERENCES 1. The Oklahoma Daily, 1950-1960, from microfilm, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 2. Cross, George L., Letters to Bill on University Administration, The University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1983. 3. Sooner Yearbooks, 1950-1960, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 4. The University of Oklahoma Bulletin, Issue for the College of Engineering, Issues from 1950-1960. 5. The University of Oklahoma General Catalog, Issue from 1950-1960, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 6. The University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, 1951-1960, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 7. Sooner Shamrock, Vol, 11, No.1-Vol. 19, No. 4, 1960.


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CHAPTER 7 A Changing College in a Changing World 1960-1970 In the 1960s, the United States successfully launched 471 payloads into space. This compares to seven and eleven in 1958 and 1959, respectively; and exceeds the total number launched in the next two decades. The Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin was the first human to orbit the earth in 1961. John Glen was the first American to orbit the earth. His flight in February of 1962 followed two sub-orbital flights by Alan Shepard and Guss Grissom. By the end of the decade, United States Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin had walked on the moon. Communication satellites changed forever human awareness and engagement in events around the world, and weather satellites constantly monitored over the entire planet. The decade was a turbulent time as our nation faced the potential of nuclear war with the Soviet Union, as well as an escalating and unpopular war in Vietnam. In November 1960, John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States and in April 1961, Cuban exiles in the United States invaded Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, and were soundly defeated by Castro’s forces. Soon after, aerial photographs identified Soviet Missiles being installed in Cuba. Immediate action by President Kennedy established a Naval blockade of Cuba and demand for the removal of the missiles; the Soviet Union complied. In July, President Kennedy called for the establishment of the draft and an activation of the military reserves. In September 1961, eight Oklahoma reserve units were called to active duty. As the cold war progressed, tensions in Europe were elevated by stand-offs in West Berlin, isolated by Soviet Union closure of the highway from Allied occupied Germany. The airlift of supplies and personnel provided some relief to the isolated city; however, the cargo planes were harassed by enemy fighter aircraft. In the meanwhile, the war between South Vietnam and the communist North Vietnam continued to escalate. On November 23, 1963, the world was shocked by the assassination of President Kennedy. Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson was immediately sworn in as President and served the remainder of the term, before being elected to serve a second term in November 1964. Since World War I Reserve Officer Training Corps had been compulsory for the first two years for all male students at the University. Now with the unpopularity of the conflict in Vietnam, there was increasing pressure to abolish compulsory 170


A Changing College in a Changing World 171

military training at universities around the nation. In March 1965, compulsory ROTC was discontinued at OU. This prompted a change in engineering curricula, which had always been under pressure for a reduction in the number of credit hours for graduation. However, since many of the engineering students elected to take ROTC, provision was made to make a number of the military science courses satisfy electives in the curricula. Throughout the nation there was a growing movement of protest against the Vietnam War. On campuses across the nation this protest was led by activist gropus such as the SDS (Students for a Democratic Society). This group also protested the authority of academic administration and threatened violence against all authority. They picketed the Model United Nations meeting as well as industrial recruiters, such as Dow Chemical, who were primarily interested in hiring engineering graduates. In addition to sponsoring a number of demonstrations on campus, they demanded class holidays, which they called Gentle Thursdays, calling for students to skip classes in protest of the war. On October 8, 1969, President Hollomon declared a University holiday to discuss the Vietnam War. Oklahoma Governor Bartlett, who had been increasingly critical of the University in its treatment of student protests, expressed publicly his regret if student did not attend class. In the College of Engineering, where the majority of students were not sympathetic to the SDS movement, classes were held with nearly 100 percent attendance. In addition to the Cold War, and the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement awakened the nation to the disgraceful injustices that were in existence in the treatment of racial differences. Martin Luther King led the movement, which eventually produced sweeping legislative changes. Unfortunately, violent actions by segregationist factions marred the peaceful movement toward recognizing equality for all citizens. On April 5, 1968, Reverend King was assassinated. The College of Engineering, during this period of time, actively recruited minority students and later in the decade developed formal programs for recruitment and support for minority students. Colleges of engineering nationwide, including the University of Oklahoma, had started in the 1950s to revise the undergraduate curriculum and to develop graduate programs requiring a stronger foundation in basic engineering sciences and mathematics preparing engineers to participate in and lead this race to explore space. In addition, the rapid development of computers foretold the application of engineering principles with more rigorous analysis to many problems of product design and manufacturing.


A Changing College in a Changing World 172

President Cross had recruited Dr. Cedomir Sliepcevich to serve as Associate Dean of the College in the 1950s in order to begin the development of more graduate studies and research programs in the College in order to bring the University of Oklahoma in-line with the increasing national needs for engineers with stronger basic studies in math and physical science. In 1962, Dean Carson reached the mandatory retirement age, which at that time was 67 for administrators. In September of that year, a groundbreaking ceremony for the new Engineering Center was arranged along with an appreciation dinner for the retiring Dean. The new facility, which was estimated to cost $2,872,444, would later be named Carson Engineering Center in the Dean’s honor. Carson, who was only the second Dean of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma, had served in that capacity for 25 years. It was announced that he would remain on the faculty as Professor of Mechanical Engineering and would be the Director of Engineering Placement Services. As Dean, the placement of graduates had always been a top priority. Many who graduated during his years as dean give him much credit for assisting them in obtaining their first jobs. William Henry Carson was born in Pittsburg, Texas and graduated from high school there in 1915. He attended the University of Wisconsin and after an interruption to serve 22 months in the Army during World War I, he received his BSME degree in 1923. After two years in industry, Carson’s teaching career began when he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma in 1925. In 1929, he was appointed as Chairman of the School of Mechanical Engineering. During 1933-1937, he served as Professor and Chairman of the Schools of Mechanical, Petroleum, and Natural Gas Engineering. He was appointed Dean of the College of Engineering in 1937 following Dean Felgar’s retirement. In 1954, the University of Venezuela conferred an honorary Doctor’s Degree on Dean Carson. He served as chairman of the executive committee of the Southwestern Gas Measurement Short Course, which was held on campus annually beginning in 1924. He served a term as president of the Oklahoma Society of Professional Engineers, and was an active member of numerous engineering societies serving in various leadership roles. He and Mrs. Carson traveled extensively on behalf of engineering education including visits to Canada, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, Venezuela, England, France, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, Syria, Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. Dean Carson retired from the faculty and as Director of the Engineering Placement Services in June 1966. He died from a heart attack in May 1969 at age of 73. After Carson retired as dean, President Cross offered the Deanship of the College


A Changing College in a Changing World 173

of Engineering to Dr. Sliepcevich. However, after the problems that he had faced in getting the faculty to establish the “core curriculum”, along with the difficulties in obtaining suitable financial support from the University, Dr. Sliepcevich decided that he much preferred to devote his energies to teaching and research than to academic administration. As a result, President Cross recruited Dr. Gene M. Nordby to be the new Dean of the College of Engineering. Dr. Nordby was only 36 years old when he was named the College’s third dean. For the previous four years he had served as Head of Civil Engineering at the University of Arizona under Dean Tom Martin, who was noted as an innovative engineering dean with strong emphasis on research. Nordby had earned his PhD at the University of Minnesota, and had served on the faculties at the University of Colorado and Purdue University. Prior to his tenure at Arizona, Nordby had served as Program Director for the Engineering Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation. Dean Nordby authored a textbook in structural mechanics and had done extensive research in the design of prestressed concrete structures. He officially became Dean at the start of the spring semester of the 1962-63 school year, and wasted no time in Gene M. Nordby making changes. He saw the 17 separate departments and schools as an unwieldy administrative organization. In May 1963, he obtained the Regents approval to reorganize the College effective as of July 1. The next bulletin to appear was not published until August 1965. In that bulletin the College was organized into the following academic units with the noted degree offerings: School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering School of Architecture Bachelor of Architecture


A Changing College in a Changing World 174 School of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical Engineering School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Sanitary Science Bachelor of Science in Engineering Meteorology School of Electrical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Department of Engineering Bachelor of Science in Engineering (options in Bio-Medical Engineering, Computer Science, Engineering Mechanics, Systems Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering: also the Engineering Honors Program) Program in Engineering Physics The College also offers the degree, Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics, administered by the Department of Physics of the College of Arts and Sciences in cooperation with the College of Engineering. Department of Industrial Education Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education School of Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering (also, an option in Natural Gas Engineering ) Bachelor of Science in Geological Engineering

It should be noted that the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics had been dissolved in the summer of 1962 before the appointment of Dean Nordby. The new Dean initially proposed eliminating the program in Engineering Physics and the degree. However, the program had been historically very strong and had been the first offered in the country. He was met with much opposition and the above listing represented a compromise. By the 1966 bulletin, the School of Industrial Education had been dropped and the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Meteorology was listed in the Department of Engineering. In 1967, the Department of Meteorology was listed as offering a Bachelor of Science degree. More discussion of this reorganization will be given in the section


A Changing College in a Changing World 175

discussing the faculty of the College. In 1969, the School of Architecture was separated from the College of Engineering, forming the College of Environmental Design. In the summer of 1963, construction began on the new Engineering Center, along with a separate building on the North Campus for Aerospace Engineering. The Engineering Center, later named Carson Engineering Center, was located just north of Felgar Hall. The six floor building housed the Dean’s offices on the main floor, which is the third level of the building. The sub-basement, which is entirely below grade, and the basement, which is partially below grade, were assigned to Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences. Industrial Engineering occupied a portion of the main floor. Electrical Engineering offices were located on the second floor. Civil Engineering and Environmental Science was assigned to the third floor. The fourth floor served primarily as laboratory space and class rooms for Electrical Engineering. The North Campus building 210 was built to serve Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, primarily for laboratories and graduate research facilities. It was built adjoining the existing Aeronautical Engineering building and consisted of a large high-bay area along with a two-story wing of offices, laboratories and class rooms. The move into the new engineering center was completed in the summer of 1965. The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering remained in Felgar Hall, in the west and east portions, respectively. In June 1966, President Cross announced his plans to retire as of June 1968. He proposed that a search committee be appointed as soon as possible to propose candidates to the Regents. Dr. Cross proposed that the new president spend a year on campus to become familiar with the University and its constituency. By the 15th of June, the Regents had appointed the search committee. It was chaired by Professor Gilbert Fite, and consisted of nine faculty from the Norman Campus; Dr. Robert Bird from the College of Medicine; Mr. Lou Sharpe, President of the Alumni Association; and Bill Whitehurst, President of the Student Association. The committee began work immediately. Throughout the entire process the committee worked closely with the Regents. Dr. Mark Johnson, President of the OU Regents, and Professor Fite visited the first choices of the committee in order to determine their interests. As it turned out, none of those visited wished to be candidates. Three outstanding nominees from the second ten did accept invitations to be interviewed. The regents choose Dr. J. Herbert Hollomon, who had been suggested by Dean McGee, President of Kerr McGee, after a group of the regents


A Changing College in a Changing World 176

flew to Washington, D.C. to meet with him and Mrs. Hollomon. The official announcement of his appointment as the new President of the University of Oklahoma was made on May 19, 1967, when he was presented to a standing ovation of faculty, staff, and students in the ballroom of the Oklahoma Memorial Union. Dr. Hollomon had an impressive record. He had received his PhD from MIT in 1946, working in the area of Metallurgy and was awarded the Alfred Nobel Prize in 1947 for his work in that field. As an Engineer with General Electric, he quickly rose to the position of General Manager of the G.E. General Engineering Laboratory. It is interesting to note that the December 1961 issue of the Sooner Shamrock included a full page advertisement from General Electric featuring Dr. Herbert Holloman. He served as a member of the President’s Science Advisory Committee and had been a cofounder of the National Academy of Engineering. At the time of his selection he was serving as Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Hollomon moved into his offices in Buchanan Hall on September 15, 1967. Meeting with a large group of students that very day, he made a point that “he just likes young people.” It did not take long, however, for controversy to find the new President-designate. He initiated a request, which the Regents approved, for a new President’s residence to be built on the South Campus for $195,000. A group of state legislators, led by State Representative George Nigh, protested. As a result, the Regents decided not to build a new home for the President, but a few months later, quietly purchased the home of former Law Dean, Earl Sneed on Lindsey Street. This served as home for the Presidents of the University until after the appointment of President David L. Boren in 1994, when Boyd House was remodeled to again serve as the home of the President of the University of Oklahoma. On July 1, 1968, Dr. Hollomon became President of the University of Oklahoma after completing most of the planned year of “familiarization” with the University. As part of his reorganization of the administration, he appointed Dean Nordby as Vice President for Finance and Administration on May 15, 1969. A search committee was appointed for the vacated position of Dean of Engineering. After several candidates were brought in for interview, Dr. William R. Upthegrove was named Dean on May 5, 1970. Upthegrove had been a faculty member in the College of Engineering from 1956 until 1963. He had joined the Chemical Engineering faculty after completing his doctoral studies in metallurgical engineering at the University of Michigan, with plans to start a program in metallurgical engineering at OU. After leading the development of the program to a good start, he resigned from the University to accept a position


A Changing College in a Changing World 177


A Changing College in a Changing World 178

with International Nickel. After a brief stay in industry he returned to academia as Head of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas. Metallurgical Engineering is in the department of Mechanical Engineering at Texas. Part of the attraction for Upthegrove to return to OU was the fact that President Hollomon was internationally recognized for his contributions in metallurgical research. The changes in leadership, both at the University level and the College level, provided the setting for dramatic changes in the decade of the 1960s. The rapid advancements in technology associated with the developments in air transportation, electronics, and space systems demanded radical changes of emphasis in engineering education. President Cross recognized this and in the selection of the new Dean came the increased development in research and graduate study. In William R. Upthegrove 1960 there were only 18 members of the faculty in the college of Engineering with earned doctorates. Most of these were in Chemical Engineering. By the end of the decade, there were 68 members of the faculty with doctoral degrees. The graduate programs were expanded and the number of graduate degrees awarded, including both masters and doctoral degrees, increased dramatically. It was encouraging that this improvement in graduate faculty was recognized by the academic community. The January 4, 1971 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education, reported on a survey by The American Council on Education, taken in 1969. In this study, 6,093 scholars were surveyed, and asked to rate the graduate faculties in 36 fields. The ratings were weighted on a scale from 0 to 5. Faculties, who scored 3.0 or higher, were indicated as being “strong.” The programs that were rated 2.5 to 2.9 were reported as “good,” and those rating 2.0 to 2.4 were classified as “adequate plus.” The University of Oklahoma only had 11 programs that were rated 2.0 or higher in the survey. In Engineering, Mechanical was rated “good,” Chemical and Civil attained “adequate plus” ratings, and only Electrical failed to reach the 2.0 level. Other engineering disciplines were not included in the survey. Within the University of Oklahoma, the only other program


A Changing College in a Changing World 179

to be rated in the “good” category was Geology. History, Botany, Population Biology, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Zoology, and Physiology were rated in the “adequate plus” category. It should be noted that very few mid-sized state universities rated better than OU. This decade marked the real beginning of the use of computers in engineering education. The IBM 650 computer had been obtained in 1957, and some engineering students had taken courses offered in Mathematics, programming in the machine language and a language Symbolic Optimized Algorithm Program (SOAP). In May of 1962, the IBM 650 was replaced with the IBM 1410, which was approximately 10 times faster. Engineering courses in “Programming for Digital Computers” and “Engineering Analysis for Digital Computers” were offered. In addition, The Merrick Foundation Grant computer, described in chapter six, was under construction under the direction of Professor Tuma of Electrical Engineering. Unfortunately, this computer, designated as the “OSAGE,” was based on vacuum tube technology and because of reliability issues, particularly, with the electrostatic memory device, was never fully operational. By the middle of the decade, the University obtained an IBM 360 computer, which was much larger and faster than the 1410. It was used for University administration, but also for research and teaching. It should be noted that the installation of an ethernet network was still a decade or more away and access to the computer was still primarily punch cards. The slide rule, which had identified engineering students since the beginning of the College, continued to be in general use. However, the mechanical calculators, which were used for computations requiring more than three significant figures of accuracy were being replaced by desktop electronic calculators by the middle of the decade and small handheld calculators manufactured by Hewlett Packard and Texas Instruments were available late in the decade. These were rather expensive, however, and few students were able to afford them. The prices were soon to drop, and it seemed like “over night” that slide rules disappeared. The listing of faculty and the changes in organization that took place during this decade of change are given in the appendix. Since the reorganization involved combining a number of departments, the faculty listings are given under the heading of the new departments. It should be noted that during the later years of the 1960s courses in Engineering Drawing were being eliminated from the various curricula in Engineering under the pressures of modernization. By the end of this decade drawing had been eliminated from all of the programs.


A Changing College in a Changing World 180

The cover of the October 1960 issue of the Sooner Shamrock showed a picture of the new computer building on the North campus. This building later named the Merrick Center served as the home for the construction of the OSAGE computer. In the issue, there is a feature story on the School of Architecture, and an article by Jack Duffy, an ME student on his summer experience working as an intern with Proctor and Gamble. On October 21, 1960, the tryouts for the Engineers’ Show were announced by Harold Kallenberger, publicity chairman. This annual event was the primary fund raiser for the Engineers’ Club. The show was traditionally held on the weekend of Dad’s Day at the University, which was November 11 that year and admission was $2. The group acts were provided by the following sororities: Gamma Phi Beta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Chi Omega, and Alpha Phi. The individual act that stole the show was once again James Gamble’s marionette act. It was a very professional show using marionettes that Jim had constructed. In February 1961, the Magical Marionettes were a top act for Sooner Scandals. On March 1, 1961, The Oklahoma Daily pictured the five Engineering queen candidates with a big slide rule (the large slide rule that would hang in the front of the class room for demonstration purposes when teaching slide rule to freshman classes). On March 10, Karen Cullen, sophomore from Woodward, was announced as the Engineering Queen for the 1961-62 school year. Karen was a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority and an English major with a 3.77 GPA. In honor of Engineering Week, the streetlights on campus were replaced with green bulbs, and The Oklahoma Daily was printed on green paper. The semi-formal Engineers’ The 1961 Engineers’ Queen Candidates Dance was held in the Union ballroom on Friday night the 17th (tickets were $1). On Saturday night, the banquet was


A Changing College in a Changing World 181

the speaker. Bill M. Burks, PE major from Midland, Texas was announced. This same day, Dean Carson announced the preliminary plans for the new Engineering Center. Engineering open house was held April 12. Some of the exhibits were a 69-foot Shark Missile from the U.S. Air Force at Wright Patterson AFB, a model oil well drilling rig, a new type of electrical power supply, a flying Air Platter (ground effects machine), and a model Cyclotron. On October 21, 1961, the Engineers’ Club sponsored a talent show as the major fund raiser for the club, on Saturday night of Dad’s Day Weekend. Gardener Randal was the show director with most of the Engineers’ Club members assisting. Some of the acts in the show were: Tri Delta’s “Campus Life 1961,” Gamma Phi Beta “Show College Dads Where the Money Goes,” Kappa Kappa Gamma, “O.U. Take Off Number,” and Pi Beta Phi, “Outer Space.” The University of Oklahoma Regents announced plans for funding new buildings on campus. This included a Fine Arts Center, Engineering Center, addition to Adams Hall, remodeling Felgar Hall, and a small building for “Aero-Space” research on the North Campus. In December, the Regents announced the bond sale and Howard Samis and Davies, were selected as the Architects for the two Engineering buildings. During this period all OU students were required to pass a basic English examination, known as the “English J exam.” A student who failed the exam was required to take and pass a remedial course in English. Needless to say, the exam was unpopular with the students and many faculty advisers sympathized with them since it was inconvenient, and tended to disrupt schedules. Students were campaigning to eliminate the exam, but University committees involved announced after study that the exam would remain a requirement. On January 8, 1962, after considerable study, the University of Oklahoma Regents announced a new policy that freshmen would not be allowed to drive cars on campus. Two days later, the order was rescinded. The public announcement said that this was because the rule would be difficult to enforce, and that commuters would need a car to travel between home and the University. In other campus news, later that month the new Kellogg Center opened, housing the Oklahoma College of Continuing Education. On Friday, March 9, 1962, the basement of Felgar Hall was filled with booths


A Changing College in a Changing World 182

Carson Engineering Center


The Aerospace Research Center located on North Campus

A Changing College in a Changing World 183


A Changing College in a Changing World 184

manned by the sorority sisters of the candidates for Engineers’ Queen. Coffee, Cokes, homemade cookies, and reportedly a few kisses were given, in hopes of winning votes for their candidate. By Tuesday, the campus street lights had turned green, The Oklahoma Daily was printed on green newsprint, and a large green flag sporting a Shamrock was flown out of a third story window of Felgar Hall. The engineering students wore their green Engineering Club shirts and sported scraggly beards all in celebration of the special week. On Wednesday night the Engineering banquet was held in the Union with the Governor of Oklahoma, J. Howard Edmondson as the featured speaker. On Friday night the annual Engineers’ dance was held in the Union Ballroom. Linda Frensley, a Kappa Alpha Theta junior in art education from Oklahoma City was crowned as the 1962 Engineers’ Queen. St. Pat for 1962 was revealed as Gardener Randal, a Senior Engineering Physics major from Norman. On April 12, 1962, Dr. William Viavant reported that the University was replacing the IBM 650 computer with an IBM 1410 computer. He compared the computation time for the 650, as milliseconds, while the 1410 would make the same computation in microseconds. The 1410 also had a disc file with a capacity of 1,700,000 words available in 1/5 of a second. The Engineering open house for 1962 was held on Friday April 13. Among the exhibits was a 100-foot-long suspension bridge built by the Civil Engineering students. Mechanical Engineering demonstrated the principles of digital computers; Nuclear Engineering had an exhibit showing the measurement of nuclear radiation. Petroleum Engineering had an operating model of an oil well drilling operation, while the Architecture Students built a scale model of an architect’s office. The site of the new Engineering Center was dedicated on September 28, 1962. President Cross honored retiring Dean Carson at the ceremony. Alumnus Harold Ward, Traffic Manager for Humble Oil and Refining Co. of Houston, Texas served as master of ceremonies for the event. The annual Dad’s Day Engineering Show was held in November. Delta Gamma sorority won first place with an act named “Little Old OU,” and Kappa Alpha Theta received second place with their act entitled, “Whose got the Gimmick?”. The annual banquet was held on Friday, March 15, 1963, the featured speaker was Chester Lauk, who was an Executive Assistant with Continental Oil Company and Director of American Capital Life Insurance of Houston, Texas. In the 1930s and 1940s, he had been an actor on the popular radio show, “Lum and Abner.”


A Changing College in a Changing World 185

His topic was “The Engineer’s Role Today.” Janey Ross, a member of Chi Omega, from Dennison, Texas was crowned Queen, and James “Red” Hawkes from Decatur, Georgia was named St. Pat. He was an Aerospace Engineering senior and a member of Pe-et, Omicron Delta Kappa, Sigma Gamma Tau, Sigma Tau, and Naval ROTC. He went on to earn a Harvard MBA and become CEO of EatonVance Mutual Funds in Boston. Dean Emeritus Carson announced that 150 companies were scheduled to interview engineering graduates that spring 1963 semester. He gave a breakdown of the scheduled interviews by discipline. ME 100; EE 91; ChE 55; Engineering Physics 47; CE 46; AeroE 32; Industrial Mgmt. 32; GenE 23; GeolE 12; PE 24. On Tuesday April 16, 1963, the Engineering open house was announced in The Oklahoma James “Red” Hawkes and Janey Ross were Daily. The theme of this year’s selected as St. Pat and Engineers’ Queen for 1963 program was “Engineers in Space.” Chemical Engineering’s exhibit demonstrated a Hilch tube, and a modern distillation tray. The Petroleum Engineers demonstrated secondary recovery methods, and a sub-surface pump. Mechanical Engineering demonstrated flow problems with a water table, a small scale steam turbine and a vibrating systems analog. Electrical Engineering had five projects which included a diode array, an error correction method for transient circuits, a beer can induction motor, a laser information board, and a Telestar satellite poster. Industrial Management Engineering demonstrated a production line for producing boxes of candy. Civil Engineering and Architecture demonstrated basic principles of structural engineering. The American Meteorological Society presented a model of a weather front, and a new meteorologic rocket sonde, and an explanation of the Tiros weather satellite. A special lecture was presented by a 1948 Mechanical Engineering graduate, Oran Nicks, the Director of Lunar and Planetary Programs for NASA. A story in The Oklahoma Daily on May 9, 1963 reported that Mary Ann Phelps,


A Changing College in a Changing World 186

majoring in General Engineering, had been elected secretary of the Engineers’ Club. She was the first woman to hold office in the club. She also served as Secretary of the St. Pat’s Council. Her father was a 1939 graduate from OU in Engineering. On October 21, 1963, the enrollment numbers for the Fall Semester were reported. The total University enrollment was 14,530. Arts and Sciences totaled 5,205; Engineering 2,385; and Business had 2,063. The annual Engineers’ Show was held on Dad’s Day weekend. Three acts were announced in the paper. They were: Chi Omega, “Bye Bye High School,” Sigma Tau Delta, “Behind Each Man, a Woman Stands,” and Pi Beta Phi, “Merry go OU.” This year, the review in the campus newspaper was not so kind, stating that the show needs to improve. The shocking headlines on November 23, 1963 told of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas. The paper reported, on January 8, 1964, that the highway department was starting a crash building program to complete I-35 from Purcell to Ardmore. Coach Bud Wilkinson announced his resignation from the University on Tuesday, January 21, 1964. His long-time Assistant Coach, Gomer Jones would be his replacement. The rumor was that he would enter politics, and run a race seeking election as a senator from Oklahoma. On January 30, the annual beards contest began as usual, and on February 18, 1964, the five Queen candidates were announced. On Wednesday, March 11, The Oklahoma Daily reported that the “Campus goes Green!” The open house was set for Friday and Saturday. An engineering symposium would be held Saturday morning, with the dance Friday night, and the banquet to be held on Saturday night. In the same paper, Dean Nordby announced that the graduate enrollment of the college had doubled in the past two years. The open house exhibits were as follows: PE demonstrated a rotary drilling rig; Industrial Management demonstrated radar tracking on a radar scope; Metallurgy had a crystal growing demonstration; ME demonstrated heat transfer to a pipe which created sound like an organ; CE had a “magic” water faucet; and Meteorology demonstrated a portable weather station. The individual first place award went to four mechanical engineering students. These were Jack Alberts, Mike Bikel, Pat Condon, and Al Crosbie. An interesting note is that Condon later received


A Changing College in a Changing World 187

his PhD from the University of Texas, and Crosbie received his PhD from Purdue University. Condon later retired as a Major General in the U.S. Air Force and Crosbie is a Distinguished Professor at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. The symposium featured a talk on “Engineering Trends” by Dr. Fredrick Riddell, Director, Avco Corp. space flight program in Tulsa. The Saturday, March 14, 1964 edition of The Oklahoma Daily told a story that had the Engineering students in panic on Friday. The Saturday paper reported that all five candidates were kidnapped at 7:30 Friday morning by Law students, who said that they were tired of the engineering students painting the owls green. They were taken to Oklahoma City and kept in the homes of various lawyers. An Oklahoma City television station was directed to one of the hiding places and broadcast pictures of the queen candidates, dancing with the Law students. After a day of consternation, the girls were returned at 8 p.m. and the coronation proceeded at the dance on schedule. Ginny Clark, a junior from Madison, New Jersey, and a member of Alpha Phi sorority, was crowned Queen. Mike Maples, an Electrical Engineering junior was named St. Pat. On September 9, 1964 The Oklahoma Daily reported that Col. Thweat, Commander of the Army ROTC program at OU faced an estimated 3,000 student protesters against compulsory ROTC. The article also stated that the Regents favored a voluntary program. The next issue of the paper reported that “Enrollment Woes Reach the Plague Level.” As the University had grown, the problem of enrollment had become a nightmare for the students as well as the academic departments. An attempt to alleviate the problem was to have a pre-enrollment option, which also presented problems. It was not until computers were available for managing enrollments that the situation did ease somewhat. On September 11, 1964, the University issued a rule that kidnapping was officially against student regulations. This was directly related to the abductions of the Queen candidates last spring. That kidnapping had been the first since 1948. On October 26, 1964 The Engineering wives defeated the Law wives in a football game before 125 spectators. Mrs. Samuel Smith quarterbacked the Engineering


A Changing College in a Changing World 188

team. Other wives mentioned included Mrs. Fred Bray, Mrs. Richard Milburn, and Mrs. Terrence Tinkel. The final score was 24 to 6. An open house for the new addition to the Aerospace Laboratories on the North Campus was held on November 3. Laboratories included stress analysis, non-destructive testing, aerodynamics, radiative heat transfer, and propulsion laboratories. On November 5, The Oklahoma Daily announced the annual Dad’s Day Engineering show to be held Friday and Saturday night. Bob Walters, an Aerospace Engineering major, was Chairman of the show. Four sororities were to present acts: Tri Delta, Delta Gamma, Alpha Chi Omega, and Kappa Alpha Theta. In addition there were several individual vocalists on the program. The Oklahoma Daily reported that Sooner City, the plywood pre-fabs, would be torn down. These were built in 1946-47, and had been viewed as a luxury for married veterans returning to school after World War II. The beards contest began as usual on January 30. Each contestant went through the ceremony of demonstrating a clean shaven face in order to demonstrate that they did not start growing their beard early. On February 19, five contestants for Queen were announced, selected from 20 applicants. The Oklahoma Daily reported on Friday March 12, 1965, that the night before, two separate groups of Engineering students proceeded on a mission to provide the desired Engineers’ Week decorations to the Law Building. Neither group knew about the plans of the other. One group had found a plaque with the name and shield of the honorary Law Fraternity, Delta Theta Phi. They decided to return it to the owner. To make sure the rightful owner found it they planned to drape it around the neck of one of the owls atop the Law Barn. The second group set out to decorate the building with green ribbons and large green Shamrocks. As the two groups carefully made their way around the building they were surprised to see each other. In the dark they could not at first identify the other group, and assuming that it might be lawyers they were afraid they had been discovered. Soon, however, they each recognized the other group and both completed their mission before departing for a small celebration. At the dance on Friday night March 12, 1965, Judy Elderkin, an Oklahoma City sophomore in the Delta Delta Delta Sorority was crowned Queen. Bob Uda, an Aerospace Engineering senior from Kailua, Hawaii was elected St. Pat. He was


A Changing College in a Changing World 189

a student Colonel in the Air Force ROTC. At the banquet on Saturday night, the featured speaker was Governor Henry Bellmon. In the fall of 1965 the annual Dad’s Day Engineers’ Show was held as usual. Twelve acts were chosen. They included acts from two fraternities, two sororities, the OU Men’s Glee Club, an acrobatic dance team, folk singers, and a comedy act. The first-place trophy was awarded to the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. On February 22, 1966, new rules were announced by the Engineers’ Club, concerning the Queen contest. Any queen candidate kidnapped will automatically be ineligible for office. In addition strict rules will be enforced regarding banners and posters as established by the Association of Women Students and the Panhellenic Council.

In addition to being named St. Pat, Bob Uda wrote numerous articles for the Sooner Shamrock

Friday morning, March 11, 1966, found the Law Barn owls draped in green and wearing green top hats. The annual Engineering open house was held Friday March 11, 1966. This year, the exhibits were prepared by the student professional societies. The exhibits were: ASME, a Hilch vortex tube; ASCE, a 60 foot suspension bridge; AIAA, a smoke tunnel and a demonstration of how a rippled skin might reduce drag on an aircraft; Engineering Physics demonstrated a laser beam and a Wilson cloud chamber; ANS demonstrated a flaw detector using gamma rays; and AICHE demonstrated computer process control. The owls on the north and south sides of Monnett Hall remain green to this day

That night, the Engineering Ball was held at 10 p.m., before a replica of an Irish castle. The new St. Pat, Dick Williamson, crowned Laurie


A Changing College in a Changing World 190

Bourne, Engineers’ Queen for 1966-67. Williamson was a Chemical Engineering senior from Tulsa, and Bourne was a junior and a member of Kappa Alpha Theta from Carlsbad, New Mexico.

The 1966 Queen candidates. Left to right: Sue Gunderson, Laurie Bourne, Barbara Ellis, Sharon Bruce, and Linda Romano

On June 23, 1966, Dean Emeritus Carson announced that he was ending his teaching and placement advising career as of June 30. Starting next fall, engineering placement would be handled by the OU Placement Services. He would continue to direct the Southwestern Gas Measurements Short course and have activities on the Interstate Oil Compact Commission. He had been Chairman of the Engineering Committee for the commission since 1941.

On Friday, November 11 the Engineer’s Show was presented as usual. The acts were divided into large, medium, and small categories. Pi Beta Phi won first in the large acts, with Delta Gamma second. The Saint’s Dixieland Band won in the medium division, while Nancy Turk from Ardmore won in the small act division. On November 17, 1966 Karl Keller, a veteran who had recently returned to OU to complete his degree in Aerospace Engineering and a who was a test pilot for the Aero-Commander Aircraft Co., completed an around-the-world flight with Arthur Godfrey in a new Jet Commander. On January 30, 1967, the beards contest began as usual with the judging announced to be held at 8:30 a.m. on March 18, in the auditorium of Felgar Hall. And on February 22, five finalists were selected from a group of 23 women who had applied


A Changing College in a Changing World 191

to enter the Engineering Queen race. The Wednesday, March 15, 1967 issue of The Oklahoma Daily sported headlines that Engineering week was in full swing. Sam Hatcher, who was coordinator for the week was pictured on the front page. He was a Mechanical Engineering senior from Norman. On Thursday, there were five booths in the basement laboratory of Felgar Hall. The basement was filled with girls, tape players, record players, loud speakers, cookies, and punch. The girls were surrounded by men in green shirts, beards, cigars, and green hats. On Friday morning, the law students found their owls with a fresh coat of green paint. That night, Buddy Billen and his band, played for the dance in the Union Ballroom. At 10:00 p.m., the new St. Pat was announced as Terry Tinkel, a Mechanical Engineering senior from South Bend, Indiana. The new Engineering Queen was Barbara Green, a Pi Beta Phi sophomore from Oklahoma City. The Queen kissed the Blarney Stone in front of the replica of an Irish castle that had been used for the last several years. The banquet was held Saturday night with Mr. Dwight Nesmith, Assistant Director of the Kansas State University Engineering Experiment Station, as the featured speaker. There was an unusual occurrence, however, at the banquet. About five minutes before the banquet began, two boys, later identified as law students, walked into the ballroom with a large rolled up banner. They talked an engineering professor into holding a ladder for them as they climbed up near the ceiling and hung the banner. The professor had first demanded verbal assurance that they were not law students. Later, during the banquet, two law students dressed as bus boys, came into the room and unfurled the banner. It was a picture of Mother Justice, holding the scales of justice, in addition to large letter across the bottom, which read “ERIN GO LAW.” On April 14, 1967 The Oklahoma Daily reported that an early morning fire had leveled the Meteorology building on the North Campus. This building was one of the frame structures that had been built for the Naval Air Training Unit that occupied the area during World War II. Over $500,000 in equipment and 10 years of research documentation was reported lost in the fire. Thirty graduate students lost their notes and thesis in the fire. There was no insurance on the building or its contents. In October 1967, the College of Engineering faculty voted to cancel the requirement of the “J Exam.” This had been an English proficiency exam that had been required for a number of years. However, with the large number of students taking the exam, it had become somewhat difficult to administer. In addition, it was felt that the students entering and the quality of the required course in English


A Changing College in a Changing World 192

composition, that the exam was no longer needed. This took an administrative load off of the English department, as well as the engineering advisors. But most of all, the students celebrated the cancellation of the requirement. On Thursday and Friday nights November 16 and 17, 1967 the Dad’s Day Engineers’ Show was produced. This year the Show had four group acts and six individual acts. The titles of the productions reflected the news that President Cross was retiring and Dr. Holloman was now on campus preparing to be his replacement. The act by the Pi Beta Phi sorority and the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity was entitled “Mr. President.” The Chi Omega and Kappa Sigma teamed up to present “Who is Afraid of the Board of Regents?” Alpha Delta Pi presented “Registration,” and Kappa Kappa Gamma’s act was named “The School Too Tough to Die.” This year, The Engine Wives presented a skit for the first time in the 35 years history of the show (however, the paper failed to give the skit a name). On December 12, 1967, The Oklahoma Daily reported that Industrial Engineering had received accreditation from The Engineer’s Council of Professional Development (ECPD). This was an important recognition for the new school. The ECPD was later changed to The Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology, and continued to assess the quality of the Engineering programs by regular inspections, with input from both industrial and academic sources On March 1, 1968, The Oklahoma Daily had a full page of photographs showing some of the beards that were being sported by students and a few faculty entered in the annual beards contest. The annual ball was held Friday night March 15. The cost to Engineering Students was still one dollar. The new St. Pat was announced. He was Tim Guilfoil, senior in Engineering Physics from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Then St. Pat crowned the new Engineering queen. She was Beverly May, a sophomore from Oklahoma City. In May of 1968, the grass in the lawn of the Law Building sprouted an unusual look. In an area fifteen feet by sixty feet, bright green grass spelled out, “ENGR.” During Engineers’ Week, someone had managed a neatly controlled spread of fertilizer on the lawn in an effort to improve the appearance of the campus. An article in the May 1968 Sooner Shamrock discussed the growing unrest among the students about incidental fees that were being charged by the University. It reported that the Engineers’ Club received $1,900 from the student Senate. The breakdown of this allocation was given as: $800 distributed to the student technical societies for open house projects; $500 for printing the open house programs;


A Changing College in a Changing World 193

$300 for postage, printing and misc.; $100 for speakers; $200 for open house expenses. The article pointed out that the profits from the Engineers’ Show were used to help pay for the annual dance and banquet. The cost to engineering students had been only one or two dollars per ticket for years. The article noted that the Sooner Shamrock is not a subsidiary of the Engineers’Club. Also, the editor and staff are not chosen by the Club. The magazine is financed by a one dollar per semester fee charged all engineering students during their sophomore, junior, and senior years. In addition, advertising for the magazine was sold by the staff for $55 per page. The October 1968 Sooner Shamrock published the following editorial. A Violation of Confidence During August, a faculty meeting was held when most of the faculty were not on campus and under pressure from Dean Nordby, the $1 per semester fee that supports the Shamrock was removed with the approval of the University Regents. The Editorial stated that it was a violation of the students’ confidence. The Shamrock Staff and The St. Pat’s Council had been told that, if the fee is to be removed, it will be discontinued after the 1968-69 terms. This would give the staff an opportunity to plan for alternative funding. The Council was assured that no action could possibly be taken until the middle of the school year.

In a follow-up in the December 1968 Shamrock was a copy of a letter forwarded to the Shamrock from President Hollomon. The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education in a meeting October 21, 1968, approved the request of the University of Oklahoma, contained in your letter of September 13, 1968, for authorization to discontinue the $1.00 Engineering Publication Fee, effective with the beginning of the spring semester of 1969.

E. T. Dunlap Chancellor

It should be noted that this, in effect, ended the publication of the Sooner Shamrock. However, it was published through the spring semester of 1969 using up the reserve funds that had been saved. In the following years there have been sporadic attempts to re-start the magazine. However, without a continuing publication and a staff to sell advertising, the publication has consisted of single issues, sporadically through out the years.


A Changing College in a Changing World 194

On Friday, October 18, 1968 the inauguration of Dr. Herbert Hollomon as President of the University of Oklahoma was held. This was the first such event since the inauguration of President Bizzell in 1926. The ceremony was held on the south oval with the platform directly behind the statue of President Bizzell. The audience was south of the platform facing north toward the Library. It was a spectacular event with the faculty in their academic robes. Dr. Hollomon had a large Medallion suspended by a wide silver chain around his neck and a large Mace, both especially designed and made in the College of Art. The main address was given by Dr. John W. Gardner, former United States Secretary of Heath, Education, and Welfare and author of Excellence, a highly influential book of the decade. In attendance on the platform were Governor Bartlett and Dr. E. T. Dunlap. A reception was held in the Commons Restaurant at 3:30 with the inaugural ball in the Oklahoma Memorial Union ballroom at 8:30 p.m. On November 22 and 23, 1968 the annual Engineers’ show was presented in Holmberg Hall. There were eleven acts and the price of tickets was $2.50. As it turned out, this was the last show presented by the Engineers’ Club. Apparently, the show lacked something in preparation. The project lost money, and it was decided the following fall to discontinue the annual show, which had first been presented in 1932. Throughout the decade of the 1960s, the unrest about the war in Vietnam had sparked protests and pickets. Taking the lead in these activities was a group that claimed affiliation with the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). In the March 1969 issue of the Sooner Shamrock, was the following editorial. Some are neither students or democratic. Disclaiming the unjust war in Vietnam, police brutality, corporate incest, racial discrimination, and the oppressive school administration, has become a popular sport across the nation. It is unfortunate however, that the zeal for change should be diluted by violence and anarchy. Sure, there are some things wrong, that is life, that is tough. But that is no cause for riot.

Also, in the March 1969 Sooner Shamrock, was an article by Bert Avery, who had joined the School of Chemical Engineering as an Assistant Director, and part time graduate student. In this issue, he reviewed a meeting, which he had led in the past September, entitled “Engineering Opportunities for Negro and Indian Youth.” Attending the conference were high school principals, school superintendents, science teachers, and counselors. This was a part of an effort that the College had


A Changing College in a Changing World 195

been making to increase minority enrollments in the College. Engineers’ week was March 10-15, 1969. The large green banner that hung over the west entrance to Felgar Hall still exhibited the image of the slide rule as representing Engineering. The Law Barn owls sported a new coat of green paint and their eyes blinked a green light in approval of the celebration. At the ball on Friday night, St. Pat was announced, H. W. Norton, a Mechanical Engineering senior from Ardmore. He was president of the student chapter of ASME and president of Tau Beta Pi. St. Pat then crowned Queen Nancy Campbell, a sophomore from Midland, Texas, and a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. The highlight of the banquet on Saturday night was the naming of the first three members to the “College of Engineering Hall of Fame.” They were, Oran Nicks, Deputy Associate Administrator of NASA; John Houchin, President of Phillips Petroleum Co. and a University of Oklahoma Regent; and William D. Owlsey, Senior Vice President of Halliburton. The plan was to make this an annual event. Unfortunately, however, with the rapid pace of events and changing administrations, the continuation of the Hall of Fame was forgotten in subsequent years. Another major event at the banquet was the ceremony making President Hollomon an Honorary Knight of St. Pat. On April 18, 1969 The Oklahoma Daily, announced that Dr. Murlin Hodgell had been appointed Director of Architecture and Dean Designate, until July 1969. At that time the College of Architecture was to be established. Thus the School of Architecture finally was separated from the College of Engineering. The official name of the new college was to become the College of Environmental Design. In the May 1969 Sooner Shamrock, Bert Avery was author of an article about the Women’s Engineers Club. He noted that one of the purposes of the club was to offer assistance and guidance, as well as to make welcome, entering women students into engineering. He also made the suggestion that some of the women engineering students should be interviewed as possible Engineers’ Queen Candidates. On Thursday, May 15, 1969, The Oklahoma Daily carried the announcement that Dr. Gene Nordby had been named the Vice President for Finance and Administration for the University of Oklahoma. He would also remain as Dean of Engineering until his replacement was appointed. On September 16, a 12-member search committee was appointed with Dr. C. P. Colver, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences as Chairman. In October, the St. Pat’s Council made the decision to cancel the annual Engineers’


A Changing College in a Changing World 196

Show, since it had failed to make a profit in the previous year, and involved considerable efforts by engineering students and the performers. This loss of income caused some problems in the funding of the club activities. On October 8, 1969, The Oklahoma Daily reported that President Hollomon approved a holiday for the purpose of discussing the Vietnam War. However, most Engineering classes were held as usual because both the faculty and the students were more conservative than many of the other students. In addition, faculty members needed every class session to cover the required material in the courses. The Oklahoma Daily published an article on October18 giving the amounts that the Student Senate had awarded to Engineering. This money came from the activity fees that all students paid with their tuition. The appropriations for Engineering were: $500 for the Sooner Shamrock; $400 to the Engineers’ Club; $250 for the student section of the American Society of Civil Engineers; and $50 for Chemical Engineering. On the following Thursday, the owls atop the Law Barn were draped with a black hood with LKOT # 457. There was no explanation of the occasion, and perhaps it will remain one of the secrets surrounding the society. On January 15, 1970, the regents approved the request of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering to offer the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nuclear Engineering. The rational for the degree was the increasing demand for Nuclear Engineers to manage the nuclear power plants that were being built around the country. The nuclear program at OU had been primarily a graduate program directed at preparing research engineers. The graduate program had installed a small training reactor and laboratory equipment was in place for the degree program. Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences had asked to close the graduate program, for which it was responsible. It therefore was possible to start the undergraduate program with a minimum cost. The graduates were in high demand and several went to work in the nuclear plant in Russellville, Arkansas as well as at other sites around the country. Unfortunately, when the Three Mile Island accident occurred, public panic haulted construction of nuclear plants, including the Black Fox Plant that Oklahoma Public Service Company was forced to cancel. While the program lived on into the 1970s, enrollments dropped and the College would be forced to eventually close the program after a few short years. On February 21, 1970, the Engineering Queen Candidates were announced. The annual Engineering week activities began on March 9. The booth building in the basement of Felgar Hall and the Queen election proceeded as usual. On Friday night at the ball, Robert Lawrence, an Electrical Engineering senior from Bethany, Oklahoma was named St. Pat. He then proceeded to the coronation


A Changing College in a Changing World 197

of Queen Karen Kongs, a sophomore Alpha Chi Omega from Oklahoma City. The Apollo 13 mission to the moon experienced a power malfunction reported on April 14, 1970. One of the astronauts aboard the craft was Fred Haise, a 1959 OU aerospace engineering graduate. The nation watched breathlessly as the crew, facing a carbon dioxide build up, struggled with the crippled ship. On April 18, 1970, a report came that the ship had successfully splashed down, and that the crew was safe. On May 5, 1970 Dr. William Upthegrove was named the Dean of Engineering. It should be noted that Upthegrove’s major field of specialization was Metallurgy. In June, Governor Bartlett publicly hinted that he favored the resignation of President Hollomon. He was dissatisfied with Hollomon’s handling of the anti-war movement on campus, and with some of President Hollomon’s handling of funds. In general the Governor felt that Hollomon was leading the University in the wrong direction. The Governor replaced John Houchin on the Regents. Mr. Houchin had been a member of the regents when Dr. Hollomon was selected to be President. On June 2 The Oklahoma Daily quoted President Hollomon as saying that he would not resign. However, in an interview with Mr. Houchin, the paper quoted him as predicting that Hollomon would leave. On Friday, June 26, The Oklahoma Daily reported that the Regents had voted to retain Hollomon, on a four to one vote with one regent abstaining. The next day The Oklahoma Daily reported that Governor Bartlett “rapped the Regents knuckles.” On July 7, Regent Sparks resigned, and Bartlett immediately appointed his replacement. On July 10, The Oklahoma Daily announced a legislative inquiry into Hollomon’s entertainment budget. On July 24, President Hollomon resigned and Dr. Pete Kyle McCarter, the Provost, was appointed Acting President. In some ways, the whole sequence of events reflected some of the political interference that had occurred early in the history of the University. Dr. Cross, who had done an outstanding job during his many years as President, later in one of his “off the cuff” remarks, was credited with saying that Hollomon had done more to improve his reputation as President than he had been able to do in 25 years. Dr. Upthegrove reportedly was disappointed when he heard that President Hollomon had resigned even before he had arrived on campus. However, before the summer was over, he had moved his family back to Norman. As the college’s fourth Dean, he would lead through the next decade in progress toward excellence.


A Changing College in a Changing World 198

PE

MetE

ME

ChemE

IE

GeoE

Gen. Engr.

EPhys

EE

CE

AeroE

ArchE

Arch.

0

64

4

78

25

31

22

7

23

80

27

40

2

30

‘61

0

28

6

33

31

18

13

3

21

66

27

33

0

25

‘62

0

24

4

45

20

20

3

10

21

53

28

21

1

24

‘63

0

11

1

26

21

17

5

8

9

51

26

32

0

24

‘64

0

18

4

26

11

20

2

5

16

66

16

27

0

29

‘65

0

11

2

26

17

18

1

12

18

50

22

27

0

42

‘66

0

10

2

30

12

17

1

18

6

43

17

29

0

41

‘67

0

16

4

30

13

21

2

0

7

42

15

31

0

36

‘68

0

18

3

31

17

14

4

1

7

49

13

30

0

38

‘69

0

27

7

24

19

15

4

6

4

54

27

23

0

0

‘70

Bachelor of Science degrees granted 1961-1970

NucE


12

6

4

2

2

5

0

9

2

0

3

0

AeroE

CE

EE

EPhys

Gen. Engr.

GeoE

IE

ChemE

ME

MetE

PE

NucE

‘61

0

6

0

6

4

0

3

0

0

5

6

17

‘62

7

7

0

12

10

0

5

0

3

16

17

19

‘63

3

9

0

12

3

0

0

2

3

4

3

6

‘64

0

8

0

6

4

8

4

3

4

6

13

5

‘65

2

10

0

7

4

21

1

0

0

6

25

5

‘66

2

9

0

5

2

7

0

1

0

9

20

2

‘67

Master of Science degrees granted 1961-1970

0

7

0

7

9

16

2

0

1

10

19

3

‘68

0

10

1

10

7

12

2

1

0

14

17

11

‘69

0

4

2

6

2

13

0

0

0

19

10

7

‘70

A Changing College in a Changing World 199


A Changing College in a Changing World 200

PE

MetE

ME

ChemE

IE

Engr. Sci.

EPhys

EE

CE

AeroE

0

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

‘61

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

‘62

0

0

0

0

4

0

11

0

0

0

0

‘63

0

0

0

0

4

0

10

0

0

0

0

‘64

0

0

0

0

8

0

13

0

0

0

0

‘65

0

1

3

1

8

0

0

0

5

4

1

‘66

0

2

3

4

7

3

0

1

1

0

1

‘67

0

2

0

3

5

2

0

0

3

7

1

‘68

1

3

0

5

7

1

0

0

2

8

3

‘69

0

3

0

2

3

2

0

0

2

5

1

‘70

PhD degrees granted 1961-1970

NucE


A Changing College in a Changing World 201

REFERENCES 1. The Oklahoma Daily, 1960-1970, from microfilm, The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 2. The University of Oklahoma Bulletin, for the College of Engineering. Issues for 1960-1970. 3. The University of Oklahoma Commencement Programs, 1960-1970. The University of Oklahoma Archives, Western History Collection, The University of Oklahoma Libraries. 4. Sooner Shamrock, Vol. 20, No. 1-May 1969.



Appendix A

Curricula


1913 Curricula Electrical and Mechanical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour College Algebra (Math I) 3 Language (Engl I) 3 Chemistry (Chem Ia) 3 Freehand Drawing (Draw I) 2 Shop work (Shop I) 4 Total: 15

Credit Hour Trigonometry (Math IIa) 3 Language (Engl II) 3 Chemistry (Chem II) 3 Mechanical Drawing (Draw II) 2 Shop work (Shop II) 4 Total: 15

Electrical and Mechanical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Analytical Geom (Math IIIa) 2 Calculus (Math IVa) 3 Physics (Physics I) 3 Physics Lab (Physics Ia) 1 Descriptive Geom (Draw III) 3 Shop work (Shop III) 2 Electives Total: 14

Credit Hour Analytical Geom (Math IIIb) 2 Calculus (Math IVb) 3 Physics (Physics II) 3 Chemistry (Chem III) 5 Shop work (Shop IV) 2 Elem. Mechanisms (Draw IV) 3 Electives Total: 18

Electrical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Theoretical Math (Math VII) 5 Physics (Physics III) 2 Elec. Meas. (Physics IIIa) 3 Electro-Chemistry (EE IV) 2 Valve Gears (ME I) 2 Electives Total: 14

Credit Hour Dynamo Machinery (EE II) 3 Elec. Meas. (Physics IVa) 3 Dynamo Lab (EE IIa) 3 Strength Materials (Math VIIIa) 2 Graphical Statics Mech. (ME VI) 4 Theoretical Hydraulics (CE IX) 3 Elective Total: 18

A-1


1913 Curricula Continued Electrical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Dynamo Machinery (EE III) 5 Electrical Lab (EE IIIa) 2 Elec. Railways (EE V) 2 Dynamo Design (EE VII) 3 Steam Lab (ME IIIa) 2 Electives Total: 14

Credit Hour Steam Machinery (ME III) 3 Electical Lab (EE VIa) 2 Power Plant Design (ME VIII) 3 Contracts and Specifications 2 Design (Draw XIII) 2 Electives Total: 12

Mechanical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Theoretical Math (Math VII) 5 Valve Gears (ME I) 2 Mechanical Lab (ME Ia) 2 Physics (Physics III) 2 Steam Machinery (ME II) 3 Mechanical Lab (ME IIa) 2 Kinematic Drawing (Draw V) 2 Total: 18

Credit Hour Steam Machinery (ME III) 3 Strength Materials (Math VIIIa) 3 Theoretical Hydraulics (CE IX) 3 Physics (Physics IIa) 2 Graphical Statics (ME IV) 2 Electrical Lab (EE IIa) 2 Kinematic Drawing (Draw VI) 2 Total: 17

Mechanical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Steam Lab (ME IIIa) 2 Steam Engineering (ME IV) 5 Thermodynamics (ME VII) 3 Electrical Lab (EE IIIa) 2 Steam Engine Des. (Draw VII) 3 Electives Total: 15

Credit Hour Steam Lab (ME IVa) 2 Power Plants (ME VIII) 2 Heating and Vent. (ME IX) 2 Power Plant Design (Draw VIII) 3 Contracts and Specifications 2 Electives Total: 11

A-2


1913 Curricula Continued Civil Engineering - First Year Algebra (Math I) English (Engl. I) Chemistry (Chem. I) Drawing (Draw I) Shop work (Shop I)

Credit Hour 3 3 3 2 4 Total: 15

Credit Hour Trigonometry (Math IIa) 3 English (Engl. II) 3 Chemistry (Chem. I) 3 Surveying (CE I) 3 Plotting Surveys (Draw IX) 2 Mech. Drawing (Draw II) 2 Total: 16

Civil Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Analytical Geom. (Math IIIa) 2 Diff. Calculus (Math IVa) 3 Physics (Physics I) 3 Descriptive Geom. (Draw III) 2 Advanced Survey (CE II) 3 Topographical Draw. (Draw X) 1 Total: 14

Credit Hour Analytical Geom. (Math IIIb) 2 Integral Calculus (Math IVb) 3 Physics (Physics II) 3 Physics Lab (Physics IIa) 2 Roads and Paving (CE III) 2 Astronomy and Geodesy (CE IV) 2 Contracts and Specifications 2 Total: 16

Civil Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Theoretical Mech. (Math VII) 5 Geology (Geol I) 3 Rail Road Engr. (CE V) 2 R.R. Draw & Fld. Wk. (Dr. XI) 2 Materials (CE VI) 2 Electives 5 Total: 19

Credit Hour Strength Materials (Math VIIIa) 3 Theory of Structures (CE VIII) 2 Rail Road Engr. (CE Vc) 2 R.R. Draw & Fld. Wk. (Dr. XIc) 2 Theoretical Hydraulics (CE IX) 3 Testing Materials (ME IIa) 2 DC Machinery (EE II) 3 Electives 2 Total: 19

A-3


1913 Curricula Continued Civil Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Foundations (CE X) 2 Water Supply Engr. (CE XI) 3 Bridges (CE XIII) 3 Bridge Design (Draw XII) 2 Railroads (CE XIII) 2 Steam Engr. (ME II) 3 Total: 15

Credit Hour Bridges (CE XIIc) 3 Bridge Design (Draw XIVc) 3 Sewerage (CE XIV) 3 Railroads (CE XIIIc) 3 R.R. & Highway Des. (Dr. XIVc) 2 Electives or Thesis 5 Total: 19

1929 Curricula All Schools - First Year Credit Hour *Chemistry 1 or 3 (Gen. Chem.) 5 English 1 (English Comp.) 3 Math 5 (Col. Alg.) 3 Math 6 (Trig.) 3 !Mech. Draw. 1 2 !Shop 1 (Wood) 1 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Freshman Conference Total: 18

Credit Hour Chemistry 4 (Qual. Analysis) 3 English 2 (English Comp.) 3 Math 14 (Analytical Geom.) 5 Engin. 1 (Engin. Probs.) 3 Mech. Draw. 3 2 Shop 2 (Forge) 1 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Freshman Conference Total: 18

* Students who have had high school Chemistry take Chemistry 3. ! Students entering the College of Engineering who receive entrance credit in shop or mechanical engineering drawing will be excused in some cases from the required work in these subjects in their place; such subtitutions are allowed only after examination by the engineering faculty.

A-4


1929 Curricula Continued Aeronautical Engineering - Second Year The work of the second year was the same as Mechanical Engineering.

Aeronautical Engineering - Third Year ME 151 (Gen. Thermody.) ME 161 (Steam Lab.) Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) Mech. 152 (Graphics) EE 51 (Dir. Cur. Mach.) EE 52 (Dir, Cur. Lab.) CE 1 (Elem. Surv.)

Credit Hour 4 2 5 1 2 2 4

Total: 20

Credit Hour ME 154 (Power Plant) 4 ME 162 (Steam Lab) 2 ME 170 (Conf. con’t) 1 ME 180 (El. Aero. Engr.) 3 Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) 5 Mech. 154 (Test. Mater.) 1 EE 53 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) 2 EE 54 (Alt. Cur. Lab) 2 Total: 20

Aeronautical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour ME 173 (Gas, Oil, Tr. & Meas.) 3 ME 181 (Aero. Motors) 3 Mech. 156 (Mach. Des.) 3 Mech. 170 (El. Aerodynamics) 3 English 19 (Adv. Comp.) 2 Acct. 55 3 Total: 20

Credit Hour ME 157 (Power Pl. Des.) 3 ME Problems ME 171 (Conf. con’t) 1 ME 167 (Adv. Thermody.) 3 Mech 155 (Hydraulics) 4 Mech 171 (Airplane Des.) 5 Engin. 203 (Ind. Manage.) 2 Total: 20

A-5


1929 Curricula Continued Architectural Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour AE 1 (Arch. Details) 2 Art 9 (Persepective) 3 Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Physics 51 (Gen. Physics) 5 Econ. 40 (Principles) 5 Mil. Sci. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

AE 2 (Persepective) Art 10 (Sketching) Engin. 51 (Contracts) Phys. 52 (Gen. Physics) Math 118 (Int. Calc.) Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Credit Hour 3 3 3 5 4 1 Total: 19

Architectural Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour AE 3 (Dom. Arch.) 2 AE 4 (Arch Orders) 2 FA 14 (Hist. of Arch.) 3 Electives 2 ME 8 (El. Heat Eng.) 4 Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) 5 Mech. 152 (Graphics) 1 Total: 17

AE 5 (El. Arch. Design) Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) Mech. 154 (Test. Mater.) CE 140 (Masonry) CE 1 (Survey) Acct. 55 (El. Acct.)

Credit Hour 3 5 1 4 4 3 Total: 20

Architectural Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour AE 6 (Arch. Design) 3 CE 143 (Rein. Conc.) 4 CE 144 (Quan. Sur. Est.) 2 CE 165 (Struct. Engin.) 2 EE 55 (El. Circ. Mach.) 3 EE 56 (Lab) 5 Total: 20

Credit Hour AE 7 (Arch. Design) 3 AE 8 (Prob. Arch. Design) 2 ME 16 (Heat and Vent) 3 CE 145 (Struct. Design) 4 English 19 (Adv. Comp) 2 Electives 6 Total: 20

A-6


1929 Curricula Continued Chemical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Chemistry 5 (Quan. Analysis) 3 Chemistry 121 (Organ. Chem.) 5 Chemistry 171 (Metal.) 3 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Physics 51 (General Phys.) 5 Mil. Sc. of Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Credit Hour Chemistry 100 (Adv. Qual. Anal.) 5 Chemistry 123 (Org. Lab.) 3 Chemistry 124 (Organ. Chem.) 2 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Physics 52 (General Phys.) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Chemical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Chem. Eng. 7 3 Chem. 151 (Phys. Chem.) 3 ME 4 (Thermody.) 3 ME 161 (Steam Lab.) 2 Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) 5 Mech. 152 (Graphics) 1 Geol. 1 (General) 5 Total: 22

Credit Hour Chem. Eng. 105 2 Chemistry 109 (Chem. Tech.) 2 Chemistry 152 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) 3 Chemistry 157 (Physical) 2 Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) 5 Mech. 154 (Test. Mater.) 1 Geol. 2 (Hist.) 5 Total: 20

Chemical Engineering - Fourth Year Chem. Eng. 107 Chemistry 147 (Met. of Iron) Chemistry 175 (Met. Nonfer.) or Pet. Ref. Eng. 111 Chemistry 137 (Pet. Analy.) in place of Chemistry 174, 175 EE 51 (Dir. Cur. Mach.) EE 52 (Dir. Cur. Lab.) English 19 (Adv. Comp.) Econ. 40 (Principles) Total:

Credit Hour 2 2

Chem. Eng. 110 Chem. Eng. 115 (Plant Des.) Chem 172 (Assaying) or 3 Pet. Ref. Eng. 112 Chemistry 142 (Gas & Fuel) 3 in place of Chemistry 172 2 EE 53 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) 2 EE 54 (Atl. Cur. Lab.) 2 Engin. 51 (Contracts) 5 Acct. 55 (Elem. Acct.) 18 or 19 Total:

A-7

Credit Hour 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 20 or 21


1929 Curricula Continued Civil Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour CE 1 (Elem. Surv.) 4 Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Physics 51 (General Physics) 5 Geol. 22 (Engin. Geol.) 3 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

CE 2 (Adv. Surv.) Physics 52 (General) Econ. 40 (Principles) Math 118 (Int. Calc.) Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Credit Hour 4 5 5 4 1 Total: 19

Civil Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour CE 152 (Rail. Engin.) or CE 133 (High. Eng.) and Mech 150 (Highway Mater. Test) ME 8 (El. Heat. Eng.) Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) Mech. 152 (Graphics) Mech. 154 (Test. Mater.)

4

Acct. 55 (Elem. Acct.)

3

Credit Hour

5 4 5 1 1

CE (Masonry)

4

CE (Rail. Surv.) Engin. 51 (Contracts) Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) Mech. 155 (Hydraulics)

4 3 5 4 Total: 20

Total: 18 or 19

Civil Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 120 (Water Supply) 3 CE 143 (Rein. Conc.) 4 CE 144 (Quan. Surv.) 2 CE 165 (Struct. Engin.) 4 EE 55 (Elec. Cir. and Mach.) 3 EE 56 (Elec. Lab.) 2 Total: 19

CE 112 (Hyd. Engin.) CE 125 (Sewerage) CE 135 (Adv. High) CE 145 (Con. Design) English 19 (Adv. Comp.)

Credit Hour 3 3 4 4 2 Total: 19

A-8


1929 Curricula Continued Electrical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Mech. Draw. 4 (Machine) 2 Shop 3 (Machine) 1 Physics 51 (General Physics) 5 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Econ. 40 (Principles) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Credit Hour EE 4 (El. D.C. Machin.) 3 Mech. Draw. 51 (Kinematic) 3 Shop 4 (Machine) 1 Physics 52 (General Physics) 5 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Acct. 55 (Elem. Acct.) 1 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Electrical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour EE 162 (Dir. Cur. Lab.) 2 EE 163 (Dir. and Alt. Cur. Prob.) 1 EE 164 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) 4 ME 161 (Steam Lab) 2 Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) 5

EE 165 (Alt. Cur. Lab.) EE 166 (Alt. Cur. Prob.) EE 167 (Alt. Cur. Circuits) ME 154 (Power Plant) ME 162 (Steam Lab)

Credit Hour 2 1 3 4 2

Mech. 152 (Graphics)

1

Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater. )

5

Physics 114 (Adv. Elec.)

2

Mech. 154 (Test. Mater.)

1

Physics 115 (Elec. Lab.)

1

Physics 116 (Adv. Elec.)

2

ME 4 (El. Thermody.)

3

Physics 117 (Elec. Lab.)

1

Total: 21

Total: 21

Electrical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour EE 171 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) 4 EE 172 (Alt. Cur. Lab.) 3 EE 175 (Adv. Prob.) 1 EE 182 (Current EE) 2 EE 188 (Elec. Tr.) 4 CE 1 (El. Surv.) 4 English 19 (Adv. Comp.) 2 Total: 20

Credit Hour EE 81 (Inspection Trip) EE 174 (Power Plant) 4 EE 183 (Adv. A.C. Mach.) 4 EE 184 (Adv. Lab.) 2 EE 185 (Elec. Prob.) 1 Engin. 51 (Contracts) 3 Mech. 115 (Hydraulics) 4 Total: 18

A-9


1929 Curricula Continued Engineering Physics - Second Year Credit Hour Phys. 51 (General Physics) 5 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Shop 3 (Machine) 1 French or German 5 Electives 2 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Credit Hour Physics 51 (General Physics) 5 Physics 100 (Adv. Mech.) 3 Physics 101 (Lab. for 100) 1 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Shop 4 (Machine) 1 French or German 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Engineering Physics - Third Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour 2 1 3

Physics 102 (Adv. Heat.) Physics 103 (Heat Lab.) Physics 114 (Adv. Elec.)

3 1 2

Physics 116 (Adv. Elec.) Physics 117 (Elec. Lab.) Physics 150 (Th. of Meas. EE 167 (Alt. Cur.) or ME 154 (Steam Power) EE 165 (Alt. Cur. Lab.) or ME 156 (Fuels & Lub.)

Physics 115 (Elec. Lab.)

1

EE 164 (Alt. Cur. Mach.)

4

ME 4 (El. Thermody.)

3

Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.)

5

Mech. 151 (App. Mech.)

5

Mech. 154 (Test Mater.)

1

Mech. 152 (Graphics)

1

Acct. 55

3

Total: 20

4 2

Total: 21

Engineering Physics - Fourth Year Credit Hour Physics 106 (Adv. Light)

3

Physics 104 (Light Lab.) Physics 190 (Colloquium) Chemistry 151 (Phys. Chem.) Econ. 40 (El. Econ.) French or German or Elec. Total:

1 3 5 5 19

Credit Hour Physics 161 (Precis. Meas.) or Physics 171 (Ind. Phys.) Physics 190 (Colloquium) Chemistry 152 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) Engin. 51 (Contracts) Mech. 155 (Hydraulics) Electives Total:

A-10

2 3 3 4 8 21


1929 Curricula Continued Geological Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Geol. 1 (General) 5 CE 1 (El. Surv.) 4 Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Phys. 51 (General Physics) 5 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Credit Hour Geol 2 (Hist.) 5 CE 4 (Alidale) 2 Engin. 51 (Contracts) 3 Physics 52 (General Physics) 5 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Geological Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Geol. 3 (Mineral) Geol. 102, (Crystallog) Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) Mech. 152 (Graphics) Econ. 40 (Principles)

5 3 5 1 5 Total: 19

Geol. 4 (Struct. Geol.) Geol. 101 (El. Paleon.) Geol. 103 (Det. Mineral) Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) Mech. 154 (Test Mater.)

Credit Hour 3 3 3 5 1

Acct. 55

3

English 19

2 Total: 20

Geological Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Geol. 100 (El. Paleon.) 3 Geol. 105 (Adv. Hist.) 3 Geol. 107 (Pet. and Gas) 5 *ChemE, CE, EE, ME or PE 4 ME 8 (El. Heat Engin.) 4 Total: 22

Credit Hour Geol. 106 (Adv. Hist.) 3 Geol. 109 (Ore. Dep.) 5 Geol. 182 (Adv. Petrog.) 3 *ChemE, CE, EE, ME, or PE 4 Mech. 155 (Hydraulics) 4 Total: 19

* Choose a course in Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, or Petroleum Engineering and follow it through the year.

A-11


1929 Curricula Continued Mechanical Engineering - Second Year ME 1 (Heat Engines) Mech. Draw. 4 (Machines) Shop 3 (Machine) Math. 17 (Dif. Calc.) Physics 51 (General Physics) Econ. 40 (Principles) Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Credit Hour 2 2 1 4 5 5 1

Credit Hour ME 169 (ME Conf.) 2 Mech. Draw. 3 (Des. Geom.) 2 Mech. Draw 51 (Kinemat.) 3 Shop 4 (Machine) 1 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Physics 52 (General Physics) 5 Pub. Spk. 1 (Gen. Prep.) 2 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 20

Total: 20

Mechanical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour ME 151 (Thermody.) ME 161 (Steam Lab.) Mech. 151 (App. Mech.) EE 51 (Dir. Cur. Mach.) EE 52 (Dir. Cur. Lab.)

4 2 5 2 2

ME 154 (Power Plant) ME 162 (Steam Lab.) ME 170 (ME Conf. cont’d) Mech. 153 (St. of Mater.) Mech. 154 (Test Mater.)

Credit Hour 4 2 1 5 1

CE 1 (Elem. Surv.)

4

EE 53 (Alt. Cur. Mach.)

2

Mech. 152 (Graphics)

1

EE 54 (Alt. Cur. Lab.)

2

Acct. 55

3

Total: 20

Total: 20

Mechanical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour ME 156 (Oil Test.) 1 ME 160 (Int. Com. Eng. Lab.) 1 ME 163 (Refrigeration) 3 ME 165 (Adv. Int. Com. Eng.) 3 ME 173 (Gas & Oil, Tr. & Meas.) 3 Mech. 156 (Mach. Des.) 3 English 19 (Adv. Comp.) 2 Total: 19

ME 157 (Power Plant Des.) ME 164 (Heat and Vent.) ME 166 (Boilers and Turbines) ME 167 (Adv. Thermody.) ME 168 (Hydraulics Lab) Engin. 203 (Ind. Management)

A-12

Credit Hour 3 3 2 3 1 2

Total: 19


1929 Curricula Continued Mining Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Geol. 1 (General) 5 CE 1 (Elem. Surv.) 4 Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Physics 51 (General Physics) 5 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Credit Hour Geol. 2 (Hist.) 5 CE 6 (Mine Surv.) 3 Engin. 51 (Contracts) 3 Physics 52 (General Physics) 5 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Mining Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Geol. 3 (Mineral) ME 150 (Thermody.) ME 165 (Oil & Gas Engines) ME 160 (Mech. Lab.) ME 161 (Steam Lab.)

5 4 3 1 2

Mining (Elem. of Mining) Geology 4 (Struct. Geol.) ME 162 (Steam Lab.) Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) Mech. 154 (Test Mater.)

Credit Hour 3 3 2 5 1

Mech. 151 (App. Mech.)

5

Econ. 40 (Principles)

5

Mech. 152 (Graphics)

1

Total: 19

Total: 21

Mining Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Mining (Ore Dressing) 3 Chemisty (Assaying) 2 Chemistry 171 (Gen. Metal) 3 EE 51 (Dir. Cur. Mach.) 2 Geol. 109 (Ore Deposits) 5 ME 173 (Gas and Oil, Tr. and Meas.) 3 Total: 20

Credit Hour Mining (Mine Manag.) 3 Chemistry 174 (Met. Iron & St.) 2 Chemistry 176 (Metal Lab.) 2 EE 53 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) 2 EE 54 (Alt. Cur. Lab.) 2 Acct. 55 3 Mech. 155 (Hydraulics) 4 Total: 20

A-13


1929 Curricula Continued Petroleum Engineering (Production Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Geol. 1 (General) 5 CE 1 (El. Surv.) 4 Mech. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Physics 51 (General Physics) 4 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 1 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Credit Hour Geol. 2 (Hist.) 5 CE 6 (Mine Surv.) 3 Engin. 51 (Contracts) 3 Physics 52 (General Physics) 5 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Petroleum Engineering (Production Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour PE 101 (Drill. and Dev.) ME 150 (Thermody.) ME 1 (Heat Engines) ME 161 (Steam Lab.) Mech. 151 (App. Mech.)

3 4 4 2 5

PE 102 (Equip. and Meth.) ME 162 (Steam Lab) Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) Mech. 154 (Test. Mater.) Geol. 3 (Mineral)

Credit Hour 3 2 5 1 5

Mech. 152 (Graphics)

1

Econ. 40 (Principles)

5

ME 160 (Mech. Lab.)

1

ME 165 (Int. Comb. Eng.)

3

Total: 21

Total: 19

Petroleum Engineering (Production Engineering Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour PE 103 (Nat. Gas, Casing Head 3 and El. Ref.) PE 104 (El. Mining) 2 EE 51 (Dir. Cur. Mach.) 2 EE 52 (Dir. Cur. Lab.) 3 ME 173 (Gas & Oil Tr.) 3 Geol. 4 (Struct. Geol.) 3 Acct. 55 3 Total: 19

Credit Hour PE 105 (Oil Field Man.)

3

PE 106 (Prod. Lab.) EE 53 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) EE 54 (Alt. Cur. Lab.) ME 157 (Power Pl. Des.) Mech. 155 (Hydraulics) Geol. 107 or Chemistry 171, 174 Total:

1 2 2 3 4 5 20

A-14


1929 Curricula Continued Petroleum Engineering (Refinery Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Geol. 1 (General) 5 Chemistry 121 (Organ.) 5 Mech. Draw. 3 (Des. Geom.) 2 Physics 51 (General Physics) 5 Math 17 (Dif. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 22

Credit Hour Chemistry 5 (Quan. Analysis) 3 Engin. 51 (Contracts) 3 Econ. 40 (Priciples) 5 Physics 52 (General Physics) 5 Math 118 (Int. Calc.) 4 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 21

Petroleum Engineering (Refinery Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour PE 111 (Pet. Ref.) ME 150 (Heat Engines) ME 161 (Steam Lab.) ME 165 (Oil & Gas Engines) Mech. 151 (App. Mech.)

3 4 2 3 5

PE 112 (Pet. Ref.) Chemistry 124 (Organ.) Chemistry 142 (Gas & Fuel) Mech. 153 (Str. of Mater.) Mech. 154 (Test or Mater.)

Credit Hour 2 2 2 5 1

Mech. 152 (Graphics)

1

English 19

2

CE 1 (Elem. Surv.)

4

Acct. 55

3

Total: 22

Total: 18

Petroleum Engineering (Refinery Engineering Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour PE 101 (Drill & Dev.) 3 PE 113 (Ref. Prac.) 2 PE 114 (Pet. Seminar) 1 PE 116 (Ref. Des.) 2 Chemistry 137 (Pet. Analysis) 3 Chemistry 151 (Phys. Chem.) 3 EE 51 (Dir. Cur. Mach.) 2 EE 52 (D.C. Lab.) 2 ME 160 (Mech. Lab) 1 Total: 19

PE 102 (Equip. & Meth.) PE 104 PE 115 (Pet. Ref.) EE 53 (A.C. Mach.) EE 54 (A.C. Lab.) ME 157 (Power Pl. Des.) Mech. 155 (Hydraulics)

A-15

Credit Hour 3 3 3 2 2 3 4 Total: 20


1937 Curricula All Schools* - First Year Credit Hour College Algebra (Math I) 3 Language (Engl I) 3 Chemistry (Chem Ia) 3 Freehand Drawing (Draw I) 2 Shop work (Shop I) 4 Total: 15

Credit Hour Trigonometry (Math IIa) 3 Language (Engl II) 3 Chemistry (Chem II) 3 Mechanical Drawing (Draw II) 2 Shop work (Shop II) 4 Total: 15

* Except for modifications noted in the School of Architecture. Architecture - First Year Credit Hour Arch. 3 (Technical Lecture) Arch. 41 (Architectural Draw.) Art31 (Draw. from Antique) Math 5 (College Algebra) Math 6 (Trigonometry) English 1 (Composition) Freshman Conference Phys. Ed. or Mil. Sc. Total:

3 3 3 3 3 1 16

Credit Hour Arch. 4 (Technical Lecture) Arch. 61 (App. Desc. Geom.) Art 32 (Still Life) Math 14 (Analytical Geom.) Chemistry 30 (Beginning) English 2 (Composition) Freshman Conference Phys. Ed. or Mil. Sc. Total:

3 3 4 3 3 1 17

Architecture - Second Year Credit Hour Arch. 9 (Classic Arch.) 2 Arch. 62 (Elem. Arch. Comp.) 3 Arch. 65 (Domestic Arch.) 4 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 French 1 (Beginning) 5 Phys. Ed. or Mil. Sc. 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour Arch. 10 (Medieval Arch.) 2 Arch. 66 (Adv. Arch. Comp.) 5 Art 99 (Figure Drawing) 3 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 French 2 (Intermediate) 5 Phys. Ed. or Mil. Sc. 1 Total: 20

A-16


1937 Curricula Continued Architecture - Third Year Credit Hour Arch. 8 (Pencil Sketching) 2 Arch. 180 (Renaissance Arch.) 2 Architectural Design 5 Art 200 (Adv. Fig. Drawing) 3 EE 105 (Illum. & Wiring) 2 Physics 51 (General Physics) 5 Total: 19

Arch. 181 (American Arch.) Arch. 280 (Pen Sketching) Architectural Design CE 3 (Surveying) Physics 52 (Gen. Phys. cont’d)

Credit Hour 2 2 5 3 5

Total: 17

Architecture - Fourth Year Credit Hour 5 3 4 1 2

Architectual Design Art 71 (Modeling) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) Mech. 252 (Graphic) English 119 (Adv. Comp) Econ. 41 (Principles) Total: 18

Architectural Design CE 140 (Masonry) Mech. 253 (Strength or Mater.) Mech. 254 (Test of Mater.) Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.)

Credit Hour 5 4 4 1 3

Total: 17

Architecture - Fifth Year Arch. 200 (Bldg. Equipment) Architectural Design CE 205 (Architectural Bldg.) CE 233 (Reinforced Concrete) Elective

Credit Hour 3 5 4 4 2

Total: 18

Credit Hour Arch. 251 (Prof. Practice) 2 Arch. 252 (Arch. Specifications) 2 Arch. 265 (Working Drawings) 4 Arch. 266 (Arch. Construction) 2 CE 245 (Concrete Design) 4 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 17

A-17


1937 Curricula Continued Architectural Engineering - First Year The work of the first year was the same as Architecture.

Architecture Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Arch. 9 (Classic Architecture) 2 Arch. 62 (Architecture Comp.) 3 Arch. 63 (Domestic Arch.) 4 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Mil. Sc or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour Arch. 9 (Pencil Sketching) 2 Arch. 10 (Medieval Arch.) 2 Arch. 66 (Adv. Arch. Comp.) 5 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Architecture Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Arch. 180 (Renaissance Arch.) 2 Architectural Design 5 CE 3 (Surveying) 3 EE 105 (Illum. and Wiring) 2 Mech 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech 252 (Graphics) 1 English 119 (Advanced Comp.) 2 Total: 19

Arch. 181 (American Arch.) CE 140 (Masonry) Architectural Design Mech 253 (Strength of Mater.) Mech 254 (Test of Materials) Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.)

Credit Hour 2 4 5 4 1 3

Total: 19

Architecture Engineering - Fourth Year Arch. 200 (Bldg. Equipment) Architectural Design CE 205 (Arch. Building) CE 233 (Reinforced Concrete) Econ. 41 (Principles)

Credit Hour 3 5 4 4 3

Total: 19

Credit Hour Arch. 251 (Professional Practice) 2 Arch. 252 (Arch. Specifications) 2 Arch 265 (Working Drawings) 4 Arch. 266 (Arch. Construction) 2 CE 245 (Concrete Design) 4 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 17

A-18


1937 Curricula Continued Landscape Architecture - First Year The work of the first year was the same as Architecture.

Landscape Architecture - Second Year Credit Hour Arch. 9 (Classic Arch.) 2 Arch. 62 (Elem. Arche. Comp.) 3 Arch. 65 (Domestic Arch.) 4 Art 41 (Water Color) 3 Botany 1 (General) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys Ed. 1 Total: 18

Credit Hour Arch. 10 (Medieval Arch.) 2 Arch. 66 (Arch. Composition) 5 Art 32 (Still Life) 3 Art 42 (Water Color cont’d) 3 Botany 14 (Oklahoma Vegetation) 2 Elective 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Landscape Architecture - Third Year Credit Hour Arch. 180 (Renaissance Arch.) 2 Architectural Design 5 Art 99 (Figure Drawing) 3 English 119 (Adv. Comp.) 2 Botany (Selected) 2 Art 71 (Modeling) 3 Elective 2 Total: 19

Arch. 181 (American Arch.) Landscape Design Art 72 (Modeling cont’d) Botany (Selected) Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) Elective

Credit Hour 2 5 3 3 3 2 Total: 18

Landscape Architecture - Fourth Year Credit Hour Landscape Design 5 Chemistry 4 (Qual. Analysis) 3 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Botany 225 (Plant Ecology) 3 Speech 21 (Principles) 2 Elective 2 Total: 18

Credit Hour Landscape Design 5 CE 3 (Surveying) 3 Botany 304 (Plant Taxonomy) 2 Botany 306 (Plant Identifications) 3 Econ. 41 (Principles) 3 Elective 2 Total: 18

A-19


1937 Curricula Continued Chemical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Chemistry 5 (Quan. Analysis) 3 Chemistry 99 (Organic Chem.) 5 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 18

Credit Hour Chem. E. 100 (Industrial) 3 Chemistry 100 (Organic Lectures) 2 Chemistry 102 (Organic Lab.) 3 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 18

Chemical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 242 (Gas, Fuel & Water Analysis) Chemistry 251 (Phys. Chem.) ME 104 (Thermodynamics) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) Mech. 252 (Graphics) Acct. 51 Elective Total:

Credit Hour

2

Chem. E. 207 (Thermodynamics)

3

3 3 4 1 3 2 18

Chem. E. 214 (Unit Processes) Chemistry 252 (Physics cont’d) Chem. 253 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) Elective Total:

2 2 3 4 1 2 18

Chemical Engineering - Fourth Year Chem. E. 311 (Unit Ops.) Chem. E. 313 (Frac. Distl.)

Credit Hour 3 2

Chem. E. 319 (Plant Design)

2

Chem. E. 351 (Problems) Chemistry 356 (Colloids) ME 265 (Int. Comb. Engines) ME 266 (Int. Comb. Lab.) Speech 21 (Principles) Total:

2 3 3 1 2 18

Chem. E. 312 (Unit Ops. cont’d) Chem. E. 314 (Frac. Distl.) Chem. E. 339 (Indus. Stoichiometry) Chem. E. 352 (Problems cont’d) EE 155 (Elec. Cur. & Mach.) EE 156 (Elec. Lab.) ME 154 (Steam Power Plant) Economics 41 (Principles) Total:

A-20

Credit Hour 3 1 2 2 4 1 3 3 19


1937 Curricula Continued Civil Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour CE 1 (Elem. Surveying) 4 E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom) 2 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Geol. 22 (Engr. Geology) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour CE 2 (Adv. Surveying) 3 Ind. Ed. 3 (Machine Shop) 1 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Econ. 41 (Principles) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Civil Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour CE 132 (Highway Lab.) 1 CE 133 (Highway Engr.) 4 ME 108 (Heat Engines) 4 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Grapics) 1 Acct. 51 3 Total: 17

Credit Hour CE 140 (Masonry) 4 CE 151 (Railroad Surveying) 3 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) 3 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 18

Civil Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 144 (Plans & Estimates) 1 CE 221 (Water Supply) 3 CE 233 (Concrete) 4 CE 263 (Structural Engr.) 4 CE 272 (Engr. Economics) 2 EE 155 (Elec. Cur. & Mach.) 4 EE 156 (Elec. Lab.) 1 Total: 19

CE 212 (Hydraulic Engineering) CE 226 (Sewage) CE 235 (Advanced Highway) CE 245 (Concrete Design) CE 266 (Structural Design) English 119 (Advanced Comp.)

Credit Hour 3 3 4 4 3 2

Total: 19

A-21


1937 Curricula Continued Municipal Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour CE 3 (Elem. Survey) 3 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Geol. 22 (Engineering Geol.) 3 Gov. 1 (United States) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour CE 2 (Adv. Surveying) 3 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Gov. 31 (Municipal) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Municipal Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour CE 132 (Highway Lab.) 1 CE 133 (Highway Engr.) 4 ME 108 (Heat Engines) 4 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 Elective 4 Total: 18

Credit Hour CE 140 (Masonry) 4 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) 3 Econ. 41 (Principles) 3 Elective 4 Total: 18

Municipal Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 144 (Plans & Estimates) 1 CE 221 (Water Supply) 3 CE 233 (Reinforced Concrete) 4 CE 265 (Structural Engr.) 4 CE 272 (Engr. Economics) 2 Elective 4 Total: 18

CE 226 (Sewerage) Engr. 101 (Contracts) English 119 (Adv. Composition) Elective

Credit Hour 3 3 2 10

Total: 18

A-22


1937 Curricula Continued Structural Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour CE 1 (Elem. Surveying) 4 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Physics 51 (General) 5 Geol. 22 (Engr. Geol.) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Ind. Ed. 3 (Machine Shop) 1 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Econ. 41 (Principles) 3 Elective 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Structural Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour EE 105 (Illum. & Wiring) 2 ME 108 (Heat Engines) 4 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Elective 4 Total: 18

Credit Hour CE 140 (Masonry) 4 ME 270 (Air Conditioning) 4 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Elective 2 Total: 18

Structural Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 144 (Plans & Estimates) 1 CE 233 (Reinforced Concrete) 4 CE 265 (Structural Engr.) 4 CE 272 (Engr. Economics) 2 Elective 7 Total: 18

CE 245 (Concrete Design) CE 266 (Structural Design) English 119 (Adv. Composition) Elective

Credit Hour 4 3 2 9

Total: 18

A-23


1937 Curricula Continued Transportation Engineering - Second Year CE 1 (Elem. Surveying) Math 99 (Calculus) Physics 51 (General) Geol. 22 (Engr. Geol.) Elective Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Credit Hour 4 4 5 3 2 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour CE 2 (Adv. Surveying) 3 Ind. Ed. 3 (Machine Shop) 1 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Econ. 41 (Principles) 3 Elective 2 Mil. Sc. Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Transportation Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour CE 132 (Highway Lab.) 1 CE 133 (Highway Engr.) 4 ME 108 (Heat Engines) 4 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 Elective 4 Total: 18

Credit Hour CE 140 (Masonry) 4 CE 151 (Railroad Surveying) 3 CE 234 (Traffic) 3 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 18

Transportation Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 233 (Reinforced Concrete) 4 CE 265 (Structural Engr.) 4 CE 272 (Engri Economics) 2 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Elective 5 Total: 18

CE 235 (Advanced Highway) CE 266 (Structural Design) English 119 (Adv. Composition) Elective

Credit Hour 4 3 2 9

Total: 18

A-24


1937 Curricula Continued Electrical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 E. Draw. 4 (Machine) 2 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Econ. 41 (Principles) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Credit Hour EE 83 (Principles) 5 Ind. Ed. 4 (Machine Shop cont’d) 1 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Electrical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour EE 201 (Convocation) EE 261 (Direct Cur. Mach.) EE 267 (AC Circuit Theory) ME 104 (Elem. Thermo.) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) Mech. 252 (Graphics) Physics 122 (Atomic Physics) Total:

2 5 3 4 1 3 18

Credit Hour EE 262 (Elem. Elec. Lab.) 2 EE 295 (Electronics) 3 ME 154 (Power Plant) 3 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Physics 216, 217 (Elec. Meas.) 2 CE 3 (Surveying) 3 Total: 18

Electrical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour EE 202 (Convocation cont’d) EE 271 (AC Machinery) EE 272 (AC Lab.) EE 288 (Elec. Transmission) ME 159 (Steam Lab.) Elective (Technical) Total:

4 2 4 3 6 19

Credit Hour Inspection Trip EE 283 (Adv. AC Machinery) EE 284 (Adv. AC Lab.) English 119 (Adv. Composition) Mech 255 (Hydraulics) Engr. 101 (Contracts) Total:

A-25

4 2 2 3 3 19


1937 Curricula Continued Engineering Physics - Second Year Credit Hour Physics 51 (General) 5 E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Economics 41 (Principles) 3 Elective 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 18

Credit Hour Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Physics 102 (Heat) 3 Physics 103 (Heat Lab) 1 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Engineering Physics - Third Year Credit Hour Physics 206 (Light) 3 Physics 207 (Light Lab) 1 Physics 218 (Electromechanics) 2 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechanics) 4 Chemistry 99 (Organic) 5 Elective 3 Total: 18

Credit Hour Physics 216 (Elec. Cir. & Meas.) 1 Physics 217 (Elec. Meas. Lab) 1 Physics 220 (Electromag. Waves) 2 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Chemistry 100 (Organic cont’d) 2 English 119 (Adv. Composition) 2 Elective 5 Total: 18

Engineering Physics - Fourth Year Credit Hour Physics 223 (Ex. Elec. Lab) 1 Physics 317 (Theoretical) 3 Physics 322 (Modern Physics) 3 Physics 360 (Theory of Meas.) 3 EE 267 (AC Circuit Theory) 5 Chemistry 251 (Physical) 3 Total: 18

Credit Hour Physics 318 (Theoretical cont’d) 3 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) 3 Chemistry 252 (Physics cont’d) 2 Chemistry 253 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) 3 Math 322 (Diff. Equations) 3 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 17

A-26


1937 Curricula Continued General Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Gov 1 (U.S.) or Hist. 43 (U.S.) 3 Speech 21 (Principles) 2 English Elective 2 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 19

Credit Hour 4 5 3 3 2 1

Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) Physics 52 (General cont’d) Economics 41 (Principles) Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) Elective Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Total: 19

General Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour CE 3 (Elem. Surveying) 3 EE 155 (Elec. Circuits & Mach.) 4 EE 156 (Electrical Lab) 1 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 Chemistry 71 (Gen. Metalurgy) 3 Geology 22 (Engr. Geology) 3 Total: 19

CE 140 (Masonry) Mech. 253 (Strength or Mater.) Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) Mech. 257 (Materials of Engr.) Engr. 101 (Contracts) English 100 (Usage)

Credit Hour 4 4 1 3 3 3

Total: 18

General Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 272 (Engr. Economics) 2 ME 104 (Elem. Thermodynamics) 3 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) 3 Elective (Technical) 6 Elective (Non-technical) 4 Total: 18

Credit Hour ME 154 (Power Plant) 3 Math 125 (Theory of Equations) 3 Elective (Technical) 9 Elective (Non-technical) 3

A-27

Total: 18


1937 Curricula Continued Geological Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Geol. 1 (General) 5 E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Credit Hour Geol. 2 (Historical) 5 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 18

Geological Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour 5 2 3 4 1 3

Geol. 3 (Mineralogy) Geol. 261 (Crystallography) CE 3 (Surveying) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) Mech. 252 (Graphics) Econ. 41 (Principles)

Total: 18

Credit Hour Geol. 4 (Structural Geology) 3 Geol. 131 (Elem. Paleontology) 3 Geol. 262 (Determinative Min.) 2 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 CE 4 (Alidade) 2 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 18

Geological Engineering - Fourth Year Geol. 211 (Advanced Historical) Geol. 263 (Economic - nonmetals) Geol. 381 (Petrography) ME 104 (Elem. Thermodynamics) Mech. 255 (Hydraulics)

Credit Hour 5 3 3 3 3

Total: 18

Geol. 212 (Adv. Hist. cont’d) Geol. 264 (Economic - metals) Geol. 371 (Petroleum and Gas) Geol. 382 (Adv. Petrography) Geology Elective

Credit Hour 3 3 3 3 3

PE 201 (Drilling & Develop.)

3

Total: 18

A-28


1937 Curricula Continued Mechanical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour ME 1 (Heat Engines) 2 E. Draw. 4 (Machine) 2 Ind. Ed. 3 (Machine Shop) 1 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Speech 21 (Principles) 2 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Credit Hour ME 69 (ME Conference) 2 E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geometry) 2 E. Draw. 51 (Kinematics) 2 Ind. Ed. 4 (Machine Shop cont’d) 1 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physcis 52 (General cont’d) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Mechanical Engineering - Third Year ME 151 (Gen. Thermo.) ME 161 (Steam Lab.) CE 3 (Elem. Surveying) EE 151 (DC Machinery) EE 152 (DC Lab.) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) Mech. 252 (Graphics)

Credit Hour 4 2 3 2 1 4 1

Total: 17

Credit Hour ME 162 (Steam Lab cont’d) 2 ME 170 (ME Conference cont’d) 1 ME 256 (Fuel Testing) 1 ME 270 (Air Cond. and Refrig.) 4 EE 153 (Alt. Cur. Mach.) 2 EE 154 (Electrical Lab.) 1 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 1 Total: 17

Mechanical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour ME 265 (Internal Comb. Engines) 3 ME 266 (Internal Comb. Eng. Lab) 1 ME 373 (Gas. Meas. and Trans.) 4 ME 374 (Stor. and Trans. of Oils) 2 Engr. 303 (Industrial Management) 2 English 119 (Adv. Composition) 2 Economics 41 (Principles) 3 Total: 17

Credit Hour ME 171 (ME Conf. cont’d) 1 ME 257 (Power Plant Design) 4 ME 268 (ME Problems) 3 ME 269 (Hydraulics Lab.) 1 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) 3 Mech. 256 (Machine Design) 3 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Total: 18

* Five hours of approved electives must be taken in addition to the above.

A-29


1937 Curricula Continued Aeronautical Engineering - Second Year Second year curriculum same as second year of mechanical engineering

Aeronautical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour ME 151 (Gen. Thermo.) 4 ME 161 (Steam Lab.) 2 ME 280 (Elem. Aero. Engr.) 3 CE 3 (Elem. Surveying) 3 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 English 119 (Adv. Composition) 2 Total: 19

Credit Hour ME 162 (Steam Lab cont’d) 2 ME 170 (ME Conf. cont’d) 1 ME 265 (Internal Comb. Engines) 3 ME 266 (Internal Comb. Lab.) 1 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Mech. 371 (Airplane Mechanics) 3 Economics 41 (Principles) 3 Total: 18

Aeronautical Engineering - Fourth Year ME 281 (Aero. Engr. Lab.) ME 373 (Gas. Meas. and Trans.) Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) Mech. 372 (Airplane Mech. cont’d)

Credit Hour 1 4 3 2

EE 155 (Electrical Cts. and Mach.)

4

EE 156 (Electical Laboratory) 1 Engr. 303 (Indust. Management) 2 Total: 17

A-30

ME 171 (ME Conf. cont’d) ME 256 (Fuel Testing) ME 268 (ME Problems) ME 383 (Engine Design) Mech. 374 (Airplane Stress Anal.) Engr. 101 (Contracts) Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) Total:

Credit Hour 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 17


1937 Curricula Continued Mining Engineering - Second Year Second year curriculum same as second year of geological engineering

Mining Engineering - Third Year CE 6 (Mine Surveying) ME 150 (Thermodynamics) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.)

Credit Hour 3 4 4

Mech. 252 (Graphics)

1

Chemistry 71 (Gen. Metallurgy) 3 Geol. 261 (Crystallography)

3

Total: 18

Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) Geology 4 (Structural) Geology 204 (Elements of Mining) Geology 262 (Determinative Min.) Economics 41 (Principles) Elective Total:

Credit Hour 4 1 3 3 3 3 2 19

Mining Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Mining 331 (Ore Dressing)

3

ME 265 (Internal Comb. Engines) ME 266 (Int. Comb. Lab.)

2 1

Mech. 255 (Hydraulcis)

3

Chemistry Elective

3

Geology 381 (Petrography)

3 Total: 19

Credit Hour Mining 332 (Mine Management) EE 155 (Elec. Cts. & Mach.) EE 156 (Electrical Lab.) Chemistry 274 (Metallury of Iron) Geology 382 (Adv. Petrography) Geology 462 (Ore Deposits) Total:

A-31

3 4 1 2 3 5 18


1937 Curricula Continued Natural Gas Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geometry) 2 Math 99 (Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 Geol. 23 (Elem. Petrology) 3 Speech 21 (Principles) 2 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Credit Hour ME 69 (Conference) 2 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Economics 41 (Principles) 3 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 18

Natural Gas Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour EE 155 (Elec. Cts. & Mach.) 4 EE 156 (Electric Lab.) 1 ME 151 (Gen. Thermo.) 4 ME 151 (Steam Lab.) 2 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 Economics 42 (Principles) 3 Total: 19

Credit Hour ME 154 (Power Plant) 3 ME 162 (Steam Lab cont’d) 2 ME 170 (ME Conference cont’d) 1 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 PE 201 (Drilling and Develop.) 3 Finance 151 (Money & Banking) 3 Total: 17

Natural Gas Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 3 (Elem. Surveying) 3 ME 265 (Internal Comb. Engines) 3 ME 266 (Internal Comb. Eng. Lab) 1 ME 373 (Gas. Meas. and Trans.) 3 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics)

3

Engr. 101 (Contracts) Engr. 303 (Indrustiral Management)

3

Credit Hour ME 171 (ME Conf. cont’d) 1 ME 268 (ME Problems) 3 ME 270 (Air Cond. and Refrig.) 4 ME 310 (Nat. Gas Syst. Design) 2 PE 203 2 (Nat. Gas and Nat Gasoline) English 119 (Adv. Composition) 2

2

Finance 262 (Public Utilities)

Total: 18

3

Total: 17

A-32


1937 Curricula Continued Petroleum Engineering - Second Year Math 99 (Calculus) Physics 51 (General) Geology 1 (General) Speech 21 (Principles) Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Credit Hour 4 5 5 2 1 Total: 17

Credit Hour E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) 2 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Geology 2 (Historical) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 17

Petroleum Engineering - Third Year PE 120 (Report Writing) ME 150 (Thermodynamics) ME 159 (Steam Lab.) Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) Mech. 252 (Graphics) Engr. 101 (Contracts) Geology 23 (Mineralogy)

Credit Hour 1 4 3 4 1 3 3

Total: 19

Credit Hour PE 201 (Drilling and Develop.) 3 EE 155 (Elec. Cts. and Mach.) 4 EE 156 (Electrical Lab.) 1 ME 265 (Internal Comb. Engines) 3 ME 266 (Internal Comb. Lab) 1 Mech. 253 (Strength of Materials) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Geology 4 (Structural) 3 Total: 20

Petroleum Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour PE 202 (Equipment & Methods) 3 PE 203 (Nat. Gas & Nat. Gasoline) 2 PE 257 (Oil & Gas Law) 3 PE 373 (Gas Transm. & Meas.) 4 CE 3 (Surveying) 3 Economics 41 (Principles) 3 Total: 18

Credit Hour PE 305 (Oil Field Management) 3 PE 306 (Production Lab.) 1 PE 309 (PE Seminar) 1 PE 313 (Refinery Operations) 2 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) 3 Geology 371 (Petro. and Gas) 3 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) 3 Total: 18

A-33


1937 Curricula Continued Refinery Engineering - Second Year E. Draw. 3 (Desc. Geom.) Math 99 (Calculus) Chemistry 99 (Organic) Physics 51 (General) Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed.

Credit Hour 2 4 5 5 1

Credit Hour CE 3 (Surveying) 3 Math 100 (Calculus cont’d) 4 Chemistry 5 (Quantitative Anal.) 3 Chemistry 100 (Organic Lectures) 2 Physics 52 (General cont’d) 5 Mil. Sc. or Phys. Ed. 1 Total: 18

Total: 17

Refinery Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour ME 150 (Thermodynamics) 4 Mech. 251 (Applied Mechs.) 4 Mech. 252 (Graphics) 1 Chem. E 209 (Principles) 2 Chemistry 251 (Physical) 3 Geology 22 (Engineering Geol.) 3 Total: 17

Credit Hour PE 201 (Drilling & Development) 3 EE 155 (Elec. Cts. and Mach.) 4 EE 156 (Electrical Lab.) 1 Mech. 253 (Strength of Mater.) 4 Mech. 254 (Testing Materials) 1 Engr. 101 (Contracts) 3 Chemistry 252 (Physical) 2 Total: 18

Refinery Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour PE 311 (Petr. Distil and Thermo.) 3 PE 215 (Special Problems) PE 312 PE 313 (Technol. of Refining) 2 (Cracking Polymerizations) PE 315 (Prin. of Lubr. Oil Ref.) 2 PE 316 (Prin. of Lubrication) PE 317 (Processing Lubr. Oils) 1 PE 318 (Lubrication Lab.) PE 373 (Gas. Meas. and Trans.) 4 Mech. 255 (Hydraulics) ME 265 (Internal Comb. Engines) 3 Acct. 51 (Elements of Acct.) Speech 21 (Principles) 2 Economics (Principles) Total: 18 Total: Five hours of approved electives must be taken in addition to the above

A-34

Credit Hour 2 3 2 1 3 3 3 17


1961 Curricula Aeronautical and Space Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Math 22 (Analysis II) Chemistry 3 (General) IE 1, 52, 54, or 101 Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour

3 5 5 1 1-2

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Analysis III Calculus) Engineering 21 (Introduction) EG 101 (Engineering Graphics) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Total: 15 or 16

3 4 1 3 3 1-2 15 or 16

Aeronautical and Space Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Government 1 (U.S.) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speaking) Elective Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 3 2 3 1-2 18 or 19

Credit Hour 3-4 3 5

Math 223 or 201 English Elective Physics 52 (General) Engineering 104 (Thermodynamics) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

4 1-2 Total: 16 or 18

Aeronautical and Space Engineering - Third Year ASE 280 (Aerodynamics) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. or Mat’ls.) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Laboratory) Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

Credit Credit Hour Hour 3 ASE 265 (Aircraft Power Units) 3 3

ASE 282 (Aircraft Instruments)

1

3 1 2

ASE 290 (Aerodynamics) Engr. 145 (Instr. & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engineering Lab.)

3 2 1

4

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3

Total: 16

Chemistry 203 (Physical)

A-35

3 Total: 16


1961 Curricula Continued Aeronautical and Space Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour ASE 170 (Conference) 1 ASE 171 (Conference) ASE 266 ASE 372 (Aircraft Structures) 4 (Aircraft Power Units Lab.) ASE 384 (Elem. Space Tech.) 3 ASE 281 (Aerodynamics Lab.) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) 3 ASE 373 (Airplane Load Criteria) Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab.) 2 ASE 374 or 381 (Design) Chemistry or Physics Elective 3 Elective Elective 3 Elective Elective Total: 19 Total:

Credit Hour 1 2 1 2 3 3 2-3 3 17 or 18

Architecture - First Year Credit Hour Arch. 8 (Design I) Arch. 15 (Nature of Materials) Math 21 (Analysis I) Englilsh 21 (Composition) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

3 2 5 3 1-2 14 or 15

Arch. 18 (Design II) Arch. 44 (Arch. Graphics I) Math 22 (Analysis II) English 22 (Composition) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 2 5 3 1-2 14 or 15

Architecture - Second Year Credit Hour Arch. 41 (Design III)

3

Arch. 56 (Arch. Graphics II)

2

Arch. 77 (Elements of Structure) 2 Physics 51 (General) Government 1 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

5 3 1-2 Total: 16 or 17

Credit Hour Arch. 51 (Design IV) Arch. 126 (Building Sanitation) Mech. 113 (Mech. for Architects) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

A-36

3 2 6 3 1-2 Total: 15 or 16


1961 Curricula Continued Architecture - Third Year Arch. 162 (Design V) Arch. 109 (Hist. of Ancient Arch.) Arch. 221 (Arch. Structures I)

Credit Hour 4

Arch. 166 (Design VI) Arch. 110 (Hist. or Medival Arch.) Arch. 222 (Arch. Structures II) Arch. 105 (Illum. & Elect. Install.) Sociology 1 (Introduction) Total:

2 3

Arch. 165 (Working Drawings) 4 Approved Elective

3 Total: 16

Credit Hour 4 2 4 3 3 16

Architecture - Fourth Year Credit Hour Arch. 273 (Design VII) 5 Arch. 200 (Mech. Equipt. Bldg.) 3 Arch. 223 (Arch. Structures III) 4 Arch. 252 (Spec. & Contracts) 3 Economics 41 (Principles) 3 Total: 18

Arch. 390 (Design VIII) Arch. 285 (Furn. & Landscape) Hist. Sci. 201 or 202 Approved Elective

Credit Hour 7 3 3 3

Total: 16

Architecture - Fifth Year Credit Hour Arch. 391 (Design IX) 7 Arch. 280 (Hist. of Ren. Arch.) 2 Arch. 360 (Planning Seminar) 3 English 53, 54, or 55 (Engl. Lit.) 3 Approved Elective 3 Total: 18

Credit Hour Arch. 392 (Design X) 7 Arch. 281 (Hist. of Mod. Arch.) 3 Arch. 361 (Planning Seminar) 3 Arch. 351 (Prof. Practice) 2 English 103 or 104 (Am. Lit.) 3 Total: 18

A-37


1961 Curricula Continued Chemical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour Math 22 (Analysis II) Chemistry 3 (General) English 21 (Composition) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speaking) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

5 5 3

Math 103 (Analysis III Calculus) 4 Physics 51 (General) 5 English 22 (Composition) 3

2

EG 101 (Engineering Graphics)

1-2 16 or 17

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

3

1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Chemical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV Calc.)

4

Physics 52 (General)

5

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

Chemistry 17 (Analytical)

3

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour

1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Math 201 (Engineering Math) Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engineers Chemistry 255 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mat’ls.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 3 1 3 1-2 16 or 17

Chemical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Chem. 204 (Phys. Chem. for Engineers) Chem. 258 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Engr. 251 (Statics) ChE 140 (Chem. Engr. Fundamentals) Humanistic and Social Studies Elective Toat:

Credit Hour

1 1

Engr. 145 2 (Instrumentation and Analogs) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) 3 ChE 217 (Chem. Engr. Thermo.) 3

4

ChE 220 (Unit Operations)

2

Analysis Elective 2-3 Humanistic and Social Studies 3 Elective

3

4 3

3

Total: 17-18

18

A-38


1961 Curricula Continued Chemical Engineering - Fourth Year Chemistry 103 (Organic) Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

Credit Hour 5 3

Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C)

2

Credit Hour 3 4

Chemistry 104 (Organic) ChE 325 (Chem. Engr. Des. II) Humanistic and Social Studies 9 Electives

ChE 324 (Chem. Engr Des. I) 2 Humanistic and Social Studies 3 Electives Total: 18

Total: 16

Civil Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Math 22 (Analysis II) Chemistry 3 (General) Government I (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour

3

5 5 3 1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speaking) Math 103 (Analysis III Calc.) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) EG 101 (Engineering Graphics) English 22 (Composition) Total:

2 4 3 3 3 17 or 18

Civil Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Physics 51 (General) 5 Math 104 (Analysis IV Calc.) 4 Human & Soc. Studies Elective 3 CE 10 (Elem. Surveying) 2 CE 11 (Elem. Surveying, Field) 1 CE 144 (Plans and Estimates) 1 Mil. Sc. or Equivalent 1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Credit Hour Engr. 120 (Engr. Analysis) 3 Physics 52 (General) 5 Human & Soc. Studies Elective 3 Engr. 251 (Statics) 2 Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) 4 Mil. Sci. or Equivalent 1-2

A-39

Total: 18 or 19


1961 Curricula Continued Civil Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Laboratory) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) CE 133 (Highway Engr.) Mech. 262 (Graphical Mechs.) Chemistry 203 (Physical) Total:

Credit Hour Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Engr. 146 (Engr. Laboratory) CE 140 (Mat’ls. of Construction) CE 155 (Route Surveying) CE 265 (Structural Analysis) Math Elective

3 1 3 3 4 1 3 18

4 1 3 3 4 3

Total: 19

Civil Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour CE 221 (Water Supply & Sewerage)

3

CE 233 (Reinforced Concrete)

3

CE 255 (Steel & Timber Design) Engr. 254 (Engr. Laboratory) Physics or Chemistry Elective Approved Professional Elective Total:

3 2 3 4 18

Credit Hour CE 223 (San. & Hydraulic Des.) CE 263 (Soil Mech. & Foundation) CE 272 (Econ. of Engr. Design) Approved Professional Elective Human & Soc. Studies Elective

3 4 3 6 3

Total: 19

Sanitary Science - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Approved Elective Government 1 (U.S.) Math 5 (College Algebra) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 5 3 3 1-2 15 or 16

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) Approved Elective History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Math 6 (Trigonometry) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

A-40

3 5 3 3 1-2 15 or 16


1961 Curricula Continued Sanitary Science - Second Year Credit Hour Chemistry 1 (General) Botany 1 (General) Approved Elective Speech 1 (Fundamentals) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

4 5 3 3 1-2 16 or 17

Physics 5, (General) Zoology 1 (General) Chemistry 2 (General) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

5 5 4 1-2 Total: 15 or 16

Sanitary Science - Third Year Chemistry 155 (Quant. Anal.) Microbiology 181 (Gen. Bacteriology)

Credit Hour 4

Approved Elective

3

EG 101 (Engineering Graphics) Government 231 or 131 (Municipal Gov. & Admin.)

3

Educ. 101 (Health Education) Bus. Com. 41 (Bus. Com.) or English 120 (Tech. Writing) San. Sc. 216 (Public Health Admin. & Law) CE 10 (Elem. Surveying)

3

CE 11 (Elem. Surveying, Field)

5

Total: 17

Approved Elective

Credit Hour 6-8

A-41

3 1 2 1

6 Total: 16

Sanitary Science - Summer Session San. Sc. 250 (Field Traning)

Credit Hour 3


1961 Curricula Continued Sanitary Science - Fourth Year Credit Hour Microbiology 284 (Pathogenic Bacteriology) Zoology 265 (Parasitology) Educ. 248 (Health Education)

Credit Hour

5

Zoology 112 (Human Physiology) 4

3 2

Zoology 267 (Med. Entomology) San. Sc. 278 (Indust. Sanitation) San. Sc. 300 (Epidemiology & Communicable Disease) San. Sc. 303 (Radioisotope Technics)

3 2

San. Sc. 304 (Radioisotope Lab)

1

San. Sc. 270 (Vital Statistics)

2

San. Sc. 322 (Sanitary Lab.)

3

San. Sc. 290 (Public Health Problems)

1

Approved Elective

Total: 16

2 2

2 Total: 16

Electrical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Math 22 (Analysis II) Chemistry 3 (General) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

3 5 5 3 1-2 17 or 18

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Engineering 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivilant Total:

3 4 5 1 1-2 17 or 18

Electrical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) 4 Physics 52 (General) 5 EG 101 (Engineering Graphics) 3 Speech 21 2 (Princ. of Pub. Speaking) Elective 1 3 Mil. Sc. or Equivalent 1-2

Math 201 (Engineering Math) Engr. 142 (Elec. Cts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mat’ls.) Engr. 251 (Statics) Elective 2 Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total: 18 or 19 Total:

A-42

Credit Hour 4 3 1 3 2 3 1-2 17 or 18


1961 Curricula Continued Electical Engineering - Third Year Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) EE 102 (Circuits Analysis I) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) EE 171 (Elec. Machinery I) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab)

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3 1

Total: 17

Credit Hour 3 3 3 1 1 1

EE 202 (Circuits Analysis II) EE 203 (Static Fields) EE 157 (Electronics I) EE 158 (Electronics Lab) EE 173 (Elec. Mach. Lab. I) EE 204 (Circuits Lab) Engr. 221 4 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Total: 16

Electical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour EE 271 (Elec. Machinery II) 4 Chemistry or Physics Elective 3 Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab) 2 Elective 3 3 EE 257 (Electronics II) 3 EE 258 (Electronics Lab II) 1 Total: 16

English 120 (Technical Writing) EE 273 (Elec. Mach. Lab. II) Elective 4 Elective 5

Credit Hour 3 1 3 9

Total: 16

Engineering Physics - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Chemistry 3 (General) Math 22 (Analysis II) Engr. 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 5 5 1 1-2 15 or 16

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 History 3 or 4 (U.S.) 3 Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) 4 EG 101 (Engineering Graphics) 3 Mil. Sc. or Equivalent 1-2 Total: 16 or 17

A-43


1961 Curricula Continued Engineering Physics - Second Year Credit Hour Humanistic Elective Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.)

3 4

Physics 52 (General)

5

Government 1 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

3 1-2 Total: 16 or 17

Credit Hour Engr. 142 (Circuit Analysis) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 112 (Struct & Prop. of Mat’ls.) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 5 3 4 1-2 16 or 17

Engineering Physics - Third Year Credit Hour Physics 106 (Light) 3 Physics 122 (Mod. Physics) 3 Engr. 251 (Statics) 2 Math 201 (Engineering Math) 4 Chemistry 203 (Physical Chem.) 3 Engineering 144 (Engr. Lab) 1 Total: 16

Credit Hour Physics 218 (Elec. & Magnetim) 3 Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) 3 Math 202 (Engineering Math) 3 Chemistry 204 (Physical Chem.) 3 Humanistic Elective 3 Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab) 1 Physics 131 (Junior Lab II) 1 Total: 17

Engineering Physics - Fourth Year Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 120 (Tech. Writing) or Bus. Com. 41 Physics 323 (Nuclear Physics) Physics 230 (Senior Lab I) EE 257 (Electronics II) Physics Elective

Credit Hour 3

Physics Electives

Credit Hour 6

3

Hist. of Sc. 303 (Hist. of Sc.)

3

3 1

Physics 231 (Senior Lab II) Elective Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

1 3

3 3 Total: 16

4 Total: 17

A-44


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering - First Year Credit Hour Math 22 (Analysis II) Chemistry 3 (General)

4 5

English 21 (Composition)

3

History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) EG 101 (Engr. Graphics) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speak) English 22 (Composition) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 1-2 Total: 16 or 17

4 3 2 3 1-2 17 or 18

The first year course requirements are identical for all students enrolled in General Engineering

General Engineering (Unspecified Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 22 (Analysis II) Physics 51 (General) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Electives

Credit Hour

4 5 1-2 6

Electives Physics 52 (General) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 251 (Statics) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Total: 16 or 17

4 5 4 2 1-2 16 or 17

General Engineering (Unspecified Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mat’ls.) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3 3 3

Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.)

3

Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A)

1

Elective

5 Total: 18

Credit Hour Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) ME 281 (Analysis of Machine Elements) Elective Total:

A-45

3 2 1 4 3 5 18


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Unspecified Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Elective

2 15 Total: 17

Credit Hour Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D) Elective

2 15 Total: 17

General Engineering (Computer Science Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Human. & Social Studies History of Science Elective Mil. Sci. or Equivalent

4 5 3 3 1-2

Total: 16 or 17

Credit Hour Electives Physics 52 (General) Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Math 125 (Intro. to Matrices & Determinants) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 5 2 3 1 2 1-2 17 or 18

General Engineering (Computer Science Option) - Third Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

Chemistry 203 (Physical Chem. for Engineers)

3

Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mat’ls.)

3

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

4

2

Elective

3

1

Math Elective Engr. 202 (Programming for Digital Computers)

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) 3 Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Math Elective

3 Total: 16

3 Total: 19

A-46


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Computer Science Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Human & Social Studies Elective

3 9

Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C)

2

Engr. 302 (Engr. Anal. for Dig. Comps.)

3

Total: 17

Credit Hour Human & Social Studies Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D) ME 281 (Anal. of Machine Elements)

3 2

Electives

6

3

Physics or Chemistry Elective 3 Total: 17

General Engineering (Earth Science Option) - Second Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Geol. 7 (Elem. Geol for Petr. Engr.) Chemistry 17 (Anal. Chem. for Engr.)

4 5

Math 201 (Engineering Math) Physics 52 (General)

4 5

5

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

3

Engr. 251 (Statics)

2

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2 Total: 18 or 19

Geol. 82 (Petrology for Petr. Engr.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

3 1-2 Total: 19 or 20

General Engineering (Earth Science Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mater.) Geol. 104 (Structural Geol.) Engr. 142 (Elect. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A)

3 3 4 3 1

Math Elective 3 Chemistry 255 1 (Elem. Phys. Chem. Meas.) Total: 18

Credit Hour Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Chemistry 204 (Phys. Chem for Engrs.) Chemistry 258 (Elem. Phys. Chem. Meas.) Chemistry 102 (Organic Chem.) Human & Social Studies

3 2 1 3 1 5 3

Total: 18

A-47


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Earth Science Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

History of Science Elective

3

Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C)

2

Geol. 121 (Field Geology)

3

Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Met. Engr. 315 (X-ray Studies of Structures) Engr. 202 (Program. for Dig. Comps.) Total:

3

Mech. Engr. 281 (Analysis of Machine Elements) Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab. D) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Human & Social Studies

2

Electives

3

3 2 4 3 6

Total: 18

19

General Engineering (Engineering Economic Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Economics 41 (Principles) Accounting 51 (Elements) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 3 3 1-2 16 or 17

Credit Hour Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Physics 52 (General) Economics 42 (Principles) Accounting 52 (Elements) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 3 3 1-2 16 or 17

General Engineering (Engineering Economics Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 142 (Elect. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Math 223 (Elem. Differential Equations or equivalent) History of Science Elective Economics Elective

3 2 3 1 3

3

3 Total: 18

Credit Hour Ind. Ed. 196 (Manufacturing Process) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Math 219 (Prin. of Mathematical Statistics or equivalent) Economics Elective

A-48

2 3 2 1 4

3 3 Total: 18


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Engineering Economics Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Engr. 202 (Prog. for Dig. Comps.) Civil Engr. 272 (Econ. of Engr. Design) Economics Elective

Credit Hour

3

Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D)

2

3 2

Physics or Chemistry Electvie Chem. Engr. 217 Engr. 302 (Engr. Anal. for Dig. Comps.) Mech. Engr. 281 (Anal. of Machine Elements) Economics Elective Total:

3 4

3 3 3 Total: 17

3 3 3 18

General Engineering (Environmental Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Human & Social Studies Chemistry 17 (Anal. Chem. for Engrs.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

4 5 3

Math 223 or equivalent Physics 52 (General) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3 5 4

3

Engr. 251 (Statics)

2

1-2 16 or 17

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2 Total: 15 or 16

General Engineering (Environmental Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. Materials) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 142 (Elect. Crts. & Mach.)

3 3 3 3

Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A)

1

PS 181 (Bacteriology)

5 Total: 18

Credit Hour Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) ME 281 (Analysis of Mach. Elements) SS 332 (Sanitary Anayses) SS 278 (Ind. Sanitation & Safety) Total:

A-49

3 2 1 4 3 3 2 18


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Materials Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Human & Social Studies Chemistry 17 (Anal. Chem for Engrs.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

4 5 3

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4 5 4

3

Engr. 251 (Statics)

2

1-2 16 or 17

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2 Total: 16 or 17

General Engineering (Materials Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials)

Credit Hour

3

Chemistry 204 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.)

3

3

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) 3

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs)

2

Engr. 142 (Elect. Crts. & Mach.)

3

Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B)

1

Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A)

1

Met. E. 210 (Structural Met. I) 4 Total: 17

Math 229 (Statistical Methods of Quality Control or equivalent) Met. Engr. 211 (Struct. Met II) Ind. Ed. 196 (Mfg. Processes) Total:

3 4 2 18

General Engineering (Materials Engineering Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Human & Social Studies Chemistry 102 (Org. Chem.) Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Met. Engr. 385 (Nuclear Materials)

Credit Hour

3 5 2

Physics or Chemistry Electives History of Science Elective Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D)

3 3 2

4

Human & Social Studies

3

3

Total: 17

Mech. Engr. 281 3 (Analysis of Machine Elements) Met. Engr. 315 2 (X-ray Studies of Structures) Total: 19

A-50


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Medical Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Human & Social Studies Chemisty 17 (Anal. Chem. for Engrs.) Total:

Credit Hour

4 5 1-2 3

Math 223 or equivalent Physics 52 (General) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 251 (Statics)

3 5 4 2

3

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2

16 or 17

Total: 15 or 16

General Engineering (Medical Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Zoology 1 (Introduction)

3

Credit Hour Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3 3 3 1

5 Total: 18

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) ME 281 (Analysis of Mach. Elements) Chemistry 102 (Organic) Total:

3 2 1 4 3 5 18

General Engineering (Medical Engineering Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Zoology 20 (Comparative Vertebrae Anatomy) Math 219 (Principles of Mathematical Statistics) Human and Social Studies Elective

Credit Hour

2

Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D)

2

4

Engr. 202 (Prog. for Dig. Comps.)

3

3 3 5

Total: 17

Engr. Phys. 272 (Intro. to Nuclear Engineering) or approved Engr. Anal. Elective History of Science Elective Human & Social Studies Elective Total:

A-51

3 3 3 5 19


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Nuclear Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Human & Social Studies History of Science Elective Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour

4 5 3 3 1-2

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total: 16 or 17 Total:

4 5 2 3 1 1-2 15 or 16

General Engineering (Nuclear Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

Engr. 104 (Themodynamics)

4

Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.)

3

Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mater.)

3

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3

Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

4

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs)

2

English Lit. Elective

3

Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab A)

1

Math Elective

Engr. Phys. 272 (Intro. to Nuc. Engr.) Elective

3 Total: 16

3 3 Total: 19

General Engineering (Nuclear Engineering Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Engr. Phys. 372 (Nuc. Reactors) Met. Engr. 385 (Nuclear Materials) Mech. Engr. 281 (Anal. of Machine Elements) EE 372 (Servomechanisms) Engr. 202 (Prog. for Digit. Comps.) Engr. Phys. 373 (Nuc. Reactor Lab) Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Total:

3 3

Credit Hour Chem. Engr. 380 (Nuc. Chem. Proc.) Engr. Phys. 378 (Reactor Instrument. & Control)

3 3

3

Human & Social Studies

3

3

Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D) Civil Engr. 303 (Radioisotope Techniques)

2

Elective

3

3 1 2 18

3

Total: 17

A-52


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Scientific & Tech. Exposition Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Journalism 41 (Basic News Media & Tech.) Speech 31 (Adv. Pub. Speak.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

4 5

Math 223 or equivalent Physics 52 (General) Speech 47 (Princ. & Methods of Discuss.) Geology 22 (Engr. Geology) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 3 1-2 16 or 17

3 5 3 3 1-2 15 or 16

General Engineering (Scientific & Tech. Exposition Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A)

2

1

Math Elective

3

3

Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mater.) History of Science 201

3 3 Total: 19

Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 145 (Insrumentation & Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) English 101 (Read. in World Lit.) History of Science 202

3 3 2 1 4 3

3 Total: 19

General Engineering (Scientific & Tech. Exposition Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

English 215 (Hist. of the English Lan.)

3

Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D)

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

Engr. Phys. 272 (Intro. to Nuc. Engr.) 3

Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) History of Science 381 Engr. 202 (Prog. for Digit. Comp.) Life Science Elective

2 3

Physics 322 (Intro. to Mod. Phys.) History of Science 383 Geography 50 (Intro. to Weather & Climate) Classics 16 (Medical Vocab.) Mech. Engr. 281 (Anal. of Machine Elements) Total:

3 5 Total: 19

A-53

2

3 3 3 2 3 19


1961 Curricula Continued

General Engineering (Systems Engineering Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Human & Social Studies History of Science Elective Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

4 5 6 3 1-2

Total: 19 or 20

Credit Hour Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Human & Social Studies Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

4 5 2 1 3 1-2 Total: 19 or 20

General Engineering (Systems Engineering Option) - Third Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.)

3

Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials)

3

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) 3

Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

4

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs)

2

Elective

3

Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B)

1

Math Elective

3

Math 219 (Princ. of Math. Stats.)

3

Elect. Engr. 302 (Crt. Analysis III) Engr. Phys. 272 (Intro. to Nuc. Engr.)

3 3 Total: 19

Total: 19

A-54


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Systems Engineering Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Aero. E. 280 (Aerodynamics)

3

Chem. Engr. 310 (Rate Ops.) Mech. Engr. 281 (Anal. of Machine Elements)

4

Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C)

2

Engr. Phys. (Nuclear Reactor Control) Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D) Physics 361 (Theoretical Mechanics) Mech. 357 (Instrumentation & Controls) Elect. Engr. 399 (Engr. Anal. - Special Problems) Engr. 302 (Engr. Anal. for Digit. Comp.) Aero. E. 282 (Aircraft Instruments & Systems Lab) Total:

3

Elect. Engr. 372 (Servomechanicsm) Engr. 202 (Prog. for Digit. Comp.)

Credit Hour

3 3

Total: 18

3 2 3 4 3 3 1 19

General Engineering (Theoretical & Applied Mechs. Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General0 Human & Social Studies Engr. Draw. 12 (Desc. Geom.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

4 5 6 3 1-2 19 or 20

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 251 (Statics) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 4 2 1-2 16 or 17

General Engineering (Theoretical & Applied Mechs. Option) - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mater.) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3

Engr. 142 (Elect. Crts. & Mach.)

3

Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A)

1

Math 202 (Engr. Math)

3 3

4 Total: 17

Credit Hour Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 145 (Instrumentation and Analogs) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Mech. Engr. 281 (Anal. of Mach. Elements) Engr. 202 (Prog. for Digit. Comps.) Elective Total:

A-55

3 2 1 3 3 3 19


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Theoretical & Applied Mechs. Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour History of Science Elective Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Mech. 261 (Diff. Eq. in Engr. Mechs.)

Credit Hour

3 2

Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D) Mech. 356 (Mech. Vibr.)

3

Physics 361 (Theoretical Mech.) 3

Mech. Engr. 232 (Heat Trans.) 3 Mech. 365 3 (Mod. Meths. of Struct. Anal.) Mech. 357 (Instrumentation and 4 Controls) Total: 18

2 3

Mech. 364 (Theoretical Fluid Mechanics)

3

Human & Social Studies

3

Mech. 363 (Intro. to Theory of Elasticity & Plasticity)

3 Total: 17

General Engineering (Gen. Engr. & Law Option) - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General0 Engr. Draw. 12 (Desc. Geom.) Geol. 7 (Elem. Geol. for Petr. Engrs.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour

4 5 3

Math 223 or equivalent Physics 52 (General) Engr. 251 (Statics)

3 5 2

5

Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.)

3

1-2

Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) History of Science Elective Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

1 3 1-2 18 or 19

Total: 19 or 20

A-56


1961 Curricula Continued General Engineering (Gen. Engr. & Law Option) - Third Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.)

3

Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials)

3

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) 3

Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

4

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analogs)

2

Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C)

2

Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B)

1

Math Elective 3 Physics or Chemistry Elective 3 Total: 19

Mech. Engr. 281 (Anal. of Mach. Elements) Engr. Anal. & Design Elective

3 3

Total: 18

General Engineering (Gen. Engr. & Law Option) - Summer Credit Hour Engr. 259 (Engr. Lab D) Engr. Analysis & Design Elective Human & Social Studies

2 3 3 Total: 8

General Engineering (Gen. Engr. & Law Option) - Fourth Year Credit Hour Law 205 (Contracts I) Law 225 (Judical Admin.) Law 241 (Legal Bibliography) Law 255 (Property I) Law 261 (Torts I) Human & Social Studies

3 2 1 4 4 3

Total: 17

Credit Hour Law 206 (Contracts II) Law 212 (Equity) Law 232 (Legal Accounting) Law 246 (Moot Court) Law 256 (Property II) Law 262 (Torts II) Human & Social Studies Total:

A-57

3 3 2 1 4 2 3 18


1961 Curricula Continued Geological Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Chemistry 3 (General) Math 22 (Analysis II) Engr. 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 5 5 1 1-2 15 or 16

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Analytical III, Calc.) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) EG 15 (Basic Geol. Drawing) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 4 3 2 1-2 17 or 18

Geological Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Geology 2 (Historical)

4 5 4

Government 1 (U.S.)

3

Mil. Sc. or Equivelant

1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Credit Hour Math Elective Physics 52 (General) Geology 82 (Mineralogy) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop of Materials) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speak.) Mil. Sc. or Equivelant Total:

3 5 3 3 2 1-2 17 or 18

Geological Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Physical) Engr. 251 (Statics) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Lab) Geology 84 (Elem. Petrology) Geology 131 (Elem. Paleontology) Total:

Credit Hour

3 2

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

4 3

3

EG 152 (Geological Drawing)

2

1 4

Engr. 146 (Lab) Geology 121 (Field Methods)

1 2

4

Human & Soc. Studies Elective

3

16

Total: 18

A-58


1961 Curricula Continued Geological Engineering - Summer Credit Hour Geology 123 (Summer Geology Field Trip)

4 Total: 4

Geological Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

2 2 3

Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) GE 301 (Drill. Engr.) Geology 264 (Econ. Geology) Geology 371 (Petroleum & Gas)

3 3 3

3

Human & Soc. Studies Elective

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3

Engr. 254 (Lab) GE 202 (Prod. Engr.) Geology 263 (Econ. Geology) Geology 374 or 375 (Geophysics) Human & Soc. Studies Elective Total:

3 16

4

Total: 16

Industrial Education - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) EG 101 (Engr. Graphics) Ind. Ed. 5 (Bench Woodwork) General Elective Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 3 3 2 5 1-2 17 or 18

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) Government (U.S.) Art I (Basic Drawing) Ind. Ed. 8 (Intro. to Crafts) Ind. Ed. 50 (Wood Finishing) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

A-59

3 3 3 3 2 1-2 15 or 16


1961 Curricula Continued Industrial Education - Second Year Credit Hour

Credit Hour

Ind. Ed. 7 (Wood Turning) Ind. Ed. 11 (Mach. Woodwork) Art Elective

2

Ind. Ed. 14 (Upholstering)

2

2

Ind. Ed. Elective

2

3

1

General Elective

7

Ind. Ed. 52 (Acetylene Welding) Art 21 (Theory of Design & Color) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2 Total: 17 or 18

2 1-2 15 or 16

Industrial Education - Third Year Credit Hour Ind. Ed. 54 (Sheet Metal) Ind. Ed. 101 (Elem. Mach. Tool Prac.) Ind. Ed. 158 (Ind. Arts. Design) Ind. Ed. 32 (Shop Maintenance) Ed. 120 (Psych. in Ed.) General Electives

Credit Hour

2

Ind. Ed. 103 (Adv. Mach. Tool Prac.)

1

1

Ind. Ed. 156 (Art Metal)

2

2

Ind. Education Elective

2

Ed. 122 (Physhology of Adolescence) General Elective

2

2 5 Total: 14

3 7

Total: 15

Industrial Education - Fourth Year Credit Hour Ind. Ed. 160 (Furniture Design & Const.) Ind. Ed. 235 (Princ. of Trade & Ind. Teaching) Ind. Educ. Elective General Elective Ed. 141 (Curriculum & Instruction in the Secondary School) Total:

Credit Hour

2

Ed. 256 (Teaching Experiences in Seconday Schools)

8

2

General Elective

5

2 6

History 112 (Oklahoma History) Total:

3 16

4

Total: 16

16

A-60


1961 Curricula Continued Industrial Management Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition)

3

Chemistry 3 (General)

5

History 3 or 4 (U.S.) EG 101 (Engr. Graphics) Engr. 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

3 3 1 1-2 Total: 16 or 17

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speak.) Math 22 (Analysis II) IEI (Wood Pattern Making) Government 1 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 2 5 1 3 1-2 15 or 16

Industrial Management Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Chemistry 203 (Physical) Econ. 41 (Principles) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

4 5 3 3 1-2

Total: 16 or 17

Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 241 (Statics) Econ. 42 (Principles) IE 101 (Elem. Mach. Tool) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 2 3 1 1-2 17 or 18

Industrial Management Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab) Bus. Man. 151 (Org. & Mgt.) IE 103 (Adv. Mach. Tool Prac.) Chemistry Elective Total:

4

Credit Hour Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.)

3

3

Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab.)

1

1 3

English Elective Bus. Man. 266 (Ind. Mgt.)

3 3

1

Phil. 103

3

3

3 18

4

Total: 17

A-61


1961 Curricula Continued Industrial Management Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 202 (Prog. for Digit. Comp.) Mech. 357 (Instrumentation & Auto. Controls) Bus. Law 140 or 146 (Contracts) Bus. Man. 303 (Motion, Time) IE 196 (Mfg. Processes) Total:

3

Credit Hour Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab) Engr. 302 (Anal. for Digit. Comp.)

2

4

CE 272 (Econ. of Engr. Design)

3

3

Bus. Man. 340 (Prod. Plan)

3

3 2 18

IE 197 (Tool Design) 3 IE 305 (Research Problems) 3 Total: 17

3

3

Mechanical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Math 22 (Analysis II)

3 5

Chemistry 3 (General)

5

Engineering 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1 1-2

Total: 15 or 16

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) Speech 21, (Princ. of Pub. Speak.) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Government 1 (U.S.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

3 4 2 3 3 3 16 or 17

Mechanical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) EG 101 (Engr. Graphics) Ind. Ed. 196 (Mfg. Processes) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 3 2 1-2 15 or 16

Credit Hour Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 52 (General) EG 114 (Adv. Engr. Graphics) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

A-62

4 5 2 4 1-2 18 or 19


1961 Curricula Continued Mechanical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 203 (Physical) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. or Materials) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab I) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Engr. 251 (Statics) ME 132 (Engr. Thermodynamics) Total:

Credit Hour

3

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analog)

2

3

Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab II)

1

3

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3

1

Engr. 253 (Dynamics)

3

4

ME 232 (Heat Transfer)

3

2

Elective

3

3

Human & Soc. Studies Elective

3

19

Total: 18

Mechanical Engineering - Fourth Year Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab III) ME 171 (ME Conference) ME 281 (Analysis of Mach. Elements) ME 316 (Turbo-Machinery) Human & Soc. Studies Elective Physics Elective Technical Elective Total:

Credit Hour 2 1

Engr. 259 or ME 262 (Lab) ME 381 (Machine Design)

Credit Hour 2 3

3

ME Design Elective

6

3 3 3 3 18

Human & Soc. Studies Elective Technical Elective

3 3

Total: 17

Metallurgical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour Math 22 (Analysis II) English 21 (Composition) Chemistry 3 (General) Engr. 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

5 3 5 1 1-2 15 or 16

Credit Hour Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) 4 English 22 (Composition) 3 EG 101 (Engr. Graphics) 3 Physics 51 (General) 5 Mil. Sc. or Equivalent 1-2 Total: 16 or 17

A-63


1961 Curricula Continued Metallurgical Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.)

4

Physics 52 (General)

5

Chemistry 17 (Analytical)

3

Elective A Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

3 1-2

Credit Hour Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mater.) Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Elective A Elective B Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Total: 16 or 17

4 3 3 3 3 1-2 17 or 18

Metallurgical Engineering - Third Year Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Engr. 251 (Statics) Chemistry 204 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Met. E. 210 (Struct. Met. I) Elective A

Credit Hour 3 Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) 1 Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.) Met. E. 140 2 (Chem. Engr. Fundamentals) 3

Met. E. 211 (Struct. Met. II)

4 3 Total: 16

Elective A Elective B

Credit Hour 1 3 4 4

3 3 Total: 18

Metallurgical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Met. E. 217 (Chem. Engr. Thermodynamics) Met. E 315 (X-ray Studies of Structure) Elective A Elective C Total:

4 3 3

Credit Hour Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speak.) Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) Met. E. 222 (Processes of Chem. Metallurgy)

2

Met. E. 399 (Met. Problems)

3 3 18

Elective A Elective C

A-64

2 2 3 2

3 4 Total: 16


1961 Curricula Continued Natural Gas Engineering - First Year Credit Hour Math 22 (Analysis II) Chemistry 3 (General) English 21 (Composition) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speak.) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Credit Hour

5 5 3

Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) English 22 (Composition)

4 5 3

2

EG 101 (Engr. Graphics)

3

1-2

Engr. 21 (Introduction) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

Total: 16 or 17

1 1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Natural Gas Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.)

4

Physics 52 (General)

5

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

4

Chemistry 17 (Analytical)

3

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2

Credit Hour

Total: 17 or 18

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Chemistry 203 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Chemistry 255 (Phys. Chem Meas.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Mater.) Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Lab A) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 3 1 3 3 1 1-2 16 or 17

Natural Gas Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Chemistry 204 (Phys. Chem. for Engrs.) Chemistry 258 (Phys. Chem. Meas.) Engr. 146 (Engr. Lab B) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Engr. 251 (Statics) Human & Soc. Studies Elective Total:

Credit Hour

3

Engr. 145 (Instrumentation & Analog)

2

1

Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3

1

NGE 212 (Nat. Gas Prod. & Trans.)

3

4

ChE 220 (Unit Operations)

3

2 3 18

Analysis Elective 3 Human & Soc. Studies Elective 3 Total: 17

A-65


1961 Curricula Continued Natural Gas Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Chemistry 103 (Organic Chem.) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 254 (Engr. Lab C) NGE 312 (Gas Meas’t & Distr.) NGE 315 (Design of Nat. Gas Facilities) Human & Soc. Studies Elective Total:

Credit Hour

5

NGE 370 (Special Problems)

3

3 2

NGE 319 (Nat. Gas Processing) 3 Human & Soc. Studies Electives 9

3

PE 375 (Measurements Lab)

1

3 Total: 16

3 19

Petroleum Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) Chemistry 3 (General) Math 22 (Analysis II) Engr. 21 (Introduction) Speech 21 (Princ. of Pub. Speak) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

Credit Hour

3 5 5 1

Math 103 (Analysis III, Calc.) EG 101 (Engr. Graphics) Elective A Chemistry 17 (Quant. Analysis)

4 3 3 3

2

English 22 (Composition)

3

1-2 17 or 18

Mil. Sc. or Equivalent

1-2 Total: 17 or 18

Petroleum Engineering - Second Year Credit Hour Math 104 (Analysis IV, Calc.) Physics 51 (General) Geology 7 (Elem. and Hist.) English 120 (Report Writing) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

4 5 5 3 1-2 18 or 19

Credit Hour Math Elective Physics 52 (General) Geology 82 (Petrology) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Mil. Sc. or Equivalent Total:

A-66

3 5 3 4 1-2 16 or 17


1961 Curricula Continued Petroleum Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour PE 202 (Production Engr.) Chemistry 203 (Physical) Engr. 221 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mech.) Engr. 251 (Statics) Geology 107 (Structures) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Total:

Credit Hour

3 3

PE 273 (Field Proc. Design) Engr. 252 (Strength of Mater.)

3 3

4

Math Elective

3

2 3

Engr. 142 (Elec. Crts. & Mach.) Chemistry 204 (Physical)

3 3

3

PE 206 (Prod. Engr. Lab)

1

18

Total: 17

Petroleum Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour PE 320 (Reservoir Engr.) PE 257 (Oil & Gas Law) Engr. 253 (Dynamics) Engr. 146 (Lab) Elective A Engr. 144 (Instruments & Analogs) Total:

Credit Hour

3 3 3 1 6

PE 305 (Oil Fld. Mgt. & Eval.) PE 301 (Drilling Engr.) Engr. 254 (Lab) PE 309 (Literature Review) Elective A

3 3 2 1 6

2

PE 308 (Res. Engr. Lab)

1

18

Total: 16

A-67


1970 Curricula Aerospace Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Chemisty 12 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Total: 15

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Physics 51 (General) 4 Engr. 101 (Engr. Communication) 2 Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 Total: 14

Aerospace Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General) Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

Credit Hour 4 4 3

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 112 3 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Total: 17

Math 201 (Engr. Math) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science)

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3

Total: 16

Aerospace Engineering - Third Year Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) AME 267 (Analysis) AME 253 (Dynamics Anal. of Mech. Systems) AME 211 (Measurements) Approved EE Elective Human-Social Studies

Credit Hour 3 3

AME 372 (Aerospace Struct. I) AME 256 (Vibrating Systems)

Credit Hour 3 3

3

AME 290 (Gas Dynamics)

3

3

3 3 Total: 18

Engr. 202 (Numerical Methods for Engr. Comp.) Human-Social Studies

3 3 Total: 15

A-68


1970 Curricula Continued Aerospace Engineering - Fourth Year Human-Social Studies AME 265 (Gas Power Systems)

Credit Hour 3

Human-Social Studies

Credit Hour 3

3

AME 232 (Heat Transfer)

3

AME 280 (Aerodynamics I)

3

Approved Technical Elective

3

AME 390 (Stability & Control) 3 Total: 15

Physics 222 (Modern Phys. for Engrs.) Approved Design Elective AME 384 (Vehicle Trajectory Analysis) Approved Experimental Elective Total:

3 3 3 2 17

Mechanical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Chemisty 12 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Total: 15

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Physics 51 (General) 4 Engr. 101 (Engr. Communication) 2 Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 Total: 14

Mechanical Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General) Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

Credit Hour 4 4 3

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 112 3 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Total: 17

Math 201 (Engr. Math) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science)

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3

Total: 16

A-69


1970 Curricula Continued Mechanical Engineering - Third Year Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) AME 267 (Analysis) AME 253 (Dynamics Anal. of Mech. Systems) AME 204 (Thermodynamics) Approved EE Elective

Credit Hour 3 3

AME 211 (Measurements) AME 251 (Stress Analysis)

Credit Hour 3 3

3

AME 256 (Vibrating Systems)

3

3

AME 290 (Gas Dynamics) Engr. 202 (Numerical Methods for Engr. Comp.)

3

3

Human-Social Studies

3 Total: 18

3 Total: 15

Mechanical Engineering - Fourth Year Human-Social Studies

Credit Hour 3

AME 232 (Heat Transfer)

3

AME 381 (Design Synthesis) AME 285 (Control Systems) Approved Technical Elective Total:

3 3 3 15

Human-Social Studies Physics 222 (Modern Phys. for Engrs.) Approved Design Elective Approved Experimental Elective Approved Technical Elective Total:

Credit Hour 6 3 3 2 3 17

Nuclear Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Chemistry 12 or 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Total: 15

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Physics 51 (General) 4 Engr. 101 (Engr. Communication) 2 Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 Total: 14

A-70


1970 Curricula Continued Nuclear Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General)

Credit Hour 4 4

Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

3

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) 3 Engr. 112 3 (Struct. & Prop. of Mat’l) Total: 17

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science) Human-Social Studies

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3

Total: 16

Nuclear Engineering - Third Year History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Human-Social Studies NE 210 (Nuc. Fundamentals) Physics 222 (Modern Phys. for Engrs.) AME 267 (Analysis)

Credit Hour 3 3 3 3 3

Total: 15

Approved EE Elective Human-Social Studies Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) NE 260 (Basic Experimental Nuc. Engr.) NE 240 (Basic Nuc. Reactor Theory) AME 285 (Control Systems) Total:

Credit Hour 3 3 3 2 3 3 17

Nuclear Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour NE 265 (Basic Nuc. Engr. Lab.)

2

Approved Math Elective

3

Human-Social Studies NE 215 (Interaction Rad. with Matter)

3

Approved Technical Elective

3

AME 232 (Heat Transfer)

3

3 Total: 17

Credit Hour Approved Technical Elective NE 380 (Nuclear Fuels & Fuels Cycles) NE 395 (Seminar) NE 370 (Reactor Dynamics & Control) NE 255 (Nuc. Reactor Power Sys. Design) Approved Tecnical Elective Total:

A-71

3 3 1 3 3 3 16


1970 Curricula Continued Architecture (BS/MS degree) - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Hist. 3 or 4 (U.S.) 3 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t) 3 Total: 15

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Arch. 1 (Arch. Orientation) 1 Arch. 55 (Arch. Graphics 1) 2 Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 Humanities 3 Total: 14

Architecture (BS/MS degree) - Second Year Credit Hour English 50 (Engl. & Amer. Masterpieces) Math 104 (Calculus III) Chemistry 12 (General) Physics 51 (General)

Credit Hour

3

Math 201 (Engr. Math)

4

4 5 4

Physics 52 (General) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) CE 140 (Macromeritics) CE 155 (Geometrology) Total:

4 3 2 3 16

Total: 16

Architecture (BS/MS degree) - Third Year Credit Hour Arch. 56 (Arch. Graphics II)

2

Arch. 108 (Basic Design I) 3 Arch. 109 (Hist. Ancient Arch.) 2 Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 142 (Engr. Crt. Analysis) 3 CE 242 (Appl. of Computer) 2 Total: 15

Credit Hour Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) Arch. 118 (Basic Design II) CE 265 (Beginning Struct. Theory) Humanities

3 3 3 4 3

Total: 16

A-72


1970 Curricula Continued Architecture (BS/MS degree) - Fourth Year Credit Hour 2 5 3

Arch. 57 (Arch. Graphics III) Arch. 241 (Intro. to Design) CE 236 (Soil Mech.) CE 266 (Struct. Anal. & 3 Design - Metals) Technical Elective 3 Total: 16

Credit Hour 3 2 7

Hist. Sci. 201 or 202 Arch. 210 (Hist. Med. Arch.) Arch. 262 (Intro. to Design cont.) CE 267 (Struct. Anal. & 3 Design - Concrete I) Technical Elective 3 Total: 18

Bachelor of Science granted upon completion of fourth year

Architecture (BS/MS degree) - Fifth Year Credit Hour Arch. 250 (Adv. Materials) Arch. 300 (Mech. Equipt. of Bldgs.) Arch. 360 (Urban Planning I) Arch. 366 (Intermediate Design) Arch. 380 (Hist. Ren. Arch.) Total:

Credit Hour

3

Arch. 205 (Wiring & Illumination)

3

3

Arch. 361 (Urban Planning II)

3

3

Arch. 372 (Esthetic Crit.)

2

5

Arch. 373 (Arch. Esthetics)

5

3 17

Arch. 281 (Hist. American Arch.) 3 Total: 16

Architecture (BS/MS degree) - Sixth Year Arch. 352 (Spec. & Cont.)

Credit Hour 3

Arch. 491 (Adv. Arch. Design)

7

Arch. 493 (Arch. Seminar I) 3 Elective 3 Total: 16

Arch. 451 (Professional Practice) Arch. 492 (Adv. Arch. Design cont.) Arch. 494 (Arch. Seminar II) Elective Total:

A-73

Credit Hour 3 7 3 3 16


1970 Curricula Continued Chemical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Chemistry 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Total: 15

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Chemistry 102 (Organic) 5 Engr. 101 (Engr. Communication) 2 Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 Total: 15

Chemical Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 51 (General)

Credit Hour 4 4

ChE 140 (Chem. Engr. Fund.)

2

Pol. Sci. 1 (U.S. Gov’t)

3

Humanities

3 Total: 16

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) ChE 313 (Process Dynamics & Control) Total:

Credit Hour 4 4 3 3 3 17

Chemical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) ChE 217 (Chem. Engr. Thermo.) Humanities Math Elective Hist 3 or 4 (U.S.) Total:

Credit Hour

3

Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.)

3

3

Engr. 142 (Electrical Science)

3

3

ChE 220 (Unit Operations)

3

3 3 3 18

Humanities Technical Elective

3 3 Total: 15

A-74


1970 Curricula Continued Chemical Engineering - Fourth Year ChE 331 (Kinetics) ChE 310 (Theory of Rate Operations) ChE 324 (Chem. Engr. Design I) ChE 352 (Process Design Lab) Technical Elective Total:

Credit Hour 3

ChE 325 (Adv. Process Design)

Credit Hour 3

3

Humanities

3

2

Technical Elective

6

1 6 15

Elective

3 Total: 15

Metallurgical Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Chemistry 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Total: 15

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Physics 51 (General) 4 Engr. 144 (Engr. Analysis) 2 History 3 or 4 (U.S.) 3 Total: 15

Metallurgical Engineering - Second Year Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) Engr. 112 (Struct & Prop. of Materials)

Credit Hour 2

Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.)

Credit Hour 3

3

Chemistry 205 (Physical)

4

Engr. 113 (Materials Science Lab)

1

Physics 52 (General) Math 104 (Calculus III) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Total:

4 4 3 17

IE 103 (Anal. for Manufacturing Processes I) Math 201 (Engr. Math) Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

3 4 3 Total: 17

A-75


1970 Curricula Continued Metallurgical Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Met. Engr. 210 (Phys. Met. I) Met. Engr. 298 (Met. Engr. Lab I) Chemistry 206 (Physical) Met. Engr. 381 (Intro. to X-ray Diff. & Spectrography) Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) Humanities Total:

Credit Hour

3

Met. Engr. 308 (Met. Engr. Thermodynamics)

3

1

Met. Engr. 211 (Phys. Met. II)

3

4

Met. Engr. 299 (Met. Engr. Lab.)

1

3

Engr. 142 (Electrical Science)

3

3 3 17

Analysis Elective Humanities

3 3 Total: 16

Metallurgical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Math Elective Technical Elective Humanities Modern Physics Total:

3 3 3 3 3 15

Credit Hour Met. Engr. 312 (Electonic Processes in Materials) Met. Engr. 330 (Mech. Met.) Technical Elective Humanities

3 3 6 3

Total: 15

Civil Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Math 24 (Calculus 1) 3 Chemistry 12 or 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm) Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.)

A-76

Credit Hour 3 3 4 2 2 Total: 14


1970 Curricula Continued Civil Engineering - Second Year Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mech.) Math 104 (Calculus III)

Credit Hour 3 4

Physics 52 (General)

4

Pol. Sci. (U.S. Gov’t I) CE 155 (Geometrology)

3 3 Total: 17

Math 201 (Engr. Math) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 104 (Thermodynamcis) Total:

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3 16

Civil Engineering - Third Year Math Elective

Credit Hour 3

CE 140 (Macromeritics)

3

Engr. 121 3 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) CE 265 (Begin. Struct. Theory) 4 CE 242 2 (App. of Computer Tech.) Total: 18

Humanities Elective CE 221 (San. Engr. Anal. & Unit Ops.)

Credit Hour 3 3

CE 236 (Soil Mechanics)

3

CE 255 (Hydromechanics Proc.) CE 266 (Struct. Anal. & Des. - Metals) CE 267 (Struct. Anal. & Des. - Concrete I) Total:

2 3 3 17

Civil Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour 4

CE 235 (Trans. Sys. Design) CE 223 (Sanitary & Hydraulic Systems 3 & Process Design) Professional Elective 3 Humanities Elective 6

Total: 17

Credit Hour 2

CE 298 (CE Design) CE 328 (Urban Engr.) or CE 360 (Engr. Invest. Procedure) Basic Science Elective Professional Elective Humanities Elective

A-77

3

3 3 3 Total: 14


1970 Curricula Continued Environmental Engineering - First Year English 21 (Composition) Math 5 (College Algebra) Chemistry 11 (General) Poli. Sci. 1 (U.S. Gov’t)

Credit Hour 3 3 4 3

Total: 13

Credit Hour English 22 (Composition) 3 Mathematics 3 Chemistry 12 (General) 4 Physics 30 (Gen. Phys. Lab) 1-2 History 3 or 4 (U.S.) 3 Total: 15

Environmental Engineering - Second Year Mathematics Physics 41 (General) Zoology 1 Technical Elective

Credit Hour 2 4 5 6 Total: 17

Mathematics Physics 42 (General) Micro. 181 (Principles) Technical Elective

Credit Hour 4 4 5 3 Total: 16

Environmental Engineering - Third Year Chemistry 103 Poli. Sci. 131 or 231 Technical Elective Human-Social Studies

Credit Hour 5 3 4 5 Total: 17

Credit Hour English 120 (Technical Writing) 3 Speech 1 (Fundamentals) 3 CE 10 (Surveying) 2 CE 11 (Surveying - Field) 1 Human-Social Studies 8 Total: 17

A-78


1970 Curricula Continued Environmental Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Env. Sci. 322 (Chem. Aspects of San. Sci.) Env. Sci. 332 (Biol. Aspects of Env. Sci.) Env. Sci. 360 (Env. Sci.) Technical Elective Technical Elective

3 3 3

3 3 Total: 15

Credit Hour Env. Sci. 300 (Epide. & Stat. Interpretation) Env. Sci. 305 (Basic Radiological Health) Env. Sci. 340 (Hist. & Prin. of Public Health Educ.) Technical Elective Human-Social Studies Total:

3 3 2 2 6 16

Electrical Engineering - First Year English 21 (Composition) Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) Math 24 (Calculus I) Chemistry 12 (General) Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.)

Credit Hour 3 2 3 5 2

Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.)

Credit Hour 3 3 3 4 2 2 Total: 17

Electrical Engineering - Second Year Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

Credit Hour 3

Physics 52 (General)

4

Math 104 (Calculus III)

4

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 142 (Electrical Sciences)

3

Total: 17

Math 201 (Engr. Math) App. Elective or Engr. 152 (Strength of Materials) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechanics) EE 103 (Physcial Electronics) EE 104 (Circuits Lab I) Total:

A-79

Credit Hour 3 3 3 3 3 1 17


1970 Curricula Continued Electrical Engineering - Third Year Humanities Math Elective EE 227 (Intro. to Semiconductor Electronics) or Engr. 112

Credit Hour 3 3

Humanites EE 203 (Static Fields)

Credit Hour 3 3

3

EE 257 (Electronics II)

3

EE 202 (Circuits Analysis II)

3

EE 204 (Circuits Lab II)

1 Total: 16

EE 287 (Logical Design & Switching Circuits) EE 258 (Electronics Lab II) EE Elective

3 1 2 Total: 15

Electrical Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Humanities 3 Elect. Engr. Sequence 3 Approved Elective 3 Elective Sequence 3 EE 224 (Sr. Electrical Lab I) 1 EE 271 (Energy Conversion) 3 Total: 16

Credit Hour Humanities 3 Elect. Engr. Sequence 3 Approved Elective 3 Elective Sequence 3 EE 225 (Sr. Electrical Lab II) 1 EE Elective 2 Total: 15

Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Chemistry 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr. ) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.)

A-80

Credit Hour 3 3 4 2 2 Total: 14


1970 Curricula Continued Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General)

Credit Hour 4 4

Pol. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t)

3

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) 3 Engr. 112 3 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Total: 17

Math 101 (Engr. Math) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science) Humanities

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3

Total: 16

Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) 3 Humanities 3 Engr. 157 (Electronics) 3 Electives 6 Total: 15

Humanities Electives History 3 or 4 (U.S.)

Credit Hour 3 12 3 Total: 18

Engineering - Fourth Year Electives Humanities

Credit Hour 13 3 Total: 16

Electives

Credit Hour 16 Total: 16

A-81


1970 Curricula Continued Meteorology - First Year English 21 (Composition) Chemistry 11 (General) Math 21 (Analysis I) Poli. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t)

Credit Hour 3 4 5 3

Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Chemistry 12 (General) Math 23 (Anal. Gen.) Math 24 (Calculus I) History 3 or 4 (U.S.)

Credit Hour 3 5 2 3 3 Total: 16

Meteorology - Second Year Credit Hour Math 103 (Calculus II) 3 Physics 51 (General) 4 Elective C 3 Elective D 3 Phys. Lab 30 (Gen. Phys. Lab) 2 Total: 15

Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General) Elective A Elective B

Credit Hour 4 4 3 4 Total: 15

Meteorology - Third Year Credit Hour Math 201 (Engr. Math) 4 Meteo. 240 (Atmos. Geoph. I) 3 Meteo. 260 (Meteo. Meas.) 3 Elective C 3 Elective D 3 Total: 16

Credit Hour Math 202 (Engr. Math) 3 Meteo. 241 (Atmo. Geoph. II) 3 Meteo. 253 (Atmos. Phys.) 3 Physics Elective 3 Elective D 3 Total: 15

A-82


1970 Curricula Continued Meteorology - Fourth Year Credit Hour Meteo. 251 (Atmos. Statics & Thermo) Meteo. 252 (Atmos. Kinematics & Dynamics) Hist. of Phil. of Science Elective C Math 219 (Princ. of Math Stat.) Total:

Credit Hour

3

Meteo. 264 (Synoptic Meteo.)

3

3

Meteo. 265 (Meteo. Lab I)

3

3 4 3 16

Geog. 265 (Geog. Ed.) Eletive A Eletive B

3 3 3 Total: 15

Engineernig Physics - First Year English 21 (Composition) Math 23 (Anal. Geom.) Math 24 (Calculus) Chemistry 12 (General) Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.)

Credit Hour 3 2 3 5 2

Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 30 (Lab) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) History 3 or 4 (U.S.)

Credit Hour 3 3 2 4 2 3 Total: 17

Engineering Physics - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General) Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.)

Credit Hour 4 4 2

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 112 3 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Total: 16

Credit Hour 4 3 3

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Physics 106 (Light) Engr. 142 (Electical Science) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) or 3 Physics 205 (Physical Mechs.) Humanities

3 Total: 16

A-83


1970 Curricula Continued Engineering Physics - Third Year Poli. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t) Physics 280 (Intro. to Mod. Physics) Physics 130 (Jr. Lab I) Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Humanities Total:

Credit Hour 3

Physics 131 (Jr. Lab II)

Credit Hour 1

3

Physics 218 (Elect. & Mag.)

3

1 3

Engr. 157 (Electronics) Math 219 (Prin. of Math Stat.)

3 3

3

Math Elective

3

3 16

Humanities

3 Total: 16

Engineering Physics - Fourth Year Credit Hour Physics 380 (Elem. Quantum Mechs.) Technical Elective

Credit Hour

3

Technical Elective

13

Humanities Free Elective

Total: 16

9 3 3 Total: 15

Industrial Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Chemistry 12 or 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.)

A-84

Credit Hour 3 3 4 2 2 Total: 14


1970 Curricula Continued Industrial Engineering - Second Year IE 103 (Intro. to IE)

Credit Hour 2

Credit Hour 4

Math 104 (Calculus III)

4

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Physics 52 (General) Total:

3

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Engr. 272 3 (Econ. & Optimization of Design) Math 219 (Prin. of Math Stat.) 3

3

Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.)

4 16

IE 103 (Anal. for Mfg. Proc. I) 3 Total: 16

3

Industiral Engineering - Third Year Credit Hour IE 130 (Found. of Human Engr.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Math 225 (Linear Algebra) Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) IE 223 (Mgt. of the Engr. Function) Total:

Credit Hour

3

IE 263 (Intro. to Operations Research)

3

3

Poli. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

3

3 3

Humanities IE Electives

6 3

3

Basic Science Elective

3

15

Total: 18

Industrial Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour Humanities

3

IE Design Engr. 142 (Electrical Science)

3 3

IE Elective

6

History 3 or 4 (U.S.)

Credit Hour Engr. 229 (Engr. Anal. of Random Proc.) Humanities IE Elective IE 321 (Prin. of Man-Mach. Design)

3 Total: 18

3 3 6 3

Total: 15

A-85


1970 Curricula Continued Petroleum Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Chemistry 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) Poli. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

Credit Hour 3 3 4 2 3 Total: 15

Petroleum Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General)

Credit Hour 4 4

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.)

2

History 3 or 4 (U.S.)

3 Total: 18

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) GE 36 (Phys. & Hist. Geology) Total:

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3 16

Petroleum Engineering - Third Year Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) PE 202 (Production Engr.) PE 206 (Prod. Engr. Lab) PE 203 (Phase Behavior of Hydrocarbons) Math Elective Geology 107 (Struct. Geol. for Pet. Engrs.) Total:

Credit Hour 3 3 1

Credit Hour Chemistry 205 (Physical) 4 PE 273 (Field Processing Design) 3 PE 375 (Nat. Gas. Engr. Lab) 1

2

PE 301 (Drilling Engr.)

3

3

PE 309 (Engr. Lit. Review)

1

3

Humanities

3

15

Total: 15

A-86


1970 Curricula Continued Petroleum Engineering - Fourth Year Chemistry 206 (Physical) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science) Engr. 202 (Num. Methods for Engr. Comp.) PE 320 (Oil-Reservoir Engr.) Humanities PE 308 (Res. Mech. Lab) Total:

Credit Hour 4 3

PE 205 (Oil Field Mgt. & Eval.) Humanities

Credit Hour 3 6

3

Petr. Engr. Elective

7

3 3 1 17

Total: 16

Natural Gas Engineering Option - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Chemistry 14 (General) 5 Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) Poli. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t.)

Credit Hour 3 3 4 2 3 Total: 15

Natural Gas Engineering Option - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General)

Credit Hour 4 4

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 GE 35 (Elem. Geol. for Engrs.) 2 Total: 15

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 112 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) GE 36 (Phys. & Hist. Geology) History 3 or 4 (U.S.) Total:

A-87

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3 16


1970 Curricula Continued Natural Gas Engineering Option - Third Year Credit Hour Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Flow) Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) PE 202 (Production) PE 203 (Phase Behavior of Hydrocarbons) PE 206 (Prod. Lab) Geology 107 (Struct. for PE)

Credit Hour

3

Engr. 202 (Prod. Engr.)

3

3 3

Chemistry 205 (Physical) PE 273 (Field Proc. Design)

4 3

2

PE 301 (Drilling Engr.)

3

1 3

PE 308 (Res. Mech. Lab) PE 375 (Nat. Gas. Engr. Lab.) Humanities Total:

1 1 3 18

Total: 15

Natural Gas Engineering Option - Fourth Year Chemistry 206 (Physical) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science) PE 309 (Engr. Lit.) PE 315 (Design of Nat. Gas Facilities) PE 320 (Oil Res. Engr.) Humanities Total:

Credit Hour 4 3 1

PE 305 (Oil Field Managment) PE 319 (Nat. Gas. Proc.) Math Elective

Credit Hour 3 3 3

3

Humanities

3

3 3 17

Elective

1 Total: 16

Geological Engineering - First Year Credit Hour English 21 (Composition) 3 Math 23 (Anal. Geometry) 2 Chemistry 14 (General) 5 Engr. 21 (Intro. to Engr.) 2 Math 24 (Calculus I) 3 Total: 15

English 22 (Composition) Math 103 (Calculus II) Physics 51 (General) Engr. 101 (Engr. Comm.) History 3 or 4 (U.S.)

A-88

Credit Hour 3 3 4 2 3 Total: 15


1970 Curricula Continued Geological Engineering - Second Year Math 104 (Calculus III) Physics 52 (General)

Credit Hour 4 4

Engr. 104 (Thermodynamics)

3

Engr. 144 (Engr. Anal.) 2 GE 35 (Elem. Geol. for Engrs.) 2 Total: 15

Math 201 (Engr. Math) Engr. 151 (Rigid Body Mechs.) Engr. 121 (Heat Trans. & Fluid Mechs.) Poli. Sci. I (U.S. Gov’t) GE 36 (Phys. & Hist. Geology) Total:

Credit Hour 4 3 3 3 3 16

Geological Engineering - Third Year Engr. 152 (Strength of Mater.) Geology 83 (Elem. Mineralogy) Geology 131 (Elem. Paleontology) Math Elective

Credit Hour 3

Geology 84 (Elem. Petrology)

Credit Hour 3

3

Chemistry 205 (Physical)

4

4

GE 202 (Production Engr.)

3

3

Geology 107 (Structural)

3 Total: 16

Engr. 112 3 (Struct. & Prop. of Materials) Humanities 3 Total: 16

Geological Engineering - Summer Credit Hour GE 390 (Summer Field Work)

4 Total: 4

Geological Engineering - Fourth Year Credit Hour 4 3 1 3

Chemistry 206 (Physical) Engr. 142 (Electrical Science) PE 309 (Engr. Lit. Review) GE 301 (Drilling Engineering) Humanities Total: 14

Credit Hour GE 370 (Subsurf. Geol for Engrs.) 3 Humanities 6 Technical Elective 4 Adv. Geology Elective 3 Total: 16

A-89


Appendix B

Faculty Changes


1913-1920

Electrical Engineering Professor Bozell resigned in 1916 and Professor Morrow became Director of Electrical Engineering. Morrow went on leave in 1918 to teach at the Army Signal Corps School at Yale University where Bozell was already teaching. Morrow did not return to Oklahoma following his leave. Leon Forest Wood joined the Electrical Engineering faculty in 1916 and served briefly as acting Director when Professor Morrow left; however Wood left to enter service in 1918 and resigned in 1919. Abraham Press served on the EE faculty for one year (1916-1917). In 1917 Frank Girard Tappan joined the Electrical Engineering faculty and was appointed Director in 1919, a position that he held until 1947. His background included an AB from Washington and Jefferson College and Masters of Engineering in EE from Cornell University in 1907, as well as an MA from Washington and Jefferson in 1909. He then taught at Cornell until he joined the University of Oklahoma faculty. John Oscar Kammerman served as Associate Professor of EE from 1918 until January 1, 1919. In 1920, Edwin Richard Page, BS University of Maine, 1913, was appointed Associate Professor of EE. Page taught primarily the EE Laboratories and remained on the faculty until his retirement in the late 1940s. Civil Engineering Frank Lloyd Weaver served from 1913 to 1914, and Guy Bradford Treat replaced him serving from 1914 until 1915. Herchel Smith filled the position in 1915 to 1916, followed by Robert Craig Terrell who stayed three years from 1916 until 1919. In 1919, Professor Tucker, who had been Director of Civil Engineering since 1911, resigned. John Fierney Brookes, BE Vanderbilt 1908, was appointed Professor and Director of the School of Civil Engineering. Brookes, a much loved teacher, served as Director of CE for 25 years, until 1944. George R. Maxson, B.Sc. Rutgers 1914, was appointed Assistant Professor of CE in 1919. Maxson was to be made head of Engineering Drawing in 1923, a position that he would hold for many years. Harry Edward Wier taught surveying from 1918 to 1919. Mechanical Engineering Professor Aitkenhead resigned in 1914 and was replaced by Walter Jacob Wohlenburg, Assistant Professor who stayed until 1916. Lester Clyde Lichty, BSME Nebraska 1913; MSME Illinois 1916, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1916. Lichty was on military leave 1917-1918. He was commissioned a first lieutenant in the Army and taught gas engines to the cadets at Kelly Field in Texas. He returned to OU and stayed until 1923 when he joined the faculty at Yale B-1


University. Lichty later became the author of a widely used text book on Internal Combustion Engines. George Bernard Helmrich, BME, Michigan 1915 was appointed Assistant Professor of ME in 1918. He would remain on the faculty for 10 years. Mechanics H.B. Dwight resigned as Professor of Mechanics in 1916. James Christopher Davis, BS Purdue 1903; Master of Engineering 1914, was appointed Associate Professor of Mechanics in 1917. He remained on the faculty until his death in 1937. Herbert Lucius Whittemore, BS Wisconsin 1903; Master of Engineering 1910, was appointed Professor of Mechanics in 1916 and resigned in 1918, when he left to become head of The War Materials Testing Laboratory at the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C. On February 1, 1920 Richard Vernon James, BSCE Oklahoma 1918, was appointed Assistant Professor of Mechanics. He had been an outstanding student, a charter member of the University of Oklahoma chapter of Sigma Tau, Chairman of St. Pat’s Board, and a Captain in the Student Military Corps, during the war. Professor James served many years as Chairman of the Mechanics Department, and remained on the faculty until his retirement. He maintained a reputation as an excellent but tough teacher throughout his career. Chemical Engineering Professor DeBarr remained Director of Chemical Engineering during this period and until 1923. Geology Engineering In 1916 Professor Taylor resigned and Professor Willis Thomas Lee, Head of Geology, became Director of the School of Engineering Geology. Lee resigned in 1919, and Joseph Bertram Umpleby, AB University of Washington 1908; MS Chicago 1909; PhD 1910, was appointed Director. He continued as Director until 1924. Mechanical Drawing In 1917, David Matthew Logan, BA Oklahoma 1916, was placed in charge of Mechanical Drawing. He was on military leave in 1918, and returned in 1919 but resigned at the end of the year. The 1916 Yearbook shows David Logan as a campus leader. He was a member of Sigma Chi, the House, the Senate, YMCA Cabinet, Engineers’ Club, AIEE, President of the Senior Class, St. Pat’s Board and Scholar in Mechanical Drawing.

B-2


1920-1930

Civil Engineering John Finney Brookes continued as Professor and Director of the school throughout the period. He joined the faculty in 1919 with a BE from Vanderbilt in 1908 and 11 years of professional experience in highway design and construction. Brookes had a very pleasant personality and was highly respected by both his students and colleagues. In later years, his full head of white hair and quick smile always brightened the day for all who passed him in the hall. He was joined by Assistant Professor Noah Ellsworth Wolfard, BCE Valparaiso University 1910, who had joined the faculty in 1918. In 1925-26, Wolfard was on sabbatical leave and earned an MS from Iowa State and was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 1927. George R. Maxson, BSc. Rutgers 1914, was an Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering at the start of the decade. In 1923, he was made head of the department of Mechanical Drawing, a position that he continued to hold for a number of years. In 1923, Charles Robin Sandifer, BSCE Iowa State 1917, was appointed an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. In 1927, he was promoted to Professor. Joseph Ray Matlock earned his BSCE in 1925 and remained on the faculty as an instructor, apparently taking the temporary position replacing Wolfard while he was on sabbatical. Matlock remained on the faculty as an instructor through the decade, later to be promoted and to serve as Director of the School. (On a personal note, the author was fortunate to have Professor Matlock as a teacher in Engineering Contracts and in Surveying in 1946.) Marion Elbert Mills, who held a BSCE in 1908 and a CE in 1926 from Purdue, was appointed an Associate Professor in 1927. In summary, the 1930 listing of the faculty of the School of Civil Engineering was as follows: Profs. Brookes and Sandifer, Assoc. Profs. Wolfard and Mills, and Instr. Matlock. Electrical Engineering Frank Girard Tappan, AB Washington and Jefferson, 1904; AM 1909; ME Cornell 1917, who had been appointed Director in 1919, continued to be an effective and highly respected leader throughout the decade. Edwin Richard Page, BS Maine 1913, (affectionately called “Dicky� by the students) was appointed as an Associate Professor in 1920 and promoted to the rank of Professor in 1927. Otto Walace Walter, BA Oklahoma 1920; BSEE 1921, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1921. He was awarded a sabbatical leave in 1925-26 and earned his MSEE at MIT in 1927. Upon returning to Oklahoma, he was promoted to Associate Professor in 1927. He resigned from the faculty in 1928. Charles Victor Bullen, BSEE Texas 1920; MSEE MIT 1927, was appointed an Assistant Professor in 1927 and continued until 1932. In 1928, Carl Tage Almquist, BSEE Iowa State; 1918, MS 1925, B-3


was appointed as an Associate Professor. He would remain on the faculty for the rest of his career. Charles Eugene Bathe, BSEE Oklahoma 1925, remained as a Graduate Assistant in Electrical Engineering from 1925 through 1927 primarily to operate the new radio station WNAD. In summary, the decade ended with the faculty of the School of Electrical Engineering listed as follows: Profs. Tappan and Page; Assoc. Prof. Almquist; and Asst. Prof. Bullen. Mechanical Engineering In 1920, the faculty consisted of Dean Felgar, who remained also as Director of the school, and Lester Clyde Lichty, BSME Nebraska 1913; MSME Illinois 1916, who had been appointed an Assistant Professor in 1916. Lichty was listed as being on sabbatical leave in 1923-24. He apparently did not return from the sabbatical. Later, he became a member of the faculty of Yale University and authored a widely-used book on internal combustion engines. George Bernard Helmrich, BME Michigan 1915, who had been appointed Assistant Professor in 1918, was appointed to the rank of Associate Professor in 1923. Loyal B. Holland, who had earned a BSEE at Oklahoma in 1918, was appointed an Instructor in 1923 and promoted to Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in 1924 resigning January 1, 1925. On February 1, 1925, William Henry Carson, BSME Wisconsin 1923, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. In the 1925-26 University Catalog, Felgar was no longer listed as director of the School of Mechanical Engineering, a position which he had held since the beginning of the school. George Bernard Helmrich had been promoted to Professor and been made Director of the School. Helmrich resigned in 1927 and Carson, who had been promoted to Associate Professor in 1927, was made Director of Mechanical Engineering and promoted to Professor in 1928. Eugene Fields Dawson, BME Ohio State 1921, was appointed Assistant Professor in 1927. He had previously taught at the University of Minnesota. In 1929, two additional faculty members were added. Clinton D. Case, BSME Wisconsin 1929, was appointed as an Assistant Professor, and Homer H. Dedo, BSME Kansas 1927; MSME Yale 1929, was also appointed as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. In summary, in 1930, the faculty of the School of Mechanical Engineering was listed as Profs. Felgar and Carson and Asst. Profs. Case, Dedo, and Dawson. Chemical Engineering Professor DeBarr continued as Director until 1923, when Guy Y. Williams was appointed Director. He continued through the rest of the decade. Dr. Williams administered the curriculum from his position in the Department of Chemistry, however, in 1927, Dr. Joe Eugene Moose was appointed as Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Professor Moose who held the degrees AB SMU 1917; MS Illinois 1922; PhD 1924, had been an Assistant Professor of Chemistry since B-4


1924. He resigned in 1929 and Cecil T. Langford, BA Oklahoma 1918; MS 1920; PhD California 1926, was appointed Professor of Chemical Engineering. Both Moose and Langford remained in the Department of Chemistry. Geological Engineering Had no separate faculty and was administered from the Department of Geology. Dr. Joseph Bertram Umpleby served as director of the School until his resignation in 1924. Dr. Victor Elvert Monnet was appointed in his place and served as Director for the remainder of the decade. Mechanics Professor James C. Davis served as department chairman throughout the period. Davis earned his BS from Purdue University in 1903 and ME in 1914. He was promoted to Professor in 1920. Richard Vernon James, BSCE Oklahoma 1918, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1920. In 1927-28, James was granted a sabbatical leave which he spent earning his MS degree at the University of Illinois. James was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 1928. Archie MacDougal Lukens, BSME Colorado 1925; MS 1927, was appointed an Assistant Professor of Mechanics in 1927. Laverne Allen Comp, BSCE Oklahoma 1927, was appointed as an Instructor in Mechanics in 1927 (Comp was an outstanding teacher and was later to become a distinguished Professor in Aerospace Engineering at the University. He served as a very valuable member of the advisory committee for this history). In summary, in 1930, the Mechanics faculty was listed as follows: Prof. Davis; Assoc. Prof. James; Asst. Prof. Lukens; and Instr. Comp. Mechanical Drawing (changed do Engineering Drawing in 1929) Tom Sorey served as an Assistant Professor in charge of the department in 1920. In 1923, Assistant Professor Maxson from Civil Engineering shared the teaching duties. In 1923, Sorey left to enter private business and George R. Maxson became Chairman of the department. In 1925-26, the catalog listed the faculty in Mechanical Drawing as Asst. Prof. Maxson and Instr. Johnson. In 1926, Johnson was replaced by Franklin C. Morris, BSAE Oklahoma 1926, as an instructor. Morris continued on the faculty in drawing until his retirement and replaced Professor Maxson as Department Chairman upon Maxson’s retirement. In 1927, Maxson was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. Shop Practice Everett Stirling Davis, who was Assistant Professor of Shop Practice in 1920, died of leukemia in 1922. Murdo Cameron, listed as an assistant in shop beginning in 1921, was joined by James Arthur Fenn in 1922 and Theodore King Davis in 1924 as Assistants in Shop Practice. These men taught shop courses during the decade. B-5


1930-1940 Engineering Physics Administered by the Physics Department with Dr. Homer Levi Dodge listed as the Director. Geological and Mining Engineering The program in Geological Engineering was administered by the Department of Geology with Dr. Victor E. Monnett listed as the Director. Mining Engineering, however, was administered in the College of Engineering with Professor H. C. George listed as “In Charge.” There was apparently some competition for students between the two programs. Architectural Engineering Professor Joseph Smay, the Director of Architectural Engineering, was listed as Professor of Arch. E. throughout the decade (in November 1930, Professor Smay was reported by the Daily Oklahoman to be in serious condition with typhoid fever. There were 14 cases reported at that time and a local dairy was suspected as the source of the disease). Professor Smay was the only faculty member listed, however, some of the architectural drawing courses were taught in Engineering Drawing. On December 1, 1935, Leonard Wolf was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Architecture. Professor Wolf earned a BS Arch. E. in 1930 and MS Arch. E. in 1932, both from Iowa State. Otho Oren Sparks was appointed as an Instructor in Architecture in 1935. Sparks had a BS Arch. E. from Oklahoma A&M in 1929. Wolf resigned September 1, 1937, and Henry Leueke Kamphoefner was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Architecture. Kamphoefner had a BS in Architecture from the University of Illinois in 1930 and an MS from Columbia in 1931. In February 1938, Herschel Elarth was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Architecture. He held a BS Arch from the University of Illinois in 1929 and M Arch in 1930. Sparks took a leave of absence the second semester of the 1937-1938 school year and did not return. Marion Elbert Mills, who had joined the Civil Engineering faculty in 1927, was listed both with the Architectural Engineering faculty and the Civil Engineering faculty beginning in 1936. Both Kamphoefner and Elarth were promoted to Associate Professors in 1939. The Architectural Engineering degree was accredited by the Engineers’ Council for Professional Development in 1936 during the first year that such accreditation existed. Chemical Engineering In 1930, the faculty in Chemical Engineering listed Dr. Guy Y. Williams as Director and Dr. Cecil T. Langford, who had been appointed as Professor of Chemical Engineering in 1929. In 1938, Dean Carson managed to have Chemical Engineering B-6


moved into the College of Engineering in order to satisfy accreditation requirements. Dr. Richard Lee Huntington, who had joined the Petroleum Engineering faculty in 1933, was made Professor and Director of Chemical Engineering and Associate Professor John Washington Donnell, BA OU 1925; MSPE 1931, who had joined the Petroleum Engineering faculty in 1936, was also listed as an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Professor Langford was also transferred to the College of Engineering and continued as Professor of Chemical Engineering. However, Langford transferred to the College of Pharmacy later in the year. Civil Engineering Professor John Finney Brookes, who had been appointed Director of the School of Civil Engineering in 1919, remained as the leader of CE throughout the decade. In 1930 the faculty consisted of Professors Brookes and Sandifer; Associate Professors Noah Elsworth Wolfard and Marion Elbert Mills; and Instructor Joseph Ray Matlock. In 1931, Matlock was promoted to Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. In 1935-1936 Wolfard was on a leave of absence and Leroy Crabbe was appointed as an Assistant Professor for that year only. In the fall of 1936, Wolfard returned and there were no further changes during the ten year period. As noted, Mills was also listed as a member of the Architectural Engineering faculty. During this period, Sandifer and Matlock were also listed on the faculty of the Department of Mechanics. Electrical Engineering Professor Frank Girard Tappan, who had been appointed Director in 1919, remained in that position throughout the ten years. Professor Edwin Richard Page and Associate Professor Carl Tage Almquist also serve through the decade. Victor Charles Bullen, who was promoted to Associate Professor in 1930, resigned in 1931. Clyde Leo Farrar, BSEE Colorado 1921; EE 1926, was appointed Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering on February 1, 1932. In 1935, when Professor Tappan was appointed Acting Dean, Ansel Peaslee Challenner, BSEE OU 1925; MS 1933, was appointed as an Instructor in EE (Challenner, who had worked for General Electric later, became a permanent member of the faculty and as an Emeritus Professor, served on the advisory committee for this history). Challenner’s appointment as an Instructor became permanent in 1937 and there were no further changes in the faculty through 1940. Mechanical Engineering William Henry Carson, who had been appointed Director of the School of Mechanical Engineering and promoted to Professor in 1928, remained Director of the school throughout the ten year period, including the first years in which he also served as Dean of the College. Assistant Professor Eugene Fields Dawson, who had joined the faculty in 1927, and Assistant Professors Clinton D. Case and B-7


Homer H. Dedo, who had joined in 1929, were listed on the ME faculty in 1930. In addition, Joseph Liston, BSME Purdue 1930, and Hilding Vincent Beck, BSME Illinois 1929; MSME Yale 1930, were appointed Assistant Professors in 1930. At the end of the year, Case and Dedo resigned. In 1932, Assistant Professor Dawson completed his MSME thesis for his degree at the University of Minnesota (his thesis involved an efficiency analysis of boilers at the Belle Isle power plant of OG&E). He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1937. In 1932, Sylvan Cromer, BSME OU 1930, was appointed as an Instructor. Cromer completed his MSME at OU in 1937, and was promoted to Assistant Professor. However, he left at the end of the year for a position on that faculty at LSU. Edgar Elmer Ambrosius, BSME Illinois 1928; MSME 1931, was appointed as an Assistant Professor of ME in 1936. Beck resigned in 1936 and Liston resigned in 1937. Liston accepted a position on the faculty at Purdue where he taught until he retired. At Purdue the students fondly called him “Piston Joe Liston.” In 1937, Charles Norton Paxton, ABME Stanford 1935, was appointed as an Associate Professor of ME; William Truitt Tiffin, BSME Missouri 1929, and Lawrence Hildreth Cherry, BS Engr. California 1937, were appointed instructors in ME and Engineering Drawing. Ellis Marcus Sims, BSME Texas A&M 1936; MSME 1937, was appointed an Instructor in Petroleum Engineering in 1937 and was also listed as an Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. Sims was to continue as a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering, retiring as a Professor in the 1960s. DeOwen Nichols, Jr., BSME Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1936, was appointed as an Instructor in ME in 1938. In that same year Tiffin resigned. In 1940, the faculty in Mechanical Engineering was listed as Professor Carson; Associate Professors Dawson and Paxton; Assistant Professor Ambrosius; and Instructors Cherry, Sims and Nichols. Mechanics In 1930, the faculty of the Department of Mechanics included Professor James C. Davis, Chairman; Associate Professor R. V. James; Assistant Professor A. M. Lukens, and Instructor L. A. Comp. Comp took a leave in 1930-1931 in order to start a pre-cast concrete company. The depression years proved to not be a good time to start a business, and he returned to the Mechanics faculty in 1932. Vester Elbert Willoughby, BSCE OU 1930, served a year as a member of the faculty in Comp’s place. Willoughby then joined the Highway Department, returning to the faculty of the Mechanics Department in 1937 as an Instructor. Willoughby became a permanent member of the faculty, and he was an active sponsor of many student activities and a very popular member of the faculty. In 1937, Lukens was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. Comp, who had completed his MS studies in 1935, was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor in 1937. Professor J. C. Davis died February 13, 1937, and R. V. James was appointed as Acting Chairman. Davis had also been Director of the School of General Engineering, which had no B-8


separate budget and was composed of a faculty drawn from other parts of the College. Professor James also was appointed as the Director of General Engineering. Professors Sandifer and Matlock of the Civil Engineering faculty were also listed as members of the Mechanics faculty during this period. Petroleum Engineering The 1930 listing of faculty included Professor H. C. George, Director; Professor Fred W. Padgett; Associate Professor Wilbur F. Cloud; and Instructor Irwin F. Bingham. Benjamin F. Shultz, Chief of the University power plant, was listed as an Assistant Professor in PE. In 1933, both Professor George and Professor Padgett resigned. H. C. George left to become head of oil and gas engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Padgett became the head of the research department of the Sun Oil Company. Professor W. H. Carson was made Acting Director of Petroleum Engineering as well as being made Director of the new School of Natural Gas Engineering. The latter school had no separate budget or faculty, but provided for the administration of the curriculum in Natural Gas Engineering. Dr. Richard Lee Huntington, BA OU 1917; MS Michigan 1933; PhD 1934, joined the Petroleum Engineering faculty in 1933 as an Associate Professor. In 1935, Irwin F. Bingham was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor. Bingham resigned in 1936 and John Washington Donnell, BA OU 1925; MSPE 1931, joined the faculty as an Associate Professor. In 1937, Henry Emmett Gross, BS Mining & Met. Rolla School of Mines 1928; MS Illinois 1933, was appointed as an Assistant Professor of PE. However, he left at the end of the year. In 1937, Ellis Marcus Sims, BSME Texas A&M 1936; MSME 1937, was appointed as an Instructor in PE. William Carr Bednar, BSPE OU 1935, and Glenn Mills Stearns, AB OBU 1933; BSPE OU 1936, were appointed as Assistant Professors in 1938. Although Huntington and Donnell were transferred to Chemical Engineering in 1938, they continued to be listed as faculty in Petroleum Engineering. L. H. Cherry, Instructor in ME was also listed with the PE faculty. In April 1940, the Petroleum Engineering faculty was listed as follows: Professors Carson, Cloud, Huntington; Associate Professor Donnell; Assistant Professors Bednar and Stearns; and Instructors Cherry and Sims. Engineering Drawing In 1930, the Department of Engineering Drawing included Associate Professor George Rockwell Maxson, Chairman and Instructor Frank Clair Morris. In 1936, Frank Roger Campbell, BSME OU 1932, was appointed as an Instructor. Sam Claude Holland, BA OU 1930; BS Arch E 1933, was appointed as an Instructor in 1938. Campbell resigned on February 1, 1939 and joined the faculty at the Colorado School of Mines. Harold Kenneth Bone, BSME OU 1938, was appointed as an Instructor February 1, 1939. Both Holland and Bone would spend their careers at Oklahoma. Holland continued on the faculty of Engineering Drawing. Bone would B-9


later transfer to Mechanical Engineering and served as Associate Dean of the College of Engineering at the time of his retirement. He also served on the advisory committee for this history. Industrial Education and Engineering Shops In 1930, the shop was under the supervision of Professor Carson with Murdo Cameron, James A. Fenn, and Theodore King Davis listed as Assistants in Shop. In 1936, Robert Allen Hardin, AB Neb. Wesleyan 1924; AM Nebraska 1931; PhD 1935, was appointed as Instructor of Industrial Education. In 1938, Hardin was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor and appointed Head of the Department of Industrial Education and the Engineering Shops. John M. Penick, MS Education, was listed as Assistant Industrial Education, and T. K. Davis remained Assistant in Shop. William B. Tiffin, who was also appointed as an Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, was listed as an Instructor in Shop.

B-10


1940-1950 Architecture In 1940, the faculty of Architecture was listed as Professor Smay, Chairman and Associate Professors Kamphoefner and Elarth. Associate Professor Mills of Civil Engineering, was also listed. Kamphoefner was promoted to Professor in 1940 and when Smay was given military leave in 1941, Kamphoefner was made Chairman, ex officio of Architecture. In September 1942, Elarth was given military leave. For 1942-43, two assistants, Boyd and Byrd were listed in Architecture, but by 1943-44, only Kamphoefner and Mills were listed as active, with Smay and Elarth listed as on military leave. Professor Smay was stationed in England where he designed large hangers for the Army Air Corps. In February 1945, James Walter Fitzgibbon, B.Arch. Syracuse 1938; M.Arch. Pennsylvania 1939, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. He had served the year previously as Assistant Architect for campus planning. In July 1945, Professor Smay returned and assumed the position as Chairman. Elarth did not return from military leave. In the 1946-47 catalog, Assistant Professor Richard Norton Kuhlman, B Arch. Texas 1935; M Arch. Harvard 1942, was appointed to the faculty in 1946 and was listed as Chairman of the Administrative Committee. Professor Bruce Alonso Goff (no degrees listed), was added to the faculty in 1947, and named Chairman. Goff was a very creative and well known architect. Cecil Dean Elliott, BS Arch E. OU 1943; BS Arch. OU 1943, was appointed as an Instructor in 1946 for one year. George Matsumoto, BA Washington U. 1944; M Arch Cranbrook Acad. Art 1945, was appointed Special Instructor in 1947. Anatol Helman, Architect (Engineer) Warsaw Polytechnic Institute 1934, was appointed Associate Professor of Architecture in 1948. Edward Walter Waugh, Diploma Arch. Edinburgh College of Art and Heriot-Watt Engineering College 1938, was appointed as a Special Assistant Professor in 1948. In 1948, Professor Kamphoefner resigned and Richard Kuhlman was promoted to Associate Professor. Instructors in Architecture listed in the 1948-49 catalog included, William S. Burgett, John Albert DiCastri, A. Bruce Etherington, B Arch Cornell 1947; James William Oglesby, Jr., BS Ark. 1944, Certificate NY School of Interior Design 1947; William Hix Wilson, B Arch OU 1948; Joseph H. Wythe, B Arch OU 1948. In 1949, Mendel Glickman, BS Tri State College Ind. 1921, was appointed as Professor of Architectural Engineering. Elizabeth Bauer Mock, BA Vassar 1932, was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Architecture and Librarian for the School of Architecture in 1949. The 1949-50 catalog lists the faculty of the School of Architecture with Professors Goff, Glickman, Smay; Associate Professors Helman and Kuhlman; Assistant Professor Mock; and Instructors Burgett, DiCastri, Oglesby, Wilson, and Wythe.

B-11


Chemical Engineering Dr. Huntington continued as Professor and Chairman throughout the decade, although his title was changed to Chair, ex Officio in 1942- 43, and to Chairman from 1943-44. In March 1941, it was announced that the Chemical Engineering degree had received ECPD accreditation. Professor Langford resigned in 1941 as did Professor Donnell. Laurence Standish Reid, BSChE Iowa State 1931; MSPE OU 1937 was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1940. Reid had been working in the research and development department of Black, Sivals, and Bryson. Jesse Seburn Walton, BA Iowa State 1928, was appointed Professor of Chemical Engineering in 1941. Jesse Sebourn Vance, BSChE OU 1938 was appointed Assistant Professor in 1942. Professor Walton was on leave from September 1942 until he resigned in 1945, serving with the US Corp of Engineers. Laurence Reid resigned in June 1943. In 1944, George Franklin Russell, BSChE OU 1943; MChE 1944, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Russell resigned in the summer of 1945 and Laurence Reid rejoined the faculty in 1945 as a Professor. In January 1946, Frank Cavan Fowler, BS Ill. 1939; MS Mich. 1940; PhD Mich. 1943, joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor. John Morgan Campbell, BS Iowa 1943 was appointed as an Instructor in 1946 (Campbell would receive the one of the first two PhDs granted in Engineering at OU and later serve as Director of Petroleum and Geological Engineering. He serves as a member of the advisory committee for this volume). In 1948, Jimmie Lee Huitt, BSChE La. Poly Tech 1944; MSChE OU 1948, was appointed as an Instructor. Mark Townsend, later a long time faculty member, a David Ross Boyd Professor and a member of the advisory committee for this history, was listed as a Graduate Assistant in 1949-50. Fowler was promoted to Associate Professor in 1947 and to Professor in 1949. In the 1948-49 catalog the Graduate College offered the PhD in Chemical Engineering for the first time. It would be 10 years before the doctorate would be offered in other fields of engineering. In 1949-50, the faculty of the School of Chemical Engineering was listed as Professors Huntington, Fowler, and Reid; Instructors Campbell and Huitt; with GAs Reinmuth and Townsend. Civil Engineering Professor Brookes remained as the Director in 1940-41, with Professors Sandifer and Wolfard (Wolfard resigned January 1, 1941). Associate Professor Mills, and Assistant Professor Matlock were listed to complete the faculty. For the second semester of that year, Joe Wendell Keeley, BSCE OU 1930, was listed as a Special Instructor. Keeley had been working for the Oklahoma State Highway Department since his graduation and was to later become a very popular faculty member. Keeley was promoted to Assistant Professor in the summer of 1941. In 1941-42, Professor Brookes was listed as Chair ex-officio, per President Brandt’s order that all department chairs must rotate. In 1942, Matlock was promoted to Associate Professor. Professor Sandifer took a leave of absence in March 1944 and resigned in B-12


1946 without returning. Joe Keeley was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 1945, and in 1945-46 Associate Professor Matlock was made Chairman of the School. In 1946, William Franklin Davis, BSCE Okla. A&M 1934, and Fulton Kellar Fears, BSCE OU 1943, were appointed as Assistant Professors. In 1947, Edward Pius Sellner, BS Case 1935, MSCE Texas A&M 1937, was appointed as an Associate Professor, and resigned in June 1948. In his place, Floyd Clifford Larson, CE RPI 1934, was appointed as an Associate Professor. Howard Edgar Irby, BSCE OU 1945; M. Engr. Yale 1947, and Charles Delmar Newton, BSCE OU 1948, were appointed as Instructors. Keeley was promoted to full Professor in 1948 and was made Chairman of the School in 1949. In the 1949-50 catalog, the faculty of the School of Civil Engineering was listed with Professors Keeley, Brookes, and Mills; Associate Professors Larson, and Matlock; Assistant Professors Davis and Fears; and Instructors Irby and Newton. Electical Engineering In 1940, Professor Tappan remained the Director of the School of Electrical Engineering. The faculty was listed as Professors Tappan and Page; Associate Professors Almquist and Farrar; Ansel Challenner (a member of the advisory committee for this history) was listed as an Instructor. In March 1941, Professor Almquist was called into active duty in the military and Gerald Tuma, BSEE OU 1939, was named as a Special Instructor in his place. Tuma, who served on the advisory committee for this history, was to be a very popular professor for many years, even teaching a number of years part-time past his mandatory retirement age of 70. At the time of his retirement he held the distinguished title of David Ross Boyd Professor. In 1942, Tappan was listed as Chair Ex-Officio. Page, Almquist, Challenner, and Tuma were all reported on military leave. In 1942 Robert Augustus Church, BSEE OU 1930, and Bruce Wiley, BSEE OU 1935; M.Engr. 1941, were appointed as Assistant Professors. Wiley had been a very popular student leader during his undergraduate days and was elected as St. Pat in 1935. Farrar was promoted from Associate to full Professor in February 1943. Tuma returned from service in January 1945, Challenner in December 1945, and Almquist returned in January 1946 and was promoted to full Professor. Wiley was on leave of absence from November 1945 until January 1947. Challenner was promoted to Associate Professor when he returned from service. Tuma, who had earned an MSEE in 1941 at OU, was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1946. In 1947, Professor Almquist was named Chairman of the School of Electrical Engineering. Professor Tappan received the honor of being named David Ross Boyd Professor of Electrical Engineering. He was the first faculty member in the College of Engineering to be awarded this prestigious title. Almquist remained Chairman only one year. In 1948, Professor Farrar was made Chairman of the School. Wiley was promoted to Associate Professor in 1948 and two new Assistant Professors were appointed. They were William Benjamin B-13


Lewis, BSEE Texas A&M 1946; MSEE 1947, and Charles Estel Harp, AB Phillips 1932; MS OU 1938. Harp who continued on the faculty until his retirement, had been an instructor in Physics before his appointment in engineering. Professor Page retired in 1949. Harold Fletcher Mathis, BSEE OU 1939; MSEE Texas A&M 1941, was appointed as an Associate Professor in 1949. Gerald Tuma was promoted to Associate Professor that same year. Tuma would later become a David Ross Boyd Professor. At the end of the decade the faculty of the School of Electrical Engineering was listed as follows: Professor Farrar, Chairman; David Ross Boyd Professor Tappan; Professor Almquist; Associate Professors Challenner, Wiley, Mathis, and Tuma; and Assistant Professors Lewis and Harp. Engineering Physics The faculty of the Department of Physics was listed as the faculty of the School of Engineering Physics. In 1942, William Schriever, PhD, Associate Professor of Physics, was appointed as Chairman of the School of Engineering Physics. Richard G. Fowler, PhD Mich. 1942, Associate Professor of Physics was named as Chairman of the School of Engineering Physics in 1948. Geological Engineering The faculty of the Department of Geology continued to be listed as the faculty of the School of Geological Engineering. Elmer Laurence Lucas, PhD, Professor of Geology was appointed Chairman of the School of Geological Engineering in 1942. In 1949, he was replaced by Carl Allphin Moore, PhD. Mechanical Engineering The 1940-41 catalog listed the Mechanical Engineering faculty as follows: Professor Carson (Chairman); Associate Professors Dawson, Lukens, Paxton, and Ambrosisus; Assistant Professor Gibson; Instructors, Cherry, Sims, Nichols, and Haas. Ambrosius had been promoted to Associate Professor in 1940, and named Chairman in the spring of 1941; however, he resigned in September 1941. Lukens, who was also listed as a faculty member in Mechanics, took a leave the second semester and resigned in September 1941. Allen Baker Gibson, BSME OU 1934, was appointed as Assistant Professor in February 1941. Nichols took military leave in February 1941 and later resigned in 1945. Lowell Edward Haas, BSME Iowa State 1938, was appointed as an instructor in February 1941. Dawson was promoted to full Professor in 1941 and Cherry was promoted to Assistant Professor. Paxton and Cherry left for military leave in the fall of 1941. Both resigned in the fall of 1946 without returning to OU. Henry Raine Kroeger, BSME Ohio State 1937; William Truit Tiffin, BSME Missouri 1929; and Winston Oliver Smith, BSEE Georgia Tech 1930, were appointed as Assistant Professors in the fall of 1941. John Harper Thomas, BSME OU 1941, was appointed as an instructor also that fall. Thomas was called B-14


to active duty in Navy, where he served until he returned as an Assistant Professor in 1946. Sims was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1942. In 1942, Professor E. F. Dawson was appointed Chair Ex-Officio of Mechanical Engineering. L. A. Comp was promoted to Associate Professor in 1942 and was listed both on the faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Comp was primarily involved in the Aeronautical Engineering program that included both departments. Wendell Smith Taylor, BS US Naval Academy 1923; BS Ed. OU 1933; M.Ed. OU 1934, was appointed as a Special Instructor in ME in 1942. Dawson continued as Chairman of the School throughout the rest of the decade. Ellis Sims resigned to take a faculty position in Oregon in October 1943. However, after moving there, he found that he did not like his new position and returned to OU when he was offered a position as a full Professor in January 1944. Kroeger resigned in September 1943. Taylor was promoted to Assistant Professor and Randolph Naphtali Luccock was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1943. Professor Comp took a leave to work for the Douglas Aircraft Company in the war effort 1944 and 1945. Tiffin resigned in July 1945. W. O. Smith was granted a leave of absence in November 1945. He completed a MSME degree at Purdue University and returned in the fall of 1947 with a promotion to Associate Professor. James Ernest McMichael, BSME Texas 1939; Frank Sidney Roop, BS VPI 1933, MS VPI 1934; and John Harper Thomas, BSME OU 1941 were all appointed as Assistant Professors in 1946. James Thomas Overby, BSME OU 1943, was appointed as a Special Instructor in Aeronautical Engineering in 1946. McMichael resigned in 1947 and Roop was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. In September 1947, Donald Barton Turkington, BSME Iowa State 1944; MSME Iowa State 1947, was appointed as an Assistant Professor (he would have a long career in the College, later serving as Chairman of ME and as Assistant Dean of Engineering. He also serves as a member of the advisory committee for this history). Bruce Valentine Ketcham, BME Yale 1940, was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Engineering in the School of Mechanical Engineering in 1947. Ketcham had worked for Pratt and Whitney during the war and was appointed to strengthen the Aeronautical program. James Thomas Overby, BSME OU 1943, was appointed as an Instructor in 1947 to aid in the Aeronautical Engineering program. In January 1948, Walter James Ewbank, BSChE Purdue 1936; MSChE VPI 1938, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. In September 1948, James Z. Millian, BSME Univ. Warsaw 1939; MSME Univ. of London 1945, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. He resigned in June 1949 (according to Professor Dawson, he was unable to confirm Millian’s degrees and he was very suspicious of his qualifications based on his performance on the faculty). In 1949, William P. Barnes, BSME Idaho 1948, MSME Yale 1949; Charles Joel Mauck, BSME OU 1948; Bill Eugene Council, BSME OU 1949; and Leroy Edgar Erwin, BSME OU 1948, were appointed as Instructors. J. Harper Thomas was on leave in 1949 attending the University of Wisconsin earning his MSME degree. Paul B-15


Allerton Cushman, SBEE MIT 1911; SMME 1927; Sc.D. Mich. 1932, was appointed as Professor in 1949. The faculty was listed in the 1949-50 catalog as follows: Professors Dawson (Chairman), Carson (Dean), Cushman, and Sims; Associate Professor Smith; Assistant Professors Ewbank, Taylor, Thomas, and Turkington; Instructors Mauck, Barnes, Council, and Erwin. Faculty for Aeronautical Engineering were listed separately as follows: Professor Comp (Chairman); Assistant Professor Ketcham; and Instructor Overby. Mechanics The faculty of the Mechanics Department in 1940 included Professor R. V. James, Chairman, Professor Sandifer (also listed in CE), Associate Professor Lukens (on leave and also listed in ME), Assistant Professors Comp (also listed in ME), Matlock (also listed in CE), and Instructor V. E. Willoughby. Fred Roy Mouck, BSME Kan. State 1929; MS Engr. Mech. OU 1935, was named as a Special Instructor in January 1941. In September 1941, Lukens resigned and Merl Daniel Creech, BSME OU 1929; MS Engr. OU 1930, was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Mechanics. For the 1942-43 school year Associate Professor Comp was named Chairman ExOfficio, however, James was renamed Chairman the next year. Mouck was promoted to Assistant Professor in October 1943 and Creech was promoted to Associate Professor in February 1944. William Leonard Cory, BSME OU 1928, was appointed as an Instructor in 1943. Cory, a good teacher, would remain on the faculty until his retirement, and served on the advisory committee for this history. Fulton Fears, later a faculty member in CE, served as an Instructor from November 1943 until April 1944. Vester Willoughby was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor in 1943. Mouck and Willoughby were promoted to Associate Professor rank in 1945. In the 1946-47 catalog, the name of the department was changed to Mechanics and Engineering Metallurgy. Kenneth Eugene Rose, Met. E. Colorado Mines 1939; MS Engr. Cornell 1943, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1946 to teach metallurgy. In February 1947, the faculty of the College of Engineering voted to approve new courses in metallurgy and a degree option in Metallurgical Engineering. Rose resigned June 1, 1947 and joined the faculty at Kansas. Harlod J. Toner, BSChE Wiscon. 1927; MS Metal Engr. 1939, was appointed to teach metallurgy in his place. Creech was promoted to full Professor and Cory was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1948. Toner was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1949. Harry H. Hill, BSME OU 1948, and James Otho Melton, BS Gen. E. OU 1947, were appointed as instructors in 1948 and both would continue on the faculty for some time. In the summer of 1949, only a month before his tragic death, Associate Professor Vester E. Willoughby was named Chairman of the Department of Mechanics and Engineering Metallurgy. Upon Willoughby’s death, Associate Professor Mouck B-16


was appointed as the Chairman of the Department of Mechanics and Metallurgical Engineering. In 1949, Verne Higgs Schnee, BS Chem. Cornell 1921, a metallurgist from Battelle Memorial Institute, was appointed the first full time Director of the University of Oklahoma Research Institute. In conjunction with his appointment at OURI, he was named as a tenured Professor of Metallurgy in the Department, however, he apparently did not teach. Ahmet Munci Ozelsel, BSChE Roberts College (Istanbul, Turkey) 1939; MS Illinois 1941; PhD 1944 was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1949. The faculty of the Department of Mechanics and Engineering Metallurgy was listed as follows in the 1949-1950 catalog: Associate Professor Mouck (Chairman); Professors James, Creech, and Schnee; Assistant Professors Cory, Ozelsel, and Toner, a group of six instructors including Hill and Melton, and five GAs. Petroleum Engineering In the 1940-41 catalog, the Petroleum Engineering faculty was listed as follows: Professors Carson (Director and Dean), Cloud, and Huntington; Associate Professors Reid, Bednar, and Stearns; Assistant Professor Gibson; and Instructors, Cherry and Sims. It should be noted that Huntington’s primary appointment was as Director and Professor of Chemical Engineering, Reid’s primary appointment was also in Chemical Engineering, while Gibson and Cherry had primary appointments in Mechanical Engineering. Donnell, who had been listed the previous year resigned in September, 1941. Bednar and Stearns had been promoted to Associate Professor in 1941. Also, Cherry was promoted to Assistant Professor of ME in 1941. The 194243 catalog showed Carson listed as Chair ex-officio. Bednar was given a leave of absence in June 1942 to serve with the US Army Corps of Engineers. He resigned in August 1943 without returning. Gibson resigned in July 1942. Cherry and Sims, who had both been promoted to Assistant Professors in ME, were no longer listed in Petroleum Engineering. Henry Raine Kroeger, whose primary appointment was in ME, was listed as an Assistant Professor along with Frank Peyton Vance whose primary appointment was in Chemical Engineering (Vance resigned in 1946). In the 1945-46 catalog, the PE Faculty listed Professors Carson, Cloud, Huntington, and Walton (whose primary appointment was in ChE, and who curiously enough had been on leave since 1942 and resigned in 1945); Associate Professor Stearns (who was shown to be on leave of absence); and Assistant Professor Russell (primary appointment in ChE who resigned May 1945). It should be noted that Petroleum Engineering apparently had only one full-time faculty member at this time, which must have been a critical situation. The 1946-47 catalog showed Professor Cloud as Chairman with Associate Professor Calhoun. An instructor and two graduate assistants were listed. John C. Calhoun, Jr., BSPE 1937; MS 1941; and PhD 1946, all from Penn State was appointed Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering in 1946. He was promoted to full Professor in January 1948. In 1947, Nico Van Wingen, B-17


BSE Cal Tech. 1934; MSPE Cal. 1938, was appointed as a Professor, and Howard William Benischek, BSME New Mexico 1937, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. In 1949, Emil J. Burcik, BS Carnegie I.T.; PhD Cal Tech 1941, and Alfred Chatenever, BS Chem. City Coll. NY 1936; MA 1937; PhD NYU 1948, were appointed as Associate Professors. That same year, Gaiser Dawson Maddox, BSPE OU 1933, and Alfred Watson Porter, Jr. BSChE Mich. State 1943; MSChE Mich. 1948, were appointed as Assistant Professors. Van Wingen resigned in 1949. Calhoun was made Chairman of Petroleum Engineering in 1949. As the decade closed, the faculty in Petroleum Engineering was listed as follows: Professors Calhoun (Chairman), Carson (Dean), and Cloud; Associate Professors Burcik and Chatenever; and Assistant Professors Benischek, Maddox, and Porter. There were also listed two instructors and four graduate assistants. Engineering Drawing In the 1940-41 catalog, the faculty in Engineering Drawing was listed as follows: Associate Professor Maxson (Chairman); Assistant Professor Morris; and Instructors Holland and Bone. By 1941-42, Morris and Bone were on military leave. W. O. Smith, Assistant Professor of ME was listed as part time in Drawing along with a Special Instructor Heimerich, who resigned the following year. In 1942, Maxson was promoted to Professor and Holland was made an Assistant Professor and made Chairman of the department. Taylor, an instructor in ME was cross listed on the Drawing faculty. The following year, Randolph Naphtali Luccock, BSPE OU 1930, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Taylor, who had been appointed as an Assistant Professor in ME, continued to also be listed in Drawing. Holland was promoted to Associate Professor in 1944. In December 1945, both Morris and Bone returned to the faculty and Luccock resigned. The 1946-47 catalog lists Maxson as Chairman. In 1946, Morris was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor and Bone to the rank of Assistant Professor. William Carlisle Anderson, BS Neb. State Teachers College 1936; MA Minn. 1941, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1946. There was one instructor listed along with seven teaching assistants. In 1947, Morris was made Chairman. William Albert Dumas, BS Ed. OU 1936, was named as an Instructor in 1948. Dumas would continue the rest of his career on the faculty in Engineering Drawing. In 1948, Anderson resigned, and Frank Morris was promoted to Professor in 1949. In the 1949-50 catalog, the faculty were listed as follows: Professors Morris (Chairman) and Maxson; Associate Professor Holland; Assistant Professor Bone; and Instructor Dumas with six teaching assistants. Engineering Shops The Engineering Shops were initially established to provide machine shop experience for engineering students. Dr. Robert Hardin, who had been recruited as a shop B-18


teacher in the shops had primarily trained to teach high school industrial arts teachers. The name of the department was changed to The Department of Industrial Education and Engineering Shops. In 1941, Hardin was promoted to Associate Professor. In 1941-42, the faculty of the department listed only Hardin and long time Assistant T. K. Davis, along with Instructor Tiffin, whose primary appointment was in ME. In 1943, Lavoys Evans Dietrich was appointed as a Special Instructor in Industrial Education. Dietrich, a skilled welder, taught welding in the shops until his retirement. Tiffin’s name was dropped from the department the next year and the faculty consisted of Hardin, Dietrich, and Davis until the 1946-47 school year. In 1946, Garland Granville Hammer, BS N Texas St. 1932; AM Missouri 1934, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. He resigned the following year. Floyd Lowell Jackson, BS OU 1943, was appointed as an Instructor. In 1949, Jackson was promoted to Assistant Professor and named Chairman of the Department. According to the minutes of the Engineering faculty meeting on December 9, 1947, the faculty approved a curriculum in Industrial Management Engineering to be offered by the Department of Industrial Education. The curriculum consisted of a group of basic engineering courses selected from offerings in Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering along with courses in shop and 38 semester hours of courses taken in Business Management. The finalized approved curriculum appeared in the 1949 Engineering College Bulletin. This was the start of Industrial Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. The faculty in 1949-50 listed Assistant Professor Jackson (Chairman); Professor Hardin; Instructors Dietrich, Sweet, and Bowers; along with Assistant Davis, and two GAs.

B-19


1950-1960 Aeronautical Engineering In 1951, three faculty were listed in Aeronautical Engineering. Professor L. A. Comp, BSCE OU 1927; MS Eng. Mech. 1935, was Chairman. Assistant Professors were Bruce Valentine Ketcham, BE Yale 1940, and James Overby, BSME 1943; M Aero E 1950. Overby who had started as an Instructor in 1947, was listed on military leave. In 1953, Ketcham was made Chairman. In February 1953, the new Aeronautical Engineering Laboratory Building was dedicated. This building replaced the WW II hanger that had been destroyed by the tornado in 1949. The building, located on the flight line at the North Campus, was a one story brick structure having a plan of two large circular rooms, connected by a small rectangular room that included the entrance, hallways, an office, and a medium sized laboratory room. On the northeast side of the building, six concrete engine test cells were provided. In 1954, one year after becoming department chairman, Ketcham was promoted to Associate Professor. Overby returned from military leave in 1954, only to resign in 1955. Lawrence Fred Smith, BS Aero E. 1953, was appointed as an instructor replacing Overby. In 1956, Associate Professor Ketcham, who had been chairman of Aeronautical Engineering since 1953, was awarded a Masters in Aeronautical Engineering from OU, and was promoted to full Professor. Also in 1956, Marinus Anthony Romano, BSME OU 1950; M Aero E. 1951, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Both Smith and Romano resigned September 1, 1957. James C. Brady, BS Gen E. OU 1956, was appointed as an instructor in September 1957. In 1958, Stanley H. Lowy, BS Aero E. Purdue 1943; MS Aero E. Minnesota 1947, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. In the August 1960 Engineering Bulletin, Brady was no longer listed and two new instructors were listed. Edward F.Blick, BS Aero E. OU 1958; MS Aero E. 1959, and Robert A Wheasler, MS Aero E. Architecture Engineering In Architecture and Architectural Engineering, the following faculty were listed in the 1951 catalog. Bruce Alonso Goff, Professor and Chairman; Mendel Glickman, BS Tristate College Indiana 1921, Professor of Architectural Engineering; Richard Norton Kuhlman, Bs Arch E. Texas 1935; M Arch Harvard 1942, Professor of Architecture; Joseph Edgar Smay, BS Arch E. Iowa State 1923; MS 1930, Professor of Architecture; James Palmer Boggs, BS Arch E. MIT 1930, Associate Professor; William Stanley Burgett, Assistant Professor; William Hix Wilson, B Arch OU 1948, Assistant Professor; Euine Fay Jones, B Arch Arkansas 1950; M Arch Rice 1951, Instructor. The School of Architecture and Architectural Engineering was located in Building B-20


604 on the North Campus, (the former Naval Base). In the fall of 1953, the School was moved back to main campus and located in space under the north stands in Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. This would continue to be the home of Architecture for almost forty years. Jones was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1953, and Burgett was promoted to Associate Professor. James William Oglesby, BS Arkansas 1944; NY Sch. of Interior Des. 1947, was added as an Assistant Professor, and Philip Bunton Welch, BA Stanford 1947, was made a teaching assistant in 1953. Norman Leonard Byrd, BA Arch Okla. A&M 1933, was appointed as an instructor at the same time. Welch completed his M Arch and was made an instructor in 1954. Assistant Professor E. F. Jones and Instructor Philip Welch resigned in 1954. John Bane Rawlings, BA Yale 1950; BS Arch Rice 1952, was added as an instructor in the fall of 1954. In November 1955, Goff suddenly resigned from the University and Associate Professor J. Palmer Boggs was appointed Chairman of the School. In 1955, Professors Mendel Glickman and J. W. Oglesby were on leave of absence. William Wilson was promoted to Associate Professor that same year. Two visiting Assistant Professors were added in 1955. They were Fred David Shallabarger, BS St. John’s 1936, AB Washington & Lee 1940; BS Arch Ill. 1948, and Shizuo Oka, B Arch OU 1952. Brandon Harvey Griffith, BS, was listed as an instructor. Fred Shallabarger was appointed as an Associate Professor in 1956 and Gale Salee Thomas was appointed as an Instructor. By August 1957, Professor Glickman had returned from his leave, however Professor Ogelsby failed to return. In 1958, Glickman was again listed as on leave of absence. Herb Greene, B Arch OU 1952, was appointed as an Assistant Professor, Shizo Oka was given a permanent appointment as an Assistant Professor in 1958, and Griffith transferred to Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. Wessel R. V. Ruhtenberg, B Arch Denver 1952, was appointed as an instructor, although he resigned the following year. Glickman returned in 1959 and Arthur Akira Kohara, B Arch Denver 1952, was appointed as an instructor. In the spring of 1960, the Architectural Engineering program was dropped and the name of the School was changed to the School of Architecture. Professor Mendel Glickman was appointed as the Chairman of the school. David Elmore Arnold, MA was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Instructor Kohara resigned and Robert Leroy Dillon, BS Aero E. OU 1958, an instructor in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, was temporarily appointed in his place. In August 1960, the faculty in Architecture was listed as Professors Glickman, Boggs, Kuhlman, and Smay; Associate Professors Byrd, Burgett, Shellabarger, and Wilson; Assistant Professors Arnold and Greene; and Instructor Dillon.

B-21


Chemical Engineering In 1951, Assistant Professor Lloyd George Alexander, BSChE Purdue 1941; PhD 1947, was listed as Chairman of the School of Chemical Engineering. He had joined the faculty in 1950. Other Professors listed were R. L. Huntington and L. S. Reid. Lyle Frederick Albright, BSE Mich 1943; MSChE 1944; PhD 1950, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1951. Professor Frank Fowler had resigned and was no longer listed. In 1951, there were no instructors or GAs listed. In 1953, Alexander took a leave of absence and Dr. Huntington was again appointed as Chairman. The next year, Professor Laurance (Bud) Reid was appointed as Chairman. Alexander did not return from the leave of absence and Francis Mark Townsend, BSChE 1948; MChE 1951, was listed as an Instructor. At the start of the second semester of the 1954-55 school year, Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, BS Mich. 1941; MS 1942; PhD 1948, was named Professor and Chairman. Lyle Albright was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor and Joseph Q. Snyder, BS Chem OU 1942; MSChem 1951, was listed as a Special Instructor in 1954-55. At this same time Dr. R. L. Huntington was appointed as the first Research Professor (later named the George Lynn Cross Research Professor) in the College of Engineering. In 1955, Mark Townsend was awarded his PhD and named as an Assistant Professor. In 1956, Orin Kingsberry Crosser, BSChE Missouri 1950; MSChE 1951; PhD Rice 1955, and in the second semester, John Edward Powers, BSChE Mich. 1951; PhD Cal 1954, were appointed as Assistant Professors. Albright and Snyder were no longer listed. In 1957 and 1958, William Everett Brigham, BS Iowa St. 1950; MSChE OU 1958, was listed as a Special Instructor and Paul Allen Lobo, PhD was listed as a Lecturer in the College of Engineering. In 1959, Jack Powers was named as Chairman Of Chemical Engineering after being promoted to Associate Professor in 1958. Two new Associate Professors were listed in 1959, Robert H. Perry, BA Dartmouth 1944; BChE Delaware 1947; MS MIT 1951; PhD Delaware 1953, and William J. Viavant, Texas 1944; PhD 1951. Perry was Editor of Perry’s Chemical Engineering Handbook, which had been founded by his father. Viavant was also appointed Director of Scientific Computations and was in charge of the IBM 650 which had been acquired by the University. In the 1959 catalog, James W. Fulton was listed as a Special Instructor. In 1960, Eric Weger, PhD joined the faculty as an Associate Professor and Andrew Cosgarea, BSChE Mich. 1955; MS 1956; PhD, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in ChE and Metallurgical Engineering. William R. Upthegrove, PhD, who had joined the faculty in 1956 as Chairman of the new Metallurgical Engineering School was cross listed on the Chemical Engineering faculty. In the 1960 Bulletin, The faculty of the School of Chemical Engineering was listed as follows: Associate Professor Powers (Chairman); Professors Huntington, Reid, Sliepcevich; Associate Professors Crosser, Perry, Townsend, Upthegrove, Viavant, B-22


and Weger; with Cosgarea as an Assistant Professor. Graduate Assistants were listed as Kenneth Bishop and Phillip Smith. Civil Engineering In 1951, the faculty of the School of Civil Engineering was listed with Professors Keeley (Chairman), Brookes, Matlock, and Mills; Associate Professors Larson and G. Reid; and Assistant Professors Davis and Fears. The faculty did not change until 1955 when Professor Mills retired and Brandon Griffith, BS OU 1954, was listed as a teaching assistant. In the 1956 Bulletin, Richard Boykin Pool, BSCE South Carolina 1942; MSCE Georgia Tech 1952, had been appointed as an Associate Professor in 1955. Griffith and Larson were no longer listed. Lee Burton, BSCE OU 1951, was listed as an Instructor. In 1957, Burton was no longer listed and George R. Grantham, BSCE Mich. St. 1938; MS 1940, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Fulton Fears, who had completed his PhD in Civil Engineering at Purdue, was promoted to Associate Professor. On September 13, 1958, just as school was starting, Assistant Professor Wayne Davis died of a heart attack. Joseph Robert Assenzo, BS North Eastern 1954; MS Harvard 1955, was appointed as an Assistant Professor and John Rogers Martin, BSChE OU 1935, was appointed as a Visiting Professor for the first semester. George Reid was appointed Chairman of Civil Engineering effective September 1, 1959. Guy Keith, BSCE was appointed as a Visiting Associate Professor and Robert Nathan Thompson, BSCE OU 1950; M San Sci 1959, was appointed as an Instructor along with Frank Robert Dawson, MS. The 1960 Engineering College Bulletin listed the faculty in CE as follows: Professors George Reid (Chairman), Brookes, Keeley, Matlock; Associate Professors Fears, Pool; Visiting Associate Professor Keith; Assistant Professor Assenzo; and Instructors Thompson and Dawson. Electrical Engineering The 1951 Engineering College Bulletin listed the following faculty members in Electrical Engineering. Professor Farrar (Chairman); David Ross Boyd Professor Tappan; Professor Almquist; Associate Professors Challenner,Wiley, and Tuma; Assistant Professors Harp, Lewis, and Mathis. John Robert Rankin, BEE Georgia Tech 1948, was listed as an Instructor. Assistant Professor Mathis was listed as being on military leave. In 1953, both Almquist and Tuma were listed as being on leave along with Mathis. Gerald Tuma was engaged in further graduate study at Iowa State University. Instructor Rankin was no longer listed. That same year, Tappan retired and was given the title of David Ross Boyd Professor Emeritus and both Ansel Challenner and Charles Harp were promoted to the rank of Professor. In the fall semester of 1953-54, Harold Mathis returned to campus, having completed his PhD at Northwestern University. The next year Mathis took a leave of absence from which he never returned. In 1954, Jack William Warhurst, BSEE OU 1954, was B-23


appointed as an Instructor. In 1955, Rudolph Leopold Biesele, BSEE Texas A&M 1936, was appointed as an Associate Professor. Bruce Wiley was promoted to Professor that same year and left on a leave of absence at the start of the second semester, however Wiley would never returned from that leave. In 1956, Gerald Tuma was promoted to the rank of Professor. In the fall semester of 1956-57, Jack Reynolds, BSEE OU 1956, and Thomas Henry Puckett, BSEE OU 1951; MSEE Columbia 1954, both joined the faculty as Instructors and started on plans of study in the new PhD program in Engineering. In the fall of 1957, James D. Palmer, BSEE Cal 1955; MSEE 1957, joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor and at the start of the second semester, James K. Watson BSEE OU 1951; SM MIT 1955, was also appointed as an Assistant Professor. Dale T. Young, BSEE OU 1953, joined as an Instructor in 1957, but stayed only one year. In 1958, Frank J. Kern, BA OU 1958, and Darrell R. Williams, BSEE OU 1958, were appointed as Instructors. They both entered the new PhD program in Engineering. Effective September 1, 1959, Tuma was appointed Chairman of the School of Electrical Engineering for a term of four years. In 1960, Puckett was the first student to complete the PhD in Engineering and was promoted to Assistant Professor. The 1960 Engineering College Bulletin listed the EE faculty as follows: Professors Tuma (Chairman), Almquist, Challenner, and Farrar; Associate Professor Harp; Assistant Professors Palmer, Puckett, and Watson; and Instructors Kern, Reynolds, and Williams. Engineering Drawing The Department of Engineering Drawing remained somewhat stable during the decade of the 1950s. The 1951 Bulletin listed Professors Morris (Chairman), Maxson; Associate Professor Holland; and Assistant Professor Bone. Dumas, who had been listed as an Instructor in 1950, was no longer on the faculty. In 1952, Harold Bone was awarded his MSME from Oregon State and was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. In 1956, Carolyn Marie Allen, BS OU 1956, was appointed as an Instructor and stayed for one year. In 1958, Bone transferred to Mechanical Engineering and William Albert Dumas, BS OU 1936; MS 1951, was appointed as an Assistant Professor (Dumas had served as an Instructor for one year in 195051). There was no change listed for the rest of the decade, with the exception of a promotion for Holland to the rank of Professor in 1959. In 1960, the faculty was listed as Professors Morris (Chairman), Maxson, and Holland; and Assistant Professor Dumas. Engineering Physics Engineering Physics continued to be administered primarily by the Physics Department. In 1951, Richard G. Fowler, PhD, Associate Professor of Physics, was B-24


listed as Chairman, with the entire Physics faculty listed as the faculty of the School. In 1954 and 1955, Robert A. Howard, PhD, Associate Professor of Physics was listed as Chairman. In 1956, Professor Fowler was again named as Chairman, and a committee was listed for the curriculum. The members were listed as Professors Nielson and Roys of Physics; Professor Sims of ME; and Professor Wiley of EE. The Engineering Physics degree, which had been the first in the country, received accreditation in 1957 by the Engineer’s Council for Professional Development (ECPD, later changed to ABET). In 1958, the committee was changed with Professor Howard replacing Roys and Professor Tuma replacing Wiley. Nuclear Engineering was listed for the first time in the Bulletin, noting that a Master of Science Degree in Nuclear Engineering was offered with requirements listed in the Graduate College Bulletin. In 1960, the committee was listed as Professor Fowler (Chairman), with members being Professors Howard and Plint from Physics; Professor Perry from ChE and Tuma from EE. General Engineering General Engineering continued to be a department without a specific faculty with Professor R. V. James listed as Chairman through 1958. In the 1959 Engineering College Bulletin, Professor Sliepcevich, Associate Dean of the College of Engineering, was listed as Chairman. This reflected the new emphasis on the various options, or special areas of concentration associated with the updated curricula in the College. Geological Engineering In Geological Engineering, Carl Allphin Moore, PhD, Associate Professor of Geology continued as Chairman through out the decade. Various faculty were listed from Engineering and Geology during the course of the decade; however the degree program was primarily a combination of Petroleum Engineering and Geology. In 1955, Moore was promoted to Professor of Geology. Industrial Education In 1951, Floyd Lowell Jackson, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education, was listed as Chairman of Industrial Education, with Professor Hardin and Instructors Dietrich and Bowers. Bowers left in 1953 and Martin Edsel Gonser, BS K St. 1947; MS 1950, was listed as an Instructor replacing Gonser. There was no change in the faculty until 1957, when Jackson took a leave of absence and Hardin replaced him as Chairman, Gonser was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor and Leon Thompson Harney was appointed as a Special Instructor. In 1959, Gonser resigned and Robert V. Keck, BS OU 1956; M. Ind Ed, 1957, replaced him as an Instructor.

B-25


Industrial Management Engineering Industrial Management Engineering continued to be listed with Professor Hardin, Acting Chairman and the teaching staff noted as being from the Colleges of Engineering and Business. Mechanical Engineering The faculty of the School of Mechanical Engineering listed in the 1951 Engineering College Bulletin included Professor Dawson as Chairman, Dean Carson as Professor, with Professors Sims, and Cushman. John Harper Thomas, who had returned to the faculty in 1950 after completing an MSME degree at Wisconsin had been promoted to the rank of Associate Professor, and was listed with W. O. Smith in that rank. Assistant Professors were listed as Ewbank, Taylor, and Turkington. Mauck was the only Instructor listed. The faculty of the Department of Aeronautical Engineering were included in the Mechanical Engineering list, but were also listed as a separate department. In 1952, Ewbank was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor, and Mauck was no longer listed. Turkington was promoted to Associate Professor in 1953 and Taylor in 1954. W. O. Smith was promoted to Professor in 1955, but he resigned the following year. In 1956, Taylor took a leave of absence from which he did not return. Clarence Morris McCoy, BSME OU 1947, was appointed as an Instructor in 1955. In the fall of 1956, Tom Jay Love, Jr., BSME OU 1948; MSME Kan 1956, joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor, and Floyd Olan Calvert, BSME OU 1950, was appointed as an Instructor. In the spring of 1957, Instructor McCoy died suddenly of a heart attack. In 1958, J. Harper Thomas’ father died in Chickasha and he was granted a leave of absence to attend his affairs. Thomas never returned from that leave and became a successful farmer/ rancher and civic leader in Chickasha. Associate Professor Harold Bone, BSME OU 1938; MSME Oregon St. 1952, was transferred from Engineering Drawing to Mechanical Engineering in 1958. Charles Edward Mitchell, BSME OU 1956, was appointed as an Instructor in 1957, and John Leslie Fitch, BSME 1958, was appointed as an Instructor for one semester in 1958. Calvert completed his MSME and was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1959. In July of 1959, Associate Professor Turkington replaced Professor Dawson as Chairman of the School. In 1960, the faculty of the School of Mechanical Engineering was listed as Associate Professor Turkington (Chairman); Professors Carson (Dean of Engineering), Cushman, Dawson, Ewbank, and Sims; Associate Professor Bone; Assistant Professors Calvert and Love; and Instructor Mitchell.

B-26


Mechanics and Engineering Metallurgy In the Department of Mechanics and Engineering Metallurgy, Professor Fred Mouck remained as Chairman in the 1951 listing. The faculty was reported as Professors Creech and James; Associate Professor Roberts; Assistant Professors Cory and Ozell; Instructors Hill, Melton, Randle and Copeland. John Parrington Roberts, SM Metallurgical Engr., had been added since the previous year, and Allan Muncie Ozell had changed his name from Ahmet Munci Ozelsel. In 1952, Hill, who had completed his M. Engr. degree in 1951, and Melton, who had just returned from serving in the Korean War, were promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor. In 1953, Creech was on leave, and Ozell and Cory were promoted to Associate Professor. Randle and Copeland were no longer listed in that Bulletin. In 1955, Assistant Professor Hill was appointed Chairman of the Department. Roberts and Ozell had resigned, and William Joseph Lnenicka, BSCE Neb 1949; MSCE K St. 1953, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. In August 1955, Creech resigned taking a faculty position at New Mexico State. In 1957, the name of the Department was changed to Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and a separate School of Metallurgical Engineering was formed. James Melton was promoted to Associate Professor, and Olden Lee Burchett, George Manning Close, and Rueben Billy Muns were added as Instructors. In the 1958 Bulletin, Brandon Harvey Griffith, BSCE, BS Arch E, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Griffith, was a very popular teacher and active adviser of LKOT, and continued on the faculty until forced to retire because health problems. Griff, as he was affectionately called by the students, served as an advisor for this history until he was claimed by death. The Brandon H. Griffith Award is given in his memory, each year, to the faculty member who demonstrates the greatest concern for student spirit and welfare. Burchett and Close were no longer listed as Instructors in 1958 and John Bryan Carney, Donald Lee Wilson, and Stanley Leigh Moore were appointed as Instructors. Moore, who had his college studies interrupted by World War I, had earned a BS Gen E degree at the age of 63, while working as a technician for the department. (A more detailed story is given by his son, also an OU engineering graduate, in a letter in appendix C.) In 1959, Associate Professor Cory was appointed as Chairman, replacing Hill, who had resigned to enter industry. Heinrich Wilhelm Bergmann, BSCE Neb 1955; MS Univ. Hannover, Germ. 1956; Dr Ing. 1959, was appointed as an Associate Professor (he had been recruited by Dr. Slepcievich). Muns resigned as an Instructor and Robert Leroy Dillon and Dick Downey Bednar were appointed as Instructors. B-27


The January 1959 issue of the College of Engineering Bulletin listed the faculty in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics as Associate Professor Cory (Chairman); Professors James and Mouck; Associate Professor Melton; Assistant Professor Griffith; and Instructors Bednar, Carney, Dillon, Moore, and Wilson. Natural Gas Engineering The School of Natural Gas Engineering listed Laurance Reid as Chairman with the faculty of the College of Engineering as faculty until 1956, when the faculty was listed as Reid (Chairman); with John Morgan Campbell, Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering; and Francis Mark Townsend, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering as the faculty. In 1958, Townsend was listed as Chairman with Campbell listed as the only additional faculty member. The following year, the Natural Gas Engineering curriculum was dropped and the School eliminated. Petroleum Engineering In 1950, Professor Calhoun, Chairman of Petroleum Engineering resigned to take a position at Texas A&M, where he later had a distinguished career. Associate Professor Benischek was appointed as Chairman. Donald E. Menzie, BS Penn St. 1942, MS 1948, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1951 (Menzie, who would later complete his PhD at Penn State served as an adviser for this history). Assistant Professors Maddox and Porter had resigned so that the faculty was listed as follows in the 1951 Bulletin. Benischek (Chairman); Professors Carson (Dean of Engineering), Cloud, L.S. Reid (ChE); Associate Professors Chatenever and Burcik; Assistant Professors McCray and Menzie; and Special Instructors Newman and Oakes. In 1953, Burcik had resigned, as had Newman and Oakes. Stuart Fred Faunce, BS Ohio St. 1948; MS Purdue 1949; PhD 1951, was appointed as an Assistant Professor, and Richard K. Hardy as an Instructor. In 1954, Professor R. L. Huntington was again cross listed as a member of the PE faculty. John M. Campbell, BS Iowa St. 1943; M ChE OU 1948; PhD 1951, was appointed as an Assistant Professor in 1954 (Campbell served as an adviser for this history). Robert Laidlaw was listed as a Special Instructor that same year. In 1956, Benischek resigned and Arthur McCray was made Chairman. Don Menzie was on leave, completing his doctoral studies at Penn St. and Frank W. Cole, BS OU 1948; M PE 1949, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Laidlaw, Faunce and Hardy had resigned. Assistant Professor John M. Campbell was appointed Chairman in 1957, and Charles Gardiner Dodd, BSChE Rice 1940; MS Mich 1948; PhD 1954 was appointed as the Erle P. Halliburton Professor of Petroleum Engineering. Don Menzie, back from his leave, was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. In 1958, Fred Burton B-28


and Robert Schmallhausen were listed as Special Instructors for that one year. In 1958, Preston Moore, BS PE OU 1949, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. The 1959 Bulletin lists the faculty as Associate Professor Campbell (Chairman); Professors Carson (Dean of Engineering), Cloud, and Dodd; Associate Professors McCray and Menzie; and Assistant Professors Cole and Moore. Metallurgical Engineering In 1957, the School of Metallurgical Engineering was established. Metallurgy had previously been taught in the Department of Engineering Mechanics. William R. Upthegrove, BSE Mich 1950; MSE 1954; PhD 1956, was appointed as Assistant Professor and Chairman. The faculty were listed as Charles G. Dodd, Halliburton Professor of PE; Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, Professor of ChE; and John E. Powers, Assistant Professor of ChE. In February 1958, Raymond D. Daniels, BS Case 1950; MS 1953; PhD 1956, was made an Assistant Professor, and Verne C. Kennedy, Jr., BS Mich 1942; MS 1950, was appointed as an Associate Professor. Kennedy had been recruited as the Executive Director of the University of Oklahoma Research Institute, and his appointment to the Met E faculty was really more as an adjunct appointment. Both Upthegrove and Kennedy were influenced to come to OU by Professor Sliepcevich. Upthegrove would later be appointed as the fourth Dean of the College of Engineering.

B-29


1960-1970 Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Prior to the 1963 reorganization, the two schools that were combined to form this school were the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering and the School of Mechanical Engineering. The faculty of the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering were listed as follows: Bruce V. Ketcham, M. Aero. Engr. OU, Professor and Chairman; Laverne A. (Doc) Comp, MS Engr. Mech. OU, David Ross Boyd Professor; James O. Melton, M Engr. Professor; Heinrich W, Bergman, Dr. Ingr. Assoc. Professor (both Melton and Bergman had been transferred from Engineering Mechanics when it was dissolved in 1962. Both left the University in 1964), Stanley H. Lowy, MS Aero. Engr., Assistant Professor; Edward F. Blick, M. Aero. Engr., OU, Instructor; Robert A. Wheasler, MS Aero. Engr., Instructor; Jack E. Fairchild, MS Aero. Engr., Instructor; Billy J. Harris, MS Engr. Mech., Instructor; Michael D. High, M. Aero. Engr., Instructor; Richard A. Kroeger, M. Aero. Engr., Instructor. Shortly after the reorganization, Ketcham resigned and joined the faculty of Tulsa University and Lowy resigned, joining the faculty at Texas A&M University. Blick, Wheasler, Fairchild, Harris, High, and Kroeger all remained in the graduate program of the combined School, earning PhD degrees. The School of Mechanical Engineering faculty were listed as follows prior to the reorganization. Donald Barton Turkington, MSME, Associate Professor, Chairman; Professors Dawson, Carson, (Dean of the College of Engineering), Ewbank, and Sims; Associate Professor Harold K. Bone; and Assistant Professors Calvert and Love (both on leave with NSF Science Faculty Fellowships; Calvert attended the University of California and Love, Purdue University). The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering was formed in the summer of 1963 with Associate Professor Tom Love, PhD Purdue 1963, as the Director. New faculty were Assistant Professor Darrel G. Harden, PhD OSU 1963, who had been recruited in the spring of 1963, Associate Professor Charles W. Bert, PhD Ohio State 1961; Professors Hung Ta Ho, PhD Brown 1961; and Edward F. Blick PhD OU 1963, were added in the summer of 1963. The 1965 bulletin, the first printed following the re-organization, lists the AME faculty as follows: Love, PhD, Assoc. Prof. and Director; Comp, David Ross Boyd Prof.; Professors Carson (Dean Emeritus), Dawson, Ewbank, Sims, Turkington (also Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs); Associate Professors, Bert and Bone; Assistant Professors Appl, PhD Ill.1964; Raymond V. B-30


Kaser, PhD Ariz. 1965; James A. Payne, PhD Cal 1965; and Davis M. Egle, PhD Tulane U. 1965 were added in 1965. The 1966 Bulletin lists the following changes: Dean Carson and Professor Dawson retired. Professor Ellis Sims was appointed as Assistant Director of the School. Additions to the faculty include listing Professor Gene Milo Nordby, PhD Minn. (Dean, College of Engineering); new Assistant Professors, Donald L. Crabtree, PhD Purdue 1966; John E. Francis, PhD OU 1965. Professor Bone was appointed Assistant for Special Programs, College of Engineering. Bert and Love were promoted to Professor, and Blick was promoted to Associate Professor. Assistant Professor Hung Ta Ho resigned. Professor Dawson had joined the faculty in 1927, and served as Chairman of the School of Mechanical Engineering from 1942 until 1954. He personally advised most of the returning veterans in the large enrollments following World War II. Students of the 1930s and 1940s had fond memories of his air conditioning classes and his twenty-inch slide rule. He was a good teacher and he led the Department through difficult times. In 1967, Maurice L. Rasmussen, PhD Stanford U. 1964, was appointed as an Associate Professor. Assistant Professor Crabtree resigned. In 1968, Martin C. Jischke, PhD MIT 1968, was appointed Assistant Professor. Other changes included Professor Blick’s appointment as Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research in the College of Engineering. D. G. Harden was promoted to Associate Professor. At this point the responsibility for the program in Nuclear Engineering was given to the School of AME. Nuclear Engineering had originated, primarily as a graduate program in Engineering Physics. The Nuclear Engineering Laboratory had been developed and Albert Wilson, a graduate student in Engineering Physics had the primary responsibility for the training reactor. Under the reorganization, the responsibility for the Nuclear Laboratory had been given to Chemical Engineering. Wilson completed his PhD studies and was appointed as an Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences. He left the University for a position in the Nuclear Engineering program at Idaho State University. Chemical Engineering proposed to close the Nuclear Engineering program. However, The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering requested that the program be transferred to that school and that an undergraduate Nuclear degree program be developed to meet the growing need for engineers in the then growing nuclear power generation field. The decision was made to move forward with the development of this degree program under the direction of the School of AME. David M. Elliott, PhD Texas A&M 1967, was appointed Assistant Professor and Director of the Nuclear B-31


Engineering Laboratory. In 1969 faculty changes included appointment of Dahsoong Yu, PhD Carnegie Mellon 1969, a nuclear engineer, as an Assistant Professor in the Nuclear Engineering program. Other faculty changes included Professor Turkington’s return to full time in the department from the Dean’s office and the appointment of Professor Bone as Assistant Dean for Undergraduate programs. On January 15, 1970, the BS Degree in Nuclear Engineering was approved by the Regents and the name of the school was changed to the School of Aerospace, Mechanical, and Nuclear Engineering. An additional faculty member, Gerald M. Simmons, PhD Stanford U. 1966, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Also, Ronald R. Mohler, PhD Mich. 1965, was given a joint appointment as Professor of AMNE and EE. In addition, Lynn Weaver, PhD Purdue 1958, was appointed Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research of the College of Engineering and Professor of AMNE in Nuclear Engineering. Other faculty changes included the transfer of Assistant Professor William A. Dumas, from Engineering Graphics into the Department. Dr. Frank Appl, Dr. Davis Egle, Dr. John Francis, and Dr. James Payne were promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. The newly appointed Dean Upthegrove was listed as a Professor in the School. Long-time faculty member and Assistant Director of the School, Professor Ellis Sims retired at the end of the 196970 school year. He is fondly remembered, by many of his former students, for his special teaching interest in Internal Combustion Engines. Architecture In 1960 the faculty of the School of Architecture was listed as follows: Professor Mendel Glickman, BS (Chairman); Professors James Palmer Boggs, BS in Arch.; Richard Norton Kuhlman, M. Arch.; Joseph Edgar Smay, MS Arch. Engr.; Associate Professors Norman Leonard Byrd, BA Arch. Engr.; William Stanley Burgett, Fred David Shellabarger, BA, BS Arch.; William Hix Wilson, B. Arch.; Assistant Professors David Elmore Arnold, MA; Herb Green, B.Arch.; Instructor Robert Leroy Dillon, BS Aero. Engr. In 1961, John G. York, B. Arch., was appointed as a Visiting Associate Professor, and Professor Boggs was listed as being on sabbatical leave. In 1963, Associate Professor York was made Chairman of the School. William Hix Wilson was promoted to Professor, William A. Kaighn, B.Arch, was listed as Special Instructor, and Glickman and Burgett were on leave. Arnold, Greene and Dillon were no longer listed. In 1965 Professor York is listed as Director of the School. Professors were listed B-32


as follows: Boggs, Glickman, Kuhlman, Smay, Wilson, N. L. Byrd, Burgett, and Shellabarger. Associate Professors: A.G.J. Ruthenberg, BA Arch., D.B. Vollendorf, BA Arch. In 1966 Bulletin three new assistant professors were listed: Dale Claude Byrd, MA; Raymond Chester Dragoo, B. Arch.; and J. Ronald Kabriel BA. 1967 changes included the retirements of Boggs and Glickman and the resignation of Ruthenberg. New faculty included Ervin Joseph Bell, BS, Assistant Professor and Ata O. Safai, Instructor. Also, Albert William Knott PhD , Associate Professor of Civil Engineering In 1968 new faculty included Arnold Kemp Henderson, MS, Associate Professor and Instructors Edward Kemp, B. Arch and Gene Williams, B.Arch. Safai was promoted to Assistant Professor. Professor Smay retired after a long career on the faculty and Dale C. Byrd resigned. Professor Burgett died from a heart attack on Christmas Day 1968. At this point, it seems appropriate to discuss the plan to remove Architecture from the College of Engineering. There had been growing unrest in the Architecture faculty over budget problems and the perception that the School was not receiving fair treatment from the Dean of the College of Engineering. With the new emphasis in the College on the development of research and graduate programs, salaries for faculty recruited with doctoral degrees had risen sharply. Faculty salaries were rewarded for obtaining external research funding and for publishing in recognized refereed journals. Since the Architecture faculty had only bachelor’s degrees, and since the results in the creativity of the faculty was seldom published in journals, the rating system in Engineering did not seem fair to the Architecture faculty. Their discontent naturally spread to the Architecture students. On December 9, 1967, an “open forum” was held. The faculty and students in Architecture made public their concerns, blaming the College of Engineering with mistreatment, and issued a formal request to the President, that the School of Architecture be separated from the College of Engineering. There followed a series of discussions which resulted in the decision to form a separate college for Architecture. On April 18, 1969, The Oklahoma Daily reported the appointment of Dr. Murlin R. Hodgell as Director of the School of Architecture and Dean Designate until July 1, or at such time as the College may be established. Hodgell held a BS Arch, Kansas State; MS Arch Illinois; PhD from Cornell awarded in 1959. The 1969 Bulletin of the College of Engineering listed Dr. Hodgell as the Director of the School of Architecture, and Dean Designate, Professor of Architecture and Planning. Edward V. Kemp MS Arch. Promoted to Associate Professor. Four new faculty were B-33


appointed as Assistant Professors. They were, Floyd O. Calvert, D. Eng.; Eugene L. Hayes, M Arch.; Robert A. Levy, M Arch.; and Ira H. Winarsky, MFA. At the time the 1970 bulletin was published, the School of Architecture was no longer mentioned. It was part of the newly formed College of Environmental Design. Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences In 1960 the faculty of the School of Chemical Engineering were listed as follows: John Edward Powers, PhD, Associate Professor, Chairman, School of Chemical Engineering; Richard Lee Huntington, PhD, Research Professor; Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, PhD, Professor, Associate Dean of College of Engineering; and Laurance Standish Reid, MS, Professor. Associate Professors listed as follows: Orrin Kingsberry Crosser, PhD; Robert H. Perry, PhD; Francis Mark Townsend, PhD; William R. Upthegrove, PhD, Chairman, School of Metallurgical Engineering; William J. Viavant, PhD, also Director of Scientific Computations; and Eric Weger, PhD. The one Assistant Professor was Andrew Cosgarea, PhD. The School of Metallurgical Engineering with Upthegrove as Chairman was listed separately. The faculty included Charles Dodd, Halliburton Professor of Petroleum Engineering; Verne C. Kennedy, MS, Professor, Executive Director of the University of Oklahoma Research Institute; Sliepcevich, PhD, Professor of Chemical Engineering, Associate Dean of Engineering; Powers, PhD, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering; and Assistant Professors Andrew Cosgarea, PhD and Raymond D. Daniels, PhD. In 1962, Powers was on leave and Robert H. Perry, PhD, was listed as Chairman. Andrew Cosgarea, PhD, was promoted to Associate Professor of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, and Director of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. Raymond D. Daniels was also promoted to Associate Professor. Eric Weger, PhD, was appointed as an Associate Professor and Frank B. Canfield, PhD, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Powers (who did not return from leave) and Upthegrove resigned at the end of the year. With the reorganization in 1963, Raymond D. Daniels, PhD, Associate Professor of Metallurgical Engineering was appointed Director of the School of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences. Faculty changes included the promotion of Sliepcevich to Research Professor (only the second Engineering faculty member to receive this prestigious award), new faculty included Assistant Professors Charles Philip Colver, PhD, and Michael L. McGuire, PhD. Professor Weger was no longer listed. B-34


The 1965 Bulletin listing included the additions of Robert J. Block, PhD, Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, and A. E. Wilson, PhD, Assistant Professor of Nuclear Engineering. Omer A. Pipkin, PhD, was listed as a Visiting Associate Professor. C. J. Mankin, PhD, Associate Professor of Geology and Director of Geology, was cross listed. Wilson, who was listed on leave of absence for this year, resigned to accept a position at Idaho State University. The 1966 Bulletin listed Frank Canfield, PhD, as Associate Professor and Director of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences. Daniels was made full-time Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies. R. Craig Jerner, PhD, was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, and Michael Heymann, PhD, was appointed as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. Verne Kennedy, MS, Executive Director of OURI, and Vice President for Contract Research was listed as a Professor of Metallurgical Engineering. Professor Crosser resigned, and Research Professor Huntington retired after a long and distinguished tenure, having joined the faculty in 1933. He was the first faculty member in Engineering to be awarded the prestigious title of Research Professor. In 1967, Kenneth E. Starling, PhD, was listed as a new Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Frank E. Rizzo, PhD, was listed as an Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering. Heymann was no longer listed. The 1968 Bulletin listed Bert M. Avery MS, Special Instructor, as Assistant Director of ChEMS. The new faculty appointment was James H. Christensen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. Verne Kennedy was listed as University Vice President for Operations. The new University of Oklahoma President Select, John Herbert Hollomon, PhD, was listed as Professor of Metallurgical Engineering. Daniels was no longer Associate Dean of the college. The 1970 Bulletin lists C. Philip Colver, PhD, Associate Professor, Director of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences. New additions included Arthur William Aldag, PhD, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering; William Edward Martinsen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering; and David W. Johnson, PhD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. In addition, the new Dean of the College of Engineering, William R. Upthegrove, PhD, Professor of Metallurgical Engineering. Civil Engineering and Environmental Science In 1960, George Willard Reid, SM, was Professor of Civil Engineering and Sanitary Science and Public Health, Chairman, School of Civil Engineering and Sanitary Science and Public Health, Coordinator of the Department of Sanitary Science and B-35


Public Health. John Finney Brookes, BE, was included as Professor Emeritus. Professors listed were Joe Wendell Keeley, BS, and Joseph Ray Matlock, BS. Associate Professors were Fulton Kellar Fears, PhD, and Richard Boykin Pool, MS. Guy N. Keith, BS, was listed as a visiting Associate Professor. At the end of the school year, Pool took leave to study at the University of Illinois, under an NSF Science Faculty Fellowship (after completing his PhD studies he resigned from the faculty to accept the Position of Department Head of Civil Engineering at the University of South Carolina). Joseph Robert Assenzo, SM, was listed as Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering and of Sanitary Science and Public Health. Additionally, as part of Civil Engineering, the Department of Sanitary Science and Public Health was listed separately, with Reid listed as Coordinator. Faculty listings included Reid, Assenzo, and Dan E.Guyer, MPH, as an Assistant Professor. Two Instructors and a list of collaborating faculty from other departments, both on the Norman campus and the Medical College in Oklahoma City were listed. The Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics was still listed separately in the 1960 Bulletin, although it would be combined with other departments the following year with most of the faculty being transferred to Civil Engineering. The faculty are listed as follows: William Leonard Cory, ME, Professor and Chairman, Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. Professors were, Richard Vernon James, MS; and Fred Roy Mouck. Associate Professors were Heinrich Wilhelm Bergmann, Dr. Ing., and James Otho Melton, M.Engr. Brandon Harvey Griffith, BSCE and BS Arch. was the lone Assistant Professor listed. Stanley Leigh Moore, BS Gen. Engr. was listed as an Instructor. His responsibility was primarily in charge of the laboratories and with teaching in the laboratories. In 1962 the changes in the faculty of Civil Engineering included the promotion of Stanley Moore to Assistant Professor and the appointment of Guy N. Keith, BSCE as a Visiting Assistant Professor. The transfers from the Department of T&AM were W. L. Cory, ME, Professor of Civil Engineering; R. V. James, MS, Professor Emeritus of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. (Professor James, who had graduated with a BS in Engineering from OU in 1918, had joined the faculty in 1920 and retired in 1962 after 42 years of service. He had served as Chairman for most of those years and had the reputation of being a good teacher). Others added from T&AM were Professor Mouck; Associate Professor Bergmann; and Assistant Professor Griffith. The Department of Sanitary Science and Public Health continued to be listed separately. New additions to the department included, Associate Professor Maxwell Jeffers Wilcomb, Jr., PhD, and Assistant Professor Edwin H. Klehr, PhD. B-36


The 1963 Bulletin listed Gene M. Nordby, PhD, Dean, College of Engineering, and Archie M. Kahan, PhD, Professor of Meteorology and Executive Director of The University of Oklahoma Research Institute as members of the Civil Engineering faculty. New appointments listed were: Edmond P. Segner, PhD, Professor; Associate Professor Joakim George Laguros, PhD; Assistant Professors Kuen Po Chuang, PhD; Jimmie Frank Harp, PhD; and Robert Young Nelson, PhD. Sanitary Science and Public Health were included again as a separate section. In the 1963 Bulletin, there is a separate listing for Engineering Meteorology. Professor George Reid was listed first, although without any title in Meteorology. Next listed was Walter Joseph Saucier, PhD, Professor of Meteorology, Coordinator, Meteorology Curriculum. Other faculty listed included A. M. Kahan, Executive Director of OURI, and Yoshikazu Sasaki, PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor of Meteorology. Special Instructors listed included Stanley Louis Barnes, MS; Samuel Joseph Hall, MS; Rex Lee Inman, MS; and Victor Shelby Whitehead, MS. A curriculum for the last two years of the degree program, listed the courses in meteorology as courses in Engineering Physics. The 1965 Bulletin no longer listed Archie M. Kahan, Executive Director of the OURI, however, the Meteorology faculty were listed as being in the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences. The Meteorology Curriculum and listing of courses offered in Meteorology were listed separately in the list of course offerings in Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences. There were no changes listed in the faculty with the exception of the Meteorology faculty listed. Those included Walter Joseph Saucier, PhD, Professor of Meteorology; Associate Professors of Meteorology listed were Yoshikazu Sasaki, PhD, and Raymond Clarence Staley. Instructors in Meteorology included Rex Lee Inman, MS, and Robert Warner Jones, MS. The Meteorology faculty was never actually incorporated into the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences.. Beginning in the 1966 Bulletin, the Department of Meteorology is listed with the Department of Engineering, and will be listed separately in the following discussion. The changes to the faculty in The School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences in the 1966 Bulletin included the following addition: Weldon Wayne Aldrich, PhD, Associate Professor, and Himan Aldrich Gillespie, PhD, Assistant Professor. The faculty changes reported in the 1967 Bulletin included the appointment of Hong S. Oey, PhD, as a Visiting Professor and the appointment of Associate B-37


Professors Albert William Knott, PhD, and Leale E. Streebin, PhD. James M. Robertson, PhD, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Professor Fred Mouck retired in May 1967 after 26 years on the faculty. The 1968 Bulletin noted the appointment of James F. Costello, PhD, to the faculty, and the promotion of James Harp, PhD, to the rank of Associate Professor. Assistant Professor Brandon H. Griffith retired in 1968. Professor Griffith had been a popular teacher and leader of student activities. He was especially active as a sponsor of the Engineers’ Club and LKOT. Each year, The Engineers’ Club presents The Brandon H. Griffith Award to a faculty member who has made exemplary contributions to student activities and welfare. The 1969 listing of faculty noted that Assistant Professor Gillespie was given the additional title of Assistant Director of CEES. There was one new member of the faculty, Richard Dennis Bauman, PhD, Assistant Professor. Assistant Dean of the College of Engineering Charles H. Banks was also listed as a member of the faculty. This year noted the retirement of Professor Joseph Ray Matlock, who had been a faculty member since 1925. Professor Matlock was a highly respected teacher and was an active leader of the Oklahoma Society of Professional Engineers. Additions to the faculty listed in the 1970 Bulletin included Luis M. Summers, PhD, Associate Professor of Architecture and Civil Engineering. Thomas M. Murray, PhD, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. Joakim Laguros PhD, was promoted to the rank of Professor. Assistant Professors Knott and Bauman both resigned. Electrical Engineering The 1960 Engineering College Bulletin listed Professor Gerald Tuma, MEE, as Chairman of the School of Electrical Engineering. Other Professors listed were Carl Tage Almquist, MS; Ansel Peaslee Challenner, MS; and Clyde Leo Farrar, EE. The one Associate Professor listed was Charles Estel Harp, MS. Assistant Professors listed were Thomas Henry Puckett, PhD, and James D. Palmer, MS. There were no changes in permanent faculty listed in the 1962 Bulletin. In the 1963 Bulletin, James Palmer, who had received his PhD in the program administered by the OU College of Engineering, was promoted to Associate Professor, and was listed as Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies in the College of Engineering (actually, Palmer was made Director of The School of Electrical Engineering shortly after the Bulletin was published). Also Thomas Puckett, PhD, was promoted to Associate Professor. Darrel Williams, who had been an Instructor in the Department, while earning his PhD, was appointed as an Assistant Professor. B-38


The 1965 Bulletin listed James D. Palmer, PhD, as Director of The School of Electrical Engineering. Additions to the faculty included: Thomas D. Shockley, PhD, Professor. Assistant Professors Christos T. Constantinides, PhD; Clovis R. Haden, PhD; and Jack Reynolds, PhD. By the fall of 1966, Palmer had resigned and while the Bulletin did not list his replacement, Professor Tuma served as Interim Director, while a search was made for Palmer’s replacement. Tuma had also received the honor of being appointed a David Ross Professor because of his excellence in teaching. Additions to the faculty included Richard Thomas Smith PhD, as OG&E Professor. Additions at the Assistant Professor level included, Frank J. Kern, PhD, and William Louis Kuriger, PhD. Associate Professor C. E. Harp was on leave, teaching at the University of Assuit in Egypt. Professor C. T. Almquist retired after a lengthy career on the faculty. Assistant Professor Darrell Williams resigned. In 1967 Leon W. Zelby, PhD, was named Professor and Director of the School of Electrical Engineering. Also added to the faculty was Gene B. Walker, PhD, as an Assistant Professor. Professor Clyde L. Farrar retired in 1967. Professor Farrar had a long career on the faculty, serving a number of years as Chairman of the School of Electrical Engineering and was noted for his research in electromagnetic antennae. Changes listed in 1968 included the additions of Assistant Professors Kandar G. Oza, PhD, and Vijai K. Tripathi, PhD. Resignations included Professors R. T. Smith and Thomas D. Shockley, as well as Assistant Professors Haden, Constantinides, and Reynolds. The 1969 Bulletin listed the additions of the following assistant Professors: William T. Cronenwett, PhD; Seun K. Kahng, ScD; Paul M. Vargo, PhD; and David Arlen Todd, PhD. Assistant Professor Oza was no longer listed. In 1970, the faculty additions included Professor Ronald R. Mohler, PhD, who was jointly appointed in Electrical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering, and Associate Professor Nicolaos Tzannes, PhD. Industrial Engineering The Department of Industrial Education, which had been primarily a service department, teaching courses in foundry, machine shop, and welding to engineering students, formed the “departmental frame work” for the development of the School of Industrial Engineering. B-39


In 1960, the Department of Industrial Education listed the following faculty. Professor Robert A. Hardin, PhD served as Chairman. Others were Floyd Lowell Jackson, MS, Assistant Professor, and Instructors listed were Lavoy Evans Dietrich and Robert V. Keck, MS. This listing remained the same in the 1962 listing. In the 1963 Bulletin, Jackson had been promoted to Associate Professor and Keck to the rank of Assistant Professor. Professor Keck resigned in the summer of 1965 and Professor Jackson resigned later in the year. Professor Hardin retired after 30 years on the faculty. The Department of Industrial Education was no longer listed in the 1966 Bulletin. Also listed in the 1960 Bulletin was a degree program in Industrial Management Engineering with Robert A Hardin, PhD, Professor of Industrial Education as Chairman. The curriculum listed included the core engineering courses with a few courses in Business Management and Industrial Education. No faculty were listed, with a note that many faculty from Engineering and Business are involved. The 1962 Bulletin listed James Otho Melton, M. Engr., Professor of Industrial Management Engineering, and of Aeronautical and Space Engineering, Acting Chairman of Industrial Management Engineering (Melton had been a member of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, since his graduation from that department in 1949). Other faculty members listed were R. A. Hardin, PhD Professor of IME and Industrial Education; F. A. Jackson, MS, Associate Professor of IME and of Industrial Education; William L. Cory, ME, Professor of IME and CE (Cory had also been a member of the faculty in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics). Other faculty were cross-listed from business, mathematics and Civil Engineering. The faculty listings for 1963 were essentially the same as 1962. In 1964 the Department of Industrial Management Engineering became The School of Industrial Engineering. Charles L. Proctor, PhD, who joined the faculty in the summer of 1963, was appointed Director of the new school. Faculty additions included Richard Allen Terry, PhD, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering, and Robert Allen Shapiro, PhD as an Assistant Professor of IE. In the 1965 Bulletin, these three were the only faculty listed. Melton, who had been Acting Chairman of Industrial Management Engineering, resigned in June 1964. Professor Proctor resigned in 1966 and that year’s Bulletin listed Robert A. Shapiro, PhD as Director of the School of Industrial Engineering. In addition to Shapiro and Terry, the faculty list included four instructors: Rene A. Chapelle, BSME; Bobbie Leon Foote, MA; Elmer Zen Million, M. Engr.; and James Lewis Robertson, MS. In the 1967 Bulletin, William L. Cory, ME, was added as Professor of Industrial B-40


Engineering and Civil Engineering. Hamdy H. Taha, PhD was listed as a Visiting Assistant Professor. The 1968 Bulletin added Bobby Leon Foote, PhD as an Assistant Professor, and Visiting Assistant Professors Hamdy H. Taha, PhD; W. Dean Chiles, PhD; and Joseph William Foster, PhD. In 1969, new faculty included Associate Professor Raymond P. Lutz, PhD, and Assistant Professors Hillel J. Kumin, PhD, and Jerry L. Purswell, PhD. In June of 1969, Professors Terry, Foster, and Taha resigned. Three new Assistant Professors were added in 1970. They were Michael D. Devine, PhD; LaVerne L. Hoag, PhD; and Richard F. Krenek, PhD. Petroleum and Geological Engineering It should be noted that in 1960 Geological Engineering was listed as a separate department with Carl A. Moore, PhD, Professor of Geology listed as Chairman, School of Geological Engineering, No other faculty were listed. In Petroleum Engineering, the faculty was listed as follows. John M. Campbell, PhD, Associate Professor, Chairman of Petroleum Engineering; Dean Carson was listed in both Petroleum and Mechanical Engineering; Charles Gardner Dodd, PhD, Earl P. Halliburton Professor; Wilbur Frank Cloud, MS, Professor; Associate Professors were Author White McCray and Donald E. Menzie, MS; Assistant Professors were, Frank W. Cole, MS, and Preston L. Moore, MS. The faculty listings did not change in 1961 and 1962. In the 1963 Bulletin, Geological Engineering was no longer listed, and the name of the School of Petroleum Engineering had been changed to Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering. Donald E. Menzie, who had completed is PhD studies at Penn State, was made Chairman of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, replacing John Campbell, who had now been promoted to the rank of Professor. Laurance S. Reid, MS, was listed as Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Engineering. Preston Moore was promoted to Associate Professor. Professors Dodd and Carl Moore were no longer listed. The 1965 Bulletin listed the new combined School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering. Donald Menzie, PhD, was promoted to Professor and Director of the new School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering. John Campbell, PhD, was now the Halliburton Professor of Petroleum and Geological Engineering. Added to the faculty was Paul J. Root, PhD, Associate Professor. B-41


Professor Carl Moore, PhD, Professor of Geological Engineering was again listed. Dean Carson was Dean Emeritus and Professor W. F. Cloud was listed as Emeritus. Professor Cloud had been on the faculty since 1925. He taught the course in oil and gas law for many years, and was nick named “Judge Cloud� by the students with a great feeling of affection. Also cross-listed were faculty from Geology, Chemical Engineering, and Civil Engineering. The 1966 Bulletin listed the addition of Donald D. Dunlop, PhD, as an Adjunct Professor. Professor Preston Moore was listed as having a PhD, having been awarded the degree by Oklahoma State University. Professors Huntington, Cloud, and Dean Carson, who retired the previous year were no longer listed. In 1967 the only change was that Professor Campbell was listed as being on leave. He returned to the faculty in 1968 and resigned in 1969 to start his own consulting company. In 1969 visiting Professor D.D. Dunlop was no longer listed. The 1970 Bulletin listed Lincoln F. Elkins, PE as an Adjunct Professor and Leo Garwin, PhD, Visiting Professor. Engineering Physics This program was administered by a committee, Chaired by a member of the Physics faculty. It was not a separately budgeted unit, but did award a Bachelor of Engineering Physics degree. In the 1960 Bulletin, Richard Fowler, PhD, Professor of Physics was listed as Chairman of the School. A curriculum for the degree is listed along with an option of Geophysics. Also, a brief description is given for a masters degree program in Nuclear Engineering. The 1962 Bulletin again lists Richard Fowler, PhD, Research Professor of Physics, as Chairman of the School. The list of faculty members includes Robert Howard, PhD, Professor of Physics; Walter Saucier, PhD, Professor of Meteorology; H. Bergmann, PhD, Associate Professor of Engineering Physics; Colin Plint, PhD, Associate Professor of Physics; Yoshikazu Sasaki, PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor of Meteorology; Special Instructors in Meteorology were Stanley L. Barnes, MS; Rex L. Inman, MS; and Victor S. Whitehead, MS. Special Instructors in Nuclear Engineering listed were Glenn O. Bright, MS, and Albert E. Wilson, MS. A curriculum was listed for Engineering Meteorology, and the masters program in Nuclear Engineering was again mentioned. In the 1963 Bulletin, the Engineering Physics faculty listed James Robert Burwell, PhD, Assistant Professor of Physics, Chairman, Department of Physics, College of B-42


Arts and Sciences, as Chairman, with the members of the Department of Physics listed as the faculty of the School. Meteorology and Nuclear Engineering are not mentioned, having been transferred to Civil Engineering and Chemical Engineering, respectively. However the listing of Engineering Physics courses still included the courses in both Meteorology and Nuclear Engineering. The 1965 Bulletin again listed the entire faculty of the Department of Physics, with Robert M. St. John, PhD, Chairman of the Engineering Physics Committee, and Associate Professor of Physics and Engineering Physics. Courses in Meteorology and Nuclear Engineering were no longer listed under Engineering Physics. The Bulletins for the remainder of the decade remain essentially unchanged. In addition to the Schools formed by the reorganization in 1963, there were a variety of programs offered by the College. In the 1960 Bulletin, under the heading of Engineering, a group of courses with Dean Carson listed in charge and taught by the faculty of the College. These included the basic courses that made up the core curriculum. General Engineering Under the heading of General Engineering, the faculty was listed as follows: Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, PhD, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean of the College of Engineering, Chairman, School of General Engineering. The teaching staff of the School consisted of members of the faculty of the College of Engineering, and those teaching supporting courses. While, as it turned out that there were very few students that availed themselves the opportunity to take the options provided in General Engineering, the purpose of the program was to provide the flexibility for the student to select a course of study that related to his or her specific interest. The options offered and the faculty member named responsible were given along with the detailed curriculum provided. Computer Sciences, Dr. William J. Viavant, Director of Scientific Computations; Earth Sciences, Dr. Charles G. Dodd; Engineering Economics, Dr. W. N. Peach, Economics, and Dr. C. M. Sliepcevich, General Engineering; Environmental Engineering, Professor George W. Reid, Civil Engineering; Materials Engineering, Dr. Andrew Cosgarea, Chemical Engineering and Metallurgical Engineering; Medical Technology (Pre-Med), Dr. C. M. Sliepcevich, General Engineering; Nuclear Engineering, Dr. Andrew Cosgarea, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering; Scientific and Technical Exposition, Dr. C. M. Sliepcevich, General Engineering, and Dr. D. H. D. Roller, History of Science; Systems Engineering, Dr. T. H. Puckett, Electrical Engineering; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Dr. H. W. Bergmann, Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; Combined Curriculum - General Engineering and Law, B-43


Dr. C. M. Sliepcevich, General Engineering, and Dr. Earl Snead, Law. In the 1962 Bulletin, two faculty were listed specifically in General Engineering in addition to Dr. Sliepcevich. They were Heinrich Wilhelm Bergmann, Dr. Ing. in Mechanics, Associate Professor of General Engineering, and William Coe Orthwein, PhD in Engineering Mechanics, Associate Professor of General Engineering (the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, which did not have a PhD on their faculty, had voted to deny tenure to Bergmann and Orthwein. Dr. Sliepcevich had recruited both of these men and felt strongly that they were qualified for tenure. The author believes that most of the Engineering faculty agreed with Dr. Sliepcevich. At any rate the ensuing arguments resulted in the transfer of the two faculty members to the Department of General Engineering where they were given tenure and promoted to the rank of Associate Professor. This conflict was a contributing factor in the dissolution of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics). General Engineering remained listed as similar to that of 1960, with the following exceptions. The option in Medical Technology was changed to Curriculum in Medical Engineering. A Curriculum in Fuels Technology was added. Options in Environmental Engineering, Engineering Economics, and Theoretical and Applied Mechanics were dropped. In the 1963 Bulletin, the term “General” was dropped and the programs were listed under the Department of Engineering. Reflecting the appointment of the new Dean, the faculty are now listed as follows: Gene Milo Nordby, PhD, Professor of Civil Engineering, Chairman, Department of Engineering, and Dean, College of Engineering; Donald Barton Turkington, MS, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs, College of Engineering; Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, PhD, Research Professor of Engineering. The only change in program listings from the 1962 Bulletin was the addition of an option in Mechanics being added back, with Dr. H. W. Bergmann, Associate Professor of Aerospace, Mechanical, and Civil Engineering as the Director. The faculty listing for the Department of Engineering in the 1965 Bulletin included Raymond D. Daniels, PhD, Professor of Metallurgical Engineering; Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, College of Engineering in addition to the previous listings. Under the description of the Department, for the first time the following statement is included. “Students who are pursuing a curriculum in another department who wish to transfer to a curriculum in the Department of Engineering must have a 3.0 grade-point average.” A single curriculum was listed for the degree program with suggested elective patterns for specialization in Bio-Medical Engineering, B-44


Computer Science, Engineering Mechanics, Nuclear Engineering, and Systems Engineering. Faculty directors for the options were no longer listed. In 1968 the appointments for Associate Dean and Assistant Dean were changed. Edward Forrest Blick, PhD, Associate Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, replaced Daniels as Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, College of Engineering, and Harold Kenneth Bone, MS, Associate Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, replaced Turkington as Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs, College of Engineering. In addition Charles H. Banks, SM, was appointed as an Assistant Dean, College of Engineering. The listings of these courses remained the same until the 1969 Bulletin when the Nuclear Engineering program was transferred to Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. The 1970 Bulletin reflected the appointment of the new Dean of Engineering. The faculty of the Department of Engineering were listed as follows: William R. Upthegrove, PhD, Professor of Aerospace, Mechanical, and Nuclear Engineering; Professor of Metallurgical Engineering; Chairman, Department of Engineering; Dean, College of Engineering; Charles H. Banks. SM, Assistant Dean; Harold K. Bone, MS, Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs. The position of Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies was no longer listed. Metallurgical Engineering In the 1960 Bulletin the faculty of this School were listed as follows: William R. Upthegrove, PhD, Associate Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, Chairman of the School of Metallurgical Engineering; Charles G. Dodd, PhD, Halliburton Professor of Petroleum Engineering; Verne C. Kennedy, MS, Professor of Metallurgical Engineering and Director of the University of Oklahoma Research Institute; Cedomir M. Slepcevich, PhD, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean of the College of Engineering; John E. Powers, PhD, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering; Andrew Cosgarea, PhD, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering; Raymond D. Daniels, PhD, Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering. The 1962 Bulletin indicated that Daniels was now an Associate Professor. The other change added the title of Director of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory to Professor Cosgarea’s title. The 1963 Bulletin reflected the changes taking place in the new reorganization of the College. Professor Upthegrove was no longer listed, having resigned to take a B-45


position with International Nickel Company. The faculty listing was as follows: Raymond D. Daniels, PhD, Associate Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, Director, School of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences; Cedomir M. Sliepcevich, PhD, Research Professor of Engineering; Andrew Cosgarea, PhD, Associate Professor of Metallurgical Engineering, Director of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory; Charles John Mankin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Geology. This was the last separate listing for the School of Metallurgical Engineering. Note that the above listings of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences incorporate the Metallurgical Engineering Program into that School. Meteorology As noted above, there had been some difficulty in the reorganization of the College in fitting Meteorology into the organization. In the 1966 Bulletin, it is listed as a separate department. However, no one was designated as Chairman of the department. The listing of faculty is as follows: Walter J. Saucier, PhD, Professor of Meteorology; Edwin Kessler III, ScD, Adjunct Professor of Meteorology; Roger Lhermite, PhD, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Meteorology; Yoshikazu Sasaki, PhD, Associate Professor of Meteorology; Jesse J. Stephens, Associate Professor of Meteorology; Eugene M. Wilkins, PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor of Meteorology; Allen H. Weber, MS, Assistant Professor of Meteorology. There were four Instructors listed in addition. In the 1967 Bulletin, there was no change in faculty listings. The 1968 Bulletin reported several changes. First, Professor Saucier was given the additional title of Chairman of the Department of Meteorology (in fact he had been the unofficial Chairman since he arrived at the University as a faculty member in Physics with the intent of starting a program in Meteorology). New faculty included: G. Amos Eddy, PhD, Professor of Meteorology; Arnold Court, PhD, Adjunct Professor of Meteorology; and Ernst L. Koschmieder Dr. rer. nat., Visiting Assistant Professor of Meteorology. Yoshikazu Sasaki had been promoted to Full Professor, and Allen H. Weber had received his PhD. Lhermite and Stephens were no longer listed. There were also five Instructors listed. Professor Saucier resigned effective June 1, 1969, and the 1969 Bulletin listed Professor Amos Eddy as the Chairman of the Department of Meteorology. New faculty members were: Rex Inman, PhD, Associate Professor of Meteorology; Ray Booker, PhD, Adjunct Associate Professor; and Claude E. Duchon, PhD, Assistant Professor. Koschmieder was no longer listed. In the 1970 Bulletin, Edwin Kessler III, PhD, was again listed as Adjunct Professor, B-46


and Stanley L. Barnes, PhD, was added as an Adjunct Associate Professor. Frank P. Hall, MS, was listed as Instructor and Assistant Chairman of the Department of Meteorology. Engineering Drawing This department was responsible for teaching engineering drawing courses for the various curricula in all of the schools in the College with the exception of Architecture. In 1960 Bulletin, the faculty are listed as follows: Franklin Claire Morris, Arch. E., Professor of Engineering Drawing, Chairman; George Rockwell Maxson, BS, Professor of Engineering Drawing; Sam Claude Holland BS in Arch. E., Professor of Engineering Drawing; William Albert Dumas, MS, Assistant Professor of Engineering Drawing. There were six different courses listed as being offered in Engineering Drawing. In the 1962 Bulletin, the name of the Department had been changed to The Department of Engineering Graphics. The faculty and the course offerings remained the same. However, by 1963, with the reorganization of the College, the Engineering Graphics program was merged into the Department of Engineering. The faculty and courses remained the same with the courses now listed as Engineering courses. Professor Maxson retired in June 1964, Professor Morris retired in June 1969, followed by Professor Holland in June 1970. In the same year Professor Dumas was transferred to Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering.

B-47


Appendix C Alumni communication


Mr. Joseph C. Gordon wrote a letter in 1970 in response to an inquiry from the school. Portions were published in The Vector, a newsletter of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Gordon had a successful career as a Petroleum Engineer and was living in Dallas when he wrote the following letter in 1970. After graduating from Oklahoma City High School in 1909, I chauffeured for two years, the second of which was for the City Engineer, Mr. Burk. The car, a Velie, was the first car owned by the city, and was purchased by regular monthly payments. Becoming interested in engineering, I enrolled at Norman in 1911. I learned one thing the first week. The freshman class greatly outnumbered their opponents in the annual scrap, did not know each other and had no plan of battle. We were quickly picked off and individually chained to trees until we were outnumbered and subdued. Mechanical Engineering appeared to me as the most basic branch, covering power generation and I decided to specialize in ME. Dean Felgar, a very fine gentleman, was Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Dean of the Engineering School. At first, I was the only ME, but in 1914 there were nine enrolled. The administration building was completed in 1911. The Power House, adjacent to the Engineering Building, furnished steam for heating and electricity for lights and power for the few buildings on campus. Concrete tunnels containing steam pipes and some utility lines, led to various buildings. The concrete slab covers served as sidewalks. Homer Livergood and several EE students spent lots of time delving in and out of these tunnels installing telephone lines and other utilities. Our football teams did very well in the Missouri Valley Conference. Bennie Owen, was using the forward pass successfully years before Rockne ‘pioneered’ the pass at Notre Dame. One year after defeating Texas in the annual game in Dallas, a shirt tailed parade was organized to meet the team at the Santa Fe Depot. Starting from campus, there was a good turnout by the time we neared the depot, making plenty of noise. Standing in the middle of the street, as if to stop us, was the night watchman. It occurred to me that he had a six shooter and looked rather scared and that I was in the front row, but with confidence in our numbers, we ignored him. The team was loaded on a Talley-Ho and pulled to campus in triumph. Weaver Holland, EE, chewed tobacco, and one day while in the second floor drafting room, he spit carelessly out the open window, plastering Dean Felgar’s bare C-1


head as he walked on the sidewalk below. The Dean, evidently attributing the gob to birds, remarked ruefully, as he wiped his head, ‘It is a good thing that cows don’t fly!’ The student body was friendly. One spoke to everyone he met on campus. About 1912, Stratton D. Brooks arrived and was inaugurated as President. His Cadillac sedan was one of two cars in the south end of town. The Jonsons owned the other one. One year the South Canadian River was on a rampage, and the engineers cut classes and went down to save the bridge. All we did was to shove off some trees that had piled up threatening the bridge. The south approach to the bridge was washed out but we could not do anything about that. My training in ME was of great help to me, in all activities, and I chuckle as I think about the green paint on the newly completed Law Building and other happenings of those four years.

C-2


The following letter, written by Clyde H. Whitwell in response to mailings requesting information in preparation for writing this history, gives a good description of Norman, the campus and student life in engineering. It is included in its entirety with only minor editing. March 29, 1989 Dear Professor Love: Replying to your letter of Jan. 1989, regarding a proposed history of OU College of Engineering, I will submit a few personal recollections. Due to elapse of many years, these may not assay 100% accuracy, and may be windy. You may feel free to edit freely. First some background to give a little flavor of those times. In 1905 my father, a Presbyterian minister, moved his family (6 children) from Missouri to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Territory, where he was Pastor of the Maywood Presbyterian Church on Harrison Avenue. In 1907 he sparked the building of a church edifice at Stiles and 9th, north of Stiles Park. This building is now headquarters of a commercial enterprise, and is registered as a structure of historical significance. Two of my older brothers entered OU before I did. Ray played football under Benny Owens (the one armed coach) in the days when players were rewarded only by a turtle necked sweater with a large “O� on the chest, and the privilege of appearing in a group picture in the Sooner Annual. Earl graduated in Geology in 1915, and had a successful career in Petroleum Geology. My high schooling was at Norman High, with classes at OU overlapping my final high school classes. By the fall of 1914, I had decided on a career in electrical engineering and so entered Engineering School. At the time the campus centered around the oval with Law, Library, Gymnasium, Administration, and Old Science buildings. To the east were the Engineering Building, the Power and Steam Plant with a tall concrete smoke stack. South of Engineering was the football field with one bank of wooden bleachers on the west side. Two land marks on the oval were the concrete spoon holder and 'Old Trusty' the Civil War cannon. Two class memorial gates marked the entrance to the oval. The Engineering Building housed class rooms on the second floor, while on the ground floor were the foundry, machine and wood working shops and electric C-3


laboratory. The latter housed small DC and AC motors and generators, (about 5 hp size) with a bank of light bulbs for a resistance load. Power output of the motors was tested with a Prony brake and RPM with a hand held tachometer. Elementary experimentation was going on in radio transmission equipment. Ray Balyeat et al. built a high frequency generator (spark interrupter) with a rotary fiber disc studded with brass plugs around the circumference. Clarence Karcher experimented with the conductivity of glass melted in an electric arc. My own experimenting in radio transmission was done at home with a Ford ignition coil, an electrolytic interrupter, and a 50 foot wire antenna strung from the house to the barn roof. Balyeat told me that my output, when heard at the University, sounded like a pig snorting. Dumped in a room near the electric lab. were discarded remnants of an attempt to build an ice cream cone baking machine utilizing electric induction heating. Cast iron molds and wire wound tubes were in a pile. A high voltage transmission experiment was set up with a looped circuit of wires on poles to the south of the Engineering Building. One try at pole climbing with spurs and a lineman's belt convinced me that I had no future as a pole climber. The trolley company donated a one truck (two axle) trolley car and left it at the end of the line near Tonawah Street. Under Professor Morrow's guidance it was put on house moving dollies and moved to a spot south of the Engineering Building for possible experimentation or parts salvage. Saint Patrick's Day was observed at the Engineering Building with displays of equipment (moving and otherwise) to attract the attention of visitors, plus tricks to trap or tease the unwary ones. Early hours of the mornings were time for contests between engineers and lawyers for possession of Old Trusty and firing it on campus by the successful possessors. In 1918 during the hours of morning darkness (secretly we thought) Old Trusty was moved to the Whitwell place on North Porter Street. It was dismantled and hidden under a manure pile and guarded by a squad of loyal engineers. However, a larger squad of lawyers found the cannon and carried it to the campus for the victor's ritual of firing it. At the Engineer's Banquet of that year, the lawyers spiked the punch with Croton oil, (a violent purgative). That really disrupted the festivities! In 1968, at the 50th year reunion dinner, a prominent Oklahoma political figure (then or formerly a member of the University Board of Regents), reminisced about being the leader of the group of Banquet spoilers, how he was expelled without a diploma, and later given the diploma in the French WW I battle zone. Later, when Bennie Shultz was on the campus maintenance staff, President Brooks told Bennie to take that ____ C-4


cannon to the South Canadian River and bury it so that it could never be found. (Don't know if it turned out that way.) A tale was current on campus about a co-ed, sole female member of a Civil Engineering field survey group, who spotted a small round tin box in the grass, with the trade name `Merry Widow’ on its lid. Kicking the box with her toe, she asked, ’What came in that?’ None of the fellows answered until Loyal B. Holland mumbled, ’gum.’ My college years were mostly ‘all work and little play.’ My extra curricular activities were not around the campus, but included jobs around our 5 acres home place, such as care of milk cows, horse, chickens, garden, etc., because I was the only near adult male at home most of the time. Also there was work on the family farm and in the Whitwell Farmer’s Store. I had various campus jobs such as setting class room clocks to the correct time with batteries on a stick, Physics Lab Assistant (along with Clarence Karcher) doing electric wiring with Bennie Shultz in the new Chemistry Building and in Holmberg Hall. Also I was instructor in a school for draftees on campus between my graduation and my induction into the army at Camp Pike in August 1918. I went unscathed through the deadly flu epidemic at Camp Pike, then my last month in uniform (after Armistice) was in a Signal Corps Officer Candidate School at Yale University. Former OU Professors Lester W. Morrow and Harold V. Bozell were connected with this Signal Corps school at this time. When this school broke up in mid December 1918, I went directly to Westinghouse Electric in Pittsburgh, Pa., to a spot in their Student Engineering Program. Here, after a few months of shop experience, I spent about two years in the industrial DC motor design section. In 1921, I went to the Equitable Gas Co. (a natural gas utility company in Pittsburgh) where I worked for 41 years with the job titles, Industrial Engineer, Distribution Engineer, and Superintendent of Gas Measurement Division. I retired in 1962. While I never achieved fame or fortune in my career, I find satisfaction in the fact that my training at OU in the College of Engineering saw me through years of continual employment from graduation in 1918 until retirement in 1962. I remember with appreciation the professors and instructors who guided me through my years at OU. Among those whom I remember are President Stratton D. Brooks, Dean Felgar, Professors Bozell, Morrow, Haseman, Lichty, Wohlenburg, and Tucker.

C-5


I am enclosing a duplicate of a group picture of the 1918 graduating class of the College of Engineering (seen on page 53). The faculty members appear in the lower right area near Dean Felgar. I am the sober looking one on the second row on the left of Shop Instructor Davis. After 71 years, I can name only a few of my class mates. These are Bennie Shultz, 3rd from left end of the top row, Calvin Hughes, 3rd from left end 2nd row from top, Loyal B. Holland, 5th from left end of 2nd row from top, and B. Paul Stockwell at the end of the 3rd row from top. Roy E. Hefner, 3rd from right end 2nd row from the top. Clyde H. Whitwell, EE 1918

C-6


One alumnus that responded to the letter asking for input into the history was Harry F. Childers, BSME 1923. After I worked a year, I decided to launch out. I went down to the University and enrolled in 1916. I had four older sisters. All of them were working and they contributed to my finances which principally consisted of ten dollars a month for board and room back in 1916. My recollections of the first year was going to Chemistry Class, which had some 250 people in the freshman class, and listening to Daddy DeBarr's discourses on Chemistry. Our textbooks were late in arriving. My concern was trying to retain what he was telling us about Chemistry and to retain it for final examinations. But, I survived. About the same time, one of my older sisters, who worked for the Santa Fe as a cashier in Ponca City, was transferred to Norman as cashier of their freight department. That worked out just fine because she had a home in Norman and practically financed me through two and a half years of my sophomore, junior and even up to Christmas of my senior year. Then she got married and left and I had to make it on my own the last half year at the University. I overhauled a couple of cars and worked in a bakery in which I had experience and finally made it through. The thing that really opened doors for me was my ability to sing. I was in the glee club at the University and studied voice with Joseph Benton. We toured the state with the Glee Club, representing the University and attracting students. The crowning effort I would like to tell about was participating in an opera that the Fine Arts Department put on in my senior year. I was given a rather prominent part in it. The opera was ‘Menion.’ I was cast as the companion of the lead who was Joseph Benton. I had a nice solo in it. After the opera, Dean Felgar made a point to comment on my appearance in the opera to the engineering assembly and admonished all of them to take part in public work as well as following their engineering careers. I had worked in the summer between my junior and senior years for a refinery in my hometown of Ponca City, running compressors for a tank riveting crew building a storage tank. When I finished school in 1923, I had a job working for them at this refinery for about a year and a half.

C-7


Henry B. Wilson, BSPE 1929 wrote the following about his student days at OU: I came to OU in a different manner than most other petroleum engineers. I was an easterner, went to high school (really a prep school, The Hill School in Pottstown, Pa.). I graduated in 1924 and went to Princeton University. During my freshman and sophomore vacations, I worked in the oil fields of Oklahoma (The Old Gilliland Oil Co.). Then I decided to study Petroleum Engineering and entered OU as a sophomore in 1926 and graduated in 1929. My two years at Princeton was the equivalent to one year at OU. I came west from a strictly male college atmosphere to a coeducational one. I met a girl in 1926, and after graduation, I married her and we moved to Houston to work for Humble Oil and Refining. She is presently my wife of 60 years in June 1989. I owe the Petroleum Engineering School for all of my good fortune. The stock market crash came in 1929 and I am sure had I still been a stock broker after a 1928 Princeton graduation, I would have been out of work. Humble kept me on and the rest is an interesting career with Exxon. Elza T. Gray, BSEE 1930, wrote: I could write a book if there was enough space. I loved the University and still do. I guess the most significant memory that I have of my experience at the University is when I arrived in Norman, two weeks before my sophomore year, with $3.50 in my pocket. I got a job as a janitor at a department store after school and worked until 10 or 10:30 p.m. Then I studied until 2:30 or 3:00 a.m. I was up by 7:00 a.m., and a bus ride to class (if I had the nickel). You couldn't go to college like that now. In fact, you couldn't back in 1926-1930, but fortunately, I didn't know that! I retired from Westinghouse Corporation in 1971 as Division Representative in the Southeast, and now live on a small cattle ranch east of Duncan. Roy J. Thompson, BSEE, 1931, wrote in response to the inquiry sent to alumni. He provides an overview of the environment of the decade of the 1920s, in addition to a very graphic picture of the typical engineering student’s life during the era: In terms of economic and cultural forces, the 1920s were a rather stable period of time for the collegian. Entering school as I did in 1927, I found things much the same as they were for a brother who graduated in 1923, (BSEE), or a sister, class of 1925. We did not know what we did not have, or guess that the years following would bring great de-stabilizing changes. I can think of many things that were ‘not,’ and no doubt there are many more. For instance, there were no student radios, no TV, and a room need have only one electric outlet for a study lamp. There was prohibition-- no legal beer, liquor, or wine. No fast food eating places, no movies in sound or color, and no color Kodak film. There were no copy machines, tape C-8


recorders, ball point pens, no Kleenex, Bandaids, sulfa, or anti-biotic drugs. We had no Saturday classes and no student could use an automobile. Curfew for girls was 10 on week nights and 11:30 on Friday and Saturday. There was not much of a chance to go home more than once a semester, or even up to the City, except on a few weekends. Clothes styles stayed much the same year to year and could be good to wear until they were worn out. And, oh yes! of great importance, there were no credit cards. It was a time conducive for evening seminars, club and society meetings, bull sessions, dates at the library, intramural athletics, costume balls, Saturday afternoon dansantes, and Sunday church. The 1920s were a great time to be a collegian. Tulsa Central graduated 524 in June 1927, and a high percentage enrolled at the University of Oklahoma. Many of us crowded onto the same railroad train with our personal effects in one suitcase and one box in the baggage car. Excitement was intense among the freshmen, most of who tried to identify with the upper class and act like they were not freshmen. The train left Tulsa headed west, the Santa Fe left Oklahoma City still headed west, and arrived in Norman headed south! There resulted a 90 degree disorientation that persists to this day, and not only to me. From a list of approved housing, furnished by the Registrar, a roommate and I had rented a room, by mail, in a private home on Monnet near Boyd, close to the location of the new engineering building, the old infirmary, and Varsity Corner. Rent was $10 per month each, and a meal ticket at a nearby boarding house was $4.50 for three meals a day except no Saturday breakfast. After digging for $47 in enrollment fees, $12 for a slide rule and a leather case, $18 for textbooks, and the AIEE Associate member fee, I found that I could enjoy prosperity-- including dates, Student Council dances and such, on a $50 monthly allowance from home. Laundry was mailed home weekly by most students, and the return was eagerly opened for the sweets that were often enclosed. Winter clothes dirtied quickly because of the coal dust. Most all Norman buildings, homes, and fraternity houses were heated with soft coal furnaces. The University Central Power Plant steam boilers were fired with soft coal. By 1931, conversion to natural gas was well-along, but with the conversion, there was a loss of good paying jobs for students tending furnaces and shoveling ash. Incidently, Walter Kraft was Director of the Physical Plant and Benny Schultz was his executive. Their philosophy of temperature control was basically to open or close windows, add or shed clothes, and to change the steam pressure at the plant, thereby avoiding control and maintenance complaints. I was pleased to find that the book store manager, Miles, was a son of the family in whose home I roomed. The book store provided the red skullcap ‘beanies’ which all freshmen were required to wear at all times. Freshman were further required to C-9


attend football games dressed in white pants with a red shirt and beanie, and to sit together in the bleacher on the east side of Owen Field (As an aside, I don’t remember that girls were a part of any of this). Vigilantes, armed with paddles, (I vaguely remember them to be RufNeks plus freshman athletes), operated a 100 yard long ‘hot alley’ at half time, pulling from the bleachers numerous freshmen, pointed out as guilty of some rule infraction, such as being seen without the beanie, or failing to say ‘Howdy’ to everyone met on the sidewalks. Showing off a new felt hat during Homecoming, caused me to be so punished, and I still vividly remember the pain of the beating. This was not considered to be ‘hazing,’ rather, the open public execution of justice. We engineering students soon became associated with each other. The slide rule case swinging from the belt was sure identification by sight, and often as not by unshaven faces and rough clothes. There was immediate contact with our faculty, and by the end of four years, they knew practically everything about every surviving student, and we students knew more about them than they thought we did. For me, personal relationships with my teachers carried over into my career. It was a good era to be a professor and a good time to be a student. At enrollment, Professor Tappan was designated as my advisor, and I went to see him. He was heavy set, arms a little short, eyes squinting a little, and his mouth was set in a pleasant near smile. I liked him at first sight. He ‘directed’ me to join AIEE, as Transactions would be text material (I stayed through IEEE to become a Life Member), then took me in the adjoining office for a very short introduction to Dean Felgar. I was impressed by Dean Felgar’s dignity and poise, the good taste seen in his dress and office surroundings, and his smooth courtesy in putting a very nervous boy at ease. Although I had few occasions for contact, I always respected Dean Felgar and liked him personally. I do remember that he achieved a PhD during my years at OU and people were addressing him as Doctor as well as Dean. Professor Tappan shared an office with Carl Almquist, who became my favorite teacher. I am sure that as a student, I never used his first name, but through the following years, we had frequent professional contacts, and I think of him now only as Carl. He was slender, medium height, immaculate in dress, dapper with a small mustache. The personal appearances of Dean Felgar and Carl Almquist set for me the examples of what a Professional Engineer should look like, and as a result, I avoided the then-popular tough-guy-engineer image. Professor Richard Page completed the core of the EE School as I remember it (I think that Tappan was Chairman). He was big, close-cropped hair trimmed in a flat top. He was known to every one as ‘Dickie.’ All of the EE lab work was his and it C-10


was very frustrating trying to please him, either in plugging-up in the lab or writing reports. I finally realized that his goal was to teach his students how to organize and prepare a report, and in a secondary sense, he felt it his personal responsibility to protect the University instruments and equipment from stupid student damage. We, who were students in the late 20s, enjoyed the advantage of studying under only the best teachers in every subject. There were no special classes for mechanics, hydraulics, structures, electricity, or any other subject. EE, ME, CE, PE, ChE or whatever, took the same subjects as far as each one went. We went to the appropriate Colleges for mathematics, physics, chemistry, economics, accounting, business law, and the like. We integrated into the whole University. I remember great teaching by Dawson, Brookes, and James in Engineering; Court, Hassler, Dodge, Ewing, and Guy Y. Williams in Arts and Sciences. I remember ROTC as drudgery, particularly the cleaning out of the stables on Saturday at the time, times two, for missed drill or class time. Our horses for Field Artillery numbered in the hundreds. On the other hand, we had the privilege of horseback riding, dating, or taking part in the annual equestrian competition. The US Army Officers were an impressive group, all World War I veterans. I remember Captain Fairchild riding and training a beautiful horse of his own. There was plenty of fun to be had for a little money, like the very popular Student Council dances. Or trips to the 'city', transportation was fast and free for the asking by merely standing in a waiting line at the corner of Main & Highway 77, or for the return, at SW 44 & Shields in the city. If you were flush or with a date, there was the Interurban, and it was real excitement to ride into the bustling OKC terminal. I had an extra recreation in playing flute in the University Symphony, and a small group that played nights, once in a while, for broadcast from the WNAD studio. The station received letters from many listeners, far and near, and radio was fast becoming a big thing. We were exposed to EM wave theory and amplifier circuits in the class room. Dickie added the vacuum tube to his lab list along with rectifiers and Thyratrons. The 60 Hertz lid was coming off fast during my senior year of 1930-31. Engineering students were accustomed to being recruited for jobs prior to graduation. Bull sessions would argue the relative merits of going industrial through ‘test’ at GE or Westinghouse, or going communications with Western Electric or Bell, or going power with a utility. As I remember, almost every graduate, through June 1928, went to a spot of his preference. But the next year, very few recruiters came to campus, and during the winter of 1930-31, a number of those, previously C-11


employed, had been laid off and were drifting through on their way home. Some re-entered OU for advanced study. In the EE class of 1931, 17 men, as I remember, were not recruited at all. Unfortunately, many never did get a chance at an engineering career. Those last two years of my matriculation, 1929-30 and 1930-31, were very hard for most everyone. Allowances from home stopped, competition for working-student jobs became intense, money problems and working hour schedules made it difficult to succeed academically, and the dropout rate skyrocketed. I was among the most fortunate who could hang on having had three good working summers…Western Electric in 1928, and PSO, Tulsa in 1929 and 1930. With savings from those jobs and one year, 1929-30, with a board and room job as fraternity house manager, I was able to make it through. I think it worthy to comment, that there were two obstacles peculiar to those days…one, there was no such thing as 'student loans,' or really any source from which to borrow, […] and two, the EE curriculum required 148 hours for a degree, and no easy electives. For my first job, a Geology graduate buddy of mine and I were going door-to-door in the OKC wholesale district and actually stumbled into jobs as truck drivers, […] stumbled because the owner had just bought two new rigs. The salesman overheard our pleadings, and convinced the owner that he would get a better life out of the new rigs by putting two educated greenhorns on them than he would by using harddriving old hands. We had a rough time overcoming resentments, but we persevered to prove the salesman right. Long, long hours and long trips for $70 a month. This led to a warehouse dock connection with an electrical appliance wholesaler, and I became an appliance salesman. Through this, and a connection with my former summer employer at PSO in Tulsa, I landed a job in their Sales Department. Finally, in the fall of 1933, I was transferred to the PSO Engineering Department. That was my first job in engineering after graduation.

C-12


The daughter of Walker Jones, BSAE 1931, writes about her father, who departed this life, just as preparation began to write this history: He graduated from high school at the age of 17, in West Frankfort, Illinois, just after a tornado tore through their community killing 300 persons and destroying his family home and business. His family moved to Oklahoma City, where Jones lived with his family and commuted on the Interurban to OU. He earned most of his expenses working summers and part time as a carpenter. His activities included the OU band, Alpha Beta Xi, Phi Eta Sigma, and Sigma Tau. He had been attracted to engineering by his high school course in chemistry, but because of a conflict with his adviser in ChE, and his practical knowledge of construction, he changed to Architectural Engineering. Like many who graduated in the early days of the Great Depression, he worked as a laborer for a couple of years. In 1933, he managed to obtain a job on a geodetic survey headed by Professor Wolfard, who had taught him surveying in school. Through this work, he obtained his first full time engineering job with the Oklahoma Highway Department. He worked in the Bridge Design Department. One of his designs is the ‘Graffiti Bridge’ on North Western that has received much publicity in recent years. During World War II, Walker Jones joined Phillips Petroleum, working in the design and construction of plants and refineries needed in the war effort. He retired from Phillips in 1972. As mentioned Gertrude Sally Collier West was the second woman to graduate from the College of Engineering and elected Engineers’ Queen in 1930, the major part of her letter is as follows: I wonder if my memories would be much different than those of the men in my class. There were already a few other women in the College of Engineering, when I transferred from the University of Texas and the novelty had worn off so that we were not a distraction (I think). There was never a hint that we might have a missing chromosome. Pants were not the part of a woman’s wardrobe that they are today. Riding breeches in the field and coveralls in the shop were worn, however. I would say that less than one in ten professors showed any prejudice against women or were more demanding in performance. Perhaps they were indulgent of us knowing that marriage would likely put an end to our careers, except for figuring the viscosity of gravy or calibrating the peas. I remember my professors with a special respect and affection. They urged us along with the men to participate in engineering functions and sometimes provided transportation to Oklahoma City to attend meetings of various engineering organizations. The American Association of Engineers, forerunner of NSPE, held monthly luncheons at the YMCA or the C-13


Skirvin Hotel, where we could become acquainted with men from local engineering firms and make contacts which would be helpful when we sought employment. The enrollment at OU in 1930 was about 5,000, but it seemed smaller because of the friendly, ‘Hi’ and ‘Howdy’ atmosphere. The buildings were closely grouped so the ‘no car’ rule was not a handicap (except maybe on dates). It was just a stroll from the Engineering Building to chemistry class in DeBarr Hall and none of the buildings were far from the Campus Corner. There was a particular camaraderie among the engineering students, both men and women. The Engineers’ Club held monthly ‘smokers’ to promote fellowship among the students and to provide a link with the Association of Collegiate Engineers. The cigar and pipe smoke would have set off a peal of smoke alarms audible in Oklahoma City. Since the Eighteenth Amendment was not repealed in Oklahoma until 1933, refreshments caused no problem unless the lawyers spiked the cider surreptitiously. Not a lot of business was conducted at these meetings except around the time to plan for homecoming or for the St.Pat’s day festivities. There were occasional talks by faculty members or students, and sometimes, the more talented members could be persuaded to play the guitar and sing ballads (perhaps there were times when the men did feel a bit inhibited by having women present). Where and when St. Patrick became the patron saint of the engineers is a mystery to me, but from February until March 17th it was ‘Erin Go Braugh’ and green shirts were much in evidence about campus. The Engineering open house and St. Pat’s celebration took over the campus and many mornings the law students found a green flag on the flag pole in front of Monnet Hall. Keeping it there sometimes caused problems. St. Pat was elected from among the graduating seniors, and his identity, and that of the Engineering Queen, was kept secret as long as possible because of threats of their being kidnapped by the law students. The entire student body was dismissed from classes for the parade and open house. The parade, which included the OU Band, wound around the campus starting at the oval and ending at the Engineering Building where St. Pat crowned the Queen. At the banquet, the graduating seniors were dubbed ‘Knights of St. Pat’ by the Queen. The curfew for the formal dance, which followed, was extended from the usual 11:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. (Imagine!). Reverberations of ‘Old Trusty,’ the cannon belonging to the secret organization, LKOT (Loyal Knights of Old Trusty), could be heard through the night before the festivities. The names of the group were known only to each other. I do not know how they were chosen, but it seems they were a very select group. C-14


It was during the 1930 celebration that the gliding electric sign on the northwest roof corner of the Engineering Building was completed after about a year’s work by the EE students. The exhibits and demonstrations at the open house were up-tothe-minute for that time. The northwest room on the second floor of the Engineering Building was the structural design and drafting room, but somehow in October, there were always a couple of transits there for adjustment or repair. There was an open space between there and campus corner where World Series Baseball scores were posted in the window. A lot of men of other disciplines found urgent business there too. By the way, there was no air conditioning and by spring the temperature was more conducive of napping than of working. We just had to trust that the wax on the tracing cloth would not melt. From the foregoing pages, one might draw the conclusion that very little studying went on. Not so! The 5 percent of the time spent on special events was simply more exciting than the 95 percent spent in classes, studying, and, of course, the mundane mechanics of living. The slide rule and the Merriman-Wiggins handbook were our computer and ‘memory bank,’ so calculations were often very time consuming. Nights were never long enough to complete assignments and to bone-up for exams. But classes were, for the most part, interesting and challenging; and what satisfaction to see a design project take shape on the drawing board! Without the patience and encouragement of our professors, we’d never have made it. Then there was the anticipation, or dread, when waiting for grades to be posted. My own summer work experience, though little more than drafting, was an entry into the profession after I received my degree in Civil Engineering. The years I worked were stimulating and rewarding. With jobs so scarce for everyone, when a woman married, she usually forfeited her job. A career and marriage were almost invariably, ‘either-or,’ rarely, both. Also, as the job market shrank, it was women’s jobs which were most often sacrificed. I don’t remember hearing of this as sexual discrimination at the time. It was just the way things were. In those days before ‘Women’s Liberation’ brought about polarization of the sexes, there were so few women in engineering that men did not consider our invasion of their territory a threat, but accepted us as equals. After some years of rivalry, that C-15


acceptance is becoming evident today. Women were always welcomed in the American Association of Engineers, ASCE and other professional organizations, whereas, it was not until about 1958, that women with engineering degrees were eligible for membership in the American Association of University Women. These memories have little to do with the advancement and development of the engineering profession, but we did have hopes of making some contribution. Our expectations probably exceeded our accomplishments.

Sincerely, Gertrude S.C. West

C-16


In 1989, Sue Aycock Turnbull wrote from her Solvang, California home about some of her experiences and about her life after graduation. Excerpts from her letter are given as follows: It is true that I was in O.U. at a time when very few young women were enrolled in the College of Engineering. I came to the campus in the fall of 1930 and bravely enrolled in the Interior Decoration Department of the Art School. I soon found out that art was not my field, and several engineers who were enrolled in one of my courses suggested to me that I might transfer to Architectural Engineering since that would include more math and technical courses for which I seemed to be better fitted. This I did and found myself in several courses to be the only girl. I can honestly say that at no time did I ever feel that my presence was resented, and I never felt uncomfortable. I was able to make good grades, and the best part was that I was also able to make some very good friends. Another happy memory was being elected Engineer's Queen in the spring of 1934. My good friends Richard (Dick) Sneed and Latham Yates managed a sort of ‘Campaign’ for me which was successful by a very narrow margin. But it was an exciting time, with the lawyers as usual trying to pull off a kidnapping and other tricks to spoil the St. Pat's Day parade and celebration. Lewis McBride was St. Pat that year. When I graduated, a beginning draftsman was being paid less than a living wage, and I could not afford to continue further training. I decided to try for a job as a technical secretary in a large architectural firm, and succeeded in getting an appointment with Albert Kahn of Detroit for an interview. I was hired to assist Louis Kahn, one of the principals of the firm, Albert Kahn, Inc., to work on contracts and handle his correspondence. It was a very large office, with several hundred employees, and most of the work in the office was for Ford Motors, General Motors, and many other large industrial firms in many different fields. I met many interesting people both within the Kahn office and among clients. It was at Kahn's office that I met and later married, J. Gordon Turnbull, who was one of the key department heads. I left Detroit after about two years, and a few years after that my husband opened his own consulting engineering firm, J. Gordon Turnbull, Inc., in Cleveland, Ohio. His company grew swiftly during the war years, and though I never did any work as an ‘architect,’ I did spend much of my time at the office working with records, personnel, contracts, etc. -- that is until we started a family. I was an officer of the company until my husband died in 1953, six years after we moved to California. Upon his death, I served as President of the company

C-17


until estate matters were settled and the company was sold. My oldest son, also J. Gordon Turnbull, is an architect in San Francisco. Another son lives in the Santa Ynez valley near me, and a daughter lives in San Francisco. The following excerpts from letters received from some of the alumni are included below in order to give a better insight into the student life and concerns of the period. Richard McBrien, BSME 1933, wrote: I transferred from Central State Teachers College in 1930 and enrolled in the Mechanical Engineering School, Aeronautical option. I shared a room with another student, paying $10 to $15 per month. Meals were $1 a day and less. For hair cuts we sometimes walked the rail road track to a down town Norman barber shop to get 15 cent service instead of 25 to 35 cents at a shop near campus. As a senior, I had a part time job as a clerk and clean-up in the ME lab. During summers, I worked with the Gulf Pipe Line Co. on a survey crew, mapping a route for an oil pipe line from Tulsa to Pittsburgh. Pay was $5 per day plus meals and hotel. Net total earnings $415. During my senior year, I wrote a national essay contest paper, ‘Aircraft Engine Fuels and the Problem of Detonation,’ which won fourth place for a $700 scholarship at the Boeing School of Aeronautics, then in Alameda, California. I enrolled in the Boeing School after graduation from OU with the help of a loan from my sister and brother-in-law. Reportedly only one of 30 ME graduates had a job to go directly from school- painting pipes in the oil field. William Horn, BSPE 1937, recollected the following: My father was a production foreman in the oil fields of Oklahoma and Kansas from 1924 until 1942. Therefore, it was natural for me to enroll at OU in 1933 working toward a degree in Petroleum Engineering, which I received in June 1937 at the age of 20. During my first years the economy was still in the depths of the depression. For a few months, Dad’s salary was reduced to $115 per month. Living at home in the Oklahoma City Field and commuting to Norman, held down expenses. However, movies cost 15 cents to 50 cents maximum. Fortunately, 1937 was the best year for graduates between the worst of the depression and the beginning of World War II. Salaries offered: Indian Territory Illuminating Oil, $115 per month; oil companies for South America - $125 per month; oil field service companies - $135 per month, (this I took). C-18


St. Patrick's Day (Engineers’ Day) called for lots of rivalry with the law students. A lot of green paint was applied in places irritating them. Paper sacks full of water (etc.) were dropped from the upper floor of the Law Barn on parading engineers. For years, an old cannon was fired on St. Patrick's Day. Unfortunately, not long before I entered OU, one of the engineers had his hands blown off. I had occasion to see the victim studying in the Engineering Library. It was amazing to see him so successfully manipulate the mechanical artificial hands available at that time. During my studies at OU, all engineers had slide rules, usually by their sophomore year, mine was a log duplex. Most of them had theirs in a case fastened to their belts. I assume they were phased out by portable calculators in the 60's or 70's. Military science was required during the first two years at OU. I played in the band as part of this requirement. We played at home foot ball games, opening of new bridges and structures in Oklahoma City, etc. A memorable trip made by bus (not plane) was to Stillwater for a game and then on to Washington, D.C. In Washington, the rain kept us from marching at half time. We stayed in the National Guard Armory and had plenty of time to visit the sights. President Roosevelt was in Warm Springs. I made all of the highlights I could think of in the capitol, including Mt. Vernon and Arlington Cemetery. A worrisome and controversial matter came up about the time that I enrolled at OU. The state government was considering recommendations to consolidate all engineering at Oklahoma A&M. In turn some schools would have moved to OU. What a tragedy that would have been. Cecil R. Gray, BSEE 1939, wrote of his experiences as a student working on WNAD: During the years between 1922 and 1960, the physical plant of radio station WNAD served as a superb hands-on engineering laboratory. It also served as a scholarship type of employment for electronics oriented engineering students during the poverty depression years. The 1000 watt transmitter on the second floor of the engineering lab building was a composite assembly of scrounged parts put together by Professor Clyde Farrar with the help of students. It met or exceeded every quality standard demanded by the then Federal Radio Communications Commission and was a source of pride and inspiration to those of us fortunate enough to be involved. We student operators loved the station and devoted free time to its improvement. I suspect that a mining operation in the lawns and grounds of the Engine Lab would prove profitable to reclaim the mile of buried copper wire we ditched and buried with pick and shovel to improve the antenna ground plane. Our `Clothes-line’ antenna needed height and while the present Union tower was under construction in 1937, its steel framework exposed, as the brick layers platforms were raised, it C-19


was my duty, between classes, to climb up, raise the antenna attachment as high as possible and reattach it. Sadly, one day my class exam went over time just as the bricklayers put on a burst of speed. When I arrived, the antenna was bricked in forty feet short of our goal and the scaffolding raised to make the tie point out of reach. Later, when the station moved and a new antenna was installed, the `clothesline’ was cut off leaving a few inches of pig tail which survived for decades and left a few bricks discolored, which I can still see and point out after these fifty years. Attached is a copy of my letter from Professor Farrar admitting me to WNAD’s select group. The $12.50 a month paid my way through school, although by graduation time in 1939, it had been raised to a comfortable $21. Yes, clothes (simple), books (second hand) and tuition (miniscule), and room (Mrs. Garner’s at 760 DeBarr). This was possible by 40 cents per hour summer jobs, living on milk and crackers through the week and home frequently on the week ends to stoke up. Charles W. Himes, Arch. E. 1938 (Landscape Architecture), wrote the following from his retirement in Selma, Alabama: I entered the School of Architecture in 1932, fresh out of Norman High and in the midst of the depression. Joe Smay was the Director of the School. He was old fashioned and taught History of Architecture from classical books emphasizing the Parthenon and grand cathedrals. -- We toiled in the old labs in the second story of the Engineering Lab building. In hot weather, with no airconditioning, the electric fans did not help much. The paper would stick to your arms as you bent over the drawings. Our required subjects in chemistry, French, English, math, and everything worked us to the bone. Finally calculus got me! I transferred to Landscape Architecture - the first OU student in it. They let me substitute Botany for math and there I made A’s. They did not offer horticulture or floriculture and I was woefully unprepared to be a Landscape Architect upon graduation in 1938. In 1939, I went to the Air Force and came back to Norman in 1946. I went into the landscape business with Howard Jenson, one time Superintendent of Grounds at OU. Sam C. Naifeh, BSPE 1939, provided spot memories of his days as a student: • A celebration of OU winning the Big Six conference with a street dance on `Varsity Corner.’ • Restaurant used to advertise `Eat at the Copper Kettle where every meal is an event.’ • The electronic board on the Engineering Building. • The many paths going from the Engineering Building to Jenkins and Classen Blvd.

C-20


• Attempts by the law students to abduct the Engineers’ Queen before the Engineers’ celebration dance. • When the law students spread fire in front of the Law Barn and law students would throw water, ice, and what ever, while the parade was stopped. The `Pride of Oklahoma’ would play `Boomer Sooner’ until the parade could go on. • The jam sessions in the Student Union - by various OU student bands. • I enjoyed the Geologic field trips in southern Oklahoma and the Petroleum Engineering Laboratories. William Jack Greer, BS Gen. E. 1940, BSEngr. Phys. 1950, wrote as follows: I enrolled in the University in September 1935. The first semester, my major was Social Science, the second semester I majored in mathematics, and in the fall of 1936, I enrolled in the College of Engineering with a major in General Engineering. Professor R. V. James was my adviser. He was also head of the Department of General Engineering. To earn my education, I applied and was put on the NYA (National Youth Administration). I performed duties in the Law Barn, where I assisted the head janitor. In this manner, I received the necessary cash for expenses. I worked elsewhere near the campus for my meals. I earned my BS degree in 1940. After returning from World War II, I again enrolled in the College of Engineering in the spring of 1947 and majored in Engineering Physics. For my support, I used the ‘GI Bill.’ Mr. Greer spent most of his career at White Sands Proving Ground, in digital computer programming of mathematic models of flight simulation and missile systems. Harland Dunn, BSCE 1941, actually did his junior and senior years in 1937-1939 after transferring from Texas. He had to make up a couple of courses lost in the transfer so that his degree was not granted until 1941. He wrote of his experience with open house. For Engineers’ week in the spring of either my junior of senior year, we added a lock onto the model of the Hoover Dam that was in the area between the Engineering Laboratory Building and the Journalism Building (it may not be there any more if it had to make way for expansion). We built lock walls on the side of the dam and put hydrant spigots in the upper and lower ends of the wall to let the water in and out of the lock. The miter gates were wood and we needed something to seal the edges of the gates, so that it would not leak too bad. We found out that the felt layers on black board erasers worked fine for seals. So a few erasers disappeared from the class rooms. We had a concealed pump to pump water from the lower pool to the upper pool as we used water to operate the lock. I had a boat at home that we used to go up and down stream through the lock. We enjoyed explaining C-21


how the lock worked to the visitors. Mr. Dunn worked for the Tulsa District Corps of Engineers after graduation and was the design engineer on the Oklahoma part of the McClelland-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System. The following excerpts from letters written by alumni of the period give personal insights into the students and their life during the turbulent times of the 1940s. E. T. Binckley, who lived in California when this letter was written, entered school in 1938 to study Chemical Engineering. His brother Charles, BSME 1936, and brother Frank, Architecture, (Men of Might, May 1941) had preceded him at OU. Binckley provided the following information: Upon enrollment, I entered into the freshman engineering curriculum, which was about the same for all types of engineers. After the first year it became apparent that the smells and antiquity of the Chemistry Building were not for me, so I entered the Mechanical Engineering School, taking what was then called the “Aero Option”. Upon meeting Professors Comp and Cherry, I knew that I had made the right decision. Ours was a small group, around a dozen, but we had our own honorary society, Tau Omega, with the best looking key on campus. We had great spirit too, and had our own float in the homecoming parade. The far sighted engineering school had built a wind tunnel for our use, but as I recall, it never reached the stage from 1938 to 1942, where it could be used for class work. The old Liberty engine that supplied the power or other mechanical problems always needed work. Like most fellows in school at that time, I took ROTC and upon graduating in May, 1942, I was called to active duty a week later. Five years and five campaigns later, I returned to engineering. One of my happy memories about engineering schooling involved the Drafting Department, which in 1939, consisted of Professor Maxson, Professor Holland, and a helper named Bone. John Lesch, wrote from semi-retirement in Tulsa, gave the following insights: In 1934, I was graduated from a small rural school in Caddo County. There were five seniors in my graduating class. Logically, I should have become a farmer, but I didn’t like picking cotton. C-22


Since our nation was plunged in the midst of a terrible economic depression, it was not possible for me to attend college then, so I worked for a while before enrolling. In January 1939, I was working as a Comptometer Operator and low level supervisor at the Department of Agriculture in Stillwater. My boss was promoted and I was passed over for his job. The reason given was that I didn't have a degree. It didn't seem to matter what degree. I kinda blew my cool, quit and enrolled at OU. (Younger brother Jim, then already at OU, said that he encouraged John to come to school.) I had one old sports coat, some slacks, and $125 when I arrived at Norman. I enrolled, paid my Chem lab fees, bought a slide rule, paid a month's room rent to music Professor Joe Benton's mother at 731 DeBarr, and bought a $5 meal ticket at the Sooner Waffle Shop, where my kid brother, Jim, was working as a waiter. I had $62 left, with which to get a degree. I reflect back on the past 50 years with a great deal of satisfaction. I wanted a degree, my parents were unable to provide funds and I had none. I promptly got a job on the NYA, for 25 cents per hour, working in the PE laboratory for Professor Bill Bednar and Glenn Stearns. I also got a job washing dishes at the Sooner Waffle Shop from 5 to 7 p.m. daily. Several of the guys my age, with senior status, (Tom Morton, Bill Ford, Dink Taylor, and Stratton Cralle) involved me in the activities of the Engineers' Club. At the end of my third semester, I was invited to become a member of LKOT. Being a member of LKOT was the most gratifying experience of the activities that I encountered. Other things were more visible, but LKOT members worked quietly for the good of the Engineering College without recognition. I was honored by being elected as President of the St. Pat's Council and Engineers' Club during my junior year. Our faculty sponsor, Professor Willoughby, was one of my toughest teachers and one of my best friends. I thought he was going to do us bodily harm one night when we missed a pledge on a walk out down by the river south of Norman. We let Bob Eckart get through us and had to track him down the river to a point within sight of the Lexington Bridge when we caught him. He had been told to keep walking until someone stopped him, and he did. When I was Chief Gunner of LKOT, I used to keep Old Trusty in the lower drawer of my dresser and two 25 pound cans of powder in my foot locker under the bed at 225 East Boyd. This place was right next to the railroad tracks and was occupied C-23


by older engineering students and LKOT members for several years. When we moved in, (Bob Hines, Jim Lesch, and me) Mrs. Wagner mentioned that she kinda had an aversion to having gunpowder in her house. In fact, SHE DID NOT WANT ANY! One midnight, Jim Richardson, Tee Johnson, and I were in the bedroom, with the powder out, loading charges for Old Trusty for the St. Pat's Celebration. Some darn fool spilled about 15 grains of that powder on the linoleum floor and it made a pretty loud noise as it slithered across the floor. About two minutes later, a firm knock was heard at the door separating our digs from Mrs. Wagner' hall. Of course we had to scramble to hide everything and when I went to the door, a note had been pushed under it. It said, ‘John, I told you, I don't want any powder in my house.’ Needless to say, we moved it that night to Tee Johnson's Grandma's basement, again without permission. In the fall of 1942, I had to become inactive in LKOT. I joined the Naval Reserve and had to graduate by June 1943. I was working for the U.S. Corps of Engineers during construction of the Douglas Aircraft Plant in Oklahoma City (now a part of Tinker Field). I commuted 50 miles daily, working six eight-hour shifts each week and completed 33 hours of senior classes. The next two and a half years were spent in the Navy. Most of it in the Southwest Pacific as the Torpedo Officer on a Destroyer Tender. When I came back from the Navy, Professor Willoughby told me he thought a small independent oil operator, called Warren Petroleum, in Tulsa, was looking for an engineer. I worked for Warren for 37 years. They had a fine company and it was with a lot of pride that I retired from Gulf at the end of 1982. Carl Thain, BSME 1947, wrote from his home in McAlester: My father ran the Cherokee Strip and I grew up on a wheat farm west of Waukomis and graduated from Waukomis High School in 1937. Three sisters attended Oklahoma A&M College and two sisters, my younger brother, and I graduated from The University of Oklahoma. I enrolled in the fall of 1937. I lived in several different boarding houses where I served tables and worked in the kitchen for my board. I also sold sandwiches and cold drinks to make enough money to go to the Student Union Dances which cost 50 cents. I was a member of the Band, playing clarinet and saxophone and also served a term as President of the Ruf Neks. I graduated from the first Primary and Secondary CPT programs offered at the University, and I was active in the Engineers’ Club and participated in harassing the Lawyers.

C-24


In 1941, I still lacked hours for my degree, but I had earned a commission in the Field Artillery in ROTC. In August 1941, I went on active duty at Fort Sill, attended parachute school at Fort Benning, Georgia, and serve with the 456th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion in the 82nd Airbourne Division. I was discharged as a Colonel in the fall of 1945 and re-entered OU in the spring of 1946. I spent most of my career as a contractor in Houston, Texas and McAlester, Oklahoma. My wife, Irene was also a student at OU. We have one daughter and one grandbaby, Hillary. Ben J. Cagle, BSME 1943, wrote from his home in San Diego, California: I arrived on campus in August 1939, having never heard of a wind tunnel, nor been close to an airplane, but with a singular desire to become an aeronautical engineer. That was like going to the moon from my home town of Ringling, Oklahoma. I soon found the wind tunnel building and much activity in cleaning and fixing things. It was not running, but there were high hopes. Professor Cherry introduced me to the large bank of glass tubes and explained manometry. It seemed the whole building was awash with rubber tubes. The registrar, Boyce Timmons, arranged for me to live in the football stadium and work in the field house. So, as a student, I lived and worked on campus. I worked for OU year round, and went to summer school each year, for the four year period. No one was paid for working in the wind tunnel; we worked there for fun and a sense of purpose. We gathered there when we had spare time and listened to stories of what it was like in airplane factories. Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, is a vivid memory as the old radio, that we had repaired, gave us the news. Pearl Harbor was the turning point. We knew our purpose. The faculty helped us in ROTC to stay in school for our degree. I wanted to be a pilot, but my eyes weren’t good enough. I went on to OCS and the Army Air Corps. After a stint with aircraft production in New York, I ran my first supersonic tunnel and tested swept wings at Wright Field. We received the German scientists and designed wind tunnels from their advice. After the war, I went to Caltech and a MS in Aeronautics (my degree from OU is in ME with Aero Option). I worked in the Caltech Cooperative Wind Tunnel and saw the design of swept wing jets. After it closed, I changed fields and became an oceanographer. The Navier-Stokes equations have served me well in both fields. Some of my recollections as a student at OU are a bit arcane in today’s world. As C-25


engineering students, we delighted in teasing the lawyers. Saint Patrick’s Day was special, and we devised feats of wonder, such as painting the owls green in the gables of the Law Building. Swinging in a bosun’s chair from the roof peak in the darkness was mild compared to some of the antics we pulled to infuriate the ‘snobs.’ The Engineering curriculum was hands-on. We learned drafting, designed our parts, built wooden molds, made sand castings, poured molten metal, and machined parts to fit. We built an airplane wing and tested it. There was much calculation. The way to calculate redundant structures was by columns of columns of numbers. The principles of interactions and finite differences, vaguely perceived in hand calculations, were more meaningful to me when I first programmed a computer in the early fifties. We were mechanics being taught basic engineering principles that hold true even today. I’ve met engineers from OU in many places over the years. A keen sense of self confidence characterizes them. And that trait is due to the quality of teaching that prepared us for the profession. M. L. (Pete) Ralston, BSChE 1947, wrote of his experience in the ASTP program from his Houston home: As a native of Lawton, I enrolled in OU as a ChE sophomore in the fall of 1941. I had gone my freshman year to Cameron College, since I had a job in Lawton through High School and that helped at Cameron for the first year. In the fall of 1942, with the war progressing, I took an examination and enlisted in the Army Reserve program at OU. This was influenced by the ROTC program, but was primarily a method by which I hoped to remain in school to complete my degree. In May 1943, I started the summer school session as a senior in Chemical Engineering; however, this lasted about a week before the active duty notice arrived. Basic training took place during the three summer months in Camp Maxie, Texas. All of the regiment were college students from Oklahoma, Texas, and Louisiana as I recall. As basic neared completion, we were interviewed for the new Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP). By good fortune I was selected to return to OU for the fall 1943 program. However, the Chemical Engineering program was full and the alternatives were Mechanical and Civil Engineering. I choose Mechanical Engineering. Our first term (fall 1943) went well. We occupied the girls dorms (Hester and Robertson Halls), and meals were served cafeteria style. Drill formations were limited, primarily morning reveille and an evening formation.

C-26


After Christmas, and completion of the fall term, we moved to some new dorms south of the stadium. Spring and ‘graduation’ came and applications were made for our assignments in the Army. The assignments were quickly made known (and had nothing to do with what we requested). In my case it was ‘C’ Company, 409th Infantry, a rifle company at Camp Howze near Gainesville, Texas. Many other ‘ASTP-ers’ came from Texas A&M, Texas A&I, and etc. There were no promotion prospects. They had their non-coms, and officer candidate schools were being closed. It was a fairly grim picture as far as we were concerned. Training went on through the summer and we went to France as a division in October 1944, moving up into the Vosges Mountains and Alsace in November with the 7th Army. Good fortune came my way and as casualties occurred, I moved from private to sergeant, and was commissioned in Austria in June 1944. I was discharged in the summer of 1945, and enrolled in OU in the fall of 1946. It was great to see Dr. R.L. Huntington and Bud Reid again. I needed only a few hours, but it required two terms, so those two terms were distinctly pleasant. I had joined the SAE fraternity in 1942, so the social life was excellent. I was asked to join Sigma Tau and Tau Beta Pi, and graduated in May 1947. Job offers were plentiful. I started with Gulf Oil at their Port Arthur refinery. Thirty seven years later, after nearly fifteen years in the Middle East, Asia, and Europe, I retired at age 60. Victor Lyon wrote from Santa Fe, New Mexico: I graduated from Oklahoma City Classen High School in 1942, and enrolled at OU in the fall of the same year. Having made a fairly high score on the Iowa Content Exam, I had received a recruiting letter from NROTC and did sign up for that program although no scholarship was offered or given at that time. My roommate and I shared a room in a private home about a half block off-campus on Jenkins. I think the rental was $16/month, which we split. We had meals at a boarding house run by Mrs. Surber, lunch and dinner for 25 cents per meal, for as fine home cooking as one could ask. We skipped breakfast for the sake of economy. We had to enroll in the University College, which was a new twist that year from President Brandt. I was heading for Chemical Engineering like my older brother, but changed after my second semester to Civil Engineering. The second semester, I had to work at the Student Union because my summer earnings were nearly depleted. At the end of the spring semester, the Navy told us that we would enroll in summer school. I borrowed $60 from my dad to pay tuition and books. I also got a weekend job at Wilson & Co. in Oklahoma City. About half way through the semester, I had an emergency appendectomy. My roommate told me in the hospital that the Navy was putting us on active duty July 1, and all engineering courses C-27


would end on that date. We went into uniform, barracks, and mess halls. I didn’t have to work any more, but had to take PT, had more frequent drills, and had to go to Navy indoctrination together with the new V-12’s of which the NROTC was a part. In those days, you could spot an engineering student by the slide rule swinging from his belt. Most of us carried at least 18 hours. When I got notice that I would be leaving early, I made a quick switch to General Engineering, and loaded up on courses, including three hours of correspondence, and worked my tail off. When I went to my graduation/commissioning ceremony, I really did not know whether I would get a degree or a blank sheet of paper in that sheepskin folder. I got the degree twenty nine and a half months after matriculation. Robert E. Hefner, BSME 1947, had attended Ohio State before the war and joined the ASTP and spent time at Princeton before being assigned to the combat engineers. In Europe, he was wounded in combat, before finally coming back to his wife and son in the States. He wrote: After discharge, I entered OU, as I felt it was the best school near to Oklahoma City, where we were living. I had a family living in the City and there was not much time for the normal social life at the University. However, my grades were acceptable, and as I recall, I did receive an invitation to Tau Omega to match my Ohio State Phi Eta Sigma. Now for OU. The Mechanical instructors were very competent. I learned a lot, part of which was to be more than dubious about instructor’s positive statements. Just for fun, I designed an insulated pipe-line joint and my instructor said that it was interesting, but would never be used by oil companies. So four years later I saw a new development in the Oil and Gas Journal about an insulated joint similar to the one that I had designed. One memory that I had was in an Electrical Engineering course. The class was over 75 percent veterans experienced in the practical side of electrical distribution or electronics. Three instructors tried and struck out before a full professor with both theoretical and practical experience took over. I for one learned a lot from then on. The school, at that time, was having problems recovering from low enrollment through the war years and staffing with inexperienced instructors who could not equal their classes in practical experience. This may sound like I have bad memories of OU. Not so. I enjoyed my time at Norman, and I left with a lot of respect for the quality of the engineering professors. My professional life since that time has verified that OU did something right.

C-28


Miller A. Cameron, BS Gen E 1947, wrote from Wethersfield, CT, and shared some memories of his professors: About Professor Brookes: in his course in reinforced concrete, several times upon noticing a drowsy or nodding student, Professor Brookes made remarkably accurate chalk or eraser tosses, right on target, thus gaining the rapt attention. Professor Brookes was an outstanding educator, a professional and a gentleman, who taught his discipline in a most effective and comprehensive manner. Professor Comp, in Aircraft Structural Design, ably bridged academics to industry in a most effective and dynamic manner. He provided superb guidance and direction. He also assigned students the responsibility for teaching a class session on a "state of the art" segment, enhancing the course. In my case, I utilized a differential equations approach to improve landing gear strut design by augmenting the Von Mises design criteria of that time." John A. Taylor, BS Geol E 1947, MS 1949, wrote about the V-12 program from his home in Oklahoma City: You will find it especially interesting to cover the Naval V-12 and NROTC students who were there in World War II. I have the files on much of this as I represented a team of three that compiled the history of the Naval unit at the University of Oklahoma. Prominent in these, of course were engineering students, since that was required of being in the V-12 program. As you may or may not know, these V-12 engineering graduates went on to be leaders in industry, academia, and government throughout the United States, indeed throughout the world. Dean Carson was especially noteworthy in his administration of the academic side of the unit during those years. These were very bright students and they contributed much to the competitive academic atmosphere while at the University. Indeed, even the University of Oklahoma football team could hardly have performed without them, since the key players came from that unit. The NROTC portion of the V-12 operation were not required to take engineering. This is a little confusing in that the entire program was called V-12, of which the NROTC was federalized under that aegis. We normally refer to those in the V-12 as being those who were not actually represented by the NROTC unit. They were all Naval cadets, lived in barracks, marched to and from class, and took three semesters per year, which made it possible to finish in two years and nine months, if you went straight through college under the program. Many were in college when C-29


they took competitive examinations to enter the program. For instance, there were 400 who took the exam at Oklahoma A&M, as it was then called, and only two of us made it out of that group. I happened to be one of those two, and I was a second semester chemical engineer at the time. H. Frank Taylor, BSEE 1946, wrote from McKinney, Texas: The Navy sent me as a sophomore to the University on July 1, 1944 from Lubbock, Texas. I was not familiar with OU, and had not requested to be sent there. However, I fell in love with the University and Norman. The V-12 years must represent a unique period in the college history. The classes were certainly small. We were a part of the last V-12 class, commissioned in June 1946. The EE’s were in two groups: Power, and about six or seven of us in communications. Professor Frank Tappan was the Department Head, and Professor Clyde Farrar was our chief mentor as seniors. For registration the last several sixteen week periods, we would gather around Professor Tappan’s desk and get our class schedule worked out. One evening Professor and Mrs. Farrar had the whole class over for dinner. Ah golden years! For some forty years, I was engaged in technical sales and marketing management in semiconductors, transistors, and IC’s, neither of which we studied at OU. When the present youngsters kid me about such, I describe our regimen. None of this summer, spring break, and long Christmas break for us. We had classes forty eight weeks per year, including Saturdays. I recall a class late in 1945, when we asked Mr. Farrar, when the next lab reports were due. ‘Wednesday,’ he said. ‘But Prof., Wednesday is Christmas Day,’ we must have pleaded in unison. With a deep chuckle, he said, ‘Okay, take until Thursday.’ We might have had until Monday, but I distinctly recall doing a lab that New Years Day. Another pleasant memory involves Professor Tappan. Often, during his classes for the power portion of our work, such as transients of transmission lines, we would ask if we could discuss some other topic that day. He would ask what we wanted to discuss. It would be something such as acoustics, geology, or our favorite philosophy. Engineering might be considered ‘training’ by Liberal Arts majors, but those sessions were pure education. Joe B. Clarke, Jr., BSChE 1946, shared his college stories, from Lafayette, LA: First, the entire academic experience in war time was totally different from that of peace time. Most of us were carrying 17 or 18 hours with several labs a week. Navy discipline, drills, watch duty, inspections, etc. all increased the tension of maintaining required grade averages. C-30


Then there was the shortage of materials. Labs were a hassle and we had to make do often with used pipes, tubing connections, wire, broken down equipment, etc. A significant part of each lab was taken up in cleaning rusted equipment, salvaging old parts, and trying to make do. We were not allowed to use the acetylene torch and any welding or repair work on our laboratory equipment had to be done by appointment with the engineering lab custodian. Further, we engineering students in the Navy V-12 program were hampered by requirements as to the wearing of a uniform. For a good while, we wore whites to labs where we were bothered with the dirt, chemical fumes, and the like. After some months, we were issued khaki shirts and trousers, which helped considerably. However, we had only one set of such clothes and had to be quite careful in our work. At least we had a belt to hang our slide rules on. Looking back at the experience, I am surprised at the high quality, overall, of our professors and instructors. For the most part, I had the highest respect for them, especially Dr. Robert Huntington, then head of the Chemical Engineering Department. Others whom I recall include Dr. Guy Y. Williams, who taught Physical Chemistry, Dr. Reeves, who taught calculus, Dr. Crook, who taught Organic Chemistry, Dr. Waldron, who taught Industrial Stoichiometry, and no doubt some others whose names escape me. Of course, we had a few others, not memorable, like our Metallurgy instructor, our Strength of Materials instructor, and Electrical Engineering instructor. All in all, they challenged us to be the best we could be and took us right to the edge of our capabilities. The classes were small, rarely over 25 or 30, sometimes 12 or 15, and there was time for personal help as required. Engineering activities on St. Patrick's day were kept to a minimum. Who had time for all that in those days? We had our engineering shows, of course, but they were minimal in extent and participation. We had regular meetings of Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Tau, but here again our time was restricted because of military curfews, and we conducted our business and were gone in less than 30 minutes or an hour. Social activities during those days were necessarily kept to a minimum, but we did have a little time for fun. I remember having to brighten up the Greek letters on the concrete pyramid in front of the old engineering building. We had a few laughs, of course, but looking back on it, it seems that we didn't have very many. Mary Coffman Copeland, BSME (Aero Option) 1945, shared memories of OU from her home in Fort Smith, AR: Along with many of our nation’s finest young men, who were in the NROTC and Navy V-12 program, I found the compressed classes and training during the war years were demanding as well as stimulating. There were some incidents that were C-31


not the most pleasant to recall, but the faculty and staff were helpful and accessible. Two professors I remember fondly: Professor E. F. Dawson was my advisor and mentor. When I graduated, he presented me with a copy of Eshbach’s Handbook of Engineering Fundamentals. I treasured that copy, and when my own son graduated from OU in Petroleum Engineering in June 1985, I presented him with the latest Eshbach. Another professor, Professor Willoughby, provided me with an excellent course in Strength of Materials. Professor Willoughby later died in a tragic fire. I do remember an Electrical Engineering professor (name forgotten), whose sole purpose in life seemed to be degrading women (especially me), and taking pictures of co-eds (even without film in his camera). Also in that same class was my seatmate who had a photographic memory, which made my laborious studying seem unfair. However, his social skills needed improvement. My engineering studies involved classes and labs at times that my sorority sisters were free for sunbathing, etc. At Norman, I was fortunate to be one of ‘Hettie’s Girls’...she had a room for only seven lucky girls at 739 College. Many of the V-12 students were lacking in excess cash. One of my special friends (and some of his buddies) would go to the ponds on the University golf course and drag for golf balls, which he would sell for spending money. I was elected to St. Pat’s Council, and considered that a special honor from my friends. One of my classes was Wind Tunnel - and it was a disappointment because the class (only a few students) did cleanup work on parts for the tunnel (which was non-functioning for the entire semester). Previous to enrolling at the University of Oklahoma, I attended the University of Arkansas, where the Dean of Engineering met me at enrollment tables with, ‘We flunk 50 percent of our freshmen, you don’t really want to enroll in engineering.’ I did survive, and in 1943, I was selected, along with 82 other women students, to go to the University of Texas for ten months extremely intensive junior engineer’s course to help replace the loss of men engineers during the war. After completing this rigorous course, the Curtis-Wright Company, who had sent us there, allowed those who wished to finish their degrees to be released from going to work for them. I took advantage of this, and enrolled in the University of Oklahoma. I completed my degree in Mechanical Engineering (with Aeronautical Option), in October 1945, just ten days after I turned 21. The speaker for my graduation was Eugene Homan, President of Standard Oil Co. Veterans were just beginning to return to campuses that fall, and the semesters were changed back from three per year to the regular fall and spring times.

C-32


Jobs were far from plentiful after the war ended, and I remember a job interview in Tulsa - a fairly prominent engineering firm- and they were making me an offer, when it was ‘mentioned’ that I would keep the books. I questioned this, of course, and was told that, since ‘you are a woman,’ I would add this to my job description. I declined even though the money was improved. I spent many years with my own design business (primarily architectural) and several years as a Design Engineer with Convair in Fort Worth. After my marriage, and move to Fort Smith, I resumed designing, along with having a family. I was recruited to teach at Westark Community College in Drafting Technology. This included courses in Engineering Graphics, Descriptive Geometry, Architectural Drafting, Blueprint Reading, and now am primarily instructing in Computer Aided Design and Drafting. I have been active in the ASEE, especially in the Engineering Design Graphics Division. Putting together some memories of my thoughts in this letter has stirred past memories of my college days. As far as I know, I was the only woman enrolled in the College of Engineering during my studies at OU. I have always been extremely proud of my degree, and of the caliber of instruction that I received there. This is evident, when my son also elected to attend. William J. Kerth, BSEE 1945, was the Chairman of the Board of Adaptive Technology in 1989, a firm specializing in artificial intelligence and industrial robots. He wrote the following about his experiences at OU: Ninety six V-12 Californians arrived in early 1942 at the University of Oklahoma to pursue engineering degrees. I received my BS in Electrical Engineering in three years, and was LKOT 269, Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and Sigma Tau. At the time there was a moving sign on top of the Engineering Building and, some how, I was put in charge of this system. We would punch paper tapes with the message, and this was pulled through a slot filled with mercury over the tape, and below were a series of contacts on the same spacing format as the tape. As the tape was pulled through, the circuit was completed and the light bulbs on the sign would then display the moving message. A request was made by the South Base Naval Air Station for ten electrical engineering students, and I was one of the ten who reported for a special secret project. The first meeting opened with an Admiral with a request to look at our nails. I was in the back row and was madly cleaning dirty nails from the many shop courses that I was taking. When he had looked at all of us, he said, the only worker in the class was Kerth, as he was the only one with dirty nails. We worked on one of the first radars called DOG. There were two Yagi antennas, one on each wing that could be C-33


rotated by the pilot. The PPI (plan position indicator) had two vertical traces, one for the port wing and one for the starboard wing Yagi. When a pip was detected, the pilot centered the Yagi and changed the course of the aircraft so that the pips from the two Yagis were equal. As the plane approached the target, the pips moved down the PPI, and at the designated distance, the fish (torpedo) was released. I received a wonderful education at OU and proceeded to get my commission at Notre Dame and served in the Pacific as E Division officer on a 5,000 troop transport. Merle Dinkins, BSME 1948, wrote from Shawnee, Oklahoma: I went to OU on a football scholarship and enrolled in the basic pre-engineering courses in 1942. I was also put in the NROTC program and received my commission in mid-semester 1944. I then shipped to a destroyer in the Pacific as Assistant Engineering Officer, not knowing the bow from the stern or a gate valve from a globe valve. But I was an engineer! In 1946, I came back to OU to finish my college and to play football for Jim Tatum and Bud Wilkinson. Did you ever try to go to engineering labs from 2:00 to 4:00, leave lab at 2:30 for practice, not finish any lab and know what was going on? With the help of understanding professors, I passed and received my BSME in 1948, after five years and four letters in football. I was Assistant Plant Engineer for Robberson Steel in OKC, and then, Chief Engineer for Murphy Boiler and Piping Co., specializing in steam power plant construction. In 1950, I returned to OU to install a boiler & generator in the Power Plant. I had a ball with my old professors by having them bring a class or two to the field during construction. In 1960, I formed the Lamar Company and specialized in water and sewage plant construction until selling out to my employees in 1986 (Lamar built water treatment plants in Norman in 1965 and 1973, and a pumping station in 1983, along with some 50 million dollars in construction in the state). W. Carey Johnson, BSME, 1948, wrote from Lawton, Oklahoma: I completed my BSME in June, 1948, having attended OBU in 1941, and then OU during 1942, 1943, and part of 1944, studying Mechanical Engineering and participating in NROTC. Following a couple of years in the Pacific, I came back to C-34


campus to complete my degree. I belonged to no organizations and was not a good student. A story that might prove of interest to the readers is the role Dean W.H. Carson played in my landing a job on graduation. Dean Carson had much enthusiasm for Latin America and he was fascinated by the fact that I spoke Portuguese fluently and that I could also speak Spanish. (I was born in Brazil of missionary parents.) Dean Carson felt I should put my talents for foreign languages to the forefront. He gave me a long list of firms to contact and then he bubbled over with enthusiasm on receiving a circular from the Export Manager of Fairbanks Morse, calling for sales engineering trainees for eventual assignment to Brazil and Argentina. The long and short of it is, I was hired by the firm, and I did well with them during 13 years spent mostly in Rio de Janeiro. I might have remained in that capacity forever, but for an unwanted promotion back to New York City in 1964. I then left the firm and started my own business in Lawton. In the post war years, by far the majority of students in engineering were older students; many had been commissioned officers and had held positions of responsibility in the military. There were, however, several students directly out of high school, who, because of age, had missed the several year interruption that most of us experienced. Robert A. (Bob) Royer, BSChE 1948, was one such student. Bob, a Superintendent of Laboratory and Environmental Engineering for Agrico Chemical Company in Blytheville, Arkansas in 1989, sent a clipping of an article that appeared while he was a student about this very problem. The author of the article interviewed Bob (age 19), a junior, and a veteran in his same Chemistry Class who was eleven years older. In the interview, Bob said that ‘The veteran puts in more hours studying than most of the younger students normally do. Thus, to keep up, I have had to study considerably more and still am not making more than a low C average. As for advising young students to stay out of school, I would say no. The G.I. Bill has had a healthy influence on the class room. His desire for knowledge has resulted in my studying more.’ Bob, pointed out that the average student often gains little recognition. He wrote: I have had great success hiring professional employees by hiring average students. Given the proper recognition, they will work their heart out for me and are always loyal.

C-35


Joseph Guarracini, BSME 1948, wrote from New Jersey: I was a transfer student from night school in New York City and a Navy veteran at the time of my admission to OU in January 1947. My first dormitory location was the former Navy barracks on the South Campus. One day in late winter or early spring of 1947, I experienced a sky-darkening sand storm. While walking back to my dorm from the main campus, the sand was hitting my face like so many needles. It didn't last long, but before I left Norman, I also had experienced ‘golf ball’ sized hail and a summer invasion of cicadas so thick they blackened the campus lights at night. On balance, however, I must say that coming from the streets of New York City, the OU campus was a pleasant surprise. Early classes in the coolness of the summer mornings, swimming in the afternoons, dozing under a tree on the main campus, sharing an ice cold watermelon outdoors, coffee and doughnuts in the Union coffee shop, dancing in the main ballroom, browsing in the Main library...small things perhaps but all a part of a pleasant college experience that I enjoyed at OU. As an institution of higher learning, I firmly believe that the University of Oklahoma has little for which it must apologize. Some of the courses and instructors stand out in mind...in the Engineering College, Mechanics taught by Professor Creech, Steam Power Stations taught by Professor Roop, Professor Dawson, Dean Carson, and W. Taylor. In the Physics Department, General Physics taught by a courtly erudite gentleman named W. Schriever. In English, I remember Professor Helen Edwards. One thought that saddened me at the time, when I was invited to join Pi Tau Sigma, I had to turn it down because I couldn't afford to pay the $33 initiation fee. Consider this, I was living on $65 per month under the GI Bill. D.H. Lindsey, BSEE 1950, wrote from California: It was a time when thousands of the military service of World War II had returned to civilian life and were taking up their interrupted studies to prepare themselves for their futures. Most of these were attending college under the so called ‘GI Bill.’ I was one of them. Many of the Professors were also returning veterans. In my own case, I took Electrical Engineering classes under Professors Almquist, Challenner, Farrar, and Page, all who had served in the armed forces. Because of the influx of students, some rather desperate steps had to be taken to provide classroom space. Among those steps were using some of the buildings on the two Naval Stations, North Base and South Base, as classrooms. One of these C-36


buildings was moved to the campus proper, at a location just east of the main Engineering Building and used as class rooms. The new permanent addition to the Engineering Building provided additional space for Petroleum Engineering and the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. I recall the pain that the whole College felt when Professor Willoughby died as a result of an explosion at his home. He was a good instructor with a particular ability to get down to the student’s level of understanding. Housing was something of a problem, particularly for married students. I was married when I enrolled for the first time and became a father for the first time while I was in my sophomore year. My wife, my daughter, and I lived in one of the pre-fabricated plywood units in Sooner City. As time passed, better quality living quarters, the Nieman Apartments were constructed by the University, but we chose to remain in Sooner City until I graduated. Judson A Kizer, BSME (Aero option) 1950, told of the tornado that destroyed the Aeronautical Engineering Laboratory on the North Campus in April 1949. He wrote from his home in Chamblee, Georgia: On a Saturday in the spring of 1949, when I was a junior in Aeronautical Engineering, I was trimming hedges for a lady homeowner in northwest Norman. I had secured this job to supplement my finances. During the trimming operations, the temperature seemed to rise and I saw a dark, almost black, cloud in a southwesterly direction from Norman. As the cloud approached, the sky darkened and then it began to rain. Then the intensity of the rain increased, and very shortly, I began to hear a roaring noise similar to a passing railroad train. Not being a native of the southwest, I did not realize that a tornado was in the vicinity. The lady homeowner returned from a short shopping trip and informed me that a tornado had crossed the northwest section of Norman, but had no information on damage. Since I could not complete the trimming task, I decided to go downtown to learn more about the tornado and to offer my services, if needed. When I arrived downtown, I was told that the tornado had hit the North Campus, but no details were known as to personal injuries and property damage. Immediately, I thought of the students and staff members working at the Aeronautical Engineering Laboratory. The municipal authorities requested citizens to stay away from the tornado stricken areas. Thus, I boarded a bus and returned to my dormitory on the South Campus. On the day the tornado struck, Professor Bruce V. Ketcham, of the Aeronautical Engineering School, was supervising a group of veteran students in building laboratory demonstration equipment for instructional purposes. Among this group was C-37


a dormitory next door neighbor of mine, who was a veteran and a native of Wilkes Barre, PA. His name is Walter M. Hojonowski (nicknamed ‘Ski’), a junior in AE. He discussed the tornado incident with me at great length and is the major source for the information in this letter. ‘Ski’ stated that as the tornado approached, Professor Ketcham looked out of the door and stated, ‘That’s a funny looking cloud.’ As soon as Cecil, a student in the group, heard the professor’s comment, he ran over to the door and looked. Being a native Oklahoman, Cecil recognized the oncoming tornado and yelled, ‘Run for your lives.’ In a matter of seconds, Cecil convinced Professor Ketcham, who was a New Englander, that they were in a life threatening position. By this time, the rain was coming down in torrents and the sky was turning blacker. The group split into segments. Two students ran for a shallow ditch and both tried to crawl into a concrete culvert. Both survived but were drenched with water. The second group, including Professor Ketcham and ‘Ski,’ ran to Ken Adams’ car and climbed in. Ken and his passengers headed toward Norman with the rain coming in torrents. Fortunately, they were able to avoid the tornado. ‘Ski’ was sitting in the back seat and in his haste to close the door, he accidently pulled the inside door handle off and held it tightly in his hand. They were all the way into Norman before he realized that he had the door handle in his hand. The Aeronautical Engineering Laboratory was totally demolished. It was reported that the west wall of the building was placed against the east wall. The steel girders used in construction were twisted like pretzels. As the building housing the AE Laboratory was a total loss, the usable equipment was moved into a vacant Navy dining hall for use in laboratory classes. As soon as the tornado passed, Professor Ketcham remembered that he had driven his father’s new Pontiac to the North Campus and parked in the adjacent parking lot. Upon his return to get the car, he found it in its original location, but all of the windows were broken. Furthermore, Professor Ketcham returned to the AE Laboratory the following day to survey the damage. During the survey, he stepped on a nail, resulting in an injury that required a trip to the doctor. On Monday, when classes began, he showed up with a bandaged foot. When queried as to what happened, Professor Ketcham replied, ‘Surviving the tornado was not so bad, but stepping on a rusty nail was something else.’ So, with this humorous remark, classes continued as usual until a new laboratory could be built in the same general location.

C-38


The following are some memories shared by Dr. John M. Campbell Sr, who had a lengthy career in the College of Engineering beginning in 1946. He wrote the following letter describing his experience: I joined the faculty of the CoE in the fall of 1946 from the atom bomb project. I was only 24 years old but they were desperate for bodies to put in front of the classes and I suppose I was the best of the alternatives available. My salary was $200 per month for which I was to teach 9 credit hours, the typical full-time load at the time. In addition I could take up to 9 credit hours of graduate courses free of charge. In the fall of 1946 the university had a large jump in enrollment to 11,000 students, about 4000 of which were in Engineering; only 34 were women. The facilities were not only inadequate, they also were old. What was then called Engineering Laboratories was built in 1909; Felgar Hall consisted only of the west side of the present building around the north-south hallway, and had been built in 1925. Chemical and Petroleum Engineering shared a rather non-descript red brick building that still exists just north of the field house. Since the addition to Felgar in 1948, it has been occupied by the Physical Plant for offices and a warehouse. One must remember that Oklahoma had been hit hard by the great depression and the Dust Bowl years. There just had been little money for the investment in facilities. But, the sparseness of facilities was overcome by the dedicated, experienced faculty. Classes were offered 6 days a week in order to serve student needs, using every square foot available. I taught one of my classes in former warehouse area containing two small portable blackboards. Many classes were also larger than desired. I think it is fair to describe that first year as ‘organized chaos.’ There was too little of everything except students. But, the combination of a dedicated faculty and dedicated students still managed to produce a positive result. Many of our students were there on the G.I. Bill, were older and fairly mature, and were thankful for the educational opportunity. Of course the curriculum was substantially different than at present but it met the needs of the marketplace. Most of the professors had a masters degree and industrial experience. Most research was confined to that being performed as a requirement for an advanced degree. All mentoring was done by professors. The slide rule was the standard calculation device although manual desk calculators were available. Engineers proudly wore them with a belt loop and tended to C-39


swagger a bit around the campus like the gun slingers of the old west. There were few textbooks and most information was transmitted by lectures and class notes prepared by the professors. The communication tools were limited. One was a hand cranked Ditto machine. It used a master with a gelatinous type surface that could be written or typed on to produce a raised surface. Attaching this to the cylinder being cranked produced a legible (but not fancy) blue colored copy. This was used extensively for quizzes. The Mimeograph was the ‘Cadillac’ of the copiers. Typing on the master produced an area through which ink would flow. This was a better, more permanent copy that was used to produce class notes. The Xerox machine was not yet in use so making copies was a chore. The technology was increasing rapidly so it was difficult to transfer current information to the students in a timely manner. The stress was necessarily on fundamentals. Student life was also quite different from the present. There were few student cars and parking on campus was not a problem for professors and visitors. For many years, student cars were not allowed on campus. Most social life was limited by how far one chose to walk. The Student Union and the campus-area businesses were the locus of most activities, except for the movie theatres in downtown Norman. The Interurban provided transportation to the attractions in Oklahoma City. The facilities situation improved tremendously with the addition to Felgar in 1948. The original plans called for adding an ‘F’ shaped addition with laboratories filling in the open spaces. But because of money limitations, only half of this addition was built. The future extension of this partial addition was planned but it has never happened. If one looks at the NE corner of the present Felgar, ‘temporary’ bricks are still visible. The original plans called for Felgar to occupy space now used by the wooden air force ROTC building. In 1948, Chemical Engineering became the only school in the CoE that was approved to offer the Ph.D. degree. In the spring of 1951 Jim Huitt retired former President of Gulf Oil Co. and I became the first to receive this degree in the CoE. This was followed in several years by others, including Mark Townsend who spent many future years on the faculty. I left OU at this point to join a firm in Oklahoma City but kept in touch by being involved in non academic programs sponsored by the college faculty. In early 1954 I was contacted by George Cross the President and Bill Carson the C-40


Dean of the CoE about returning to the university to invigorate a research program and serve as Head of Petroleum Engineering. We negotiated a salary of $700/ month that was quite high at that point in time. So, I rejoined the faculty for the Fall Semester that year. I believe it was in January 1955 that Cheddy Sliepcevich was hired to come to OU from the University of Michigan. It was envisioned at the time he would be a candidate for the Deanship since Bill Carson’s retirement was only a few years away. The graduates of the university had an outstanding record but there was an apparent perception some modernization was desirable. In 1957 the Russians beat the U.S. to outer space with Sputnik. This was a blow to our national ego and there was a call from all quarters to revise and update education to prevent any further ‘embarrassment.’ Bill Carson did not have the energy or the interest to engage in a program change to satisfy accrediting agencies and our marketplace. Cheddy, as Associate Dean, inherited the responsibility to lead the change. Change was in the offing anyway but Sputnik led to a crash program that led to several years of turbulence in the college. The misconception that this change was to ‘save’ the college is erroneous. The outstanding record of graduates prior to about 1960 (when the new curriculum was instituted) is attested by the outstanding performance of prior graduates. Sputnik was the catalyst. The angst that accompanied the rapid changes was not confined to OU but was a national engineering college problem. We in Petroleum Engineering had already been instituting many changes. Natural gas was becoming a prime commodity and there was demand for increased knowledge in the area. This varied all the way from applications of liquefied natural gas technology (LNG) to the processing of gas for commercial use. LNG had been developed by the Bureau of Mines in Amarillo in the 1930’s as part of the helium recovery process and a few cities like Cleveland, Ohio, were using it for ‘peak shaving’ during the World War II years. There were several active research programs in process including one by Laurance ‘Bud’ Reid involving the conditioning of natural gas for commercial usage. Cheddy and the Chem. E. faculty also had expanding research programs. But, the curriculum was the issue at hand. In order to introduce new courses into the curriculum some traditional ones had to be removed in order to keep graduation requirements at a reasonable level. Most laboratory courses and mechanical drawing were among the first to go and were replaced by more math and science offerings. This ‘cut and paste’ process was necessary but it resulted in some human trauma. C-41


Long time dedicated and loyal professors were faced with being redundant. Both emotional and realistic problems muddied the process, even though the end result was positive. One problem was that most of the faculty had only a master’s degree and it was apparent that a PhD would be the standard for a tenure track position in the future. The older faculty was insulated by their tenure or imminent retirement. The younger ones faced a diminished future without a PhD. Outside of Chem.E., there were few current faculty with a PhD. Tom Love a newly minted one and an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering was one and a devoted adherent to the changes. My faculty was young for the most part. Several had been on board for only several years. We were lucky though because our faculty was interested in advancing their education and we had a lot of outside support from alumni and petroleum companies. I arranged reciprocal agreements with both Penn State and Oklahoma State that called for a professor to spend a full year on course work and research and then write the thesis upon return to the home campus. Preston Moore, and Frank Cole opted to go to Oklahoma State; Don Menzie and Art McCray opted to go to Penn State, the school where they had obtained their earlier degrees. All but Frank Cole received a Ph.D. under this arrangement. We in turn accepted two Oklahoma State professors, one of whom finished the program. As an adjunct to all this, in 1957 the university approved the awarding of a PhD degree for all schools in the CoE. There was a scarcity of existing faculty to teach some of the new courses so it was decided to combine some basic courses into a core curriculum instead of having them taught separately in the individual schools. This spread the wealth a bit. In addition this made some sense efficiency wise. However, it never quite lived up to our original expectations. While all of this was going on the W. K. Kellogg company gave OU a grant to construct the Oklahoma Center for Continuing Education (OCCE). This was a boon for the college, especially P.E. It enabled us to better serve the growing market for skills development of employees and to run various conferences. During the 1960’s when the cyclical petroleum industry was in a down period, this enabled me to support a staff during a time of low enrollment.

C-42


There was a growing interest within the college for modifying the Ph.D. standards to replace one of the foreign language requirements with a special technical problem. I was on the Faculty Senate at the time and we finally got them to appoint a committee to investigate the request. I was one of the 5 members chosen on a committee chaired by Victor Elconin Chair of the Foreign Language Department. Vic was fundamentally against the idea but was willing to give it a fair hearing. After much haggling, most of which was very civilized, it was agreed to put the idea before the Graduate Council, an ad hoc group of professors who taught upper level courses and served as an advisory unit to the Graduate College Dean. It met several times a year in the main lecture room of the Law Barn. On the day of the hearing we had tried to pack the audience but the chance of success was very iffy; a close vote was predicted. Toward the end of a series of longwinded discussions one faculty member rose and gave sarcastic comments that persons were not truly educated unless they could speak two foreign languages. Upon his conclusion, Bob St.John, a physics professor, rose and made the droll comment that the speaker’s case would have had more validity if he had spoken in a language other than English. The room erupted in laughter. We won their approval and ultimately that of the Board of Regents, two of which were our alumni. Change always causes pain to some of those involved but I am very proud of the faculty’s ability to look beyond short-term advocacy to produce longer term excellence. I have lived within a few miles of the OU campus ever since I left OU in 1968 to enter private practice. There have been many ups and downs during those many years but the quality of graduates has remained excellent and we can all be proud of the many accomplishments of both the graduates and the faculty.

C-43


Lloyd Austin was with Getty Oil in Kuwait (before the Iraqi invasion) when he wrote the following: I transferred to OU from a Kansas Jr. College in 1948. I was married and we were expecting a child at the time. We applied for University housing during the spring before my transfer, but out-of-state students were not even qualified for the prefabs that stood near the present towers. We ended up in a trailer home on North University Boulevard, six blocks north of Main Street where I walked to and from classes most days. Some of the things still most vivid include: 1) The chaos on my first day of enrollment, which was on a first come-first served basis, and where I had the breath literally crushed from my body by the mob scene at the south entrance of the Engineering Building. I thought my campus life would end before it started. 2) The tremendous excitement at the football games, where we worked our way up, by class, until as seniors, we were near the 50 yard line Tickets could be scalped for a whole months salary, but this was one of the most exciting thing my wife and I could afford and we never missed a home game. 3) I remember being envious of the children of rich parents who cruised the streets in fancy sport cars while I had to walk. 4) I remember being somewhat contemptuous of the fuzzy-faced freshman while most of us were grizzle-faced veterans. 5) My family was poor and could not support me and I could not make it on the GI bill even working during the summer months at an oil refinery in Kansas, but I was able to get a part-time job with Long Bell Lumber Company with the help of the Student Employment Office. I made 60 cents an hour and we were able to buy most of our groceries on what I earned. 6) I remember my great thrill to be successfully pledged to three separate honorary engineering fraternities, Pi Epsilon Tau, Sigma Tau, and Tau Beta Pi. My wife and I have since managed to send four children through the University and have a fifth there now. In addition, I have been sponsoring a student through the Alumni Association in an effort to help someone else who badly wanted an education but, like myself, had to have financial help. Clarence R. Holder, Gen. E, 1951, wrote from Tyler, TX: As a returning veteran after service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, I was one of many students who needed to supplement my income of $120 from the U.S. Government. The G.I. Bill was a wonderful experiment in the value of educating returning young men so that they could assume their place in society, but even at C-44


1949 prices, $120 per month would not support a family of three persons. Working toward a B.S. in General Engineering, I took a job as circulation manager for the student newspaper, The Oklahoma Daily. My primary duty was to deliver papers to the sorority and fraternity houses and to see that the young teenage carriers were sent on their respective routes. Bill Cross, the young son of President George L. Cross, was a paper boy, and you can imagine how it felt for a lowly student to call the President's home on those rare occasions when Bill overslept. I must say that President Cross was always gracious when called at 5:30 a.m. and usually answered with this typical measured response, ‘If he is still here, I will certainly see that he gets up and he will be sent on his way. Thanks for calling , Mr. Holder.' This is only one of the pleasant memories that I have of my years at OU. Carroll D. Hudson, also wrote from Tyler, TX: After four years military service during WW II, I attended Cameron Junior College for two years, then completed degree requirements for BS in Petroleum Engineering at OU, January ‘49 through January ‘51. Of interest, at both Cameron and OU, I worked a regular forty hour week, carried as average of 18 semester hours, was inducted into Tau Beta Pi, graduated in eight semesters and, with some help form my wife, birthed three children. We had no external financial assistance except the G.I. Bill, and no health insurance. We owed not one penny when I was graduated. I was an auto mechanic when I entered Cameron in 1947. As a petroleum engineer with ARCO Oil and Gas Company of thirty four years, I became Vice-PresidentGeneral Manager for the Ark-La Tex exploration and production region. I retired in 1985 and now consult to a group of investors, buying oil and gas properties. My world would not have changed but for two factors: The G.I. Bill (surely one of the best investments by a federal social program) and the total support of University staffers that allowed me to tailor a studies program to a work schedule that contained day, evening, and night shifts each week. Dean W.H. Carson, Dr. John Calhoun, Professors Wilbur Cloud, and Art McCray, and student assistant John Campbell were especially supportive. Dr. R.E. Wainerdi, BSPE 1952, served as an officer in the USAF in 1952-53 and received his PhD at Penn State in 1958. He served as a faculty member at Texas A&M from 1957 to 1977 where he was promoted to full Professor in Chemical C-45


Engineering in 1961. He served as Assistant, then Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs from 1971 until 1977, before resigning to become Senior Vice President and Director of 3D International 1977-82. In 1982-84 he served as President and member, Board of Directors of Gulf research & Development Co. of the Gulf Oil Corporation. In 1984, he became the President of the Texas Medical Center. He has published extensively, primarily in the area of applications of nuclear activation analysis. He wrote from Houston, TX: I was very active in Tau Beta Pi, and The PE Club. I recall that we made a wonderful display for Engineers’ Week in 1951 and 1952. The PE Club created a large model oil field and we had a real rig down for the parade. I recall that the other departments complained that we had an unfair advantage because such a large proportion of the students were PE majors. I recall that we had a wonderful class in 1952- with many fine students in it. Also, I recall Professor P.A. Cushman telling us about the Philadelphia Steam Railway in Thermodynamics. He was a grand man...as were all our Professors...(Grand that is, for some were women, even then, like Dr. Dora McFarland in Math). Stanley L. Moore, Jr. wrote from Lubbock. TX: My father, Stanley L. Moore, Sr. and I were at OU in the College of Engineering at the same time. This has confused some people. I met one employee of the University who was somewhat upset because I did not recognize him. But you may rest assured that we are indeed two different people. I first enrolled at OU in 1937. I do not know why I enrolled in Engineering, since I was trying to decide between Law and Medicine. As it turned out, I believe that my enrollment in Engineering was one of the wisest decisions that I ever made. In 1940, I joined the Naval V-7 program. I served in the Navy over five years. My last assignment was Commanding Officer of Logistic Support Company No. 512 that was stationed on Guam. In 1946, I elected to go on inactive duty as a Lieut. Commander and returned to school under the G.I. Bill. As an undergraduate, I was accepted as a member of Tau Omega, a professional aeronautical engineering Society. In 1948, I received a BS degree in General Engineering. In 1952, I resigned my position as Chief of the Vertical Control Computing Section of the Inter American Geodetic Survey and returned to OU for the third time. I received the Morehouse Industries Fellowship, which helped with expenses. In 1954, I received a master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. Upon graduation, C-46


I Took the Professional Engineer’s written examination. According to Professor James, I made the highest score that had ever been made on the examination up until that time. He acted quite pleased with this because the previous ‘high’ had been made by a student at Oklahoma State. For the last thirteen years, I have been employed at Texas Tech University. My job is to reduce energy consumption and utility expense. I can prove that I have saved the tax payers of Texas far more than my total salary. One day, in 1947, Professor James stopped me in the hallway and asked me what my father was doing. My father had been owner of a garage in Norman for some twenty five years, but had sold his business because of ill health. At the time, my dad was raising vegetables on ‘Pop’ Thoes’ land. ‘Pop’ Thoes was the former owner of the Brown Owl. When I explained this to Professor James, he asked, `do you suppose that he might be interested in a job as Laboratory Technician in the Mechanics Department?’ My father accepted the job and after working there one year, he decided to start taking one course each semester toward a degree in Engineering. Dad attended the University of Kansas until he was drafted into the Army during World War I. He served as a Second Lieutenant during the war. Although Dad had studied pre-law, some of the hours that he had accumulated at Kansas were accepted as nonprofessional electives toward an engineering degree. Dad completed requirements for a BS Degree in General Engineering in 1957, and he was graduated at the age of 63. Dad continued as an employee of the University as a member of the faculty. He was very proud of having been accepted as a member of the LKOT. Father retired in 1964, at the age of 70 and died 7 April 1969. Dr. Jack D. Whitfield, BS AeroE 1954, was President of Sverdrup Corporation, a large international engineering consulting firm, and served on the Board of Visitors of the College of Engineering. Jack’s wife, Marcheta, wrote in response to our inquiry, about the wife’s perspective of his school days and career: Jack was born to Ethel and Lloyd Whitfield in Paoli, OK and graduated from Paoli High School in 1946. By the time he was twelve, he knew that he wanted to be an Aeronautical Engineer. In high school, he convinced the School Superintendent and the Paoli School Board to offer a class in Preflight Aeronautics. He then got several of his friends to enroll in it. C-47


We dated in high school (I was in the class behind him) and I can clearly remember when he told that his dream was to help man reach the moon. I turned to him when Neil Armstrong took that giant step on the moon in 1969 and said ‘you had better find a new dream.’ He entered the Army in August 1946 for 18 months in order to get the G.I.Bill to help him pursue his education. He entered Ada College late in the second semester 1948, and started to the University of Oklahoma in September 1948. He lived with his second cousin, Howard Pruitt, on College Street. The University had a rule that all freshmen had to live in dorms on the campus, but found that they had to bend it with the returning veterans. He told them he'd already gone through that in service. We were married September 11, 1949, at the First Baptist Church, Norman. I was working as County Extension Clerk at the County Agent's Office. Our first purchase was a bike for Jack to ride to classes on the North Base. With the G.I.Bill, and a working wife, we were soon able to buy our first car. Lots of the married couples lived in prefab housing, but we were lucky to rent a one bedroom house belonging to my boss, Ed Chambers, at 512 1/2 South University Blvd. Our entertainment was OU football and basketball. Jack carried a full load and worked part time at Burk's Service Station on Highway 77. Even so, he made me proud by being on the honor roll. He was a member of IAS (now AIAA), Tau Omega, and Tau Beta Pi. A homecoming float that he helped the IAS build reinforced his dream. It was a rocket carrying the caption ‘To the Moon or Bust.' His favorite teacher was Professor Comp, whose able direction helped prepare young engineering students with the skills and incentives for the part they were to play in a world of advancing technology that would indeed take man to the moon, not to mention all the wonderful by-products. When Jack left the University in May 1951, he had completed all of his work in less than four years except an Electrical Engineering course that he was carrying by correspondence. The G.I. Bill had run out and there wasn’t enough income to stay in Norman. His first job was in east Texas with Convair as a wind tunnel engineer. In March 1954, he joined ARO, Inc., a subsidiary of Sverdrup and Parcel, who had designed the AEDC complex and supervised construction in 1951. ARO, Inc. was the operating contractor for the US Air Force’s Arnold Engineering Development Center, the worlds largest complex of wind tunnels, engine test cells, rocket test C-48


cells, and space chambers. This Center is located in Tullahoma, Tennessee, and his new job enabled Jack to not only pursue his life long dream of testing space vehicles, but to continue his education. He earned his MS in Engineering in 1960 from the University of Tennessee and a Doctor of Science degree in 1972 from the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. After many advances in technical and senior management, Jack became President of ARO, Inc in 1981. The name was changed to Sverdrup Technology, Inc. and the role of the company was greatly expanded, incorporating engineering design and consulting services as well as serving as an operating contractor for other Government aerospace facilities. In 1989, Jack was made President of the parent Sverdrup Corporation, headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Hudy C. Hewitt, Jr., BSME 1960, was serving as Mechanical Engineering Department Head at the University of New Orleans. Hudy earned his MSME from Ohio State, and then served a tour as a Naval Officer before earning his PhD from Oklahoma State. He served a number of years as a faculty member and department head at Tennessee Technological University before moving to New Orleans. He has been a national officer (including a tour as President) of Pi Tau Sigma. Excerpts from his letter are as follows: In the laboratories, I remember tests on the CFR engine to evaluate knock, and using the mechanical engine indicator on the Corliss steam engine. Oklahoma was one of the few universities to have both Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Tau. I was a member of both. They have since combined into one honor society, Tau Beta Pi. Your scholarship program was probably the only way I could have gone to school. I feel it deserves special mention. I received the President’s Scholarship and the Hughes Tool Company Scholarship. I hope these programs are still continuing. Author’s note: Hudy worked as a house boy for President and Mrs. Cross to earn expenses while in school. They were very fond of Hudy and asked about him each time that I saw them. I always felt that Professors Dawson, Love, Turkington, and Floyd Calvert were excellent. They did a good job of preparing us for the future. Pi Tau Sigma always had a Rube Goldberg project for Engineering Week. We had a loop that shot a rocket to a target (the moon) in 1959. It attracted a lot of attention with balloons popping, ball rolling, and rockets firing. C-49


C. Lawrence Vache, BSME 1959, spent his career as an Aerospace Engineer and Technical Manager for the U.S. Air Force at Tinker Field, and retired after over 30 years of service. Some of his memories are related as follows: As I look back 35 years for some recollections, I remember the circumstances of my coming to OU. I was discharged from the Navy about three days before classes started, and I missed all of the freshman orientation and information on how to get around on campus. Fortunately, my adviser was Harold Bone, who took me under his wing. Harold was originally from my home town of Temple, OK. Although I didn't know Harold at the time, I did know his brother Don, and his parents, very well. Being a Korean veteran, I was housed in Cleveland House in Wilson Center. All the students in that house were Korean veterans, which gave us considerable things in common. Being on the G.I. Bill and most of us paying our own way, resulted in us not having any extra money. Our largest spectator sport was watching freshman girls trying to learn to smoke in the Women's Quadrangle Cafeteria (Cleveland House students ate their meals there). Another event that I recall, involved Dr. Paul Cushman. He was not a young man during my time on the campus, but he kept us amused in his Heat Power and Design Engineering courses with his escapades as a square dancer. He traveled all around the state and country square dancing. Dr. William H. McCumber, Jr., BSEE 1960, later earned a PhD and living in Hong Kong at the time, wrote his recollections: I was particularly fortunate to obtain employment at WNAD, which in 1957 occupied facilities in the south end of the Memorial Union Building. Mathematics was taught in the adjacent building (Buchanan Hall) and engineering subjects were taught across the street in Felgar Hall and the Engineering Annex. Two veterans, (George A. Morris, MSEE 1961, and myself, BSEE 1960) and three regular students, (Lynn A. Murrell, BSEE 1960, Harold Russel, BSEE 1959, and Neville Edenborough, BSEE 1961) shared four jobs at WNAD and KETA-TV. The location was ideal, since we five could arrange our work schedules around our class schedules (with kind consideration of benevolent management) and hand over console operator duties during the ten minutes between classes. As WNAD employees, then we were University employees, we were allowed pre-enrolment to be certain of getting the classes which fit our interlocking schedules (State Senator Gaylon Stacy was a staff announcer, and Jack Ogle, long time anchor at WKY, was chief announcer at WNAD then).

C-50


Veterans studied together. The GI Bill was just enough to be too little, so we all worked at outside jobs to supplement the GI Bill stipend. Our study group formed as juniors (more or less, most of us were taking classes at three levels every semester). The group consisted of Lorenzo P. Morata, Navy veteran, now a highly placed executive at McDonnell-Douglas, the late Donald K. Whelchel, USAF veteran and the father of actress Lisa Whelchel, active duty USAF Major Charles Centers and Don Gallop, USAF veteran. Veterans returned from service during the Korean conflict with a maturity beyond our years. College life, greek shenanigans, honor societies, and the like were subordinated to the driving goal to complete our degrees, get out and earn a living. One semester, I worked 54 hours a week and carried 18 semester hours. It nearly killed me, but I finished in three years. Of our group Gallop graduated with honors, Morata and Whelchel were active in honor societies, Centers and I graduated with C+ averages. Most of us used amphetamines to keep going at one time or other. Those were years of transition in Electrical Engineering. Pragmatism was being replaced by abstract theory and there was a clear division in the Electrical Engineering Faculty. The older professors were giving pragmatic lectures which bore no relationship to the textbooks chosen for the courses. I am sure some of the professors never opened the required texts at all. Somehow, the young Turk graduate students who taught the elementary engineering courses were the dominant influence in the selection of the texts. It was both a curse and a blessing. Those who survived had to learn on two levels. Veterans had the advantage of knowing the pragmatics of engineering because most of worked as technicians in the military, but struggled with the then new set theoretical concepts. Whatever the reason, the EE graduates of OU came to the work force better prepared than most. We worked along side graduates from Carnegie, Georgia Tech, and USC, and found ourselves much better prepared than they. My most memorable engineering professor was Professor Gerald Tuma. His constant good humor and compassion as Chairman of the EE Department was a beacon of encouragement. It was in his class, EE 202, that I first felt I was actually going to make it! Most influential was Professor Arthur Bernhardt of the Mathematics Department. Dr. Bernhart taught advanced mathematics with a marvelous subtlety. Many students and some of his peers never did grasp the beauty of his methods. He told seemingly irrelevant stories, and then assigned homework. Today, thirty years later, I recall Bernhart’s stories and the mathematics they illustrated. Bernhart also had the concept that one was in differential equations (for example) to learn the methods for solving differential equations and should not be burdened by solving C-51


tedious integrals. ‘Your kid brother taking Integral Calculus can always be consulted,’ he said, and wrote out the integrals we needed. Many of the techniques he taught were later rediscovered (by me) in the Operational Calculus. I will eternally be indebted to the Oklahoma University College of Engineering for starting me on a wonderful life. Because of OU, I have designed rocket guidance systems, played multiple roles in putting man on the moon, developed concepts for utilization of space technology, designed and evaluated solar energy systems, developed methods for extracting information from LANDSAT imagery, evaluated and recommended energy conservation methods for a cross section of American industry, designed secure military applications for the space shuttle, developed and taught classes in Systems Engineering from Japan to New Zealand, and The Philippines to Sri Lanka.

C-52


Excerpts from Alumni letters (1960-1970) From Richard Goodard, March 8, 1989, Midland, TX: I have no specific input other than to say that when I graduated in the early 60s, the labs were a very effective teaching tool that helped me move into industry more smoothly because of the type of work that we did in our labs. At that time, we had a cement lab, a mud lab, and a couple of natural gas labs. As we have discussed, I think this is one of the things that the University has to do to continue to move forward in teaching excellence. Obviously, the move to the Energy Center and the Digital Data Acquisition Project will allow more of that to be done. As I look back at Felgar Hall in the early 60s, the quality and technical depth of the problems that we worked and the emphasis on that work amazes me. Somehow, I think that is an integral part of the history of the College, and I recommend that it be included. Sincerely, Dick Goodard Author’s Note: The “Digital Data Acquisition Project”, that Dick, a PE graduate, and an Engineering Supervisor for Exxon at the time refers to, was a project to provide for digital data acquisition equipment and graduate student assistants to install and initiate a program to use the systems in each of the labs of the Schools in the College. This project was funded by large grant from Exxon obtained as a result of a proposal prepared and submitted by Interim Dean Tom Love during 1986-1987. From Ralph R. Hall, March 25, 1989, Morristown, NJ: I’ve traveled all over the world several times since graduating from OU in 1964. My job now in my 22nd year with Exxon Engineering is in a computer oriented area of libe oil processing. Therefore, I am resting up a bit from my travels. I have also made progress in learning far more about computers since my lowly one course in FORTRAN at OU. My biggest year at The University of Oklahoma was 1963. It was not like I slept the other three at all. However, that year, I was into seemingly everything, yet I achieved the highest grade point of my college career. I just displayed my Knight of St. Pat document beside my office door this last St. Patty’s Day. I largely earned my Knighthood in 1963. I was Chemical Engineering Chairman of the Engineers’ open house...And show we did. I came up with two contraptions to thrill our visitors. Another Chem. E. C-53


built a model of a chemical plant. Our lab itself also had some interesting things like heat exchangers, distillation columns, and the like already built in. One of my goodies was a volcano. I made it out of paper mache and colored it. About every 15 to 30 minutes, it went off (manually). I believe the magic ingredients to make the smoke and fire were glycerin and potassium permanganate. One of my endeavors that year was the Chair of the Engine Show. The engineers ran the stage and the lights. After recruiting talent from the various sororities and fraternities around the University, fortunately, an engineer, who had done most of the stage work the year before, came in and volunteered to run the stage and the lights. Recruiting of talent was also no problem. Women from various sororities would come by to volunteer acts. That same year, I ran for the Student Senate, and won. I was also still working. Woodrow Wilson Center used my talent as a bus boy and washer boy. I worked for Mrs. Bumgarner. She is the lady that raised James Garner. James deleted the ‘Bum’ from his name to pursue fame in Hollywood. The next year in addition to my NDSL loan, I also acquired a couple of scholarships. I didn’t have to work that year. Very truly yours, Ralph Hall From Wilfred E. Ziegler, Williamstown, NJ, February 14, 1989: I began my studies at the University in the fall of 1968. I concluded with a degree in Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science in May 1970. Following graduation, I began work with the Union Carbide Corporation, Metals Division, Marietta, Ohio. In 1979, I accepted my present position as Superintendent, Electric Smelting/Physical Processing with Shieldalloy Metallurgical Corporation., Newfield, NJ. When, I attended the University, I was married with one child. A second child was born to us on October 31, 1968. I supported the family by participating in the U.S. Air Force Reserves, serving as a navigator crew member at Tinker Air Force Base. Most week ends, and virtually all school breaks and vacations, were spent away from home in, that capacity, trying to provide enough income to sustain life and home for the family. I was also able to acquire a position at the University working, for a major portion of my senior year as a laboratory assistant in the department of Metallurgy and Material Science. In that capacity, I worked for Dr. Craig Jerner. Between the Air Force Reserve, working for the department, a grant from

C-54


the ASME chapter at Tulsa (which I am sure that Dr. Jerner had some influence in steering my way), and a very understanding first National Bank of Norman, I was able to finish my studies. Sincerely, Wilfred E. Ziegler From Dennis A. Casazza, BSEE, 1964, Middletown, NJ, March 12, 1989: All of my EE classes were in the old engineering building, the lab building across the street from the Student Union...close to coffee!! The new engineering building was not yet built. Recollection #1 I am not sure of the year, it may have been 1962 or 1963, however it had to do with the large water tower sphere which was just completed and left unpainted. My transistor lab team had just completed a circuit analysis problem, which was to be bread-boarded and tested. In our attempt to verify our calculations, i.e. voltage levels, currents, etc. we could not reproduce our calculated results. We reviewed, our instructor confirmed we were correct, but still the lab results were way off. HAVE YOU GUESSED THE PROBLEM YET? That’s right, the unpainted water tower was inducing an EMF voltage in the lab room.—We guessed from an OG&E transmission line close by. The tower was painted, and the lab shielded. After that everything was OK! Recollection #2 It was 1963/64; we were in the motor lab trying to cable configure some type of motor. When we threw the power ON, POW! We blew the feeder breakers to the engineering building. I’ll never forget Professor Tuma running into the lab shouting, ‘…what did you do! … you’re seniors; you are supposed to know better!’ We found out shortly the main Feed Breakers to the campus were also blown. At that point we were sure graduation was a figure of our imagination! P.S. We graduated! Sincerely, Dennis A. Casazza From Richard (Dick) Ollila, BS AERO E. 1964, Columbus, Ohio, May 10, 1989: I still remember Ed Blick and you, Tom Love, teaching us the mathematical modeling of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and boundary layer flow. In this day and age, it is always good for a chuckle to tell people that I paid $7.00 per credit hour to attend OU. Sincerely, Richard G. Ollila C-55


Author’s Note: Dick was Associate Program Manager, Technical Inputs to Planning Program, for Battelle Institute in Columbus at the time that he wrote this letter. He had earned an MBA from Ohio University in 1986. He writes that, in his work, he had conducted aeronautical research and systems studies on reentry vehicles, tethered balloons, and, unique and novel flying vehicles. From Stephen (Pat) Condon, Tullahoma, TN, July 26, 1989: I grew up in Atchison, Kansas, a small town less than an hour’s drive from the University of Kansas. I had decided in high school that I was going to college when I graduated and thought that I wanted to major in engineering, (although, in retrospect, I didn’t have the faintest idea of what engineering was all about). My father was an automobile mechanic, so I had grown up with an interest in things mechanical and with a curiosity about how things worked and why. I suppose that led me toward engineering. One of my class mates in high school had a brother attending OU at the time, and that was where he planned to go. He also wanted to be an engineer, and when he found out that I was looking for a place a little farther than KU from home, he suggested that I accompany him to OU. I came to OU rather ill prepared to major in engineering. The high school from which I graduated was a prep school for a liberal arts college there in Atchison, and had a fairly weak program in math and science. In fact, at the time, chemistry was not even offered. I spent the first semester at OU catching up on math and the second semester getting introduced to chemistry. In spite of the slow start, I came up to speed reasonably well and finished the first year with just above a 3 point average. It is perhaps appropriate at this point to address finances. My family did not have the funds to send me to college. In fact, I was probably one of the very few students, who during college, sent money home to their parents. Anyway, I had been able to work a little before going to college but still did not have enough money to finance that first year...the thing that enabled me to go to OU was the National Defense Loan programs. In order to bolster my college fund, I decided that I needed to work while in school. I had been a student manager in all of our student athletic programs and so went to Dewey ‘Snorter’ Luster in OU’s intramural department to see if I could find work there. He told me that he did not have anything, but recommended that I try to get a job as counselor in University housing...it turned out that they did not have anything for freshmen, but a year and a half later, Snorter was instrumental in getting me hired as a counselor. In the meantime, I got a job working about 20 hours a week in the Cross Center cafeteria at 65 cents per hour. The money was not great, but it did allow me to take care of incidental expenses C-56


and transportation without dipping into the funds set aside for the major college expenses. I was fortunate in being able to get a good job in during the summers Atchison, in fact, my financial situation improved to the point that I was able to turn back $500 of the additional NDSL loan that I had secured for my sophomore year. In my sophomore year, I was also able to get a job as counselor in the men’s housing area…A job that I kept until I graduated. I feel that my years at OU represented a period of significant growth for me. I certainly grew academically, but I also grew socially and spiritually. I was an active participant in Wesley Foundation, the campus center of activity for the Methodist Church...It was through the Wesley foundation that I met Judy Smotherman, later to become my wife. In fact, we were married in the Wesley Foundation Chapel, the year after I graduated. My five years at OU (my slow start, limitations on hours per semester imposed by my job with the University Housing, and two years AFROTC, which did not apply to a degree, made it virtually impossible for me to complete my degree requirements in four) were very enjoyable ones for me. I don’t know that I would to go back and repeat that experience, but still it’s one, on which I reflect back with good memories, Norman was a friendly town, and members of the engineering and other faculty were quite helpful to me. Sincerely, Pat Condon, BSME 1964 Author’s Note: Pat Condon was, at the time, a Colonel in the United States Air Force, and Commander of the Arnold Engineering Development Center. He later retired as a Major General. From Phil Lohmann, Norman, OK, March 22, 1989: I graduated in May, 1962 with a BS degree in Industrial Management Engineering. However, I went to work as a petroleum engineer immediately after graduation and hve enjoyed the high regard within which Oklahoma University graduates are held within the petroleum industry. Instructors such as Dr. Preston Moore and Dr. John Campbell took the arts of drilling and reservoir analysis to a science. An unforgettable experience, which happened 30 years ago, was my first encounter with Professor Harp. Prof. Harp taught various electrical engineering courses. C-57


[I] enrolled in his EE 101 class in the fall semester. In our first lecture session, Prof. Harp walked onto the auditorium stage before eighty-five (85) students, including myself, introduced himself, and then asked, ‘Is Phil Lohmann in this class?’ I responded, ‘Yes’ and he asked me to rise. He informed me that no football player had ever received a passing grade in any of his classes and I would not be the first. He suggested that I save myself from getting an ‘F’ and arrange to take the course from another instructor. He dismissed me and asked me to leave the lecture. I realized this was an extreme case of ‘jock back lash.’ Many instructors felt then, as now, that student-athletes were given special treatment by some instructors. For two (2) weeks I studied EE 101 like it was the only course that I was taking. I took the first exam and felt like I had done well. The following lecture session, Prof. Harp walked into class and asked me to stand. He asked if I remembered what he had told me during the first lecture session. I said that I did. He then informed me that I had a ‘zero’ on the test. I could not believe I hadn’t at least passed the test. But a Zero!!! After a moment Prof. Harp laughed and informed me there was a ten (10) in front of my zero. I had made the only 100 on the test and the nearest score was 85. I have never appreciated my education more than at that moment, while my fellow students, and Prof. Harp gave me a standing ovation. I received an ‘A’ in Prof. Harp’s EE101. Prof. Harp had overcome his prejudice, my fellow students liked the idea that, I had to meet the same standards as they did, and I felt studentathletes were indeed fortunate to be able to enjoy both the academic and athletic sides of university life. Sincerely, Phil Lohmann Author’s Note: At the time, Phil was a Petroleum Consultant; his firm is Lohmann & Associates From Ronald A. Campbell, BSME 1961, Houston, TX April 10, 1989 (Compressor Controls Corporation): In your history of our college, please do not forget the PHT degree given to those wives which helped us struggling engineering students. Coming from a small town in Oklahoma (Perry), I needed all the financial help possible. Since money was not available for a fraternity, I joined the Tri Delta sorority house boy crew. Working and living in the sorority house was quite an experience for an eighteen year old. After working for two years for the Tri-Delta’s, getting married helped provide incentive to stay in school and get that BSME. The University Press provided employment for my wife and being able to work in the engineering department grading papers provided added income for me. It was C-58


really nice that the University many ways for a student to earn money and work their way through. Sincerely yours, Ron Campbell From Dr. Firouz Shahrokhi, BSME 1961, PhD 1966 (Professor, The University of Tennessee Space Institute): I first came to The University of Oklahoma in June of 1959. After graduating in 1961, and a year of experience at Boeing in Seattle, Washington, I found out very soon, that I did not have all the answers, as I had convinced myself that I did after the BS degree. I applied back again for the graduate program. My learning experience with Professor Sims is unforgettable. He and Mrs. Sims were my leaders, mentors, close friends, etc. Throughout life one can only (the lucky ones) name 3-4 persons who have had an impact on their life. I am 50 years old and can name four, two of which were from OU, namely Professors Ellis Sims and Tom Love. I learned a lot from Professor Sims, not just academic but life in general. He and his wife were with me in the waiting room when my first child was born in 1964. Being in the education business myself, I have seen thousands of educators, but to me these two are the absolute model of a perfect educator. The experience with Professor Sims was on ‘Investigation of Eddy Current Techniques in Analyzing Aircraft Structures’ sponsored by the United States Air Force. Working with Professor Tom Love, the dissertation project entitled ‘New Concept of Flame Weapons,’ was sponsored by the United States Army. The university should be more than curriculum and text books. It is the job of educators to help the students with their growth . The OU College of Engineering certainly provided that for me. Best Regards, F. Shahrokhi Professor and Director

C-59


Index


5XW, see WNAD A Abbott, Lyman 21-22 Abernathy, Jack 96 Adams, Roy 168 Adams, Ryan 163 Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology, ABET 92, 192, B-25 Aeronautical Engineer(ing) 63, 69-70, 94, 119, 159, 196 Aeronautical Engineering Building 158, 175 Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Advisory Committee 136 Aerospace Engineering Laboratory 153, 188 Aerospace Research Center 181, 183 Alberts, Jack 186 Albright, Myrna 163 Albright, Lyle 156, 162, B-22 Aldag, Arthur William B-35 Alden, Dick 158 Alden, Verne 33, 34, 35, 51 Aldrich, Weldon Wayne B-37 Alexander, Lloyd G. B-22 Alexander, S. N. 194 Allen, Carolyn Marie B-24 Almquist, Carl Tage B-3, B-7, B-13, B-23, B-38, B-39, C-10 Alpha Chi 130 Alpha Chi Omega 94, 188 Alpha Chi Sigma 55 Alpha Delta Pi 192 Alpha Gamma Delta 165 Alpha Phi 74, 153, 180, 187 Alpha Sigma Epsilon 992 Alternative fuels 128 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, or AIAA 189 American Institute of Chemical Engineers, or AICHE 189 Air Force 150, 159, 164, 165

Air Force ROTC 189 Aitkenhead, William 29, 37, B-1 Ambrosius, Edgar Elmer B-8, B-14 American Institute of Electrical Engineers, or AIEE 14, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 72, 83, C-10 American Meteorological Society 185 American Society of Civil Engineers, or ASCE 72,83, 84, 189, 196 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, or ASME 47, 55, 72, 83, 124, 146, 189, 195 Amos, S. E. 3 Anderson, William Carlisle B-18 Annable, W. Grant 71 American Nuclear Society, or ANS 189 Anthony, Clarence W. 80, 84 Appl, Frank B-32 Applegate, Mary Nell 158, 161 Architectural Club 47 Architecture 121, 123, 151, 157, 162, 165, 173, 175, 184, 185, 195 Architectural Engineering 63, 71, 73, 92, 93, 106, 112, 123, 151, A-6, A-16, A-17, A-18, A-19, A-36, A-37, A-72, A-73, B-6, B-10, B-19-20, B-31-32, C-20 Army 48-49, 83, 114-115, 135, 172 Army Air Corps 84 Army Enlisted Reserve Corp 115, 129 Army Reserve 114, 115, 127 Army ROTC 49, 101, 109, 111, 126, 150, 170-171, 187, C-11, C-22, C-24 Army Specialized Training Program, ASTP 115, 117, 128, 130, C-26 Arnold, David Elmore B-21, B-32 Ashbury, Tom 51 Askew, Dick 132, 133, 134, 135 Assenzo, Robert B-23, B-36 Association of Collegiate Engineers 77 Asp, Henry 11-13 Atkins, Clint 158


Augman, Dean 162 Austin, Lloyd C-44 Avery, Bert 194, 195, B-35 Aycock, Susan 97, 98, 158, C-17-18 B Badger, William 139 Baldwin, Ann 167 Ballard, Jim 139 Balyeat, Roy 51, 54, C-4 Bane, Gene 158 Banks, Charles H. B-38, B-45 Barberii, Nancy 131 Barbero, Robert 136 Barnes, Stanley Louis B-37, B-42, B-46 Barnes, William P. B-15 Bare, Charles 160 Barefoot, Betty 129 Bartholomew, Earl 72 Bartlett, Dewey F. 171, 194, 197 Bates, Eldred Donor 160 Bathe, Eugene 66-67, 83, B-4 Baue, Barbara Jean 158 Bauman, Richard Dennis B-38 Baxter, John 69 Beaird, Ted 67 Beal, Charlie 140 Beard contest 160, 161, 162, 163, 186, 188, 190, 192 Beck, Hilding Vincent B-8 Bednar, William Carr B-9, B-17, B-27, C-23 Bell, Ervin Joseph B-33 Bellmon, Henry 189 Benischek, Howard William B-18, B-28 Bennett, Jim 42 Berelgen, Hulusi 129 Bergholt, Ed “Oz” 131 Bergman, Heinrich W. B-27, B-30, B-36, B-42, B-43, B-44 Bert, Charles W. B-30, B-31

Beta Theta Pi 30 Biesele, Rudolf Leopold B-24 Bikel, Mike 186 Billen, Buddy 191 Bingham, Irwin F. B-9 Binckley, E. I. C-22 Binckley, Frank 125 Binkley, George 136 Bird, Fred 129 Bishop, Kenneth B-23 Bizzell, William Bennett 61-62, 78, 80, 88, 89, 90, 94, 95, 101, 106, 109, 111, 112, 119 Black, Judy 168 Blackwell, Sam 124 Blick, Ed 148, B-20, B-30, B-31, B-45 Block, George 130 Block, Robert B-35 Bohr, Niels 100 Bollinger, Bill 96 Bollinger, Ralph 96 Bolton, Don 131 Bond, Irene 138 Bond, Reford 126 Bone, Harold 101, B-9, B-18, B-24, B-26, B-30, B-31, B-45, C-22 Booker, Ray B-46 Booth, Ann 167 Boren, David L. 176 Borden, John 160 Bourne, Laurie 189-190 Box, Maurice 165 Boyd, David Ross v, 2-3, 7, 11-13, 15, 21-23, 24, 25-26 Boyd, Tom 129 Bozell, Harold Veach 25, 28, 30, 3132, 37, 41, 47, B-1, C-5 Bradley, James E. 165 Brandt, Joseph A. 112-117, B-12 Brady, James B-20, B-21, B-32, B-33 Brasel, Eva 167 Bray, Fred 188 Brigham, William Everett B-22


Bright, Glenn O. B-42 Brookes, John F. 91, 162, 163, B-1, B-3, B-7, B-12, B-36, C-11 Brooks, Stratton Duluth 36, 39, 42, 43, 45, 49, 53, 57, 60, 74-77, 124, 134, C-1, C-4 Brown, Horace 145 Brown, Wallace L. 159 Bruce, Sharon 190 Buchanan, James S. 60-61, 65 Buckingham, Al 165-166 Bullen, Charles Victor B-3, B-7 Burchett, Olden Lee B-27 Burcik, Emil B-17, B-28 Burgett, William S. B-11, B-20, B-21, B-32, B-32, B-33 Burke, Joe 153 Burks, Bill M. 181 Burns, Chester 79 Burton, Fred B-28 Burton, Lee B-23 Burwell, James Robert B-42 Butler, Sharon 167 Buttram, Frank 87 Byrd, Dale Claude B-33 Byrd, Norman B-21, B-32 Byrne, W. E. 54 C Cagle, Bill 158 Cain, Dwight C. 107 Calculators 154, 179 Caldwell, Hazlett B. 51, 54 Calhoun, John C. Jr. B-17, B-18, B-28 Carney, John Bryan B-27 Calvert, Floyd Olan B-26, B-30, B-34 Cameron, Miller A. C-29 Cameron, Murdo B-5, B-10 Campbell, Frank Roger B-9 Campbell, John 163, B-12, B-28, B41, B-42, C-39 Campbell, Nancy 195 Campbell, Ron C-58

Canfield, Frank B. B-34, B-35 Cannon Club, see also Loyal Knights of Old Trusty 75, 78 Carey, Charles Edward 43, 48, 53 Carpenter, Murel Edward 54 Carrizales, Luis 167 Carson Engineering Center 172, 175, 181, 182, 184 Carson, William Henry 68-69, 89, 91, 104, 107, 108, 109, 112, 121, 124, 129, 135, 145, 146, 162, 167, 172, 181, 184, 185, 190, B-4, B-6, B-7, B-9, B-10, B-14, B-17, B-18, B-26, B-28, B-30, B-31, B-41, B-42, B-43 Casazza, Dennis C-55 Case, Clinton D. 70, B-4, B-7 Casteel, Ed 163 Casteel, Bill 159 Casteel, Glynne 83 Caswell, Bob 138 Cate, JoAnn 163 Caudill, Charles 150 CE Club 54 Challenner, Ansell 66-67, 83 Chapman, Alfreda 126 Chapelle, Rene A. B-40 Chappell, Frank William 28, 30, 35 Chatnever, Alfred B-17, B-18, B-28 Chemical Engineer(ing) 70, 73, 78, 118, 119, 120, 121, 123, 140, 146-147, 174, 175 Chemical Engineering Society 47 Chemistry Club 47, 55 Cherry, Lawrence 106, 108 Chestnut, Neva Rae 158 Chi Omega 132, 136, 163, 180, 185, 186, 192 Childers, Harry F. 82-83, C-7 Childs, Morris 131 Chiles, W. Dean B-41 Chiles, Eddie Harrel 96, 161-162 Christensen, James H. B-35 Chuang, Kuen Po B-37


Chuck, Frank 136 Church, Robert B-13 Civil Engineering and Environmental Science Visiting Council, School of 133 Civil Engineering 8-9, 13, 14, 17, 22, 24, 25, 32, 35, 46, 49, 65, 73, 74, 92, 93, 121, 123, 127, 136, 151, 156, 162, 167, 174, 175, 178, 184, 185, 186, A-3, A-4, A-8, A-21, A-22, A-23, A-24, A-39, A-40, A-41, A-42, A-76, A-77, A-78, A-79, B-1, B-3, B-7, B-11-12, B-22, B-34-37 Civil Engineering Society 47, 54 Civilian Pilot Training Program 108, 111 Clark, Bob 132 Clark, Ginny 187 Clark, Joe B. Jr. C-30 Clark, Norman 124 Clark, Randall 44 Clay, Dorothy 161, 163 Close, George Manning B-27 Cloud, Wilbur Frank 71, B-28, B-41 Cobb, Jim 138, 139 Coe, Jack 131 Coffman, John 78 Cole, Elizabeth 139 Cole, Frank 148 Cole, L. W. 22 Cole, Smokey 131 College of Engineering Board of Advisors 122, 132 College of Engineering Board of Visitors 112, 124, 126, 127, 131, 133, 155, 156, 158, 165 College of Engineering Bulletin v, 122 College of Engineering Distinguished Graduate Society 96, 112, 124, 126, 127, 132, 156, 162 College of Engineering Hall of Fame 195 Collier, Gertrude Sally 81-82, 84-85,

C-13-16 Colver, Charles P. 195, B-34, B-35 communism 89, 142 Comp, Laverne A. (L. A.) 72, 80, 83, 99, 104, 106, 108, 129, 159, B-5, B-8, B-15, B-16, B-20, B-30, C-21 Company E 48 Compton, A. H. 95 computers 144-145, 147, 154-155, 168-169, 171, 179, 180, 184, 189 Concanower, Bob 135 Condon, Pat 186-187, C-56 Constantinides, Christos T. B-39 Cook, Elizabeth “Cookie” 126, 130 Copland, George 139 Copland, Mary Coffman C31 Cory, William “Bill” 72, 83, B-16, B-27, B-36, B-40 Cosagarea, Andrew B-22, B-34, B-43, B-45 Costello, James F. B-38 Council, Bill Eugene B-15 Court, Arnold B-46 Crabbe, Leroy B-7 Crabtree, Donald B-31 Cralle, Stratton 124, C-23 Cralle, Walter 136 Craig, Bobby Jean 136 Crane, Bob 105 Creech, Merl D. 72, 84, B-1, B-27 Creson, Sherm 159 Crisjohn, Warren 128 Cromer, Sylvan B-8 Cronenwett, William T. B-39 Croom, Freda 133 Crosbie, Al 186-187 Cross, George viii, 21-22, 24, 113, 116-117, 118, 132, 145, 146-147, 167, 172, 175, 178, 184, 192, 197 Crosser, Orrin B-22, B-34, B-35 Crowley, Marion 131 Cruce, Lee Governor 33 Crynes, Billy v, vii


Cullen, Karen 180 Cummings, Doug 153 Curran, Jim 161 Cushman, Paul A. B-16, B-26 Curtis, Lloyd Burgess 30-31, 51 D Daniel, Robert G. 164 Daniels, Raymond D. B-29, B-34, B-35, B-44, B-45 Danner, Ronald F. 56 Davenport, Eldon 125 Davenport, Paula 162 Davies, A. G. 97 Davis, Everett Stirling 47, B-5 Davis, George A. 100 Davis, James Christopher 100, B-2, B-5, B-8 Davis, Theodore King B-5, B-10, B-18 Davis, Wayne B-23 Davis, William F. B-13 Dawson, Eugene Fields vii, 89, 154, B-4, B-7, B-15,B-25, B-30, B-31, C-11 Dawson, Frank Robert B-23 Day, Dick 163 DeBarr, Edwin C. 3-4, 6, 7, 15, 24, 32, 37, 39, 120, B-2, B-4, C-7 Dedo, Homer H. B-4, B-8 DeGolyer, E. L. 124 Delta Delta Delta 74, 106, 130, 139, 188 Delta Gamma 94, 101, 168, 184, 188, 190 Delta Theta Phi 188 Dempsey, Gordon 136 Denner, Richard 150 Devine, Michael D. B-41 DiCastri, John Albert B-11 Dickinson, Ernest 140 Dietrich, Lavoys Evans B-19, B-25, B-40 Diffendanffer, Joseph Alexander 72 Dillon, Robert Leroy B-21, B-32

Dinkins, Merle C-34 Dodd, Charles G. B-28, B-29, B-34, B-41, B-43, B-45 Dodge, Homer Levi 70, 92, 113, B-6 Dolan, Theresa, see Reinhardt, Theresa Dolph, George 51 Donaldson, John B. 55 Doner, Otto Jr. 136 Donnell, John Washington B-7, B-9, B-12, B-17 Doremus, R. C. 155 Dougherty, Clifford 165 Dudley, Wray 124 Dragoo, Raymond Chester B-33 Duchon, Claude E. B-46 Duffy, Dorthy 137 Duffy, Jack 180 Dulaney, Richard 126 Dumas, William Albert B-18, B-24, B-32, B-47 Duncan, Jerry 167 Dunlap, E. T. 193, 194 Dunlop, Donald D. B-42 Durukal, Abdurraham 125 Dwight, Herbert Bancroft 25, 28, 30, 31, 34, 37, 39, B-2 E Eaton, George Jr. 137 Eckart, Bob 125, C-23 Eddy, G. Amos B-46 Edison Club, see Newton Club Edmondson, J. Howard 184 Egermeier, R. P. 139 Egle, Davis M. B-31, B-32 Eidelman, Violeta 158 Elarth, Herschel B-6, B-11 Elder, Frederick Stanton 6, 7, 8, 13-14, 15 Elderkin, Judy 188 Electrical Engineering 14, 24, 32, 39, 46, 49, 65-66, 67, 73, 74, 77, 92, 93, 98, 108, 121, 123, 127, 150, 151, 156-


157, 159, 161, 164, 165, 168, 174, 175, 178, 185, A-1, A-2, A-9, A-25, A-4243, A-79-80, B-1, B-3, B-7, B-12-13, B-22-23, B-37-38, C-3, C-10-11 Electrical Engineering Laboratory 66 Elkins, Jack 125 Elkins, Lincoln F. B-42 Elliott, Cecil Dean B-11 Elliott, David M. B-31 Ellis, Barbara 190 Elms, Richard 160 Enchiladas, The 48 Engineering Building, see also Felgar Hall 58, 62, 78, 79, 80, 135, 136, 138 Engineering College Bulletin, see College of Engineering Bulletin Engineering Corps. Co. A Oklahoma National Guard 40 Engineering Drawing 47, 133, 153, 179, B-2, B-5, B-9-10, B-17, B-23 Engineering Laboratory Building 29, 67, 119, C-20 Engineering Library 29, 62 Engineering Physics 63, 70-71, 73, 74, 92, 93, 121, 123, 151, 165, 174, 189, A-10, A-26, A-43, A-44, A-83, A-84, B-6, B-13, B-23-24, B-41-42 Engineering Placement Services 46, 172, 190 Engineering Ball 50, 77, 78, 80, 94, 96, 99, 100, 101, 104, 124, 133, 136, 155-156, 160-161, 162, 165, 168, 180, 184, 186, 188, 189, 192, 193, 195, C-14 Engineering Banquet 46, 50, 51, 56, 74, 77, 78, 79, 95, 97, 99, 100, 101, 104, 106, 109, 133, 138, 156, 161, 162, 163, 165, 167, 168, 180-181, 184, 186, 191, 193, 195, C-4 Engineers’ Club viii, 29, 35, 42, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 63, 72, 78, 79, 83, 91, 95, 96, 98, 100, 104, 109, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130, 132, 133, 134, 136,

139, 155, 160-161, 181, 184, 186, 189, 192-193, 194, 196, C-23, C-24 Engineer’s Council for Professional Development 92, 192 Engineers’ Enlisted Reserve 48-49 Engineers’ Open House 43, 44, 45, 46, 50, 51, 52, 74, 75, 77, 78, 79, 94, 95, 96, 97, 99, 101, 104, 105, 107,109, 125, 126-127, 129-130, 131, 136, 138, 140, 153, 156, 159, 161, 162, 164, 165, 181, 184, 185, 186, 192-193, C-14, C-15, C-21 Engineers’ Queen 56, 74, 77-78, 79, 81-82, 84-85, 88, 94, 95, 97, 98, 99, 100-101, 103, 104, 105, 106-107, 109, 124, 126, 128-129, 130, 132, 133, 136, 137, 138, 139, 153, 155, 158, 160, 161-162, 163, 165, 167, 168, 180, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189-190, 191, 192, 195, 196-197, C-14, C-17 Engineers’ Show 98, 99, 100, 106-107, 109, 124, 126, 128, 130, 133, 136, 137, 138, 139, 153, 156-157, 159, 161, 162, 164, 167, 168, 180, 184, 186, 188, 189, 190, 192, 193, 194, 195-196 Engineers’ Week 79, 80, 104, 124, 126, 136, 137, 138, 158, 161, 162, 163, 168, 180, 188, 191, 192, 195, 196 Engineers’ Wives Club 163, 164, 167, 187-188, 192 Engle, Don 132 Enos, Joe 136 Erter, John 55 Erwin, Deanna 165 Erwin, Leroy Edgar B-15 Etherington, A. Bruce B-11 Evans, Arthur Grant 1, 22-23, 28, 29, 33-34 Evans, Robert D. 53 Everett, Betty Jo Kerr see Kerr, Betty Jo Everett, Rex 138 Ewbank, Walter James B-15, B-26,


B-30 Ewing, Cortez 113, 116, C-11 F Faculty Senate 115-116 Fahrenkamp, Edmund 160 Fairchild, Jack E. B-30 Farrar, Clyde Leo B-7, B-13, B-23, B-38, B-39, C-19 Farris, Bill 155 Farris, Keith 161 Faunce, Stuart Fred B-28 Feagles, Beth 130 Fears, Fulton 129, 130, B-13, B-16, B-23, B-36 Fears, Jesse 139 Federal Emergency Relief Administration, FERA 88 Felgar Hall 62, 65, 81, 94, 98, 119, 135, 139, 156, 157-158, 175, 181 Felgar, James Houston v-vi, 18-20, 23-26, 28, 29-30, 31-32, 34, 37, 39, 41, 47, 57, 58, 62-63, 65, 78, 82, 88, 89, 91, 95, 98, 100, 101, 104, 119-120, 135, 139, 156, 172, B-4, C-1-2, C-5, C-7, C-10 Ferguson, Tom B. 57, 134 Felt, Wright L. 54 Fenn, James Arthur B-5, B-10 Fleetwood, W. M. 105 Flick, Dottie 125-126 Flood, Frank 20, 24, 48 Floyd, Francis 66 Fick, Harry 125 Fiorillo, Mike 138 fire 9-10, 20-21, 26, 191 Fisher, Anita Ruth 167 Fitch, John Leslie B-26 Fite, Gilbert 175 Fitzgibbon, James Walter B-11 Folger, Frank 128 Foor, R. T. 122 Foote, Bobbie Leon B-40, B-41

Ford, Bill C-23 Forney, Bill 137 Foster, Joseph W. B-41 Fowler, Frank Cavan B-12, B-14, B-22, B-24, B-42 Francis, John B-31, B-32 Freeman, Elvin D. 51, 54 Frensley, Linda 184 Frontiers of Science 144 Fronterhouse, Jerry 165 Fulton, James W. B-22 G G. I. Bill 117, 132, C-21 Gage, William Patrick 71 Gallas, Otis 161 Gamble, James “Jim” 164, 168, 180 Gamez, Alfredo 126 Gamma Alpha Rho 70, 159 Gamma Phi 130 Gamma Phi Beta 158, 180, 181, 189 Gardner, John W. 194 Gardner, Maude 78 Garms, Kendal 135 Garriott, Owen 156 Gartside, Albert Edward 40, 51 Garwin, Leo B-42 Gary, Raymond 165 Gates, Chester 132 Gates, Clarence 136 Geological Engineer(ing) 72, 73, 74, 92, 93, 121, 123, 127, 150, 152, 153, 162, 174, 175, A-11, A-28, A-58-59, A-88-89, B-2, B-5, B-6, B-13, B-24, B-40-41 Geology 7, 8, 9, 39, 42, 107 George, H. C. 72, 92, B-6, B-9 Gibson, Allen Baker B-14, B-17 Gilbreth, Oma 129 Gillespie, Himan Aldrich B-38 Gimeno, Harold 71 Gittinger, Roy 21-22, 24, 33 Givens, Ruby 22


Glahn, Jerry 160 Glamann, Jack 128 Glass, Bill R. 164, 167 Glickman, Mendel B-11, B-20, B-21, B-32, B-33 Godfrey, Arthur 190 Godfrey, Gaines 165 Goff, Bruce Alonso B-11, B-20, B-21 Gonser, Martin Edsel B-25 Good, Eddie 153 Goodard, Richard C-53 Goodman, Donald 165 Gordon, Claude 122, 126 Gordon, Joseph Cowan 35, 40-41, 43, C-1 Gorton, Leo H. 35 Gough, John 137 Gould, Charles Newton 7, 9, 14, 15, 24 Graduate College 116 Graduate degree viii, 41, 72, 109, 113, 123, 140, 146-148, 171, 172, 178, 186, 196 Grantham, George R. B-23 Gray, Cecil R. C-19 Gray, Elza T. C-8 Gray, Lloyd 79 Green, Barbara 191 Green, Herb B-21, B-32 Greer, William Jack C-21 Grieves, Bill 134 Griffin, Brandon B-21, B-23, B-27, B-36, B-38 Griffin, Schenk Henry 35-36, 51 Grimmett, Jenny Lou 161 Grogan, George 131, 132 Gross, Henry E. B-9 Gross, Jack Leroy 133 Guelich 22 Guernsey, Curt 131 Guffy, Bill 161 Guilfoil, Tim 192 Gunderson, Sue 190 Guyer, Dan E. B-36

H Haas, Lowell Edward B-14 Haden, Clovis R. B-39 Haise, Fred 197 Halko, Antionette 94 Hall, Frank P. B-47 Hall, Ralph R. C-53 Hall, Samuel Joseph B-37 Ham, Ed 136 Hamilton, Robert 136 Hammer, Garland Granville B-19 Hammett, Dillard 160 Hancock, Virginia 56-57 Hanes, Ken 160 Harden, Darrel G. B-30, B-31 Harder, Bud 79 Harder, Don 139 Hardie, John 22 Hardin, Robert Allen B-10, B-18, B-25, B-26, B-46 Hardy, Richard K. B-28 Harmon, Jack 161 Harmon, Jim 139 Harney, Leon Thomas B-25 Harp, Charles Estell B-14, B-23, B-38, B-39 Harp, Jimmie Frank B-37 Harris, Bill 157, B-30 Harris, Bob 133-134 Harrison, Marian 79 Hart, Walter 134 Haseman, Professor 39 Haskell, Charles N. 20-22, 33 Haskett, Carl 140 Hatcher, Sam 191 Hawkes, James “Red� 185 Hawkins, Bob 132 Hawn, J. T. 94 Hayes, Eugene L. B-34 Heaney, Bob 135 Heffner, Roy Edward 55 Hefner, Robert E. C-28


Hegi, Gene 163 Heid, Jim 136, 138 Helman, Anatol B-11 Helmrich, George Bernard 68-69, 91, B-2, B-4 Henderson, Arnold Kemp B-33 Hendricks, Barney 138-139 Henry, Bobbie 133, 137-138 Hervey, John G. 128, 129 Hewitt, Hudy C. C-49 Heymann, Michael B-35 Hickman, JoAnn 158 Higgins, Tom 129 High, Michael B-30 Hildebrand, Floyd 101 Hill, Bill 128 Hill, Harry 136-137, 139, B-16 Hill, Irving 140 Himes, Charles W. C-20 Hines, Robert 127, 128, 130 Hise, Bill 157 Hitt, Jack 140 Ho, Hung Ta B-30, B-31 Hoag, LaVerne L. B-41 Hodgell, Murlin 195, B-33 Hodges, Ted 66 Holcomb, Verna 98 Holder, Clarence R. C-44 Holland, Loyal B. 51, 55, B-4, C-5 Holland, Sam 122, 125, B-9, B-18, B-24, B-47 Holland, Weaver 51, C-1-2 Holloman, Herbert 171, 175-176, 177, 178, 192, 193,194, 195, 196, 197, B-35 Holmes, C. T. 96 Holtzclaw, John 163 Hool, George Albert 22-25, 28 Hoops, Howard 133 Hooven-Roberts, Cecille 163 Horn, William C-18 Hosford, Patrick 165 Hott, Don 138 Hott, Oliver 54, 138

Hott, Sabert 43, 48, 54, 138 Hott, Willis 54 Houchin, John 96, 195, 197 Howard, Claude 132 Howard, Robert 143, B-24, B-42 Hudson, Carroll D. C-45 Hughes, Calvin 55 Hughes, John Paul 160 Huitt, Jimmie Lee B-12 Hultin, Carl 130 Huntington, Richard Lee 147, B-7, B-9, B-12, B-17, B-22, B-28, B-34, B-35, B-42 Humphreys, Leo 55 Humphreys, W. P. 22 Husky, Buena 109 Husky, S. T. 98 Hutchens, Louise 79 I Ikard, George 131 Ikard, Wallace 129 Indian Territory 1 Industrial Engineering 121-122, 123, 152, 153, 156, 159, 165, 174, 175, 185, 186, 192, A-59, A-60, A-61, A-62, A-84, A-85, B-24, B-38-40 Inman, Rex Lee B-37, B-42, B-46 Institute of Aerospace Sciences 132 international students 107, 125, 138 Irby, Howard 133, B-13 Ittner, Frank 95, 96 J Jackson, Betty 131, 133, 139 Jackson, F. A. B-40 Jackson, Floyd Lowell B-19, B-25, B-40 Jackson, R. O. 135 Jackson, Ralph 167 James, Richard Vernon (R. V.) 48, 51, 55, 56, 100, B-2, B-8, B-16, B-25, B-16, B-25, B-27, B-36


James, Ted 167 Jansky, Cyril Methodius 14, 15, 16, 17, 22-25 Jefferies, Ann 163 Jennings, Bill “Beep” 137 Jerner, R. Craig B-35 Jischke, Martin C. B-31 Johnson, David W. B-35 Johnson, Earl Briggs 33, 51 Johnson, Jerry 130 Johnson, “Tee” 126, C-24 Johnson, W. Carey C-34 Johnson, Wally 132 Jones, Bob 159 Jones, Dudley 54 Jones, Euine Fay B-20, B-21 Jones, George Childs 23-25 Jones, Robert Warner B-37 K Kabriel, J. Ronald B-33 Kahan, Archie B-37 Kahng, Suen K. B-39 Kaighn, William A. B-32 Kallenberger, Harold 180 Kammerman, John Oscar B-1 Kamphoefner, Henry Leueke B-6, B-10 Kane, Mildred 167 Kappa Alpha Theta 77, 78, 137, 180, 188, 189, 190, 195 Kappa Kappa Gamma 79, 138, 155, 181, 192 Kappa Sigma 192 Karcher, Clarence J. 46, 54, C-4, C-5 Kaser, Raymound B-31 Kauffman, Howard C. 129 Kaupke, Charles Lewis 28 Keck, Robert V. B-25, B-40 Keeley, Jack 162, 163 Keeley, Joe W. 84, 131, 161, 162, 167, B-12, B-13, B-33, B-36 Keener, Herb 128, 129

Keith, Guy 131, B-23, B-36 Kellog, Jessie 56 Keller, Frank 48-49, 56 Keller, Karl 190 Kelly, Fred 167 Kemp, Edward B-33 Kendall, Nancy 126 Kennedy, Bill 161 Kennedy, Donald S. 168 Kennedy, Verne C. Jr. B-29, B-34, B-35, B-45 Kern, Frank J. B-24, B-39 Kerr, Betty Jo “Joker” 126, 133, 135, 138 Kerr, Robert S. 115, 132 Kerth, Bill 132, C-33 Kessler, Edwin III B-46 Ketcham, Bruce B-15, B-20, B-30 Kincaid, Eleanor 77-78 Kincheloe, Bob 133 Kindig, David 159 King, Jean 163 King, Ted 135 Kinnaird, John 136 Kirby, Bob 163 Kirkwood, Tom 135 Kizer, Judson A. C-37 Klehr, Edwin H. B-36 Klein, Bill 126 Klein, Elmer 132 Knights of Saint Patrick, see Saint Patrick, Knights of Kniseley, Bessie 88, 95-97 Knott, Albert William B-33, B-38 Koester, Paul O. 51, 55 Kohara, Arthur Akira B-21 Kolar, Wilbur 132 Kongs, Karen 197 Korean War 142, 145, 150, 159, 163, 165, 168 Koschmieder, Ernst L. B-46 Koutz, Stan 137 Kraft, Walter 81, C-9


Kramer, Doris Gene 128-129, 130 Krenek, Richard F. B-41 Kroeger, Henry Raine B- 17, B-30 Ku Klux Klan 4, 120 Kuhlman, Richard Norton B-11, B-20, B-32 Kumin, Hillel J. B-41 Kuriger, William Louis B-39 L L. A. Comp Wind Tunnel 89, 99, 105106 Laguros, Joakim George B-37-38 Landers, Tom v Landscape Architecture 93, 121 Langford, Cecil T. B-5, B-6, B-7, B-12 Laidlaw, Robert 158, 160, B-28 Latting, Patience see Sewell, Patience Lauk, Chester 184-185 Lawrence, Jack 165 Lawrence, Robert 196-197 Lawson, Floyd Clifford B-13 Lawyers vs. Engineers 44, 45-46, 50, 51-53, 74, 78, 79-80, 82, 92, 94-95, 97, 98, 99-100, 101-102, 105, 106-107, 109, 124, 126, 128, 130, 133, 136, 137, 139-140, 155-156, 160, 187, 188, 189, 191, 192, 195, 196, C-1, C-4, C-14, C-17, C-19, C-21 Leadman, Iris 74 Lee, Josh 163 Lee, Willis Thomas B-2 Lesch, James “Jim” R. 124, 133, 135, C-24 Lesch, John 124, 126, 127, 128, C-2224 Levy, David v-vi, 11 Levy, Robert A. B-34 Lewis, William Benjamin B-13, B-23 Lhermite, Roger B-46 Lichty, Lester 69, B-1, B-4, C-5 Ligon, Ed 161 Lindsey, D. H. C-36

Liston, Joseph 92-94, 95-96, 99, 104, B-8 Littleford, Art 165 Livergood, Homer C-1 LKOT see Loyal Knights of Old Trusty Lnenicka, William Joseph B-27 Lobo, Paul Allen B-22 Lockett, Hoyle 161 Logan, David 43, 47, B-2 Lohmann, Phil C-57 Loomer, Jim 161 Loper, Ray 135 Love, Tom J. vii, 117-118, 148, B-26, B-30, B-31 Lovett, John R. v Lowy, Stanley B-20, B-30 Loyal Knights of Old Trusty (LKOT) viii, 75-76, 83, 97, 99, 100, 107, 120, 130, 132, 139, 140, 159, 196, C-14, C-23, C-33 Lucas, Elmer Lawrence B-14 Luccock, Randolph B-15, B-18 Ludlow, Roy Verl 160 Lukens, Archie MacDougal B-5, B-8, B-14, B-16 Lutz, Raymond P. B-41 Lynch, Ray 95 Lyon, Victor C-27 M Mabrey, Marjorie 158 Mackey, Clifton M. 51, 54 Maddox, Gaiser Dawson B-18, B-28 Major, Charles Curtis 13-14, 18, 25 Maples, Mike 187 Marland, Ernest W. 89, 104 Malvern, Don 122 Mankin, C. J. B-35 Marriott, Bessie see Kniseley, Bessie Marriott, William M. 97 Massad, Alex 127, 129, 130 Master’s program, see Graduate degree


Marines 126 Martin, Frank 72, 74 Martin, John Rogers B-23 Martin, Marianelle 163 Martin, Ralph 157 Martin, Tom 173 Martinsen, William Edward B-35 Matetich, Bill 138 Mathis, Herald Fletcher B-14, B-23 Matthern, Bob 131 Matlock, J. Ray 72, 83, B-3, B-7, B-9, B-12, B-13, B-16, B-23, B-36, B-38 Matsumoto, George B-11 Mauck, Charles 138, B-15, B-26 Max Westheimer Airfield 114, 119, 132, 138 Maxson, George R. B-1, B-3, B-5, B-9, B-18, B-24, B-47, C-22 May, Beverly 192 May, Dick 163 McArthur, Carolyn 129 McBride, Lewis 97, C-17 McBrien, Richard C-18 McCarter, Peter Kyle 145, 197 McCasland, Tom 158 McCourry, Ted 140, 150 McCoy, Alex W. 42, 45 McCoy, Clarence Morris B-26 McCray, Author White B-41 McCumber, William H. C-50 McDaniel, Rod 136 McDannon, George 126 McDermitt, George 126 McFall, Mairl 156 McFerron, Clarence William 33, 35, 51 McGee, Bill 157 McGee, Dean 175 McGuire, Michael B-34 McIntire, Tom 133-134, 135 McKinney, George 75-76, 104 McKinney, Margaret 77 McKown, George 139 McMichael, James B-15

McMurray, Patricia 79 McNatt, Dan 163 McPherson, Henry Hume 14-16, 18, 25 ME Club 55 Meador, L. F. 150 Mebb, Charles 127 Mechanical Engineering 8, 13, 14, 17, 24, 28, 29, 32, 39, 46, 49, 67-68, 69, 70, 73, 74, 84, 92, 93, 104, 121, 123, 150, 152, 157, 162, 164, 167, 173, 175, 178, 184, 185, 186, 196, A-1, A-2, A-12, A-29, A-62, A-63, A-69, A-70, B-1-2, B-4, B-7-8, B-13-15, B-25, C-1 Mechanical Engineering Club 47, 55 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 69 Mechanical Engineering Society, see American Society of Mechanical Engineers Meek, Frank 132 Mehan, Joe 131, 132 Melton, James Otho B-16, B-27, B-30, B-36, B-40 Men of Might 124-139, 150, 153, 155161, 163, 165, 167 Menzie, Don 163, B-28, B-41 Meteorological Engineering 174, 186, A-82, A-83, B-45-46 Meteorology Building 191 Meyers, Freda 125 Milburn, Richard 188 Miles, Jerry 167 Millian, James Z. B-15 Million, Elmer Z. B-40 Miller, Harold 138 Miller, Louie 140 Mills, Billy Everett 160 Mills, Marian 94 Mills, Marion Elbert 125, B-3, B-6, B-7, B-11, B-12, B-23 Mills, Vivian 125 Mining Engineer(ing) 9, 13, 14, 46, 73, 92, 121, A-13, A- 31, B-6


Mining Geology 72 minority students 143, 194-195 Mistletoe 9, 18, 20 Mitchell, Charles Edward B-26 Mitchell, K. Gene 155, 156 Mitchell, Sally Lou 133 Mitner, Lee 95 Mock, Elizabeth Bauer B-11 Moffett, Jerry 167 Moffett, LeRoy 67 Mohler, Ronald R. B-32, B-39 Monnet, Julien Charles 33-34, 82 Monnett, Victor E. 72, 92, 137, B-5, B-6 Moody, William H. 155 Moore, Carl Allphin B-14, B-25, B-41, B-42 Moore, Maxine 106-107 Moore, Paul 158 Moore, Preston B-29, B-41, B-42 Moore, Stanley Leigh B-27, B-36, C-46 Moose, Joe Eugene B-4 Morgensen, Dean 133, 134 Morris, Frank 72, B-5, B-9, B-18, B-24, B-47 Morris, Joe 137 Morris, Warren 138 Morrow, Lester William Wallace 37 , B-1, C-4, C-5 Mortar Board 97 Mosier, Orville 101 Morton, Tom 105, 109, C-23 Mouck, Fred 167, B-16, B-27, B-36, B-38 Muns, Ruben Billy B-27 Murphy, Patrick 133 Murray, Thomas M. B-38 Murray, William H. “Alfalfa Bill” 8789, 95 N Nagle, Robert H. 158

Naifeh, Sam C-20 Nakayama, Eddie 130 NASA 70, 156, 170, 185, 195, 197 Naval Air Station 132 Naval Air Training Unit 191 Naval Reserves 92, 108, 127, C-24 Navy 51, 112, 114-115, 117, 118, 119, 130, 134, 145, 148, 150, 155 Navy Aviation Technical Training School 114 Navy ROTC 109, 111 115, 118, 127, 132, 134, 136, 150, 159-160, 185, C-27 Navy V-1 114-115, 127, 128 Navy V-7 114-115, 127, 128 Navy V-12 115, 128, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, C-32 National Academy of Engineering 176 National Recovery Act 88 National Society of Women Engineers 126 National Youth Administration or NYA 88, 90, 100, 114, 125, C-21, C-22 Natural gas 68-69, 101, 104, 182 Natural Gas Engineering, School of 91, 93, 101, 104, 121, 123, 174, A-32, A-65, A-66, A-87, A-88, B-27 Neal, Merritt A. 131 Needham, Riley 167 Neher, Loleta 125 Nelson, Jimmie 139 Nelson, Robert Young B-37 Nesbit, Bob 128 Nesmith, Dwight 191 Neustadt, Walter 112 Neville, Ves 167 “New Trusty”, see also Old Trusty, 77 Newton, Charles B-13 Newton Club 48, 52, 53, 54, Nichols, DeOwen Jr. B-8, B-14 Nicks, Oran 185, 195 Nigh, George 167, 176 Nighswonger, Harrison Worth 36, 51


Noles, Jack 139 Norby, Gene M. 173, 174, 176, 186, 193, 195, B-31, B-37, B-44 Norman 2, 6, 7, 10, 44 Norton, W. H. 195 Nuclear engineering 152, 184, 196, A-70, A-71, B-31 Nuclear Engineering Laboratory 65, B-34 Nuclear power 122, 143, 147 O Oakes, Herbert 78, B-28 Ochoa, Humberto 125 Oderman, Harry 54 Oey, Hong S. B-37 Oglesby, James William Jr. B-11, B-21 Ohern, Daniel Webster 28, 31, 32 Oka, Shizuo B-21 Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, see Oklahoma State University Oklahoma National Guard 40, 111 Oklahoma Society of Professional Engineers 172 Oklahoma Society of Women Engineers 120, 125, 126, 129, 131, 139 Oklahoma State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers 83 Oklahoma State University 7, 11-13, 88, 89 Old Trusty 44, 45-46, 50, 52, 57, 66, 74-76, 77, 78, 82, 95, 97, 99, 100, 101, 104, 106, 107, 109, 125, 129, 130, 131, 132, 134, 136, 161, C-4, C-14, C-19, C-24 Ollila, Richards C-55 Ollinger, Marion 78 Omicron Delta Kappa 168, 185 OSAGE Computer 144, 145, 179, 180 O’Toole, Art 160 Overby, James Thomas B-15, B-20 Owens, Jack 74, 78, 94

owls, green 34, 78, 99, 101, 187, 188, 189, 191, 195, 196 Owlsey, William D. 195 Oza, Kandar G. B-39 Ozell, Allan Muncie, see Ozelsel, Amet Munci Ozelsel, Amet Munci B-17, B-27 P Padget, Fred 39, B-9 Page, Edwin Richard B-1, B-3, B-7, B-13, B-14 Page, Richard C-10 Palmer, James 148, B-24, B-38, B-39 Parker, Deak 26 Parrington, Vernon L. 18, 22 Parry, Ed 165 Patterson, Earl 130 Patterson, Harold L. 77 Paxton, Charles N. 106, 108, B-8, B-14 Paxton, J. F. 22 Payne, James B-30, B-32 Payte, Pat 133-134 PE-ET 54, 129, 132, 168, 185 Peach, W. N. B-43 Pembleton, E. W. 55 Penick, John M. B-10 Perdue, Howard 150 Pernell, James Herbert 82 Perkinson, Benjamin Henry 82 Perry, Robert B-22, B-25, B-34 Peters, Herbert 72 Petroleum Engineer(ing) 63, 71, 72, 73, 91, 92, 105, 106, 107, 119, 121, 127-128, 137, 150, 153, 174, 175 Petroleum Engineering and Refinery Buildings 65, 71 petroleum engineering building 90, 104, 106 Phelps, Mary Ann 185-186 Phi Delta Chi 55 Phi Kappa Psi 137


Phi Mu Alpha 54, 55 Phillips, Leon C. 89-90, 106, 107, 109, 112 Physics 9, 13, 24, 39, 119, 143 Physics Club 54 Physics Lab 6, 14 Plint, Colin B-42 Pi Beta Phi 99, 160, 161, 167, 180, 181, 186, 190, 191, 192 Pi Epsilon Tau 137 Pi Tau Sigma 109, 124, 129, 132, 162 Pick and Hammer Club 36, 47 Pipkin, Omer A. B-35 Pigg, Albert M. 51 Polk, Tom 134 Ponser, Rex E. 164 Pool, Richard Boykin B-23, B-36 Porter, Alfred Watson Jr. B-18, B-28 Porter, Tom 136 Powell, Harry Garfield 30, 51 Powell, Joe 129 Powers, John Edward B-22, B-29, B-34, B-45 Prentis, George H. 160 Prescott, Maurice 66 Press, Abraham B-1 Price, Bill 156 Proctor, Charles L. B-40 Public Works Administration PWA 88, 99 Puckett, Thomas Henry 148, B-24, B-38, B-43 Purswell, Jerry L. B-41 Q R RADAR 111, 129 radio 66-67 Raibourn, James Paul 160 Ralston, M. L. C-26 Ramsey, E. K. 94 Randal, Gardener 181, 184

Rankin, John Robert B-23 Rasmussen, Maurice L. B-31 Rawlings, John Bare B-21 Reaves, Samuel Watson 15, 24, 31-32 Reflection seismology 54 Registered Professional Engineer 63, 91 Reid, George B-23, B-35, B-37, B-45 Reid, Laurence Standish B-12, B-17, B-22, B-28, B-34, B-41 Renshaw, David Ellery 35, 54 Reily, Susie 160-161 Reinhardt, Theresa 55-56 Reistle, Carl Jr. 82 Rennie, Preston 138, 139 Reynolds, Jack B-24, B-39 Rhyne, Robert E. 160 Rice, William N. 3 Richardson, Jim 126, C-24 Riddell, Frederick 187 Riggs, Carl 146 Rice, Berenice 22 Rinsland, Alemedia 126 Risner, Florence 167 Ritter, Carl 70 Rizzo, Frank E. B-35 Roberts, John Parrington B-27 Roberts, Lester 132 Roberts, Louin 100 Robertson, James Lewis B-40 Robertson, James M. B-38 Robinson, Bob 125 Rodgers, Dave 137 Roemer, Helen 124 Roller, D. H. D. B-43 Romano, Linda 190 Romano, Marinus B-20 Rooks, Helen 131 Roops, Frank B-15 Root, Paul J. B-41 Roscoe, C. M. 131 Rose, Kenneth Eugene B-16 Ross, Janey 185


Roush, Donald F. 164 Rowland, John 155 Royer, Robert A. C-35 Rudi, Norman 159 Ruf Nex 55, C-10, C-24 Ruhtenberg, Wessel B-21 Rummell, Mike 138 Rundle, Fern 56 Rural Electrification Act REA 90 Russel, George 129 Russell, George Franklin B-12, B-17 Russell, Ralph 158 S Safai, Ata O. B-33 Saint Pat 42, 43, 74, 78, 79, 82, 84, 85, 91, 94, 95, 97, 98, 100, 101, 103, 104, 105, 107, 109, 124, 126, 127, 128-129, 130, 132, 133, 136, 137, 138, 140, 150, 155, 156, 158, 160, 161, 162, 163, 165, 167, 168, 184, 185, 187, 188, 189-190, 191, 192, 195, 196-197, C-14, C-17 Saint Pat’s Board 47, 48, 51-52, 54, 55, 56-57, 72, 84, 97, 99, 106, 186, 193, 195, C-23 St. Pats Queen, see Engineers’ Queen Saint Patrick, Knights of 46, 53, 55 -56, 74, 77, 79, 97, 99, 107, 130, 132, 133, 156, 161, 162, 165, 195, C-14 Sanderlin, Raynelle “Sandie” 153 Sandifer, Charles Robin B-3, B-7, B-9, B-12, B-16 Saint’s Dixieland Band 190 Sasaki, Yoshikazu B-37, B-42, B-46 Saucier, Walter J. B-37, B-42, B-45 Saver, Gene 131 Schlaffke, Ed 105 Schmallhausen, Robert B-29 Schnee, Verne Higgs B-17 Schofield, Bill 155 School of Mines 11, 17, 25, 28, 32, 37, 72 Schooler, Robert E. 164

Schriever, William 71, B-14 Schwartz, Bob 165 Schwoerke, Kenneth 101, 105 Segner, Edmond B-37 Sellner, Edward Pius B-13 Sewell, Patience 99-100 Shallabarger, Fred Davie B-21, B-31, B-32 Shahroki, Firouz C-59 Shartel, John 78 Shapiro, Robert Allen B-4 Shaw, Gilbert 156 Shockley, Thomas D. B-39 Shults, Jim 150 Shultz, Bennie 55, 57, B-9, C-4-5, C-9 Shunatona, Bat 163 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 54, 192 Sigma Chi 47, 54, 55, 137 Sigma Gamma Tau 159 Sigma Nu 83 Sigma Tau 47, 48, 52, 54, 55, 56, 72, 83, 84, 101, 124, 168, 185 Sigma Tau Delta 86 Signal Corps. Field Co. A Oklahoma National Guard 40 Simmering, Leonard 139 Simmons, Gerald M. B-32 Sims, Ellis Marcus B-8, B-9, B-15, B-17, B-25, B-26, B-30, B-31, B-32 Slide rules 153, 154, 156, 179, 180, C-9, C-10, C-15, C-19, C-23 Sliepcevich, Cedomir 146-147, 148, 168, 172, 173, B-22, B-25, B-29, B-34, B-43, B-44, B-45 Smartt, E. W. 109 Smay, Joe 71, 112, B-6, B-11, B-20, B-32, B-33, C-20 Smith, David R. 160 Smith, Dwight 163 Smith, Ernestine “Ernie” 155 Smith, Harper 140 Smith, Herchel B-1 Smith, L. C. 167


Smith, Laurence Fred B-20 Smith, Lee Wayne 160 Smith, Lloyd Mosley 160 Smith, Phillip B-23 Smith, Richard Thomas B-39 Smith, Samuel 187 Smith, Winston Oliver B-14, B-15, B-26 Sneed, Earl 160, 176 Sneed, Richard 96 Snider, Glenn 146 Snyder, Joseph Q. B-22 Sparks, Otho Oren B-6 Society for Promotion of Engineering Education 129 Sooner City 118-119, 188 Sooner Magazine 25, 26 Sooner Shamrock vi, 62, 120, 122-140, 150, 153, 154, 155-161, 163, 165, 166, 167, 192-193, 196 Sorey, Tom 47, B-5 Southard, Carol 165 Southern Methodists 21-22 Spencer, Morris 158 St. John, Robert M. B43 Stafford, James C. 160 Staley, Raymond Clarence B-37 Stanley, Harold 137, 138 Starling, Kenneth B-35 Stark, David 129 Stark, James 136 Stark, Roy 159 Stearns, Glenn Mills B-9, B-17, C-23 Steedman 51 Steele, Guy 138 Steiner, Wilhelm Levi 71 Stephens, Jesse J. B-46 Stewart, Carolyn 163 Stockman, James 122 Stockwell, Benjamin Paul 51, 55 Stooker, M. J. 100 Storm, Clarence 20 Strance, John Sherman 132, 133

Strausbaugh, Don 157 Streebin, Leale E. B-38 Student Army Training Corps 49 Sullivan, Arahmae 132 Summers, Luis M. B-38 Swanson, Larry 161 Swearingen, Wayne 137 Sylvester, Bill 132 T Tabasco Club 48, 54 Taha, Hamdy H. B-41 Tappan, Frank Girard 30, 62-63, 91, 100, 135, B-1, B-3, B-7, B-13, B-23, C-10 Tate, Norma 139 Tau Beta Pi 72, 83, 84, 97, 129, 130, 132, 133, 158, 195 Tau Omega 69-70, 72, 92, 94, 95, 129, 159, C-22 Tau Pi 72 Tauson, Peter 96, 99 Taylor, Charles Henry 32, 37, B-2 Taylor, John “Dink” 124, C-23, C-29 Taylor, Wendell Smith B-15, B-18 Terrell, Robert Craig B-1 Terry, Richard Allen B-40 Thacker, Bobby Gene 133 Thain, Carl 136, C-24 Thomas, Gale Salee B-21 Thomas, J. Harper 122, B-14, B-15, B-26 Thompson, Alec 158 Thompson, B.F. 66 Thompson, Nathan B-23 Thompson, Roy J. C-8 Thorton, Demetrice 105 Thorton, Jo Wade 100-101, 103 Thurber, Paul 94 Tiffin, William Truitt B-8, B-10, B-14, B-15, B-19 Tinkel, Terrence 188, 191 Tinker, Nicholas 109


Tinklepaugh, Sibyl 74 Tolleson, Doane 66 Toner, Harold J. B-16 tornado 108, 119-120, 138, 153 , C-37 Torre, Aton 129 Townsend, Mark B-12, B-22, B-28, B-34 Treat, Guy Bradford B-1 Tri Delta 188 Tripathi, Vijai K. B-39 Tucker, James I. 35, 37, B-1, C-5 Tuma, Gerald 126, 144, 162, 179, B-13, B-14, B-23, B-24, B-25, B-38, B-39 Turk, Nancy 190 Turkington, Donald Barton vi, B-15, B-26, B-30, B-32, B-44, B-45 Turnbull, Paul 79, 84 Turnbull, Sue, see Aycock, Sue Tzannes, Nicolaos B-39 U Uda, Bob 188-189 Umpleby, Joseph Bertram B-2, B-5 University of Oklahoma Research Institute viii, 113, 116, 119, 136, 147, 157 University Oklahoman, see also The Oklahoma Daily 42-43, 50, 51 Upthegrove, William R. 176, 178, 197, B-22, B-29, B-32, B-34, B-35, B-45 V Vache, C. Lawrence C-50 Van Wingen, Nico B-17, B-18 Vance, Frank Peyton B-17 Vance, Jesse Sebourn B-12 Vanderpool, John 155 Varga, Jane 158 Vargo, Paul M. B-39 Vector, The 41 Veterans vii, 51, 117-119, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 142, 145, 150, 154,

155, 159, 163, 165, 168, 170- 171, 188, 190, C-21 Vicklund, C. A. 136 Vietnam 142, 170, 194, 196 Visiting Committee for the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering 131 Viavant, William 184, B-22, B-34, B-43 Voegelein, Glenn 96 W Wainerdi, R. E. C-45 Wallis, John 163 Walker, Gene B. B-39 Walker, Jones C-13 Walker, Paul 97 Walter, Otto W. 66, 67, B-3 Walters, Bob 188 Walton, Jesse Seburn B-12, B-17 Walton, John C. 60, 77 Ward, Harold 184 Wardell, Morris 156 Warhurst, Jack William B-23 Warren, Anne 158 Watson, James K. B-24 Waugh, Edward Walter B-11 Weatherford, Carl 155 Weaver, Frank Lloyd 37, B-1 Weaver, Lynn B-32 Weber, Allen H. B-46 Weeks, Homer 138 Weger, Eric B-22, B-34 Weir, Harry Edward B-1 Welch, Phillip B-21 West, Genevia 126 West, Gertrude Sally, see Collier, Gertrude Sally West, Onlee 97 Westervelt, John 139 Westheimer, Max 112 Wheasler, Robert A. B-20, B-30 Wheeler, G. L. 67


Wheeler, Jean 130 Whitfield, Jack C-47 Whitehead, Victor Shelby B-37, B-42 Whitwell, Clyde 51, 52, 55, C-3 Whitwell, Elvis 50 Whittemore, Herbert Lucius B-2 Whitten, Francis 125, 129, 130, 131 Wibker, Thelma Rose 136 Wilcomb, Maxwell Jeffers B-36 Wiley, Bruce 98, B-13, B-23, B-24, B-25 Wilckins, Eugene B-46 Will, James 125 Williams, Darrell B-24, B-38, B-39 Williams, E. M. 22 Williams, Gene B-33 Williams, Guy Y. 24-25, 118, B-4, B-6, C-11 Williams, Jim 132, 163 Williamson, Dick 189 Willis, George 79 Willoughby, Vester E. 84, 100, 106, 120, 125, 131, 139, B-8, B-16, C-23 Wilson, Albert E. B-35, B-42 Wilson, Donald Lee B-27 Wilson, Henry B. C-8 Wilson, Jack 155 Wilson, Joe 139 Wilson, Sam 155, 156 Wilson, William Hix B-11, B-20, B-21, B-32 Winarsky, Ira H., B-34 Winters, Mary Lee 126 Wirges, Manford 131 Withers, Ron 158 Withrow, Jon 161 Wixson, Steve 167 WNAD 66-67, 83, 96, 98, C-11, C-19 Wohlenburg, Walter Jacob B-1 Wong, Ed 168 Wood, Leon Forest B-1 Wood, Tom 99 Woodruff, E. G. 15

Wolfard, Noah Ellsworth B-3, B-7, B-12 Wolfe, William R. 83 Women’s Engineering Club 195 Works Progress Administration WPA 88, 90, 112 World War I 40, 48-51, 58, 83, 172, C-5 World War II 84, 111-119, 125-129, 150, 188, C-36 Wythe, Joseph B-11 X Y Yates, Latham C-17 York, John G. B-32 Young, Dale B-24 Yu, Dah Soong B-32 Z Zelby, Leon W. B-39 Ziegler, Wilfred C-54 Zimmerman, Carl 127