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Market Guide – Wind Energy NRW 2014

www.klimaschutz.nrw.de Cluster Nordrhein-Westfalen


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Inhalt

Market Guide – Wind Energy NRW 2014


Market Guide – Wind Energy NRW 2014

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Contents Foreword

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Wind Power Network NRW

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Wind potentials in North Rhine-Westphalia

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Political and legal boundary conditions for the expansion of wind energy in North Rhine-Westphalia

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Facts and figures

15

Wind energy and industry

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Offshore wind energy – market driver for North Rhine-Westphalia

31

Mini wind turbines

33

Research

34

EnergyAgency.NRW

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Annex Index of companies (by categories) Index of companies (alphabetical) Calendar of regular annual events Further reading

40 40 59 62 63


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Market Guide – Wind Energy NRW 2014

Foreword

Dear Readers, energy generation has a long tradition in North Rhine-Westphalia, and remains of great importance even today. This federal state is correspondingly referred to as Germany’s Energy Region No. 1. NRW has numerous, predominantly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) working directly and indirectly for the energy industry. Many of these companies have also been successfully involved in the field of renewable energy for a good time now, and are active, in particular, in the wind energy sector. Many new, in some cases highly innovative jobs, have been created in this sector during the past fifteen years. According to a study performed by the Renewable Energy Agency in 2012 around 50,600 persons were employed in some 3,000 companies in the regenerative energy industry in NRW at that time. There are, on the whole, therefore extremely good prospects for NRW as an industrial and energy region and for companies active in the wind energy industry. This sector thus makes a substantial contribution to the structural change necessary in the state, and to the energy turnaround. In addition, universities, universities of applied sciences and research institutions in NRW are also active – extremely successfully active – in numerous wind energy projects. They are, indeed, playing an important role in the further evolution of wind energy technology. With the companies active here in our state, and its Research & Development institutions, NRW is an important German region for wind energy, and also enjoys global significance. A considerable number of wind energy facilities are also being constructed and efficiently operated in the state. Despite the inland location, some 2,900 systems are currently in service in NRW. Installed capacity totals around 3,337 MW, while overall wind power generated in 2012 was some 5.5 TWh.


Market Guide – Wind Energy NRW 2014

Wind power’s share of total electricity generation from renewable energy sources in NRW was around 40 per cent in 2011, making it the most important of the renewable energy sources. These already impressive statistics are due to rise even further in the next few years, the state government having set itself the target of increasing wind energy’s share of overall electricity supplies from the current approx. 4 to approx. 15 per cent by 2020. The Wind Energy Market Guide NRW provides an excellent overview of wind energy facts and figures, and also of the companies, research institutions and associations active in this field in NRW. This volume also provides information on the Wind Power Network NRW and on the importance of wind energy for medium-sized enterprises in the state. It is an ideal tool for gaining acquaintance with and deepening knowledge of this topic, and as a reference work available for consultation at any time. I wish all readers fruitful reading of the first Wind Energy NRW industry survey and congratulate EnergyAgency.NRW’s Wind Power Network on a successful publication. I am confident that the Wind Energy industry survey is destined to become an established institution in NRW and beyond.

Monika Krämer Director of windtest grevenbroich gmbh

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Wind Power Network NRW

Wind Power Network NRW

Interview with Stephanus Lintker, of EnergyAgency.NRW Stephanus Lintker is the head of Wind Power Network NRW. In this interview, he talks about the activities and aims of this EnergyAgency.NRW-managed network and also discusses specific plans for the future, by means of which the wind-networker intends to become even better established.

Herr Lintker, you are head of the Wind Power Network. What is the network’s function, and what are its aims? Our aim at Wind Power Network is to bring the representatives of the wind energy industry in NRW together and to publicise the results of their co-operation. There are many activities on the subject of wind energy in NRW – the market, the industry, the technology, and research – we focus on all sectors, and work at bringing them closer together. One important criterion is the following: As a network managed by EnergyAgency.NRW, we think and act entirely impartially. We are neither an industry association nor an economic promotion agency. We are concerned with active interchange and location marketing for the North Rhine-Westphalian wind industry. Our network includes around 800 individuals and more than 300 companies, institutions and research institutes.

How do you bring these players together and how do you organise the network’s activities? One focus of our current work is the conception and implementation of events. We network via activities,

and our aim is to provide tangible opportunities for interchange. We organise annual conferences, specialist events and trips by delegations. We bring the players together as partners, and guide them into discussions in which we, as an institution, are also involved. We also play an important enabling role by bringing the state’s political decision makers into contact with the relevant companies at such events. We organise visits to technical fairs and exhibitions, for example, and also participate in NRW climate minister Johannes Remmel’s futureenergy tour. Our target is to act as a communications channel for the industry, creating communications links. We also maintain a strong Internet presence for this purpose, and this provides an important information platform for the industry.

How do you see the network’s role as an impartial institution if it is itself involved in the discussion? As we see it, our function is to identify relevant topics, ask questions, provide ideas and to stimulate and chair discussions. The target is to concentrate interests in order to support and further innovation. We maintain a dialogue with companies and institutions specifically for this purpose. Our intention here is to locate good ideas and promising projects, and link them to suitable sources of


Wind Power Network NRW

support. The important thing is connecting industry and research with appropriate sources of finance. Our function is to build bridges that will facilitate progress in the industry and for wind energy as a whole.

You also have your own topics which you wish to publicise. What are they? Our range of topics is extremely broad. We have, on the one hand, the technology side, where, for instance, we are monitoring and providing information on the development of ever larger wind energy installations, in the fields of tower and gearbox construction, inter alia, and the development of mini wind energy facilities. We also see ourselves as a channel of communication on questions concerning repowering and wind energy at wooded sites. We focus on the development of wind energy locations in NRW and on market trends. Another important target that we support is the expansion of specific applied wind energy research at the universities. We are also involved, of course, in communications and consulting activities, which play an extremely important role in the wind field. Here, we work very closely with EnergyDialogue.NRW. The central emphasis in this project, which is also managed by EnergyAgency.NRW, is on dialogue, information and mediation, particularly in case of conflicts, which can

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arise, for instance, at the planning stage of wind energy projects. EnergyDialogue.NRW is aimed, above all, at municipalities and citizens.

What are the network’s plans for the future? Where do we go from here? We aim to position the various partners’ capabilities even more visibly in the network organisation. On the one hand, we have already expanded our technical capabilities and we intend, on the other hand, to set up a steering group. We are currently in the process of selecting and approaching potential members. This steering group will meet at regular intervals and act as a “knowledge pool”, provide internal structure, and assure even clearer orientation in the elaboration of these topics. The network will thus then possess a clear mandate to initiate projects and the discussion of topics, to which it can refer when necessary.


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The Wind Power Network NRW was set up in 2009 by the state government of NRW in order to focus the diverse activities, business expertise and technological potential for innovation of the state’s wind energy sector, and interlinks more than 800 players throughout NRW. These include component and facility manufacturers, system operators, service providers, project organisers, planners, engineers, and representatives of public administrations and approval authorities. The aim of the network’s activities is that of furthering the expansion of the use of wind energy in North RhineWestphalia as a primary state government priority. Wind power is to meet around 15 per cent of total electricity consumption in NRW by the end of this decade. The use of wind energy must therefore be expanded significantly; all potentials for innovation and site utilisation must therefore be exploited. The means employed will include the networking of industry, politics, science and research, in order to further develop the already high capabilities of NRW’s wind energy technology, to intensify repowering activities and the construction of new facilities in cultivated woodlands and along infrastructural routes. The Wind Power Network NRW is one of eight energy networks active throughout the state and operated under EnergyAgency.NRW’s joint “EnergyRegion.NRW” banner. The topics tackled and the Wind Power Network’s subject-matter orientation are co-ordinated by EnergyAgency.NRW with support from representatives of industry and research, and also from the Ministry for Climate Protection, Environment, Agriculture, Nature Conservation and Consumer Protection, the Ministry for Economic

Wind Power Network NRW

Affairs, Energy, Construction, Housing and Transport and the Ministry of Innovation, Science, Research and Technology of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia. The network’s allotted task is that of bringing the relevant regional players together and reinforcing their capabilities. This also includes strategic support for enterprises in the further evolution of system hardware, with the aim of improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of wind turbines and raising their availability levels. As a generator of ideas for future leitmotifs in the wind energy sector, the network is also intended to enhance public acceptance of wind energy, intensify cooperation both within Germany and internationally, and boost the international presence of NRW’s wind energy industry. The Wind Power Network provides the industry with a platform on which experts and specialists can interact on an interdisciplinary, topic-orientated, solution-targeted basis. Numerous projects with these aims have already been initiated, including the WindForum NRW, specialist conferences, expert discussion forums and also local information events/workshops on the topics of “Repowering” and “Wind in the Woods”. The Wind Power Network NRW’s annual conference, “Wind-Updates. NRW”, focuses in particular on the subject of innovation and provides an up-to-date overview of recent developments in political boundary conditions, in planning and in system technology. Other options available include opportunities for presentations by wind energy companies in the context of the annual conference, and entries in the Wind Energy Market Guide NRW.


Wind potentials in North Rhine-Westphalia

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Wind potentials in North Rhine-Westphalia North Rhine-Westphalia is Germany’s most important energy state. Despite being a densely populated and highly industrialised landlocked state, NRW is nonetheless a good location for wind energy. According to information from the Renewable Energy Agency, North Rhine-Westphalia takes fifth place, just behind the coastal state of Schleswig-Holstein, in the national rankings for installed wind energy capacity. The NRW state government now intends to increase the percentage of electricity generated from wind energy from its present approx. 4 to 15 per cent by the year 2020. With its plains and uplands, this region between the rivers Rhine and Weser provides numerous sites suitable for the expansion of wind energy, as is documented by the “Wind Potentials Study NRW”, which was drafted in 2012 by the NRW State Environment Agency (LANUV) on behalf of the state government. Unlike the urban and industrial districts of the Ruhr Regional Alliance and the Düsseldorf governmental district, the heavily wooded uplands, located predominantly in the Arnsberg and Cologne governmental districts, provide, in particular, high wind energy potentials. Another positive factor is useful wind velocities: 95 per cent of sites in NRW have, at heights of 135 m above ground level, average wind velocities of over 6 to 7 m per second (m/s). Locations in the Eifel region and the southern Weser Uplands achieve mean wind velocities of above 7 m/s (1.2 per cent). The potentials study performed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy Systems Technology (WES) for the German Wind Energy Association (BWE), comes to the conclusion that, assuming exhaus-

tive exploitation of all potentials, North Rhine-Westphalia could, via the expanded use of wind energy alone, generate twice as much electricity as is currently needed by private households in the state. The extensive Database EnergyAtlas.NRW provides much useful information for wind energy planning, and contains, in the form of outline maps, all the data obtained for the first time for analysis of wind energy potentials. This interactive cartographic material is useful, it is true, only for initial information purposes, and cannot replace an on-the-spot appraisal of specific sites, but does nonetheless provide insights on existing sites for wind energy installations and site potentials, such as local average wind velocity. Repowering – “New for old” The ambitious targets set necessarily entail great efforts and the pursuit of new routes. One good option is so-called repowering, in which existing installations are replaced by quieter and higher-output new ones. The benefits: modern wind turbines not only use the available wind more efficiently, and thus operate more cost-effectively, they also generate electricity with greater constancy, and can be better integrated into the transmission grid. Repowering makes it possible to “tidy up” the landscape by reducing the number and concentration of installations needed. Modern turbines also operate at significantly lower speeds than the rapidly rotating older machines, and thus have a lower visual impact. Calculations by Deutsche WindGuard GmbH indicate that consistent repowering using 3.5 MW class turbines would permit achievement of the state government’s expansion target with only around the same number (some 3,000) of turbines as up to now.

Planning region

Potential net power generation (TWh/a)

Surface area (ha)

Number of wind turbines (3 MW facility)

Münster

10,4

14.700

1.470

Detmold

13,6

21.800

1.830

Arnsberg

19,5

33.500

2.720

Regionalverband Ruhr

3,4

4.400

480

Düsseldorf

5,3

8.100

740

Köln

19,1

30.400

2.540

Results of calculation of potentials (rounded off) for the guideline NRW scenario in the planning regions, classified by governmental districts Source: Renewable Energy Potentials Study NRW, Part 1 – Wind Energy, LANUV Technical Report 40, Tab. 25, p. 96


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The state government is therefore backing repowering for its expansion of wind energy, and has initiated a repowering initiative to actively assist and support the repowering process, catalogue any problems, and evolve conceptual solutions. An extensive analysis and survey of all municipalities in NRW performed by the IWR provides important bases for this. The year 2013 witnessed the first larger number of repowering projects, but the opportunity of replacing old systems with new ones has, on the whole, been taken up only slowly up to now. The reasons for this are diverse: many installations have, on the one hand, not yet reached their originally projected service life of twenty years. Repowering at the same location also raises, on the other hand, questions of biodiversity and urban and landscape impact, which must now be answered anew. In very many cases, repowering projects necessitate a new planning procedure involving the re-examination of cost-efficiency and of municipal boundary conditions. The concept of “new for old” is a central element of the energy turnaround. Some 800 existing kilowatt-class installations, with a total output of just on 300 MW, are currently located outside concentration zones. The global expansion of wind power holds great potentials as an engine of innovation for NRW’s wind industry, driving and accelerating technological development. In a balance drawn by the BWE’s “Wind Energy in Germany 2013” industry report, the rated output of wind energy facilities installed onshore has risen significantly during the past ten years. Output has increased, for example, from an average of 1.39 to 2.39 MW; rotors have grown in diameter from 65.71 to 86.6 m, and spinner height

Wind potentials in North Rhine-Westphalia

from 78.75 to 110.99 m. System manufacturers are penetrating new markets with wind energy facilities specially tailored to sites with particularly high or only moderate wind levels. Technology developments promote the expansion In addition, the production of wind energy installations involves a high level of vertical integration. Engineering technology from NRW has become firmly established on the world market as a result of the fact that a number of manufacturers pursue a so-called “OEM” (Original Equipment Manufacturer) strategy and purchase components such as turbine base frames, gearboxes and rotor blades from subsuppliers. Many manufacturers of gearboxes, bearings, generators, transformers, couplings and brakes, and also of control and sensor systems, are long established medium-sized NRW companies. Wind turbine towers, rotor blades and machine housings are still other components, on the further evolution of which NRW wind energy companies are working with great intensity, with the aim of increasing system robustness and efficiency, lowering the weight of the overall nacelle, and matching system outputs to grid requirements. In power transmission systems, in particular, companies in NRW offer high capability levels which facilitate technological adaptation to conditions at sites in densely populated onshore areas. A broad range of products and services, extending from separate gearbox concepts, gearboxes with low-speed generators and up to and including gearless concepts, is available in the multi-MW sector. Hybrid drive arrangements, in which the genera-


Wind potentials in North Rhine-Westphalia

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tor and gearbox are directly linked to one another, are also used both onshore and offshore. Compability of wind energy and nature Further developments in system engineering are also making it possible to exploit NRW’s extensive wooded areas for generation of wind energy. The new machine types developed in the course of technological evolution are also capable of using the low-turbulence zones above the treetops, and thus mean that wooded areas not of special ecological significance, i.e., not located in conservation zones, can now also be used for exploitation of wind energy. All this is, of course, taking place with special attention devoted to the biodiversity of NRW’’s sensitive natural environment. In addition to the “Wind in the Woods” guideline, the NRW State Environment Agency and the Ministry for Climate Protection, Environment, Agriculture, Nature Conservation and Consumer Protection have also drafted a guideline for implementation of biodiversity and habitat protection in the planning and approval of wind energy installations in the state of NRW in 2013. This is intended to standardise administrative procedures throughout NRW and provide all those involved in planning with legally substantiated bases for the necessary assessments.

Trend in size of onshore wind turbines 160

Rated output [kW]

2500

2000

Spinner height [m]

140

Rotor diameter [m]

120

Rated output [kW]

100

1500

80 60

1000

40 500

20

Source: Fraunhofer IWES: Windmonitor-Größenentwicklung der Windenergieanlagen Onshore [WMon07]

13 20

11 20

09 20

07 20

05 20

03 20

01 20

9 19 9

97 19

95 19

93 19

19

19 91

0

90

0

Height [m]

3000


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Political and legal boundary conditions for the expansion of wind energy in North Rhine-Westphalia

Political and legal boundary conditions for the expansion of wind energy in North Rhine-Westphalia Two degrees at most – this is the international climate policy target of restricting global warming to less than two degrees, referring to the level prior to the start of industrialisation. It means, taking present-day emissions as the basis, that the burden of greenhouse gases must be cut by 50 per cent, extrapolated to all the nations of the world, and by no less than 80 to 95 per cent in the industrialised countries. European and German climate protection targets The European Union supports this target, and aims to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2020. Energy efficiency is to be raised by 20 per cent in the same period, and the percentage share of renewable energies in total energy consumption expanded by 20 per cent. According to the EU’s 2009 climate guideline, one fifth of Europe’s energy needs are to be met from renewable sources by 2020. A binding renewable energy target for German climate protection policy derives from this: 18 per cent of the country’s gross final energy consumption must be met from regenerable sources by the same year. To achieve this, renewable energy’s share of total power consumption must increase to not less than 35 per cent by 2020. This figure is to increase to not less than 80 per cent by

2050. Wind energy is to supply the decisive contributions to achieving these targets. Energy policy in North Rhine-Westphalia This is where NRW’s climate protection strategy comes into play. The largest federal state by population and, in its central regions, the most densely populated, is also the Federal Republic’s largest “energy state”, accounting for around one third of the country’s energy production. The state government intends to increase wind energy’s share of power supply from its present 4 to 15 per cent by the year 2020. The acceleration of the energy turnaround is linked to the target of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by not less than 25 per cent by 2020, and by not less than 80 per cent by 2050, using total emissions for 1990 as the baseline year in both cases. The Wind Energy Decree The state government enacted a new decree for the planning and approval of wind energy installations (the “Wind Energy Decree”) in July 2011, in order to accelerate the expansion of wind energy in NRW. This governs the designation of sites for wind energy in regional and land-use planning in more detail, and includes recom-


Political and legal boundary conditions for the expansion of wind energy in North Rhine-Westphalia

mendations for the improvement of boundary conditions for repowering and for the re-examination of height restrictions. It also provides orientation concerning safety distances between wind energy installations and residential buildings, and concerning requirements for calculation of noise pollution and biodiversity. The Wind Energy Decree, firmly embedded in the state’s climate protection strategy, thus aims at achieving greater transparency of planning. It also specifies in more detail the range of advisory services to be provided to citizens by the municipalities, and recommends as indispensable the “inclusion” of citizens via citizens’ wind farms. The State Development Plan The new Wind Energy Decree came into existence via intensive and constructive dialogue between numerous authorities, associations and organisations. It provides the framework for the wind energy section of the new State Development Plan now being drafted, which is intended to assure planning certainty for wind energy investors and users for the coming years up to around 2030. It is to be stipulated that renewable energy sources are to be used with priority for energy supplies. The state government expects the governmental districts not to be satisfied simply with the fulfilment of

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minimum requirements, but also to show a much greater commitment. Around two per cent of the surface area of the state is thus to be made available for the use of wind energy. One binding target is that spoil heaps and landfills, in particular, are to be used as sites for wind energy facilities; only those considered tourist attractions may be excepted from this provision. Equally indispensable is the stipulation that adequate sites, proportional to the respective regional potential, are to be designated for the use of wind energy. In this future-orientated plan, regional and land-use planning are required to support all repowering initiatives intended to replace older systems with new, higher-output ones. The overall aim here is that of leaving the number of wind energy installations in North Rhine-Westphalia more or less unchanged compared to 2013, despite significant increases in power generation. An example: The Arnsberg Regional Plan The Arnsberg governmental district is the first of the five governmental districts in NRW to start the drafting of a regional plan for the coming years, in order to implement the state government’s targets. This plan


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Political and legal boundary conditions for the expansion of wind energy in North Rhine-Westphalia

specifies the regional planning targets for the development of the region and for all regionally significant planning and projects in the planning territory envisaged by the State Development Plan. A separate “Energy” subsection is currently being evolved. Content guidelines which form the basis for planning and for intensive dialogue with the regional players have been developed by way of preparation and support for the drafting work. These set out basic legal structures for the designation of the 18,000 hectares of land envisaged for utilisation of wind energy in Arnsberg in the State Development Plan. They also govern repowering activities even outside the designated priority areas and the use of wind energy in wooded areas. The recommendation in these guidelines for intermunicipal cooperation is groundbreaking, in view of the fact that the space requirements of modern wind farms may in some cases exceed the site space available in certain municipalities. This recommendation is particularly important with respect to so-called “enshadowment effects”. Where the concentration zones of various municipalities are adjacent, these may impair the utilisability of the particular zone, and thus reduce the overall potential. The Arnsberg initiative provides a good example of how the targets specified in the State Development Plan can be implemented in regional planning. Guidelines The new Wind Energy Directive is given more detailed substance in accompanying guidelines. There will continue to be no use of wind energy in nature reserves and in areas of significance for the conservation of nature, but the “Wind in the Woods” guideline nonetheless opens up wooded areas for planning of wind energy utilisation again. This guide examines the technical, forestry management and planning boundary conditions

which may be applicable for the designation of new concentration zones for wind energy installations in woods – at locations not excluded by ecologically valuable woodlands, and locations already impaired by hurricane damage, such as the so-called “Kyrill” sites. The new “Implementation of biodiversity and habitat protection in the planning and approval of wind energy installations” guideline supportingly specifies questions relevant to the conservation of nature for all sites useable for the generation of wind power. The content of the guideline focuses on the specific effects resulting from the operation of wind energy facilities. The methodology for the study of species sensitive to wind energy installations, and the way in which such species are to be taken into account in the mandatory assessments, are discussed. The procedures for both the Biodiversity Impact Assessment (BIA) and the FFH (Flora, Fauna, Habitat) Impact Assessment are depicted in detail. The relevant interaction of regional planning, municipal land-use planning and approval procedures is also outlined. The intention here is to standardise administrative procedures, impose uniform provisions throughout the state, and assure adherence to European nature conservation legislation. These two guidelines are intended to eliminate the legal uncertainty prevailing up to now in planning for the construction of wind energy facilities, and as a further contribution to accelerating the energy turnaround in North Rhine-Westphalia – in harmony with the conservation of nature. The state government also publishes information material on specific topics which, on the one hand, pursues the overall strategy of the expansion of the use of renewable energy sources and, on the other hand, also takes account of the justified interests of the environment, industry and the population, in order to provide recommendations for wind-farm project planners, investors, operators, and conservation activists.


Facts and figures

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Facts and figures

Interview with Dr. Norbert Allnoch, of the IWR Institute of the Renewable Energy Industry Dr. Norbert Allnoch is the founder and head of the IWR Institute of the Renewable Energy Industry in Münster. In this interview, he talks about the situation and evolution of wind energy in NRW, and explains why the holistically conceived development perspective is so important for the industry.

Dr. Allnoch, how has wind energy evolved up to now in North Rhine-Westphalia? NRW has been involved in wind energy from the very start, and I myself have experienced its development since 1982. In the late 80s, there was, for example, WISTRA, a pioneering project that was extremely innovative for a landlocked state at that time. Industry in NRW, and the subsupplier industry, in particular, very quickly adjusted to wind energy as a new market. Mechanical and electrical engineering in the state both benefited from rapid expansion, for example. There are also good prospects for the subsupplier industry when the offshore potentials now opening up are examined.

How can this development be accelerated? I have been involved with the renewable energy sources for a very long time, and I was concerned

even at an early stage to regard and present wind energy and the other regenerable technologies as an important future branch of industry, a “green” industry, so to speak. To achieve this, it is important that not only the aspirations and targets of climate protection should dominate, but rather that the evolution of the industry and the entire related structure be taken into account and put into focus. Only then will a young industry be able to develop healthily. Regenerative energy and the economic aspects must be viewed together, and as an “all-in” package.

Industry and its overall structure – what does this mean, in your view? Four “modules” are of decisive importance for the regenerative energy industry. Energy and environmental or climate protection are one area. Another important element is industry, or rather manufacturing industry,

»


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»

with the topics, therefore, of industrial production, location and structure. Science and research, plus initial and further training, are other essential factors. A young industry such as the regenerable energy sector and wind energy, in particular, can only be decisively nurtured, and enabled to flourish even against international competition, provided all these modules mesh with one another.

How do you view repowering? Repowering will certainly generate new impulses, and it is extremely important to support this. Repowering will only really become topical in 2014 or 2015. The NRW state government’s repowering initiative is being started even now, and thus at an early stage, which is exemplary. The municipalities need a long lead time to initiate corresponding projects. The economic policy effects of repowering in NRW should not be overstated, however, since the wind industry is, in particular, successfully active internationally.

So what should be done? How can the industry be furthered in NRW? We need to evolve holistic concepts which aim at strengthening the structure and the value chain here at home. The target must be to enhance the region’s

Facts and figures

attractiveness as a location by means of systematic infrastructural provisions and competence centres. NRW already plays an important role in the wind industry, as far as know-how and development are concerned. We in NRW are good at developing new and innovative technologies. But then comes the leap from the pioneering phase on a national market to international market maturity – and that’s where the difficulties lie. The economic policy of other countries, such as China, for example, often succeeds better here. The core question is: What boundary conditions are necessary to enable medium-sized enterprises from NRW to graduate to being international players. The key element is that not only climate policy, but also economic and structural policy must be shaped in such a way that young industries have a chance of success on the global market. We could, without doubt, also achieve our climate protection targets by having the necessary wind turbines built in other countries. But we don’t want that. As an industrialised nation, we want to play an important role. The potentials exist, and we now need to further the trend, evolve new concepts for them, and implement them without undue delay.


Facts and figures

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The international and European view Wind energy is in demand around the world: according to the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA), global installed wind energy output was around 282,000 MW at the end of 2012. That year alone witnessed new capacity of some 45,000 MW, a significant increase over the preceding year. At international level, Germany held third place, behind China and the USA. The greatest growth (13,200 MW of output) was in China. This country, with a total installed capacity of more than 75,000 MW, is ahead of the USA, where an additional 13,124 MW of capacity was created during the same period, thus bringing its total installed capacity to around 60,000 MW of wind energy. Among the nations of Europe, Germany occupies first ranking in terms of total installed onshore wind energy capacity. Germany also had the highest rate of new construction in Europe in 2013, with 3,238 new MW installed, ahead of the United Kingdom (1,883 MW), Poland (894 MW) and Sweden (724 MW).

Percentages of installed wind energy capacity in 2012 (MW)

Portugal 1.6% Canada 2.2% France 2.5%

United Kingdom 3.0%

At 7.3 of total gross electricity generation, wind energy bears the lion’s share of energy recovery from renewable energy sources, followed by biomass (6.6 %), photovoltaics (4.6 %) and hydropower (3.3 %).

Gross electricity generation 2011 in Germany by energy sources

Lignite 25.7%

Other countries 14.1% China 26.8%

Total world installed capacity: 282,482 MW

Italy 2.9%

Germany Wind energy will play a central role in the future energy mix, and remain the predominant renewable energy source in the power sector. In its Orientation Scenario A, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety forecasts growth in installed generation capacity of onshore wind energy of 39 GW in 2020, compared to 34 GW in 2013. According to the German Wind Energy Association, total installed wind energy capacity in Germany increased more than fivefold from 2000 to 2013, from 6,095 MW in 2000 to a current 33,730 MW. Throughout Germany, 1,202 wind energy facilities with an output totalling 3,238.41 MW were installed in the context of new construction, repowering and offshore projects in 2013. The country thus had 23,748 operational wind energy installations at the end of that year.

Flowing + stored water 3.3%

Other energy sources 5.9%

Natural gas 11.3%

Wind power 7.3% Renewable energy sources 22.0%

Biomass 6.6%

India 6.5% Spain 8.1%

USA 21.2%

Hard coal 19.1%

Germany 11.1%

Source: EWEA

Photovoltaics 4.6%

Source: DESTATIS

Other renewable energy sources 0.2% Nuclear energy 16.0%


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Facts and figures

Installed wind energy capacity in MW and number of installations, 2012

SchleswigHolstein

3,397 2,929

MecklenburgVorpommern

Hamburg 2,339 1,612

55 59

Bremen Lower Saxony

151 78

Berlin 2 1

SchleswigHolstein Brandenburg

4,048 2,501

North Rhine-Westphalia

7,646 5,490

Saxony-Anhalt

5,047 3,204

3,397 2,929

MecklenburgVorpommern

Hamburg

Saxony 2,339 1,612

55 59 Thuringia

3,415 2,984

Bremen

1,039 858

Hesse

Lower Saxony

151 78

993 675

973 754

Berlin RhinelandPalatinate

2 1

4,048 2,501

Saarland

2,303 1,357

167 100

North Rhine-Westphalia

7,646 5,490

Brandenburg

Saxony-Anhalt

5,047 3,204

1,120 652

Saxony

33,731 23,645

533 391

Bavaria Thuringia

3,415 2,984

Germany

1,039 858

Hesse BadenWürttemberg

993 675 973 754

RhinelandPalatinate

Saarland

2,303 1,357

167 100 1,120 652

33,731 23,645

33,731 23,645 Germany Germany Source: BWE 2013

533 391

BadenWürttemberg

■ Installed capacity (in MW) ■Bavaria Number of installations


Facts and figures

19

Experts forecast an approximately six-fold increase in the generation of electricity from renewable energy sources between 2000 and 2020. While some 37 terawatt hours (TWh) of power were generated from renewable energy sources in 2007, current computations predict a rise to just over 230 TWh in 2020. Wind energy is considered to have the greatest future development potential, with photovoltaics and biomass facilities enjoying a comparatively slight but nonetheless steady rate of increase across these years. North Rhine-Westphalia Installed wind energy capacity approximately quintupled in Germany’s largest energy state, North RhineWestphalia, between 2000 and 2013: from 643 MW in 2000 to 3,414.67 MW in 2013. At the same time the rate of increase processed analogically to the all-German wind energy expansion. It will be necessary to quadruple wind energy’s current share of overall power supplies by means of designation

of new sites and by means of repowering projects if the renewable energy expansion targets are to be achieved. In 2020, wind energy installations in North RhineWestphalia would be required to provide a net power output of 20.7 terawatt hours (TWh) annually. According to calculations by the NRW State Environment Agency, up to 71 terawatt hours would even be potentially achievable under the existing boundary conditions. Comparative assessment of the German federal states North Rhine-Westphalia is one of the leading federal states in the field of onshore wind energy, along with Lower Saxony, Brandenburg, Saxony-Anhalt and Schleswig-Holstein. NRW, with an installed capacity of 3414.67 MW in 2013, thus accounts for around 10.1 per cent of total German installed capacity. Despite the state’s inland location, the use of wind energy holds great economic potentials in North Rhine-Westphalia, and is a central strategic element in the energy turnaround.

Cumulative wind energy capacity (in MW) for NRW

cumulative capacity in MW

3,500 3,000 2,500 1,822

2,000

2,053

2,226

2,392

2,557

2,677

2,831

2,928

2009

2010

3,070

3,182

1,445

1,500 1,009

1,000

643

500 0 2000

Source: BWE 2013

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2011

2012


20

Wind energy and industry

Wind energy and industry

Interview with Dr.-Ing. Ralf G. Wittor, of Eickhoff Antriebstechnik GmbH Dr.-Ing. Ralf G. Wittor is CEO of Eickhoff Antriebstechnik GmbH. This Bochum-based company is part of the Eickhoff group, and specialises in the production of industrial and wind energy gearboxes and gearing systems. In our interview, Wittor talks about North Rhine-Westphalia as a wind energy state and the industry’s prospects.

Herr Dr. Wittor, what makes North RhineWestphalia a particular wind energy state? I’ll have to answer your question in two parts. As far as power generation from wind energy is concerned, North Rhine-Westphalia is not in the lead. NRW is an important subsupplier for the construction of wind energy installations, however, particularly where gearing systems are concerned. Leading companies develop and produce the technology and the hardware for these systems in our state, so it’s true to say that NRW is, in any case, an important wind energy state.

Why is NRW so important for wind energy in precisely the field of gearing systems? Gearing systems and gearboxes are needed in many mechanical systems, and wind turbines need them at several points, for rotor-blade adjustment, for example, for rotation of the tower, and also to convert high wind forces to smaller forces which the generators can cope with. Gears are a form of torque converter.

NRW has industries that possess many years of experience with gearing systems, in the field of mining, like our company, for example, or also in general mechanical engineering. North Rhine-Westphalia’s gearing system industry has tradition and know-how, and is the market leader in this segment. The makers of wind power systems realised at an early stage that they needed heavyduty gearboxes and turned for them to the experienced companies in NRW, from whom they initially obtained standard gearbox systems. The need for specialised designs soon became apparent, and that, in short, is how gearing engineering for wind turbines has evolved in NRW.

What potentials do you see for wind energy in NRW, in other words, the potentials for the onshore market? What bothers me is that wind energy is perceived at present primarily as an offshore market, probably because that’s where the focus of media interest lies. The offshore hype has not stopped yet. But much more is actually happening on shore. My opinion is that there are still


Wind energy and industry

important challenges for onshore installations if they are to make a significant contribution to the energy turnaround. NRW can also do even more here. I find the ideas now being discussed good. Sites where there are already infrastructural concentrations, such as main traffic routes, can be used, for example. Another important topic for NRW is wind power above woods, using installations that project well beyond the treetops. The new systems have higher towers and larger rotors, which means that the new generations of wind turbines can make reality of these ideas.

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important development in onshore systems. So larger machines with longer rotor blades, but that also means significantly greater torques. All subsuppliers, including the producers of generators, converters and towers, and we gear makers in NRW as well, must prepare for this. We must modify and further develop our products correspondingly. This is one of the central technical questions at the moment.

How international is NRW’s wind industry? What technical developments are coming up in the wind industry? The decisive driver of evolution for these systems are the rotor blades, they are getting longer and longer. That makes it possible to generate ever larger torques, but these are not simply converted into greater output, but instead, wherever possible, into a more constant power yield. The machines must be able to generate more electricity even at lower wind velocities. This is an extremely

That’s an easy question: it operates globally. The makers of large components have to orientate themselves around the international market, since neither NRW nor even Germany as a whole is the decisive market for the installation of wind energy systems. As a subsupplier based in NRW, I myself also need to know precisely how the wind market is developing internationally, and how I should prepare my organisation.


22

Structural change in NRW North Rhine-Westphalia is, from an economic viewpoint, a giant: if it were an independent country it would hold 18th place in the global ranking of all national economies, thanks to its gross domestic product (GDP) of around 582 billion euros. That is only one place behind the Netherlands, and ahead of Turkey. NRW contributes no less than 22 per cent to the domestic product of the Federal Republic of Germany, and a whole 4.5 per cent to that of Europe. “Structural change now seems to be the norm in North Rhine-Westphalia”, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung daily newspaper has commented. And the state has learned to nurture change carefully: as the FAZ notes, NRW has a good number of major companies, but still more “stars” in its provinces. These include a large number of “hidden champions”, i.e., companies who are global market leaders in their niches, but nonetheless remain completely unknown to most consumers. Again and again, companies in North Rhine-Westphalia have

Wind energy and industry

adapted impressively to technological change and in recent decades have made the state one of the world’s most important industrial regions. Most medium-sized enterprises base the further development of their products on their many years of experience and expertise in their market segment. In many cases, their technical knowledge and production know-how can be traced back to the supposedly “old” technologies of coal and steel production. In North Rhine-Westphalia, wind energy is both a key technology and a driver of exports. Companies which have mastered structural change and entered the wind energy sector, adapting their specific products and services to global market needs, can be found in all industries: chemicals, mechanical and plant engineering, structural steel, mining, logistics, banking and insurance. They all supply essential and, in some cases, highly specialised, products for the wind industry, as the following examples, from a large range of similar companies, illustrate:


Wind energy and industry

ABB AG, Bad Honnef Energy generation routes are changing, but transformers will always be there Using a century of experience gained, inter alia, in conventional power plant engineering, the around 360 employees at ABB’s Bad Honnef plant produce transformers for use in offshore wind farms, among other applications. Every new transformer is a “one-off”, and is tailored using ultra-modern technology precisely to the customer’s requirements and the needs of the specific application. The plant’s product range also includes phase modifiers for active load flow management. This balances out the effects caused by differing rates of feed-in, making it possible to transmit electricity efficiently across great distances. The Bad Honnef plant can produce high-quality, technically complex products in relatively short times. These advanced high-tech solutions are ABB’s important contribution to the success of the energy turnaround. ABB is a leading technology group in energy and automation systems. Its range includes energy-engineering products and systems, low-voltage products, process automation equipment, industrial automation and drive systems. The company employs around 145,000 persons in some 100 countries. In Germany, where it has approx. 10,000 employees, ABB achieved sales of 3.57 billion euros in 2012.

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Dörken MKS-Systeme GmbH & Co. KG, Herdecke Environmental protection in practice – from cars to wind energy As thin and durable as possible: high-performance corrosion protection has to stand up to ultra-high exposure and highly complex requirements. It is an indispensable element in wind energy engineering, to protect rotor blades, for example. Dörken has been developing and producing such Mikroschicht-Korrosionsschutz-Systeme (MKS) for more than thirty years; they are used wherever there is a need to protect components against corrosion. From the very start, the company has been careful to eliminate heavy metals harmful for health and the environment, such as chromium, lead and cadmium, from its production processes. Its environmentally friendly technological approach enabled it to score in the automotive industry in 2007, with the introduction of a Europe-wide ban on coatings containing chromium(VI). The company is now also a popular partner for the wind industry. Thanks to its extremely efficient surface protection products and their environmentally safe production routes, Dörken MKS has also benefited from the growth in wind energy, and continues to make an important contribution to its expansion.


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Gebr. Eickhoff Maschinenfabrik und Eisengießerei GmbH, Bochum From the depths of the earth up into the wind From classical mining to high-tech industry: the history of the Eickhoff group began more than 140 years ago with the establishment of a foundry and a factory making machinery for coal mining in the very heart of the Ruhr. These roots continue to shape the now global activities of this medium-sized, family-managed, traditional company even today. The Eickhoff Antriebstechnik GmbH subsidiary has been producing gearing systems for wind energy installations since 1990. This gearbox maker, with its great level of vertical integration, specialised metallurgical know-how from its foundry, combined with the manufacturing capabilities gained from building gearboxes for the mining industry, is now one of the world market’s leading suppliers. In addition to its many years of experience in plant and system engineering, the company places its faith in its broad range of products and services: From design closely coordinated with the customer, and high-speed prototyping, complete with special high-performance tests, up to and including flexible series production in co-ordination with the customer. Before delivery, every gearbox is submitted on the inspection stand to the programme of testing agreed with the customer, including documentation of its vibration performance. Business in gearing systems for wind energy facilities has increased greatly in recent years, and is now the group’s largest source of sales.

Wind energy and industry

August Friedberg GmbH, Gelsenkirchen Horse shoe nails with a thread Under its “Get a Grip” motto, the family-managed August Friedberg company, with its long tradition, specialises in the development and production of high-quality joining and fastening elements. What began more than 125 years ago with the production of hors shoe nails and screws for the mining industry in the central Ruhr has evolved, via continuous development stretching across several generations, into a diversified manufacturing company. Its present-day products are used around the globe in steel and civil engineering, in the automotive industry, and in mechanical and plant engineering. The company is also a leading subsupplier to the wind industry, furnishing know-how that secures gigantic megawatt-range installations against the enormous forces of nature: from the foundation fixings, via the nacelle and spinner fastenings, up to and including the tower and rotor blade fixings, numerous Friedberg products can nowadays be found in many of the wind energy installations operating around the globe. The company’s threaded joining elements are tailored to the special requirements of the application, developed in close cooperation with the user, and manufactured using highly reliable production methods. The concluding quality inspections assure high levels of safety and dependability in use.


Wind energy and industry

Gothaer Versicherungsbank VVAG, Cologne From fire to wind The Gothaer was founded in 1820, and is one of Germany’s longest established insurance companies. Having started in fire insurance, the group is now one of the Federal Republic’s ten largest property insurers, and underwrites some 13,000 wind energy facilities around the world. The “Gothaer” has supported the rapid expansion of renewable energy in Germany intensively from the very start, and has evolved special insurance solutions for wind energy installations. This German, French, Austrian and Belgian market leader nowadays provides insurance cover for facilities worth multi-billion euro amounts, thus furnishing the vital basis without which many investors would not have committed their resources. The Gothaer intends to monitor and support market developments in the renewable energy industry intensively, in order to be able, in the future, too, to evaluate the viability of new technologies and itself evolve insurance products appropriate to the market and the risks involved. Insurers such as the Gothaer are, what is more, increasingly becoming investors: in recent years, the Gothaer has acquired both solar and wind energy installations, and is planning investments of around 500 million euros in this sector in the next few years.

25

Henkel AG & Co. KGaA, Düsseldorf It all started with a detergent From Persil to high-performance adhesives and sealants for the wind energy industry: Henkel is a global supplier of detergents and cleaning agents, beauty and care products, and adhesives technologies. This Düsseldorfdomiciled company, founded in 1876, holds pole market positions in the consumer and industrial sectors with its around 47,000 employees and its world-known brands, such as Persil, Schwarzkopf and Loctite global. Sales in the 2012 business year totalled more than 16 million euros. Henkel has a broad range of high-performance adhesive and sealant products for wind energy applications. These include UV- and weathering-resistant sealing systems for steel tower segments, anaerobic threaded-joint securing systems, and a diverse range of products for adhesive bonding of components. Henkel also supplies to the makers of rotor blades polyurethane-based adhesives that permit more efficient rotor blade production. The 100 metre high TimberTower, the world’s first wind energy installation with a wooden tower, was completed in spruce in 2012 using various member of Henkel’s Purbond family of wood adhesives.


26

G. Siempelkamp GmbH & Co. KG, Krefeld From a textile industry supplier to series manufacturer for wind energy Innovation as a tradition: based for more than 130 years in the town of Krefeld, equipment supplier Siempelkamp has a global presence in its mechanical and plant engineering, casting systems and nuclear technology business activities. It all started with components for presses used in the textile industry on the Lower Rhine. Now the company has penetrated numerous markets with its hand-moulded ductile iron castings of up to 320 t unit weight. Since 1999, Siempelkamp has also supplied structural elements such as turbine frames, rotor spinners, stator stars and stub shafts for large onshore and offshore wind energy installations. The first projects involved production of components for 1.5 MW wind energy machines; in recent years, Siempelkamp has expanded its capabilities to include series production for the up to 7.5 MW system range. Cast components for offshore wind energy installations presented particularly great challenges in terms of maximum strength and stability with the lowest possible unit weights. The foundry in Krefeld mastered these with its many years of know-how and the use of the ductile iron material. Around 2800 components for onshore and offshore wind turbines have been delivered up to now.

Wind energy and industry

ThyssenKrupp Rothe Erde GmbH, Dortmund From railways in the 19th century to wind energy in the 21st ThyssenKrupp Rothe Erde GmbH, a member of the ThyssenKrupp group’s Business Area Components Technology, is the world’s largest producer of large rolling-element bearings and also occupies a leading market position in seamless rolled rings. The company was founded in 1855 to produce axles, wheels, fittings and wagons from internally smelted iron for the railway sector. This company’s tower and blade bearings have generated significant impulses around the world in the most diverse range of output categories during the evolution of wind energy technology. Another milestone was the development of rotor bearings. This manufacturer was involved in the design of the very first research systems and prototypes, and provides makers of wind energy facilities with extensive experience drawn from more than three decades of international activity. Ultra-modern test facilities at the company’s own Research & Development Center are used to test bearing designs under the most adverse service conditions, to research new developments and evolve future-orientated solutions for practical application. Other products include wind tower slewing rings and foundation sections, gearing systems, shaft/spinner connections and brake disks.


Research & Development

Wind energy and industry

27

NRW value and supply chain

System production

Personnel/ skilled employees

Finance

Product engeneering

Logistics + Supply Chain Management

Rotor blades

Gearing systems

Shafts and bearings Project development/ planning Generator Transport/installation (systems, farms) Tower

Investors / Operators Connection to grid Plastic components

Installation

Operation

Operations & Maintenance

Companies in the industry According to the Renewable Energy Agency, just over 34,000 companies in Germany are active in the renewable energy sector, including (in 2012) just on 4,200 in North Rhine-Westphalia. Here, too, the bandwidth extends from globally present company groups, via medium-sized enterprises, up to and including small craft firms. These companies work in the most diverse range of fields, including production, finance, project planning, installation, servicing/maintenance and the subsupplier segment. The great complexity of wind energy systems is reflected in their value chain, which extends to virtually all corporately organised service and production sectors. Precise differentiation is difficult, since not only large companies, such as the wind energy system producers, are involved, but also very many medium-sized and smaller organisations, which achieve only parts of their income from products and services for the wind industry. EnergyAgency.NRW surveys indicate that more than four hundred companies in the state work in the wind energy sector alone. North Rhine-Westphalia, with its high concentration of subsuppliers and service providers for both the onshore and offshore industry, is the Number 1 supplier state for the German wind energy industry. World-leading suppliers of gearing systems for wind energy installations,

Control and power transmission systems

such as Bosch Rexroth, Renk, Siemens-Winergy and Eickhoff are based in NRW. The state is, in addition, one of the leading Research & Development locations: a total of twenty-eight university and non-university institutions conduct research into wind energy technology here. Employment Wind energy is an engine of employment for Germany as an industrial location. Around 118,000 persons were employed in the wind energy sector throughout Germany in 2012, and the German Wind Energy Association is forecasting a continuous rise in jobs in the German wind sector up to 160,000 in 2030. In the traditional mining and steel state of North Rhine-Westphalia alone, 14,600 persons were working in the wind sector in 2012, according to Renewable Energy Agency statistics. Among all the federal German states, North Rhine-Westphalia thus occupies second place, directly behind Lower Saxony. This equates to an approx. 12.4 per cent share of the total number of wind energy jobs in Germany. This demonstrates that the beneficiaries of the expansion of wind energy are by no means to be found only in the coastal regions where the majority of wind energy installations are located. According to information from the WAB Wind Energy Agency, the labour-intensive production of components for offshore expansion of wind energy generates more than 2,500 jobs in the subsupplier industry in North Rhine-Westphalia. NRW thus holds pole position in wind energy employment.


28

Wind energy and industry

Employment in wind energy in 2012, by federal state

North Rhine-Westphalia

26,390

Lower Saxony

14,600

Bavaria

11,900

Saxony-Anhalt

10,040

Baden-Württemberg

9,220

Schleswig-Holstein

8,160

Hamburg

5,080

Brandenburg

4,880

Saxony

4,810

Bremen

4,800 4,760

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

4,030

Hesse

3,680

Rhineland-Palatinate

2,680

Berlin

1,910

Thuringia

920

Saarland 0

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

Number of employees

Source: Renewable Energy Agency

Turnover NRW wind industry companies are also in the top group in terms of turnover. Investments in wind energy facilities installed in Germany amounted in 2012 to approx. 2.6 billion euros. Sales by German manufacturing industry were 8.9 billion euros in 2011, an increase of just on 10 per cent compared to the previous year (8.1 billion €). Sales of just on 2.1 billion euros were achieved in plant and system engineering in North Rhine-Westphalia in 2011, a rise of slightly above 10 per cent compared to the preceding year (approx. 1.9 billion €). In addition, a large number of subsupplier companies also generate additional turnover throughout the value chain. According to WAB Wind Energy Agency information, NRW companies’ share of German sales in offshore wind energy is around 23 per cent of total sales for the wind energy industry in Germany. NRW companies active in the offshore sector thus hold top ranking on an all-German basis. Export orientation and internationalisation German manufacturers and subsuppliers occupy a leading international position in the expansion of wind energy. German technologies and wind energy know-how are in demand on energy markets worldwide. Facility makers from around the world obtain systems and com-

ponents for the production of their equipment from Germany, and thus predominantly from North RhineWestphalia. Statistics published by the German Wind Energy Association indicate exports of between 65 and 70 per cent of production by wind energy system makers producing in Germany in 2012. The citizens’ wind farm revenue-sharing model The use of wind energy is an essential element in the decentralised provision of renewable energy. With its broad and diverse player structure, it also generates a high level of added value which strengthens, very largely irrespective of economic cycles, the finances of the municipalities. Most of all, the state’s people must be mobilised if the energy turnaround is to be accelerated. So-called “citizens’ wind farms” provide good opportunities of involving citizens in the benefits at regional and district level, with significant economic attractions. Some twenty-five years after the installation of the first wind energy facilities, citizens’ energy is on the up. Numerous citizens’ wind farms have now been successfully established in NRW. These, as a form of citizens’ participation, not only distribute costs, they also assure a share of the profits. Citizens’ wind farms and the potentials for participation may be organised in a number of different


Wind energy and industry

ways: whether it’s a GmbH & Co. KG, a registered co-operative society (eG), Institution under Public Law (AöR), a civil-law partnership (GbR), a foundation, energy contracting, or bearer bond, citizens’ opportunities of taking a stake in one or more wind energy installations by means of investment are many and diverse. The state of NRW’s “Climate protection via citizens’ energy installations” guideline provides a comprehensive overview, plus orientation, to the complex web of economic corporate forms which can, roughly, be split into two categories, in which citizens either co-finance and/or co-produce. In the case of citizens co-producing, the interested group of persons founds an operating company. Each individual participant is then a co-owner and operator of this company. Each individual thus assumes entrepreneurial responsibility, bearing the entire risk, but also enjoys a full share of the profits. The vital precondition here is careful planning, and risk minimisation via experienced operators and/or insurances.

29

In the case of co-financing, the citizens co-finance thirdparty projects, but they do not, generally, assume any entrepreneurial responsibility, and do not become coowners. In many cases, direct offers by operators are accepted. Stake-taking in corresponding funds has also become increasingly established. Citizens’ wind farms reinforce democratic structures, provide opportunities for profit-sharing, and create potentials for keeping profits in the region. Successful models are regionally rooted in three ways: the citizen stakeholders live in the region, the operating company is domiciled in the region, and the wind energy facilities are also constructed in the same region. In addition, there are greater tax yields for the municipalities, due to the citizens’ investment in the locality, and also from companies which enjoy new sources of orders and therefore income as a result of their installation and/or service activities.


30

Wind energy and industry

EnergyAgency.NRW’s online subsidy navigator provides an overview of current opportunities for support and financing of the use of wind energy. A number of examples: ■ The Renewable Energy Sources Act (RESA) is a central instrument for the promotion of wind energy. For a period of twenty years, operators of wind energy facilities are paid a fixed rate per kilowatt hour of wind-electricity generated. The initial payment rate is reduced each year by a specific percentage (1.5 % since 2012) for newly commissioned installations. The amounts vary according to the type of installation and its output; repowered facilities, for example, receive a slightly higher initial rate. Payments may also be higher if the installation contributes to certain improvements in grid integration. In addition to payments for wind power, the Renewable Energy Sources Act also governs the prioritised purchase of this electricity. A revision is scheduled in 2014.

Subsidies A whole range of financial-subsidy provisions is available for the expansion of wind energy. The sources are, depending on the particular provision: the federal government, the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, or banks such as the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW) banking group, which promote the expansion of sustainable regenerative energy supplies by means of loans and nonrepayable grants. The various provisions differ in terms of the type, amount and repayment term of the subsidy. Private persons, non-profit organisations, municipalities and private companies may be eligible to apply, depending, again, on the particular provision. Owner co-operatives of citizens’ wind farms can also obtain subsidies and grants in several instances.

■ The KfW’s Renewable Energy Standard programme (Programme No. 270) makes provision for low-interest financing of wind energy projects. The construction of new and modernisation of existing wind energy facilities (repowering) can be subsidised up to 100 per cent of the investment, up to a maximum amount of 25 million euros. The rate of interest is determined on the basis of credit risk, while loan terms vary between a minimum of five and a maximum of twenty years. ■ The Rentenbank agricultural development bank’s “Energy from the Land” promotion programme is aimed specifically at wind energy enterprises, the majority shareholdings in which are held by local citizens, companies and land owners and the power from which is fed into the public grid. Loans up to a maximum of 10 million euros with maximum terms of twenty years are available. This programme is of interest for small- and medium-sized enterprises that intend to develop and operate citizens’ wind farm models, in particular. ■ The NRW.Bank provides support for energy infrastructure projects with its financing loans, in particular. These are used, for example, to co-finance the purchase of sites needed for the construction of a wind energy facility.

Details of these and other promotion programmes for onshore and offshore wind energy projects can be viewed at www.foerder-navi.de.


Offshore wind-energy

31

Offshore wind energy – market driver for North Rhine-Westphalia The development and construction of commercial offshore wind farms off the German coast have already started, and the first farms have been completed. In the meantime, the domestic offshore wind energy industry has become firmly established: around 18,000 persons were employed in this segment by the end of 2012, accounting for around 15 per cent of total jobs in the German wind energy sector, according to information from the IWR Institute of the Renewable Energy Industry. Not only shipbuilders, marine fabricators, ports, system/ component manufacturers and wind-farm operators are benefiting from this trend – subsuppliers active in mechanical engineering, fabrication and electrical engineering, and thus companies in NRW in many cases, are also profiting from it. The offshore wind energy market in Europe and Germany Statistics from the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) indicate that a total of fifty-eight offshore wind farms in ten countries were supplying a total of 6,040 MW of wind power by late June, 2013. Current growth is largely focused on the United Kingdom and Denmark. In

Germany, 48 new offshore wind energy facilities were completed and connected to the grid in 2013, bringing currently installed output off German coasts to 520.3 MW. Seven such farms in the North Sea, and one in the Baltic, are currently under construction, with some already nearing completion. Market forecasts for offshore wind energy up to 2020 A significant expansion of offshore wind energy in Europe is anticipated, the highest rates of growth being in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Sweden and Germany. European energy policy plans envisage offshore wind farms with a total output of 60 GW in operation by the year 2020. Despite optimistic forecasts, the expansion of offshore generation of wind power has progressed only slowly in Germany in recent years. Discussions concerning the amendment of the Renewable Energy Sources Act (RESA) and delays in grid connection have caused further uncertainty in the industry. For this reason, the political target of 10 GW installed off German coasts by 2020 will probably not be met. The overall European market trend


32

nonetheless generates great benefits for the market in NRW and for its small- and medium-sized enterprises: 72 per cent of all medium-sized companies in the offshore wind sector are domiciled in North Rhine-Westphalia. Impetus for NRW’s wind industry Wealth creation in the offshore wind industry occurs not only in coastal regions, it is also an economic engine for inland German states such as North Rhine-Westphalia. The federal states close to the coastline above all produce large difficult-to-transport components such as rotor blades and foundations, while companies in NRW supply smaller components, such as gearboxes, generators, brakes, bearings and castings, covering the most important sector of the offshore wind industry’s value

Offshore wind-energy

chain. At around 17 per cent of all companies, enterprises active in the supply of systems and components, and subsuppliers, enjoy above-average representation in North Rhine-Westphalia. Together, they achieve more than 50 per cent of the offshore wind industry’s turnover, and employ more than 2,500 persons. North RhineWestphalia’s offshore wind industry thus holds pole position in Germany in terms of employment, and generates turnover of over 1.2 billion euros, equating to around 23 per cent of overall German offshore economic activity, and giving NRW a clear lead over all other federal states. The expansion of offshore wind energy assures NRW of significant investment and sales potentials throughout the value chain, for both the German and the European offshore market.


Mini wind turbines

33

Mini wind turbines

On the domestic market, smaller wind turbines are also attracting consumer and public attention. Under certain boundary conditions, this form of energy generation may be attractive as an energy source aimed primarily at onsite consumption. Germany, with twenty-seven mini wind turbine companies, is the third largest producer country, after China and the USA. Many of these companies are located in North Rhine-Westphalia. This sector has only reached the development stage, however, particularly when compared to the solar energy market. The wind energy models currently available also differ significantly in their quality and market maturity. There has, as yet, not been any consolidation among domestic German producers. The number of mini wind turbines currently installed has not yet been statistically analysed. Estimates by the German Wind Energy Association assume around 10,000 installations in Germany. Mini wind turbines are designed for a range of rated outputs; here, differentiation is made between micro wind turbines (up to 1.5 kW rated output), domestic wind turbines (up to 5 kW rated output), intermediate-scale wind turbines (up to 30 kW rated output) and medium-scale wind turbines (up to 100 kW rated output). At prices ranging between 2,000 and 10,000 euros per kilowatt of rated output, installation costs are relatively high when compared to larger systems in the MW class.

The size of mini wind turbines permits their installation at a large range of locations. For this reason, the state government in 2011 simplified the approval procedure for the installation of smaller wind turbines: the amendment to the NRW State Building Regulations exempted small systems up to 10 m in height from the approval requirement. Systems in purely, generally or special residential zones, and in mixed-utilisation areas, are an exception from this rule. Operators of mini wind turbines must nonetheless demonstrate adherence to all relevant building-law regulations, including those pertaining to environmental protection. The same also applies to requirements for stability, noise abatement, mandatory open spaces, structural analysis and impact on historic sites and buildings. No boom-like market trend needs to be expected in NRW, however. A mini wind turbine is in many cases not an economic proposition. Because the same feed-in tariff as for multi-MW wind turbines applies, the comparatively low wind potential at the customary spinner heights of between 10 and 30 m and the high specific investment costs result in high generating costs. A mini wind turbine is worthwhile only if the electricity generated is very largely consumed on site. Their use may then be cost efficient, in view of the current private customer electricity tariff of 28 cent per kilowatt hour.


34

Research

Research

Interview with Prof. Dr. Georg Jacobs, Center for Wind Power Drives (CWD) Prof. Dr. Georg Jacobs is the head of the Center for Wind Power Drives (CWD) at RWTH University of Aachen. He talks in this interview about wind energy research in North Rhine-Westphalia and its significance for the industry.

Prof. Dr. Jacobs, what are the focuses of wind energy research in North Rhine-Westphalia? Industry and research have been traditionally well positioned in the field of power transmission systems in North Rhine-Westphalia. The power transmission technology of wind turbines is gaining steadily in importance, and is a focus of wind energy research, particularly at Aachen. Other topics on which researchers at both university and non-university institutions in NRW are working include plastics technology for rotors, structural steel engineering for towers and the turbine frame, foundation technologies, aerodynamics and the design of electrical grids.

How is wind energy research at Aachen organised? At Aachen, the Center for Wind Power Drives (CWD) has been set up. It combines seven institutes working on power transmission in wind energy facilities, which will be all housed together in a new building on the RWTH campus as from the summer of 2014. Our Center also includes the new system-testing facility

for testing of onshore wind energy installations, which is still undergoing construction. As for research in this field, NRW has, with its investment in the CWD, created the preconditions necessary to provide effective support to companies in the state and, at the same time, to raise international awareness of them. At the CWD, we are also concerned to intensify co-operation with other scientists, particularly within NRW, with the aim of jointly furthering research in wind energy. We already work closely with the research centre at J端lich.

What research is performed at the CWD? The rotor drive train and its components are critical for the availability of the system as a whole. Failures may occur if the great loads acting on a rotor are not quantified correctly during development of the system. A wind rotor is subject to unscheduled standstills of around one to two weeks each year, and it is important to have precise knowledge of the drive train and of the loads acting on it, in order to further reduce downtimes and repair costs. Wind rotors are exposed to totally unique stress mechanisms, and our aim is to determine what damage


Research

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can occur when, and how it can be minimised. We therefore test these systems in our laboratory. Up to now, we have had only a small system-testing facility, for units of 1 MW, and we have used this to gain important experience and determine test conditions. The new test facility, for systems of up to 4 MW, will be commissioned in September 2014, and we are already preparing a research project supported by NRW.Hightech for this facility, in order that we can start right away with series of measurements.

set it exactly as we need it. The other test facilities, around the world, cannot do this. They are restricted to injecting synthetic loads and are not capable of investigating real-life operating behaviour. Wind-energy facility manufacturers are showing great interest precisely in series of measurements performed during real system operation.

The new test facility will not be the only one, however, other research institutions and producers also have them. What is special about your test facility in Aachen?

For system and gearbox manufacturers in NRW, it is important to determine precisely the loads acting on every component of the drive train as a function of operating state. This knowledge makes it possible to enhance the reliability of wind energy facilities and cut production costs. Our research is thus aimed at improving the cost-efficiency of systems, in order to be more competitive at international level.

Our test facility uses high-performance computers and special load simulators to provide an authentic picture of both the wind and the power grid. We can test the entire real operating behaviour of systems in our laboratory, and this simplifies the performance and improves the informational value of our measurements. And we don’t have to wait for the wind, as we do on site, we can

What importance does your research have for the wind industry in NRW?


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Research as a partner of the industry A future-orientated industry such as wind power can succeed only if it can make use of new research discoveries promptly and directly – whether it be by way of close cooperation between enterprises and research institutions, or by way of the implementation of universally accessible new perceptions on innovative products and services. This is the foundation, inter alia, of the great economic success of the wind energy subsupplier companies, which have adapted or optimised existing technologies and know-how gained from many years of experience for the new wind energy market, and have thus become an important driving factor in structural change in NRW. The state’s wind energy industry has made it wind energy subsupplier state No. 1 around the world. NRW’s wind energy research and scientific institutions have adjusted to the structure of the subsupplier and service provision landscape: the focal emphases of the total of thirty-five institutions at thirteen universities and four non-university institutions working in this field are on wind measurement and forecasting, the production of wind energy installations and components, mechanical and electrical engineering for the drive train, electricity transmission and distribution, and grid integration and electricity storage. Construction technology and logistics are other topics being tackled in North RhineWestphalia on an innovation-orientated basis. In line with the breadth of research performed here, one in two

Research

research focuses for the wind energy sector is concentrated here in the west of Germany. Because wind energy alone will not be able to meet all future energy needs, it must be embedded in an ecologically and macroeconomically rational energy mix which supports NRW’s climate protection targets and is socially and politically accepted. Energy research plays an important role in this context. The state’s Ministry of Innovation, Science, Research and Technology has established, in the Cluster EnergyResearch.NRW (CEF.NRW), operated under the auspices of EnergyAgency.NRW, a contact on all questions concerning university energy research which focuses its interdisciplinary activities on the energy supply system as a whole. The research cluster promotes systematic interchange between the various energy-technology disciplines, such as mechanical engineering, environmental technology, the natural sciences, regional planning, economics, civil engineering and electrical engineering, by initiating Research & Development projects. The CEF.NRW’s aim is to get technological and socio-economic advances from the universities into use and to the market more quickly than has previously been the case. In addition, the state government also promotes Research & Development in wind energy by means of competitions, thus supporting research activities by private


Research

enterprise. A large number of projects are financed entirely by private companies, many of whom co-operate with universities in NRW on the development of new products and services, or their adaptation and optimisation for use in wind energy installations. Gearboxes and test facilities At the RWTH University of Aachen, for example, the capabilities of seven institutes from various disciplines and six co-operation partners are concentrated at the “Center for Wind Power Drives”, in order to study the behaviour of complete drive trains. Both wind energy system manufacturers and leading gearbox makers are included. Also participating is the Research Association for Power Transmission Engineering (FVA), which provides companies with the opportunity of improving their technical know-how and the quality of their products, while cutting production costs, by means of joint research. The setting up and use of a gear train test facility for systems up to 4 MW are the current focus of interest. Intensive work is also going on at the RWTH for the development of an electric gearbox for wind energy installations to match fluctuating rotor speed to the fixed grid frequency without the use of large frequency converters and maintenance-intensive hydraulic systems.

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The Ruhr University Bochum is also active in the field of gearing, with its Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering. Here, the emphasis is on new materials for gearing wheels for wind energy systems, in cooperation with private companies and the University of Paderborn. The state government is also supporting a feasibility study into the construction and operation of a test facility for the drive trains of wind turbines with gearboxes in the output range from 10 to 20 MW, which is to be set up at the Jülich research centre. This test facility will perform long-term tests under overload conditions significantly exceeding design loads, in order to determine the service life of the components. This feasibility study is being conducted in view of the investment risk, high costs and technical challenges involved in the building and operation of such a test facility. Services as a research focus Not only technology attracts great interest, however. At the FIR Institute for Industrial Management of the RWTH in Aachen, a scenario-based procedure for the planning of industrial service programmes is being developed, taking particular account of the requirements of medium-sized mechanical and plant engineering companies. It is based on assessment of the in each case particularly high corporate potentials that promise long-term competitive advantages over competing organisations. Such planning is capable of significantly reducing the input for service programme planning. It also assists in minimising the risk of entry to new markets for independent industrial service providers. In addition to assured provision of industrial services for growing markets, energy management questions – the assurance of grid stability and potentials for power storage, for example – are a fundamental research requirement. The second main emphasis at the RWTH University of Aachen, under examination at the “Power Generation and Storage Systems” institute of the “E.ON Energy Research Center” is therefore a central question which must be answered if the energy turnaround is to succeed: How can the individual machines at one large or a number of individual wind farms be operated together as a power plant in such a way that they support the stability of the power grids? The University of Duisburg-Essen is also working on similar questions. Here, the topics under examination extend from the integration of a single installation, via grid-connection provisions, up to and including the integration of wind energy into international transmission grids. Storage technologies Storage technologies are an essential research topic for the assurance of energy supplies from such volatile energy sources as the wind. The Hydrogen Competence


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Centre H2 in Herten is currently researching a wind power electrolysis system which combines a wind energy facility with a hydrogen-based complementary energy system in order to store wind power. The concept is based on electrolysis: a portion of the regenerativelygenerated electricity is stored in the form of electrolytically generated hydrogen. This hydrogen is converted back to electricity and fed into the grid using a fuel cell system when direct supplies from wind power are not adequate, or when transient load peaks need to be met. Energy Economics Finally, the University of Cologne’s Institute of Energy Economics focuses on the problems of energy economics. The consequences of the energy turnaround and associated technological and macroeconomic questions for international markets is a research topic under which assuredness of supply, integration into European conditions and major infrastructural projects are being examined and researched.

Research

Non-universitary research facilities The use of wind energy is being further developed and optimised not only in the context of scientific research, however. Specialist companies and institutions are themselves assisting in the technical improvement of equipment. At windtest grevenbroich gmbh, an NRW company operates one of the few test facilities anywhere in the world for onshore wind turbines. The company is, in addition, the exclusive partner for all measuring services at Europe’s largest inland test facility, located at Lelystad in the Netherlands. Many system manufacturers also make use of the great capabilities of Windtechnologische Gesellschaft (wtg) for measurement and testing of wind turbines in accordance with national and international codes of practice. These are just a few examples of the wind energy research landscape in NRW, which is consistently orientated around furthering the energy turnaround along with all its participants, and thus lighting a beacon for similar programmes around the world.


EnergyAgency.NRW

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EnergyAgency.NRW EnergyAgency.NRW works on behalf of the state government of North Rhine-Westphalia as an operational platform with a broad mandate in the field of energy: from energy research, technological development, demonstration and market launches, via energy consulting, up to and including professional further training. In times of high energy prices, it is more important than ever to accelerate the development of innovative energy technologies in NRW and to show, impartially, how companies, municipalities and private persons can use energy more economically and make rational use of renewable energy sources. The agency has around one hundred employees working at, among other places, the main offices in Düsseldorf, Gelsenkirchen and Wuppertal, and is partially financed from the European Union’s European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

EnergyAgency.NRW’s focal topics are, in detail: 1. Responsibility, in the EnergyRegion.NRW, for a highcapability cluster in climate protection, complete with the eight networks of Biomass, Fuel Cells and Hydrogen, Energy Efficiency and Solar Building, Geothermics, Fuels and Drives of the Future, Power Plant Technology, Photovoltaics and Wind Energy. Current focus: the organisation of competitive cooperation projects between NRW companies, in order thus to initiate innovative projects and products, accelerate their market maturity, and exhaust all economic potentials, including the provision of support for foreign-trade activities. 2. The EnergyResearch.NRW (CEF.NRW) cluster sees its function as being the contact for all energy research matters in NRW, and effectively furthers the co-ordinated cooperation of research and science with industry. 3. Energy consulting: Here, EnergyAgency.NRW experts provide information on opportunities for grants/subsidies, assisting companies in reducing their energy costs by detecting energy weak points – from building automation systems, up to and including production operations. The spectrum ranges from heating systems, heat recovery, up to and including insulation for protection against heat and cold in large industrial buildings, and from leak detection up to and including the drafting of complete energy concepts. 4. Further training: EnergyAgency.NRW provides a whole series of further-training seminars, which are available for end consumers, further-training institutions, energy supply utilities, associations, clubs, universities/colleges, municipalities and companies in NRW. 5. The “EnergyDialogue.NRW” is an active contact and advisory service organised by EnergyAgency.NRW for citizens, municipalities and investors. A professionally managed conflict mediation service is available to persons in NRW in case of conflict – in the context of planning and approval procedures, for example.


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Index of companies

Index of companies (by categories)

Initial and further training BEW Bildungszentrum für die Ver- und Entsorgungswirtschaft GmbH Wimberstraße 1, 45239 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 8046-6 info@bew.de, www.bew.de BEW has been one of the leading providers of initial and further training in environmental technology and environmental law for 30 years.

GLS Bank Christstraße 9, 44789 Bochum, Tel.: +49 (0) 234 5797 100 kundendialog@gls.de, www.gls.de The GLS Bank is the world’s first socio-ecological universal bank, and provides a broad and sustainable range of services.

Haus der Technik Hollestraße 1, 45127 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 1803-1 information@hdt-essen.de, www.hdt-essen.de Seminars, conferences and Master’s degrees for the wind energy sector. 5500 participants up to now, around 50 events each year. Impartial and technically qualified speakers.

KRAFTWERKSSCHULE E.V. Deilbachtal 199, 45257 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 8489 156 info@kws-erneuerbare.de, www.kws-erneuerbare.de KRAFTWERKSSCHULE E.V. provides a comprehensive range of basic and advanced training in renewable energies, and for the wind energy sector in particular.

VDI Wissensforum GmbH VDI-Platz 1, 40468 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 6214-201 wissensforum@vdi.de, www.vdi-wissensforum.de VDI Wissensforum GmbH is one of the leading specialists in further training for engineers and for skilled/ managerial staff in the technical field.

windConsultant – Annette Nüsslein Wiesdorfer Straße 5, 40591 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 56695-104 info@windconsultant.de, www.windconsultant.de, www.omwindenergy.de Business consulting, PR and marketing, business networks; studies; events, fairs and exhibitions abroad, export promotion

Operation and service Deutsche Windtechnik Service GmbH & Co. KG Ansprechpartner: Herr Kai Flatterich, Disponent Service, Tel.: +49 (0) 4845 79168-0 info@deutsche-windtechnik.de, www.deutsche-windtechnik.de Complete technical service for wind energy turbines from a single source


Index of companies

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Operation and service E+K Wind OWL GmbH & Co. KG Friedrich-Ebert-Str. 115, 32760 Detmold, Tel.: +49 (0) 5231 878448 info@ek-wind.de, www.ek-wind.de E+K Wind OWL plans and implements projects; core capabilities are development, planning, implementation, financing and operation.

GWS Tech Service GmbH Leopold-Hoesch-Straße 5–7, 52511 Geilenkirchen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2451 48 20 20 info@gws-tech.de, www.gws-tech.de Installation, commissioning, servicing/maintenance, repairs, training

momac GmbH & Co. KG Am Schürmannshütt 39, 47441 Moers, Tel.: +49 (0) 2841 1802-0 info@momac.de, www.momac-group.de Repair of gearboxes and generators including insite repairs where possible, pitch cylinders, CMS, MetalSCAN, endoscopic inspection

Murphy & Spitz Green Energy AG Riesstraße 2, 53113 Bonn, Tel.: +49 (0) 228 243911 0 info@ms-green-energy.de, www.ms-green-energy.de Independent power producer with large-scale renewable energy facilities in Germany and Europe. Opportunities for fixed-interest cash investments.

psm Nature Power Service & Management GmbH & Co. KG Jülicher Straße 10 – 12, 41812 Erkelenz, Tel.: +49 (0) 2431 97 33 6 service@psm-service.com, www.psm-service.com Technical and commercial management, maintenance and servicing • Dismantling of old facilities • Repowering • Converter, transformer, gearbox services

REWITEC GmbH – Büro NRW Leydelstraße 75, 47802 Krefeld, Tel.: +49 (0)2151 362 102 ingo.haese@rewitec.com, www.rewitec.com DuraGear® range coating concentrates for wind energy gearboxes • GR400 special grease for ball, plain and rolling-element bearings, etc. A143

Ruthmann GmbH & Co. KG Von-Braun-Straße 4, 48712 Gescher-Hochmoor, Tel.: +49 (0) 28 63 / 204-0 info@ruthmann.de, www.ruthmann.de STEIGER® – hydraulic lorry-mounted lifting platforms – from 11 to 100.4m working height, used for regular inspection/maintenance of wind energy installations.

Triflex GmbH & Co. KG Karlstraße 59, 32423 Minden in Westfalen, Tel.: +49 (0)571 / 38780-766 info@triflex.de, www.triflex.de Triflex Towersafe maintenance-free foundation sealing system

UE Systems Deutschland In der Mark 29, 57413 Finnentrop, Tel: +49 (0) 171 8681255 DanielR@uesystems.com, www.uesystems.de We supply ultrasonic measuring systems for the following applications: Leak detection, Mechanical and electrical inspection, Valves and steam traps

WAY TO WIND GmbH & Co. KG Kölner Straße 25, 53925 Kall, Tel.: +49 (0) 2441 99 90 85 info@waytowind.de, www.waytowind.de WAY TO WIND markets mini wind energy facilities to corporate customers, with an individual advertising concept, for internal production of green electricity using wind energy.


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Index of companies

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity Dortmunder Energie- und Wasserversorgung GmbH (DEW21) Ostwall 51, 44135 Dortmund, Tel.: +49 (0) 231 5441186 maik.loehr@dew21.de, www.dew21.de DEW21 is one of Germany’s leading municipal wind power generators, with 76 MW of installed output. Potentials for expansion are consistently exploited.

RWE Netzservice GmbH Friedrichstraße 60, 57072 Siegen, Tel.: +49 (0) 271 584-2182 netzservice@rwe.com, www.rwe.com/netzservice RWE Netzservice GmbH is one of the largest providers of planning, project management, construction, operation and maintenance services for power, gas and water grids and components.

Stadtwerke Düsseldorf AG Höherweg 100, 40233 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 821 6231 fkoester@swd-ag.de, www.swd-ag.de Grünstrom Direktvermarktung: The Stadtwerke Düsseldorf municipal utility brings your EEG electricity to the free market – capably, personally, profitably.

STEAG New Energies GmbH Duisburger Straße 170, 46535 Dinslaken, Tel.: +49 (0) 2064 608 116 info@steag.com, www.steag-newenergies.com We plan, implement and operate wind energy projects on sites suitable for wind power installations, such as spoil heaps, landfills, field and wooded sites

Trianel GmbH Lombardenstraße 28, 52070 Aachen, Tel.: +49 (0) 241 41320-0 info@trianel.com, www.trianel.com Specialist welding company in accordance with DIN EN 1090, ISO 9001:2008 certified, branch in the USA

Vattenfall Europe Sales GmbH III. Hagen 37, 45127 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 94699172 joerg.nauerth@vattenfall.de, www.vattenfall.de Your partner for direct marketing of wind and PV energy: Higher revenues than from RESA guaranteed, no marketing risks, single-sourced services!

Finance & Legal DAL Structured Finance GmbH Rheinpromenade 4, 40789 Monheim, Tel.: +49 (0)217326937 30 u.verkamp@dal.de, www.dal.de We are a member of the Sparkasse group and provide: Development of financing structures and arrangement of project loans

Engemann & Partner, Rechtsanwälte und Notare Kastanienweg 9, 59555 Lippstadt, Tel.: +49 (0) 2941 9700-0 kanzlei@engemann-und-partner.de, www.engemann-und-partner.de Comprehensive legal support for all renewable energy projects, particularly in wind energy – advice for operators, planners and municipalities

Kanzlei Busmann Lengericher Landstraße 11b, 49078 Osnabrück, Tel.: +49 (0) 541 600 18 79 0 info@kanzlei-busmann.de, www.kanzlei-busmann.de The Busmann firm of lawyers specialises in renewable energy law, planning law and both domestic and international transactions.


Index of companies

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Finance & Legal Kreissparkasse Köln Neumarkt 18–24, 50667 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 2272478 855-post@ksk-koeln.de, www.ksk-koeln.de Structuring of individual financing solutions – particularly in the on-shore wind, photovoltaics and biogas segments of the renewable energy industries.

Marsh GmbH Kasernenstraße 69, 40213 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 8987 368 michael.haerig@marsh.com, www.marsh.de Risk and insurance management • Special insurance solutions for the energy industry • Risk & Insurance, Due Diligence for mergers and acquisitions

NRW.BANK Kavalleriestraße 22, 40213 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 91741 - 0 presse@nrwbank.de, www.nrwbank.de NRW.BANK is the development bank for the State of North Rhine-Westphalia. It supports its owner – the State of North Rhine-Westphalia – with regard to economic and structural tasks.

Osborne Clarke Innere Kanalstraße 15, 50823 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 5108 4530 alexander.dlouhy@osborneclarke.de, www.osborneclarke.de Legal assistance for German and international projects and joint ventures throughout the renewable energy sector and comprehensive legal advice for companies and associations in the energy sector

Assessors Dr. Grauthoff – Unternehmensberatung für Energie und Umwelt Heistermannstraße 1, 46539 Dinslaken, Tel.: +49 (0) 2064 42 40 51 dr.grauthoff@arcor.de Approval and construction-management planning, environmental-impact assessment, landscape-care support plan, biodiversity assessment, landscape analysis

enveco GmbH Grevener Straße 61c, 48149 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 315810 mail@enveco.de, www.enveco.de All expertises required for approval of wind energy installations • Advisory services for municipalities • Repowering concepts • Betreiber-Datenbasis, marketing BDB-Index • Advisory services CO2 market ENVIRONMENT – Planungsgemeinschaft Stadt und Umwelt Heistermannstraße 1, 46539 Dinslaken, Tel.: +49 (0) 2064 47 63 43 enviro@arcor.de Construction-management and approval planning, biodiversity assessment, environmental-impact assessment, landscape-care support plan, landscape analysis

EuroWind GmbH Robert-Perthel-Straße 19, 50739 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0)221 57 95 60-00 info@eurowind.info, www.eurowind.info Measuring data analyses • Wind resource and energy yield assessments • Wind power potential analyses • Acoustic assessments • Shadow flicker assessments • Turbulence assessments • Wind power and solar power forecasts

Grontmij GmbH Graeffstraße 5, 50823 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 57402-766 christian.weiler@grontmij.de, www.grontmij.de Regional planning and approval procedures, site location search, species protection, land use planning / urban development planning, rights of way, communication


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Index of companies

Assessors KÖTTER Consulting Engineers Bonifatiusstraße 400, 48432 Rheine, Tel.: +49 (0) 5971 9710-0 info@koetter-consulting.com, www.koetter-consulting.com Noise immission predictions • Emission + Immission measurements • Acoustic component optimization Accredited lab for German-wide measurements of sound and vibrations

Kortemeier Brokmann Landschaftsarchitekten GmbH Oststraße 92, 32051 Herford, Tel.: +49 (0) 5221 9739-0 info@kortemeier-brokmann.de, www.kortemeier-brokmann.de Potentials analyses, environmental-impact study, Natura 2000-VP, biodiversity assessment, LCSP, projectimpact assessments, landscape-impact analyses, GIS services, environmental construction-phase support.

Landschaftsplanungsbüro Seling Max-Reger-Straße 24, 49076 Osnabrück, Tel.: +49 (0) 541 42929 Buero-Seling@t-online.de, www.planungsbuero-seling.de WEI appraisals: Animal-impact appraisals (birds and bats), EIS + LCSP + biodiversity assessment, Preliminary assessment in acc. with Article 3c, Environmental report for land utilisation plan, 3D visuals, etc.

Ökoplan – Bredemann, Fehrmann, Hemmer und Kordges Savignystraße 59, 45147 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 623037 info@oekoplan-essen.de, www.oekoplan-essen.de Biodiversity assessments, Animal-life mapping, Obtrusive effects assessments, Land utilisation plan changes, environmental reports, LCSP, EIS

reko GmbH & Co. KG Sander-Bruch-Str. 10, 33106 Paderborn, Tel.: +49 (0) 5254 95 28 129 R.Korfmacher@rekowind.de, www.rekowind.de Noise, enshadowment, wind and revenue/profit appraisals, moving-image displays, visual impact studies. General advisory services form part of every order.

SOLvent GmbH Lünener Straße 211, 59174 Kamen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2307 240063 jw@solvent.de, www.solvent.de, Contact: Dipl.-Inf. Johannes Waterkamp Revenue/profit forecasts, wind farm calculations, noise-pollution forecasts, enshadowment forecasts, potentials studies, consulting

TCP Prüftechnik GmbH Harkortstraße 3, 48163 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 77748940 schnitger@tcp-online.net, www.tcp-online.net Non-destructive materials testing consultancy and equipment supplier. Non-destructive testing services: X-ray, ultrasound, surface, ACFM®

TÜV NORD SysTec GmbH & Co. KG Langemarckstraße 20, 45141 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 40 85572390 windenergie@tuev-nord.de, www.tuev-nord.de Type Certification, Type Approval, Offshore Project Certification, Energy yield assessment, CFD, Risk analysis, QA/QC, Fabrication/manufacturing/periodic/damage inspections

Manufacturer BRAUN Windturbinen GmbH Südstraße 19, 57583 Nauroth, Tel.: +49 (0) 2747 930585 info@braun-windturbinen.com, www.braun-windturbinen.com ANTARIS Small windturbines in the range from 2.5 kW - 9.5 kW; Alternators from 2.5 kW - 18.0 kW; Rotorblades from 3.0 m D - 6.5 m Diameter; Grid Inverter for Windturbines from 2.0 kW - 10.0 kW; electronic Controll systems


Index of companies

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Manufacturer Bühler Technologies GmbH Harkortstraße 29, 40880 Ratingen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2102 4989-0 info@buehler-technologies.com, www.buehler-technologies.com Devices and controllers for liquid level, pressure and temperature, plus coolers, pumps and filters

con-SEPT GmbH Alarichstraße 1, 50679 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 422 90 329 info@con-sept.com, www.con-sept.com con-SEPT supplies mini-wind energy systems with an output of approx. 600-800kWh per year. This system can be set up extremely easy, with no need for screwdrivers and spanners.

Eovent GmbH Beginenstraße 9, 52066 Aachen , Tel.: +49 (0) 241 8095570 info@eovent.com, www.eovent.com Eovent makes vertical-axis small wind turbines. We couple clean and safe electricity with a powerful way of communicating your ecological identity.

GE Wind Energy GmbH Holsterfeld 16, 48499 Salzbergen, Tel.: +49 (0) 5971 980 0 detlef.neeland@ge.com, www.ge-renewable-energy.com 2.5-120: 2.5 MW, rotor 120m, tower 110, 120, 139m. Support in project development, financing, operation, maintenance, netzint., extensive range of services

Kenersys Europe GmbH Albersloher Weg 10, 48155 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 21099 0 info@kenersys.com, www.kenersys.com Wind-energy installations for various wind zones (K82, K98, K100, K110 and K120) for spinner heights of 80m to 145m

NEUHÄUSER Windtec GmbH Scharnhorststraße 11 – 16, 44532 Lünen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2306 949 0 contact@neuhaeuser.com, www.neuhaeuser.com NEUHÄUSER Windtec GmbH produces and markets wind energy installations with 5 and 40 kW outputs.

Nheolis c/o Dongfang GmbH, Schirl 72, 48346 Ostbevern, Tel.: +49 (0) 2532 7090 info@nheolis.de, www.nheolis.de Maker of downwind mini wind energy installations, 1.5 to 12 kWp, “Chistera” rotor technology. Marketed in Germany by Dongfang GmbH, Ostbevern

Nordex Energy GmbH Centroallee 263a, 46047 Oberhausen, Tel: +49 (0) 40 30030 2940 salesgermany@nordex-online.com, www.nordex-online.com Nordex offers high-efficiency wind turbines for onshore • N117 2400, N100 2500, N90 2500, N117 3000, N100 3300 • N131/3000 • Project development • Full service and maintenance

superwind GmbH Am Rankewerk 2–4, 50321 Brühl, Tel.: +49 (0) 2232 577357 power@superwind.com, www.superwind.com Manufacturer of mini wind generators from 0.3 to 3 kW. Used mainly by authorities and industry for nongrid supply functions

Vestas Deutschland GmbH Niederlassung Osnabrück, Eduard-Pestel-Straße 2, 49080 Osnabrück, Tel.: +49 (0) 541 335320 vestas-centraleurope@vestas.com, www.vestas.de Every day, more than 49,000 Vestas wind energy installations supply clean energy that assists in the global battle against climate change.


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Index of companies

Planning BBB Umwelttechnik GmbH Munscheidstraße 14, 45886 Gelsenkirchen, Tel.: +49 (0) 209 167 2550 info@bbb-umwelt.de, www.bbb-umwelt.com BBB offers planning and engineering services, provides bankable wind reports and wind measurements (according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17025) and delivers technical due diligence services.

BBWind Projektberatungsgesellschaft mbH Schorlemerstraße 12–14, 48143 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 98110310 info@bbwind.de, www.bbwind.de We enable you to implement and operate your own wind farm projects. We advise, you decide!

BMR energy solutions GmbH Weserstraße 9, 41836 Hückelhoven, Tel.: +49 (0) 2433 98159-0 info@bmr-energy.com, www.bmr-energy.com The BMR group provides wind, solar and bio-energy solutions.

CPC Germania Max-Born-Straße 1, 48431 Rheine, Tel.: +49 (0) 5971 860855 info@cpc-germania.com, www.cleanpowercompany.de Wind energy • Planning, project development • Project implementation/realisation • Technical and Commercial Management

doaro energie UG haftungsbeschränkt Nachbarsweg 105 b, 45481 Mülheim an der Ruhr, Tel.: +49 (0) 208 48 72 60 doaro@arcor.de Planning and implementation of wind and solar energy locations • Marketing to energy utilities, investors and citizens’ associations • Commercial management Energiekontor AG Ritterstraße 12a, 52072 Aachen, Tel.: +49 (0) 241 701926-0 info@energiekontor.de, www.energiekontor.de Planning, construction, financing, operation of wind and solar farms in Germany, UK and Portugal, currently nearly 500 wind power installations at 86 wind farms.

EPLAN Software & Service GmbH & Co. KG An der alten Ziegelei 2, 40789 Monheim am Rhein, Tel.: +49 (0) 2173 3964-0 info@eplan.de, www.eplan.de EPLAN Software & Service advises companies on process optimisation and develops tailor-made PLM concepts and mechatronic engineering solutions.

Erneuerbare Energien GmbH Dipl.-Ing. Emmerich, Biebricherstraße 16, 47802 Krefeld, Tel.: +49 (0) 2151 56 92 39 emmerich@windrat.de, www.windrat.de Implementation of wind energy projects from site location via approval procedures, clarification of grid connection, contract making, up to commissioning

Hofer & Pautz GbR Buchenallee 18, 48341 Altenberge, Tel.: +49 (0) 2505 9377840 info@hofer-pautz.de, www.hofer-pautz.de Planning • assessment • Environmental-impact assessment, environmental report, LCSP • Applications in acc. with § 4 BImSchG • Animal-life studies, biodiversity, vegetation • conservation law • Ecological construction-phase support

IPEK energy GmbH Marktplatz 4, 48431 Rheine, Tel.: +49 (0) 5971 914619 0 info@ipek-energy.com, www.ipek-energy.com Project development in wind, solar energy • Wind-, noise-, shadow analysis assessments • Preparation of applications • Tendering, negotiation, contract awarding • Construction management, commissioning


Index of companies

47

Planning juwi Energieprojekte GmbH Katernberger Straße 107, 45327 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 364596-14 energieprojekte@juwi.de, www.juwi.de Economic development of wind energy projects at forestry and agricultural sites – Acquisition • site assessment • planning • financing • construction, operational management

Kohr Windenergie Engerweg 22, 47877 Willich, Tel.: +49 (0) 163 7474933 info@kohr-wind.de, www.kohr-wind.de Kohr Windenergie provides all-in solutions for new wind energy facilities and modifications, from site location up to generation.

KTB GmbH Technologie-Beratung und -Planung Beisenstraße 39–41, 45964 Gladbeck, Tel.: +49 (0) 2043 378716 hfh@ktb-info.de, www.ktb-info.de Consulting, planning and financial/risk management for wind power installations

Land+Wind Umweltplanung Roddestraße 5, 48153 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0 )251 53 555 468 buero@landundwind.de, www.landundwind.de Determination of potential sites, environmental-impact study, environmental reports for constructionmanagement planning, LCSP, biodiversity assessment, approval planning for wind farms, etc.

melius-energie GmbH Wilhelm-Busch-Str. 62, 49479 Ibbenbüren, Tel.: +49 (0) 5451 996120 info@melius-energie.de, www.melius-energie.de Wind-energy planning for third-party and citizens’ wind energy projects. Services extending from the initial idea up to and including successful implementation, plus operational management.

N·E·ST Neue Energie Steinfurt GmbH Hollich 79, 48565 Steinfurt, Tel.: +49 (0) 2551 919 55 40 info@n-e-st.de, www.n-e-st.de Planning and project management • Remote control of wind power facilities • Direct electricity marketing • Planning of cable routes • Wind-farm siting

öKon Landschaftsplanung GmbH Liboristraße 13, 48155 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 13 30 28-12 oekon@oekon.de, www.oekon.de Environmental-impact studies • Landscape-care support plans • Landscape-aesthetics studies • Ecological construction support • Biodiversity assessments

Ostwind Gruppe Im Freihafen 4, 47138 Duisburg, Tel.: +49 (0)203 75969120 duisburg@ostwind.de, www.ostwind.de OSTWIND develops, plans and constructs wind farms – 483 wind energy installations (755 MW capacity) planned, constructed and grid-connected up to now!

PNE WIND AG Technologiepark 19, 33100 Paderborn, Tel.: +49 (0) 5251 3908136 info@pnewind.com, www.pnewind.com Planning, implementation, financing and operational sale, with follow-up service, for onshore and offshore wind farms, national/international

Prowind GmbH Lengericher Landstraße 11b, 49078 Osnabrück, Tel.: +49 (0) 541 600 29 0 info@prowind.com, www.prowind.com Prowind GmbH has been a full-service provider for all facets of wind energy, based in Osnabrück, since 2000.

We are

www.prowind.com


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Index of companies

Planning SL NaturEnergie Gruppe Voßbrinkstraße 124, 45964 Gladbeck, Tel.: +49 (0) 2043 2065-0 info@sl-naturenergie.com, www.sl-naturenergie.com We have seventeen years of experience in supporting wind energy and PV projects throughout their development cycles: planning, construction, operation and beyond.

Stadtwerke Münster GmbH Hafenplatz 1, 48155 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 694-3948 wind@stadtwerke-muenster.de, www.stadtwerke-muenster.de/wind Cooperation partner for citizens and municipalities • Single-source planning, construction and operation • Optimisation of operational and maintenance management

WINDENERGIE

WES energy GmbH Monschauer Straße 12, 40549 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 58 300 545 info@wes-energy.de, www.wes-energy.de Whether individual services or turnkey projects, WES energy develops, plans and implements professional wind energy solutions.

Wolters Partner Architekten & Stadtplaner GmbH Daruper Straße 15, 48653 Coesfeld, Tel.: +49 (0)2541 94080 info@wolterspartner.de, www.wolterspartner.de Planning of concentration zones • Drafting of land utilisation and development plans • Planning-process support • Preliminary ecological estimates

wpd onshore GmbH & Co. KG Benzenbergstraße 2, 40219 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 239234-0 s.otto@wpd.de, www.wpd.de Development of wind farms: Project planning, structuring and financing, tendering and construction, operation, technical and commercial management

WWK Partnerschaft für Umweltplanung Molkenstraße 5, 48231 Warendorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 2581 9366-0 info@wwk-umweltplanung.de, www.wwk-umweltplanung.de Urban land-use planning • EIA, biodiversity assessment • LCSP • animal-life studies • enshadowment forecasts • individual analyses of visual impact

ZERNA Baumanagement GmbH Lise-Meitner-Allee 11, 44801 Bochum, Tel.: +49 (0) 234 92 04-1433 msc@zerna-bm.eu, www.zerna-bm.eu Project development • project implementation • repowering • engineering • repair • production supervision • construction supervision • on-shore • inspection • technical due diligence

Other services airwerk GmbH Schürmannstraße 30b, 45136 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 12516910 kontakt@airwerk.com, www.airwerk.com Measurement solutions for structural monitoring of offshore wind energy converter • Wind measurement campaigns • Conceptual design of steel lattice towers for Wind Energy Converter (WEC) • Project development services

AREGUS Services Bügelstraße 2, 46045 Oberhausen, Tel.: +49 (0) 208 3079345 info@aregus.de, www.aregus.de Energy Management Auditor • ISO 50001 • Permission management • HAZOP Studies • Risk assessment • Occupational health and safety • Environmental Management • Data safety/Data security


Index of companies

49

Other services ash Projekte Wolff-Metternich-Str. 12, 33102 Paderborn, Tel.: +49 (0) 5251 2021096 info@ash-projekte.de, www.ash-projekte.de Projects, sales and marketing: Advisory services for targeted marketing and internationalization; Marketing services for networks and technology

Brunel Car Synergies GmbH Dinnendahlstraße 9, 44809 Bochum, Tel.: +49 (0) 234 4171-134 werner.grosse-wilde@brunel.de, www.carsynergies.de Accredited laboratory for operational/vibration stability – environmental simulation and hydraulic pressure test, damage analyses, FEM, design, test-facility construction, development support

Center for Wind Power Drives (CWD) der RWTH Aachen c/o Chair for Wind Power Drives, Schinkelstraße 10, 52062 Aachen, Tel.: +49 (0) 241 8095635 jacobs@ime.rwth-aachen.de, www.cwd.rwth-aachen.de 4 MW nacelle system test bench • Real wind loads in six degrees of freedom • Grid simulation including FRT tests • Interdisciplinary research • WTG drive train technology

Deutsche Messe/Hannover, Büro NRW Rheinallee 128, 40545 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 41603712 rainer.dorau@messe.de, www.messe.de HANNOVER MESSE – Wind Leading Trade Fair for Wind Generation Technology, Components and Services

DMT GmbH & Co. KG Am Technologiepark 1, 45307 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 172 1647 marc.wahl@dmt.de, www.dmt.de Condition monitoring systems for condition-orientated maintenance, component testing and construction of test rigs for drive systems

EcofinConcept GmbH Rheinstraße 7, 41836 Hückelhoven, Tel.: +49 (0) 2433 970 471 info@ecofinconcept.de, www.ecofinconcept.de Renewable energy sources • Consulting • project development • agency services • investments • Wind farms • wind energy installations • solar farms • solar installations • repowering

EFTAS Fernerkundung Technologietransfer GmbH Oststraße 2–18, 48145 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0)251 133070 info@eftas.com, www.eftas.com Geo-data •Environmental information • GeoIT infrastructures •Satellite-image analysis • Aerial-image interpretation

ELE-Scholven-Wind GmbH Rüttenscheider Straße 1 – 3, 45128 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2064 608 101 andreas.brandt@steag.com Construction and operation of the Oberscholven spoil-heap wind energy facilities

ENVISYS GmbH & Co. KG c/o Lisa Schöffel M.A., Salierring 13, 50677 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 3643 49527 10 info@envisys.de, www.envisys.de Software TURBINE; for calculation of energy yield and the cost-efficiency of wind energy installations and farms, from mini to large-scale installations

EurA Consult AG Dennewartstraße 25–27, 52068 Aachen, Tel.: +49 (0) 241 963 12 12 info@euraconsult.de, www.euraconsult.de Management of the “InTeWind” network (www.intewind.de), implementation of wind energy development projects, assistance in obtaining subsidies


50

Index of companies

Other services FGH GmbH Roermonder Str. 199, 52072 Aachen, Tel.: +49 (0) 241 997857250 netzintegration@fgh-ma.de, www.fgh-gmbh.com Grid integration for generation plants, units, and components: accredited certification according to international grid codes, LVRT test labs, type testing, system and facility evaluation, model validation.

Gothaer Allgemeine Versicherung AG Gothaer Allee 1, 50969 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 308 31794 Ludger_Schepers@gothaer.de, www.gothaer.de One of Europe’s leading Insurers in the wind energy sector Insurance solutions for renewable energy technologies and projects at any state.

Hansa Luftbild AG Nevinghoff 20, 48147 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 23 30 187 info@hansaluftbild.de, www.hansaluftbild.de LiDAR • System monitoring • Basic data for new construction projects • Site location • Feasibility studies • Ecological construction-phase supervision • Management of mitigation and compensation measures

HUSUM Wind Ohligser Straße 45, 40591 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 4841 902 0 info@husumwind.com, www.husumwind.com HUSUM Wind has been the showcase of wind technology for twenty-five years. Mark your diary: 15 to 18 September 2015!

KISTERS AG Charlottenburger Allee 5, 52068 Aachen, Tel.: +49 (0) 241 9671 0 info@kisters.de, www.kisters.de KISTERS combines control systems and Asset Management into an overall software package for technical and commercial wind farm operation

Kleinwindkraft-Portal Hardenbergstraße 10, 44866 Bochum, Tel.: +49 (0) 2327 960 420 mail@klein-windkraftanlagen.com, www.klein-windkraftanlagen.com The web portal publishes information on small wind turbines (< 100 kW) for distributed power generation. Newsletter and market survey.

Internationales Wirtschaftsforum Regenerative Energien Soester Str. 13, 48155 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 23946-0 info@iwr-institut.de, www.iwr-institut.de For 30 years, renewable energy has now been our main focus, since 1995 under the trademark IWR. Core competences: economic & policy counselling, economic research, networks and media

Lorenz Kommunikation Veilchenweg 10, 41516 Grevenbroich, Tel.: +49 (0) 2182 57 87 80 k.lorenz@lorenz-kommunikation.de, www.lorenz-kommunikation.de Press and PR work, Investor Relations, event management, coaching, business consulting, market analyses

MAIBACH VuS GmbH Am Bahnhof 7, 46342 Velen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2863 381871 info@maibach-vus.de, www.bauwatchbausicherung.de BauWatch, video surveillance of construction sites, site security, mobile video surveillance, theft/vandalism security, rentals

Manfred Schleuter Elektrotechnikermeister Im Neuen Esch 24a, 46395 Bocholt, Tel.: +49 (0) 2871 2919387 manfred.schleuter@gmx.de, www.energieberatung-westmuensterland.de Addresses and presentations • Planning • Appraisals • Project development


Index of companies

51

Other services OK! Security GbR David-Hansemann-Straße 18, 52531 Übach-Palenberg, Tel.: +49 (0) 2451 486 74 23 info@ok-security.de, www.ok-security.de Construction, operational and repowering surveillance • Security patrols and alarm response • Installation and maintenance of technological components

Solarthemen – Guido Bröer & Andreas Witt GbR Bültestraße 85, 32584 Löhne, Tel.: +49 (0) 5731 83460 redaktion@solarthemen.de, www.solarthemen.de, www.energiekommune.info, www.eejobs.de Journals and media services for the renewable energy industry.

Stanton Chase Emanuel-Leutze-Straße 17, 40547 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 954980 r.siegert@stantonchase.com, www.stantonchase.com Recruitment consulting: Filling of managerial and specialist engineering positions Contact: Roland Siegert

STEAG Energy Services GmbH Rüttenscheider Straße 1–3, 45128 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 801 4110 Georg.Haendel@steag.com, www.steag-energyservices.com/kompetenzen.html Studies, planning, Quality Assurance, construction supervision of wind farms, plus analysis of operating data using neuronal networks and statistical methods

TÜV Rheinland Industrie Service GmbH Am Grauen Stein, 51105 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 40 3787904-900 wind@de.tuv.com, www.tuv.com TÜV Rheinland is DAkkS accredited for type and component certification in acc. with IEC 61400-22. View our services at: www.tuv.com

TÜV SÜD Product Service GmbH Heinz-Trökes-Straße 128, 47259 Duisburg, Tel.: +49 (0) 203 54 52 714 Sami.Demircan@tuev-sued.de, www.tuev-sued.de Approval of wind energy systems and components for the USA and Canada • Stationary energy storage systems • Approval of control cabinet • Approval of machinery

Volkmann Consult Joachimstraße 53, 40547 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 172 24 23 240 dirk@volkmann-consult.de, www.volkmann-consult.de Project Management, Interim Management

windtest grevenbroich gmbh Frimmersdorfer Straße 73a, 41517 Grevenbroich, Tel.: +49 (0) 2181 2278-0 info@windtest-nrw.de, www.windtest-nrw.de Accredited measurements: Power curve, loads, noise, grid integration, site assessment: yield report, wind profiles, shadow cast, test-field operator.

ZENIT GmbH Bismarckstraße 28, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr, Tel.: +49 (0) 208 30004-59 bw@zenit.de, www.zenit.de ZENIT supports wind energy sector companies and others in innovation and internationalisation activities on behalf of the EU, the federal government and the German states.


52

Index of companies

Transport and logistics BARTH+CO SPEDITION GMBH & CO KG Siemensstraße 21, 41542 Dormagen, Tel.: +49 (0)2133 479-243 durusoy.dilek@barth-co.com, www.barth-co.com Land-based transportation and construction-site logistics

Demag Cranes & Components GmbH Ruhrstraße 28, 58300 Wetter (Ruhr), Tel.: +49 (0) 2335 92-0 jann.hansen@terex.com, www.demagcranes.de Industrial cranes, crane components, lifting equipment, chain hoists, rope winches, KBK lightweight crane systems and lifting solutions for wind industry applications.

Ko-Mats GmbH Wienerstraße 39, 48455 Gildehaus-Bad Bentheim, Tel.: +49 (0)5924 299 460 info@ko-mats.com, www.ko-mats.de Rental and sale of excavator and crane outrigger support mats for all aspects of heavy-load management and energy-transmission engineering.

Spedition Gregor Schrudde Halterner Straße 195, 46284 Dorsten, Tel.: +49 (0)2362 20190 info@spedition-schrudde.de, www.spedition-schrudde.de Telesattel, semi-low loaders, low-loaders, approval procedures, support of oversize-load movements, route surveys, project logistics

Trendelkamp Technologie GmbH Bahnhofstraße 43, 48356 Nordwalde, Tel.: +49 (0)25739250 trendelkamp@trendelkamp.com, www.trendelkamp.com Maintenance Lifts • Specialist welding company in accordance with DIN EN 1090 • ISO 9001:2008 certified • branch in the USA

Associations and public institutions Bergische Universität Wuppertal Lehrstuhl für Elektr. Energieversorgungstechnik, Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Markus Zdrallek Rainer-Gruenter-Straße 21, 42119 Wuppertal, Tel: +49 (0) 202 439-1976 zdrallek@uni-wuppertal.de, www.eev.uni-wuppertal.de Planning and reliability-analyses of on-shore and off-shore wind farm networks

Fachhochschule Köln Betzdorferstraße 2, 50679 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 8275 2214 ingo.stadler@fh-koeln.de, www.f07.fh-koeln.de/einrichtungen/iet/labore/erneuerbare_energien/ We tackle grid integration of renewable energy sources, including: Energy storage • Load management • Grid calculations and grid simulation

Fachhochschule Münster Stegerwaldstraße 39, 48565 Steinfurt, Tel.: +49 (0) 2551 9-62176 vennemann@fh-muenster.de, https://www.fh-muenster.de/fb4/personen/vennemann/vennemann_peter.php Wind power is one of our teaching and research fields. Degree theses examine technical and energy-industry questions.

Hochschule Bonn-Rhein-Sieg Grantham-Allee 20, 53757 Sankt Augustin, Tel.: +49 (0) 2241 865-300 katharina.seuser@h-brs.de, www.fb03.h-bonn-rhein-sieg.de Prof. Dr. Katharina Seuser: “Acceptance of wind energy in NRW” research project.


Index of companies

53

Associations and public institutions ie3 Institut für Energiesysteme, Energiewirtschaft und Energieeffizienz Emil-Figge-Straße 70, 44227 Dortmund, Tel.: +49 (0) 231 755-2396 ie3.etit@tu-dortmund.de, www.ie3.e-technik.tu-dortmund.de The institute is one of the leading German higher education institutes in the field of energy systems, energy efficiency and energy economy with the focus on electrical networks.

LAG Steinfurter Land e.V. – Servicestelle Windenergie des Kreises Steinfurt Tecklenburger Straße 10, 48565 Steinfurt, Tel.: +49 (0) 2551 692169 svenja.haverkamp@kreis-steinfurt.de, www.agenda21.kreis-steinfurt.de

Zukunftskreis Steinfurt Servicestelle Windenergie

The wind energy service point supports the expansion of wind energy in Steinfurt County and all participating individuals and organisations.

Landwirtschaftskammer NRW Nevinghoff 40, 48147 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 2376-356 theodor.remmersmann@lwk.nrw.de, www.landwirtschaftskammer.de Advisory services for site owners • Project coordination

Netzwerk WindWest Heiliggeistplatz 2, 48431 Rheine, Tel.: +49 (0) 5971 800 66 60 yassine.mokdad@wind-west.de, www.wind-west.de Interdisciplinary networking of all participants in the wind energy value chain in northern NRW and western Lower Saxony.

Rheinisch-Westfälischer Genossenschaftsverband e.V. Mecklenbecker Straße 235 – 239, 48163 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 7186-0 info@rwgv.de, www.rwgv.de Advisory services for the foundation of energy cooperatives • Economic assessment • Legal advice • Tax consulting • Further training • Representation of interests

VDMA NRW Grafenberger Allee 125, 40237 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 68 77 48 0 nrw@vdma.org, nrw.vdma.org Networking/Representation of interests for manufacturers of systems, components and production technology for wind turbines via VDMA AG Windindustrie.

VGB PowerTech e.V. Klinkestraße 27 – 31, 45136 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 8128-238 ulrich.langnickel@vgb.org, www.vgb.org Establishment, exchange and transfer of technical know-how • Coordination of technical and operational standards • Identification of R&D activities

Supplier of electrical and electronic components ABB AG Transformatoren Lohfelderstraße 19-21, 53604 Bad Honnef, Tel.: +49 (0) 2224 14-0 zentrale.detfo@de.abb.com, www.abb.de/transformatoren Large power transformers • Industrial transformers • Phase shifting transformers • All products above with TrafoStarTM technology • Installation and commissioning

AEG Power Solutions GmbH Emil-Siepmann-Straße 32, 59581 Warstein-Belecke, Tel.: +49 (0) 2902 763 0 ne.europe@aegps.com, www.aegps.com Manufacturer of high-performance uninterruptible power supplies (UPSs), industrial chargers, DC systems and converters • Wind energy: Power back-up for blade pitch control


54

Index of companies

Supplier of electrical and electronic components Brüel & Kjaer Vibro GmbH Central Sales Office, Sibyllastraße 9, 45136 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 201 89432 90 info@bkvibro.com, www.bkvibro.com High-performance Condition Monitoring system, available as client-owned stand-alone solution or including centralized surveillance and diagnostics

DSL-electronic GmbH Textilstraße 2, 41751 Viersen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2162 40025 axel.hoffmann@dsl-electronic.de, www.dsl-electronic.de Mains system protection, frequency and voltage monitoring, synchronisers, measured-data transducers, chargers, arc-protection

FRABA POSITAL Carlswerkstraße 13c, 51063 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 96213-0 info@posital.de, www.posital.com absolute and incremental IXARC rotary encoders • TILTIX inclinometers • LINARIX draw wire sensors • accessories

GWU-Umwelttechnik GmbH Bonner Ring 9, 50374 Erftstadt, Tel.: +49 (0) 2235 955220 meteo@gwu-group.de, www.gwu-group.de Meteorological systems • Wind profile measurement: LiDAR and SoDAR • Consulting, installation, technical support and system monitoring

HANNING & KAHL GmbH & Co KG Rudolf-Diesel-Straße 6, 33813 Oerlinghausen, Tel.: +49 (0) 5202 707-600 info@hanning-kahl.com, www.hanning-kahl.com Electro-mechanical brake system for wind turbines

HARTING Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG Simeonscarré 1, 32427 Minden, Tel.: +49 (0) 571 8896-0 christoph.dossow@harting.com, www.harting.de Connectors • Ethernet Components • Current sensors • RFID-Systems • Cable Harnessing • Control cabinets • Customised Solutions

Isoblock Schaltanlagen GmbH & Co KG Anton-Storch-Straße 17, 49080 Osnabrück, Tel.: +49 (0) 541 95909-0 gerrit.schmiemann@isoblock.de, www.isoblock.de Low-voltage switchgear systems: Grid and system protection for photovoltaics systems • Medium-voltage switchgear systems: Grid connection for regenerative energy sources, Medium-voltage systems 10 kV and 20 kV

KEB – Karl E. Brinkmann GmbH Försterweg 36–38, 32683 Barntrup, Tel.: +49 (0) 5263 401-0 info@keb.de, www.keb.de Electrical and mechanical solutions for pitch and yaw systems • KEB COMBIVERT drive units • KEB COMBISTOP brake systems • KEB PITCH brake motors

Moog Max-Born-Straße 1, 59423 Unna, Tel.: +49 (0) 2303 5937 0 wind.germany@moog.com, www.moog.de/wind Moog’s product range for wind energy includes pitch systems, slip-ring solutions, blade sensing systems and expert services.

Nexans Deutschland GmbH Bonnenbroicher Straße 2–14, 41238 Mönchengladbach, Tel.: +49 (0) 2166 270 info.nd@nexans.com, www.nexans.de Nexans is a leading cable manufacturer and provides a comprehensive range of high-performance cables, systems and components for the energy sector.


Index of companies

55

Supplier of electrical and electronic components PINTSCH ABEN B.V. Hünxer Straße 149, 46537 Dinslaken, Tel.: +49 (0) 2064 602-313 info@pintschaben.com, www.pintschaben.com More then 150 years of experience have made PINTSCH ABEN a specialist in marine transport technology and aviation navigation and warning lights.

REO AG Brühlerstraße 100, 42657 Solingen, Tel.: +49 (0) 8804-0 info@reo.de, www.reo.de REO is a manufacturer of chokes, transformers, mains filters and damping resistors for wind power converters. More information: www.reo.de

Weidmüller Klingenbergstraße 16 , 32758 Detmold, Tel.: +49 (0) 5231 14 0 info@weidmueller.com, www.weidmueller.com Industrial Ethernet, power distribution, lightning and anti-spike protection, signal processing, sensor/actuator interfacing, modular terminals, plug-type connectors

Supplier of large components ATS Construction GmbH NL Essen Zukunfts Zentrum Zollverein, Triple-Z, Katernberger Straße 107, 45327 Essen, Tel.: +49 (0) 6732 9657 2810 martin.schenkenberger@ats-construction.de, www.ats-construction.de The ATS tower is the tower solution for WEIs with high spinner heights. The range is rounded off by foundation construction and installation of the complete system.

EUROPIPE GmbH Pilgerstraße 2, 45473 Mülheim an der Ruhr, Tel.: +49 (0) 208 976 0 europipe@europipe.com, www.europipe.com Manufacturer of welded large-diameter pipes • World’s greatest capacity • Shareholders guarantee plate capacity and plate supply

Gräbener Maschinentechnik GmbH & Co. KG Am Heller 1, 57250 Netphen-Werthenbach, Tel.: +49 (0) 2737 989-200 graebmasch@graebener-group.com, www.graebener-maschinentechnik.de Manufacturer of crimping and bending machines, plate-edge milling machines and circumferential/ longitudinal-weld milling machines for preparation for narrow-gap welding.

Max Bögl Wind AG Stolberger Straße 200, 50933 Köln, Tel.: +49 (0) 221 98 54 48-13777 wind@max-boegl.de, www.max-boegl.de Max Bögl hybrid tower system • Consulting, project development • Turnkey construction of wind farms • Self-jacking tower crane • Road, path and foundation construction

Modellbau Nachtigall GmbH Holtkamp 3, 46414 Rhede, Tel.: +49 (0) 2872 980651 modellbau-gmbh@t-online.de, www.modell-formenbau.de Patterns and moulds for the Wind-power industry • Foundry patterns • Rotor-blade patterns • Nacelle patterns • Materials: polystyrene, wood, epoxy compounds, aluminium

Oevermann Hochbau GmbH Robert-Bosch-Straße 7–9, 48153 Münster, Tel.: +49 (0) 251 7601-0 huelsmann.n@oevermann.com, www.oevermann.com Hybrid towers and foundations for wind energy converters: planning and draft development • structural analysis ready for certification • execution of construction work


56

Index of companies

Supplier of large components Siegthalerfabrik GmbH Siegtalstraße 32–34, 57080 Siegen, Tel.: +49 (0) 271 35908-0 info@siegthaler.de, www.siegthaler.de Tower flanges, azimuth brake disks and rings up to 7000mm diameter, machining of customers’ components up to max. 50t.

Siempelkamp Gießerei GmbH Siempelkampstraße 45, 47803 Krefeld, Tel.: +49 (0) 2151 894 201 giesserei@siempelkamp.com, www.siempelkamp.com World’s largest hand-moulding foundry for hand-moulded formed large castings made of nodular cast iron up to 320 t piece weight.

ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG – Geschäftseinheit Grobblech Mannesmannstraße Tor 9, 47259 Duisburg, Tel.: +49 (0) 203 5275627 info.plate@thyssenkrupp.com, http://grobblech.thyssenkrupp-steel-europe.com Four-high mill plates are used as material for wind energy towers; in the offshore sector, in particular, also for foundation structures, e.g. jack-up rigs and jackets.

Supplier of mechanical components 3M Deutschland GmbH Carl-Schurz-Straße 1, 41453 Neuss, Tel.: +49 (0) 2131144140 3M-Wind@mmm.com, www.mmm.com/wind 3M offers innovative coatings, tapes, adhesives as well as electrical solutions to increase the performance and reliability of wind turbines.

AS Tech Industrie- und Spannhydraulik GmbH Leopold-Hoesch-Straße 5 –7, 52511 Geilenkirchen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2451 48 20 20 info@astech-hydraulik.com, www.astech-hydraulik.com Bolt tensioning devices, hydraulic nuts, mechanical bolt tensioning devices, power units, measuring, monitoring and documentation systems, special-purpose hydraulics

August Friedberg GmbH Achternbergstraße 38a, 45884 Gelsenkirchen, Tel.: +49 (0) 209 9132 0 info@august-friedberg.com, www.august-friedberg.com Fasteners for Wind power stations • HV tower bolt sets up to M72 • Studs • Rotor blade connection systems • Application Engineering and Development Partnership

Bosch Rexroth AG Mannesmannstraße, 58455 Witten, Tel.: +49 (0) 2302 877 516 wind-gears@boschrexroth.de, www.boschrexroth.com/windenergy Gearboxes, hydraulic systems and condition monitoring systems, services: Inspection, maintenance, repairs, spares and exchange gearboxes

BRAUER Maschinentechnik AG Raiffeisenring 25, 46395 Bocholt, Tel: +49 (0)2871 7033 info@brauer-getriebe.de, www.brauer-getriebe.de Repair and optimisation of all makes and sizes of wind energy gearboxes Numerous reconditioned gearboxes available

DELIMON GmbH Arminstraße 15, 40227 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 7774 0 kontakt@bijurdelimon.com, www.bijurdelimon.com Central lubrication systems, pumps, distributors, lubricating pinions. Pre-assembled systems, either filled or unfilled. Test laboratory, production locations around the world.


Index of companies

57

Supplier of mechanical components Dörken MKS-Systeme GmnH & Co. KG Wetterstraße 58, 58313 Herdecke, Tel.: +49 (0) 2330 63 243 mks@doerken.de, www.doerken-mks.de Fastening elements require high performing corrosion protection and optimized assembly characteristics: DELTA-MKS® zinc flake systems are the preferred solution.

Dorstener Antriebstechnik GmbH Hüttenstraße 1, 46284 Dorsten, Tel.: +49 (0) 2362 67 438 andrea.schweinstig@zollern.de, www.dorstener.de Main gearbox • Pitch gearbox • Yaw gearbox

Eickhoff Antriebstechnik GmbH Hunscheidtstraße 176, 44789 Bochum, Tel.: +49 (0) 234 975-0 m.weber@eickhoff-bochum.de, www.eickhoff-bochum.de Wind-Power Gearboxes • Industrial Gearboxes • Special Gearboxes and Accessories • Service • 3D Lifting Rings • E-GOMS On-Line Diagnostics System

EM Brake Systems AG Zur Brinke 14, 33758 Schloß Holte-Stukenbrock, Tel.: +49 (0) 5207 99161-0 info@emb-systems.com, www.emb-systems.com Electromechanical rotor brakes • Electromechanical rotor locks • Electromechanical azimuth brakes

Fuchs Schraubenwerk GmbH Bismarckstraße 24, 57076 Siegen, Tel.: +49 (0) 271 4095-0 info@fuchs-schrauben.de, www.fuchs-schrauben.de Development, production and supply of cold formed parts, specialty and standard fasteners for wind energy, automotive and steel construction industry.

GEDORE Tool Center GmbH & Co. KG Remscheider Straße 149, 42899 Remscheid, Tel.: +49 (0) 2191 596900 gtc@gedore.com, www.gedore.com All types of manual tools, up to and including complete equipping

Henkel AG & Co. KGaA Henkelstraße 67, 40191 Düsseldorf, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 7970 info@henkel.com, www.henkel.de Wide range of heavy-duty adhesive and sealing materials: UV- and weather-resistant seals for steel tower segments, anaerobic systems to secure bolts.

Jahnel-Kestermann Getriebewerke GmbH Hunscheidtstraße 116, 44789 Bochum, Tel.: +49 (0) 234 339246 Kremer@jake-gear.com, www.jake-gear.com Design and manufacture of wind gearing systems for the 600 KW to 6,500 KW output range Global wind power gearing services for own and third-party products

KTR Kupplungstechnik GmbH Rodder Damm 170, 48432 Rheine, Tel.: +49 (0) 5971 798-0 mail@ktr.com, www.ktr.com RADEX®-N shaft couplings, KTR-STOP® YAW brakes and rotor brakes, Rotor-Lock, MMC cooling systems, hydraulic components, DATAFLEX® torque measuring systems

Laumann GmbH & Co. KG Rodder Straße 42, 48477 Hörstel-Bevergern, Tel.: +49 (0) 5459 80 19 0 info@h-laumann.de, www.h-laumann.de Our capabilities in acc. with DIN ISO 9001 2008 • Module production • Welding technology, DIN 18800 7C • Design and prototype construction • CNC laser cuttin


58

Index of companies

Supplier of mechanical components Lincoln GmbH Neuenhausplatz 7, 40699 Erkrath, Tel.: +49 (0) 211 20 99 62 0 lincoln.CCE@skf.com, www.lincolnindustrial.de Lincoln is a world leading manufacturer of automatic lubrication systems for the industry. Lincoln is an SKF Group Brand.

MBH Maschinenbau & Blechtechnik GmbH Zeppelinstraße 7, 49479 Ibbenbüren, Tel.: +49 (0) 5459 9309-0 info@mbh-hassink.de, www.mbh-hassink.de Development and design • CNC sheet and plate machining • Mechanical and plant engineering • Fitting and welding shop • Robot welding

Moventas GmbH Otto-Hahn-Straße 55, 42369 Wuppertal, Tel.: +49 (0) 202 2414-0 wind-service@moventas.com, www.moventas.com Manufacturer of gearing systems for wind energy installations. Service for all manufacturer of wind gearboxes: Repair, maintenance, upgrades, field service.

PLARAD Maschinenfabrik Wagner GmbH & CO. KG Birrenbachshöhe, 53804 Much, Tel.: +49 (0) 2245 62-0 info@plarad.com, www.plarad.com Precision-torque screwing technology, 300 to 150,000 Nm. Development, installation, maintenance, repair, calibration, training, analysis and consulting.

ThyssenKrupp Rothe Erde GmbH Tremoniastraße 5–11, 44137 Dortmund, Tel: +49 (0) 231 186-0 rotheerde@thyssenkrupp.com, www.thyssenkrupp-rotheerde.com Slewing bearings: pitch, yaw, rotor bearings; seamless rolled rings for wind turbine towers, foundation sections, gearboxes, shaft/hub connections, brake disks

GmbH

Tractel Greifzug GmbH Scheidtbachstraße 19 – 21, 51469 Bergisch Gladbach, Tel.: +49 (0) 2202 1004 0 info.greifzug@tractel.com, www.tractel.com Service lifts, Rotor blade inspection platforms, TRACTELIFT™ Climbing aid for vertical ladders, FABA™ ladders with integrated fall arrest device, PPE, Hoists for any wire rope length from 100 kg to 3 tons.

Walter Stauffenberg GmbH & Co. KG Im Ehrenfeld 4, 58791 Werdohl, Tel.: +49 (0) 23 92 916 0 sales@stauff.com, www.stauff.com Cable-fixing systems and fluid-dynamics components for wind energy applications.

WALTHER-PRÄZISION, Carl Kurt Walther GmbH & Co. KG Westfalenstraße 2, 42781 Haan, Tel.: +49 (0) 2129 567-0 info@walther-praezision.de, www.walther-praezision.de Mono-couplings, multi-couplings and docking systems for rational connection and disconnection of fluid and electrical lines.

Wheelabrator Group GmbH Heinrich-Schlick-Straße 2, 48629 Metelen, Tel.: +49 (0) 2556 88 0 kontakt@wheelabratorgroup.de, www.noricangroup.com Compressed air and wheelblast systems for systematic treatment of metal surfaces for e.g. derusting, descaling, hardening.

Winergy (Siemens AG) Am Industriepark 2, 46562 Voerde, Tel.: +49 (0) 2871 92-4 info@winergy-group.com, www.winergy-group.com Gearing-system manufacturer for wind turbines • Service


Index of companies

59

Index of companies (alphabetical)

Company

Category

Page

3M Deutschland GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

56

ABB

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

53

AEG Power Solutions GmbH

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

53

airwerk GmbH

Other services

48

AREGUS Services

Other services

48

AS Tech Industrie- und Spannhydraulik GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

56

ash Projekte

Other services

49

ATS Construction GmbH NL Essen

Supplier of large components

55

August Friedberg GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

56

BARTH+CO SPEDITION GMBH & CO KG

Transport and logistics

52

BBB Umwelttechnik GmbH

Planning

46

BBWind Projektberatungsgesellschaft mbH

Planning

46

Bergische Universität Wuppertal

Associations and public institutions

52

BEW Bildungszentrum für die Entsorgungs- und Wasserwirtschaft GmbH

Initial and further training

40

BMR energy solutions GmbH

Planning

46

Bosch Rexroth AG

Supplier of mechanical components

56

BRAUER Maschinentechnik AG

Supplier of mechanical components

56

BRAUN Windturbinen GmbH

Manufacturer

44

Brüel & Kjaer Vibro GmbH – Central Sales Office

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Brunel Car Synergies GmbH

Other services

49

Bühler Technologies GmbH

Manufacturer

45

Center for Wind Power Drives (CWD) der RWTH Aachen

Other services

49

con-SEPT GmbH

Manufacturer

45

CPC Germania

Planning

46

DAL Structured Finance GmbH

Finance & Legal

42

DELIMON GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

56

Demag Cranes & Components GmbH

Transport and logistics

52

Deutsche Messe/Hannover, Büro NRW

Other services

49

Deutsche Windtechnik AG

Operation and service

40

DMT GmbH & Co.KG

Other services

49

doaro energie UG haftungsbeschränkt

Planning

46

Dörken MKS-Systeme GmnH & Co. KG

Supplier of mechanical components

57

Dorstener Antriebstechnik GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

Dortmunder Energie- und Wasserversorgung GmbH (DEW21)

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity

42

Dr. Grauthoff – Unternehmensberatung für Energie und Umwelt

Assessors

43

DSL-electronic GmbH

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

E+K Wind OWL GmbH & Co. KG

Operation and service

41

EcofinConcept GmbH

Other services

49

EFTAS Fernerkundung Technologietransfer GmbH

Other services

49

Eickhoff Antriebstechnik GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

ELE-Scholven-Wind GmbH

Other services

49

EM Brake Systems AG

Supplier of mechanical components

57

Energiekontor AG

Planning

46

Engemann & Partner, Rechtsanwälte und Notare

Finance & Legal

42

enveco GmbH

Assessors

43


60

Company

Index of companies

Category

Page

ENVIRONMENT – Planningsgemeinschaft Stadt und Umwelt

Assessors

43

ENVISYS GmbH & Co. KG c/o Lisa Schöffel M.A.

Other services

49

Eovent GmbH

Manufacturer

45

EPLAN Software & Service GmbH & Co. KG

Planning

46

Erneuerbare Energien Gmbh Dipl.-Ing. Emmerich

Planning

46

EurA Consult AG

Other services

49

EUROPIPE GmbH

Supplier of large components

55

EuroWind GmbH

Assessors

43

Fachhochschule Köln

Associations and public institutions

52

Fachhochschule Münster

Associations and public institutions

52

FGH GmbH

Other services

50

FRABA POSITAL

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Fuchs Schraubenwerk GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

GE Wind Energy GmbH

Manufacturer

45

GEDORE Tool Center GmbH & Co. KG

Supplier of mechanical components

57

GLS Bank

Initial and further training

40

Gothaer Allgemeine Versicherung AG

Other services

50

Gräbener Maschinentechnik GmbH & Co. KG

Supplier of large components

55

Grontmij GmbH

Assessors

43

GWS Tech Service GmbH

Operation and service

41

GWU-Umwelttechnik GmbH

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

HANNING & KAHL GmbH & Co KG

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Hansa Luftbild AG

Other services

50

HARTING Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Haus der Technik

Initial and further training

40

Henkel G & Co. KGaA

Zulieferer mechanische Komponenten

57

Hochschule Bonn-Rhein-Sieg

Associations and public institutions

52

Hofer & Pautz GbR

Planning

46

HUSUM Wind

Other services

50

ie3 Institut für Energiesysteme, Energiewirtschaft und Energieeffizienz

Associations and public institutions

53

Internationales Wirtschaftsforum Regenerative Energien

Other services

50

IPEK energy GmbH

Planning

46

Isoblock Schaltanlagen GmbH & Co KG

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Jahnel-Kestermann Getriebewerke GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

juwi Energieprojekte GmbH

Planning

47

Kanzlei Busmann

Finance & Legal

42

KEB – Karl E. Brinkmann GmbH

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Kenersys Europe GmbH

Manufacturer

45

KISTERS AG

Other services

50

Kleinwindkraft-Portal

Other services

50

Ko-Mats GmbH

Transport and logistics

52

Kohr Windenergie

Planning

47

Kortemeier Brokmann Landschaftsarchitekten GmbH

Assessors

44

KÖTTER Consulting Engineers

Assessors

44

KRAFTWERKSSCHULE E.V.

Initial and further training

40

Kreissparkasse Köln

Finance & Legal

43

KTB GmbH Technologie-Beratung und -Planning

Planning

47

KTR Kupplungstechnik GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

LAG Steinfurter Land e.V. – Servicestelle Windenergie des Kreises Steinfurt

Associations and public institutions

53


Index of companies

Company

61

Category

Page

Land + Wind Umweltplanung

Planning

47

Landschaftsplanungsbüro Seling

Assessors

44

Landwirtschaftskammer NRW

Associations and public institutions

53

Laumann GmbH & Co. KG

Supplier of mechanical components

57

Lincoln GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

58

Lorenz Kommunikation

Other services

50

MAIBACH VuS GmbH

Other services

50

Manfred Schleuter Elektrotechnikermeister

Other services

50

Marsh GmbH

Finance & Legal

43

Max Bögl Wind AG

Supplier of large components

55

MBH Maschinenbau & Blechtechnik GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

melius-energie GmbH

Planning

47

Modellbau Nachtigall GmbH

Supplier of large components

55

momac GmbH & Co. KG

Operation and service

41

Moog

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Moventas GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

57

Murphy & Spitz Green Energy AG

Operation and service

41

N·E·ST Neue Energie Steinfurt GmbH

Planning

47

Netzwerk WindWest

Associations and public institutions

53

NEUHÄUSER Windtec GmbH

Manufacturer

45

Nexans Deutschland GmbH

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

54

Nheolis

Manufacturer

45

Nordex Energy GmbH

Manufacturer

45

NRW.BANK

Finance & Legal

43

Oevermann Hochbau GmbH

Supplier of large components

55

OK! Security GbR

Other services

51

öKon Landschaftsplanung GmbH

Planning

47

Ökoplan – Bredemann, Fehrmann, Hemmer und Kordges

Assessors

44

Osborne Clarke

Finance & Legal

43

Ostwind Gruppe

Planning

47

PINTSCH ABEN B.V.

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

55

PLARAD Maschinenfabrik Wagner GmbH & CO. KG

Supplier of mechanical components

58

PNE WIND AG

Planning

47

Prowind GmbH

Planning

47

psm Nature Power Service & Management GmbH & Co. KG

Operation and service

41

reko GmbH & Co. KG

Assessors

44

REO AG

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

55

REWITEC GmbH – Büro NRW

Operation and service

41

Rheinisch-Westfälischer Genossenschaftsverband e. V.

Associations and public institutions

53

Ruthmann GmbH & Co. KG

Operation and service

41

RWE Netzservice GmbH

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity

42

Siegthalerfabrik GmbH

Supplier of large components

56

Siempelkamp Gießerei GmbH

Supplier of large components

56

SL NaturEnergie Gruppe

Planning

48

Solarthemen – Guido Bröer & Andreas Witt GbR

Other services

51

SOLvent GmbH

Assessors

44

Spedition Gregor Schrudde

Transport and logistics

52

Stadtwerke Düsseldorf AG

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity

42

Stadtwerke Münster GmbH

Planning

48

Stanton Chase

Other services

51


62

Index of companies

Company

Category

Page

STEAG Energy Services GmbH

Other services

51

STEAG New Energies GmbH

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity

42

superwind GmbH

Manufacturer

45

TCP Prüftechnik GmbH

Assessors

44

ThyssenKrupp Rothe Erde GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

58

ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG – Geschäftseinheit Grobblech

Supplier of large components

56

Tractel Greifzug GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

58

Trendelkamp Technologie GmbH

Transport and logistics

52

Trianel GmbH

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity

42

Triflex GmbH & Co. KG

Operation and service

41

TÜV NORD SysTec GMBH & Co. KG

Assessors

44

TÜV Rheinland Industrie Service GmbH

Other services

51

TÜV SÜD Product Service GmbH

Other services

51

UE Systems Deutschland

Operation and service

41

Vattenfall Europe Sales GmbH

Energy utility and supplier of green electricity

42

VDI Wissensforum GmbH

Initial and further training

40

VDMA NRW

Associations and public institutions

53

Vestas Deutschland GmbH Niederlassung Osnabrück

Manufacturer

45

VGB PowerTech e.V.

Associations and public institutions

53

Volkmann Consult

Other services

51

Walter Stauffenberg GmbH & Co. KG

Supplier of mechanical components

58

WALTHER-PRÄZISION, Carl Kurt Walther GmbH & Co. KG

Supplier of mechanical components

41

WAY TO WIND GmbH & Co. KG

Operation and service

55

Weidmüller

Supplier of electrical and electronic components

48

WES energy GmbH

Planning

58

Wheelabrator Group GmbH

Supplier of mechanical components

58

windConsultant – Annette Nüsslein

Initial and further training

40

windtest grevenbroich gmbh

Other services

51

Winergy (Siemens AG)

Supplier of mechanical components

58

Wolters Partner Architekten & Stadtplaner

Planning

48

wpd onshore GmbH & Co. KG

Planning

48

WWK Partnerschaft für Umweltplanung

Planning

48

ZENIT GmbH

Other services

51

ZERNA Baumanagement GmbH

Planning

48

Calendar of regular annual events February April June September September October November Spring and autumn Spring

E-World – Energy & Water, Messe Essen Exhibition Centre Hanover Trade Fair NRW Wind Energy Industry Day WindEnergy Hamburg (2014) HUSUM Wind (2015) Wind-Updates.NRW – Wind Power Network NRW annual conference NRW Wind Energy Days, Bad Driburg NRW WindForums Special Energy Show – Wind Power, Haus Düsse, Bad Sassendorf


Market Guide – Wind Energy NRW 2014

Further reading Ministry for Climate Protection, Environment, Agriculture, Nature Conservation and Consumer Protection: www.umwelt.nrw.de ■■ Windenergieerlass vom 11.07.2011 ■■ Leitfaden Rahmenbedingungen für Windenergieanlagen auf Waldflächen in Nordrhein-Westfalen (2012) ■■ EnergieDaten.NRW 2012

NRW State Environment Agency: www.lanuv.nrw.de ■■ Potenzialstudie Erneuerbare Energien NRW. Teil 1 – Windenergie. LANUV-Fachbericht 40 (2012) ■■ Leitfaden Umsetzung des Arten- und Habitatschutzes bei der Planung und Genehmigung von Windenergieanlagen in Nordrhein-Westfalen (2013) ■■ EnergieAtlas.NRW: www.energieatlas.nrw.de

German Wind Energy Association (BWE): www.wind-energie.de ■■ Potenzial der Windenergienutzung an Land (2011) ■■ Branchenreport “Windindustrie in Deutschland 2013”

German Local Authorities Confederation: www.dstgb.de ■■ Kommunale Handlungsmöglichkeiten beim Ausbau der Windenergie – unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des Repowering (2012)

Deutsche WindGuard GmbH: www.umwelt.nrw.de/klima ■■ Zielsetzung bis 2020 für die Windenergieentwicklung in Nordrhein-Westfalen und Bedeutung dieser Ziele für den Windenergieausbau (2011)

IWR Institute of the Renewable Energy Industry: www.iwr.de ■■ Studien zur Regenerativen Energiewirtschaft ■■ Repowering in NRW 2012 – Stand und Perspektiven – Zwischenbericht, Internationales Wirtschaftsforum Erneuerbare Energien, Münster, April 2013, www.windkraft.nrw.de

Arnsberg Regional Government: ■■ Leitlinien Regionalplan Arnsberg. Sachlicher Teilabschnitt “Energie” ■■ www.soest.de/03leben_wohnen/

German Wind Energy Institute www.dewi.de


Imprint

Further Information

EnergieAgentur.NRW NetzwerkWindkraft NRW Magdalena Sprengel Roßstraße 92 40476 Düsseldorf Photos Telefon: + 49 (0) 211 86642243

Cover: Pixelshop; p. 10: f9photos; p. 12:

sprengel@energieagentur.nrw.de

Tanja Bagusat; p. 13: Taffi; p. 22: Kara; p. 29:

www.energieagentur.nrw

sakura; p. 30: VRD; p. 31: F. Schmidt; p. 32:

www.windkraft.nrw.de

vschlichting; p. 33: erikdegraaf; p. 38: Thorsten Schier (alle fotolia.com); p. 2: pedrosala;

© EnergieAgentur.NRW/EA286

p. 16: prochasson frederic; p. 37: BESTWEB (alle shutterstock.com) p. 8: ENGEL UND

Editorial office www.lorenz-kommunikation.de www.windresearch.de www.ecocontent.de www.energieagentur.nrw.de

NORDEN; p. 36 RWTH Aachen; p. 23: ABB AG, Dörken MKS Systeme GmbH & Co. KG; p. 24: Gebr. Eickhoff Maschinenfabrik und Eisengießerei GmbH & Co. KG, August Friedberg GmbH; p. 25: Gothaer Versicherungsbank VVAG, Henkel AG & Co. KGaA; p. 26: G. Siempelkamp GmbH & Co. KG, ThyssenKrupp

Design

Rothe Erde GmbH

www.engelundnorden.de Status 02/2014

Market Guide Wind Energy 2014  
Market Guide Wind Energy 2014  

Overview of wind energy facts and figures, and also of the companies, research institutions and associations active in this field in NRW, Germ...

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