Page 1

SAFETY IN ACTION

HOW TO BUCK AN INDUSTRY TREND

AVOIDING INJURIES AS OIL AND GAS ACTIVITIES PICK UP FEATURE

BEHIND THE NUMBERS

TAILGATE TALKS

ENERGY SAFETY CANADA

OVEREXERTION

STRENGTHENING THE CHAIN OF SAFETY ISSUE

O8

COMPLIMENTARY COPY

FALL 2017


CONNECT WITH SAFETY

Follow us on social media

@EnergySafetyCanada

@EnergySafetyCan


SAFETY IN ACTION

FALL 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PUBLISHED BY

4 CEO John Rhind President Murray Elliott Vice President, Communications & PetroLMI Carol Howes Manager, Communications Amy Krueger Editor Terry Bullick, Bullick Communications Design, Production & Project Management Kylie Henry & Katherine Stewart, Studio Forum Inc.

Contributors Jennifer Allford, Mike Fisher, Anne Georg, Michael Grills, Des Kilfoil, Jason Stang Printing McAra Printing, Calgary, Alta.

Statements, opinions and viewpoints expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent the views of Energy Safety Canada. Copyright 2017/2018 by Energy Safety Canada. Canada Post Publication Mail Agreement #40006922 For advertising rates or for consent to reprint or redistribute content in the publication, contact Energy Safety Canada at: communications@energysafetycanada.com Head Office: 5055 - 11 Street NE Calgary, Alta, T2E 8N4 P 403.516.8000Â | F 403.516.8166 Enrolment Services & Certificate of Recognition: 1.800.667.5557

18 TAILGATE TALKS

ON AND OFF THE JOB

Teamwork: Strengthening the chain of safety

Safety is changing for the better

5 LIFELINES

21

5 things to think about

FEATURE

Mental health Helmets on! Surviving a wilderness (mis)adventure

8 THE MERGER

The deal is

10

HOW TO BUCK AN INDUSTRY TREND 26

INTELLIGENT GEAR

Cut the noise

SAFE COMPANY

SemCAMS: Demonstrating that nothing is more

12

important than safety

SHIFT YOUR WORK

Knowing the basics of hoisting and rigging

15

29 TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

What's your safety attitude

BEHIND THE NUMBERS

Overexertion

energysafetycanada.com

HOME SAFE To read this publication online, visit energysafetycanada.com

ON THE COVER Check it out: Learn how on-the-job injuries can be avoided

30 The ripple effect

To learn more about your safety and what Energy Safety Canada is doing to help you protect yourself, follow us on:

as industry activities pick-up on page 21. FRONTLINE FALL 2017

3


On and off the job

SAFETY IS CHANGING FOR THE BETTER IN CANADA’S OIL AND GAS SECTOR

In October, Enform Canada and Oil Sands Safety Association merged to become Energy Safety Canada— a single, unified voice in oil and gas health and safety.

Our vision is to be a globally recognized authority with deep oil and gas safety expertise to improve safe work performance. We will:

Develop and support common safety standards Ensure effective learning Share data analysis and research Support workers and employers Advocate for the health and safety of industry workers and those affected by industry activity.

Our goal is the same as industry’s: zero time lost to injuries and incidents. For more about our new organization and what it means to you, see page 8.

4

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

This is Frontline’s first issue under the banner of Energy Safety Canada. While the look of the magazine has changed slightly, the content remains the same. We will continue to give you information and insights to keep you safe on the job. Helping workers learn more about health and safety is a cornerstone of our organization. We’re committed to bringing you stories and articles that help you, your co-workers and your workplace become healthier and safer. We invite you to share your stories and experiences with us at communications@energysafetycanada.com.

John Rhind / CEO

Murray Elliott / President


5 things to think about behind the wheel

5 THINGS TO THINK ABOUT BEHIND THE WHEEL: Grant Aune has seen almost every kind of road crash there is. The former RCMP officer and expert on motor vehicle collisions is now president and CEO of Advantage Fleet Services, a company that teaches organizations how to eliminate incidents on the roads. He offers five ways to keep safe behind the wheel:

WRITTEN BY JENNIFER ALLFORD

1 Get informed: Be

3 Remove the word

4 Slow down: Speed

aware that the #1 killer of people aged four to 34 is motor vehicle collisions.

accident from your vocabulary: Incidents happen when drivers are surprised. Surprises happen when you don’t watch for or expect changes.

kills.

2 Improve your driving attitude: Stay positive and attentive.

LIFELINES

5 Instead of practising the act of driving, practise the art of driving: Concentrate on the task at hand and make conscious decisions.

ILLUSTRATED BY MICHAEL GRILLS/ UNION ILLUSTRATION

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

5


MENTAL HEALTH

Call a helpline. Read more about mental health and look for sessions or workshops offered in your community.

Connect with other people who’ve had similar experiences and find out how they’re doing.

Talk to someone you trust, such as a person in your faith or cultural group. Connect with community mental health clinics or organizations for information, support and services. Talk with supportive friends and family and share how you feel.

Talk to your family doctor.

TOUGH ON THE OUTSIDE; TURMOIL ON THE INSIDE 6

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

It was a devastating double whammy. First, tens of thousands of people lost their jobs in the oil and gas industry when the price of oil plummeted.

2,400 homes and other structures were destroyed. Thousands of energy workers and their families are still dealing with the mental health effects.

Then, nearly 88,000 people had to flee Fort McMurray when fire ravaged the region in May 2016. More than

If you’re one of them, the Canadian Mental Health Association suggests taking any of the actions above. Help is available.


Mental health

Helmets on!

Surviving a wilderness (mis)adventure

LIFELINES

SURVIVING A WILDERNESS (MIS)ADVENTURE STRANDED.

HELMETS ON! A new law in Alberta requires that people wear helmets while riding off-highway vehicles (OHVs), including snowmobiles, dirt bikes and ATVs. The law came into effect in May 2017 and applies to anyone riding on public land. Wearing a helmet is recommended anywhere you’re riding an OHV. Every year in Albert, about 19 people are killed driving OHVs and 6,000 more riders have to go to an emergency department. To learn more, visit transportation.alberta.ca and search for: helmets.

No one ever thinks it’s going to happen to them. But it can, and Bruce Zawalsky has seen it. The head of the Boreal Wilderness Institute in Edmonton and the author of Canadian Wilderness Survival, he’s helped thousands of people be prepared for just such an experience.

HERE ARE SOME OF HIS TOP TIPS: DRESS PROPERLY: Carry extra clothes in the back seat or in a backpack. Essential gear includes a toque, gloves, outer shell or winter coat, and wool socks. Being stranded can quickly go from mildly annoying to a truly miserable experience without the right clothing. Bonus gear: a sleeping bag or blanket can keep you downright comfortable. STAY WITH YOUR VEHICLE: This is basic advice people don’t always follow. Vehicles tend to attract other vehicles, especially on roads. Zawalsky says people sometimes think they’re only 30 minutes away from their destination, but don’t realize the time and effort needed to cover 40 to 50 kilometres on foot. Or they take a shortcut through the bush and get lost—and much harder to find. This advice goes for off-road vehicles, too. CALM AND COLLECTED: Attitude is the difference between thinking you’re having an adventure and facing the end of the world. “You have to remind yourself that you can do this,” Zawalsky says. Most people who are stranded are found (safe) within a few hours or the next day. Stay positive and think about how you’ll live to tell the story of your wilderness survival. For more, see our blog at energysafetycanada.com.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

7


The merger

What’s the deal with Energy Safety Canada?

THE DEAL IS THE DEAL FOR WORKERS IS

THE DEAL FOR COMPANIES IS

Getting safety training and resources will be easier

Safe work performance will improve faster

Duplication of safety training will be reduced

Access to safety data analysis will support the continuous progression of safe work performance

Safety standards will become more alike from site to site Current training and certifications will still be valid

8

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

Solutions and standards will save time and money, and increase efficiency


Enform and Oil Sands Safety Association (OSSA) have merged. They became Energy Safety Canada on October 2nd― to set the standard in oil and gas safety.

THE DEAL FOR ALL OF US IS OIL AND GAS SAFETY IN CANADA IS CHANGING FOR THE BETTER To learn more, visit energysafetycanada.com or email Info@energysafetycanada.com

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

9


Intelligent gear

Have you heard the one about the guy with an expensive hearing aid? Asked what type it is, he answers "12:30." Hearing loss is no joke. It is one of the fastest growing, most prevalent chronic conditions in Canada. Noise exposure

CUT THE NOISE

1

SAVE YOUR HEARING

is especially risky when

2

sound is constant— such as heavy equipment that runs day and night. Wearing safety-certified protective hearing devices that are properly

EARMUFF OPTIONS

keep you safer.

Earmuffs offer superior protection and can be super high-tech. Some have built-in radio communication and others have digital noise-cancelling features so wearers can hear what’s going on around them.

We look at products

1 3M PELTOR HELMET ATTACH MONO 3.5MM

fitted and inserted will save your hearing and

that help you rise above the noise.

Model # HTM793E Contains a mono receive-only headset to plug into a hand-held radio, intercom system or mic set. Has blue tooth connectivity. Uses a bone mic that translates vibrations at the back of your skull, making your voice clear in noisy environments. Can drown out a jackhammer while picking up a voice or a beep—and where it’s coming from. Mounts on hard hat.

2 3M PELTOR SOUNDTRAP TACTICAL 6-S HEADSET Model # MT15H67FB01 Picks up weak sounds while protecting against loud noise.

WRITTEN BY ANNE GEORG

10

Reduces hazardous impulse noises from sources such as firearms to harmless levels within five milliseconds.

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM


3

EARPLUG OPTIONS Ear protection usually means earplugs. They’re often colourful and easy to see. Some come with a cord that your wear around your neck and some can be detected with a magnet if they fall out. Earplugs are cool (as in your ears won’t overheat), can be more comfortable than earmuffs and usually give ample protection without reducing hearing.

4

3 CUSTOM PROTECT EAR DB BLOCKER CONVERTIBLE VENTED Cost effective and custom moulded for comfort and effectiveness for up to five years. Detachable cord plugs into radio communication devices. Filtered vent allows conversations in noisy settings.

4 HONEYWELL HOWARD LEIGHT LASER LITE Model # LL1 Self-adjusting polyurethane foam expands to fit the ears of virtually every wearer. Contoured T-shape inserts easily. Smooth, soil-resistant closed cell-foam skin prevents buildup. Disposable.

EAR-FIT VALIDATION SYSTEMS These systems measure how effective hear-protective devices fit people, and help identify the right devices needed in a workplace.

5

5 3M E-A-RFIT DUAL-EAR VALIDATION SYSTEM Model # 393-1000 Fit tests both ears at once in less than five seconds. Earmuff and earplug testing capability. Tests at seven standard frequencies: 125 Hz to 8000 Hz

DEFINING DECIBELS Decibels (dB) measure the intensity of sound. Each 3 dB increase indicates the sound intensity has doubled. For example, 93 dB is double 90 dB. Here are some examples of the intensity of common sounds.

RISK

SOUND DB

160 dB-plus: Immediate physical damage

Fireworks

162

130 dB: Immediate pain threshold

Jet takeoff

157

120 dB-plus: Severe ear irritation

Jackhammer

130

115 dB-plus: Unprotected exposure not permitted

Rock concert

120

Email: hear@protectear.com

100 dB-plus: Extremely loud

Crying baby

110

Phone: 1-800-520-0220

85 dB-plus: Ear damage possible

Smoke alarm

85

65 dB: Non-hazardous

Dishwasher

60

50 dB: Comfortable

Audible whisper

30

dB: Audibility threshold

Normal breathing

10

FIND OUT MORE Custom Protect Ear

Acklands-Grainger (3M and Honeywell) Online: acklandsgrainger.com 32 stores across Saskatchewan, Alberta and B.C.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

11


Shift your work

KNOWING THE BASICS OF HOISTING AND RIGGING

LEARN MORE ABOUT H O I ST I N G A N D RIGGING FROM:

RRC The Alberta-based Rigging Resource Centre at riggingresource.com

IHSA.CA

WRITTEN BY MIKE FISHER

The Infrastructure Health & Safety Association’s Hoisting and Rigging Safety Manual at ihsa.ca.

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

Complex tasks share common principles

Petroleum Industry Overview & Virtual Rig Experience Version 2 at energysafetycanada.com.

When it comes to hoisting and rigging, one word fits every situation, says expert Rick Sikora, CEO of Edmonton-based Cranemasters. That word is safety. “When we use a mechanical device to move something, we either support it from below or we use a crane and suspend it from above," says Sikora. “And whenever something is supported, we have to look at the common risks—the potential for personal injury or the risk of property damage.” Understanding the limits and abilities of equipment helps ensure safety during lifting operations. Being struck by an object is a major risk in the oil and gas industry. Sikora’s company trains oil and gas workers (and workers in other industries) about the complexities of hoisting and lifting. He says his perfect day is when a worker texts him a rigging photo and asks if it’s safe. It takes a trained eye to tell. Hoisting and rigging equipment has thousands of varieties. Rigging hardware can include shackles and eyebolts. Slings can be chain, synthetic, polyester and wire rope. Below the hook are spreader bars, magnets and plate clamps. And then there’s an array of cranes and mechanical lifting devices. Other variables include worker competence, weather conditions and site location. It’s like figuring out the complexities of a threedimensional game of chess: you need to plan your every move and know how one move affects the next. Sikora offers these basic rules for hoisting and rigging.

12

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

EFFECT OF SLING ANGLE ON TOTAL LOAD

The tension on a sling increases as the angle between the sling and the load decreases 500 lbs.

577 lbs.

707 lbs.

1,000 lbs.

LOAD PER SLING

LOAD PER SLING

LOAD PER SLING

LOAD PER SLING

90⁰ 1,000 lbs BEST

60⁰

45⁰

1,000 lbs

1,000 lbs

1,000 lbs

MINIMUM

AVOID

GOOD

30⁰

Sling angle less than 30° not recommended

90 82.5 75 67.5 60 52.5 45 37.5 30 22.5 15 0

SLING ANGLE TO HORIZONTAL (IN DEGREES)


5 basic rules of hoisting and rigging

1

KNOW HOW TO USE EQUIPMENT

5

VERIFY WORKER COMPETENCY

HAVE A PLAN

BE CALCULATING

WEAR THE GEAR

4

3

1

2

3

KNOW HOW TO USE EQUIPMENT

VERIFY WORKER COMPETENCY

WEAR THE GEAR

Whether it’s a crane or a chain, be familiar with the manufacturer’s specifications and operating instructions for equipment. For example, one rigging manufacturer may build a shackle to be used at 90 degrees and another may build a shackle to be used at 120 degrees. Knowing the difference is essential.

A simple checklist can quickly determine a worker’s qualifications, training and experience with rigging and hoisting standards and equipment.

2

Wear properly fitting personal protective gear that matches the task, such as: Steel-toed boots to protect from falling objects Gloves to protect from sharp objects and pinch points. And make sure your gloves don’t interfere with your ability to use equipment controls

Hard hat, again to protect you from falling objects

Safety vest or other gear to distinguish you as a signaller or a remote control crane operator Safety eye wear appropriate for the task and site.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

13


Shift your work

4 5

BE CALCULATING The principles of rigging are constant. Each load is different. Maybe you’re using large and complex equipment, such as a mobile hydraulic crane. Or maybe you’re using something simpler and smaller, which could be hardware such as an eyebolt. Either way, your equipment must be able to withstand the stress applied to it during the lifting process. The weight of the load is a primary consideration, as it influences the type of rigging equipment required, including the size and capacity. Alberta’s Occupational

14

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

Health and Safety Code specifies that rigging cannot lift a load greater than 20 per cent of the ultimate breaking strength of the weakest part of the rigging. Geometry also matters. The tension on a sling increases as the angle between the sling and the load decreases (see page 12). A common problem in oil and gas is that many workers don’t know exactly how much tension on a sling increases, but they continue to lift anyway.

HAVE A PLAN Failing to plan is a surefire path to failure. Answering these questions can better prepare you and your co-workers. What equipment will we use? Are manufacturer specifications for the equipment available? What is the size and weight of the load? What is the capacity and condition of the lifting equipment? Who will be involved? What is their knowledge and experience?

How will the rigging equipment be attached to the load and the lifting equipment?

What are the surrounding hazards, such as overhead electrical lines, and nearby buildings, structures and other equipment?

What are the sightlines and visibility?


Behind the numbers

WRITTEN BY DES KILFOIL

THE STRESS, STRAIN AND SPRAIN OF

"GIVE'R!" “GO HARD!” WHENEVER YOU HEAR THESE WORDS, CHANCES ARE SOMEONE IS ABOUT TO EXERT TREMENDOUS EFFORT TO GET A JOB DONE. BUT CHANCES ARE ALSO THAT PERSON COULD SPRAIN, STRAIN OR OTHERWISE INJURE THEMSELVES FROM OVEREXERTION. WHAT HAPPENS WHEN PEOPLE GO TOO HARD, AND WHY DO THEY DO IT?

OVEREXERTION EXPLAINED

Overexertion is pushing yourself or being pushed beyond your physical limits. It happens when you use excessive force to push, pull, lift, hold, carry, turn or throw.

People can overexert themselves playing recreational sports, moving furniture, gardening, painting, even doing woodwork or some other hobby. And, of course, working. Workers' Compensation Board stats from 2011 to 2016 show that of 23,464 workplace injuries in Western Canada, some 13 per cent (close to one in eight) were caused by overexertion.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

15


Behind the numbers

INJURIES CHANGE WITH AGE

AS WORKERS AGE, THEIR RISK OF CERTAIN INJURIES CHANGES.

MIDDLE-AGE MENACE

Why do more workers in their middle years hurt themselves from overexertion?

As we age, our overall health and physical and cognitive abilities start to decrease, however slowly. Yet many of us continue to work at the same pace. Some workers over-perform because they’re worried about keeping their jobs or they have financial and family commitments to keep. Others find it harder to concentrate on their work. And pushing performance and abilities increases the risk of injury.

STRONG BACK & STRONG MIND

Being physically fit helps prevent overexertion. And mental fitness is just as important. Train yourself to rest properly, eat well and be active regularly.

Most importantly: as you age, acknowledge your changing limitations and adjust your behaviour accordingly. “Push your limits” may be a common motto in the gym, but “know your limits” is a more apt saying for work and play of all kinds.

UNDER 35 Workers under the age of 35 are most likely to be hurt by a falling or swinging pipe or other object.

35 – 44 Overexertion becomes the leading cause of workplace injuries for workers 35 to 44 years old. The trend continues for workers 45 to 54.

45 – 54 For workers 45 to 54 years old, overexertion shares first place with “bodily reaction” injuries such as wrenching your back to avoid falling, or spraining an ankle stepping sideways to avoid an obstacle. 16

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

SPOTTING THE SIGNS

SYMPTOMS OF PAIN OVEREXERTION APPEAR QUICKLY

Discomfort and pain mean strained ligaments, torn muscles, sprained joints, tendonitis or even bone stress fractures.

THIRST

BREATH

Thirst means you’re already dehydrated, and can be followed by a dizzy, lightheaded feeling or full-out collapse from overexertion.

Another obvious sign is breathing difficulty. If that happens, stop what you’re doing. Now. And get help.


REDUCING THE RISK

1

OVEREXERTION INJURIES ARE LARGELY AVOIDABLE. HERE’S HOW:

PLAN SAFE

Figure out the job beforehand, and plan

2

CLEAR WAY

Clear pathways and obstacles.

how to do it safely.

4

LIMIT WEIGHT

Limit the weight of any objects you’re handling, and when needed, use equipment or machinery to help you.

7

USE LEGS

Bend your knees and lift with your legs, not your back.

5

SOLID FOOTING

Make sure your footing is solid. Square your body to your work; keep your toes in the same direction as your nose.

8

WATER BREAKS

Take breaks, and keep hydrated.

3

SLOW DOWN

Don’t hurry. Stretch and warm up.

6

LIFT SMART

Don’t stretch or contort your body to lift a heavy object.

9

THE RIGHT FOOTWEAR

Make sure your boots are in good condition, not worn out or damaged.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

17


Tailgate talks

TEAMWORK

STRENGTHENING THE CHAIN OF SAFETY

TEAMWORK The safety of your crew is like a chain: only as strong as its weakest link. Building strong links takes as much teamwork as it does training. Here are tips and insights you can use at your next tailgate talk to build your team and improve safety and performance.

18

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM


MAKE SOME FAMILY TIES “Sometimes, we’re only as good as an employee’s family, because we need their support, too,” says Scott Van Vliet, CEO and founder of Environmental Refuelling Systems (ERS). While “running lean” has cut back on ERS’s family activities for a couple of years, Van

Vliet says family events are the mortar that solidifies his workforce. “It’s hard for us to bring people together because so many of our guys fly in and fly out, but it’s critical to bring our people and their families together. And we’re really trying to have more work events and activities."

TAILGATE TIP:

TAKE IT FROM A ROUGHNECK Mike Board is the general manager of the Calgary Roughnecks lacrosse team. He says his team is a lot like a crew at a camp: players come together from across the country for a few days at a time and have to be “ready to go to war together” on the job. “We’re an organization of strong individuals and the individuals in the room have to come together to feel they’re part of the team,” Board says. He relies on a few small, simple ways to build the bonds between his players.

Juggle logistics to have players on the same flights to and from games

YOUR CREW CAN SUGGEST WAYS TO INVOLVE THEIR FAMILIES IN EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES.

Hold group dinners and set up round tables to encourage conversations

Rotate seating at meals and meetings and lockers in change rooms so everyone gets to know one another

Use social media so teammates can “banter back and forth” when they’re not physically together.

TAILGATE TIP: ASK YOUR CREW TO SIT WITH DIFFERENT TEAMMATES FOR ONE MEAL A DAY FOR A WEEK. FRONTLINE FALL 2017

19


Safe company

Tailgate talks

MORE TEAMWORK TIPS 2

1 ASK AND LISTEN

MAKE IT PERSONAL

PICK UP THE PHONE

"You’ve got to get everyone on the same page and have them understand what they’re trying to achieve and the benefits of achieving it. Make sure everyone can ask questions and be heard. We’ve moved away from having one or two people driving a project to having everyone participate."

"Making a personal connection is effective, such as asking someone what they like doing with family and friends away from work, like camping, travelling or watching their kids play hockey. It’s about understanding the lives we have outside of work."

"Pick up the phone and let people know they’re doing a good job—or bad work. We’re constantly asking our people to pick up the phone and talk to people, or meet with people and break down the barriers to building a team. You need leadership to bring that out. Leaders set the tone."

CRAIG NICHOLSON, Director, Health, Safety & Environment, CEDA

20

3

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

CHRISTINA WOROBEC, Manager, Corporate Health, Safety & Environment, CEDA

SCOTT VAN VLIET CEO and Founder, Environmental Refuelling Systems


Feature

The downside of an uptick in oil and gas activity is this: injury rates in young, new employees go up. A lot. From 2009 to 2012, the industry’s workforce increased by 25 per cent and the number of injuries went up by 29 per cent. But among workers 15 to 24 years old, the claim rate soared by 94 per cent. Young, or green, employees are twice as likely to be injured on the job as other workers. These workers are usually males and the most common cause of their injuries is being hit by something (struck by an object). A wrench falling from a drilling platform. A pipe swinging from rigging. A pressurized hose uncoupling.

HOW TO BUCK AN INDUSTRY TREND Avoiding injuries as oil and gas activities pick up WRITTEN BY TERRY BULLICK PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON STANG

With oil and gas activities in Western Canada inching their way to recovery, companies, employers and employees alike are looking for ways to buck the upward trend in injuries among young workers. FITTING INTO A PUZZLE

Before Beaver Drilling hires any employee, the company looks for ways to reduce the injury risks to new employees. “We begin during the interview process and explain the Beaver culture to potential employees,” says Jason Blahun, Beaver Drilling’s health, safety and environment manager. “We ask questions about how they would fit into the company. We look for people who would be the best piece in our puzzle.” New Beaver employees of all ages are immediately introduced to the company’s operational policies, equipment, risks, hazards and teams. Mentors (experienced leaders) teach and shadow new or young employees. “We don’t put anyone in the position where they could miss making a critical decision,” Blahun says. “Great consequences can result from a missed decision and we realize that human factors have real risks.” This is also why Beaver includes mindfulness in its hazardous training for young workers. “We want workers to be mindful of what’s going on 360 degrees around them,” Blahun says. “You don’t just want workers to set their sights on going from point A to point B in their jobs. You want them to be aware of everything around them.”

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

21


Feature

I N - D E P T H O R I E N T AT I O N

H2Safety is a Calgary-based company that builds custom emergency response programs and health, safety and environmental management systems for clients around the world. In the past year it’s hired 16 new employees, 13 of them in the spring of 2017. Every one of them goes through in-depth orientation that includes about 40 hours of mandatory safety training during their first six months on the job. Courses include: H2S Alive, CPR, driver awareness, incident investigation, gas monitoring, and hazard management. New employees (of any age) are typically trained for at least 30 days before going into the field. And they are usually placed into a tech pool (a team of co-workers who share experiences and insights) and work with a coordinator to learn company and industry processes. Following that, they are assigned to work with a project manager. “It represents a big investment,” says Ryan Groot, H2Safety’s Health,Safety and Environment director. “And we’re selling emergency management and HSE services so we have to be subject matter experts.” Groot adds, “To be fair, a lot of our work is administrative in nature, but when we go into the field we are very well prepared.” IN THIS TOGETHER

One way Beaver Drilling has bucked the young worker injury trend is by reminding existing employees of a simple fact: new young workers don’t know as much as seasoned older workers. “It’s like training a hockey player,” Blahun says. You have to welcome young players to the team and develop their skills. “One of our big improvements is having a team environment: we’re all in this together. And we’re all equal. A new young employee is just as important to us as an experienced rig manager.” It may sound cliché, but when workers feel they’re part of a team or family they’re always watching out for one another. "Teams win games together and teams lose games together—and the more our people understand that, the better we perform,” Blahun says.

22

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

“One of our big improvements is having a team environment: We’re all in this together. And we’re all equal. A new young employee is just as important to us as an experienced rig manager.”


SAFETY HAS NO AGE (OR EXPERIENCE) LIMITS

Glenn Finnson has worked at Syncrude for some 30 years. A geological engineer by profession, he’s experienced in many of the company’s oil sands operations in Fort McMurray, from operating heavy equipment to overseeing organizational management. In 2016, Finnson was named vice president of Safety, Security, Health and Environment. He says new employees take basic training that outlines the company’s safety expectations and industry hazards. But they are also quickly introduced to Syncrude’s new company-wide loss prevention system (LPS). “Under LPS there’s a self-assessment people go through to analyze their behaviours and actions so they know how to better ensure their safety and the safety of the people around them,” Finnson says. “It’s a process we reinforce because it gets people to refer back to their training and their skills. They’re calling upon their knowledge and their senses.” If someone can’t answer LPS assessment questions, they can turn to a mentor and other support. And in some cases, a person can’t work until they can demonstrate their competency. LPS is more than questions and answers. It’s also tools and management techniques that help identify, prevent and eliminate the factors and attitudes around losses of any kind: health and safety, time, production and quality. One of those management techniques is a “see something, say something” approach. It’s foundational to seeking out hazards and reinforcing the support people have to reduce and eliminate hazards. LPS and safety, Finnson says, are part of what make Syncrude “a caring company that wants to have people go home the way as they came into work.” FOR MORE I N F O R M AT I O N VISIT:

He adds: “We don’t differentiate between the age and experience of our workers. We pay attention to all our employees. And we rely on each other.”

Finnson is confident the company can reach its lostenergysafetycanada.com time injury rate goal of zero. It’s gotten closer every year he’s worked at Syncrude—it’s currently at 0.02, and see Young Worker the best performance ever. Safety Bulletins as well as Age Groups and Their Top Injuries worksafebc.ca and see Listen to Your Gut

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

23


Feature

A C U LT U R E O F M E N T O R I N G A N D CO N N E CT I N G

About three years ago, CEDA took a long, hard look at how it was training new workers. “We stopped looking at it as green-hand training and asked what we needed to do to empower and mentor new employees,” says Craig Nicholson, CEDA’s director of Health, Safety and Environment. Riffing on the practice of green hard hats for new employees, CEDA made green-hand stickers for new workers’ hard hats and silver-hand stickers for mentors’ hard hats. Mentors hesitated at first about putting the stickers on their hats. That quickly changed when the company began bringing mentors together to share their insights and experiences of introducing new workers onto their teams. Plus, the company often assigns multiple mentors to each employee, reducing the stress and demands that fall to mentors when monitoring new workers. “We’ve seen a change in culture and people wanting to become mentors,” says Christina Worobec, CEDA’s manager of corporate health, safety and environment.

T H E I N F LU E N C E S ON YOUNG W O R K E R S’ S A F E TY

Several factors influence the safety of young, inexperienced workers. An Energy Safety Canada safety bulletin notes young workers are more likely to be: Given tasks beyond their abilities Unaware of the risks associated with tasks they’re doing Unsure of how to protect themselves or others from injury Unsupervised Unfamiliar with safe work procedures Unsure of how or afraid to ask questions Unaware of their rights and responsibilities Overconfident and feel invincible.

24

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM


TIPS FOR KEEPING NEW WORKERS SAFE

Ensure young, or green, workers: Understand their rights and responsibilities Have been given general and site specific orientations

Take hazard assessment training and participate in identifying and assessing hazards

Are part of an assessment processes Participate in toolbox meetings, especially those about risk to new workers Know the risks of hazardous energy.

If you supervise new and young workers, you can also reduce their on-the-job risks by: Assigning a buddy, mentor or coach Training and supporting buddies, mentors and coaches Having co-workers watch and intervene before something happens Building their competency with on-the-job training Making them aware of line-of-fire and no-go zones and stop- work processes Giving them a booklet or checklist to record when and how they complete tasks.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

25


Safe company

DEMONSTRATING THAT NOTHING IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN SAFETY

WRITTEN BY ANNE GEORG PHOTOS SUPPLIED BY SEMCAMS

26

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM


TURNAROUND AT K3 SOUR GAS PLANT SHOWS SEMCAMS IS COMMITTED TO WORKING WITHOUT INCIDENT

In May 2017, 700 workers arrived at the SemCAMS K3 sour gas plant near Fox Creek, Alta. Their mission: undertake a highly technical major turnaround on a tight timeline at a hazardous industrial site. Troy Tattersall, the K3 superintendent, was in charge of the month-long effort. After 26 years working with the company, he knows how to keep workers safe. “I laid down the tone I wanted during the turnaround: for everyone to work calmly and with a purpose,” he recounts. That purpose included performing as many as 700 technical procedures—called blinds—during the turnaround. The potentially hazardous tasks involve depressurizing vessels and closing valves to prevent gas leaks in areas being inspected. As the turnaround began, Tattersall noted many workers were unclear about the blind process, so he stopped the entire turnaround for much of a day to review the steps. By doing that, he demonstrated to workers that nothing is more important than safety. “It was completely different than any turnaround I’ve worked on during my career,” says Les Paul, SemCAMS’ health and safety advisor at K3 and part of the turnaround team. He’s been with the company for 32 years, working in safety for much of that time. “We’ve preached over the years that incidents are caused by a perceived rush to get the job done. Troy lived by that. We needed to do the job right, not quickly.” Paul says one of his major career accomplishments is being part of the team that built the company’s safety program and culture over almost two decades.

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

27


Safe company

heat or cold, using the work permit system, scope of work and potential workplace hazards. New employees receive a safety orientation. In the past five years, SemCAMS has increased the emphasis on workers’ personal responsibility for safety. The results are positive. Since 2013 SemCAMS has reported a 57 per cent decrease in recordable incidents; a 60 per cent decrease in vehicle incidents; a 75 per cent reduction in spills; and a 100 per cent reduction in reportable gas releases (to zero).

NO MATTER HOW GOOD WE ARE, THE REAL FOCUS IS ON GETTING BETTER. ANDREW CATTRAN

SemCAMS Vice President of Operations

They pulled the best elements from the safety programs of SemCAMS’ two parent companies and adapted them to the culture of the new company. SemCAMS is the Calgary-based Canadian subsidiary of Tulsa, Okla.-based SemGroup Corp. “Our safety team is where our operations are—not in the Calgary office. We built our codes of practice off of what we knew from the field,” Paul says. “That makes a huge difference.” Within the SemCAMS safety program are hundreds of procedures, including handling hazardous chemicals, working in confined spaces and at heights, and driving. All workers can access SemCAMS’ environment, health and safety program on the corporate intranet. It includes permits, audits, inspections, training and communications, and acts as a toolbox to manage on-site health and safety. At all SemCAMS facilities, shifts begin with safety review meetings with workers and supervisors. Weekly, monthly and quarterly safety meetings focus on specific topics, such as working safely in

“People are talking about safety more often and management is asking for workers’ input more regularly,” Paul says. “The more you talk about it, the more other people talk about it and are more engaged.” He says support for SemCAMS' safety culture begins with upper management. “They believe that striving for zero workplace incidents is not only the right way, but the only way.” Andrew Cattran is SemCAMS’ vice president of operations. He says everyone working at the company is part of the safety equation. “Our safety focus encompasses the whole company,” he explains. “We address everyone involved from all aspects of safety: the procedures we need to follow, our safety audits and our incident investigations.” Every year the company selects areas for improvement. This year, it's new worker orientations and equipment isolations, which tied into May’s K3 plant turnaround. “Kudos to Troy, Les and everyone involved. They finished the turnaround with only a twisted ankle to report,” he says. “That’s an amazing feat. I’m proud of them.” Tattersall says the site had a calm, measured atmosphere. “Usually there’s a lot of hand waving and the workers are in a hurry to get the job done. But when I walked around the facility, you wouldn’t know 700 people worked there. The pace of work was controlled and that prevented injuries.” Cattran says SemCAMS is proactive with safety, citing 3,000 near-miss reports, hazard IDs and other opportunities that are identified and reviewed annually as leading indicators that help the company to know where it can improve. “Our culture is ‘never be satisfied, keep improving.’ That’s the message we send to all of our operations leaders,” Cattran says. “No matter how good we are, the real focus is on getting better.”

28

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM


Test your knowledge

WHAT’S YOUR SAFETY ATTITUDE?

QUESTION 1: Safe driving When you drive, your speed is most often: A. 10 km/h under the posted limit. B. Within 5 km/h of the posted limit. C. 15 km/h or more above the posted limit. Speeding is a leading cause of driving deaths. The faster and more often you speed, the more likely you are to hurt or kill yourself or someone else.

A: 5 B: 10 C: 0 QUESTION 2: Sleep habits Right before going to bed you normally: A: Have a couple of drinks or eat a big meal. B: Ensure the room is dark and not too warm or cool. C: Worry for 20 minutes, then fall asleep. A lack of sleep can leave you drowsy during your waking (and working) hours, reducing your productivity on the job and increasing your risk for various health problems.

A: 0 B: 10 C: 5

ANSWER THESE 11 QUESTIONS AND YOU’LL QUICKLY GET A GOOD IDEA OF YOUR SAFETY PROFILE.

QUESTION 3: Alcohol consumption When not working, you have: A: No more than 2 drinks a day (10 drinks a week) for women and no more than 3 drinks a day (15 a week) for men. B: 3 or more a day (11 or more a week) for women and 4 or more a day (more than 15 a week) for men. C: Fewer than 5 drinks a week and rarely more than 2 the same day.

QUESTION 4: Overexertion Before strenuous activities, you: A. Warm up and stretch to get your body ready for work. B: Assess the hazards of lifting or carrying anything. C: Eat a light lunch. Overexertion is the secondleading cause of injury in the upstream oil and gas industry. The most common activities leading to overexertion are handling pipe, handling tools and equipment, and handling hoses.

A: 10 B: 5 C: 0

QUESTION 7: Tailgate talks How many tailgate talks or workplace safety meetings have you been to in the past year? A: 0 to 5. B: 6 to 20. C: 21+.

A: Store food where bears can’t reach it; dispose of garbage so that it doesn’t attract bears. B: Make noise to inhibit animals from coming near. C: Feed or leave out food for wildlife. If you live, work or play in wilderness areas, knowing safe practices about bears and other creatures can keep you and others from harm.

A: 10 B: 5 C: 0 QUESTION 6: Safety training How many hours of safety training have you completed in the past two years? A: 0 to 20 hours. B: 21 to 49 hours. C: 50+ hours. Safety training helps you understand the hazards of your job—and how to reduce and respond to them. True safety depends as much on your attitude as it does on your knowledge.

A: 0 B: 5 C: 10

approach, weekly tailgate talks and other similar meetings keep safety real. Teams can share and solutions to risks big and small.

A: 0 B: 5 C: 10 QUESTION 8: Slips, trips and falls The floor or ground where you work is cleared of unnecessary ropes, tools and cords: A: Seldom. B: Weekly. C: Always. Slips, trips and falls are among

A: 0 B: 5 C: 10 QUESTION 11: Safety culture Where you work, supervisors and managers: A: Don’t want workers to report hazards and near misses because it could cost money or result in too much paperwork. B: Set a good example for safe work practices. C: Regularly collaborate with crews and contractors to improve safety. Leaders who walk the walk when it comes to safety are a powerful inspiration to the

the leading causes of injury in

people they work with.

the oil and gas industry.

A: 0 B: 5 C: 10

A: 0 B: 5 C: 10 QUESTION 9: Saying something One of your co-workers often smells of alcohol near the end of his shift. You: A: Say nothing; it's none of your business. B: Start watching him more closely to see if he’s drinking on the job. C: Check your company’s drug and alcohol policy, then let your supervisor know your concerns. You have a responsibility to protect your own safety and

Drinking increases your risk of

your co-workers’ safety and

several kinds of cancer, heart

must know your company’s

diseases and a long list of other

policy for reporting alcohol and

illnesses. And it can be deadly

drug use, including medications.

on the job.

A: 0 B: 5 C: 10

A: 5 B: 0 C: 10

A: Every couple of years. B: Every six to 12 months. C: As you identify risks.

With their boots-on-the-ground

their knowledge, experiences

QUESTION 5: Wildlife smarts When in wilderness and remote areas, you:

QUESTION 10: Emergency plan You—and your coworkers—review and update your jobsite’s emergency response plan:

YOUR SAFETY SCORE 75 TO 100 POINTS: Safety-strong—and good enough to train and mentor others 50 TO 74 POINTS: Aware but not always fully engaged 49 AND UNDER: Living life with reckless abandon—a risk to yourself and others

FRONTLINE FALL 2017

29


The ripple effect

HOME SAFE

WRITTEN BY DES KILFOIL

THE RIPPLE EFFECT

It’s been 26 years since an explosion nearly killed her father, but Kayla Rath still panics at the sound of a siren. “I always assume the worst,” says Kayla. “Every worst-case scenario is always my first thought.” On Sept. 20, 1991, at a natural gas facility in southwest Kansas, Kayla’s father literally burst into flames. Brad Livingstone was working with a welder who, ignoring safety rules, started patching a leak in a gas storage tank. It exploded, killing the welder instantly. Brad, engulfed in flames, was blown onto the roof of another storage tank, which exploded seconds later. He was still alive when he was pulled to safety, but with second- and third-degree burns to more than 60 per cent of his body, Brad had only a five per cent chance of survival. ”When I walked into his room I chose not to touch him, because I was scared of him,” Kayla recalls. “His hands and face … were all swollen and red and black.” But Brad did survive, enduring months of agonizing skin grafts and years of rehabilitation. Kayla credits her “amazing” mother for keeping him on the road to recovery and for holding the family together. Today, Brad is a popular motivational speaker at corporate safety seminars. His Just A Second Ago presentation is a blunt warning that lives can change instantly if workers take shortcuts, refuse to abandon “that’s the way we’ve always done it” attitudes or, as in his case, allow themselves to be intimidated by reckless colleagues. Invited to speak alongside her father three years ago, Kayla now regularly joins his presentations. Married with five children, her message is equally blunt: anyone who ignores workplace safety is simply being selfish, because accidents “ripple” far beyond the victim.

Lives can change instantly if workers take shortcuts or refuse to abandon “that’s the way we’ve always done it” attitudes

30

ENERGYSAFETYCANADA.COM

“Workplace safety is not just about you. It’s about your child, your mom, your brother,” she says. ”Friends are the ripples, children are the ripples.” "Children expect their parents to come home safety from work," adds Kayla. "When that doesn't happen, their lives are changed forever."


careersinoilandgas.com

It works, and you can too. Now with job postings. Whether you are new to the industry or want to make a change, we have the tools and insights to help you find, explore and compare over 100 careers.


ZERO INJURIES ZERO INCIDENTS

With the formation of Energy Safety Canada, it’s a new day for safe work performance in the oil and gas industry. But the goal remains the same: zero injuries, zero incidents. We will continue to provide the knowledge and tools to protect you, your coworkers and your workplace. EnergySafetyCanada.com

Energy Safety Canada Frontline Magazine - Fall 2017  
Energy Safety Canada Frontline Magazine - Fall 2017