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MAY

13 14 15 2016

with the ATLANTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CHORUS


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2 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

w e l l s t a r. o r g


content May 2016

ar* experiences 2 WellStar 3 Southern Lexus Dealer Association 5 Braselton Visitors Bureau Authority 7  Atlanta Braves Summer Concerts

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Fifth Group – Lure

9

Atlanta Food & Wine Festival

11 Georgia Natural Gas 13 The Shops Buckhead Atlanta 19 Château Élan 21 Cancer Treatment Centers of America

features 11 Amplified by Passion

8

Announcing the 2016-17 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Season By Andrew Alexander

23 Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse 43 Center for Civil & Human Rights 45 Ruth’s Chris Steak House 59 Serenbe

departments 6 Welcome 10 Robert Spano 12 Orchestra Leadership 14 Musicians 80 ASO Sponsors

26 Concert Program and Notes 80 ASO Support

61 Emory Voice Center 85 The Palm Atlanta 92 Frederick Brown Amphitheatre 93 LaGrange/Troup County Chamber of Commerce/Tourism 94 Gordon Biersch

90 ASO Staff

95 Emory Healthcare – Aesthetics

91 Ticket Info / General Info

96 Harry Norman Realtors

contests Don’t forget, on EncoreAtlanta.com/contests, you can win additional prizes, like show tickets to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Fox Theatre, Alliance Theatre and more!

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4 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

instructions 1 Download the free “Encore Atlanta Plus” app from the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. 2 Open the E+ app and scan the pages listed on this page. icon in this issue 3 Look for this as well as future issues of Encore Atlanta at the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Alliance Theatre at the Woodruff Arts Center, The Atlanta Opera and the Fox Theatre.


ASO | Welcome Dear Friends,

I

n April, we announced the 2016-17 season of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, which features classical favorites, 20th and 21st century masterworks, world premieres, distinguished visitors and the incomparable Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus.

The season is designed in the spirit of celebrating creativity with four unique festivals, including a John Adams’ 70th birthday celebration, a salute to American composers and the Elements Festival, which celebrates the creativity of composers who illustrate the beauty of nature in music. And finally, the Modern Masters Series, which pays tribute to today’s living composers and includes a reprise of Christopher Theofanidis’ Creation/ Creator, which will not only be performed in Symphony Hall, but also at the 2017 SHIFT Festival in Washington, DC. The 2016-17 season will also celebrate one of the greatest creators of creativity, the legendary musician and prophet, Orpheus. We’re also happy to announce two new outdoor concerts this summer. On June 16, 2016, the Orchestra will perform Great American Music at Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre, followed by The Music of The Eagles at Chastain Park Amphitheater on June 25, 2016, and look for a Piedmont Park announcement coming soon. On a final note, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra has raised $17.25 million for the Musicians’ Endowment Fund, and the Orchestra has filled five of the 11 positions, with an additional audition planned for the fall. As you know, reaching our $25 million goal is critical not only to the success of the organization, but to the future of classical music in Atlanta. To those who have helped us reach this initial milestone, thank you, and to those considering helping us reach the finish line, we welcome your support. Thank you for your continued dedication to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra!

Sincerely,

Roger Mastroianni

Jennifer Barlament Executive Director

6 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


2016 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES PRESENTED BY

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Robert Spano

C

onductor, pianist, composer and pedagogue Robert Spano is known for his unique communicative abilities. In 14 seasons as Music Director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, this imaginative conductor has quietly been responsible for nurturing the careers of numerous classically-trained composers and conductors. As Music Director of the Aspen Music Festival and School, he oversees the programming of more than 300 events and educational programs, including Aspen’s American Academy of Conducting. The Atlanta School of Composers reflects Spano’s commitment to American contemporary music. He has led ASO performances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and the Ravinia, Ojai and Savannah Music Festivals.  Guest engagements have included orchestras such as the New York and Los Angeles philharmonics, San Francisco, Boston, Cleveland, Chicago and Philadelphia symphony orchestras, along with Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala, BBC Symphony and Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. His opera performances include Covent Garden, Welsh National Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Houston Grand Opera and the 2005 and 2009 Seattle Opera productions of Wagner’s Ring Cycle. 

With a discography of critically-acclaimed recordings for Telarc, Deutsche Grammophon and ASO Media recorded over nine years, Robert Spano has won six Grammy® Awards with the Atlanta Symphony. Spano is on faculty at Oberlin Conservatory and has received honorary doctorates from Bowling Green State University, the Curtis Institute of Music, Emory University and Oberlin. Maestro Spano is one of two classical musicians inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame and is proud to live in Atlanta.

Derek Blanks

Maestro Spano begins the 2015-16 season conducting the Saito Kinen Orchestra in Japan as part of a gala performance celebrating Seiji Ozawa’s 80th birthday. With the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra he leads four world premieres, seven Atlanta premieres and celebrates the centennial of the legendary Robert Shaw’s birth with Brahms’s A German Requiem and Leshnoff’s Zohar in Atlanta and at Carnegie Hall. Additional guest conducting engagements include the Minnesota Orchestra, the Oregon, Utah and Kansas City symphonies, Orquestra Sinfonica Brasileira, Orquestra Sinfonica Estado Sao Paulo and the Melbourne Symphony in Australia. Maestro Spano also holds a conductor residency with the Colburn School Orchestra in Los Angeles. As a pianist, he joins Wu Han and Alessio Bax for a program of piano masterworks as part of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s residency at the University of Georgia in Athens.


ASO | leadership 2015-2016 Board of Directors Officers D. Kirk Jamieson Chair

Meghan H. Magruder Vice Chair

Thomas Wardell Vice Chair

John B. White, Jr. Secretary

Suzanne Tucker Plybon Treasurer

Directors Keith Adams Neil H. Berman Paul Blackney Brett M. Blumencranz Frank H. Boykin Mary Rockett Brock Janine Brown† C. Merrell Calhoun Bill Carey S. Wright Caughman, M.D. Russell Currey Harry J. Cynkus Carlos del Rio, M.D.

Lynn Eden Shirley C. Franklin Paul R. Garcia Jason Guggenheim Virginia A. Hepner* Caroline Hofland Douglas R. Hooker Tad Hutcheson Mrs. Roya Irvani Clayton F. Jackson Camille Kesler* Carrie Kurlander James H. Landon Donna Lee

Hank Linginfelter Karole F. Lloyd Kelly L. Loeffler Belinda Massafra* Brian F. McCarthy Penny McPhee† Terence L. Neal Joseph M. O’Donnell Howard D. Palefsky Sunny K. Park E. Fay Pearce, Jr. Ronda Respess* William Schultz John Sibley

Paul Snyder John Sparrow Gail Ravin Starr Joseph M. Thompson Ray Uttenhove S. Patrick Viguerie Kathy N. Waller Mark D. Wasserman Richard S. White, Jr. Camille Yow

Board of Counselors Mrs. Helen Aderhold Elinor Breman Dr. John W. Cooledge John Donnell Jere Drummond Carla Fackler Charles Ginden

John T. Glover Dona Humphreys Aaron J. Johnson Ben F. Johnson III Herb Karp Jim Kelley George Lanier

Patricia Leake Lucy Lee Mrs. William C. Lester Mrs. J. Erskine Love Patricia H. Reid Joyce Schwob H. Hamilton Smith

W. Rhett Tanner G. Kimbrough Taylor Michael W. Trapp Chilton Varner Edus Warren Adair R. White Sue S. Williams

Life Directors Howell E. Adams, Jr. Mrs. Drew Fuller Bradley Currey, Jr. Mary D. Gellerstedt

Azira G. Hill Mrs. Charles A. Smithgall, Jr.

* Ex-officio † 2015-2016 Sabbatical


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AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra Robert Spano Music Director The Robert Reid ROBERT Topping Chair

FIRST VIOLIN

David Coucheron Concertmaster The Mr. and Mrs. SPANO Howard R. Peevy Chair Donald Runnicles Principal Guest The Mabel Dorn Conductor Reeder Honorary Chair The Neil and Sue Williams Chair Associate Concertmaster Vacant Michael Krajewski The Charles Principal Pops McKenzie Taylor Conductor Chair DONALD Joseph Young Justin Bruns RUNNICLES Assistant Conductor; Assistant/ Acting Associate Music Director Concertmaster of the Atlanta Symphony Youth Jun-Ching Lin Orchestra Assistant Concertmaster The Zeist Foundation Chair Anastasia Agapova Carolyn Toll Norman Mackenzie Hancock Director of Choruses John Meisner The Frannie and Christopher Pulgram MICHAEL KRAJEWSKI Bill Graves Chair Carol Ramirez Juan Ramirez Olga Shpitko Denise Berginson Smith Kenn Wagner Lisa Wiedman Yancich SECTION VIOLIN ‡

JOSEPH YOUNG

NORMAN MACKENZIE

Judith Cox Raymond Leung Sanford Salzinger

SECOND VIOLIN

Principal - Vacant The Atlanta Symphony Associates Chair Sou-Chun Su Associate/Acting Principal The Frances Cheney Boggs Chair Jay Christy Assistant/Acting Associate Principal Noriko Konno Clift Acting Assistant Principal Sharon Berenson David Braitberg David Dillard Eleanor Kosek Ruth Ann Little Thomas O’Donnell Ronda Respess Frank Walton VIOLA

Reid Harris Principal The Edus H. and Harriet H. Warren Chair Paul Murphy Associate Principal The Mary and Lawrence Gellerstedt Chair Catherine Lynn Assistant Principal Marian Kent Yang-Yoon Kim Yiyin Li Lachlan McBane Jessica Oudin Sarah Park Chastain†

Players in string sections are listed alphabetically


CELLO

PICCOLO

HORN

TIMPANI

Christopher Rex Principal The Miriam and John Conant Chair Daniel Laufer Associate Principal The Livingston Foundation Chair Karen Freer Assistant Principal Dona Vellek Assistant Principal Emeritus Joel Dallow Larry LeMaster Brad Ritchie Paul Warner

Carl David Hall

Brice Andrus Principal The Betty Sands Fuller Chair Susan Welty Associate Principal Ernesto Tovar Torres • Jaclyn Rainey • Bruce Kenney

Mark Yancich Principal The Walter H. Bunzl Chair William Wilder Assistant Principal

BASS

Colin Corner • Principal The Marcia and John Donnell Chair  Gloria Jones Associate Principal Lucy R. & Gary Lee Jr. Chair Jane Little Assistant Principal Emeritus Karl Fenner • Michael Kenady Michael Kurth Joseph McFadden Daniel Tosky • FLUTE

Christina Smith Principal The Jill Hertz Chair Robert Cronin Associate Principal C. Todd Skitch Carl David Hall

OBOE

Elizabeth Koch Tiscione Principal The George M. and Corrie Hoyt Brown Chair Yvonne Powers Peterson Associate Principal The Kendeda Fund Chair Samuel Nemec Emily Brebach ENGLISH HORN

Emily Brebach CLARINET

Laura Ardan Principal The Robert Shaw Chair Ted Gurch Associate Principal 2nd Clarinet Vacant Alcides Rodriguez E-FLAT CLARINET

Ted Gurch BASS CLARINET

Alcides Rodriguez BASSOON

Andrew Brady • Principal Vacant Associate Principal Laura Najarian Juan de Gomar CONTRABASSOON

Juan de Gomar

TRUMPET

Stuart Stephenson Principal The Madeline and Howell Adams Chair Associate Principal Vacant Michael Tiscione Acting Associate Principal/Second Michael Myers TROMBONE

Principal - Vacant The Terence L. Neal Chair, Honoring his Dedication and Service to the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Nathan Zgonc Acting Principal Joshua Bynum † Brian Hecht BASS TROMBONE

Brian Hecht The Home Depot Veterans Chair TUBA

Michael Moore Principal ‡ rotate between sections * Leave of absence

PERCUSSION

Thomas Sherwood* Principal The Julie and Arthur Montgomery Chair Charles Settle Acting Principal The Connie and Merrell Calhoun Chair William Wilder Assistant Principal The William A. Schwartz Chair HARP

Elisabeth Remy Johnson Principal The Sally and Carl Gable Chair KEYBOARD

The Hugh and Jessie Hodgson Memorial Chair Peter Marshall † Beverly Gilbert † Sharon Berenson LIBRARY

Rebecca Beavers Principal Nicole Jordan Assistant Principal Librarian † Regularly engaged musician • New this season


JEFF ROFFMAN

16 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


T

he 2016-17 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra season will be a celebration of creativity featuring an irresistible mix of classical favorites, 20th and 21st century masterworks, world premieres and distinguished guests. To celebrate the creative spirit, the season has right at its center the orchestra’s reprisal of Christopher Theofanidis’ Creation/ Creator, the grand oratorio which the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra gave its world premiere and recorded in April of 2015.

Amplified by Passion Announcing the 2016-17 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Season by Andrew Alexander

“Creation/Creator tackles both the ideas about how the world was created and also the act of creativity itself,” says Evans Mirageas, Vice President for Artistic Planning. “It’s a magnificent piece that sits right in the middle of the season. The season is a celebration looking backwards and forwards from that fulcrum to the notion of the wonder of the creation of music.” In the fall, the theme of creativity is expressed in a series of concerts featuring the work of composers who have illustrated the beauty of nature by focusing on the four basic elements: Earth, Air, Fire and Water. Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Music Director Robert Spano initiates the series (Nov. 3 and 5) with a concert based on the theme of water featuring Elgar’s Sea Pictures and Vaughan Williams’ A Sea Symphony, which Spano recorded with the Orchestra in 2003, a now classic recording which won three Grammy® Awards. For the concert,

encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 17


JEFF ROFFMAN

the Orchestra will be joined by Georgia native and renowned mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, making her Symphony Hall debut in the Elgar, and recent Richard Tucker Award winner, soprano Tamara Wilson, and baritone Brian Mulligan for the Vaughan Williams.

CHRISTOPHER THEOFANIDIS’ Creation/Creator

The Elements Festival continues the following week, (Nov. 10-12), with the element of Fire in a Spano-led concert featuring Oliver Knussen’s Flourish with Fireworks, Stravinsky’s The Firebird Suite the rarely perfomed Scriabin Symphony ‘Prometheus, Poem of Fire’ and a solo performance by Concertmaster David Coucheron of Prokofiev’s fiery Violin Concerto No. 1. The series concludes with Principal Guest Conductor Donald Runnicles taking the helm for Earth and Air with a performance of Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde and 20th century composer Toru Takemitsu’s A flock descends into the Pentagonal Garden.

The season is a celebration looking backwards and forwards …to the notion of the wonder of the creation of music works. The 2016-17 Delta Classical season opens (Sep. 22 and 24) with performances of Adams’ Tromba lontana alongside Sibelius’ Symphony No. 5 and Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 3, featuring frequent guest pianist Garrick Ohlsson. The birthday bash continues (Oct. 6 and 8) with Spano conducting Adams’ The Chairman Dances on a program that also includes Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 and Bosnian pianist Pedja Muzijevic performing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 22. American composers become the theme for the concerts of (Oct. 13 and 15) with Adams’ Lollapalooza paired with Copland’s Symphony No. 3 and Gershwin’s Piano Concerto in F, featuring the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra debut of Russian pianist Denis Kozhukhin. The Adams celebration concludes with a performance of the composer’s pivotal Harmonielehre or “book of harmony” (Mar. 2 and 4), a concert that also features Sibelius’ Violin Concerto performed by young American violinist Benjamin Beilman.

As the Elements Festival and John Adams celebrations show, there’s a remarkable mix of the old and the new in the 2016-17 season, a theme that continues throughout with a string of Modern Masters performances. During his 16 seasons with the Atlanta Throughout the season, the Symphony Symphony Orchestra, Robert Spano has will also celebrate the 70th birthday of championed new work by performing, contemporary composer John Adams touring and even commissioning significant with performances of several of his great contemporary works by living American 18 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


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composers. Throughout the new season, five concerts will pair contemporary works by living composers with works by more established 20th century masters. In all, the season will include three world premieres: a new work by Marc Neikrug (Jan. 12 and 14), a new composition by Rapido! Competition winner, Mark Buller (Jun. 1 and 3), as well as a performance of Scriabin’s Symphony No. 5 in a new arrangement by Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Double Bass player and composer Michael Kurth (Nov. 10 and 12). The Orchestra will introduce 12 new works to its repertoire during the 2016-17 season including Theofanidis’ Dreamtime Ancestors (Mar. 2 and 4) and James Lee III’s Sukkot Through Orion’s Nebula (Oct. 20 and 22).

a special one-night only, Spano-conducted, all-Tchaikovsky program featuring the composer’s Violin Concerto in D Major (Sept. 15). The Atlanta Symphony’s own Christina Smith solos on Jolivet’s Flute Concerto on an all-French composers’ program (May 25 and 27), that also includes the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus joining the Orchestra for Fauré’s Requiem. Principal Trumpet Stuart Stephenson makes his solo debut performing Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto (Jan. 5 and 7) under the baton of Guest Conductor Peter Oundjian.

Symphony Hall is not the only place you can hear the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. The Orchestra is visiting more locations around the state with increasing frequency this year: the 2016-17 season features six Former Atlantan and renowned American concerts at the University of Georgia in countertenor David Daniels makes his Athens, four at Kennesaw State University, long-awaited Atlanta Symphony Orchestra two at Madison and one in Savannah. The debut with a concert performance of Orchestra will also perform two concerts at Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice, (May 11 and Reinhardt and a holiday concert at North 13), featuring soprano Susanna Phillips as Euridice. Though the role has been strongly associated with Daniels throughout his career, the singer has yet to make a complete recording of the opera, and the concert itself will be recorded live for release on the ASO’s own label. In all, 12 new guest artists make their Atlanta Symphony Orchestra debuts this season, joining a roster of popular returning guests and featured soloists from within the Orchestra. In early December, young mandolin virtuoso Avi Avital arrives to perform the Concerto for Mandolin and Strings by Israeli composer Avner Dorman, whose exciting percussive work Spices, Perfumes,Toxins! the Orchestra memorably performed in 2015. Superstar violinist Joshua Bell performs at Symphony Hall in 20 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

JOSHUA BELL

Avenue Presbyterian Church. In addition, the Orchestra will be taking its performance of Creation/Creator to the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, for the SHIFT Festival of American Orchestras.


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CIRQUE DE LA SYMPHONIE

And of course, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra continues its tradition of ringing in the holidays at Symphony Hall with its Coca-Cola Holiday Concert Series including

Enjoy all the season has to offer with great benefits by becoming a 2016-17 subscriber TODAY! aso.org

Casual Fridays return for their third season and offer a great way to skip the traffic and enjoy the best of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in a slightly abbreviated program. The Thursday night pre-concert Chamber Recital series is back, with seating on stage in Symphony Hall, making the patrons a part of the concert experience. Whether it’s POPS!, Modern Masters or classical favorites, the 2016-17 season offers countless ways to experience the great musical creativity and vitality of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

the return of Handel’s Messiah, Part I, A Very Merry Holiday POPS!, the classic and beloved Christmas with the ASO concerts, a spectacular acrobatic performance from Cirque de la Symphonie and a new jazz program featuring Atlanta native jazz trumpeter Byron Stripling in a holiday-time tribute to the great Louis Armstrong. The Delta POPS! Series returns this year, bigger and better than ever, with the Orchestra performing the score live for popular films such as Raiders of the Lost Ark (Jan.27 and 28), The Nightmare Before Christmas (Oct. 28 and 29) and Singin’ in the Rain (Jun. 9 and 10). The King himself, Elvis Presley, gets an orchestral tribute 22 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

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JEFF ROFFMAN

(May 19 and 20), and back by popular demand, the legendary music of Simon and Garfunkel (Feb.17 and 18). Tony Awardwinning Georgia native Sutton Foster will bring Broadway magic to Atlanta with a special Symphony Hall performance, (Apr. 21 and 22).


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ASO | sponsors AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Classical Series is presented by Delta Air Lines.

Delta is proud to celebrate over 74 years as Atlanta’s hometown airline. Delta’s community spirit worldwide continues to be a cornerstone of our organization. As a force for global good, our mission is to continuously create value through an inclusive culture by leveraging partnerships and serving communities where we live and work. It includes not only valuing individual differences of race, religion, gender, nationality and lifestyle, but also managing and valuing the diversity of work teams, intracompany teams and business partnerships. Solo pianos used by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra are gifts of the Atlanta Steinway Society and in memory of David Goldwasser. The Hamburg Steinway piano is a gift received by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in honor of Rosi Fiedotin. The Yamaha custom six-quarter tuba is a gift received by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in honor of Principal Tuba player Michael Moore from The Antinori Foundation. The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra records for ASO Media. Other recordings of the Orchestra are available on the Argo, Deutsche Grammophon, New World, Nonesuch, Philips, Telarc and Sony Classical labels. Media sponsors: WABE, WSB AM, and AJC. Trucks provided by Ryder Truck Rental Inc.

24 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


PRESENTING SPONSOR OF THE ATLANTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THE ATLANTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THE ATLANTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA


ASO | 5.5/6/7 | program AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra

ASO | 5.5/6/7| program

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Classical Series is presented by Delta Air Lines.

Robert Spano, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Principal Guest Conductor

Delta Classical Concert Concerts of Thursday, May 5 and Saturday, May 7, at 8:00pm, and Friday, May 6, at 6:30pm.

Lothar Zagrosek, Conductor Javier Perianes, piano FELIX MENDELSSOHN (1809-1847) Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt (Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage), Opus 27 (1828) 13MIN ROBERT SCHUMANN (1810-1856) Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in A minor, Opus 54 (1845) 33MIN I. Allegro affettuoso II. Intermezzo. Andantino grazioso III. Allegro vivace Javier Perianes, piano The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

KEN MELTZER, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Program Annotator Ken’s in-depth program notes, detailed musical analysis and listening samples can be found online: aso.org/encore. Podcasts of Ken’s pre-concert lectures are at: aso.org and kenmeltzer.com To contact Ken, please email Ken.Meltzer@ woodruffcenter.org.

INTERMISSION 20MIN JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-1897) Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 68 (1876) 46MIN I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro II. Andante sostenuto III. Un poco Allegretto e grazioso IV. Adagio; Più Andante; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio

The concert of Friday, May 6, performed without intermission, includes the Mendelssohn and Brahms works.

26 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt (Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage), Opus 27 (1828) FELIX MENDELSSOHN was born in Hamburg, Germany, on February 3, 1809, and died in Leipzig, Germany, on November 4, 1847. The first performance of Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage took place in Berlin on December 1, 1832, with the composer conducting. Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, two horns, three trumpets, timpani, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performance: November 20, 1965, Robert Mann, Conductor. Most Recent Classical Subscription Performances: April 21, 22, and 23, 2011, Julian Kuerti, Conductor.

F

elix Mendelssohn first met Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) in November of 1821 at the great German author’s home in Weimar. On that occasion, Mendelssohn was introduced by his music teacher, Karl Zelter. Goethe was immediately entranced by the twelveyear-old Mendelssohn’s precocious talents. Goethe told Mendelssohn: “I am Saul, and you are my David. When I am sad, come and cheer me with your playing.” Mendelssohn’s final visit with Goethe took place in Weimar in May of 1830. The author gave the composer a manuscript sheet from Faust, with the following inscription: “To my dear young friend F.M.B., mighty yet delicate master of the piano, in friendly remembrance of happy May days in 1830. J.W. von Goethe.” Two years earlier, Mendelssohn composed a work based upon two poems by Goethe, the Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture.

These are the poems that also served as the inspiration for Ludwig van Beethoven’s 1815 Cantata of the same name, scored for chorus and orchestra. When Goethe learned of Mendelssohn’s composition, he wrote to his young friend: “Sail well in your music, and may your voyages always be as prosperous as this one.” Mendelssohn’s Overture contrasts the sea’s mysterious stillness with the sailor’s joyous sighting of land. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in A minor, Opus 54 (1845) ROBERT SCHUMANN was born in Zwickau, Germany, on June 8, 1810, and died in Endenich, Germany, on July 29, 1856. The first performance of the Piano Concerto took place at the Hall of the Hôtel de Saxe in Dresden, Germany, on December 4, 1845, with Clara Schumann as soloist and Ferdinand Hiller, conducting. In addition to the solo piano, the Concerto is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performance: November 27, 1948, William Schatten, Piano, Henry Sopkin, Conductor. Most recent Classical Subscription Performances: March 20, 21, and 22, 2008, Nicholas Angelich, Piano, Hugh Wolff, Conductor. Robert Shaw Performances (Classical Subscription, unless otherwise noted): November 21, 22, and 24, 1968, Lilian Kallir, Piano; November 25 and 26, 1968, Lilian Kallir, Piano (Tour, Macon, GA, and Moultrie, GA); December 1, 2, and 3, 1983, Murray Perahia, Piano; January 16, 1984, Jeffrey Kahane, Piano (Tour, West Palm Beach, FL).

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Notes on the Program by Ken Meltzer


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obert Schumann composed the Piano Concerto for his beloved wife, the pianist and composer Clara Wieck Schumann (1819-1896). The work originated in May of 1841, as a Fantasy in A minor for piano and orchestra. In 1845, Schumann added two movements to the Fantasy. Clara Schumann wrote in her diary: “(The Fantasy) has now become a concerto that I mean to play next winter. I am very glad about it for I have always wanted a great bravura piece by him.” The following month, Clara enthused: “I am happy as a king at the thought of playing it with orchestra.”

unerringly from start to finish. These admirable qualities, coupled with Schumann’s inspired lyrical gifts, produce a sublime work, certainly one of the finest piano concertos of the Romantic era. The Concerto is in three movements, the final two played without pause. The first (Allegro affettuoso) opens in dramatic fashion, with a forte orchestral chord, immediately followed by an emphatic descending passage for the soloist. The oboes, supported by the clarinets, bassoons, and horns, sing the espressivo principal theme, soon repeated by the soloist. The brief second movement (Intermezzo. Andantino grazioso) is in A—B—A form. The soloist, in dialogue with the strings, presents the charming opening theme, derived from the ascending portion of the principal melody of the first movement. The cellos launch the more rhapsodic “B” section. In the finale (Allegro vivace), the soloist introduces the joyous principal theme, again related to the principal melody of the opening movement. The finale concludes with an expansive coda, in which the soloist takes center stage, closing with a dazzling, ascending flourish.

Clara Schumann was the soloist in the December 4, 1845 premiere of Robert’s Concerto in A minor for Piano and Orchestra. The first performance took place in Dresden at the Hall of the Hôtel de Saxe, led by the work’s dedicatee, conductor Ferdinand Hiller. On New Year’s Day, 1845, Clara Schumann played the new Concerto with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, under Felix Mendelssohn’s direction. In many subsequent performances of the Schumann Piano Concerto, it was Robert who served as conductor/accompa- Symphony No. 1 in C minor, nist for his wife. Opus 68 (1876) In a letter written to Clara a few years before their marriage, Robert Schumann described his conception of a piano concerto as “a compromise between a symphony, a concerto and a huge sonata. I see I cannot write a concerto for the virtuosos—I must plan something else.” And, despite the considerable technical hurdles for the soloist, there is always an admirable sense of partnership between pianist and orchestra. Further, it is remarkable that while four years separate the composition of the first movement and the final two, the Concerto is an organic composition that proceeds 28 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

JOHANNES BRAHMS was born in Hamburg, Germany, on May 7, 1833, and died in Vienna, Austria, on April 3, 1897. The first performance of the Symphony No. 1 took place in Karlsruhe, Germany, on November 4, 1876, with Otto Dessoff conducting. The Symphony No. 1 is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performance: April 30, 1949, Henry Sopkin, Conductor.


Robert Shaw Performances (Classical Subscription, unless otherwise noted): February 7, 1975 (Tour, Columbus, GA); March 18, 19, and 20, 1982; October 20, 21, and 22, 1983; November 22 and 27, 1983 (Runout, Thomasville, GA, Gainesville, GA); March 21 and 24, 1984 (Tour, Helena, AK, Aurora, IL); June 10, 1984 (Atlanta Parks); September 17, 18, and 19, 1987; October 4, 1987 (Special); February 2, 1988 (Tour, Tampa, FL); May 25, 1988 (Tour, New York, NY).

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s early as 1853, prominent musicians, Robert Schumann included, urged the young Johannes Brahms to try his hand at symphonic composition. Brahms, however, resisted the call. In 1870, Brahms wrote to conductor Hermann Levi: “I shall never write a symphony. You have no idea the likes of us feel when we hear the tramp of a giant like him beside us.” Here, Brahms referred to the great shadow cast by Ludwig van Beethoven and his epochal Nine Symphonies. And it was not until 1876, when Brahms was forty-three years old, that he completed his First Symphony. The November 4, 1876, premiere took place in Karlsruhe, under the direction of Otto Dessoff. Although Beethoven had been dead nearly half a century when the C-minor Symphony premiered, comparisons with the man Brahms called a “giant” were inevitable. The Brahms First presents a dramatic journey from C minor to C Major, as does Beethoven’s Fifth. A four-note motif, also reminiscent of the famous opening theme of the Beethoven Fifth, plays a prominent role the first movement. A friend of Brahms noted the similarity of the finale’s

principal theme to the Ode “To Joy” in Beethoven’s Ninth. To this observation, Brahms responded, “any ass can see that!” The eminent conductor, Hans von Bülow, dubbed the work “Beethoven’s Tenth.” Although Bülow certainly meant that as a compliment, it provided Brahms no great satisfaction. For Brahms’s part, it seems that the completion of his First Symphony liberated him from the paralyzing specter of Beethoven’s imposing legacy. Three more Brahms Symphonies followed over the ensuing decade—each, like the first, a monument of the late 19th-century orchestral repertoire. In time, it became abundantly clear that in his Four Symphonies, Brahms, a musical descendent of Beethoven, spoke very much in his own voice—a voice of Romantic lyricism, passion, and grandeur. The Symphony’s opening movement begins with a dramatic, slow-tempo introduction (Un poco sostenuto), featuring the timpani’s relentless hammer-blows and hints of the ensuing Allegro’s thematic material. Another brusque chord launches the Allegro proper and the strings’ forte presentation of the ascending and descending theme that forms the nucleus for the movement’s thematic material. Two relatively brief movements follow. The beautiful slow movement (Andante sostenuto) concludes with a shimmering violin solo. The third movement (Un poco Allegretto e grazioso) is a graceful intermezzo. As with the opening movement, the finale begins with an extended slow-tempo introduction (Adagio). The principal section of the finale (Allegro non troppo, ma con brio) opens with the broad and majestic theme that bears a kinship to Beethoven’s Ode “To Joy.” Storm and stress finally resolve to the triumphant closing measures.

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Most Recent Classical Subscription Performances: November 6, 7, and 8, 2014, Marc Piollet, Conductor.


ASO | 5.5/6/7 | artists LOTHAR ZAGROSEK, Conductor

CHRISTIAN NIELINGER

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othar Zagrosek has been principal conductor of the Konzerthausorchester Berlin since 2006. He studied with Hans Swarowsky, István Kertész, Bruno Maderna and Herbert von Karajan, and was appointed principal conductor of the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra in 1982, followed by appointment as musical director of the Paris Grand Opéra, principal guest conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, general music director of the Leipzig Opera, and general music director of the Stuttgart State Opera.

Berlin’s Philharmonie, the Musikverein in Vienna, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, St Petersburg’s Philharmonic Hall, the Great Hall at the Moscow Conservatory and Suntory Hall in Tokyo.

Perianes’ 2015/16 season includes concerts with Wiener Philhamoniker, Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra, hr-Sinfonieorchester, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, TonkünstlerOrchester, Orchestre de Chambre de Paris and Orchestra of St. Luke’s (Carnegie Hall), His career as a conductor has taken him, as well as a month-long-tour of orchestras among other engagements, to the Vienna and in Australia and New Zealand. Hamburg State Operas, the Deutsche Oper Perianes records exclusively for harmonia Berlin, the Frankfurt Opera, the Théâtre mundi. In May 2015 he released a live de la Monnaie in Brussels, Glyndebourne, recording of Grieg’s Piano Concerto with the Salzburg Festival, the Vienna and Berlin the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Sakari Festival Weeks, the Munich Opera Festival Oramo and a selection of Grieg’s Lyric and the London Promenade Concerts. Pieces. Songs without Words, a selection Since 1995 he has been first guest conductor of piano works by Mendelssohn released in and artistic adviser to the German Youth November 2014, has received unanimous Philharmonic and a critical praise. His previous releases for the regular guest with label include Schubert’s Impromptus and the Bavarian Radio Klavierstücke, Manuel Blasco de Nebra’s Orchestra, the West keyboard sonatas, Mompou’s Música callaGerman Radio da, ...les sons et les parfums which focuses Orchestra, the NHK in on works by Chopin and Debussy, and Tokyo, the Orchestre Moto perpetuo - a selection of Beethoven’s Philharmonique of sonatas. Perianes’ recording of Falla’s Radio France, and the Nights in the Gardens of Spain and select® RAI Orchestra in Turin. ed solo works received a Latin Grammy Nomination.

JAVIER PERIANES, piano

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avier Perianes’ flourishing international career spans five continents taking him to some of the world’s most prestigious venues, including, Carnegie Hall in New York, the Barbican, Royal Festival and Wigmore Halls in London, Salle Pleyel and the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris,

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ASO | 5.5/6/7| program JOSEP MOLINA

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ASO | 5.8 | program AtlantaSymphonyYouthOrchestra Concert of Sunday, May 8, 2016, at 3:00pm. The Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra is sponsored by Wells Fargo.

Joseph Young, Conductor

Finale Concert PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840-1893) Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture (1870, rev. 1880)

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ALBERTO GINASTERA (1916-1983) Four Dances from Estancia, Opus 8a (1941) I. The Land Workers II. Wheat Dance III. The Cattlemen IV. Final Dance (Malambo) INTERMISSION

The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

BENJAMIN BRITTEN (1913-1976) Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell, “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra,” Opus 34 (1946)

KEN MELTZER, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Program Annotator Ken’s in-depth program notes, detailed musical analysis and listening samples can be found online: aso.org/encore. Podcasts of Ken’s pre-concert lectures are at: aso.org and kenmeltzer.com To contact Ken, please email Ken.Meltzer@ woodruffcenter.org.

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Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture (1870, rev. 1880)

Four Dances from Estancia, Opus 8a (1941)

PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY was born in Kamsko-Votkinsk, Russia, on May 7, 1840, and died in St. Petersburg, Russia, on November 6, 1893. The first performance of the Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture took place in Moscow, Russia, at a concert of the Musical Society on March 16, 1870, with Nikolai Rubinstein conducting. The Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, harp, bass drum, cymbals, and strings.

ALBERTO GINASTERA was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on April 11, 1916, and died in Geneva, Switzerland, on June 25, 1983. The premiere of the Suite from Estancia took place in Buenos Aires on May 12, 1943, with Ferruccio Calusio conducting the Teatro Colón Orchestra. Estancia is scored for two piccolos, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, timpani, suspended cymbals, cymbals, triangle, castanets, tam-tam, bass drum, military drum, field drum, xylophone, tambourine, piano, and strings.

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t was at the suggestion of Russian composer Mily Balakirev that Tchaikovsky composed his orchestral depiction of William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The work was the product of an extended creative process. Tchaikovsky began his Romeo and Juliet in 1869. But it was not until 1880, after several performances and revisions, that Tchaikovsky completed the final version, one of the Russian composer’s most popular and beloved works. Romeo and Juliet opens with an extended slow-tempo introduction, featuring a theme depicting the kindly Friar Laurence. Violent music, representing the warring Montagues and Capulets, launches the principal fast-tempo section. Muted violas and the English horn introduce Romeo and Juliet’s immortal “love theme,” paired with an undulating motif in the muted violins. The development and recapitulation of the themes resolve to the brooding final section, capped by the forceful concluding bars.

n 1941, Lincoln Kirstein commissioned the celebrated Argentine composer Alberto Ginastera to write a new ballet for his American Ballet Caravan. Kirstein planned to have George Balanchine choreograph the work. However, Kirstein’s group disbanded the following year. It was not until 1952 that Ginastera’s ballet, Estancia, received its first performance, at the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. Ginastera created a concert suite that incorporated four movements from the original ballet score. Ginastera’s Suite from Estancia had its first performance in Buenos Aires on May 12, 1943, with Ferruccio Calusio leading the Teatro Colón Orchestra. “Estancia” is the Argentine word for “ranch.” The story of the ballet is about a boy from the city who wants to win the heart of ranch girl. She rejects him, as he seems to be no match for the gauchos who work on the ranch. But in the end, the city boy earns the ranch girl’s favor by proving he can compete with the gauchos. Estancia is the first musical-dramatic work to draw upon the “gauchesco” literary and

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Notes on the Program by Ken Meltzer


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ASO | 5.8 | program dance traditions, portraying through characteristic dance and song a “day-in-the-life” of an Argentine ranch. Striking rhythms pervade the suite, especially in movements I, III, and IV; Los trabajadores agrícolas (The Land Workers), Los peones de hacienda (The Cattlemen), and the concluding Malambo—the latter a type of dance in which gauchos compete through undertaking ever-more-energetic dance steps. The second-movement Danza del trigo (Wheat Dance) provides lyrical contrast. Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell, “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra,” Opus 34 (1946) BENJAMIN BRITTEN was born in Lowestoft, England, on November 22, 1913, and died in Aldeburgh, England, on December 4, 1976. The first performance of “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” took place on October 15, 1946, with Sir Malcolm Sargent conducting the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, harp, xylophone, tambourine, triangle, bass drum, gong, side drum, castanets, whip, cymbals, suspended cymbal, Chinese blocks, and strings.

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have a small film to write for the Board of Education,” Benjamin Britten informed Mary Behrend, a friend who had commissioned the composer’s Second String Quartet (1945). The educational film, commissioned by the Crown Film Unit, was designed to introduce children to the various instruments of the orchestra. The premiere of the educational film, entitled Instruments of the Orchestra, took place on November 29, 1946. Sir Malcolm 34 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

Sargent served as conductor and narrator. During the previous month, Sargent conducted the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra in the first concert performance of the “Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra.” Sargent also delivered the text, authored by Eric Crozier. “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” proved to be a success from its inception. “I’m glad that the Min. of Ed. chaps approve,” Britten told a friend. “I never really worried that it was too sophisticated for kids—it is difficult to be that for the little blighters!” The “Young Person’s Guide” remains one of the most popular compositions of its kind. As with any superior educational experience, Britten’s “Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” simultaneously informs, stimulates and entertains students (of all ages). The composer’s subtitle for the “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” is Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Henry Purcell. The piece begins with a grand, tutti declaration of a melody that was originally a hornpipe, featured in British composer Henry Purcell’s (1659-95) Incidental Music to the play, Abdelazar, or The Moor’s Revenge (1695). Statements of the melody by each of the four instrument families (woodwind, brass, strings, and percussion) lead to a reprise of the orchestral tutti. A series of thirteen variations follows, each designed to highlight particular instruments. The variations are succeeded by a lively fugue, with the instruments making their entrances in the same order as the preceding variations. In the grand climax, the brass majestically proclaims the original Purcell melody, while the remainder of the orchestra continues the fugue. A brief, spirited coda rounds out “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra.”


won in 2008 and 2014. In 2013, Joseph was a semi-finalist in the Gustav Mahler International Conducting Competition ncreasingly recognized as “one of the (Bamberg, Germany). In 2011, he was one most gifted conductors of his generation,” of six conductors featured in the League Joseph Young is currently the Assistant of American Orchestra’s prestigious Bruno Conductor of the Atlanta Symphony Walter National Conductor Preview, hosted Orchestra. In his role, Joseph conducts by the Louisiana Philharmonic. more than 50 concerts per season with the Joseph earned his bachelor’s degree in Atlanta Symphony, which include programs music education at the University of South on the Delta Classical Series, Concerts for Carolina, and completed graduate studies Young People and Families, and various with Gustav Meier and Markand Thakar at other concerts geared towards specific the Peabody Conservatory in 2009, earning audiences in the community. Mr. Young an artist’s diploma in conducting. He has also serves as the Music Director of the been mentored by many world-renowned Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra, where conductors including Jorma Panula, Robert he is the driving force behind the ensemble’s Spano and Marin Alsop, with whom he artistic growth. Previous appointments have continues to maintain a close relationship. included Resident Conductor of the Phoenix Symphony, where he made his subscription debut in the 2011-12 season, and League of American Orchestras Conducting Fellow with the Buffalo Philharmonic and Baltimore Symphony. JOSEPH YOUNG, Assistant Conductor, Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra Music Director

Joseph is a recipient of the 2015 Solti Foundation U.S. Career Assistance Award for young conductors, an award he also encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 35

JEFF ROFFMAN

Joseph made his major American orchestral debut in January 2008 with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and has since appeared with the Saint Louis Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Colorado Symphony, Charleston Symphony, Phoenix Symphony, Bamberger Symphoniker, Spoleto Festival Orchestra, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Orquesta Sinfonica y Coro de RTVE (Madrid), and Chicago Sinfonietta, among others. During the 2015-16 Season he will make his subscription debut with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Little Orchestra Society. This season he will also return to the Baltimore Symphony and the St. Louis Symphony.

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ASO | 5.8 | artists Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra

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Joseph Young Assistant Conductor; Music Director of the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra The Zeist Foundation Chair All sections listed in alphabetical order. VIOLIN I

VIOLA

Yueci Chen Eunice Choi Aomeng Cui Jennifer Deng Whit FitzGerald Nam Kim Malhar Kute Sarah Li Jasmine Liu Phoebe Liu Passacaglia Mason George Pan Kyle Qian Alex Yang

William Church Emma DeJarenette* Wilfred Farquharson Joy Hsieh Kelsey Johnson James Kang* Jun Kang Amy Liu Richard Pei Matthew Pinder Ive Xue Grace Zhou Raymond Zhu

VIOLIN II

Joe Billips Joseph Brown Brandon Chung Clarisa Colton Tannessa Dang Jefferson Downs Lexine Feng Olivia Hunt Rayen Kang Kevin Li Aria Posner Leonardo Tang

Will Bontempo*** Sarah Chen Vivian Cheng Naomi Fan Andrew Fu Brianna Hou Serena Gao MK Guthrie Maya Kang Julia Koh Christine Liu Zoe Lo Julia Lu Annie Su Julia Su Samuel Surbrook

CELLO

BASS

Daniel Barket Bailey Bennett Malcolm Crowder Gabriel English Matthew Henson Blake Hilley

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Matthew Jung Travis Lorenz Nicole Mann Daniel Tancredi** FLUTE

Rachel Anders Haiwen Gui Jack Kang Nina Qin OBOE

Mekhi Gladden*** Sydney Hancock Hannah Lee Alexa Levy

TRUMPET

Michael Barbour Imani Duhe Steven Lukehart Richard Stinson Lizbeth Yanez TROMBONE

Lovrick Gary Hans Kang*** Andrew Taylor Evan Roussey TUBA

Errol Rhoden III Joshua Williams

CLARINET

PERCUSSION

Caleb Rucker Michael Tang Eric Wang Alisha Zamore

Michael Dehan Kyle Favors Jim Graber Drew Hooper Parker Olson Dylan So

BASSOON

Allie Byrd Christopher Chung Kalli Edwards Austin Summy HORN

Jonathon Chiou Hannah Culbreth Nick Fratto Tyler Lane Molly Shannon Sean Turner Akhil Vaidya Elyza Wylder

HARP

Kimberly Walker KEYBOARD

Ethan Shen *Ardath W. Weck Chair **Douglas Sommer Chair ***Elinor Rosenberg Breman ASYO Fellowship


WEST SIDE STORY the EMPIRE STRIKES BACK AARON COPLAND’S RODEO & MORE! JOSEPH YOUNG, CONDUCTOR JUSTIN BRUNS, VIOLIN

TICKETS AT THE WOODRUFF ARTS CENTER BOX OFFICE |

| aso.org


ASO | 5.14/15/16 | program AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra Robert Spano, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Principal Guest Conductor Michael Krajewski, Principal Pops Conductor

Delta POPS! Concert The Golden Age of Broadway Classics

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Friday, May 13 and Saturday, May 14 at 8pm, Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 3pm.

Michael Krajewski, Conductor Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus Jenn Gambatese, Sarah Pfisterer, Nathaniel Stampley, vocalists Produced in collaboration with Broadway Pops International | BroadwayPops.com Overture to Gypsy — Julie Styne — orch Wendel Music “Strike Up the Band” from ‘S Wonderful – George Gershwin Introduction and “Summertime” from Porgy and Bess – George Gershwin “I Got Plenty O’ Nothin’” from Porgy and Bess – George Gershwin “New York, New York” from On the Town – Leonard Bernstein Overture to West Side Story – Leonard Bernstein A George M. Cohan Overture – Wendel Music (“Give My Regards to Broadway,” “Mary,” “Harrigan,” “Over There,” “Yankee Doodle Dandy,” “You’re a Grand Old Flag”) THERE WILL BE A 20 MINUTE INTERMISSION Porter’s Overture A – Lang (“Ridin’ High,” “Love For Sale,” “Anything Goes”) “Blow Gabriel Blow” from Anything Goes – Cole Porter “Ascot Gavotte” from My Fair Lady – Frederick Loewe “I Could Have Danced All Night” from My Fair Lady – Frederick Loewe “Carousel Waltz” from Carousel – Richard Rodgers “If I Loved You” from Carousel – Richard Rodgers “Oklahoma” from Oklahoma! – Richard Rodgers “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” from The Sound of Music – Richard Rodgers The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

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ASO | 5.14/15/16 | artists MICHAEL KRAJEWSKI, Principal Pops Conductor

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TYE CARSON

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nown for his entertaining programs and clever humor, Michael Krajewski is a much sought after conductor of symphonic pops. He is Music Director of The Philly Pops and Principal Pops Conductor of the Houston, Atlanta and Jacksonville Symphonies.

As a guest conductor, Michael has performed with the Cleveland and Philadelphia Orchestras; the Boston and Cincinnati Pops; the San Francisco, Baltimore, Detroit, Indianapolis, Seattle, Dallas, St. Louis, Pittsburgh and National Symphonies, and numerous other orchestras across the United States. In Canada, he has led Ottawa’s National Arts Centre Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Calgary Philharmonic, and the Edmonton, Winnipeg and KitchenerWaterloo Symphonies. Other international appearances include performances in Dublin and Belfast with the Ulster Orchestra, as well as performances with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra, the Iceland Symphony Orchestra and this season’s debut with Spain’s Bilbao Symphony Orchestra. Michael is the conductor of the video Silver Screen Serenade with violinist Jenny Oaks Baker that aired worldwide on BYU Broadcasting. On recording, he has led the Houston Symphony on two holiday albums: Glad Tidings and Christmas Festival. In 201415, Michael conducted his original Sounds of Simon & Garfunkel program all over North America featuring national touring 40 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

artists AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle. Michael’s other collaborative programs have included such artists as flutist James Galway, mezzo Marilyn Horne, pianist Alicia de Larrocha, guitarist Angel Romero, and pop artists Jason Alexander, Roberta Flack, Judy Collins, Art Garfunkel, Wynonna Judd, Kenny Loggins, Ben Folds, Doc Severinsen, Patti Austin, Sandi Patty, Ann Hampton Callaway, Chicago, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Chieftains, Pink Martini, Rockapella, Cirque de la Symphonie, Classical Mystery Tour, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy and The Midtown Men. With degrees from Wayne State University in Detroit and the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, Michael furthered his training at the Pierre Monteux Domaine School for Conductors. He was a Dorati Fellowship Conductor with the Detroit Symphony and later served as that orchestra’s assistant conductor. He was resident conductor of the Florida Symphony, and for eleven years served as music director of the Modesto Symphony Orchestra. Michael lives in Orlando, FL with his wife Darcy. When not conducting he enjoys travel, photography and solving crossword puzzles. “…his wry wit, as spontaneous as a stand-up comedian’s, emerged to amuse the audience. Krajewski turned to the orchestra to lead a bright, sassy account. It showed that he is as effective and entertaining a communicator in music as he is in words.” — Charles Ward, Houston Chronicle NORMAN MACKENZIE, Director of Choruses

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s Director of Choruses for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra since 2000 and holder of its endowed Frannie and Bill Graves Chair, Norman Mackenzie was chosen to help carry forward the creative vision of


Mr. Mackenzie has been hailed by The New York Times as Robert Shaw’s “designated successor.” In his 14-year association with Mr. Shaw, he was keyboardist for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Principal Accompanist for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Choruses, and ultimately assistant choral conductor. In addition, he was musical assistant and accompanist for the Robert Shaw Chamber Singers, the Robert Shaw Institute Summer Choral Festivals in France and the United States, and the famed Shaw/Carnegie Hall Choral Workshops. He was choral clinician for the first three workshops after Shaw’s passing and partnered with Robert Spano for the Twentieth Anniversary Workshop featuring the Berlioz Requiem. ATLANTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CHORUS

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he Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus was founded in 1970 by former Music Director Robert Shaw. Comprising

200 auditioned voices, the Chorus is an all-volunteer organization that performs on a regular basis with the Orchestra and is featured on many of the their recordings. Led by Director of Choruses Norman Mackenzie, the Chorus is known for its precision and expressive singing quality. Their recordings with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra have won multiple Grammy® Awards, including Best Choral Performance, Best Classical Recording and Best Opera Recording. Those include Vaughan Williams’s A Sea Symphony and the Berlioz Requiem. The Chorus performs large choralsymphonic works with the full Orchestra under the batons of Music Director Robert Spano and Principal Guest Conductor Donald Runnicles. In addition, the Chorus has been involved in the creation and shaping of numerous world-premiere commissioned choral works. The Chorus made its debut at New York’s Carnegie Hall in 1976 in a performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra led by Robert Shaw. In addition, the Chorus performed in Washington, D.C., for President-elect Jimmy Carter’s Inaugural Concert in 1977. The Chorus has traveled to Germany three times to be a special guest of the Berlin Philharmonic in December 2003 for performances of Britten’s War Requiem, in May 2008 for the Berlioz Requiem and in December 2009 for a week of Brahms Requiem performances — all with Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Principal Guest Conductor Donald Runnicles. Within the Chorus, there is an auditioned group of 60 musicians called the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chamber Chorus. The Chamber Chorus, which formed before

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JD SCOTT

legendary founding conductor Robert Shaw to a new generation of music lovers. At the Orchestra, he prepares the Choruses for all concerts and recordings, works closely with Robert Spano on the commissioning and realization of new choral-orchestral works and conducts holiday concerts annually. During his tenure, the chorus has made numerous tours, garnered several Grammy® awards for Best Classical Album and Best Choral Performance and made an acclaimed debut with the Berlin Philharmonic. Mr. Mackenzie also serves as Organist and Director of Music and Fine Arts for Atlanta’s Trinity Presbyterian Church and pursues an active recital and guest conducting schedule.


ASO | 5.14/15/16 | artists the larger Chorus in 1967, performs music SARAH PFISTERER, vocals of the Baroque and Classical eras, as well as arah Pfisterer has played over 1000 works by modern masters. performances in the role of Christine in JENN GAMBATESE, vocals The Phantom Of The Opera on Broadway enn Gambatese had the great privilege and across the country. On Broadway, she of playing Carrie Pipperidge in the Lyric played Magnolia in Harold Prince’s Show Opera of Chicago’s star-studded Spring Boat and was seen in Children And Art 2015 production of Carousel. She made directed by Richard Maltby, celebrating her Lyric Opera debut the previous season Stephen Sondheim’s 75th birthday. Offto great acclaim as Maria in The Sound of Broadway she played Anna Smith in Meet Music opposite Billy Zane. This followed Me In St. Louis at the her “traveling by bubble” across the country Irish Repertory Theatre as Glinda in the 1st national tour of Wicked. directed by Charlotte Moore. A Metropolitan On Broadway she created the roles of Opera semi-finalist, Jane in Disney’s Tarzan, Natalie in All Sarah has worked with Shook Up, and Marie Leroux in Is He conductors such as Dead?. Additionally on Broadway she Michael Tilson Thomas played Penny Pingleton in Hairspray, muland John McGlinn tiple roles in A Year with Frog and Toad, and did a recording of and Urleen in Footloose. Among her favorJerome Kern’s Oh Boy in London under the ite off-Broadway appearances have been direction of Mr. McGlinn. Eliante in Classic Stage Company’s The NATHANIEL STAMPLEY, vocals School for Lies, and both Dora in Fiorello! athaniel Stampley appeared in the and The Girl in Stairway to Paradise for West End in The Lion King (Disney New York City Center’s “Encores!” series. UK Ltd.). He also went on tour with Among her most important credits in Ragtime and Orpheus Returns. His Offregional theater are leading roles for three Broadway/Regional credits include Big Love Connecticut companies: Chloe Haddock (Signature Theatre); Fiorello!, and Lost in in Lips Together Teeth Apart at Westport the Stars (NY City Center’s Encores!); The Country Playhouse, Constance Blackwell Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess (The A.R.T.); in We Have Always Lived in the Castle at Abyssinia (North Shore Music Theatre); Yale Repertory Theatre, and both Annie Pacific Overtures (Chicago Shakespeare Oakley in Annie Get Your Gun and Carrie Pipperidge in Carousel for Goodspeed Theater); Strike Up the Band and One Touch of Venus (Auditorium Theatre’s Ovations!); Musicals. Violet, Once on This Island and Big River She studied at New York (Joseph Jefferson Award nomination; Apple University, graduating Tree Theatre); The Color Purple (The magna cum laude with a Milwaukee Repertory Theater); Showboat double major in drama (Sacramento Music Circus); Harriet: The and sociology. Woman Called Moses, El Capitan, Girl Crazy, The King and I, Porgy and Bess (The Skylight Music Theater).

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42 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


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regencysuites.com encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 43


ASO | 5.14/15/16| artists

ASO | 5.14/15/16 | artists He has performed in a concert version of The Marriage of Figaro and Songs from Around the World with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra; American Favorites from Gershwin to Copland, Home for the Holidays concerts, and has recorded with the Elgin Symphony Orchestra (Naxos). He has been a guest artist with the UW-Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Youth Sympony Orchestra and toured internationally with the Madison Children’s Choir. He recently performed a Rogers and Hammerstein tribute concert at Lincoln Center. He has performed in The Weill Music Institute concert series, Musical Explorers and Link Up with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s at Carnegie Hall. Other Concerts include Musical Introduction Series at 92Y, the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and the Springfeld Sympony Orchestra. In Collaboration with Margaret Paek, Lanette Costas, Jason and Alicia Hall Moran he performed in the installation, BLEED at the Whitney Museum of Art. . He directed 19 Secrets and Painted Red for Sacred Ground Productions. He has upcoming concert dates with the Philadelphia Orchestra in Bernstein’s Mass.

44 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


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ASO | 5.14/15/16 | artists Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus

ASO | 5.14/15/16| artists

Norman Mackenzie, Director of Choruses The Frannie and Bill Graves Chair SOPRANO 1 Ariel Barnes Kathryn Bishop Sarah Clements Hanan Davis Liz Dean Laura Foster Natalie Gough Michelle Griffin Jayme HoganYarbro Jacquelyn Holloway Erin Jones Victoria Kolterman Arietha Lockhart** Mindy Margolis* Patricia Nealon* Joneen Padgett* Callaway Powlus Catherine Steen Lykins Stacey Tanner

George Eda Mathews** Shannon Nesbit Rachel O’Dell Vickie Orme Chantae Pittman Donna Ross* Sydney Sewell Sydney SmithRikard Paula Snelling* Camilla Springfield** Tommie Storer Emily Tallant Cheryl Thrash** Donna Weeks*

Jeffrey Baxter, Choral Administrator The Florence Kopleff Chair Rachel Stewart** Diana Strommen Nancy York*

Peter Marshall, Accompanist

Stephen Reed#

TENOR 2 Randall Barker** Mark Barnes ALTO 2 Curtis Bisges Nancy Adams* Stephanie Bizardi Charles Cottingham# Marcia Chandler Evan Crowther Meaghan Curry Cynthia DeBold** Phillip Crumbly* Joseph Few* Sally Kann Hamilton Fong Katherine Keith Jeffords* MacKenzie Steven Johnstone* Lynda Martin David Lamb Brenda Pruitt* Jonathan Marvel Laura Rappold Michael Parker Sharon Simons Alexandra Tanico Marshall Peterson* ALTO 1 Clifton Russell Cheryl Vanture Deborah Boland** Sarah Ward Wesley Shearer Rachel Bowman Scott Stephens* Ryan Whicker Amy Chastain Diane Woodard** Robert Wilkinson Laurie Cronin Beth Freeman BASS 1 TENOR 1 SOPRANO 2 Pamela Griffin* Dock Anderson Jeffrey Baxter** June Abbott** Noelle Hooge Russell Cason* David Blalock** Sloan Atwood* Beverly Hueter Trey Clegg John Brandt* Jessica Barber Janet Johnson* Daniel Cameron* Steven Darst* Anne Beloncik Susan Jones Michael Dennison Justin Cornelius Schantz Virginia Little* Jon Gunnemann* Joseph Cortes Barbara Brown Staria Lovelady David Hansen** Clifford Edge** Kelly Campobasso Holly McCarren* Nick Jones# Steven Farrow** Martha Craft Frances Leif Gilbert-Hansen Jameson Linville Ellen Dukes** McDowell** Peter MacKenzie James Jarrell Katherine Folds Anna Miller Jason Maynard Jeffrey LeCraw Mary Goodwin Linda Morgan** Monte Nichols Clinton Miller Amanda Hoffman Laura Soltis Andrew Riechel Matthew Neylon Kathleen KellyMeesook Sonu Christopher Patton Kendric Smith#

46 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

Owen Talley Ike Van Meter Edgie Wallace* Edward Watkins** BASS 2 Philip Barreca Clarence Bell Charles Boone Brian Brown* John Cooledge# Rick Copeland* Joel Craft** Andrew Gee* Philip Jones Eric Litsey** Evan Mauk Eckhart Richter* John Ruff* Jonathan Smith Timothy Solomon** David Webster** Seth Whitecotton Gregory Whitmire* Keith Wyatt* * 20+ years of service ** 30+ years of service # Charter member (1970)


encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 47


ASO | 5.19/21 | program AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Classical Series is presented by Delta Air Lines.

ASO | 5.19/21| program

Additional support is generously provided by

The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

KEN MELTZER, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Program Annotator Ken’s in-depth program notes, detailed musical analysis and listening samples can be found online: aso.org/encore. Podcasts of Ken’s pre-concert lectures are at: aso.org and kenmeltzer.com To contact Ken, please email Ken.Meltzer@ woodruffcenter.org.

Robert Spano, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Principal Guest Conductor

Delta Classical Concert Concerts of May 19 and 21, 2016, at 8:00pm.

Joseph Young, Conductor Christina and Michelle Naughton, pianos FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN (1732-1791) Symphony No. 46 in B Major, Hob.I:46 19MIN I. Vivace II. Poco adagio III. Menuet. Allegretto IV. Finale. Presto e scherzando WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART (1756-1791) Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra No. 10 in E-flat Major, K. 365 (1779) 25MIN I. Allegro II. Andante III. Rondeau. Allegro Christina and Michelle Naughton, pianos

INTERMISSION 20MIN SERGEI PROKOFIEV (1891-1953) Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet, Suites 1 and 2, Opus No. 64bis/64ter (1935-6) 42MIN I. Montagues and Capulets (Suite 2, No.1) II. The Young Girl Juliet (Suite 2, No. 2) III. Minuet (Suite 1, No. 4) IV. Masks (Suite 1, No. 5) V. Romeo and Juliet (Balcony Scene) (Suite 1, No. 6) VI. Death of Tybalt (Suite 1, No. 7) VII. Dance of the Maids from the Antilles (Suite 2, No. 6) VIII. Romeo at the Tomb of Juliet (Suite 2, No. 7) IX. Juliet’s Death (Ballet score)

48 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


Notes on the Program by Ken Meltzer gio), cast in 6/8 time, and the parallel key of B minor. The third movement is a Minuet (Menuet), an elegant court dance in 3/4 time. The central Trio episode is based upon a variant of the first movement’s four-note motif. The Finale (Presto e scherzando) is a nonstop tour-de-force of unexpected twists These are the first Classical Subscription and turns, including a sudden reappearance Performances. of the third-movement Minuet. rom 1766 until 1790, Franz Joseph Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra Haydn served as Kappellmeister to No. 10 in E-flat Major, K. 365 (1779) the court of the ruling Prince Nikolaus WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART was Esterházy. The years 1766-73 were among born in Salzburg, Austria, on January the most prolific and creative of Haydn’s 27, 1756, and died in Vienna, Austria, on Esterházy tenure. These years are often December 5, 1791. In addition to the two characterized to as Haydn’s Sturm und solo pianos, the Concerto No. 10 is scored Drang (“Storm and Stress”) period—a for two oboes, two clarinets (optional), reference to the relatively contemporaneous two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets German literary movement. During those (optional), timpani (optional), and strings. Sturm und Drang years, Haydn composed several Symphonies that feature minor keys, First Classical Subscription Performance: pervasive, restless energy, stunning dynamic March 16, 1950, William Johnson, contrasts, and frequent, dramatic pauses. Michael McDowell, Pianos, Henry Sopkin, All of these elements serve to create an Conductor. atmosphere of super-charged drama. No Most Recent Classical Subscription doubt, Haydn’s revolutionary Sturm und Performances: December 4, 5, and 6, Drang Symphonies thrilled, and at times, 1986, Cipa Dichter, Misha Dichter, Pianos, even shocked contemporary audiences. William Fred Scott, Conductor. Symphony No. 46 in B Major, Hob.I:46

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN was born in Rohrau, Austria, on March 31, 1732, and died in Vienna, Austria, on May 31, 1809. The Symphony No. 46 is scored for two oboes, bassoon, two horns, and strings.

It’s not surprising for an artist of Haydn’s artistic range and creativity that many compositions from this period do not fit completely within the Sturm und Drang model. One such piece is the Symphony No. 46. It is a work teeming with energy and beauty, and one that features the delightful surprises that make Haydn’s works unique and endlessly fascinating.

Robert Shaw Performances: February 22, 1968, Robert Fizdale, Arthur Gold, Pianos; February 25, 1972 (Tour, Florence, SC), Thelma Sasser, William Sasser, Pianos.

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rom September of 1777 to January of 1779, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart toured throughout Europe. Mozart hoped the tour would secure a new position that would allow him to leave Salzburg. For The Symphony No. 46 is in four move- some time, Mozart had viewed his native ments. The first (Vivace) opens with a force- city as an insufficient venue for his talents. ful presentation of a wide-ranging four-note Mozart’s efforts to find employment outside motif that will play a central role through- of Salzburg proved unsuccessful. During out the work. The violins are muted for the this trip, however, Mozart suffered a far slow-tempo second movement (Poco ada- more devastating blow. encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 49

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The composer’s mother, Anna Maria, accompanied Mozart on the tour. On July 3, 1778, while in Paris, Anna Maria Mozart died, at the age of 57. Mozart returned to Salzburg in 1779. That year, he composed a pair of superb works, both in the key of E-flat, and scored for two soloists and orchestra—the Sinfonia concertante for Violin and Viola, K. 364, and the Concerto for Two Pianos, K. 365. Some commentators have suggested that the Andante of the Sinfonia concertante—one of Mozart’s most beautiful and tragic slow movements—is a musical expression of the composer’s grief over his mother’s death. No such pathos may be found in the buoyant and optimistic Piano Concerto, K. 365. It is quite possible Mozart originally wrote this Concerto for performance by him and his sister, Nannerl, also a fine pianist. Mozart finally left Salzburg in the spring of 1781 to stake his independence in Vienna. There, he performed the Concerto on at least a few occasions with one of his pupils, Josepha Barbara Auernhammer.

House in Czechoslovakia, on December 30, 1938. The Suites are scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, bass clarinet, tenor saxophone, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, cornet, three trombones, tuba, timpani, xylophone, triangle, military drum, suspended cymbal, cymbals a2, suspended cymbals, triangle, bass drum, tambourine, orchestra bells, maracas, triangle harp, piano/celeste, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performances: April 10, 11 and 12, 1980, Louis Lane, Conductor. Most Recent Classical Subscription Performances: May 13, 14, 15, and 16, 2010, Ludovic Morlot, Conductor.

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rokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet has long been celebrated as one of the greatest ballet scores. But during the period of its creation and early performances, Prokofiev met resistance at every turn. This prompted the great Russian ballerina Galina Ulanova, who danced the role of Juliet at the July 11, 1940 Leningrad premiere, to offer the The Concerto for Two Pianos, K. 365, following toast, a play on the concluding is in three movements. The traditional lines of the Shakespeare original: orchestral introduction of the first (Allegro) Never was a story of more woe sets the stage for a movement notable Than this of Prokofiev’s music for for high spirits and a wealth of thematic Romeo. material. Typical of the slow movements in Mozart’s Concertos, the Andante spotlights Prokofiev adapted music from his Romeo the soloists’ lyric, even vocal, qualities. A and Juliet ballet for two Orchestral Suites sparkling Rondeau (Allegro) brings the (premiered, respectively, in Moscow, in 1936, and Leningrad, in 1937) as well as Concerto to a festive close. a collection of Ten Pieces for Solo Piano, Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet, Suites Opus 75 (1937). Prokofiev completed a 1 and 2, Opus No. 64bis/64ter (1935-6) third Orchestral Suite in 1946. SERGEI PROKOFIEV was born in Sontsovka, Russia, on April 23, 1891, and died in Moscow, Russia, on March 5, 1953. The first performance of the ballet, Romeo and Juliet, took place at the Brno Opera 50 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

I. Montagues and Capulets (Suite 2, No.1)— The brief and fierce introduction is derived from an Interlude that follows the Prince of Verona’s warning to the battling Montague and Capulet families. After the introduc-


II. The Young Girl Juliet (Suite 2, No. 2)— The playful nature of the thirteen-year-old Juliet is marvelously depicted by the spiccato violin figures, but there is also more reflective music that suggests the blossoming young woman.

a deep sleep, creating the appearance of death. The Capulet family carries Juliet’s lifeless body to the family tomb. Romeo has learned of Juliet’s supposed death and has rushed to the Capulet tomb. The music depicting the funeral procession—and Romeo’s despair—develops a shattering momentum and intensity. After the climax, the music subsides to a pianissimo whisper.

III. Minuet (Suite 1, No. 4)—The Minuet accompanies the arrival of the guests to a ball at the Capulet home. The stately, IX. Juliet’s Death (Ballet score)—Romeo principal dance alternates with contrasting drinks poison and dies. Juliet awakens and sees her dead husband. She takes Romeo’s episodes. knife and kills herself. IV. Masks (Suite 1, No. 5)—Romeo, Montague’s son, and his friend, Mercutio, JOSEPH YOUNG, Assistant Conductor, arrive at the ball, wearing disguises. Capulet Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra and his wife enter with their daughter Juliet. Music Director They bid the musicians to play, and the ncreasingly recognized as “one of the guests to dance. At the sight of Juliet, most gifted conductors of his generation,” Romeo immediately falls in love with the Joseph Young is currently the Assistant beautiful young woman. Conductor of the Atlanta Symphony V. Romeo and Juliet (Balcony Scene) (Suite Orchestra. In his role, Joseph conducts 1, No. 6)—At night, Romeo stands beneath more than 50 concerts per season with the Juliet’s balcony and prays for her to appear. Atlanta Symphony, which include programs Juliet comes to the balcony, and the two on the Delta Classical Series, Concerts for Young People and Families, and various declare their eternal love. other concerts geared towards specific VI. Death of Tybalt (Suite 1, No. 7)— audiences in the community. Mr. Young Tybalt challenges Romeo to a duel. Romeo also serves as the Music Director of the is now married to Juliet, and therefore, Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra, where Tybalt’s cousin. Romeo refuses to fight. he is the driving force behind the ensemble’s Mercutio intercedes and is mortally woundartistic growth. Previous appointments have ed by Tybalt. When Romeo learns that his included Resident Conductor of the Phoenix friend has died, he is overcome with anger, Symphony, where he made his subscription and kills Tybalt. A searing funeral procesdebut in the 2011-12 season, and League sion follows. of American Orchestras Conducting VII. Dance of the Maids from the Antilles Fellow with the Buffalo Philharmonic and (Suite 2, No. 6)—Juliet is forced by her Baltimore Symphony. parents to marry Count Paris. On the day Joseph made his major American orchestral of Juliet’s wedding, handmaidens surround debut in January 2008 with the Baltimore her, bearing lilies. Symphony Orchestra, and has since VIII. Romeo at the Tomb of Juliet (Suite appeared with the Saint Louis Symphony, 2, No. 7)— Juliet, hoping to escape with Buffalo Philharmonic, Colorado Symphony, Romeo, drinks a potion that places her in

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tion, the Dance of the Knights begins.


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JEFF ROFFMAN

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Charleston Symphony, Phoenix Symphony, Bamberger Symphoniker, Spoleto Festival Orchestra, Orquestra Sinfónica do Porto Casa da Música, Orquesta Sinfonica y Coro de RTVE (Madrid), and Chicago Sinfonietta, among others. During the 2015-16 Season he will make his subscription debut with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Little Orchestra Society. This season he will also return to the Baltimore Symphony and the St. Louis Symphony. Joseph is a recipient of the 2015 Solti Foundation U.S. Career Assistance Award for young conductors, an award he also won in 2008 and 2014. In 2013, Joseph was a semi-finalist in the Gustav Mahler International Conducting Competition (Bamberg, Germany). In 2011, he was one of six conductors featured in the League of American Orchestra’s prestigious Bruno Walter National Conductor Preview, hosted by the Louisiana Philharmonic.

CHRISTINA and MICHELLE NAUGHTON, pianos

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hristina and Michelle Naughton made their European debut at Herkulesaal in Munich, where the Süddeutsche Zeitung proclaimed them “an outstanding piano duo.” They made their Asian debut with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, where the Sing Tao Daily said of their performance: “Joining two hearts and four hands at two grand pianos, the Naughton sisters created an electrifying and moving musical performance.” An appearance with the Philadelphia Orchestra led the Philadelphia Inquirer to characterize their playing as “paired to perfection,” while the Saarbrücker Zeitung exclaimed, “This double star could soon prove to be a supernova.” 

Orchestral engagements include appearances with the Philadelphia Orchestra; Houston, Milwaukee, New Jersey, North Carolina, Nashville, Virginia, Hawaii, Joseph earned his bachelor’s degree in Maryland, Toledo, Delaware, El Paso, music education at the University of South Napa Valley, Wichita, Tulsa, Gulf Coast Carolina, and completed graduate studies and Madison symphonies; the Buffalo with Gustav Meier and Philharmonic; the Wisconsin Chamber Markand Thakar at the Orchestra; Cleveland’s Red Orchestra; Peabody Conservatory Chicago’s Ars Viva Symphony Orchestra in 2009, earning an and Erie Philharmonic; as well as with artist’s diploma in ensembles such as the Mahler Chamber conducting. He has Orchestra, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Royal been mentored by Flemish Philharmonic in Belgium, Solistes many world-renowned Européens Luxembourg, Hamburg Chorus, conductors including Kiel Philharmonic and Norddeutsche Jorma Panula, Robert Philharmonie Rostock. Past and future seaSpano and Marin Alsop, with whom he sons feature collaborations under the batons of conductors such as Stephane Deneve, Edo continues to maintain a close relationship. deWaart, Charles Dutoit, JoAnn Falletta, Giancarlo Guerrero, Emanuel Krivine, Cristian Macelaru, Andres Orozco-Estrada and Michael Stern. The Naughtons recorded their first album in the Sendesaal in Bremen, Germany, and it 52 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


ASO | 5.19/21| artists Born in Princeton, NJ, to parents of European and Chinese descent, the Naughtons are graduates of The Juilliard School and the Curtis Institute of Music, where they were each awarded the Festorazzi Prize. They are Steinway Artists and currently reside in New York City. encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 53

MARCO BORGGREVE

was released worldwide in fall 2012 by ORFEO. The album has been praised by  DerSpiegel Magazine for “stand(ing) out with unique harmony, and sing(ing) out with stylistic confidence,” and described by ClassicsToday as a “Dynamic Duo Debut.” 


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The Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra is sponsored by Wells Fargo.

AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra* AtlantaSymphonyYouthOrchestra+ Concert of Thursday, May 26, 2016, at 8:00pm.

Joseph Young, Conductor Malhar Kute, violin Terry Neal, narrator

Side-By-Side Concert DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH (1906-1975) Festive Overture, Opus 96 (1954)+

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SERGEI PROKOFIEV (1891-1953) Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 in G minor, Opus 63 (1935)* I. Allegro moderato Malhar Kute, violin

The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

KEN MELTZER, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Program Annotator Ken’s in-depth program notes, detailed musical analysis and listening samples can be found online: aso.org/encore. Podcasts of Ken’s pre-concert lectures are at: aso.org and kenmeltzer.com To contact Ken, please email Ken.Meltzer@ woodruffcenter.org.

PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY (1840-1893) Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture (1870, rev. 1880)*,+ BENJAMIN BRITTEN (1913-1976) Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell, “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra,” Opus 34 (1946)*,+ Terry Neal, narrator

This concert is performed without intermission.

54 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


Notes on the Program by Ken Meltzer DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, on September 25, 1906, and died in Moscow, Russia, on August 9, 1975. The first performance of the Festive Overture took place at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow on November 6, 1954, with Alexander Melik-Pashayev conducting the Bolshoi Theater Orchestra. The Festive Overture is scored for piccolo, two flutes, three oboes, three clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, triangle, snare drum, cymbals, bass drum, and strings.

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mitri Shostakovich composed his Festive Overture in the autumn of 1954. The premiere took place at Moscow’s Bolshoi Theater on November 6, 1954. Shostakovich composed the Festive Overture as part of the celebrations of the 37th anniversary of the October Revolution. But some commentators have suggested that the work’s energy and high spirits express Shostakovich’s reaction to the death the previous year of his long-time nemesis, Soviet Dictator Joseph Stalin. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 in G minor, Opus 63 (1935)

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n his autobiography, Sergei Prokofiev recalled the circumstances surrounding the creation of his Violin Concerto No. 2: In 1935 a group of admirers of the French violinist (Robert) Soëtans asked me to write a violin concerto for him, giving him exclusive rights to perform it for one year. I readily agreed since I had been intending to write something for the violin at that time and had accumulated some material. As in the case of the preceding concertos, I began by searching for an original title for the piece, such as “concert sonata for violin and orchestra,” but finally returned to the simplest solution: Concerto No. 2. Nevertheless, I wanted it to be altogether different from No. 1 both as to music and style. Despite Prokofiev’s apparent desire that his Second Violin Concerto stand in sharp contrast to the First, most commentators have noted the similarly elegant and lyric nature of the two works. Regardless of Prokofiev’s stated intent, what emerged is a work of enduring charm and grace that demands the highest level of technical mastery from the soloist.

The Concerto is in three movements. SERGEI PROKOFIEV was born in This concert features the opening moveSontsovka, Russia, on April 23, 1891, ment (Allegro moderato), based upon two and died in Moscow, Russia, on March 5, themes, both introduced by the soloist. 1953. The first performance of the Violin Concerto No. 2 took place in Madrid, Spain, on December 1, 1935, with Robert Soëtans as soloist and Enrique Arbos conducting the Madrid Symphony Orchestra. In addition to the solo violin, the Concerto is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two trumpets, two horns, triangle, suspended cymbal, castanets, snare drum, bass drum, triangle, and strings.

Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture (1870, rev. 1880) PETER ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY was born in Kamsko-Votkinsk, Russia, on May 7, 1840, and died in St. Petersburg, Russia, on November 6, 1893. The first performance of the Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture took place in Moscow, Russia, at a concert of the Musical Society on March 16, 1870, with Nikolai Rubinstein conducting.

encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 55

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Festive Overture, Opus 96 (1954)


ASO | 5.26 | program The Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, harp, bass drum, cymbals, and strings.

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t was at the suggestion of Russian composer Mily Balakirev that T chaikovsky composed his orchestral depiction of William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The work was the product of an extended creative process. Tchaikovsky began his Romeo and Juliet in 1869. But it was not until 1880, after several performances and revisions, that Tchaikovsky completed the final version, one of the Russian composer’s most popular and beloved works. Romeo and Juliet opens with an extended slow-tempo introduction, featuring a theme depicting the kindly Friar Laurence. Violent music, representing the warring Montagues and Capulets, launches the principal fast-tempo section. Muted violas and the English horn introduce Romeo and Juliet’s immortal “love theme,” paired with an undulating motif in the muted violins. The development and recapitulation of the themes resolve to the brooding final section, capped by the forceful concluding bars. Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell, “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra,” Opus 34 (1946) BENJAMIN BRITTEN was born in Lowestoft, England, on November 22, 1913, and died in Aldeburgh, England, on December 4, 1976. The first performance of “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” took place on October 15, 1946, with Sir Malcolm Sargent conducting the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” is scored for narrator, piccolo, two 56 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, harp, xylophone, tambourine, triangle, bass drum, gong, side drum, castanets, whip, cymbals, suspended cymbal, Chinese blocks, and strings.

“I

have a small film to write for the Board of Education,” Benjamin Britten informed Mary Behrend, a friend who had commissioned the composer’s Second String Quartet (1945). The educational film, commissioned by the Crown Film Unit, was designed to introduce children to the various instruments of the orchestra. The premiere of the educational film, entitled Instruments of the Orchestra, took place on November 29, 1946. Sir Malcolm Sargent served as conductor and narrator. During the previous month, Sargent conducted the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra in the first concert performance of the “Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra.” Sargent also delivered the text, authored by Eric Crozier. “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” proved to be a success from its inception. “I’m glad that the Min. of Ed. chaps approve,” Britten told a friend. “I never really worried that it was too sophisticated for kids—it is difficult to be that for the little blighters!” The “Young Person’s Guide” remains one of the most popular compositions of its kind. As with any superior educational experience, Britten’s “Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” simultaneously informs, stimulates and entertains students (of all ages). The composer’s subtitle for the “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” is Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Henry Purcell. The piece begins with a grand, tutti


MALHAR KUTE, violin

M

alhar Kute, 18, is a senior at Chamblee Charter High School as a member of the Magnet Program, and has been playing the violin since he was 10 years old. He currently studies under the tutelage of Justin Bruns. Malhar has received much recognition for his violin performance. In 2014 he won first place in the Samuel A. Fordis Concerto Competition and performed with the Georgia Philharmonic. Last year, he was a finalist in the Rising Stars Festival of Arts Competition, and in 2014 he won the DeKalb Youth Symphony Concerto Competition. He also recently won the Ruth Kern Concerto Competition and performed with the Atlanta Community Symphony Orchestra.

JEFF ROFFMAN

Malhar has been a member of the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra for two years, where he currently serves as concertmaster. In 2014-2015 he was the co-concertmaster of the DeKalb Youth Symphony. He has been a member of the GMEA All State Orchestra for four years, earning the leading positions of principal second violin in 2015 and concertmaster in 2016. Malhar has attended several prestigious music summer programs, such as the Meadowmount School of Music and the Montecito International Music Festival. He has also performed in master classes for Jun Iwasaki and Karen Gomyo. In addition to music, Malhar is very passionate about math and science. In 2015, he was one of eleven students worldwide to earn a perfect score on the AP Calculus BC exam and was recently invited to the 2016 White House Science Fair to honor this achievement. In college, Malhar plans to pursue degrees in both materials engineering and violin performance. encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 57

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declaration of a melody that was originally a hornpipe, featured in British composer Henry Purcell’s (1659-95) Incidental Music to the play, Abdelazar, or The Moor’s Revenge (1695). Statements of the melody by each of the four instrument families (woodwind, brass, strings, and percussion) lead to a reprise of the orchestral tutti. A series of thirteen variations follows, each designed to highlight particular instruments. The variations are succeeded by a lively fugue, with the instruments making their entrances in the same order as the preceding variations. In the grand climax, the brass majestically proclaims the original Purcell melody, while the remainder of the orchestra continues the fugue. A brief, spirited coda rounds out “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra.”


ASO | 5.26 | artists TERRY NEAL, narrator and Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Board Member

T

Mr. Neal retired from The Coca-Cola Company in 2009 with over 30 years of service. Formerly, he served as the Vice President of the Latin America Group and Director of Customer Development. Throughout his career, both domestically and internationally, his focus was on building collaborative business relationships with large complex customers, as well as developing organizational and individual capabilities. Mr. Neal is currently a member of the Coca-Cola Alumni Association Board of Directors, serving as Chairman of the Public Affairs Committee. He resides in Atlanta with his wife, Jeanne and has one daughter, Chloe. Â

JEFF ROFFMAN

ASO | 5.26 | artists

erry Neal is an avid supporter and patron of the GRAMMYÂŽ Awardwinning Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. Over the years his commitment to the Orchestra has been demonstrated through a variety of roles, from serving as a member of the Board of Directors to stepping in as Interim President & CEO from October 2014 to December 2015. He also served as the Orchestra Board representative on the Woodruff Arts Center initiative that consolidated all development functions into one organization.

58 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


s e r e n b e p l ay h o u s e • 2 0 1 6 • s e a s o n s e v e n

A SEASON of

SUR R EN DER

It takes COURAGE to follow your DESTINY

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Photos by BreeAnne Clowdus

encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 59


ASO | 5.26 | artists Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra

ASO | 5.26 | artists

Joseph Young Assistant Conductor; Music Director of the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra The Zeist Foundation Chair All sections listed in alphabetical order. VIOLIN I

VIOLA

Yueci Chen Eunice Choi Aomeng Cui Jennifer Deng Whit FitzGerald Nam Kim Malhar Kute Sarah Li Jasmine Liu Phoebe Liu Passacaglia Mason George Pan Kyle Qian Alex Yang

William Church Emma DeJarenette* Wilfred Farquharson Joy Hsieh Kelsey Johnson James Kang* Jun Kang Amy Liu Richard Pei Matthew Pinder Ive Xue Grace Zhou Raymond Zhu

VIOLIN II

Joe Billips Joseph Brown Brandon Chung Clarisa Colton Tannessa Dang Jefferson Downs Lexine Feng Olivia Hunt Rayen Kang Kevin Li Aria Posner Leonardo Tang

Will Bontempo*** Sarah Chen Vivian Cheng Naomi Fan Andrew Fu Brianna Hou Serena Gao MK Guthrie Maya Kang Julia Koh Christine Liu Zoe Lo Julia Lu Annie Su Julia Su Samuel Surbrook

CELLO

BASS

Daniel Barket Bailey Bennett Malcolm Crowder Gabriel English Matthew Henson Blake Hilley

60 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

Matthew Jung Travis Lorenz Nicole Mann Daniel Tancredi** FLUTE

Rachel Anders Haiwen Gui Jack Kang Nina Qin OBOE

Mekhi Gladden*** Sydney Hancock Hannah Lee Alexa Levy

TRUMPET

Michael Barbour Imani Duhe Steven Lukehart Richard Stinson Lizbeth Yanez TROMBONE

Lovrick Gary Hans Kang*** Andrew Taylor Evan Roussey TUBA

Errol Rhoden III Joshua Williams

CLARINET

PERCUSSION

Caleb Rucker Michael Tang Eric Wang Alisha Zamore

Michael Dehan Kyle Favors Jim Graber Drew Hooper Parker Olson Dylan So

BASSOON

Allie Byrd Christopher Chung Kalli Edwards Austin Summy HORN

Jonathon Chiou Hannah Culbreth Nick Fratto Tyler Lane Molly Shannon Sean Turner Akhil Vaidya Elyza Wylder

HARP

Kimberly Walker KEYBOARD

Ethan Shen *Ardath W. Weck Chair **Douglas Sommer Chair ***Elinor Rosenberg Breman ASYO Fellowship


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ASO | 5.27/28/29 | program AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra Robert Spano, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Principal Guest Conductor Michael Krajewski, Principal Pops Conductor

Delta POPS! Concert Michael Cavanaugh: Songs of Elton John & more Friday, May 27 and Saturday, May 28 at 8pm, Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 3pm.

ASO | 5.27/28/29| program

Stuart Chafetz, Conductor Michael Cavanaugh, piano and vocals Billboard calls Michael Cavanaugh the “The new voice of the American Rock ‘n’ Roll Songbook.” After the huge success from the orchestra show The Songs of Billy Joel & more, Cavanaugh produced two other orchestral shows: The Songs of Elton John & more (tonight’s performance) which features some of the greatest hits by piano legend Sir Elton John, as well as the Singer Songwriter show: The songs of Paul Simon, James Taylor and Neil Diamond which are part of Michael’s “Generations of Rock” series.    Cavanaugh will be opening up the Rock ‘n’ Roll songbook and not only play songs by Elton John, but will feature selections by other legendary artists. Get ready for some surprises! We will also have an audience vote for a song to be featured in the 2nd Act. Please text the word “Songs” to 25827 (CLUBS) and at intermission we will we will send you a text that allows you to vote for the featured song. No other touring artist allows the audience to select any part of the set list…tonight you get to! We hope you enjoy (and sing along) to tonight’s performance. THERE WILL BE A 20 MINUTE INTERMISSION

Selections for tonight will include: “Pinball Wizard,” “Your Song,” “Candle in the Wind,” “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,” “Rocket Man,” and “Benny and the Jets”.

The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra POPS! Series is presented by Delta Air Lines. 62 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


ASO | 5.27/28/29| program encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 63


ASO | 5.27/28/29| artists

PAT JOHNSON

ASO | 5.27/28/29 | artists STUART CHAFETZ, Conductor

MICHAEL CAVANAUGH, piano & vocals

S

M

tuart Chafetz is a conductor with a dynamic podium demeanor and a refined sense of audience engagement. Increasingly in demand with orchestras across the continent, this season Chafetz will be on the podium in Chicago, Naples, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cincinnati, Hawaii, Jacksonville, Dallas, Louisiana and others.

He previously held posts as Resident Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and Associate Conductor of the Louisville Orchestra. As Principal Timpanist of the Honolulu Symphony for twenty years, Chafetz would also conduct the annual Nutcracker performances with Ballet Hawaii and principals from the American Ballet Theatre. It was during that time that Chafetz led numerous concerts with the Maui Symphony and Pops.

ichael Cavanaugh is the New Voice of the American Rock & Roll Songbook. A charismatic performer, musician and actor, made famous for his piano/lead vocals in the Broadway Musical Movin’ Out. 

Michael Cavanaugh was handpicked by Billy Joel to star in the title role and evokes a style rivaling the Piano Man. Michael appeared in the show for three years with over 1200 performances, receiving accolade after accolade, which culminated in 2003 with both Grammy® and Tony Award nominations.  With the close of Movin’ Out at the end of 2005, Mr. Cavanaugh began touring in his own right, creating a show that reinterprets the modern pop/rock songbook. He soon became one of the hottest artists in the corporate/events market. He continues to perform worldwide for company and charity events, as well as sporting events including PGA tour events, the US Open and the Indy 500. It wasn’t long before symphony orchestras discovered Michael’s talents and audience appeal. He accepted his first orchestral booking, Michael Cavanaugh – The Songs of Billy Joel and more, which debuted in April of 2008 with the Indianapolis Symphony and continues to tour. In October 2008, he signed with Warner/ADA to distribute his first CD titled In Color. 

In the summers, Chafetz spends his time at the Chautauqua Institution, where he conducts the annual Fourth of July and Opera Pops. Chafetz makes his home near San Francisco, CA, with his wife Ann Krinitsky. Chafetz holds a Bachelor’s degree in music performance from the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati and In June, 2010, Mr. Cavanaugh debuted his a Master’s from the Eastman School of second symphony show in the Generations Music. of Rock series, entitled Michael Cavanaugh: The Songs of Elton John and more and then debuted his third symphony show Singers and Songwriters: the Music of Paul Simon, Neil Diamond and James Taylor in 2012. He continues to tour all three symphony productions. 64 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


ASO | 5.27/28/29| artists encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 65


ASO | 6.2/4 | program AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Classical Series is presented by Delta Air Lines.

ASO | 6.2/4| program

Additional support generously provided by

The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

KEN MELTZER, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Program Annotator Ken’s in-depth program notes, detailed musical analysis and listening samples can be found online: aso.org/encore. Podcasts of Ken’s pre-concert lectures are at: aso.org and kenmeltzer.com To contact Ken, please email Ken.Meltzer@ woodruffcenter.org.

Robert Spano, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Principal Guest Conductor

Delta Classical Concert Concerts of Thursday, June 2, and Saturday, June 4, 2016, at 8:00pm.

Peter Oundjian, Conductor Robert McDuffie, violin PHILIP GLASS (b. 1937) Violin Concerto No. 2, “The American Four Seasons” (2009) 38MIN I. Prologue II. Movement I III. Song No.1 IV. Movement II V. Song No.2 VI. Movement III VII. Song No.3 VIII. Movement IV Robert McDuffie, violin

INTERMISSION 20MIN HECTOR BERLIOZ (1803-1869) Symphonie fantastique, Opus 14 (1830) 52MIN I. Reveries, Passions (Largo; Allegro agitato e appassionato assai) II. A Ball (Valse. Allegro non troppo) III. Scene in the Country (Adagio) IV. March to the Execution (Allegretto non troppo) V. Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath (Larghetto; Allegro)

66 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


Notes on the Program by Ken Meltzer into a series of effects. Rather, The Four Seasons demonstrates an admirable—and PHILIP GLASS was born in Baltimore, highly satisfying—sense of cohesion. This is Maryland, on January 31, 1937. The first achieved, in great part, by Vivaldi’s use of the performance of the Violin Concerto No. 2 ritornello (a recurring instrumental phrase) took place in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on in the outer movements of each “Season. December 9, 2009, with Robert McDuffie Vivaldi’s considerable melodic gifts, daring as violin soloist, and the Toronto Symphony harmonies, and brilliant writing for the solo Orchestra, conducted by Peter Oundjian. In instrument produce an immensely entertainaddition to the solo violin, the Concerto is ing work. Violin Concerto No. 2, “The American Four Seasons” (2009)

These are the First Classical Subscription Performances.

T

he Violin Concerto No. 2, “The American Four Seasons”, by the distinguished American composer Philip Glass, was a co-commission by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Aspen Music Festival and School, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts at University of Illinois at ChampaignUrbana, and Carlsen Center at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kansas. Glass’s Violin Concerto No. 2 was inspired by one of the most beloved works in the concert repertoire, Le quattro stagioni (The Four Seasons) (ca. 1725), by the Italian Baroque composer Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741). The Four Seasons is a series of three-movement concertos, scored for solo violin, strings, and continuo. Each of the four concertos (comprising two quick-tempo movements framing one in slow tempo) depicts a season of the year. The 1725 score of Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons includes sonnets describing the programs for each of the twelve movements. Further, certain passages in the score are accompanied by captions describing what the music is intended to portray. While Vivaldi incorporates dozens of such descriptive touches into The Four Seasons, the music never lapses

Philip Glass Discusses “The American Four Seasons”

The Violin Concerto No. 2 was composed for Robert McDuffie in the Summer and Autumn of 2009. The work was preceded by several years of occasional exchanges between Bobby and myself. He was interested in music that would serve as a companion piece to the Vivaldi “Four Seasons” concertos. I agreed to the idea of a four-movement work but at the outset was not sure how that correspondence would work in practice— between the Vivaldi concertos and my own music. However, Bobby encouraged me to start with my composition and we would see in due time how it would relate to the very well known original. When the music was completed I sent it on to Bobby, who seemed to have quickly seen how the movements of my Concerto No. 2 related to the “Seasons.” Of course, Bobby’s interpretation, though similar to my own, proved to be also somewhat different. This struck me as an opportunity, then, for the listener to make his/her own interpretation. Therefore, there will be no instructions for the audience, no clues as to where Spring, Summer, Winter, and Fall might appear in the new concerto – an interesting, though not worrisome, problem for the listener. After all, if Bobby and I are not in complete agreement, an independent

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ASO | 6.2/4| program

scored for strings and synthesizer.


ASO | 6.2/4 | program interpretation can be tolerated and even welcomed. (The mathematical possibilities, or permutations, of the puzzle are in the order of 24.) Apart from that, I would only add that, instead of the usual cadenza, I provided a number of solo pieces for Bobby— thinking that they could be played together as separate concert music when abstracted from the whole work. They appear in the concerto as a “prelude” to the first movement and three “songs” that precede each of the following three movements. –Philip Glass http://www.philipglass.com/music/ recordings/american4seasons.php

ASO | 6.2/4| program

Symphonie fantastique, Opus 14 (1830) HECTOR BERLIOZ was born in La CôteSaint-André, Isère, France, on December 11, 1803, and died in Paris, France, on March 8, 1869. The first performance of the Symphonie fantastique took place at the Paris Conservatoire on December 5, 1830, with François-Antoine Habeneck conducting the Orchestra of the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire. The Symphonie fantastique is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, E-flat clarinet, two clarinets, four bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, two cornets, three trombones, two tubas, timpani (two players), bass drum, cymbals, suspended cymbals, snare drum, low bells (offstage), two harps, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performances: February 12 and 13, 1958, Henry Sopkin, Conductor. Most Recent Classical Subscription Performances: January 23, 25, and 26, 2014, Robert Spano, Conductor. Robert Shaw Performances (Classical Subscription, unless otherwise noted): September 26, 1968; October 6, 1968 68 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

(Other Series); October 28-November 2, 1968 (Tour); March 13, 14 and 15, 1980; April 20, 1980 (Runout, Thomasville).

I

n September 1827, Hector Berlioz, then a 23-year-old student at the Paris Conservatory, attended productions by an English touring company of Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet. In those performances, Harriet Smithson, a beautiful and young Irish actress, portrayed the tragic heroines, Ophelia and Juliet. Berlioz immediately fell in love with her. Berlioz did everything within his power to try to get Smithson to take notice of him, but without success. In February of 1830, Berlioz wrote to his sister: “I am about to commence my grand symphony (Episode in the Life of An Artist), in which the development of my infernal passion will be depicted.” On April 16 of that same year, Berlioz announced that his Symphony was complete. The premiere of the Symphonie fantastique took place at the Paris Conservatory on December 5, 1830, with François-Antoine Habeneck conducting the Orchestra of the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire. The drama, innovation, and sheer audacity of the young composer’s vision stunned the audience. By the time Harriet Smithson returned to Paris in 1832 and attended a performance of the Fantastic Symphony, it seemed the actress was the only person in the entire city who didn’t realize she was the inspiration for the music. When Smithson discovered the truth, she finally agreed to meet Berlioz. After a brief courtship, the two wed on October 3, 1833. Franz Liszt and Heinrich Heine served as witnesses. However, the marriage deteriorated, and in the early 1840s, Smithson and Berlioz separated. Even after the acrimonious conclusion of their marriage, Berlioz acknowledged his artistic kinship with Harriet Smithson, and


Berlioz, a gifted and prolific writer, provided the following program notes for his Symphonie fantastique. A young musician of morbidly sensitive temperament and lively imagination poisons himself with opium in an attack of lovesick despair. The dose of the narcotic, too weak to kill him, plunges him into a deep slumber accompanied by the strangest visions, during which his feelings, his emotions, his memories are transformed in his sick mind into musical images. The Beloved herself becomes for him a melody, a cyclical theme (idée fixe) that he encounters and hears everywhere. (Annotator’s note: The idée fixe is introduced approximately five minutes into the opening movement by the flute and first violins.) I. Reveries, Passions (Largo; Allegro agitato e appassionato assai)—At first he recalls that sickness of the soul, those intimations of passion, the apparently groundless depression and intoxication he experienced before he met the woman he adores; then the volcanic love that she inspired in him, his delirious anguish, his furious jealousy, his return to tenderness, his religious consolation. II. A Ball (Valse. Allegro non troppo)— He meets his beloved again in the midst of the tumult of a glittering fête. III. Scene in the Country (Adagio)—On a summer evening in the country, he hears two shepherds piping back and forth a ranz des vaches (the traditional melody of Swiss shepherds for summoning their

flocks); this pastoral duet, the peaceful landscape, the rustling of the trees gently rocked by the wind, some prospects of hope he recently found—all combine to soothe his heart with unusual tranquility and brighten his thoughts. But she reappears, he feels his heart tighten, he is smitten with sad foreboding: what if she were to prove false?…One of the shepherds resumes his simple tune; the other no longer responds. The sun sets… distant roll of thunder…solitude…silence. IV. March to the Execution (Allegretto non troppo)—He dreams he has murdered his Beloved, that he has been condemned to death and is being led to the scaffold. The procession advances to the sound of a march that is now somber and agitated, now brilliant and solemn, in which the muffled sound of heavy steps is suddenly juxtaposed with the noisiest clamor. At the end, the idée fixe returns for a moment like a final thought of love, suddenly interrupted by the death blow. V. Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath (Larghetto; Allegro)—He imagines himself at a Witches’ Sabbath, among a hideous throng of ghouls, sorcerers and monsters of every kind, assembled for his funeral. Ominous sounds, groans, bursts of laughter, distant cries that other cries seem to answer. The Beloved’s melody reappears, but it has lost its noble and timid character; it has become a vulgar dance tune, unworthy, trite and grotesque: there she is, coming to join the Sabbath…A roar of joy greets her arrival…She takes part in the infernal orgy…The funeral knell, a burlesque parody of the Dies irae…the witches’ round…the dance and the Dies irae are heard together.

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ASO | 6.2/4| program

the profound influence she exercised upon his development as an artist. Toward the end of her life, Smithson suffered paralysis. After Harriet Smithson’s death in 1854, Liszt wrote to Berlioz: “She inspired you, you loved her and sang your love, her mission was fulfilled.”


ASO | 6.2/4 | artists PETER OUNDJIAN, Conductor

ASO | 6.2/4| artists

DALE WILCOX

T

oronto-born conductor Peter Oundjian, noted for his probing musicality, collaborative spirit, and engaging personality, has been an instrumental figure in the rebirth of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra since his appointment as Music Director in 2004. In addition to conducting the Orchestra in dynamic performances which have achieved outstanding artistic acclaim, he has been greatly involved in a variety of new initiatives which have strengthened the ensemble’s presence in the community and attracted a young and diverse audience.

During his tenure, Oundjian has also released eight recordings on the Orchestra’s self-produced record label TSO Live and signed a multi-disc recording contract with Chandos Records. He recently led the TSO on a tour of Europe which included a sold-out performance at Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw and the first performance of a North American orchestra at Reykjavik’s Harpa Hall.

Oundjian was Principal Guest Conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra from 2006 to 2010 and played a major role at the Caramoor International Music Festival in New York between 1997 and 2007. Since 1981, he has served as a visiting professor at the Yale School of Music, and was awarded the university’s Sanford Medal in 2013. In May 2009 Mr. Oundjian received an honorary doctorate from the San Francisco Conservatory. ROBER MCDUFFIE, violin

G

rammy® nominated artist Robert McDuffie has appeared as soloist with most of the major orchestras of the world. He gave the World Premiere of Philip Glass’ Violin Concerto No. 2, The American Four Seasons - a work written for Robert McDuffie - with the Toronto Symphony. McDuffie recently completed a 30-city U.S. tour with the Venice Baroque Orchestra, pairing the Glass Four Seasons with the Vivaldi Four Seasons

Robert McDuffie recorded The American Four Seasons with the London Philharmonic and Marin Alsop on Philip Glass’ Orange Mountain Music label. His acclaimed Telarc and EMI recordings include the violin concertos of Mendelssohn, Bruch, Oundjian was appointed Music Director of Adams, Glass, Barber, Rozsa, Bernstein, the Royal Scottish National Orchestra in William Schuman, and Viennese violin 2012. Few conductors bring such musician- favorites. ship and engagement to the world’s great Future plans include additional appearances podiums—from Berlin, Amsterdam, and Tel with actor/playwright Anna Deavere Smith, Aviv, to New York, Chicago, and Sydney. a return to Korea and his annual visit to He has also appeared at some of the great the Aspen Music Festival. He will perform annual gatherings of music and music-lovwith the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, ers: from the London Proms and the Prague the Puerto Rico Symphony Orchestra, the Spring Festival, to the Edinburgh Festival Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the and The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Mozart Louisiana Philharmonic. On June 17, 2016 Festival where he was Artistic Director he will perform the world premiere of from 2003 to 2005. Mills Concerto for Violin, Rock Band and

70 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


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encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 71


ASO | 6.2/4| artists

Robert McDuffie is the founder of the Rome Chamber Music Festival. He has been awarded the prestigious Premio Simpatia by the Mayor of Rome, in recognition of his contribution to the city’s cultural life. Mr. McDuffie holds the Mansfield and Genelle Jennings Distinguished University Professor Chair at Mercer University, Macon, Georgia, where he founded the Robert McDuffie Center for Strings. Robert McDuffie lives in New York. He plays a 1735 Guarneri del Gesu violin, known as the “Ladenburg”.

72 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

CHRISTIAN STEINER

Orchestra with the Toronto Symphony.


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ASO | 6.9/11/12 | program AtlantaSymphonyOrchestra The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Classical Series is presented by Delta Air Lines.

Additional support generously provided by

Robert Spano, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Principal Guest Conductor

Delta Classical Concert Concerts of Thursday, June 9, and Saturday, June 11, at 8:00p, and Sunday, June 12, 2016, at 3:00pm.

Robert Spano, Conductor André Watts, piano JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-1897) Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in B-flat Major, Opus 83 (1881) 55MIN I. Allegro non troppo II. Allegro appassionato II. Andante III. Allegretto grazioso André Watts, piano

ASO | 6.9/11/12| program

The use of cameras or recording devices during the concert is strictly prohibited. Please be kind to those around you and silence your mobile phone and other hand-held devices.

INTERMISSION 20MIN Symphony No. 2 In D Major, Opus 73 (1877) 41MIN I. Allegro non troppo II. Adagio non troppo III. Allegretto grazioso (Quasi andantino) IV. Allegro con spirito

KEN MELTZER, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Program Annotator Ken’s in-depth program notes, detailed musical analysis and listening samples can be found online: aso.org/encore. Podcasts of Ken’s pre-concert lectures are at: aso.org and kenmeltzer.com To contact Ken, please email Ken.Meltzer@ woodruffcenter.org.

74 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


Notes on the Program by Ken Meltzer

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in B-flat Major, Opus 83 (1881) The first performance of the Piano Concerto No. 2 took place at the Redoutensaal in Budapest, Hungary, on November 9, 1881, with the composer as soloist and Sándor Erkel conducting the Budapest Philharmonic. In addition to the solo piano, the Concerto is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performance: January 30, 1954, Joseph Battista, Piano, Henry Sopkin, Conductor. Most Recent Classical Subscription Performances: November 29 and 30, December 1, 2012, Emanuel Ax, Piano, Robert Spano, Conductor. Robert Shaw Performances (Classical Subscription, unless otherwise noted): February 5, 6, and 8, 1970, Theodore, Lettvin, Piano; February 9, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 1970, Theodore Lettvin, Piano (Tour); April 22, 1970, Bruno Leonardo Gelber, Piano (Tour); October 19, 20, and 22, 1972, Bruno Leonardo Gelber, Piano; April 21, 22, and 23, 1977, Lee Luvisi, Piano; September 21, 22, and 23, 1978, Peter Serkin, Piano; November 5, 6, and 7, 1981, James Tocco, Piano; October 9, 10, and 11, 1986, Peter Serkin, Piano; April 23 and 26, 1987, Peter Serkin, Piano (Tour); February 15, 16, and 17, 1990, András Schiff, Piano.

J

and complex work did not easily win public acceptance. Brahms himself was philosophical: “It will please, once I have improved its anatomy, and a second one will sound quite different.” Brahms was correct on both counts, although twenty years would elapse before that Second Concerto materialized. Brahms first sketched thematic material for his B-flat Concerto in the spring of 1878, following a trip to Italy with his friend, Viennese surgeon, Theodor Billroth. It appears that Brahms did no further work on the Concerto for three years. At the conclusion of another journey to Italy, Brahms resumed composition. Two months later, on July 7, 1881, he completed the score. In a letter to a friend, Brahms announced, with typically self-deprecating humor, the creation of the epic four-movement Concerto: “I don’t mind telling you that I have written a tiny, tiny, pianoforte concerto with a tiny, tiny, wisp of a scherzo.” A similar letter to the superb pianist, Clara Schumann—widow of composer Robert Schumann—elicited the following response: “I don’t really trust your word ‘little.’ However, I wouldn’t mind a bit (if it were little) because in that case I might even be able to play it myself.” Brahms forwarded the score of the B-flat Concerto to Billroth on July 11 with the following explanation: “I am sending you enclosed a couple of little pieces for the piano(!)” Billroth replied that very day, comparing the Second Piano Concerto to the First as “that of the grown man to the youth; unmistakably the same, yet in every way sturdier, more mature.”

ohannes Brahms completed his First Brahms was the soloist for the premiere, Piano Concerto (D minor, Opus which took place on November 9, 1881, at 15) in 1858. The premiere took place the Redoutensaal in Budapest. A few weeks the following year. The epic, stormy, later, Brahms again performed the work encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 75

ASO | 6.9/11/12| program

JOHANNES BRAHMS was born in Hamburg, Germany, on May 7, 1833, and died in Vienna, Austria, on April 3, 1897.


ASO | 6.9/11/12 | program at Meiningen, with his friend, Hans von Bülow, conducting. Unlike the D-minor, Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto was an instant success with the critics and public.

ASO | 6.9/11/12| program

Billroth’s comparison of the B-flat Concerto to its predecessor as “that of the grown man to the youth” is quite apt. Whereas the D-minor is filled with storm and stress, the Second Concerto radiates an autumnal glow, and proceeds with an inevitability that are hallmarks of the mature Brahms. Despite their differences of style, the D-minor and B-flat Piano Concertos do share a symphonic conception that places them in a special category among 19th-century works. The First Piano Concerto was created from sketches for what Brahms initially planned to be his first symphony. Brahms had no similar aspirations for the B-flat Concerto. Still, the close partnership of soloist and orchestra, as well as the use of four movements as opposed to the traditional three, prompted critic Eduard Hanslick to term the work “a symphony with piano obbligato.” That, however, is a characterization offered by someone who did not have to confront the supreme technical and interpretive demands this extraordinary work places upon the soloist. The Concerto’s first movement (Allegro non troppo) opens with a dialogue between the horns and piano, finally leading to the introduction of the principal thematic material. The second movement (Allegro appassionato) is a vigorous scherzo, with a brilliant major-key “trio” section. The slow-tempo third movement (Andante) is based upon a poignant and beautiful melody introduced by the solo cello. Brahms returned to that melody five years later in his melancholy song, Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer (“My Sleep Becomes Ever Lighter”), Opus 105, No. 2. The rondo 76 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

finale (Allegretto grazioso) offers a light touch and high spirits virtually throughout, culminating in a grand final statement. Symphony No. 2 In D Major, Opus 73 (1877) The first performance of the Symphony No. 2 took place in the concert hall of the Musikverein in Vienna on December 30, 1877, with Hans Richter conducting the Vienna Philharmonic. The Symphony No. 2 is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, and strings. First Classical Subscription Performance: April 6, 1950, Henry Sopkin, Conductor. Most Recent Classical Subscription Performances: February 21, 22, and 23, 2013, Robert Spano, Conductor. Robert Shaw Performances (Classical subscription, unless otherwise noted): April 13 and 14, 1973 (Tour); September 20-23, 1979; October 10, 1979 (Tour); February 17, 1980 (Runout); March 26, 1980 (Tour); October 11, 12, and 13, 1984; October 14, 1984 (Runout); October 17 and 19, 1984 (Tour); November 18, 1984 (Runout); March 15 and 17, 1985 (Tour).

“I

shall never write a symphony. You have no idea how the likes of us feel when we hear the tramp of a giant like him beside us.” So Johannes Brahms wrote in 1870 to conductor Hermann Levi. The “giant” Brahms feared was Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), whose Nine Symphonies form the cornerstone of the orchestral repertoire. Although he attempted the composition of a symphony as early as 1854, it wasn’t until 1876 that the 43-year-old Brahms gathered the courage to complete his First (in C minor, Opus 68). The First Symphony received


its premiere on November 4, 1876. The premiere and early subsequent performances were far from unqualified triumphs. Nevertheless, Brahms had finally cast aside his trepidation about composing in a genre that invited comparisons to Beethoven.

clever about it,” the Second Symphony is a remarkably intricate and unified composition. In its own genial fashion, the D-Major Symphony is as dramatically rewarding as its heroic predecessor.

The Symphony No. 2 is in four movements. The first (Allegro non troppo) opens with the cellos and basses intoning a three-note motif that will return in various guises throughout the Symphony. The movement also includes a waltz-like theme that recalls the composer’s beloved “Lullaby,” Opus 49, Nr. 4 (1868). The slow-tempo second movement (Adagio non troppo) alternates lyrical repose with moments of tension, not resolved until the final bars. The third movement (Allegretto grazioso) opens with the oboe’s presentation of the sprightly The premiere of the Brahms Second principal melody that returns throughout, Symphony took place on December 30, alternating with fleet interludes. The 1877, at the concert hall of the Musikverein concluding movement (Allegro con spirito), in Vienna. The eminent conductor, Hans the most cheerful finale among Brahms’s Four Symphonies, radiates energy and Richter, led the Vienna Philharmonic. optimism from start to finish. The D-Major Symphony seems to reflect the composer’s relaxed state of mind during the happy summer of 1877. The lyrical character of the work—sometimes referred to as Brahms’s “Pörtschach” or “Pastoral” Symphony—certainly is in marked contrast to the storm and stress that pervades the C-minor First (although to be sure, the Second Symphony has its moments of conflict as well, particularly in the first two movements). Brahms referred to his Second Symphony as a “charming new monster” and, in typically self-deprecating fashion, told his friend, Elisabeth von Herzogenberg, that it was merely a little Sinfonia. That of course, is hardly the case, and in spite of Brahms’s protestations to critic Eduard Hanslick that “there is nothing encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 77

ASO | 6.9/11/12| program

Brahms spent the following summer in Pörtschach, a tiny Austrian village on Lake Wörth. It was there, between the months of June and September 1877, that Brahms composed his Second Symphony. Brahms found Pörtschach a congenial place for musical inspiration. In addition to the Second Symphony, Brahms composed his Violin Concerto (1878), the G-Major Violin Sonata (1878-9), and Two Piano Rhapsodies (1879) while vacationing at the peaceful lakeside village.


ASO | 6.9/11/12 | artists ANDRÉ WATTS, piano

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ndré Watts is a world-renowned concert pianist who holds the Jack I. and Dora B. Hamlin Endowed Chair in Music at Indiana University, and was the 2001 recipient of the National Medal of Arts.

Angeles Philharmonics; and the St. Louis, Dallas, Houston, Baltimore, Indianapolis, Seattle and National symphonies.

Mr. Watts has appeared on numerous television programs, and his 1976 New York recital, aired on the program Live from Lincoln Center, was the first full length Mr. Watts’ career began at 16 when Leonard recital broadcast in the history of television. Bernstein chose him to make his debut with In June 2006, he was inducted into the the New York Philharmonic in their Young Hollywood Bowl of Fame to celebrate the People’s Concerts, broadcast nationwide 50th anniversary of his debut. He is also on CBS-TV. Two weeks later, Mr. Bernstein the recipient of the 1988 Avery Fisher Prize. asked him to substitute at the last minute Mr. Watts was the youngest person ever for the ailing Glenn Gould in performances to receive an Honorary Doctorate from with the New York Philharmonic. Yale University and has received numerHe is a regular guest at the major sum- ous honors from respected music promer music festivals including Ravinia, the grams like the University of Pennsylvania, Hollywood Bowl, Saratoga, Tanglewood Brandeis University, The Juilliard School and the Mann Music Center, and with of Music and his Alma Mater, the Peabody orchestras like the Philadelphia and Conservatory of Johns Hopkins University.

STEVEN J. SHERMAN

ASO | 6.9/11/12| artists

Minnesota Orchestras; New York and Los

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ASO | gallery 1

1 The Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra attended a special program at the Nashville School of Arts which included master classes with faculty, rehearsal time with the Director of the Vanderbilt University Orchestra, Robin Fountain (pictured here), campus tours and a performance in Ingram Hall. In addition, the students enjoyed master classes with Nashville Symphony Musicians and attended a Nashville Symphony Orchestra performance in the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. 2 The 2016 Talent Development Program Spring Recitals were a great success. The students showcased their hard work and incredible talents for friends, family and music lovers alike.

2

JEFF ROFFMAN

3 Congratulations to Music Director Robert Spano, who was awarded the “Champion of New Music” award for his significant contribution to the work and livelihoods of contemporary composers. The 2015/16 season for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra included four world premieres by composers Mark Grey, Jonathan Leshnoff and ASO Double Bass Michael Kurth, plus seven Atlanta premieres.

3

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ASO | support

T

he Orchestra donor list includes all donations made since June 1, 2014. This list represents those among us who have been transformed by music, whether during one evening or over the course of a lifetime. Those among us who understand the Orchestra’s role in providing music education across our schools, enhancing our quality of life and being a beacon of Atlanta’s cultural sophistication for the entire world. On behalf of your Atlanta Symphony Orchestra – musicians, volunteers, and staff – we thank you for playing such an important part in the music we work so passionately to create and share. Bravo!

$500,000+

A Friend of the Orchestra (3) Connie & Merrell Calhoun Delta Air Lines Lettie Pate Evans Foundation, Inc. Sally & Carl Gable Abraham J. & Phyllis Katz Foundation The Kendeda Fund Lucy R. & Gary Lee Jr. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

$250,000+

Mrs. Anne Cox Chambers

$100,000+

The Coca-Cola Company Mr. & Mrs. Bradley Currey Jr. First Data Corporation GE Asset Management The Home Depot Foundation Jane & Clay Jackson The Fred & Sue Mcgehee Family Charitable Fund Patty & Doug Reid The Slumgullion Charitable Fund Mrs. Charles A. Smithgall Jr. Sue & Neil** Williams Wells Fargo

$75,000+

Susan & Richard Anderson Bank of America & Merrill Lynch Susan & Thomas Wardell

$50,000+

AGL Resources, Inc. Alston & Bird LLP Marcia & John Donnell Equifax Inc. The Graves Foundation Invesco Ltd. Karole & John Lloyd Terence L. & Jeanne P. Neal* Victoria & Howard Palefsky Mr. Robert Spano UPS The Zeist Foundation, Inc.

$35,000

The Jim Cox, Jr. Foundation Ann & Gordon Getty Foundation D. Kirk & Kimberlee Micek Jamieson/Verizon Wireless Kaiser Permanente National Endowment for the Arts Adair & Dick White Mr. & Mrs. John B. White Jr.*

$25,000+

Allstate Atlanta Homes & Lifestyle Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Blackney The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation Mary Rockett Brock Wright & Alison Caughman City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs Catherine Warren Dukehart Ms. Lynn Eden Betty Sands Fuller

Charles & Mary Ginden James. H. Landon The Charles Loridans Foundation, Inc. Massey Charitable Trust Newell Rubbermaid Mr. & Mrs. E. Fay Pearce Jr.* Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Publix Super Market Charities, Inc. Ryder Truck Sytems, Inc. Bill & Rachel Schultz* The Mark & Evelyn Trammell Foundation Joan N. Whitcomb The Vasser Woolley Foundation, Inc.

$17,500+

Capital Group Companies, Inc. Dr. John W. Cooledge Fulton County Arts & Culture GMT Capital Corporation Georgia Council for the Arts Ann A. & Ben F. Johnson III* Meredith Corporation (Traditional Home) Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. O’Donnell Mark & Rebekah Wasserman

$15,000+

The Antinori Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Frank H. Boykin Janine Brown & Alex J. Simmons Jr. John W. & Rosemary K. Brown Kelley O. & Neil H. Berman Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Cofield*

*We are grateful to these donors for taking the extra time to acquire matching gifts from their employers. **Deceased.

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ASO | support Russell Currey & Amy Durrell Fulton County Arts Council Drs. Jeannette Guarner & Carlos del Rio Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Donna Lee & Howard Ehni Xia Liu Ken & Carolyn Meltzer The Sally & Peter Parsonson Foundation Dr.** & Mrs. Mark P. Pentecost Jr. Piedmont National Family Foundation Provare Technology The Reiman Foundation Jeffrey C. Sprecher & Kelly Loeffler Loren & Gail Starr Triska Drake & G. Kimbrough Taylor The Trapp Family John & Ray Uttenhove Chilton & Morgan Varner Patrick & Susie Viguerie Kathy N. Waller Mr. & Mrs. Edus H. Warren Jr. Camille Yow

$10,000+

Atlanta Decorative Arts Center Julie & Jim Balloun The Breman Foundation Inc. Alexandra & Brett Blumencranz Mr. David Boatwright The Walter & Frances Bunzl Foundation Janet Davenport in honor of Norman Mackenzie

Cari K. Dawson & John M. Sparrow Eleanor & Charles Edmondson Ms. Nancy Field & Mr. Michael Schulder Nancy D. Gould Gene Haywood Roger & Lynn Hudgins Dona & Bill Humphreys JBS Foundation King & Spalding LLP Mr.** & Mrs. Donald R. Keough Pat & Nolan Leake John & Linda Matthews John F. & Marilyn M. McMullan Morgens West Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Solon P. Patterson* Suzanne & Bill Plybon* Joyce & Henry Schwob Mr. & Mrs. John W. Scott Mr. John A. Sibley III Hamilton & Mason Smith Alison M. & Joseph M. Thompson Carol & Ramon Tomé Family Fund* Turner Foundation Inc. Ticketmaster Neal** & Virginia Williams

$7,500+

Patricia & William Buss The Robert Hall Gunn Jr. Fund Mary Ruth McDonald* Donald S. Orr & Marcia K. Knight Piedmont Charitable Foundation

$5,000+

A Friend of the Orchestra (2)

A ppassionato Donors who give at the Appassionato level ($10,000 $24,999) enjoy the benefits of the Patron Partnership, while also having opportunities to attend the annual Appassionato Soiree, receive VIP personal ticketing and reservation concierge, exclusive access to artists’ events, and recognition as a concert sponsor. For more information, visit www.atlantasymphony.org/giving or call Shawn Gardner at 404.733.4839.

Ms. Kay Adams* & Mr. Ralph Paulk Aadu & Kristi Allpere* Lisa & Joe Bankoff Jack & Helga Beam Rita & Herschel Bloom Jacqueline A. & Joseph E. Brown, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Russell E. Butner Mr. & Mrs. Walter K. Canipe Susan & Carl Cofer Dr. & Mrs. William T. Cook Greg & Debra Durden The Robert S. Elster Foundation George T. & Alecia H. Ethridge Carol G. & Larry L. Gellerstedt III Mary D. Gellerstedt Mr. & Mrs. Richard Goodsell Georgia-Pacific Corporation Deedee & Marc Hamburger* Dr. Lewis H. Hamner III & Thomas J. Brendiar Dr. & Mrs. Geoffrey Henson Jan & Tom Hough Mr. Roger Hudguns Tad & Janin Hutcheson Roya & Bahman Irvani Mr. & Mrs. Baxter Jones Cecile M. Jones Paul & Rosthema Kastin The Philip I. Kent Foundation Kohler Co. The Sartain Lanier Family Foundation Wolfgang** & Mariana Laufer Lillian Balentine Law Isabel Lamy Lee Lenox Square Loews Atlanta Hotel Belinda & Gino Massafra Judy Zaban-Miller & Lester Miller Walter W. Mitchell Gregory & Judy Moore Robert & Mary Ann Olive Franca G. Oreffice Barbara & Sanford Orkin Margaret H. Petersen In Memory of Dr. Frank S. Pittman III Mr. Leonard B. Reed* Mr. & Mrs. Joel F. Reeves Vicki & Joe Riedel Mr. & Mrs. George P. Rodrigue Shipt

*We are grateful to these donors for taking the extra time to acquire matching gifts from their employers. **Deceased.

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ASO | support Beverly & Milton Shlapak In memory of Willard Shull Thurmond Smithgall Dr. Steven & Lynne Steindel* Peter James Stelling Amy & Paul Synder Drs. Jonne & Paul Walter Alan & Marcia Watt* Joan N. Whitcomb Thomas E. Whitesides, Jr. M.D. Russell Williamson & Shawn Pagliarini Suzanne Bunzl Wilner Jan & Beattie Wood In Memory of Bill Lester and In Honor of Ronda Respess

$3,500+

A Friend of the Orchestra (3) Natalie & Matthew Bernstein Ronald & Gayle Breakstone Alison & Chuck Carlin Mr. & Mrs. Dennis M. Chorba Carol Comstock & Jim Davis* Thomas G. Cousins Peter & Vivian de Kok Betty W Dykes David & Patty Emerson Dr. & Mrs. Carl D. Fackler Frontgate Peg Simms Gary Sally W. Hawkins Henry Howell Dr.** & Mrs. James M. Hund Robert & Sherry Johnson Mark B. Kent & Kevin A. Daft Dick & Georgia Kimball* J. Bancroft Lesesne & Randolph Henning Deborah & William Liss*

Dr. & Mrs. James T. Lowman Lubo Fund Mr. & Mrs. Frederick C. Mabry Barbara & Jim MacGinnitie Janice & Tom Munsterman Margo Brinton & Eldon Park Susan Perdew Hellen Ingram Plummer Charitable Foundation, Inc. Mary Kay & Gene Poland* S.A. Robinson John T. Ruff Barry & Gail Spurlock Mrs. C. Preston Stephens Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Stormont Mr. & Mrs. Edward Stroetz, Jr. Stephen & Sonia Swartz Mrs. William J. Thompson Burton Trimble Dr. & Mrs. James O. Wells, Jr. H. & T. Yamashita* Herbert & Grace Zwerner

$2,000+

A Friend of the Orchestra Mr. & Mrs. John Allan Ms. Mary Allen Dr. Evelyn R. Babey Asad Bashey Mr. & Mrs. R. Edwin Bennett Dr. & Mrs. Joel E. Berenson Shirley Blaine Leon Borchers Dr. & Mrs. Anton J. Bueschen Dr. Aubrey M. Bush & Dr. Carol T. Bush California Closets Henry & Claudia Colvin Ralph & Rita Connell Jean & Jerry Cooper

patron partnership

Members of the Patron Partnership ($2,000-$9,999) enjoy a host of benefits that include event invitations to Insiders’ Evenings and Symphony Nightcaps, access to the Robert Shaw Room, and opportunities to sit onstage during a rehearsal. For more information, visit www.atlantasymphony.org/giving or call Shawn Gardner at 404.733.4839. Mrs. Lavona Currie Mr. Philip A. Delanty Mary & Mahlon Delong Xavier Duralde & Mary Barrett Ms. Diane Durgin Dr. Francine D. Dykes & Mr. Richard H. Delay Mary Frances Early Ellen & Howard Feinsand Phyllis & Dr. Richard D. Franco John & Michelle Fuller Dr. Mary G. George & Mr. Kenneth Molinelli Sally & Walter George Caroline Gilham Mrs. Janet D. Goldstein Mrs. Louise Grant Joanne & Alex Gross Mr. & Mrs. Gary Guy Harald R. Hansen Virginia Hepner & Malcolm Barnes John & Martha Head Mr. & Mrs. John E. Hellriegel Kenneth R. Hey Thomas High Sarah & Harvey Hill Mrs. Sally Horntvedt Harry & Tatty Howard Richard & Linda Hubert Dr. W. Manchester Hudson JoAnn Hall Hunsinger The Hyman Foundation Mary & Wayne James Cynthia Jeness Aaron & Joyce Johnson

Mr. W.F. & Dr. Janice Johnston Allyson M. Kirkpatrick Mr. & Mrs. Alan M. Knieter Mrs. Jo W. Koch Dr. & Mrs. James T. Laney* Jessica Langlois Thomas C. Lawson Olivia A. M. Leon Dr. Fulton D. Lewis III & S. Neal Rhoney Mr. & Mrs. J. David Lifsey Joanne Lincoln Mr. & Mrs. Paul A. Lutz* Kay & John Marshall Elvira & Jay Mannelly Martha & Reynolds McClatchey Al & Betsy McGhee Mrs. Kathryn M. McGrew Mr. Justin R. McLain McMaster-Carr Supply Company Dr. Larry V. McIntire Birgit & David McQueen Virginia K. McTague Anna & Hays Mershon Midtown Bank & Trust Company Lilot S. Moorman & Jeffrey B. Bradley The Mortimer Family* Dr. & Mrs. R. Daniel Nable Melanie & Allan Nelkin Gary & Peggy Noble

*We are grateful to these donors for taking the extra time to acquire matching gifts from their employers. **Deceased.

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Peach State Freightliner Trucks Mr. Andreas Penninger Doris Pidgeon in Memory of Rezin E. Pidgeon, Jr. The Reverend Neal P. Ponder, Jr. Tom & Mary Quigley Dr. & Mrs. W. Harrison Reeves, Sr. Mrs. Susan H. Reinach Margaret & Bob Reiser Roger & Lynn Lieberman Ritvo

Ms. Susan Robinson & Ms. Mary Roemer Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Rodgers The Gary W. Rollins Foundation Patricia & Maurice Rosenbaum Jane & Rein Saral Helga Hazelrig Siegel Lewis Silverboard Baker & Debby Smith Johannah Smith Southern Company Dr. Odessa K. Spraggins

Jonathan & Victoria Sprinzen Mr. & Mrs. Raymond F. Stainback, Jr. John & Yee-Wan Stevens Kay & Alex Summers Poppy Tanner Mr. & Mrs. Edward M. Tate Mr. & Mrs. George B. Taylor, Jr. Judith & Mark K. Taylor Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Tice Sheila L. Tschinkel

Vogel Family Foundation Mr. & Mrs. William C. Voss Dr. Nanette K. Wenger Robert Wenger David & Martha West Hubert H. Whitlow, Jr. Mrs. Frank L. Wilson, Jr. Mary Lou Wolff Mr. & Mrs. John C. Yates **Deceased

*We are grateful to these donors for taking the extra time to acquire matching gifts from their employers. **Deceased.

patron partnership 2015-16 committee Belinda Massafra Chair Kristi Allpere Vice-Chair, Programs Helga Beam Vice-Chair, Annual Fund

June Scott Vice-Chair, Communications & Newsletter Co-editor Deedee Hamburger Programs Committee Member Judy Hellriegel Annual Fund Committee Member

Cindy Jeness Communications Committee Member Milt Shlapak Program Committee Member Peter Stelling Communications & Program Committee Member

Jonne Walter Annual Fund Committee Member Marcia Watt Communications Committee Member

The ROBERT SHAW ROOM, the VIP Donor Lounge and Dining Room, is open for cocktails and dinner prior to Atlanta Symphony Orchestra performances in Atlanta Symphony Hall, as well as for cocktails and complimentary coffee during intermission. For more information, visit atlantasymphony.org/giving or call Shawn Gardner at 404.733.4839.

Atlanta Symphony Associates The volunteer organization of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

2015-16 ASA Board of Directors Camille Kesler President Belinda Massafra Advisor Leslie Petter Advisor

Sabine Sugarman Secretary Glee Lamb Treasurer Sylvia Davidson Nominating Chair

Bunny Davidson Membership VP Melissa Hudson Communications & Development VP Jonathan Brown &  Josh Cochran Bravo Unit Chairs

Martha & John Head Concerto Unit Chairs Joan Abernathy Encore Unit Chair Corrie Johnson &  Joanne Chesler Gross Ensemble Unit Chair

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ASO | support Henry Sopkin Circle Recognizing planned gifts that benefit the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

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amed for the Orchestra’s founding Music Director, the Henry Sopkin Circle recognizes individuals who have included the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in their will or estate plans. Members enjoy special events and benefits throughout the season, including the Annual Henry Sopkin Circle Luncheon. For more information, visit www.atlantasymphony.org/giving or call Shawn Gardner at 404.733.4839.

Anonymous (21) Madeline & Howell E. Adams, Jr. Mr.** & Mrs. John E. Aderhold Mr. & Mrs. William Atkins Dr. & Mrs. William Bauer Neil H. Berman Mr.** & Mrs. Sol Blaine W. Moses Bond Mr.** & Mrs. Robert C. Boozer Elinor A. Breman James C. Buggs Mr. & Mrs.** Richard H. Burgin Hugh W. Burke Patricia & William Buss Wilber W. Caldwell Connie and Merrell Calhoun Cynthia & Donald Carson Lenore Cicchese* Margie & Pierce** Cline Dr. & Mrs. Grady S. Clinkscales, Jr. Robert Boston Colgin Dr. John W. Cooledge John R. Donnell Pamela Johnson Drummond Catherine Warren Dukehart Ms. Diane Durgin Kenneth P. Dutter Arnold & Sylvia Eaves Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Edge Elizabeth R. Etoll Brien P. Faucett Dr. Emile T. Fisher

A. D. Frazier, Jr. Nola Frink Betty & Drew** Fuller Sally & Carl Gable William & Carolyn Gaik Mr.** & Mrs. L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. Ruth Gershon & Sandy Cohn Micheline & Bob Gerson Mr. & Mrs. John T. Glover Robert Hall Gunn, Jr., Fund Billie & Sig** Guthman James & Virginia Hale Sally & Paul** Hawkins John & Martha Head Mary Virginia Hearn** Barbara & John** Henigbaum Richard E. Hodges, Jr. Pat & Chuck Holmes Mr.** & Mrs. Fred A. Hoyt, Jr. Jim & Barbara Hund Clayton F. Jackson Mary B. James Calvert Johnson Herb & Hazel Karp Anne Morgan & Jim Kelley Robert Kinsey James W. & Mary Ellen** Kitchell Paul Kniepkamp, Jr. Miss Florence Kopleff** James H. Landon Ouida Hayes Lanier Ione & John Lee Lucy Russell Lee & Gary Lee, Jr. Mr.** & Mrs. William C. Lester

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Liz & Jay** Levine Robert M. Lewis, Jr. Joanne Lincoln Jane Little Mrs. J. Erskine Love, Jr. Nell Galt & Will D. Magruder K Maier John W. Markham Linda & John Matthews Dr. Michael S. McGarry Mr. & Mrs. Richard McGinnis John & Clodagh Miller Mr. & Mrs. Bertil D. Nordin Roger B. Orloff Dr. Bernard** & Sandra Palay Dan R. Payne Bill Perkins Mr.** & Mrs. Rezin E. Pidgeon, Jr. Reverend Neal P. Ponder, Jr. William L. & Lucia Fairlie Pulgram Vicki J. & Joe A. Riedel Helen & John Rieser Dr. Shirley E. Rivers** David F. & Maxine A. Rock Mr.** & Mrs. Martin H. Sauser Mr. Paul S. Scharff & Ms. Polly G. Fraser Dr. & Mrs. George P. Sessions Charles H. Siegel** Hamilton & Mason Smith Mrs. Lessie B. Smithgall Elliott Sopkin

Elizabeth Morgan Spiegel Gail & Loren Starr Peter James Stelling C. Mack** & Mary Rose Taylor Jennings Thompson IV Margaret** & Randolph** Thrower Kenneth & Kathleen Tice Mr. H. Burton Trimble, Jr. Steven R. Tunnell Mary E. Van Valkenburgh Adair & Dick White Mr. & Mrs. John B. White, Jr. Hubert H. Whitlow, Jr. Sue & Neil** Williams Mrs. Frank L. Wilson, Jr. Joni Winston George & Camille Wright Mr.** & Mrs. Charles R. Yates

You can leave a legacy of music. Call Jessica Langlois, Director of Development for more information. 404.733.4864

**Deceased


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800.899.SFCM | admit@sfcm.edu | sfcm.edu encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 85 151012 ATLANTA YSO 4c-AD.indd 1 SanFranConservatory_ENC1511 qp.indd 1

10/12/15 10:22 4:32 PM 10/14/15


corporate & government | support

Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs

Major support is provided by the City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs.

Major funding is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners.

86 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

This program is supported in part by the Georgia Council for the Arts (GCA) through the appropriations of the Georgia General Assembly. GCA also receives support from its partner agency, the National Endowment for the Arts

This program is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.


THE WOODRUFF CIRCLE Woodruff Circle members each contribute more than $250,000 annually to support the arts and education work of the Woodruff Arts Center, Alliance Theatre, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, and High Museum of Art. We are deeply grateful to these 36 partners who lead our efforts to ensure the arts thrive in our community.

$1 MILLION+

A FRIEND OF THE ATLANTA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

$500,000+ A Friend of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chick-fil-A Foundation / Rhonda and Dan Cathy Sally and Carl Gable Georgia Power Foundation, Inc. The Home Depot

JOY & TONY GREENE

SunTrust Foundation SunTrust Bank Teammates and The SunTrust Trusteed Foundations: Florence C. and Harry L. English Memorial Fund Walter H. and Marjory M. Rich Memorial Fund

Wells Fargo wish Foundation, Inc.

$400,000+ The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Inc. Sarah and Jim Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Donald Keough

PwC, Partners & Employees Louise Sams & Jerome Grilhot UPS

$300,000+ AT&T The Goizueta Foundation Invesco Ltd.

Margaret and Terry Stent Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Edus H. Warren, Jr.

$250,000+ Bank of America Deloitte, its Partners & Employees Equifax Inc. & Employees EY, Partners & Employees King & Spalding LLP, Partners & Employees

PNC Patty and Doug Reid Mrs. Charles A. Smithgall Jr. Woodruff Circle & Patron Circle donations made: June 1, 2014 – May 31, 2015 Beauchamp C. Carr Challenge Fund Donors

encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 87


THE PATRON CIRCLE The Patron Circle includes donors who generously made contributions to our FY15 annual funds and/or long-term special projects and endowment funds.

CORPORATE PARTNERS $200,000+ KPMG LLP, Partners & Employees $150,000+ Alston & Bird LLP Jones Day Foundation & Employees Porsche Cars North America $100,000+ AGL Resources Inc. First Data Corporation GE Asset Management Genuine Parts Company Intercontinental Exchange, Inc. Kaiser Permanente Kilpatrick Townsend LLP Northern Trust Company Target Stores $75,000+ General Electric Company Georgia-Pacific Corporation Newbridge Management WestRock Company $50,000+ BB&T Corporation Birch Communications Carter’s Charitable Foundation Crawford & Company GMT Capital Corporation Norfolk Southern Corporation North Highland Company Primerica, Inc. Printpack, Inc. Publix Super Market Charities, Inc. Regions Financial Corporation Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP U.S. Trust $25,000+ ACE Charitable Foundation AGSI Business Techology Americas Mart Real Estate, LLC

AT&T Mobility Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles BlueCross BlueShield of Georgia BNY Mellon Wealth Management The Boston Consulting Group Cousins Properties Foundation Disney Publishing Worldwide Georgia Natural Gas Global Payments, Inc. Holder Construction Company JLL JP Morgan Private Bank Kia Motors America, Inc. Lanier Parking Solutions Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP Novelis, Inc. Post Properties, Inc. Quikrete Ryder Truck Rental, Inc. Sam’s Club & Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. SCANA Energy The Selig Foundation Southwest Airlines State Bank & Trust Company Steinway Piano Galleries Traditional Home United Distributors, Inc. Verizon Wireless Waffle House Wilmington Trust Woodruff Arts Center Employees Yancey Bros. Co. $15,000+ ABM Acuity Brands, Inc. Alvarez & Marsal Antique Piano Shop

Arby’s Foundation, Inc. Arnall Golden Gregory LLP Assurant Specialty Property Atlanta Tech Village Atlantic Trust Company AVYVE Bank of North Georgia/ Synovus Financial Corp Benjamin Moore Bluetube Interactive Bryan Cave Building Materials Holding Corporation Calico The Casey-Slade Group, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Christie’s Cushman & Wakefield, Inc. Fifth Third Bank Gas South, LLC Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Humphries and Company LLC Kimberly-Clark Corporation Macy’s NGI Investments Northside Hospital Performex Company Perkins & Will, Inc. Piedmont National Corporation PulteGroup, Inc. Recall Corporation Ricoh USA, Inc. Rooms to Go Children’s Fund Smith & Howard, PC Southwire Company Stonegate Designs Vertical Systems Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, PLLC

FOUNDATION SUPPORTERS $150,000+

A Friend of the High Museum of Art Abraham J. & Phyllis Katz Foundation The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. National Endowment for the Arts The Rich Foundation, Inc. The Sara Giles Moore Foundation The Shubert Foundation, Inc. $100,000+ The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs

The Frances and Beverly DuBose Foundation, Inc. The Marcus Foundation, Inc. Morgens West Foundation The Sartain Lanier Family Foundation, Inc. $75,000+ Fulton County Arts Council Triad Foundation, Inc. $50,000+ The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation

88 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

The Charles Loridans Foundation, Inc. Frances Wood Wilson Foundation, Inc. The Fraser-Parker Foundation Georgia Council for the Arts The Graves Foundation Livingston Foundation, Inc. The Mark and Evelyn Trammell Foundation Massey Charitable Trust Samuel H. Kress Foundation Spray Foundation, Inc.


$25,000+ Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Atlanta Foundation Gertrude and William C. Wardlaw Fund The Harold and Mimi Steinberg Charitable Trust The Howell Fund, Inc. Ida Alice Ryan Charitable Trust James Starr Moore Memorial Foundation Jane Smith Turner Foundation John & Mary Franklin Foundation, Inc. Margaret Gill Clements Napier Foundation

The Oscar G. and Elsa S. Mayer Family Foundation Piedmont Charitable Foundation, Inc. Price Gilbert, Jr. Charitable Fund The Ray M. and Mary Elizabeth Lee Foundation, Inc. The Vasser Woolley Foundation, Inc. Walter Clay Hill & Family Foundation $15,000+ The Blanche Lipscomb Foundation Camp-Younts Foundation Center Family Foundation

The Chatham Valley Foundation, Inc. Covenant Foundation, Inc. JBS Foundation Jim Cox, Jr. Fund John H. and Wilhelmina D. Harland Charitable Foundation The L&C Wood Family Foundation, Inc. Roderick S., Flossie R., and Helen M. Galloway Foundation Thalis & Michael C. Carlos Foundation Thomas H. Lanier Foundation Tull Charitable Foundation Weldon H. Johnson Family Foundation

INDIVIDUAL PHILANTHROPISTS $200,000+ A Friend of the High Museum of Art Ms. Jeannie Hearn $150,000+ Victoria and Howard Palefsky $100,000+ Susan and Richard Anderson Mr. Joseph F. Best, III Thalia & Michael Carlos Fund Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Currey, Jr. Marcia and John Donnell The Douglas J. Hertz Family Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Holmes, Jr. Mr. Jimmy Liautaud Carol and Ramon Tomé Family Fund Mrs. Sue Williams $75,000+ A Friend of the High Museum of Art Sandra and Dan Baldwin Mrs. Frances B. Bunzl Karole and John Lloyd Carla and Graham Roberts Susan and Thomas Wardell Ms. Joni Winston $50,000+ Nancy and Kenny Blank Barbara and Steve Chaddick Peggy and Rawson Foreman Sonya and Rick Garber Mrs. Charlotte Garson Robin and Hilton Howell Karen and Jeb Hughes Jane and Clay Jackson Lori and Bill Johnson Mr. Baxter P. Jones & Dr. Jiong Yan Terence L. and Jeanne P. Neal Beth and David Park Alyson and Gregory Rogers Ruthie Magness Rollins Linda and Steve Selig

Robert Spano Sara and Paul Steinfeld Joan N. Whitcomb Adair and Dick White Elizabeth and Chris Willett $25,000+ A Friend of the High Museum of Art Aarati and Peter Alexander Susan and Ron Antinori Spring and Tom Asher Julie and Jim Balloun Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Bankoff Paul and Linnea Bert Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Blackney John and Mary Brock John W. and Rosemary K. Brown Lucinda W. Bunnen Ms. Mary Cahill Connie and Merrell Calhoun Wright and Alison Caughman Susan and Carl Cofer Ann and Tom Cousins Ann and Jeff Cramer Mr. Larry Darrow Elaine and Erroll Davis Catherine Warren Dukehart Ms. Lynn Eden Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Evans Feinberg Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. Howard Feinsand Mr. John Foy Betty Sands Fuller Carol and Paul Garcia Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence L. Gellerestedt III Mr. and Mrs. Holcombe T. Green, Jr. Margaret and Scotty Greene Nena Griffith Ms. Maria Guarisco Newell and Tom Harbin Virginia A. Hepner and Malcolm Barnes Mr. Andrew Heyman

Allison and Ben Hill Jocelyn J. Hunter Mr. and Mrs. Bahman M. Irvani Katie and West Johnson Mary and Neil Johnson Jinny and Michael Keough The Klaus Family Foundation James H. Landon Mr. and Mrs. J. Hicks Lanier Mr. and Mrs. Gary Lee, Jr. John Paddock and Karen Schwartz Merry McCleary & Ann Pasky Sally and Allen McDaniel Mr. Alan B. McKeon & Ms. Evelyn Ashley The Deborah A. Kahn & Harris N. Miller Charitable Fund Jennifer and Brand Morgan Mr. and Mrs. C.V. Nalley, III Mr. and Mrs. William A. Parker, Jr. Sally & Pete Parsonson Foundation Mrs. Martha Pentecost Christina and Jim Price Laurie and Roland Pritchett Mr. and Mrs. Gordon P. Ramsey Mr. and Mrs. David M. Ratcliffe Mr. and Mrs. William C. Rawson Dan and Garnet Reardon Bill and Rachel Schultz Jeffrey C. Sprecher and Kelly Loeffler Les Stumpff and Sandy Moon Mary and Greg Thompson Rebekah and Mark Wasserman Ada and William Weiller Mr. and Mrs. John B. White, Jr. Ramona and Ben White Susan and John Wieland Ms. Regina Williamson Dina E. Woodruff Mr. and Mrs. John C. Yates Mary and Bob Yellowlees The Zaban Foundation

encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 89


ASO | staff EXECUTIVE Jennifer Barlament Executive Director Alesia Mack Director of Executive Services Alvinetta CookseyWyche, Executive Services Office Assistant

DEVELOPMENT Jessica Langlois Director of Major Gifts and Special Projects Shawn Gardner Senior Development Coordinator Ashley Nixon Special Events Coordinator

ARTISTIC Evans Mirageas Vice President for Artistic Planning & Operations Carol Wyatt Executive Assistant to the Music Director & Principal Guest Conductor Jeffrey Baxter Choral Administrator  Nicole Epstein Managing Producer of ASO Presents Alex Malone Managing Producer Symphony POPS!  Ken Meltzer ASO Insider & Program Annotator Scott O’Toole Artistic Assistant Bob Scarr Archives Program Manager

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS Kristen Delaney Vice President of Marketing & Communications KC Commander Marketing Coordinator Elizabeth Daniell Communications Coordinator Lisa Eng Multimedia Creative Manager Adam Fenton Director of Multimedia Technology Holly Hanchey Director of Marketing & Patron Experience  Tammy Hawk Director of Communications Robert Phipps Publications Director Will Strawn Marketing Coordinator

90 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org

SALES & REVENUE MANAGEMENT Russell Wheeler Senior Director of Sales & Revenue Management Dallas Greene Season Tickets Assistant Melanie Kite Director of Subscriptions & Patron Services Pamela Kruseck Manager of Group Sales & Tourism  Christine Lawrence Box Office Manager Gokul Parasuram Group & Corporate Sales Assistant Robin Smith Subscription & Education Sales Christopher Stephens Corporate Sales Manager Karen Tucker Season Tickets Associate EDUCATION & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Katherine Algarra Manager of the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra & Community Music School Kaitlin Gress Manager of Community Programs Tiffany I. M. Jones Education Associate for Audience Development Ruthie Miltenberger Manager of Family Programs Adrienne Thompson Manager, Talent Development Program

OPERATIONS Russell Williamson Senior Orchestra Manager Paul Barrett Senior Production Stage Manager Richard Carvlin Stage Manager  Christopher McLaughlin Orchestra Operations Manager  Jesse Pace Front of House Manager  Kourtnea Stevenson Assistant Orchestra Personnel Manager  Susanne Watts Orchestra Personnel Manager FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Susan Ambo Chief Financial Officer Peter Dickson Senior Accountant Nicole Epstein Venues Accountant  Kimberly Hielsberg Senior Director of Financial Planning & Analysis Stephen Jones Symphony Store Shannon McCown Office Manager April Satterfield Controller


ASO | ticket info CAN’T ATTEND A CONCERT? If you can’t use or exchange your tickets, please pass them on to friends or return them to the box office for resale. To donate tickets, please phone 404.733.5000 before the concert begins. A receipt will be mailed to you in January acknowledging the value of all tickets donated for resale during the year.

WOODRUFF ARTS CENTER BOX OFFICE Open 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Monday; 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Tuesday – Friday; and noon – 8 p.m. Saturday; noon - 5 p.m. Sunday. Please note: All single-ticket sales are final. No refunds or exchanges. All artists and programs are subject to change.

SINGLE TICKETS Call 404.733.5000 10 a.m.-8 p.m. MondayFriday; noon-8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Service charge applies. Phone orders are filled on a best-available basis.

GROUP DISCOUNTS Groups of 10 or more save up to 15 percent on most ASO concerts, subject to ticket availability. Call 404.733.4848.

www.atlantasymphony.org Order any time, any day! Service charge applies. Allow two to three weeks for delivery. For orders received less than two weeks before the concert, tickets will be held at the box office.

GIFT CERTIFICATES Available in any amount for any series, through the box office. Call 404.733.5000. DONATE Tickets sales only cover a fraction of our costs. Please consider a donation to your ASO. Call 404.733.4262 or visit aso.org.

ASO | general info LATE SEATING Patrons arriving later are seated at the discretion of house management. Reserved seats are not guaranteed after the performance starts. Late arrivers may be initially seated in the back out of courtesy to the musicians and other patrons. SPECIAL ASSISTANCE All programs of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra are accessible to people with disabilities. Please call the box office (404.733.5000) to make advance arrangements. SYMPHONY STORE The Symphony Store is now open in its new location directly adjacent to the Robert Shaw Room and Delta SKY360º Club. The store is open before, during and after most concerts.

THE ROBERT SHAW ROOM The ASO invites donors who contribute at least $2,000 annually to become members of this private dining room for cocktails and dining on concert evenings — private rentals available. Call 404.733.4860. IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS Concert Hotline (Recorded info) 404.733.4949 Symphony Hall Box Office 404.733.5000 Ticket Donations/Exchanges 404.733.5000 Subscription Information/Sales 404.733.4800 Group Sales 404.733.4848 Atlanta Symphony Associates 404.733.4865 (Volunteers) Educational Programs 404.733.4870 Youth Orchestra 404.733.5038 Box Office TTD Number 404.733.4303 Services for People 404.733-5000 with Special Needs 404.733.4800 Lost and Found 404.733.4225 Symphony Store 404.733.4345 Donations & Development 404.733.4262

encoreatlanta.com | Atlanta’s Performing Arts Publication 91


PRESENTS

MAY

JUNE

21

4

UB40

JULY

29

AUG.

13

KELLIE PICKLER

Featuring Ali Campbell, Astro & Mickey Virtue

JULY 15

AUG.

PLUS OUR SUMMER SPOTLIGHT CONCERTS

27

JUNE

10

GIN BLOSSOMS

JUNE

18

MAY

Remember When Rock Was Young Elton John Tribute with Atlanta Pops Orchestra

JULY

3

JULY

7

KELLY PORTER PRODUCTIONS presents:

22

LISA KELLY

“THE VOICE OF IRELAND”

Yacht Rock Revue

The Purple Xperience

A Tribute to Prince and the Revolution

You may purchase tickets at The Fred box office, or online at www.ticketalternative.com or by phone at 1-877-725-8849

www.amphitheater.org

770.631.0630

THE FREDERICK BROWN JR. AMPHITHEATER 201 McIntosh Trail, Peachtree City, GA 30269 • 770.631.0630

SEPT.

SPECIAL SEPTEMBER 11 TRIBUTE CONCERT

11

G GLEE GREENWOOD


Visit LaGrange and be surprised by all we have to offer. Just a short drive from Atlanta, you’ll find authentic artifacts at the Biblical History Center, exquisite gardens at Hills & Dales Estate, exceptional recreational opportunities on West Point Lake and more. Be whisked away from the humdrum of everyday life. Plan your itinerary at visitlagrange.com.


CELEBRATE TRUE BREW AND HONEST FOOD. 3 BLOCKS NORTH OF THE FOX THEATRE BRUNCH, LUNCH & LATE NIGHT • PRIVATE DINING AVAILABLE 2 CONVENIENT ATLANTA LOCATIONS 3242 PEACHTREE ROAD NE • BUCKHEAD • 404-264-0253 848 PEACHTREE STREET NE • MIDTOWN • 404-870-0805

$5 OFF $20 PURCHASE CLIP THIS COUPON FOR SAVINGS AT GB.

Valid for 30 days. Void where prohibited by law. No cash value. For promotional purposes only. Not valid towards gift card purchases. One per table. Valid at participating restaurants only. Not valid at airport locations. Alcohol purchase may be prohibited. Not valid with any other offer or discount. No stored value. Must be used in a single visit. A printed copy of this offer or a digital copy via mobile device must be presented to your server to qualify for this discount. Excludes tax and gratuity. Must be 21 years or older to consume alcohol. Promo to 5off20ATL.

®

New upscale vegan restaurant in Midtown near the Fox Theatre! Let us FIX your meal on your next restaurant outing! Lunch • Brunch • Dinner • Carry-out

565-A Peachtree Street NE Atlanta, Georgia 30308 • ph (404) 815-8787 www.herbanfix.com PMS 7529

PMS 7533

PMS 484

Private event room available for birthdays, company events and holiday parties.

ENCOREATLANTA.COM Discover the best Atlanta has to offer. 94 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra | aso.org


“Everybody deserves an excellent real estate experience.” -Mrs. Harry Norman

HarryNorman.com ATLANTA NORTH 770-622-3081

ATLANTA PERIMETER 770-394-2131

BIG CANOE - NORTH GA 770-893-2400

BUCKHEAD NORTH 404-814-9000

BUCKHEAD NORTHWEST 404-261-2700

COBB MARIETTA 770-422-6005

INTOWN 404-897-5558

LUXURY LAKE & MOUNTAIN 706-212-0228

NORTH FULTON 678-461-8700

BLUE RIDGE 706-632-7211

BUCKHEAD 404-233-4142

BUCKHEAD CHASTAIN 404-233-1492

EAST COBB 770-977-9500

FORSYTH/LAKE LANIER 770-497-2000

HIAWASSEE 706-632-7211

PEACHTREE CITY 770-632-8526

SANDY SPRINGS 404-250-9900

SAVANNAH 912-233-6609

ASO ENCORE – May 2016  

Encore Atlanta is the official show program for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Alliance Theatre at the Woodruff Arts Center, The Fox...

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